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Sample records for acetylcholine

  1. Novel acetylcholine and carbamoylcholine analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Petrycer; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Christensen, Jeppe K.;

    2008-01-01

    A series of carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine analogues were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Several of the compounds displayed low nanomolar binding affinities to the alpha 4beta 2 nAChR and pronounced selectivity...

  2. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor is involved in acetylcholine regulating stomatal movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In animal cells, action of acetylcholine depends on its binding with its two specific receptors on the plasma membrane: the nicotinic and muscarinic respectively. The present investigation has shown that agonists of muscarinic receptor (muscarine) could induce stomatal opening, while the antagonists (atropine) could block stomatal opening induced by acetylcholine. Their effects can only be realized in medium containing Ca2+, but not in medium containing K+. The results tend to reveal that the muscarinic receptor is involved in acetylcholine-induced stomatal movement.

  3. Immunisation with Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfman, L

    1984-01-01

    Acetylcholine mediates the transfer of information between neurons in the electric organ of, for example, Torpedo as well as in vertebrate skeletal muscle. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex translates the binding of acetylcholine into ion permeability changes. This leads to an action potential in the muscle fibre. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein has been purified from Torpedo by use of affinity chromatography. The receptor is an intrinsic membrane glycoprotein composed of five polypeptide chains. When various animals are immunised with the receptor they demonstrate clinical signs of severe muscle weakness coincident with high antibody titres in their sera. The symptoms resemble those found in the autoimmune neuromuscular disease myasthenia gravis in humans. This animal model has constituted a unique model for studying autoimmune diseases. This paper reviews some of the work using Torpedo acetylcholine receptor in order to increase the understanding of the motor nervous system function and myasthenia gravis. It is now known that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein is the antigen involved in myasthenia gravis. The mechanism of immune damage involves a direct block of the receptor function. This depends on the presence of antibodies which crosslink the postsynaptic receptors leading to their degradation. The questions to be answered in the future are; (a) what initiates or triggers the autoimmune response, (b) how do the antibodies cause the symptoms--is there a steric hindrance of the interaction of acetylcholine and the receptor, (c) why is there not a strict relationship between antibody titre and severity of symptoms, and (d) why are some muscles affected and other spared? With help of the experimental model, answers to these questions may result in improved strategies for the treatment of the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis. PMID:6097937

  4. Dose protocols of acetylcholine test in Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向定成; 龚志华; 何建新; 洪长江; 邱建; 马骏

    2004-01-01

    @@ Acetylcholine test has been widely used clinically in several countries as a practical test provoking coronary artery spasm.1-3 Although it has also been launched recently in a few hospitals in China, the dose protocol for acetylcholine test used in these hospitals were from abroad.4,5 This study was aimed at developing a dose protocol for acetylcholine test suitable for Chinese people.

  5. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Sensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metherate, Raju

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine release in sensory neocortex contributes to higher-order sensory function, in part by activating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Molecular studies have revealed a bewildering array of nAChR subtypes and cellular actions; however, there is some consensus emerging about the major nAChR subtypes and their functions in…

  6. Docking to flexible nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Tommy; Bruun, Anne T; Balle, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Computational docking to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and other members of the Cys-loop receptor family is complicated by the flexibility of the so-called C-loop. As observed in the large number of published crystal structures of the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), a structural...

  7. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds and prote......The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds...

  8. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette;

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily that play important roles in control of neurotransmitter release in the central and peripheral nervous system. These receptors are important therapeutic targets for development of drugs......-resolution structure of a nAChR is yet to be determined, structural studies are to a large extent based on acetylcholine binding proteins (AChBPs) that despite low overall sequence identity display high degree of conservation of overall structure and amino acids at the ligand-binding site. Further, AChBPs reproduce...

  9. Parazoanthoxanthin A blocks Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozman, Klara Bulc; Araoz, Romulo; Sepcić, Kristina; Molgo, Jordi; Suput, Dusan

    2010-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are implicated in different nervous system-related disorders, and their modulation could improve existing therapy of these diseases. Parazoanthoxanthin A (ParaA) is a fluorescent pigment of the group of zoanthoxanthins. Since it is a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, it may also bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). For this reason its effect on Torpedo nAChR (alpha1(2)betagammadelta) transplanted to Xenopus laevis oocytes was evaluated, using the voltage-clamp technique. ParaA dose-dependently reduced the acetylcholine-induced currents. This effect was fully reversible only at lower concentrations. ParaA also reduced the Hill coefficient and the time to peak current, indicating a channel blocking mode of action. On the other hand, the combined effect of ParaA and d-tubocurarine (d-TC) on acetylcholine-induced currents exhibited only partial additivity, assuming a competitive mode of action of ParaA on nAChR. These results indicate a dual mode of action of ParaA on the Torpedo AChR. PMID:20230806

  10. Acetylcholine affects osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells via acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Li, Xianxian; Fu, Jing; Li, Yue; Gao, Li; Yang, Ling; Zhang, Ping; Shen, Jiefei; Wang, Hang

    2014-03-25

    The identification of the neuronal control of bone remodeling has become one of the many significant recent advances in bone biology. Cholinergic activity has recently been shown to favor bone mass accrual by complex cellular regulatory networks. Here, we identified the gene expression of the muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (m- and nAChRs) in mice tibia tissue and in osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells. Acetylcholine, which is a classical neurotransmitter and an osteo-neuromediator, not only influences the mRNA expression of the AChR subunits but also significantly induces the proliferation and viability of osteocytes. Moreover, acetylcholine treatment caused the reciprocal regulation of RANKL and OPG mRNA expression, which resulted in a significant increase in the mRNA ratio of RANKL:OPG in osteocytes via acetylcholine receptors. The expression of neuropeptide Y and reelin, which are two neurogenic markers, was also modulated by acetylcholine via m- and nAChRs in MLO-Y4 cells. These results indicated that osteocytic acetylcholine receptors might be a new valuable mediator for cell functions and even for bone remodeling. PMID:24508663

  11. Toward Acetylcholine Sensor Devices: Facile Synthesis of 2-Cyanoresorcin[4 ] arene and Its High Affinity toward Acetylcholine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Song-De; WEI Ying; WANG Bo; XU Zun-Le; CHEN Wen-Hua

    2003-01-01

    @@ The biological importance of acetylcholine spurs the efforts to construct its synthetic receptors with the aims to develop acetylcholine sensor devices. Among the various building blocks used to synthesize artificial acetylcholine receptors, resorcin [4 ]arenes, [1] which can be conveniently obtained from the acid-catalyzed condensation of resorcinol with aldehyde, were shown to serve as one of the most strongest synthetic receptors for choline type guests.

  12. Cellular trafficking of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul A ST JOHN

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play critical roles throughout the body. Precise regulation of the cellular location and availability of nAChRs on neurons and target cells is critical to their proper function. Dynamic, post-translational regulation of nAChRs, particularly control of their movements among the different compartments of cells, is an important aspect of that regulation. A combination of new information and new techniques has the study of nAChR trafficking poised for new breakthroughs.

  13. Activities of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors modulate neurotransmission and synaptic architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Oda; Hidekazu Tanaka

    2014-01-01

    The cholinergic system is involved in a broad spectrum of brain function, and its failure has been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. Acetylcholine transduces signals through muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, both of which inlfuence synaptic plasticity and cognition. However, the mechanisms that relate the rapid gating of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors to per-sistent changes in brain function have remained elusive. Recent evidence indicates that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors activities affect synaptic morphology and density, which result in per-sistent rearrangements of neural connectivity. Further investigations of the relationships between nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and rearrangements of neural circuitry in the central nervous system may help understand the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease.

  14. The effect of ketamine on intraspinal acetylcholine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Goldkuhl, Renée Röstlinger; Nylund, Anders;

    2006-01-01

    The general anaesthetic ketamine affects the central cholinergic system in several manners, but its effect on spinal acetylcholine release, which may be an important transmitter in spinal antinociception, is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of ketamine on spinal acetylcholine...... release. Microdialysis probes were placed intraspinally in male rats, and acetylcholine was quantified with HPLC. Anaesthesia was switched from isoflurane (1.3%) to ketamine (150 mg/kg h), which resulted in a 500% increased acetylcholine release. The increase was attenuated during nicotinic receptor...... blockade (50 microM mecamylamine). The nicotinic receptor agonist epibatidine (175 microM) produced a ten-fold higher relative increase of acetylcholine release during isoflurane anaesthesia compared to ketamine anaesthesia (270% to 27%). Intraspinal administration of ketamine and norketamine both...

  15. Exercise and neuromodulators: choline and acetylcholine in marathon runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlay, L. A.; Sabounjian, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Certain neurotransmitters (i.e., acetylcholine, catecholamines, and serotonin) are formed from dietary constituents (i.e., choline, tyrosine and tryptophan). Changing the consumption of these precursors alters release of their respective neurotransmitter products. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine is released from the neuromuscular junction and from brain. It is formed from choline, a common constituent in fish, liver, and eggs. Choline is also incorporated into cell membranes; membranes may likewise serve as an alternative choline source for acetylcholine synthesis. In trained athletes, running a 26 km marathon reduced plasma choline by approximately 40%, from 14.1 to 8.4 uM. Changes of similar magnitude have been shown to reduce acetylcholine release from the neuromuscular junction in vivo. Thus, the reductions in plasma choline associated with strenuous exercise may reduce acetylcholine release, and could thereby affect endurance or performance.

  16. Expression and function of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. Carballosa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are prototypical ligand gated ion channels typically found in muscular and neuronal tissues. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, however, have also recently been identified on other cell types, including stem cells. Activation of these receptors by the binding of agonists like choline, acetylcholine, or nicotine has been implicated in many cellular changes. In regards to stem cell function, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation leads to changes in stem cell proliferation, migration and differentiation potential. In this review we summarize the expression and function of known nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different classes of stem cells including: pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, periodontal ligament derived stem cells, and neural progenitor cells and discuss the potential downstream effects of receptor activation on stem cell function.

  17. Acetylcholine activity in selective striatal regions supports behavioral flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragozzino, Michael E; Mohler, Eric G; Prior, Margaret; Palencia, Carlos A; Rozman, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Daily living often requires individuals to flexibly respond to new circumstances. There is considerable evidence that the striatum is part of a larger neural network that supports flexible adaptations. Cholinergic interneurons are situated to strongly influence striatal output patterns which may enable flexible adaptations. The present experiments investigated whether acetylcholine actions in different striatal regions support behavioral flexibility by measuring acetylcholine efflux during place reversal learning. Acetylcholine efflux selectively increased in the dorsomedial striatum, but not dorsolateral or ventromedial striatum during place reversal learning. In order to modulate the M2-class of autoreceptors, administration of oxotremorine sesquifumurate (100 nM) into the dorsomedial striatum, concomitantly impaired reversal learning and an increase in acetylcholine output. These effects were reversed by the m(2) muscarinic receptor antagonist, AF-DX-116 (20 nM). The effects of oxotremorine sesquifumurate and AF-DX-116 on acetylcholine efflux were selective to behaviorally-induced changes as neither treatment affected acetylcholine output in a resting condition. In contrast to reversal learning, acetylcholine efflux in the dorsomedial striatum did not change during place acquisition. The results reveal an essential role for cholinergic activity and define its locus of control to the dorsomedial striatum in cognitive flexibility.

  18. Inhibition of acetylcholine synthesis in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to better understand diseases that stem from deficiencies in cholinergic activity, reproducible in vitro and in vivo models displaying cholinergic hypofunction are desirable. This necessitates the availability of specific inhibitors. This paper examines the design, synthesis and evaluation of quinuclidinyl compounds with structural features previously reported, but with certain key differences. Structure activity studies with in vitro assay systems are presented. In a few studies, choline was held constant and acetyl-CoA concentration was varied, but with a constant amount of (14C) - acetyl CoA. Acetylcholine synthesis and CO2 production from labelled glucose were measured in cerebral cortex slices from male rats after decapitation. The nanomoles of ACh and CO2 produced from (14C) -glucose were calculated from glucose specific activity. Results are presented

  19. Acetylcholine is released from taste cells, enhancing taste signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Robin; Roper, Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), a candidate neurotransmitter that has been implicated in taste buds, elicits calcium mobilization in Receptor (Type II) taste cells. Using RT-PCR analysis and pharmacological interventions, we demonstrate that the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 mediates these actions. Applying ACh enhanced both taste-evoked Ca2+ responses and taste-evoked afferent neurotransmitter (ATP) secretion from taste Receptor cells. Blocking muscarinic receptors depressed taste-evoked responses in Receptor cells, suggesting that ACh is normally released from taste cells during taste stimulation. ACh biosensors confirmed that, indeed, taste Receptor cells secrete acetylcholine during gustatory stimulation. Genetic deletion of muscarinic receptors resulted in significantly diminished ATP secretion from taste buds. The data demonstrate a new role for acetylcholine as a taste bud transmitter. Our results imply specifically that ACh is an autocrine transmitter secreted by taste Receptor cells during gustatory stimulation, enhancing taste-evoked responses and afferent transmitter secretion.

  20. New insights on plant cell elongation: a role for acetylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sansebastiano, Gian-Pietro; Fornaciari, Silvia; Barozzi, Fabrizio; Piro, Gabriella; Arru, Laura

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of auxin and acetylcholine on the expression of the tomato expansin gene LeEXPA2, a specific expansin gene expressed in elongating tomato hypocotyl segments. Since auxin interferes with clathrin-mediated endocytosis, in order to regulate cellular and developmental responses we produced protoplasts from tomato elongating hypocotyls and followed the endocytotic marker, FM4-64, internalization in response to treatments. Tomato protoplasts were observed during auxin and acetylcholine treatments after transient expression of chimerical markers of volume-control related compartments such as vacuoles. Here we describe the contribution of auxin and acetylcholine to LeEXPA2 expression regulation and we support the hypothesis that a possible subcellular target of acetylcholine signal is the vesicular transport, shedding some light on the characterization of this small molecule as local mediator in the plant physiological response. PMID:24642879

  1. New Insights on Plant Cell Elongation: A Role for Acetylcholine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian-Pietro Di Sansebastiano

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of auxin and acetylcholine on the expression of the tomato expansin gene LeEXPA2, a specific expansin gene expressed in elongating tomato hypocotyl segments. Since auxin interferes with clathrin-mediated endocytosis, in order to regulate cellular and developmental responses we produced protoplasts from tomato elongating hypocotyls and followed the endocytotic marker, FM4-64, internalization in response to treatments. Tomato protoplasts were observed during auxin and acetylcholine treatments after transient expression of chimerical markers of volume-control related compartments such as vacuoles. Here we describe the contribution of auxin and acetylcholine to LeEXPA2 expression regulation and we support the hypothesis that a possible subcellular target of acetylcholine signal is the vesicular transport, shedding some light on the characterization of this small molecule as local mediator in the plant physiological response.

  2. Conformational analysis of acetylcholine and related choline esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Jensen, B

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structures of carbamoylcholine [2-(carbamoyloxy)-N,N,N-trimethylethanaminium] chloride, bromide and iodide, methoxycarbonylcholine [2-(methoxycarbonyloxy)-N,N,N-trimethylethanaminium] iodide, acetylcholine [2-(acetyloxy)-N,N,N-trimethylethanaminium] chloride and succinylcholine ¿2...

  3. Branched nanotrees with immobilized acetylcholine esterase for nanobiosensor applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risveden, Klas; Dick, Kimberly A; Bhand, Sunil;

    2010-01-01

    A novel lab-on-a-chip nanotree enzyme reactor is demonstrated for the detection of acetylcholine. The reactors are intended for use in the RISFET (regional ion sensitive field effect transistor) nanosensor, and are constructed from gold-tipped branched nanorod structures grown on SiN(x)-covered w......A novel lab-on-a-chip nanotree enzyme reactor is demonstrated for the detection of acetylcholine. The reactors are intended for use in the RISFET (regional ion sensitive field effect transistor) nanosensor, and are constructed from gold-tipped branched nanorod structures grown on Si...... of electrical fields employed in the RISFET on the function of acetylcholine esterase is investigated using quantum chemical methods, which show that the small electric field strengths used are unlikely to affect enzyme kinetics. Acetylcholine esterase activity is determined using choline oxidase and peroxidase...

  4. Methodologic aspects of acetylcholine-evoked relaxation of rabbit aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K; Nedergaard, O A

    1999-08-01

    The acetylcholine-evoked relaxation of rabbit isolated thoracic aorta precontracted by phenylephrine was studied. Phenylephrine caused a steady contraction that was maintained for 6 h. In the presence of calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and ascorbic acid the contraction decreased with time. N(G)-Nitro-L-arginine abolished the inhibitory effect of EDTA and ascorbic acid. Acetylcholine evoked a rapid concentration-dependent relaxation that recovered spontaneously and slowly, but fully, with time. Relaxation evoked by equieffective concentrations of carbachol and acetylcholine had the same time course. Cumulative addition of acetylcholine (10(-7)-3 x 10(-5) M) caused a marked relaxation that was reverted slightly at high concentrations. The relaxation was the same with rings derived from the upper, middle, and lower part of the thoracic aorta. Two consecutive concentration-response curves for acetylcholine obtained at a 2-h interval demonstrated a slight development of tachyphylaxis. The relaxation was inversely related to precontractile tension evoked by phenylephrine when expressed as a percentage, but independent when expressed as g tension. Storage of aorta in cold salt solution for 24 h did not alter the relaxation. EDTA and ascorbic acid did not alter the relaxation. It is concluded that (1) EDTA and ascorbic acid can not be used with impunity to stabilize catecholamines used as preconstriction agents; (2) the reversal of the acetylcholine-evoked relaxation is not due to hydrolysis of acetylcholine; (3) the relaxation is uniform in all segments of thoracic aorta; (4) cold storage of aorta does not alter the relaxation; and (5) acetylcholine releases the same amount of relaxing factor, irrespective of the precontractile tension. PMID:10691020

  5. Modal gating of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Ridhima

    Many ion channels exhibit multiple patterns of kinetic activity in single-channel currents. This behavior is rare in WT mouse muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), where A2C↔A2O gating events are well-described by single exponentials. Also, single-channel open probability (PO) is essentially homogeneous at a given agonist concentration in the WT receptors. Here I report that perturbations of almost all the residues in loop C (alpha188-alpha199, at the agonist binding site) generate heterogeneity in PO ('modes'). Such unsettled activity was apparent with an alanine substitution at all positions in loop C (except alphaY190 and alphaY198) and with different side chain substitutions at alphaP197 for both adult- and fetal-type AChRs. I used single channel electrophysiology along with site-directed mutagenesis to study modal gating in AChRs consequent to mutations/deletions in loop C. The multiple patterns of kinetic activity arose from the difference in agonist affinity rather than in intrinsic AChR gating. Out of the four different agonists used to study the modal behavior, acetylcholine (ACh) showed a higher degree of kinetic heterogeneity compared to others. The time constant for switching between modes was long (~mins), suggesting that they arise from alternative, stable protein conformations. By studying AChRs having only 1 functional binding site, I attempted to find the source of the affinity difference, which was traced mainly to the alphadelta agonist site. Affinity at the neurotransmitter binding site is mainly determined by a core of five aromatic residues (alphaY93, alphaW149, alphaY190, alphaY198 and deltaW57). Phenylalanine substitutions at all aromatic residues except alphaY93 resulted in elimination of modes. Modes were also eliminated by alanine mutation at deltaW57 on the complementary side but not at other aromatics. Also, by substituting four gamma subunit residues into the delta subunit on the complementary beta sheet, I found that

  6. The Oncogenic Functions of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are ion channels that are expressed in the cell membrane of all mammalian cells, including cancer cells. Recent findings suggest that nAChRs not only mediate nicotine addiction in the brain but also contribute to the development and progression of cancers directly induced by nicotine and its derived carcinogenic nitrosamines whereas deregulation of the nAChRs is observed in many cancers, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS indicate that SNPs nAChRs associate with risks of lung cancers and nicotine addiction. Emerging evidences suggest nAChRs are posited at the central regulatory loops of numerous cell growth and prosurvival signal pathways and also mediate the synthesis and release of stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters induced by their agonists. Thus nAChRs mediated cell signaling plays an important role in stimulating the growth and angiogenic and neurogenic factors and mediating oncogenic signal transduction during cancer development in a cell type specific manner. In this review, we provide an integrated view of nAChRs signaling in cancer, heightening on the oncogenic properties of nAChRs that may be targeted for cancer treatment.

  7. The Oncogenic Functions of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ion channels that are expressed in the cell membrane of all mammalian cells, including cancer cells. Recent findings suggest that nAChRs not only mediate nicotine addiction in the brain but also contribute to the development and progression of cancers directly induced by nicotine and its derived carcinogenic nitrosamines whereas deregulation of the nAChRs is observed in many cancers, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) indicate that SNPs nAChRs associate with risks of lung cancers and nicotine addiction. Emerging evidences suggest nAChRs are posited at the central regulatory loops of numerous cell growth and prosurvival signal pathways and also mediate the synthesis and release of stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters induced by their agonists. Thus nAChRs mediated cell signaling plays an important role in stimulating the growth and angiogenic and neurogenic factors and mediating oncogenic signal transduction during cancer development in a cell type specific manner. In this review, we provide an integrated view of nAChRs signaling in cancer, heightening on the oncogenic properties of nAChRs that may be targeted for cancer treatment. PMID:26981122

  8. Intravenously administered lidocaine in therapeutic doses increases the intraspinal release of acetylcholine in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Höglund, A Urban

    2002-01-01

    the intraspinal release of acetylcholine. In the present study it was hypothesized that systemically administered lidocaine is acting through the same mechanisms as cholinergic agonists and affects the intraspinal release of acetylcholine. Microdialysis probes were placed in anesthetized rats for sampling...... of acetylcholine. Ten and 30 mg/kg lidocaine injected intravenously significantly increased the intraspinal release of acetylcholine. The effect of lidocaine could be reduced by pretreatment with intraspinally administered atropine or mecamylamine. Our results suggest that the antinociceptive effect produced...

  9. Flavonoids with M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyyammai Swaminathan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-active compounds have potential for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, a series of natural and synthetic flavones and flavonols was assayed in vitro for their ability to inhibit radioligand binding at human cloned M1 muscarinic receptors. Several compounds were found to possess competitive binding affinity (Ki = 40–110 µM, comparable to that of acetylcholine (Ki = 59 µM. Despite the fact that these compounds lack a positively-charged ammonium group under physiological conditions, molecular modelling studies suggested that they bind to the orthosteric site of the receptor, mainly through non-polar interactions.

  10. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Andreasen, Jesper Tobias; Arvaniti, Maria;

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been pursued for decades as potential molecular targets to treat cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to their positioning within regions of the brain critical in learning and memory, such as the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus......, and their demonstrated role in processes underlying cognition such as synaptic facilitation, and theta and gamma wave activity. Historically, activity at these receptors is facilitated in AD by use of drugs that increase the levels of their endogenous agonist acetylcholine, and more recently nAChR selective ligands have...

  11. Functional interaction between Lypd6 and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M; Soni, Neeraj;

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) affect multiple physiological functions in the brain and their functions are modulated by regulatory proteins of the Lynx family. Here, we report for the first time a direct interaction of the Lynx protein LY6/PLAUR domain-containing 6 (Lypd6) with n...

  12. Enzyme-linked DNA dendrimer nanosensors for acetylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Ryan; Morales, Jennifer M.; Skipwith, Christopher G.; Ruckh, Timothy T.; Clark, Heather A.

    2015-10-01

    It is currently difficult to measure small dynamics of molecules in the brain with high spatial and temporal resolution while connecting them to the bigger picture of brain function. A step towards understanding the underlying neural networks of the brain is the ability to sense discrete changes of acetylcholine within a synapse. Here we show an efficient method for generating acetylcholine-detecting nanosensors based on DNA dendrimer scaffolds that incorporate butyrylcholinesterase and fluorescein in a nanoscale arrangement. These nanosensors are selective for acetylcholine and reversibly respond to levels of acetylcholine in the neurophysiological range. This DNA dendrimer architecture has the potential to overcome current obstacles to sensing in the synaptic environment, including the nanoscale size constraints of the synapse and the ability to quantify the spatio-temporal fluctuations of neurotransmitter release. By combining the control of nanosensor architecture with the strategic placement of fluorescent reporters and enzymes, this novel nanosensor platform can facilitate the development of new selective imaging tools for neuroscience.

  13. Functional partial agonism at cloned human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R;

    1996-01-01

    of maximal response, depending on the molar ratio of agonist and antagonist used. Using recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (m1 and m5) and the functional assay, receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT), we have now shown that co-administration of the full agonist, carbachol...

  14. Changes in Acetylcholine Extracellular Levels during Cognitive Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepeu, Giancarlo; Giovannini, Maria Grazia

    2004-01-01

    Measuring the changes in neurotransmitter extracellular levels in discrete brain areas is considered a tool for identifying the neuronal systems involved in specific behavioral responses or cognitive processes. Acetylcholine (ACh) is the first neurotransmitter whose diffusion from the central nervous system was investigated and whose extracellular…

  15. Tissue-specific effects of acetylcholine in the canine heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callø, Kirstine; Goodrow, Robert; Olesen, Søren-Peter;

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acetylcholine (ACh) release from the vagus nerve slows heart rate and atrioventricular conduction. ACh stimulates a variety of receptors and channels, including an inward rectifying current (IK,ACh). The effect of ACh in ventricle is still debated. We compare the effect of ACh...

  16. Clitoria ternatea root extract enhances acetylcholine content in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, K S; Murthy, K D; Karanth, K S; Nalini, K; Rao, M S; Srinivasan, K K

    2002-12-01

    Treatment with 100 mg/kg of Clitoria ternatea aqueous root extract (CTR), for 30 days in neonatal and young adult age groups of rat, significantly increased acetylcholine (ACh) content in their hippocampi as compared to age matched controls. Increase in ACh content in their hippocampus may be the neurochemical basis for their improved learning and memory. PMID:12490229

  17. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Andreasen, Jesper Tobias; Arvaniti, Maria;

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been pursued for decades as potential molecular targets to treat cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to their positioning within regions of the brain critical in learning and memory, such as the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus...

  18. Stimulation of acetylcholine receptors impairs host defence during pneumococcal pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A.J. Giebelen; M. Leendertse; S. Florquin; T. van der Poll

    2009-01-01

    The cholinergic nervous system can inhibit the systemic inflammation accompanying sepsis by virtue of a specific action of acetylcholine on alpha7 cholinergic receptors. The current authors sought to determine the effect of nicotine, an alpha7 cholinergic receptor agonist, on the host response to pn

  19. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR Dependent Chorda Tympani Taste Nerve Responses to Nicotine, Ethanol and Acetylcholine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuo Jun Ren

    Full Text Available Nicotine elicits bitter taste by activating TRPM5-dependent and TRPM5-independent but neuronal nAChR-dependent pathways. The nAChRs represent common targets at which acetylcholine, nicotine and ethanol functionally interact in the central nervous system. Here, we investigated if the nAChRs also represent a common pathway through which the bitter taste of nicotine, ethanol and acetylcholine is transduced. To this end, chorda tympani (CT taste nerve responses were monitored in rats, wild-type mice and TRPM5 knockout (KO mice following lingual stimulation with nicotine free base, ethanol, and acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of nAChR agonists and antagonists. The nAChR modulators: mecamylamine, dihydro-β-erythroidine, and CP-601932 (a partial agonist of the α3β4* nAChR, inhibited CT responses to nicotine, ethanol, and acetylcholine. CT responses to nicotine and ethanol were also inhibited by topical lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio (CPT-cAMP and loading taste cells with [Ca2+]i by topical lingual application of ionomycin + CaCl2. In contrast, CT responses to nicotine were enhanced when TRC [Ca2+]i was reduced by topical lingual application of BAPTA-AM. In patch-clamp experiments, only a subset of isolated rat fungiform taste cells exposed to nicotine responded with an increase in mecamylamine-sensitive inward currents. We conclude that nAChRs expressed in a subset of taste cells serve as common receptors for the detection of the TRPM5-independent bitter taste of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol.

  20. Localization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in plant guard cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), as an important neurotransmitter in animals, also plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. But relatively little is known about its receptors in plants. A green fluorescence BODIPY FL-labeled ABT, which is a high affinity ligand of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), was used to localize mAChR in plant guard cells. In Vicia faba L. and Pisum sativum L., mAChR was found both on the plasma membrane of guard cells. mAChR may also be distributed on guard cell chloroplast membrane of Vicia faba L. The evidence that mAChR localizes in the guard cells provides a new possible signal transduction pathway in ACh mediated stomata movement.

  1. Structures of acetylcholine picrate and methoxycarbonylcholine picrate hemihydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Grønborg, L; Jensen, B

    1988-01-01

    Acetylcholine picrate, C7H16NO2+.C6H2N3-O7-, Mr = 374.3, orthorhombic, Pbca, at 105 K: a = 18.799 (4), b = 7.726 (2), c = 22.878 (4) A, V = 3323 (2) A3, Z = 8, Dm(295 K, flotation) = 1.44, D chi(105 K) = 1.496 Mg m-3, mu(Mo K alpha) = 0.120 mm-1, F(000) = 1568, m.p. (hot-stage microscope) 381-382 K......(295 K, flotation) = 1.49, D chi(105 K) = 1.539 Mg m-3, mu(Mo K alpha) = 0.126 mm-1, F(000) = 836, m.p. (hot-stage microscope) 391-391.5 K, R = 0.033 for 6359 observed [I greater than or equal to 3.0 sigma(I)] reflections. The acetylcholine ion as well as the methoxycarbonylcholine ion have as first...

  2. Optochemical control of genetically engineered neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, Ivan; Banghart, Matthew R.; Mourot, Alexandre; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Gaub, Benjamin; Kramer, Richard H.; Trauner, Dirk

    2012-02-01

    Advances in synthetic chemistry, structural biology, molecular modelling and molecular cloning have enabled the systematic functional manipulation of transmembrane proteins. By combining genetically manipulated proteins with light-sensitive ligands, innately ‘blind’ neurobiological receptors can be converted into photoreceptors, which allows them to be photoregulated with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we present the optochemical control of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with photoswitchable tethered agonists and antagonists. Using structure-based design, we produced heteromeric α3β4 and α4β2 nAChRs that can be activated or inhibited with deep-violet light, but respond normally to acetylcholine in the dark. The generation of these engineered receptors should facilitate investigation of the physiological and pathological functions of neuronal nAChRs and open a general pathway to photosensitizing pentameric ligand-gated ion channels.

  3. Leukocytic acetylcholine in chronic rejection of renal allografts

    OpenAIRE

    Wilczynska, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Leukocytes, which accumulate in graft blood vessels during fatal acute rejection of experimental renal allografts, synthesise and release acetylcholine (ACh). In this study, I tested the hypothesis that ACh produced by leukocytes accumulating in graft blood vessels contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic renal allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Kidneys were transplanted in the allogeneic Fischer 344 to Lewis rat strain combination. Isogeneic transplantations were performed in Lew...

  4. New Insights on Plant Cell Elongation: A Role for Acetylcholine

    OpenAIRE

    Gian-Pietro Di Sansebastiano; Silvia Fornaciari; Fabrizio Barozzi; Gabriella Piro; Laura Arru

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of auxin and acetylcholine on the expression of the tomato expansin gene LeEXPA2, a specific expansin gene expressed in elongating tomato hypocotyl segments. Since auxin interferes with clathrin-mediated endocytosis, in order to regulate cellular and developmental responses we produced protoplasts from tomato elongating hypocotyls and followed the endocytotic marker, FM4-64, internalization in response to treatments. Tomato protoplasts were observed during auxin and...

  5. The effect of acetylcholine on the ultrastructure of torpedo acetylcholinesterases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-chanCHEN; Ying-geZHANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effects of acetylcholine (ACh), the natural substrate of acetylcholinesterases (ACHE), on the conformational state of the active gorge of ACHE. METHODS: Atomic force microscopy (AFM). RESULTS: The surface of the enzyme particles was smooth. The boundary of them was clear and the shapes were ellipsoid. However, the morphology of the enzyme after reacted with ACh became almost utterly different. The most obvious change was a hole or a gorge emerged in the protein,

  6. Cocaine inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influences dopamine release

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra eAcevedo-Rodriguez; Lifen eZhang; Fuwen eZhou; Suzhen eGong; Howard eGu; Mariella eDe Biasi; Fu-Ming eZhou; Dani, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) potently regulate dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and alter cocaine’s ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit...

  7. High-resolution mass spectrometry for detecting Acetylcholine in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Murata, Jun; Watanabe, Takehiro; Sugahara, Kohtaro; Yamagaki, Tohru; Takahashi, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) was first identified a century ago, and has long been known as a neurotransmitter in animals. However, it has been shown recently that the occurrence of ACh is widespread among various non-animal species including higher plants. Although previous reports suggest that various plant species are capable of responding to exogenously applied ACh, the molecular basis for ACh biosynthesis and regulatory mechanisms mediated by endogenous ACh are largely unclear. This is partly bec...

  8. A new family of insect muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, R-Y; Li, M-Q; Wu, Y-S; Qi, Y-X; Ye, G-Y; Huang, J

    2016-08-01

    Most currently used insecticides are neurotoxic chemicals that target a limited number of sites and insect cholinergic neurotransmission is the major target. A potential target for insecticide development is the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), which is a metabotropic G-protein-coupled receptor. Insects have A- and B-type mAChRs and the five mammalian mAChRs are close to the A-type. We isolated a cDNA (CG12796) from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. After heterologous expression in Chinese hamster ovary K1 cells, CG12796 could be activated by acetylcholine [EC50 (half maximal effective concentration), 73 nM] and the mAChR agonist oxotremorine M (EC50 , 48.2 nM) to increase intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Thus, the new mAChR is coupled to Gq/11 but not Gs and Gi/o . The classical mAChR antagonists atropine and scopolamine N-butylbromide at 100 μM completely blocked the acetylcholine-induced responses. The orthologues of CG12796 can also be found in the genomes of other insects, but not in the genomes of the honeybee or parasitoid wasps. Knockdown of CG12796 in the central nervous system had no effect on male courtship behaviours. We suggest that CG12796 represents the first recognized member of a novel mAChR class. PMID:27003873

  9. Gold nanoparticle–choline complexes can block nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chur Chin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Chur Chin1, In Kyeom Kim2, Dong Yoon Lim3, Ki Suk Kim4, Hyang Ae Lee4, Eun Joo Kim41Department of Pediatrics, Fatima Hospital, Daegu, Korea; 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea; 3Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju, Korea; 4Korea Institute of Toxicology, Daejeon, KoreaAbstract: We identified a novel class of direct ion-channel blockers of ligand-gated ion channels called the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. Negatively charged gold nanoparticles (1.4 nm block ion pores by binding to the sulfur group of the cysteine loop of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, and currents evoked by acetylcholine (Ach can break these bonds. The current evoked by ACh in nAChRs was blocked directly in ion pores by the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. In adrenal-gland perfusion studies, the complex also blocked nAChRs by diminishing catecholamine release by about 75%. An in vivo study showed muscle relaxation in rats after injection of the complex. These results will foster the application of gold nanoparticles as a direct ion-channel blocker. Keywords: negatively charged gold nanoparticle, choline, gold–sulfur bond, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, direct ion-channel blocker

  10. Effects of cooling on the response of the snail bursting neuron to acetylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljković, Miodrag; Kartelija, Gordana; Radenović, Lidija

    2005-06-01

    The Br-type neuron of the snail Helix pomatia, involved in neuronal regulation of various homeostatic and adaptive mechanisms, represents an interesting model for studying effects of temperature change on neuronal activity of poikilotherms. Acetylcholine induces a transient, inward dose-dependent current in the identified Br neuron. In the work presented, we analyzed the effects of cooling on the acetylcholine-induced inward current. The amplitude of acetylcholine-induced inward current was markedly decreased after cooling, and the speed of the decay of acetylcholine response was decreased. PMID:16154950

  11. Secretion of goblet cell serine proteinase, ingobsin, is stimulated by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and acetylcholine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1987-01-01

    Ingobsin is localized to the intestinal goblet cells in the rat and in man. In the present study, we investigated the effect of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and acetylcholine on the secretion of ingobsin from the proximal duodenum. Intravenous infusion of VIP or acetylcholine increased...... the concentration of ingobsin in duodenal secretion, while the concentration in the duodenum was unchanged. Simultaneous infusion of VIP and acetylcholine increased the concentration of ingobsin in duodenal secretion and decreased the concentration of ingobsin in the duodenum. This study demonstrates that secretion...... of ingobsin from the proximal duodenum is exocrine and can be stimulated by VIP and acetylcholine....

  12. Acetylcholine synthesis and possible functions during sea urchin development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Angelini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neurotransmitter system molecules were found to play a role during fertilisation and early cell cycles of a large number of invertebrate and vertebrate organisms. In this study, we investigated the presence and possible function of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, the biosynthetic enzyme of acetylcholine in gametes of the sea urchin, Paracentrotus lividus, through localisation and functional studies. ChAT-like molecules were detected in oocytes, mature eggs and zygotes with indirect immunofluorescence methods. Positive immunoreactivity was found in the ovarian egg cytoplasm and surface as well as at the zygote surface. This suggests the eggs' capacity to autonomously synthesise acetylcholine (ACh, the signal molecule of the cholinergic system. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE, the lytic enzyme of acetylcholine was also found in ovarian eggs, with a similar distribution; however, it disappeared after fertilisation. Ultrastructural ChAT localisation in sperms, which was carried out with the immuno-gold method, showed immunoreactivity in the acrosome of unreacted sperms and at the head surface of reacted sperms. In order to verify a functional role of ACh during fertilization and sea urchin development, in vivo experiments were performed. Exposure of the eggs before fertilisation to 1 mM ACh + 1 ?M eserine caused an incomplete membrane depolarisation and consequently enhanced polyspermy, while lower concentrations of ACh caused developmental anomalies. The exposure of zygotes to 0,045 AChE Units/mL of sea water caused developmental anomalies as well, in 50% of the embryos. Altogether, these findings and other previously obtained results, suggest that the cholinergic system may subserve two different tasks during development, according to which particular type of ACh receptor is active during each temporal window. The first function, taking place in the course of fertilisation is a result of autonomously synthesised ACh in sperms, while the

  13. Conformationally restrained carbamoylcholine homologues. Synthesis, pharmacology at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and biostructural considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Fuente Revenga, M; Balle, Thomas; Jensen, Anders A.;

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of small selective ligands for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) based on acetylcholine (ACh) has led to the development of potent agonists with clear preference for the α4β2 nAChR, the most prevalent nAChR subtype in the central nervous system. In this work we present...

  14. Contrasting actions of philanthotoxin-343 and philanthotoxin-(12) on human muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brier, Tim J; Mellor, Ian R; Tikhonov, Denis B;

    2003-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings and outside-out patch recordings from TE671 cells were made to investigate antagonism of human muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) by the philanthotoxins, PhTX-343 and PhTX-(12). When coapplied with acetylcholine (ACh), PhTX-343 caused activation...

  15. Enhanced self-administration of alcohol in muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Cour, Cecilie; Sørensen, Gunnar; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is known to alter alcohol-drinking behavior. It is not known if muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes have similar effects. The muscarinic M4 receptor is highly expressed in the brain reinforcement system...

  16. Rational design of a-conotoxin analogues targeting a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armishaw, Christopher; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Balle, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels and belong to the superfamily of Cys-loop receptors. Valuable insight into the orthosteric ligand binding to nAChRs in recent years has been obtained from the crystal structures of acetylcholine binding proteins (ACh...

  17. Unraveling the high- and low-sensitivity agonist responses of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Ahring, Philip K; Christensen, Jeppe K;

    2011-01-01

    The neuronal a4ß2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors exist as two distinct subtypes, (a4)(2)(ß2)(3) and (a4)(3)(ß2)(2), and biphasic responses to acetylcholine and other agonists have been ascribed previously to coexistence of these two receptor subtypes. We offer a novel and radical explanation...

  18. The biological role of non-neuronal acetylcholine in plants and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessler, I; Kilbinger, H; Bittinger, F; Kirkpatrick, C J

    2001-01-01

    Acetylcholine, one of the most exemplary neurotransmitters, has been detected in bacteria, algae, protozoa, tubellariae and primitive plants, suggesting an extremely early appearance in the evolutionary process and a wide expression in non-neuronal cells. In plants (Urtica dioica), acetylcholine is involved in the regulation of water resorption and photosynthesis. In humans, acetylcholine and/or the synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase, have been demonstrated in epithelial (airways, alimentary tract, urogenital tract, epidermis), mesothelial (pleura, pericardium), endothelial, muscle and immune cells (granulocytes, lymphocytes, macrophages, mast cells). The widespread expression of non-neuronal acetylcholine is accompanied by the ubiquitous expression of cholinesterase and acetylcholine sensitive receptors (nicotinic, muscarinic). Both receptor populations interact with more or less all cellular signalling pathways. Thus, non-neuronal acetylcholine can be involved in the regulation of basic cell functions like gene expression, proliferation, differentiation, cytoskeletal organization, cell-cell contact (tight and gap junctions, desmosomes), locomotion, migration, ciliary activity, electrical activity, secretion and absorption. Non-neuronal acetylcholine also plays a role in the control of unspecific and specific immune functions. Future experiments should be designed to analyze the cellular effects of acetylcholine in greater detail and to illuminate the involvement of the non-neuronal cholinergic system in the pathogenesis of diseases such as acute and chronic inflammation, local and systemic infection, dementia, atherosclerosis, and finally cancer. PMID:11243568

  19. Electrolyte and protein secretion by the perfused rabbit mandibular gland stimulated with acetylcholine or catecholamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Case, R M; Conigrave, A D; Novak, I;

    1980-01-01

    1. A method is described for the isolation and vascular perfusion in vitro of the mandibular gland of the rabbit. The perfusate is a physiological salt solution containing glucose as the only metabolic substrate.2. During perfusion with solutions containing acetylcholine, the gland secretes....... Acetylcholine evoked a small secretory response at a concentration of 8 x 10(-9) mol l(-1) and a maximum response at 8 x 10(-7) mol l(-1). Eserine (2 x 10(-5) mol l(-1)) evoked secretory responses comparable to those evoked by acetylcholine in a concentration of 8 x 10(-9) mol l(-1). Secretion, whether...... unstimulated or evoked by acetylcholine or eserine, could be blocked completely by atropine.4. During prolonged stimulation with acetylcholine, the fluid secretory response declined rapidly over a period of about 15 min from an initial high value to a much lower plateau value. After 3 or more hours...

  20. Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning from a home-made shampoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaka, Yair; Broides, Arnon; Tzion, Raffi Lev; Lifshitz, Matitiahu

    2011-07-01

    Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning is a major health problem in children. We report an unusual cause of organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning. Two children were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit due to organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning after exposure from a home-made shampoo that was used for the treatment of head lice. Owing to no obvious source of poisoning, the diagnosis of organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning in one of these patients was delayed. Both patients had an uneventful recovery. Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning from home-made shampoo is possible. In cases where the mode of poisoning is unclear, direct questioning about the use of home-made shampoo is warranted, in these cases the skin and particularly the scalp should be rinsed thoroughly as soon as possible.

  1. Adult celiac disease with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh J Freeman; Helen R Gillett; Peter M Gillett; Joel Oger

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with some autoimmune disorders. A 40-year-old competitive strongman with celiac disease responded to a glutenfree diet, but developed profound and generalized motor weakness with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis, a disorder reported to occur in about 1 in 5000. This possible relationship between myasthenia gravis and celiac disease was further explored in serological studies. Frozen stored serum samples from 23 acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis patients with no intestinal symptoms were used to screen for celiac disease. Both endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies were examined. One of 23 (or, about 4.3%) was positive for both IgA-endomysial and IgA tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Endoscopic studies subsequently showed duodenal mucosal scalloping and biopsies confirmed the histopathological changes of celiac disease. Celiac disease and myasthenia gravis may occur together more often than is currently appreciated. The presence of motor weakness in celiac disease may be a clue to occult myasthenia gravis, even in the absence of intestinal symptoms.

  2. Ca2+ is involved in muscarine-acetylcholine-receptor-mediated acetylcholine signal transduction in guard cells of Vicia faba L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Fanxia; MIAO Long; ZHANG Shuqiu; LOU Chenghou

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is an important neurochemical transmitter in animals; it also exists in plants and plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. ACh has been known to induce the stomatal opening. By monitoring the changes of cytosolic Ca2+ with fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM under the confocal microscopy,we found that exogenous ACh increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration of guard cells of Vicia faba L. Muscarine, an agonist of muscarine acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), could do so as well. In contrast, atropine, the antagonist of mAChR abolished the ability of ACh to increase Ca2+ in guard cells.This mechanism is similar to mAChR in animals. When EGTA was used to chelate Ca2+ or ruthenium red to block Ca2+ released from vacuole respectively, the results showed that the increased cytosolic Ca2+ mainly come from intracellular Ca2+ store. The evidence supports that Ca2+ is involved in guard-cell response to ACh and that Ca2+ signal is coupled to mAChRs in ACh signal transduction in guard cells.

  3. Acetylcholine modulates transient outward potassium channel in acutely isolated cerebral cortical neurons of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lanwei Cui; Tao Sun; Lihui Qu; Yurong Li; Haixia Wen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The neuronal transient outward potassium channel has been shown to be highly associated with acetylcholine.However,the influence of acetylcholine on the transient outward potassium current in cerebral cortical neurons remains poorly understood.OBJECTIVE:To investigate acetylcholine modulation on transient outward potassium current in rat parietal cortical neurons using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A neuroelectrophysiology study was performed at the Department of Physiology,Harbin Medical University between January 2005 and January 2006.MATERIALS:Wistar rats were provided by the Animal Research Center,the Second Hospital of Harbin Medical University;PC-IIC patch-clamp amplifier and IBBClamp data collection analysis system were provided by Huazhong University for Science and Technology,Wuhan,China;PP-83 microelectrode puller was purchased from Narrishage,Japan.METHODS:The parietal somatosensory cortical neurons were acutely dissociated,and the modulation of acetylcholine (0.1,1,10,100 μmol/L) on transient outward potassium channel was recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Influence of acetylcholine on transient outward potassium current,potassium channel activation,and inactivation.RESULTS:The inhibitory effect of acetylcholine on transient outward potassium current was dose- and voltage-dependent (P<0.01).Acetylcholine was found to significantly affect the activation process of transient outward potassium current,i.e.,the activation curve of transient outward potassium current was left-shifted,while the inactivation curve was shifted to hyperpolarization.Acetylcholine significantly prolonged the time constant of recovery from inactivation of transient outward potassium current (P<0.01).CONCLUSION:These results suggest that acetylcholine inhibits transient outward potassium current by regulating activation and inactivation processes of the transient outward potassium channel.

  4. Functional interaction between Lypd6 and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M; Soni, Neeraj;

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) affect multiple physiological functions in the brain and their functions are modulated by regulatory proteins of the Lynx family. Here, we report for the first time a direct interaction of the Lynx protein LY6/PLAUR domain-containing 6 (Lypd6) with n......AChRs in human brain extracts, identifying Lypd6 as a novel regulator of nAChR function. Using protein cross-linking and affinity purification from human temporal cortical extracts, we demonstrate that Lypd6 is a synaptically enriched membrane-bound protein that binds to multiple nAChR subtypes in the human...... brain. Additionally, soluble recombinant Lypd6 protein attenuates nicotine-induced hippocampal inward currents in rat brain slices and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells, suggesting that binding of Lypd6 is sufficient to inhibit n...

  5. Caffeine potentiates the enhancement by choline of striatal acetylcholine release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. A.; Ulus, I. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effect of peripherally administered caffeine (50 mg/kg), choline (30, 60, or 120 mg/kg) or combinations of both drugs on the spontaneous release of acetylcholine (ACh) from the corpus striatum of anesthetized rats using in vivo microdialysis. Caffeine alone or choline in the 30 or 60 mg/kg dose failed to increase ACh in microdialysis samples; the 120 mg/kg choline dose significantly enhanced ACh during the 80 min following drug administration. Coadministration of caffeine with choline significantly increased ACh release after each of the choline doses tested. Peak microdialysate levels with the 120 mg/kg dose were increased 112% when caffeine was additionally administered, as compared with 54% without caffeine. These results indicate that choline administration can enhance spontaneous ACh release from neurons, and that caffeine, a drug known to block adenosine receptors on these neurons, can amplify the choline effect.

  6. Avian Imc-tectal projection is mediated by acetylcholine and glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S R; Wu, G Y; Felix, D

    1995-03-27

    In the bird, biochemical and histochemical data suggest that the neurotransmitter between nucleus isthmi pars magnocellularis (Imc) and tectum is either acetylcholine or glutamate. There are, however, discrepancies regarding the functional role of acetylcholine. In the present study we investigated the action of acetylcholine and glutamate and their specific antagonists on excitatory isthmo-tectal synaptic transmission using electrophysiological and microiontophoretic techniques. The results show two different population of cells: (1) excitatory cholinergic input, blocked by atropine sulphate but not by glutamate antagonist; (2) excitatory glutamatergic input of NMDA or non-NMDA receptor type, which is blocked or reduced by CPP or CNQX but not by atropine sulphate.

  7. Structure and dynamics of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Hu, Jianxin; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rosemond, Erica; Green, Hillary F.; Liu, Tong; Chae, Pil Seok; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.; Weis, William I.; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford); (NIH); (D.E. Shaw); (Hanyang); (UTSMC)

    2012-03-01

    Acetylcholine, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, exerts many of its physiological actions via activation of a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Although the five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) share a high degree of sequence homology, they show pronounced differences in G-protein coupling preference and the physiological responses they mediate. Unfortunately, despite decades of effort, no therapeutic agents endowed with clear mAChR subtype selectivity have been developed to exploit these differences. We describe here the structure of the G{sub q/11}-coupled M3 mAChR ('M3 receptor', from rat) bound to the bronchodilator drug tiotropium and identify the binding mode for this clinically important drug. This structure, together with that of the G{sub i/o}-coupled M2 receptor, offers possibilities for the design of mAChR subtype-selective ligands. Importantly, the M3 receptor structure allows a structural comparison between two members of a mammalian GPCR subfamily displaying different G-protein coupling selectivities. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tiotropium binds transiently to an allosteric site en route to the binding pocket of both receptors. These simulations offer a structural view of an allosteric binding mode for an orthosteric GPCR ligand and provide additional opportunities for the design of ligands with different affinities or binding kinetics for different mAChR subtypes. Our findings not only offer insights into the structure and function of one of the most important GPCR families, but may also facilitate the design of improved therapeutics targeting these critical receptors.

  8. Cyclic nucleotides of canine antral smooth muscle. Effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, S; Grant, B; Wooton, J

    1981-01-01

    1. The effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin on the intracellular content of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in antral circular muscle have been determined. 2. Acetylcholine results in a significant but transient increase in intracellular cyclic GMP. 3. Isoproterenol and norepinephrine increase intracellular cyclic AMP. Based on half-maximal effective doses, isoproterenol is 2.7-times more effective than norepinephrine. The increase in intracellular cyclic AMP by both agents is inhibited by propranolol but not phentolamine, indicating that both agents act on the muscle cell by a beta-receptor-coupled mechanism. 4. Gastrin has no demonstrable effect on either cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP. This suggests that while gastrin and acetylcholine can produce a like myoelectric response in the muscle cell, the action of gastrin is mediated by a separate receptor, presumably on the muscle cell, and not by a release of acetylcholine.

  9. A family of acetylcholine-gated chloride channel subunits in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putrenko, Igor; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Dent, Joseph A

    2005-02-25

    The genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans encodes a surprisingly large and diverse superfamily of genes encoding Cys loop ligand-gated ion channels. Here we report the first cloning, expression, and pharmacological characterization of members of a family of anion-selective acetylcholine receptor subunits. Two subunits, ACC-1 and ACC-2, form homomeric channels for which acetylcholine and arecoline, but not nicotine, are efficient agonists. These channels are blocked by d-tubocurarine but not by alpha-bungarotoxin. We provide evidence that two additional subunits, ACC-3 and ACC-4, interact with ACC-1 and ACC-2. The acetylcholine-binding domain of these channels appears to have diverged substantially from the acetylcholine-binding domain of nicotinic receptors. PMID:15579462

  10. AGE-RELATED EFFECTS OF CHLORPYRIFOS ON ACETYLCHOLINE RELEASE IN RAT BRAIN. (R825811)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an organophosphorus insecticide that elicits toxicity through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Young animals are markedly more sensitive than adults to the acute toxicity of CPF. We evaluated acetylcholine (ACh) release and its muscarinic recept...

  11. Functional Characterization of CCHamide and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin

    concerning the pharmacological and the physiological functions of GPCR signalling. Theprimary research in this Ph.D. thesis concerns two topics: (1) functional characterization ofCCHamide-2 signalling and (2) functional characterization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor(mAChR) signalling.CCHamide-2...... in mutants created with the CRISP/Cas9 technique showed thatCCHamide-2 is probly an orexigenic peptide and also that is an important factor for larvaldevelopmental timing.In mammals, muscarinic acetylcholine signalling is involved in the signal transmission of theparasympathetic nervous system. However...... little is known about muscarinic acetylcholine receptorsignalling in insects. In this study, I found that two types of mAChRs occur in D. melanogaster, onecoupling to Gq (A-type) and the other to Gi (B-type). Both A- and B-type Dm-mAChRs can beactivated by acetylcholine (ACh), but the classical...

  12. Inhibition by substance P of some peripheral actions of acetylcholine in the cat

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, S.L.; Ryall, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    1 The effect of substance P on contractions of the nictitating membrane and pressor responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and dimethylphenyl-piperazinium (DMPP) which were mediated via nocotinic receptors was studied in cats anaesthetized with chloralose.

  13. Expression of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in human lung cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schuller Hildegard M; Dhar Madhu; Plummer Howard K

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background We and others have shown that one of the mechanisms of growth regulation of small cell lung cancer cell lines and cultured pulmonary neuroendocrine cells is by the binding of agonists to the α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. In addition, we have shown that the nicotine-derived carcinogenic nitrosamine, 4(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), is a high affinity agonist for the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. In the present study, our goal was t...

  14. Effects of the α subunit on imidacloprid sensitivity of recombinant nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, K; Buckingham, S D; Freeman, J.C.; Squire, M D; Baylis, H. A.; Sattelle, D B

    1998-01-01

    Imidacloprid is a new insecticide with selective toxicity for insects over vertebrates. Recombinant (α4β2) chicken neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and a hybrid nicotinic AChR formed by co-expression of a Drosophila melanogaster neuronal α subunit (SAD) with the chicken β2 subunit were heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes by nuclear injection of cDNAs. The agonist actions of imidacloprid and other nicotinic AChR ligands ((+)-epibatidine, (−)-nicotine and acetylcholine...

  15. Effect of organophosphorus insecticides on phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuyin Li; Liming Zou; Carry Pope

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organophosphorus insecticides may promote the accumulation of acetylcholine at synapses and the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity to cause disturbance of neural signal conduction and induce a toxic reaction. Organophosphorus insecticides may act on M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, whose combination with G proteins is regulated by phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of organophosphorus insecticides on the phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2-mediated M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and to reveal other possible actions of organophosphorus insecticides.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An observational study, which was performed in the Central Laboratory of Shenyang Medical College, and Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University from June 2002 to December 2004.METHODS: The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor was extracted and purified from pig brain using affinity chromatography. Subsequently, the purified M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, and [OP32] ATP were incubated with different concentrations of paraoxon and chlorpyrifos oxon together. The mixture then underwent polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the gel film was dried and radioactively autographed to detect phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Finally, the radio-labeled phosphorylated M2 receptor protein band was excised for counting with an isotope liquid scintillation counter.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effects of chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon, chlorpyrifos, and parathion in different concentrations on the phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor; effects of chlorpyrifos oxon on the phosphorylation of the adrenergic receptor.CONCLUSION: Different kinds of organophosphorus insecticides have different effects on the phosphorylation of the G protein

  16. Characteristics of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nukina,Itaru

    1983-06-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh receptors were studied in the rat central nervous system (CNS using 3H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB, an antagonist of muscarinic ACh receptors. Scatchard analysis indicated that the rat CNS had a single 3H-QNB binding site with an apparent dissociation constant (Kd of 5.0 X 10(-10 M. Li+, Zn++ and Cu++ had strong effects on 3H-QNB binding which indicates that these metal ions might play important roles at muscarinic ACh receptor sites in the brain. Since antidepressants and antischizophrenic drugs displaced the binding of 3H-QNB, the anticholinergic effects of these drugs need to be taken into account when they are applied clinically. The muscarinic ACh receptor was successfully solubilized with lysophosphatidylcholine. By gel chromatography, with a Sepharose 6B column, the solubilized muscarinic ACh receptor molecule eluted at the fraction corresponding to a Stokes' radius of 6.1 nm. With the use of sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation, the molecular weight of the solubilized muscarinic ACh receptor was determined to be about 90,000 daltons. The regional distribution of 3H-QNB binding in rat brain was examined, and the highest level of 3H-QNB binding was found to be in the striatum followed by cerebral cortex and hippocampus, indicating that muscarinic ACh mechanisms affect CNS function mainly through these areas.

  17. Therapeutic Potential of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Daniel; Lee, Chih-Hung L; Flood, Dorothy; Marger, Fabrice; Donnelly-Roberts, Diana

    2015-10-01

    Progress in the fields of neuroscience and molecular biology has identified the forebrain cholinergic system as being important in many higher order brain functions. Further analysis of the genes encoding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has highlighted, in particular, the role of α7 nAChRs in these higher order brain functions as evidenced by their peculiar physiologic and pharmacological properties. As this receptor has gained the attention of scientists from academia and industry, our knowledge of its roles in various brain and bodily functions has increased immensely. We have also seen the development of small molecules that have further refined our understanding of the roles of α7 nAChRs, and these molecules have begun to be tested in clinical trials for several indications. Although a large body of data has confirmed a role of α7 nAChRs in cognition, the translation of small molecules affecting α7 nAChRs into therapeutics has to date only progressed to the stage of testing in clinical trials. Notably, however, most recent human genetic and biochemical studies are further underscoring the crucial role of α7 nAChRs and associated genes in multiple organ systems and disease states. The aim of this review is to discuss our current knowledge of α7 nAChRs and their relevance as a target in specific functional systems and disease states. PMID:26419447

  18. Acetylcholine and memory-enhancing activity of Ficus racemosa bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiyaz Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alzheimer′s disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting in dementia and enhancement of acetylcholine (Ach levels in brain using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors is one of the most important approaches for the treatment of AD. Methods: In this study, aqueous extract of Ficus racemosa Linn. (Moraceae bark having anti-infl ammatory, antioxidant, and anticholinesterase activity was evaluated for its ability to enhance Ach levels, and to ascertain its antidementia activity in rats. This work was carried out under the assumption that the F. racemosa extract may show combination of actions which could be beneficial in the treatment of AD, such as neuroprotection, attributed to antioxidant and anti-infl ammatory property and may elevate levels of Ach like Ficus hispida extract reported earlier. Results: Administration of the extract at two levels viz., 250 and 500 mg/kg signifi cantly raised (P ≤ 0.05 Ach levels in hippocampi of rats compared to control. The percentage enhancement in Ach levels was found to be 22% and 38%, respectively. Further, the extract at both dosage levels elicited signifi cant reduction (P ≤ 0.05 in transfer latency on elevated plus-maze, which was used as an exteroceptive behavioral model to evaluate memory in rats. Conclusion: It is inferred that it would be worthwhile to explore the potential of F. racemosa in the management of Alzheimer disease.

  19. Menthol binding and inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Ashoor

    Full Text Available Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca(2+-dependent Cl(- channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca(2+ chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca(2+-free bathing solution containing Ba(2+. Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [(125I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca(2+ transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner.

  20. Role of acetylcholine on plant root-shoot signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The role of acetylcholine (ACh) on plant root- shoot communication was investigated using the root-split system of Vicia faba L. In the experiments, slight osmotic stress caused the decrease of ACh content in root tips and the xylem sap transported up per time unit from root tip to the shoot when the water potential of the shoot was kept unchanged. It also caused the decrease of ACh content in the abaxial epidermis. The decrease was highly correlative to the changes of transpiration rate, suggesting that the decrease of ACh content probably functions as a signal to regulate stomatal behavior. The effect of osmotic stress might be mainly through the inhibition of the ACh synthesis in root tip; thus further influences the ACh content in root tip, xylem sap and abaxial epidermis and resulting in the changes of stomatal behavior. These results provide new evidence that plants transduce positive and negative signals among roots and shoots to coordinate stomatal behavior and adapt to variable environments.

  1. Alpha-conotoxins as pharmacological probes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Layla AZAM; J Michael MCINTOSH

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine-rich peptides from the venom of cone snails (Conus) target a wide variety of different ion channels. One family of conopeptides, the a-conotoxins, specifically target different isoforms of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) found both in the neuromuscular junction and central nervous system. This family is further divided into subfamilies based on the number of amino acids between cysteine residues. The exquisite subtype selectivity of certain a-conotoxins has been key to the characterization of native nAChR isoforms involved in modulation of neurotransmitter release, the pathophysiol-ogy of Parkinson's disease and nociception. Structure/function characterization of a-conotoxins has led to the development of analogs with improved potency and/or subtype selectivity. Cyclization of the backbone structure and addition of lipo-philic moieties has led to improved stability and bioavailability of a-conotoxins, thus paving the way for orally available therapeutics. The recent advances in phylogeny, exogenomics and molecular modeling promises the discovery of an even greater number of a-conotoxins and analogs with improved selectivity for specific subtypes of nAChRs.

  2. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist attenuates ILC2-dependent airway hyperreactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle-Treger, Lauriane; Suzuki, Yuzo; Patel, Nisheel; Sankaranarayanan, Ishwarya; Aron, Jennifer L.; Maazi, Hadi; Chen, Lin; Akbari, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a complex and chronic inflammatory disorder that is associated with airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and driven by Th2 cytokine secretion. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) produce large amounts of Th2 cytokines and contribute to the development of AHR. Here, we show that ILC2s express the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR), which is thought to have an anti-inflammatory role in several inflammatory diseases. We show that engagement of a specific agonist with α7nAChR on ILC2s reduces ILC2 effector function and represses ILC2-dependent AHR, while decreasing expression of ILC2 key transcription factor GATA-3 and critical inflammatory modulator NF-κB, and reducing phosphorylation of upstream kinase IKKα/β. Additionally, the specific α7nAChR agonist reduces cytokine production and AHR in a humanized ILC2 mouse model. Collectively, our data suggest that α7nAChR expressed by ILC2s is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of ILC2-mediated asthma. PMID:27752043

  3. Identification of petrogenic produced water components as acetylcholine esterase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froment, Jean; Langford, Katherine; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Bråte, Inger Lise N; Brooks, Steven J; Thomas, Kevin V

    2016-08-01

    Effect-directed analysis (EDA) was applied to identify acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitors in produced water. Common produced water components from oil production activities, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylphenols, and naphthenic acids were tested for AChE inhibition using a simple mixture of PAHs and naphthenic acids. Produced water samples collected from two offshore platforms in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea were extracted by solid phase extraction and fractionated by open-column liquid solid chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) before being tested using a high-throughput and automated AChE assay. The HPLC fractions causing the strongest AChE inhibition were analysed by gas chromatography coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-HR-ToF-MS). Butylated hydroxytoluene and 4-phenyl-1,2-dihydronaphthalene were identified as two produced water components capable of inhibiting AChE at low concentrations. In order to assess the potential presence of such compounds discharged into aquatic ecosystems, AChE activity in fish tissues was measured. Saithe (Pollachius virens) caught near two offshore platforms showed lower enzymatic activity than those collected from a reference location. Target analysis of saithe did not detected the presence of these two putative AChE inhibitors and suggest that additional compounds such as PAHs, naphthenic acids and yet un-identified compounds may also contribute to the purported AChE inhibition observed in saithe. PMID:27176761

  4. Schizophrenia and the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laura F; Freedman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the devastating symptoms of psychosis, many people with schizophrenia also suffer from cognitive impairment. These cognitive symptoms lead to marked dysfunction and can impact employability, treatment adherence, and social skills. Deficits in P50 auditory gating are associated with attentional impairment and may contribute to cognitive symptoms and perceptual disturbances. This nicotinic cholinergic-mediated inhibitory process represents a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in schizophrenia. This chapter will review evidence implicating the nicotinic cholinergic, and specifically, the alpha7 nicotinic receptor system in the pathology of schizophrenia. Impaired auditory sensory gating has been linked to the alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene on the chromosome 15q14 locus. A majority of persons with schizophrenia are heavy smokers. Although nicotine can acutely reverse diminished auditory sensory gating in people with schizophrenia, this effect is lost on a chronic basis due to receptor desensitization. The alpha7 nicotinic agonist 3-(2,4 dimethoxy)benzylidene-anabaseine (DMXBA) can also enhance auditory sensory gating in animal models. DMXBA is well tolerated in humans and a new study in persons with schizophrenia has found that DMXBA enhances both P50 auditory gating and cognition. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists appear to be viable candidates for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia. PMID:17349863

  5. Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Modulators Reduce Sugar Intake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masroor Shariff

    Full Text Available Excess sugar consumption has been shown to contribute directly to weight gain, thus contributing to the growing worldwide obesity epidemic. Interestingly, increased sugar consumption has been shown to repeatedly elevate dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc, in the mesolimbic reward pathway of the brain similar to many drugs of abuse. We report that varenicline, an FDA-approved nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR partial agonist that modulates dopamine in the mesolimbic reward pathway of the brain, significantly reduces sucrose consumption, especially in a long-term consumption paradigm. Similar results were observed with other nAChR drugs, namely mecamylamine and cytisine. Furthermore, we show that long-term sucrose consumption increases α4β2 * and decreases α6β2* nAChRs in the nucleus accumbens, a key brain region associated with reward. Taken together, our results suggest that nAChR drugs such as varenicline may represent a novel treatment strategy for reducing sugar consumption.

  6. Bolus injection of acetylcholine terminates atrial fibrillation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleidervish, Ilya A; Goldberg, Yuri; Ovsyshcher, I Eli

    2008-01-28

    It is well established that a tonic increase in the availability of the atrial muscarinic K(+) channels, either by enhanced vagal tone or by steady infusion of a low-dose of cholinergic or adenosine receptor agonists, promotes the genesis of atrial fibrillation. Here, we aimed to test the hypothesis that bolus administration of a muscarinic receptor agonist would destabilize and terminate atrial arrhythmia by uniformly and transiently activating K(+) channels throughout the atria, and that if the agonist was rapidly hydrolysable, it would dissipate before the more tonic, pro-arrhythmic effects could take hold. The episodes of untreated atrial fibrillation, induced in anesthetized rats by programmed electrical stimulation via trans-esophageal bipolar catheter, lasted on average 8.6+/-2.2 min (n=32). Intravenous injection of a model hydrolysable muscarinic agonist, acetylcholine (0.2 mg/kg body weight), converted atrial fibrillation into sinus rhythm within 8.4+/-1.9 s (n=10, Ppre-atrial fibrillation values within 10-20 s of injection. In conclusion, our evidence indicates that bolus administration of rapidly hydrolysable muscarinic agonist could be an effective way to pharmacologically terminate atrial fibrillation and restore sinus rhythm. PMID:18078927

  7. Cocaine Inhibition of Nicotinic Acetylcholine ReceptorsInfluences Dopamine Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eAcevedo-Rodriguez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs potently regulate dopamine (DA release in the striatum and alter cocaine’s ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors.

  8. Cocaine inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influences dopamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Rodriguez, Alexandra; Zhang, Lifen; Zhou, Fuwen; Gong, Suzhen; Gu, Howard; De Biasi, Mariella; Zhou, Fu-Ming; Dani, John A

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) potently regulate dopamine (DA) release in the striatum and alter cocaine's ability to reinforce behaviors. Since cocaine is a weak nAChR inhibitor, we hypothesized that cocaine may alter DA release by inhibiting the nAChRs in DA terminals in the striatum and thus contribute to cocaine's reinforcing properties primarily associated with the inhibition of DA transporters. We found that biologically relevant concentrations of cocaine can mildly inhibit nAChR-mediated currents in midbrain DA neurons and consequently alter DA release in the dorsal and ventral striatum. At very high concentrations, cocaine also inhibits voltage-gated Na channels in DA neurons. Furthermore, our results show that partial inhibition of nAChRs by cocaine reduces evoked DA release. This diminution of DA release via nAChR inhibition more strongly influences release evoked at low or tonic stimulation frequencies than at higher (phasic) stimulation frequencies, particularly in the dorsolateral striatum. This cocaine-induced shift favoring phasic DA release may contribute to the enhanced saliency and motivational value of cocaine-associated memories and behaviors. PMID:25237305

  9. Schizophrenia and the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laura F; Freedman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the devastating symptoms of psychosis, many people with schizophrenia also suffer from cognitive impairment. These cognitive symptoms lead to marked dysfunction and can impact employability, treatment adherence, and social skills. Deficits in P50 auditory gating are associated with attentional impairment and may contribute to cognitive symptoms and perceptual disturbances. This nicotinic cholinergic-mediated inhibitory process represents a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in schizophrenia. This chapter will review evidence implicating the nicotinic cholinergic, and specifically, the alpha7 nicotinic receptor system in the pathology of schizophrenia. Impaired auditory sensory gating has been linked to the alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene on the chromosome 15q14 locus. A majority of persons with schizophrenia are heavy smokers. Although nicotine can acutely reverse diminished auditory sensory gating in people with schizophrenia, this effect is lost on a chronic basis due to receptor desensitization. The alpha7 nicotinic agonist 3-(2,4 dimethoxy)benzylidene-anabaseine (DMXBA) can also enhance auditory sensory gating in animal models. DMXBA is well tolerated in humans and a new study in persons with schizophrenia has found that DMXBA enhances both P50 auditory gating and cognition. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists appear to be viable candidates for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia.

  10. Acetylcholine Protects against Candida albicans Infection by Inhibiting Biofilm Formation and Promoting Hemocyte Function in a Galleria mellonella Infection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Borghi, Elisa; Falleni, Monica; Perdoni, Federica; Tosi, Delfina; Lappin, David F; O'Donnell, Lindsay; Greetham, Darren; Ramage, Gordon; Nile, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Both neuronal acetylcholine and nonneuronal acetylcholine have been demonstrated to modulate inflammatory responses. Studies investigating the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections have revealed contradictory findings with regard to disease outcome. At present, the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of fungal infections is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether acetylcholine plays a role in fungal biofilm formation and the pathogenesis of Candida albicans infection. The effect of acetylcholine on C. albicans biofilm formation and metabolism in vitro was assessed using a crystal violet assay and phenotypic microarray analysis. Its effect on the outcome of a C. albicans infection, fungal burden, and biofilm formation were investigated in vivo using a Galleria mellonella infection model. In addition, its effect on modulation of host immunity to C. albicans infection was also determined in vivo using hemocyte counts, cytospin analysis, larval histology, lysozyme assays, hemolytic assays, and real-time PCR. Acetylcholine was shown to have the ability to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, acetylcholine protected G. mellonella larvae from C. albicans infection mortality. The in vivo protection occurred through acetylcholine enhancing the function of hemocytes while at the same time inhibiting C. albicans biofilm formation. Furthermore, acetylcholine also inhibited inflammation-induced damage to internal organs. This is the first demonstration of a role for acetylcholine in protection against fungal infections, in addition to being the first report that this molecule can inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation. Therefore, acetylcholine has the capacity to modulate complex host-fungal interactions and plays a role in dictating the pathogenesis of fungal infections.

  11. Alpha cells secrete acetylcholine as a non-neuronal paracrine signal priming human beta cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Dando, Robin; Jacques-Silva, M. Caroline; Fachado, Alberto; Molina, Judith; Abdulreda, Midhat; Ricordi, Camillo; Roper, Stephen D.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that plays a major role in the function of the insulin secreting pancreatic beta cell1,2. Parasympathetic innervation of the endocrine pancreas, the islets of Langerhans, has been shown to provide cholinergic input to the beta cell in several species1,3,4, but the role of autonomic innervation in human beta cell function is at present unclear. Here we show that, in contrast to mouse islets, cholinergic innervation of human islets is sparse. Instead, we find that the alpha cells of the human islet provide paracrine cholinergic input to surrounding endocrine cells. Human alpha cells express the vesicular acetylcholine transporter and release acetylcholine when stimulated with kainate or a lowering in glucose concentration. Acetylcholine secretion by alpha cells in turn sensitizes the beta cell response to increases in glucose concentration. Our results demonstrate that in human islets acetylcholine is a paracrine signal that primes the beta cell to respond optimally to subsequent increases in glucose concentration. We anticipate these results to revise models about neural input and cholinergic signaling in the endocrine pancreas. Cholinergic signaling within the islet represents a potential therapeutic target in diabetes5, highlighting the relevance of this advance to future drug development. PMID:21685896

  12. Loss of Acetylcholine Signaling Reduces Cell Clearance Deficiencies in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio M Pinto

    Full Text Available The ability to eliminate undesired cells by apoptosis is a key mechanism to maintain organismal health and homeostasis. Failure to clear apoptotic cells efficiently can cause autoimmune diseases in mammals. Genetic studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have greatly helped to decipher the regulation of apoptotic cell clearance. In this study, we show that the loss of levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor, but not of a typical neuronal acetylcholine receptor causes a reduction in the number of persistent cell corpses in worms suffering from an engulfment deficiency. This reduction is not caused by impaired or delayed cell death but rather by a partial restoration of the cell clearance capacity. Mutants in acetylcholine turn-over elicit a similar phenotype, implying that acetylcholine signaling is the process responsible for these observations. Surprisingly, tissue specific RNAi suggests that UNC-38, a major component of the levamisole-sensitive receptor, functions in the dying germ cell to influence engulfment efficiency. Animals with loss of acetylcholine receptor exhibit a higher fraction of cell corpses positive for the "eat-me" signal phosphatidylserine. Our results suggest that modulation by ion channels of ion flow across plasma membrane in dying cells can influence the dynamics of phosphatidylserine exposure and thus clearance efficiency.

  13. Two types of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila and other arthropods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Caitlin Alexis; Hauser, Frank; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I;

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play a central role in the mammalian nervous system. These receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine, and blocked by a variety of antagonists. Mammals have five mAChRs (m1-m5......). In this study, we cloned two structurally related GPCRs from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which, after expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells, proved to be muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. One mAChR (the A-type; encoded by gene CG4356) is activated by acetylcholine (EC50, 5 × 10(-8) M......) and muscarine (EC50, 6 × 10(-8) M) and blocked by the classical mAChR antagonists atropine, scopolamine, and 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB), while the other (the B-type; encoded by gene CG7918) is also activated by acetylcholine, but has a 1,000-fold lower sensitivity to muscarine, and is not blocked...

  14. Loss of Acetylcholine Signaling Reduces Cell Clearance Deficiencies in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Sérgio M; Almendinger, Johann; Cabello, Juan; Hengartner, Michael O

    2016-01-01

    The ability to eliminate undesired cells by apoptosis is a key mechanism to maintain organismal health and homeostasis. Failure to clear apoptotic cells efficiently can cause autoimmune diseases in mammals. Genetic studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have greatly helped to decipher the regulation of apoptotic cell clearance. In this study, we show that the loss of levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor, but not of a typical neuronal acetylcholine receptor causes a reduction in the number of persistent cell corpses in worms suffering from an engulfment deficiency. This reduction is not caused by impaired or delayed cell death but rather by a partial restoration of the cell clearance capacity. Mutants in acetylcholine turn-over elicit a similar phenotype, implying that acetylcholine signaling is the process responsible for these observations. Surprisingly, tissue specific RNAi suggests that UNC-38, a major component of the levamisole-sensitive receptor, functions in the dying germ cell to influence engulfment efficiency. Animals with loss of acetylcholine receptor exhibit a higher fraction of cell corpses positive for the "eat-me" signal phosphatidylserine. Our results suggest that modulation by ion channels of ion flow across plasma membrane in dying cells can influence the dynamics of phosphatidylserine exposure and thus clearance efficiency.

  15. Acetylcholine receptors in dementia and mild cognitive impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabri, Osama; Kendziorra, Kai [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Wolf, Henrike; Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Brust, Peter [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    To clarify whether changes in the cholinergic transmission occur early in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we carried out positron emission tomography (PET) with the radioligand 2-[{sup 18}F]F-A-85380, which is supposed to be specific for {alpha}4{beta}2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We included patients with moderate to severe AD and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), presumed to present preclinical AD. Both patients with AD and MCI showed significant reductions in {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChRs in brain regions typically affected by AD pathology. These findings indicate that a reduction in {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChRs occurs during early symptomatic stages of AD. The {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR availability in these regions correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment, indicating a stage sensitivity of the {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR status. Together, our results provide evidence for the potential of 2-[{sup 18}]F-A-85380 nAChR PET in the diagnosis of patients at risk for AD. Because of the extraordinary long acquisition time with 2-[{sup 18}F]F-A-85380, we developed the new {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR-specific radioligands (+)- and (-)-[{sup 18}F]norchloro-fluoro-homoepibatidine (NCFHEB) and evaluated them preclinically. (-)-[{sup 18}F]NCFHEB shows twofold higher brain uptake and significantly shorter acquisition times. Therefore, (-)-[{sup 18}F]NCFHEB should be a suitable radioligand for larger clinical investigations. (orig.)

  16. Circulating antibodies against nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in chagasic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    GOIN, J C; VENERA, G; BONINO, M BISCOGLIO DE JIMÉNEZ; STERIN-BORDA, L

    1997-01-01

    Human and experimental Chagas' disease causes peripheral nervous system damage involving neuromuscular transmission alterations at the neuromuscular junction. Additionally, autoantibodies directed to peripheral nerves and sarcolemmal proteins of skeletal muscle have been described. In this work, we analyse the ability of serum immunoglobulin factors associated with human chagasic infection to bind the affinity-purified nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from electric organs of Discopyge tschudii and to identify the receptor subunits involved in the interaction. The frequency of serum anti-nAChR reactivity assayed by dot-blot was higher in seropositive chagasic patients than in uninfected subjects. Purified IgG obtained from chagasic patients immunoprecipitated a significantly higher fraction of the solubilized nAChR than normal IgG. Furthermore, immunoblotting assays indicated that α and β are the main subunits involved in the interaction. Chagasic IgG was able to inhibit the binding of α-bungarotoxin to the receptor in a concentration-dependent manner, confirming the contribution of the α-subunit in the autoantibody-receptor interaction. The presence of anti-nAChR antibodies was detected in 73% of chagasic patients with impairment of neuromuscular transmission in conventional electromyographical studies, indicating a strong association between seropositive reactivity against nAChR and electromyographical abnormalities in chagasic patients. The chronic binding of these autoantibodies to the nAChR could induce a decrease in the population of functional nAChRs at the neuromuscular junction and consequently contribute to the electrophysiological neuromuscular alterations described in the course of chronic Chagas' disease. PMID:9367405

  17. Insensitive Acetylcholine Receptor Conferring Resistance of Plutella xylostella to Nereistoxin Insecticides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Luo-gen; YU Guang; CHEN Zi-hao; LI Zhong-yin

    2008-01-01

    The combinative rate measurement of (3-[Ⅰ125] iodotyrosyl) α-bungarotoxin was applied in the analysis of the relation between nerve acetylcholine receptor and three types of insecticide resistance in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). In the dimehypo-resistant strain and in the cartap-resistant strain, the nerve acetylcholine receptor showed the remarkable insensitivity to dimehypo and cartap, of which the binding rate to ligand was approximately 66 and 60%, respectively, of the susceptible strain. The sensitivity to deltamethrin in the deltamethrin-resistant strain did not show visible change. These results indicated that the decline in the sensitivity of nerve acetylcholine receptor to insecticide might be a potential mechanism to nereistoxin insecticides resistance in the diamondback moth.

  18. Covalent attachment of antagonists to the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: synthesis and reactivity of substituted maleimides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrus, Joseph I; Halliday, Jill I; Kanizaj, Nicholas;

    2012-01-01

    The 3-methylmaleimide congeners of the natural product methyllycaconitine (MLA) and an analogue covalently attach to functional cysteine mutants of the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR).......The 3-methylmaleimide congeners of the natural product methyllycaconitine (MLA) and an analogue covalently attach to functional cysteine mutants of the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)....

  19. The A- and B-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from Drosophila melanogaster couple to different second messenger pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin; Folke, Jonas; Hauser, Frank;

    2015-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine and blocked by several antagonists, among them atropine. In mammals five mAChRs (m1-m5) exist of which m1, m3, and m5 are coupled to members of the Gq...

  20. Influence of melatonin on the development of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cultured chick retinal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F.S. Sampaio

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of melatonin on the developmental pattern of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors was investigated in embryonic 8-day-old chick retinal cells in culture. The functional response to acetylcholine was measured in cultured retina cells by microphysiometry. The maximal functional response to acetylcholine increased 2.7 times between the 4th and 5th day in vitro (DIV4, DIV5, while the Bmax value for [125I]-alpha-bungarotoxin was reduced. Despite the presence of alpha8-like immunoreactivity at DIV4, functional responses mediated by alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors were observed only at DIV5. Mecamylamine (100 µM was essentially without effect at DIV4 and DIV5, while dihydro-ß-erythroidine (10-100 µM blocked the response to acetylcholine (3.0 nM-2.0 µM only at DIV4, with no effect at DIV5. Inhibition of melatonin receptors with the antagonist luzindole, or melatonin synthesis by stimulation of D4 dopamine receptors blocked the appearance of the alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive response at DIV5. Therefore, alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors were expressed in retinal cells as early as at DIV4, but they reacted to acetylcholine only after DIV5. The development of an alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive response is dependent on the production of melatonin by the retinal culture. Melatonin, which is produced in a tonic manner by this culture, and is a key hormone in the temporal organization of vertebrates, also potentiates responses mediated by alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors in rat vas deferens and cerebellum. This common pattern of action on different cell models that express alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors probably reflects a more general mechanism of regulation of these receptors.

  1. Autophagic flux data in differentiated C2C12 myotubes following exposure to acetylcholine and caffeine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darin Bloemberg

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The C2C12 line of mouse myoblasts is a useful cell culture model in which to conduct in vitro analyses related to skeletal muscle. Here we present data regarding the autophagic response induced by two chemicals known to influence calcium release and contraction in skeletal muscles and C2C12 cells: acetylcholine and caffeine. More specifically, by concurrently administering acetylcholine or caffeine along with chloroquine to differentiated myotubes for various amounts of time and assessing the protein expression of LC3 and p62, we report data on the relative level of autophagic flux induced by these two calcium- and contraction-regulating chemicals.

  2. Intersubunit bridge formation governs agonist efficacy at nicotinic acetylcholine alpha4beta2 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Line Aagot Hede; Ahring, Philip Kiær; Jensen, Marianne Lerbech;

    2012-01-01

    The a4ß2 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been pursued as a drug target for treatment of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and smoking cessation aids for decades. Still, a thorough understanding of structure-function relationships of a4ß2 agonists is lacking....... Using binding experiments, electrophysiology and X-ray crystallography we have investigated a consecutive series of five prototypical pyridine-containing agonists derived from 1-(pyridin-3-yl)-1,4-diazepane. A correlation between binding affinities at a4ß2 and the acetylcholine binding protein from...

  3. [Intern(euron)al affairs : The role of specific neocortical interneuron classes in the interaction between acetylcholine and GABAergic anesthetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebig, L; Grasshoff, C; Hentschke, H

    2016-08-01

    Acetylcholine is a neuromodulator which is released throughout the central nervous system and plays an essential role in consciousness and cognitive processes including attention and learning. Due to its 'activating' effect on the neuronal and behavioral level its interaction with anesthetics has long been of interest to anesthesiologists. It is widely held that a reduction of the release of acetylcholine by general anesthetics constitutes part of the anesthetic effect. This notion is backed by numerous human and animal studies, but is also in seeming contradiction to findings that acetylcholine activates specific classes of inhibitory neurons: if acetylcholine excites elements within the neuronal network responsible for the release of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), its withdrawal should diminish, not enhance, the effect of anesthetics.Focusing on cortical circuits, we present an overview of recent advances in cellular neurophysiology, particularly the interactions between inhibitory neuron classes, which provide insights on the interaction between acetylcholine and GABA. PMID:27380048

  4. Central nervous system promotes thermotolerance via FoxO/DAF-16 activation through octopamine and acetylcholine signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhashi, Tsubasa; Sakamoto, Kazuichi

    2016-03-25

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) responds to many kinds of stressors to maintain homeostasis. Although the ANS is believed to regulate stress tolerance, the exact mechanism underlying this is not well understood. To understand this, we focused on longevity genes, which have functions such as lifespan extension and promotion of stress tolerance. To understand the relationship between ANS and longevity genes, we analyzed stress tolerance of Caenorhabditis elegans treated with octopamine, which has an affinity to noradrenaline in insects, and acetylcholine. Octopamine and acetylcholine did not show resistance against H2O2, but the neurotransmitters promoted thermotolerance via DAF-16. However, chronic treatment with octopamine and acetylcholine did not extend the lifespan, although DAF-16 plays an important role in longevity. In conclusion, our results show that octopamine and acetylcholine activate DAF-16 in response to stress, but chronic induction of octopamine and acetylcholine is not beneficial for increasing longevity.

  5. Demonstration of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-like immunoreactivity in the rat forebrain and upper brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Matsuyama, T.; Strosberg, A.D.; Traber, J.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor protein (mAChR) in the rat forebrain and upper brainstem was described by using a monoclonal antibody (M35) raised against mAChR purified from bovine forebrain homogenates. A method is investigated for light microscopic (LM) and electronmicroscop

  6. Role of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in Alzheimer's disease pathology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Sylvia; Maskos, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the major form of senile dementia, characterized by neuronal loss, extracellular deposits, and neurofibrillary tangles. It is accompanied by a loss of cholinergic tone, and acetylcholine (ACh) levels in the brain, which were hypothesized to be responsible for the cognitive decline observed in AD. Current medication is restricted to enhancing cholinergic signalling for symptomatic treatment of AD patients. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor family (nAChR) and the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor family (mAChR) are the target of ACh in the brain. Both families of receptors are affected in AD. It was demonstrated that amyloid beta (Aβ) interacts with nAChRs. Here we discuss how Aβ activates or inhibits nAChRs, and how this interaction contributes to AD pathology. We will discuss the potential role of nAChRs as therapeutic targets. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. PMID:25514383

  7. VISUALIZATION OF CHOLINOCEPTIVE NEURONS IN THE RAT NEOCORTEX - COLOCALIZATION OF MUSCARINIC AND NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; STREEFLAND, C; STROSBERG, AD; SCHRODER, H; LUITEN, PGM

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluores

  8. Functional Characterization of a Novel Class of Morantel-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors in Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtot, Elise; Charvet, Claude L; Beech, Robin N; Harmache, Abdallah; Wolstenholme, Adrian J; Holden-Dye, Lindy; O'Connor, Vincent; Peineau, Nicolas; Woods, Debra J; Neveu, Cedric

    2015-12-01

    Acetylcholine receptors are pentameric ligand-gated channels involved in excitatory neuro-transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In nematodes, they represent major targets for cholinergic agonist or antagonist anthelmintic drugs. Despite the large diversity of acetylcholine-receptor subunit genes present in nematodes, only a few receptor subtypes have been characterized so far. Interestingly, parasitic nematodes affecting human or animal health possess two closely related members of this gene family, acr-26 and acr-27 that are essentially absent in free-living or plant parasitic species. Using the pathogenic parasitic nematode of ruminants, Haemonchus contortus, as a model, we found that Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 are co-expressed in body muscle cells. We demonstrated that co-expression of Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to the functional expression of an acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to the anthelmintics morantel and pyrantel. Importantly we also reported that ACR-26 and ACR-27, from the distantly related parasitic nematode of horses, Parascaris equorum, also formed a functional acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to these two drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living model nematode, we demonstrated that heterologous expression of the H. contortus and P. equorum receptors drastically increased its sensitivity to morantel and pyrantel, mirroring the pharmacological properties observed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results are the first to describe significant molecular determinants of a novel class of nematode body wall muscle AChR.

  9. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of DHβE analogs as neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Tue H.; Jensen, Anders A.; Lund, Mads Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    Dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) is a member of the Erythrina family of alkaloids and a potent competitive antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Guided by an X-ray structure of DHβE in complex with an ACh binding protein, we detail the design, synthesis...

  10. Septohippocampal Acetylcholine: Involved in but Not Necessary for Learning and Memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Marise B.; Baxter, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) has been accorded an important role in supporting learning and memory processes in the hippocampus. Cholinergic activity in the hippocampus is correlated with memory, and restoration of ACh in the hippocampus after disruption of the septohippocampal pathway is sufficient to rescue memory. However, selective…

  11. INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS. A.S. Bale*; P.J. Bushnell; C.A. Meacham; T.J. Shafer Neurotoxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA Toluene (TOL...

  12. alpha(7) Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation prevents behavioral and molecular changes induced by repeated phencyclidine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Christensen, Ditte Z; Hansen, Henrik H;

    2009-01-01

    in a modified Y-maze test. Polymorphisms in the alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) gene have been linked to schizophrenia. Here we demonstrate that acute administration of the selective alpha(7) nAChR partial agonist SSR180711 dose-dependently reversed the behavioral impairment induced by PCP...

  13. Exocrine secretion of epidermal growth factor from Brunner's glands. Stimulation by VIP and acetylcholine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1983-01-01

    Brunner's glands of the duodenum are innervated by cholinergic and VIP-ergic nerves, and the glands have been shown to contain epidermal growth factor (EGF). In this study the effect of VIP and acetylcholine (Ach) on secretion of EGF from Brunner's glands was investigated in the rat. Intravenous...

  14. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I.; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K.; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya (Stanford-MED); (Kyoto); (Gakushuin); (Kyushu)

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  15. Congenital myasthenic syndromes in two kinships with end-plate acetylcholine receptor and utrophin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sieb, J P; Dörfler, P; Tzartos, S;

    1998-01-01

    markedly reduced. In Patient 1, but not in Patient 2, the envelopment of the nerve terminal by Schwann cell was increased. Acetylcholine-receptor (AChR) density was reduced as judged by the reduced immunoreactivity to antibodies against different receptor subunits. Immunohistochemical analysis of proteins...

  16. Spiroindolines identify the vesicular acetylcholine transporter as a novel target for insecticide action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Sluder

    Full Text Available The efficacy of all major insecticide classes continues to be eroded by the development of resistance mediated, in part, by selection of alleles encoding insecticide insensitive target proteins. The discovery of new insecticide classes acting at novel protein binding sites is therefore important for the continued protection of the food supply from insect predators, and of human and animal health from insect borne disease. Here we describe a novel class of insecticides (Spiroindolines encompassing molecules that combine excellent activity against major agricultural pest species with low mammalian toxicity. We confidently assign the vesicular acetylcholine transporter as the molecular target of Spiroindolines through the combination of molecular genetics in model organisms with a pharmacological approach in insect tissues. The vesicular acetylcholine transporter can now be added to the list of validated insecticide targets in the acetylcholine signalling pathway and we anticipate that this will lead to the discovery of novel molecules useful in sustaining agriculture. In addition to their potential as insecticides and nematocides, Spiroindolines represent the only other class of chemical ligands for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter since those based on the discovery of vesamicol over 40 years ago, and as such, have potential to provide more selective tools for PET imaging in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease. They also provide novel biochemical tools for studies of the function of this protein family.

  17. Tying up Nicotine: New Selective Competitive Antagonist of the Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Crestey, François; Jensen, Anders A;

    2015-01-01

    Conformational restriction of the pyrrolidine nitrogen in nicotine by the introduction of an ethylene bridge provided a potent and selective antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Resolution by chiral SFC, pharmacological characterization of the two enantiomers...

  18. Cognitive improvement by activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: from animal models to human pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H; Timmerman, Daniel B;

    2010-01-01

    Agonists and positive allosteric modulators of the alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) are currently being developed for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in patients with schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. This review describes the neurobiological properties of the alpha n...

  19. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of Erythrina alkaloid analogues as neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crestey, François; Jensen, Anders A.; Borch, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of a new series of Erythrina alkaloid analogues and their pharmacological characterization at various nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes are described. The compounds were designed to be simplified analogues of aromatic erythrinanes with the aim of obtaining subtype...

  20. Distinct neural pathways mediate alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent activation of the forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Hansen, Henrik H;

    2010-01-01

    alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists are candidates for the treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Selective alpha(7) nAChR agonists, such as SSR180711, activate neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens shell (ACCshell) in rats, regions...

  1. Prostate stem cell antigen interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and is affected in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majbrit Myrup; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; Arvaniti, Maria;

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving impaired cholinergic neurotransmission and dysregulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ly-6/neurotoxin (Lynx) proteins have been shown to modulate cognition and neural plasticity by binding to nAChR subtypes...

  2. Effect of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChR located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The...

  3. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex : colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A.D.; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluores

  4. Acetylcholine Release in the Hippocampus and Striatum during Place and Response Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pych, Jason C.; Chang, Qing; Colon-Rivera, Cynthia; Haag, Renee; Gold, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    These experiments examined the release of acetylcholine in the hippocampus and striatum when rats were trained, within single sessions, on place or response versions of food-rewarded mazes. Microdialysis samples of extra-cellular fluid were collected from the hippocampus and striatum at 5-min increments before, during, and after training. These…

  5. Theoretical investigation of interaction between the set of ligands and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Prytkova, T. R.; Shmygin, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are neuron receptor proteins that provide a transmission of nerve impulse through the synapses. They are composed of a pentametric assembly of five homologous subunits (5 α7 subunits for α7nAChR, for example), oriented around the central pore. These receptors might be found in the chemical synapses of central and peripheral nervous system, and also in the neuromuscular synapses. Transmembrane domain of the one of such receptors constitutes ion channel. The conductive properties of ion channel strongly depend on the receptor conformation changes in the response of binding with some molecule, f.e. acetylcholine. Investigation of interaction between ligands and acetylcholine receptor is important for drug design. In this work we investigate theoretically the interaction between the set of different ligands (such as vanillin, thymoquinone, etc.) and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (primarily with subunit of the α7nAChR) by different methods and packages (AutodockVina, GROMACS, KVAZAR, HARLEM, VMD). We calculate interaction energy between different ligands in the subunit using molecular dynamics. On the base of obtained calculation results and using molecular docking we found an optimal location of different ligands in the subunit.

  6. Anterior Thalamic Lesions Alter Both Hippocampal-Dependent Behavior and Hippocampal Acetylcholine Release in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Lisa M.; Hall, Joseph M.; Vetreno, Ryan P.

    2011-01-01

    The anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) are important for learning and memory as damage to this region produces a persistent amnestic syndrome. Dense connections between the ATN and the hippocampus exist, and importantly, damage to the ATN can impair hippocampal functioning. Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key neurotransmitter in the hippocampus, and in vivo…

  7. Acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves contributes to cutaneous vasodilation during heat stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Wilson, Thad E.; Cui, Jian; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to active cutaneous vasodilation during a heat stress in humans. Given that acetylcholine is released from cholinergic nerves during whole body heating, coupled with evidence that acetylcholine causes vasodilation via NO mechanisms, it is possible that release of acetylcholine in the dermal space contributes to cutaneous vasodilation during a heat stress. To test this hypothesis, in seven subjects skin blood flow (SkBF) and sweat rate were simultaneously monitored over three microdialysis membranes placed in the dermal space of dorsal forearm skin. One membrane was perfused with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine (10 microM), the second membrane was perfused with the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 10 mM) dissolved in the aforementioned neostigmine solution (l-NAME(Neo)), and the third membrane was perfused with Ringer solution as a control site. Each subject was exposed to approximately 20 min of whole body heating via a water-perfused suit, which increased mean body temperature from 36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.5 +/- 0.1 degrees C (P acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves is capable of modulating cutaneous vasodilation via NO synthase mechanisms early in the heat stress but not after substantial cutaneous vasodilation.

  8. Lynx1 and Aβ1-42 bind competitively to multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M;

    2016-01-01

    Lynx1 regulates synaptic plasticity in the brain by regulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). It is not known to which extent Lynx1 can bind to endogenous nAChR subunits in the brain or how this interaction is affected by Alzheimer's disease pathology. We apply affinity purification...

  9. Characterization of the positive and negative inotropic effects of acetylcholine in the human myocardium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X.Y. Du (Xiaoyi); R.G. Schoemaker (Regien); E. Bos (Egbert); P.R. Saxena (Pramod Ranjan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn the human isolated myocardium, acetylcholine (10−9 to 10−3 M) elicited a biphasic inotropic effect (a decrease in the lower and an increase in the higher concentration range) in atrial and a positive inotropic effect in ventricular trabeculae. However, under conditions of raised contr

  10. MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR-EXPRESSION IN ASTROCYTES IN THE CORTEX OF YOUNG AND AGED RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; DEJONG, GI; STROSBERG, AD; LUITEN, PGM

    1993-01-01

    The present report describes the cellular and subcellular distribution pattern of immunoreactivity to M35, a monoclonal antibody raised against purified muscarinic acetylcholine receptor protein, in astrocytes in the cerebral cortex of young and aged rats. Most M35-positive astrocytes were localized

  11. Spiroindolines Identify the Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter as a Novel Target for Insecticide Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluder, Ann; Shah, Sheetal; Cassayre, Jérôme; Clover, Ralph; Maienfisch, Peter; Molleyres, Louis-Pierre; Hirst, Elizabeth A.; Flemming, Anthony J.; Shi, Min; Cutler, Penny; Stanger, Carole; Roberts, Richard S.; Hughes, David J.; Flury, Thomas; Robinson, Michael P.; Hillesheim, Elke; Pitterna, Thomas; Cederbaum, Fredrik; Worthington, Paul A.; Crossthwaite, Andrew J.; Windass, John D.; Currie, Richard A.; Earley, Fergus G. P.

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of all major insecticide classes continues to be eroded by the development of resistance mediated, in part, by selection of alleles encoding insecticide insensitive target proteins. The discovery of new insecticide classes acting at novel protein binding sites is therefore important for the continued protection of the food supply from insect predators, and of human and animal health from insect borne disease. Here we describe a novel class of insecticides (Spiroindolines) encompassing molecules that combine excellent activity against major agricultural pest species with low mammalian toxicity. We confidently assign the vesicular acetylcholine transporter as the molecular target of Spiroindolines through the combination of molecular genetics in model organisms with a pharmacological approach in insect tissues. The vesicular acetylcholine transporter can now be added to the list of validated insecticide targets in the acetylcholine signalling pathway and we anticipate that this will lead to the discovery of novel molecules useful in sustaining agriculture. In addition to their potential as insecticides and nematocides, Spiroindolines represent the only other class of chemical ligands for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter since those based on the discovery of vesamicol over 40 years ago, and as such, have potential to provide more selective tools for PET imaging in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease. They also provide novel biochemical tools for studies of the function of this protein family. PMID:22563457

  12. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Variants Are Related to Smoking Habits, but Not Directly to COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budulac, Simona E.; Vonk, Judith M.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Timens, Wim; Boezen, Marike H

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) cluster as a risk factor for nicotine dependency and COPD. We investigated whether SNPs in the nAChR cluster are associated with smoking habits and lung function declin

  13. Functional Characterization of a Novel Class of Morantel-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors in Nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Courtot

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine receptors are pentameric ligand-gated channels involved in excitatory neuro-transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In nematodes, they represent major targets for cholinergic agonist or antagonist anthelmintic drugs. Despite the large diversity of acetylcholine-receptor subunit genes present in nematodes, only a few receptor subtypes have been characterized so far. Interestingly, parasitic nematodes affecting human or animal health possess two closely related members of this gene family, acr-26 and acr-27 that are essentially absent in free-living or plant parasitic species. Using the pathogenic parasitic nematode of ruminants, Haemonchus contortus, as a model, we found that Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 are co-expressed in body muscle cells. We demonstrated that co-expression of Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to the functional expression of an acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to the anthelmintics morantel and pyrantel. Importantly we also reported that ACR-26 and ACR-27, from the distantly related parasitic nematode of horses, Parascaris equorum, also formed a functional acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to these two drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living model nematode, we demonstrated that heterologous expression of the H. contortus and P. equorum receptors drastically increased its sensitivity to morantel and pyrantel, mirroring the pharmacological properties observed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results are the first to describe significant molecular determinants of a novel class of nematode body wall muscle AChR.

  14. Functional Characterization of a Novel Class of Morantel-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors in Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtot, Elise; Charvet, Claude L; Beech, Robin N; Harmache, Abdallah; Wolstenholme, Adrian J; Holden-Dye, Lindy; O'Connor, Vincent; Peineau, Nicolas; Woods, Debra J; Neveu, Cedric

    2015-12-01

    Acetylcholine receptors are pentameric ligand-gated channels involved in excitatory neuro-transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In nematodes, they represent major targets for cholinergic agonist or antagonist anthelmintic drugs. Despite the large diversity of acetylcholine-receptor subunit genes present in nematodes, only a few receptor subtypes have been characterized so far. Interestingly, parasitic nematodes affecting human or animal health possess two closely related members of this gene family, acr-26 and acr-27 that are essentially absent in free-living or plant parasitic species. Using the pathogenic parasitic nematode of ruminants, Haemonchus contortus, as a model, we found that Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 are co-expressed in body muscle cells. We demonstrated that co-expression of Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to the functional expression of an acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to the anthelmintics morantel and pyrantel. Importantly we also reported that ACR-26 and ACR-27, from the distantly related parasitic nematode of horses, Parascaris equorum, also formed a functional acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to these two drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living model nematode, we demonstrated that heterologous expression of the H. contortus and P. equorum receptors drastically increased its sensitivity to morantel and pyrantel, mirroring the pharmacological properties observed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results are the first to describe significant molecular determinants of a novel class of nematode body wall muscle AChR. PMID:26625142

  15. Concomitant release of ventral tegmental acetylcholine and accumbal dopamine by ghrelin in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Jerlhag

    Full Text Available Ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, regulates energy balance specifically via hypothalamic circuits. Growing evidence suggest that ghrelin increases the incentive value of motivated behaviours via activation of the cholinergic-dopaminergic reward link. It encompasses the cholinergic afferent projection from the laterodorsal tegmental area (LDTg to the dopaminergic cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the mesolimbic dopamine system projecting from the VTA to nucleus accumbens (N.Acc.. Ghrelin receptors (GHS-R1A are expressed in these reward nodes and ghrelin administration into the LDTg increases accumbal dopamine, an effect involving nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the VTA. The present series of experiments were undertaken directly to test this hypothesis. Here we show that ghrelin, administered peripherally or locally into the LDTg concomitantly increases ventral tegmental acetylcholine as well as accumbal dopamine release. A GHS-R1A antagonist blocks this synchronous neurotransmitter release induced by peripheral ghrelin. In addition, local perfusion of the unselective nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine into the VTA blocks the ability of ghrelin (administered into the LDTg to increase N.Acc.-dopamine, but not VTA-acetylcholine. Collectively our data indicate that ghrelin activates the LDTg causing a release of acetylcholine in the VTA, which in turn activates local nicotinic acetylcholine receptors causing a release of accumbal dopamine. Given that a dysfunction in the cholinergic-dopaminergic reward system is involved in addictive behaviours, including compulsive overeating and alcohol use disorder, and that hyperghrelinemia is associated with such addictive behaviours, ghrelin-responsive circuits may serve as a novel pharmacological target for treatment of alcohol use disorder as well as binge eating.

  16. Choline acetyltransferase and organic cation transporters are responsible for synthesis and propionate-induced release of acetylcholine in colon epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Sandra; Klein, Jochen; Diener, Martin

    2014-06-15

    Acetylcholine is not only a neurotransmitter, but is found in a variety of non-neuronal cells. For example, the enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), catalyzing acetylcholine synthesis, is expressed by the colonic epithelium of different species. These cells release acetylcholine across the basolateral membrane after luminal exposure to propionate, a short-chain fatty acid. The functional consequence is the induction of chloride secretion, measurable as increase in short-circuit current (Isc) in Ussing chamber experiments. It is unclear how acetylcholine is produced and released by colonic epithelium. Therefore, the aim of the present study was the identification (on mRNA and protein level) and functional characterization (in Ussing chamber experiments combined with HPLC detection of acetylcholine) of transporters/enzymes in the cholinergic system of rat colonic epithelium. Immunohistochemical staining as well as RT-PCR revealed the expression of high-affinity choline transporter, ChAT, carnitine acetyltransferase (CarAT), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), and organic cation transporters (OCT 1, 2, 3) in colonic epithelium. In contrast to blockade of ChAT with bromoacetylcholine, inhibition of CarAT with mildronate did not inhibit the propionate-induced increase in Isc, suggesting a predominant synthesis of epithelial acetylcholine by ChAT. Although being expressed, blockade of VAChT with vesamicol was ineffective, whereas inhibition of OCTs with omeprazole and corticosterone inhibited propionate-induced Isc and the release of acetylcholine into the basolateral compartment. In summary, OCTs seem to be involved in regulated acetylcholine release by colonic epithelium, which is assumed to be involved in chemosensing of luminal short-chain fatty acids by the intestinal epithelium.

  17. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of the D-1 dopamine receptor mediating acetylcholine release in rabbit retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensler, J.G.; Cotterell, D.J.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1987-12-01

    Superfusion with dopamine (0.1 microM-10 mM) evokes calcium-dependent (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rabbit retina labeled in vitro with (/sup 3/H)choline. This effect is antagonized by the D-1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Activation or blockade of D-2 dopamine, alpha-2 or beta receptors did not stimulate or attenuate the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine from rabbit retina. Dopamine receptor agonists evoke the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine with the following order of potency: apomorphine less than or equal to SKF(R)82526 < SKF 85174 < SKF(R)38393 less than or equal to pergolide less than or equal to dopamine (EC50 = 4.5 microM) < SKF(S)82526 less than or equal to SKF(S)38393. Dopamine receptor antagonists inhibited the dopamine-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine: SCH 23390 (IC50 = 1 nM) < (+)-butaclamol less than or equal to cis-flupenthixol < fluphenazine < perphenazine < trans-flupenthixol < R-sulpiride. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the dopamine receptor mediating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release is characteristic of the D-1 dopamine receptor. These potencies were correlated with the potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the D-1 dopamine receptor in rabbit retina as labeled by (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390, or as determined by adenylate cyclase activity. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding in rabbit retinal membranes was stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 saturation data revealed a single high affinity binding site (Kd = 0.175 +/- 0.002 nM) with a maximum binding of 482 +/- 12 fmol/mg of protein. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists to stimulate (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release were correlated with their potencies to stimulate adenylate cyclase (r = 0.784, P less than .05, n = 7) and with their affinities at (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding sites (r = 0.755, P < .05, n = 8).

  18. Covalent Trapping of Methyllycaconitine at the α4-α4 Interface of the α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Absalom, Nathan L; Quek, Gracia; Lewis, Trevor M;

    2013-01-01

    The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely expressed in the brain and are implicated in a variety of physiological processes. There are two stoichiometries of the α4β2 nAChR, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2, with different sensitivities to acetylcholine (ACh), but their pharmacologi......The α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely expressed in the brain and are implicated in a variety of physiological processes. There are two stoichiometries of the α4β2 nAChR, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2, with different sensitivities to acetylcholine (ACh...

  19. Cholinergic neurons and terminal fields revealed by immunohistochemistry for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter. II. The peripheral nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, M K; Eiden, L E; Weihe, E

    1998-05-01

    The peripheral sympathetic and parasympathetic cholinergic innervation was investigated with antibodies directed against the C-terminus of the rat vesicular acetylcholine transporter. Immunohistochemistry for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter resulted in considerably more detailed visualization of cholinergic terminal fields in the peripheral nervous system than reported previously and was well suited to also identify cholinergic perikarya. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter immunoreactivity completely delineated the preganglionic sympathetic terminals in pre- and paravertebral sympathetic ganglia, and in the adrenal medulla as well as postganglionic cholinergic neurons in the paravertebral chain. Cholinergic terminals of sudomotor and vasomotor nerves of skeletal muscle were optimally visualized. Mixed peripheral ganglia, including periprostatic and uterovaginal ganglia, exhibited extensive preganglionic cholinergic innervation of both noradrenergic and cholinergic postganglionic principal neurons which were intermingled in these ganglia. Varicose vesicular acetylcholine transporter-positive fibres and terminals, representing the cranial parasympathetic innervation of the cerebral vasculature, of salivary and lacrimal glands, of the eye, of the respiratory tract and of the upper digestive tract innervated various target structures including seromucous gland epithelium and myoepithelium, respiratory epithelium, and smooth muscle of the tracheobronchial tree. The only macrovascular elements receiving vesicular acetylcholine transporter-positive innervation were the cerebral arteries. The microvasculature throughout the viscera, with the exception of lymphoid tissues, the liver and kidney, received vesicular acetylcholine transporter-positive innervation while the microvasculature of limb and trunk skeletal muscle appeared to be the only relevant somatic target of vesicular acetylcholine transporter innervation. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter

  20. Elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the striatum reveals regulation of behaviour by cholinergic-glutamatergic co-transmission.

    OpenAIRE

    Monica S Guzman; Xavier De Jaeger; Sanda Raulic; Souza, Ivana A; Li, Alex X.; Susanne Schmid; Menon, Ravi S.; Gainetdinov, Raul R.; Caron, Marc G.; Robert Bartha; Prado, Vania F.; Prado, Marco A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons in the striatum are thought to play major regulatory functions in motor behaviour and reward. These neurons express two vesicular transporters that can load either acetylcholine or glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Consequently cholinergic neurons can release both neurotransmitters, making it difficult to discern their individual contributions for the regulation of striatal functions. Here we have dissected the specific roles of acetylcholine release for striatal-dependent...

  1. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes as Potential Drug Targets for the Treatment of Schizophrenia, Drug Abuse and Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Thomsen, Morgane; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2011-01-01

    's disease and drug abuse. Dopaminergic systems are regulated by cholinergic, especially muscarinic, input. Not surprisingly, increasing evidence implicates muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated pathways as potential targets for the treatment of these disorders classically viewed as "dopamine based...... muscarinic receptor subtypes have greatly advanced our knowledge of the physiological roles of the M(1)-M(5) receptors. Recently, new ligands have been developed that can interact with allosteric sites on different muscarinic receptor subtypes, rather than the conventional (orthosteric) acetylcholine binding...

  2. Magnesium sulfate enhances non-depolarizing muscle relaxant vecuronium action at adult muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong WANG; Qi-sheng LIANG; Lan-ren CHENG; Xiao-hong LI; Wei FU; Wen-tao DAI; Shi-tong LI

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of magnesium sulfate and its interaction with the non-depolarizing muscle relaxant vecuronium at adult muscle-type acetylcholine receptors in vitro.Methods:Adult muscle-type acetylcholine receptors were expressed in HEK293 cells.Drug-containing solution was applied via a gravity-driven perfusion system.The inward currents were activated by brief application of acetylcholine (ACh),and recorded using whole-cell voltage-clamp technique.Results:Magnesium sulfate (1-100 mmol/L) inhibited the inward currents induced ACh (10 μmol/L) in a concentration-dependent manner (IC5o=29.2 mmol/L).The inhibition of magnesium sulfate was non-competitive.In contrast,vecuronium produced a potent inhibition on the adult muscle-type acetylcholine receptor (IC50=8.7 nmol/L) by competitive antagonism.Magnesium sulfate at the concentrations of 1,3,and 6 mmol/L markedly enhanced the inhibition of vecuronium (10 nmol/L) on adult muscle-type acetylcholine receptors.Conclusion:Clinical enhancement of vecuronium-induced muscle relaxation by magnesium sulfate can be attributed partly to synergism between magnesium sulfate and non-depolarizing muscle relaxants at adult muscle-type acetylcholine receptors.

  3. Acetylcholine secretion by motor neuron-like cells from umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueyuan Liu; Dehua Li; Dong Jiang; Yan Fang

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s were isolated by a double enzyme digestion method. The third passage of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s was induced with heparin and/or basic fi-broblast growth factor. Results confirmed that cel morphology did not change after induction with basic fibroblast growth factor alone. However, neuronal morphology was visible, and microtu-bule-associated protein-2 expression and acetylcholine levels increased fol owing induction with heparin alone or heparin combined with basic fibroblast growth factor. Hb9 and choline acetyl-transferase expression was high fol owing inductive with heparin combined with basic fibroblast growth factor. Results indicate that the inductive effect of basic fibroblast growth factor alone was not obvious. Heparin combined with basic fibroblast growth factor noticeably promoted the differen-tiation of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s into motor neuron-like cel s. Simultaneously, um-bilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s could secrete acetylcholine.

  4. Theoretical studies of interaction models of human acetylcholine esterase with different inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease(AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and one of the most common causes of dementia in the elderly.Acetylcholine esterase inhibitors(AChEI) are the main drugs used in the treatment of AD.In this work,docking studies have been performed in order to understand the interaction between a number of inhibitors(tacrine,rivastigmine,huperzine A,TV-3326(ladostigil),donepezil and anseculin) and acetylcholine esterase(AChE).The calculated binding affinities between inhibitors and AChE increase in the order tacrine

  5. Quantitative Molecular Imaging of Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Human Brain with A-85380 Radiotracers

    OpenAIRE

    Lotfipour, Shahrdad; Mandelkern, Mark; Brody, Arthur L.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been implicated in a spectrum of cognitive functions as well as psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, including tobacco addiction and Alzheimer's Disease. The examination of neuronal nAChRs in living humans is a relatively new field. Researchers have developed brain-imaging radiotracers for nAChRs, with radiolabeled A-85380 compounds having the most widespread use. We provide a brief background on nAChRs, followed by a discussion...

  6. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the honey bee, Apis mellifera

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Andrew K.; Raymond-Delpech, Valerie; Steeve H Thany; Gauthier, Monique; Sattelle, David B.

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission and play roles in many cognitive processes. They are under intense research as potential targets of drugs used to treat neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Invertebrate nAChRs are targets of anthelmintics as well as a major group of insecticides, the neonicotinoids. The honey bee, Apis mellifera, is one of the most beneficial insects worldw...

  7. Acetylcholine as a neuromodulator: cholinergic signaling shapes nervous system function and behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Picciotto, Marina R.; Higley, Michael J.; Mineur, Yann S.

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholine in the brain alters neuronal excitability, influences synaptic transmission, induces synaptic plasticity and coordinates the firing of groups of neurons. As a result, it changes the state of neuronal networks throughout the brain and modifies their response to internal and external inputs: the classical role of a neuromodulator. Here we identify actions of cholinergic signaling on cellular and synaptic properties of neurons in several brain areas and discuss the consequences of ...

  8. Acetylcholine Elevation Relieves Cognitive Rigidity and Social Deficiency in a Mouse Model of Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Karvat, Golan; Kimchi, Tali

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are defined by behavioral deficits in social interaction and communication, repetitive stereotyped behaviors, and restricted interests/cognitive rigidity. Recent studies in humans and animal-models suggest that dysfunction of the cholinergic system may underlie autism-related behavioral symptoms. Here we tested the hypothesis that augmentation of acetylcholine (ACh) in the synaptic cleft by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase may ameliorate autistic phenotypes. We ...

  9. Hippocampal acetylcholine release during memory testing in rats: augmentation by glucose.

    OpenAIRE

    Ragozzino, M E; Unick, K E; Gold, P. E.

    1996-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that a modest increase in circulating glucose levels enhances memory. One mechanism underlying glucose effects on memory may be an increase in acetylcholine (ACh) release. The present experiment determined whether enhancement of spontaneous alternation performance by systemic glucose treatment is related to an increase in hippocampal ACh output. Samples of extracellular ACh were assessed at 12-min intervals using in vivo microdialysis with HPLC-EC. Twenty-fo...

  10. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex: colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A D; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluorescent double-labeling techniques. For both classes of receptors, pyramidal and nonpyramidal cells were found immunostained and an identical laminar distribution pattern of immunopositive neurons in ...

  11. INFLUENCE OF ANTIBIOTICS ON THE MECHANICAL RESPONSES OF GUINEA-PIG ILEUM TO ACETYLCHOLINE AND HISTAMINE

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The side effects of antibiotics have been extensively described during the last decades, however, their role on digestive motility must be better investigated. Following a line of research, the influence of penicillin, chloranfenicol tetracycline and gentamicine on longitudinal smooth muscle responses to acetylcholine and histamine were studied on guinea-pig ileum. There were no differences between the responses before and after the addition of each antibiotic. Further investigations must be ...

  12. CHRNB2 Is the Second Acetylcholine Receptor Subunit Associated with Autosomal Dominant Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy*

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Hilary A.; Favre, Isabelle; Kirkpatrick, Martin; Zuberi, Sameer M; Goudie, David; Heron, Sarah E.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sutherland, Grant R.; Berkovic, Samuel F; Bertrand, Daniel; Mulley, John C

    2000-01-01

    Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is an uncommon, idiopathic partial epilepsy characterized by clusters of motor seizures occurring in sleep. We describe a mutation of the β2 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, effecting a V287M substitution within the M2 domain. The mutation, in an evolutionary conserved region of CHRNB2, is associated with ADNFLE in a Scottish family. Functional receptors with the V287M mutation are highly expressed in Xenopus oocytes ...

  13. Variants in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors α5 and α3 increase risks to nicotine dependence†

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiangning; Chen, Jingchun; Williamson, Vernell S; An, Seon-Sook; Hettema, John M.; Aggen, Steven H.; Neale, Michael C.; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors bind to nicotine and initiate the physiological and pharmacological responses to tobacco smoking. In this report, we studied the association of α5 and α3 subunits with nicotine dependence and with the symptoms of alcohol and cannabis abuse and dependence in two independent epidemiological samples (n = 815 and 1,121, respectively). In this study, seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped in the CHRNA5 and CHRNA3 genes. In both samples, we found that...

  14. Neonicotinoid Binding, Toxicity and Expression of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subunits in the Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

    OpenAIRE

    Taillebois, Emiliane; Beloula, Abdelhamid; Quinchard, Sophie; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Daguin, Antoine; Servent, Denis; Tagu, Denis; Thany, Steeve H.; Tricoire-Leignel, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides act on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and are particularly effective against sucking pests. They are widely used in crops protection to fight against aphids, which cause severe damage. In the present study we evaluated the susceptibility of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum to the commonly used neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid (IMI), thiamethoxam (TMX) and clothianidin (CLT). Binding studies on aphid membrane preparations revealed the existence of high and ...

  15. Minor structural changes in nicotinoid insecticides confer differential subtype selectivity for mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E.

    1999-01-01

    The major nitroimine insecticide imidacloprid (IMI) and the nicotinic analgesics epibatidine and ABT-594 contain the 6-chloro-3-pyridinyl moiety important for high activity and/or selectivity. ABT-594 has considerable nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subtype specificity which might carry over to the chloropyridinyl insecticides. This study considers nine IMI analogues for selectivity in binding to immuno-isolated α1, α3 and α7 containing nicotinic AChRs and to purported α4β2 nicotinic ...

  16. Annulated heterocyclic bioisosteres of norarecoline. Synthesis and molecular pharmacology at five recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R;

    1995-01-01

    A series of O-alkylated analogs of 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-isoxazolo[4,5-c]azepin-3-ol (THAO) were synthesized and characterized as ligands for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). O-Methyl-THAO (4a), O-ethyl-THAO (4b), O-isopropyl-THAO (4c), and O-propargyl-THAO (4d) were shown to be potent...

  17. Regulation of Synaptic Transmission and Plasticity by Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    McKay, Bruce E.; Placzek, Andon N; Dani, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely expressed throughout the central nervous system and participate in a variety of physiological functions. Recent advances have revealed roles of nAChRs in the regulation of synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity, particularly in the hippocampus and midbrain dopamine centers. In general, activation of nAChRs causes membrane depolarization and directly and indirectly increases the intracellular calcium concentration. Thus, when nAChRs ...

  18. Inducibility of human atrial fibrillation in an in silico model reflecting local acetylcholine distribution and concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Minki; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Pak, Hui-Nam; Shim, Eun Bo

    2015-01-01

    Vagal nerve activity has been known to play a crucial role in the induction and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unclear how the distribution and concentration of local acetylcholine (ACh) promotes AF. In this study, we investigated the effect of the spatial distribution and concentration of ACh on fibrillation patterns in an in silico human atrial model. A human atrial action potential model with an ACh-dependent K+ current (IKAch) was used to examine the effect of vag...

  19. Acetylcholine increases the breakdown of triphosphoinositide of rabbit iris muscle prelabelled with [32P] phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, A A; Akhtar, R A; Hawthorne, J N

    1977-01-15

    1. Paired iris smooth muscles from rabbits were incubated for 30 min at 37 degrees C in an iso-osmotic salt medium containg glucose, inositol, cytidine and [32P]phosphate. 2. One of the pair was then incubated at 37 degrees C for 10 min in unlabelled medium containing 10mM-2-deoxyglucose and the other was incubated in the presence of acetylcholine plus eserine (0.05mM each). 2-Deoxyglucose, which was included in the incubation medium to minimize the biosynthesis of triphosphoinositide from ATP and diphosphoinositide, decreased the amount of labelled ATP by 71% and inhibited further 32P incorporation from ATP into triphosphoinositide by almost 30%. 3. Acetylcholine (0.05mM) increased significantly the loss of 32P from triphosphoinositide (the 'triphosphoinositide effect') in 32P-labelled iris muscle. This effect was measured both chemically and radiochemically. It was also observed when 32Pi was replaced by myo-[3H]inositol in the incubation medium. 4. The triphosphoinositide effect was blocked by atropine but not by D-tubocurarine. Further, muscarinic but not nicotinic agonists were found to provoke this effect. 5. Acetylcholine decreased by 28% the 32P incorporation into triphosphoinositide, presumably by stimulating its breakdown. This decrement in triphosphoinositide was blocked by atropine, but not by D-tubocurarine. 6. The triphosphoinositide effect was accompanied by a significant increase in 32P labelling, but not tissue concentration, of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid. The possible relationship between the loss of 32P label from triphosphoinositide in response to acetylcholine and the concomitant increase in that of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid is discussed. 7. The presence of triphosphoinositide phosphomonoesterase, the enzyme that might be stimulated in the iris smooth muscle by the neurotransmitter, was demonstrated, and, under our methods of homogenization and assay, more than 80% of its activity was localized in the

  20. Ionomycin-induced acetylcholine release and its inhibition by adenosine at frog motor nerve endings.

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, J M; Silinsky, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    1. Acetylcholine (ACh) evoked secretion by the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, was studied at frog motor nerve endings. 2. Bath application of ionomycin stimulated an irreversible increase in the rate of spontaneous, quantal ACh release in the presence of extracellular Ca2+. In contrast, local application of ionomycin stimulated a rapid, reversible acceleration of spontaneous ACh release. 3. The magnitude of the secretory response to ionomycin was dependent both upon the concentration of ionoph...

  1. Bitter triggers acetylcholine release from polymodal urethral chemosensory cells and bladder reflexes

    OpenAIRE

    Deckmann, Klaus; Filipski, Katharina; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Fronius, Martin; Althaus, Mike; Rafiq, Amir; Papadakis, Tamara; Renno, Liane; Jurastow, Innokentij; Wessels, Lars; Wolff, Miriam; Schütz, Burkhard; Weihe, Eberhard; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We report the presence of a previously unidentified cholinergic, polymodal chemosensory cell in the mammalian urethra, the potential portal of entry for bacteria and harmful substances into the urogenital system. These cells exhibit structural markers of respiratory chemosensory cells (“brush cells”). They use the classical taste transduction cascade to detect potential hazardous compounds (bitter, umami, uropathogenic bacteria) and release acetylcholine in response. They lie next to sensory ...

  2. The control of chick myoblast fusion by ion channels operated by prostaglandins and acetylcholine

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Chick myoblast fusion in culture was investigated using prostanoid synthesis inhibitors to delay spontaneous fusion. During this delay myoblast fusion could be induced by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), by raising extracellular potassium and by addition of carbachol. Carbachol-induced fusion, but not PGE-induced fusion, was prevented by the acetylcholine receptor blocker alpha-bungarotoxin. Fusion induced by any of these agents was prevented by the Ca channel blockers lanthanum and D600. The thresho...

  3. Evidence that coated vesicles transport acetylcholine receptors to the surface membrane of chick myotubes

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Coated vesicles are present in the myoplasm of embryonic chick myotubes grown in vitro. They are most numerous beneath regions of the surface membrane that contain a high density of acetylcholine receptors (AChR). Prolonged exposure of myotubes to saline extract of chick brain increases the number of intracellular AChR and the number of coated vesicles. This suggests that coated vesicles contain AChR, and this hypothesis was tested with horseradish peroxidase-alpha-bungarotoxin (HRP-alpha BTX...

  4. Primary structure of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Final report, 9 April 1989-6 April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, J.W.

    1992-05-06

    Signals are transmitted between cells in the brain using neurotransmitters and neurotransmitter receptors. Poisons that interfere with this process stop normal brain function and often kill nerve cells. One of the neurotransmitters used in the mammalian brain is acetylcholine. We discovered that there is a large number of different nicotinic receptors for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, each with its different properties. We used recombinant DNA technology to clone and sequence the gene transcripts that encode the subunits of these receptors. From these sequences we deduced the primary structures of the nicotinic receptor subunits. We also used the cDNA clones to determine which brain loci express the respective genes. We have expressed the clones in the Xenopus oocyte and have demonstrated that each functional combination of subunits has a unique pharmacology Unlike their homologs at the neuromuscular junction, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain are exceptionally permeable to calcium. This property suggests that these receptors may play an important role in regulating calcium-dependent cytoplasmic processes and that they may be important contributors to use-dependent cell death.

  5. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of retinal ganglion cell photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Puneet; Hartwick, Andrew T E

    2016-09-01

    Melanopsin-dependent phototransduction in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) involves a Gq-coupled phospholipase C (PLC) signaling cascade. Acetylcholine, released in the mammalian retina by starburst amacrine cells, can also activate Gq-PLC pathways through certain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Using multielectrode array recordings of rat retinas, we demonstrate that robust spiking responses can be evoked in neonatal and adult ipRGCs after bath application of the muscarinic agonist carbachol. The stimulatory action of carbachol on ipRGCs was a direct effect, as confirmed through calcium imaging experiments on isolated ipRGCs in purified cultures. Using flickering (6 Hz) yellow light stimuli at irradiances below the threshold for melanopsin activation, spiking responses could be elicited in ipRGCs that were suppressed by mAChR antagonism. Therefore, this work identified a novel melanopsin-independent pathway for stimulating sustained spiking in ganglion cell photoreceptors. This mAChR-mediated pathway could enhance ipRGC spiking responses in conditions known to evoke retinal acetylcholine release, such as those involving flickering or moving visual stimuli. Furthermore, this work identifies a pharmacological approach for light-independent ipRGC stimulation that could be targeted by mAChR agonists. PMID:27055770

  6. Chemical stimulation of adherent cells by localized application of acetylcholine from a microfluidic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Zibek

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemical stimulation of cells is inherently cell type selective in contrast to electro-stimulation. The availability of a system for localized application of minute amounts of chemical stimulants could be useful for dose related response studies to test new compounds. It could also bring forward the development of a novel type of neuroprostheses.In an experimental setup micro-droplets of an acetylcholine solution were ejected from a fluidic microsystem and applied to the bottom of a nanoporous membrane. The solution travelled through the pores to the top of the membrane on which TE671 cells were cultivated. Calcium imaging was used to visualize cellular response with temporal and spatial resolution. Experimental demonstration of chemical stimulation for both threshold gated stimulation as well as accumulated dose response was achieved by either employing acetylcholine as chemical stimulant or applying calcein uptake, respectively.Numerical modelling and simulation of transport mechanisms involved were employed to gain a theoretical understanding of the influence of pore size, concentration of stimulant and droplet volume on the spatial-temporal distribution of stimulant and on the cellular response. Diffusion, pressure driven flow and evaporation effects were taken into account. Fast stimulation kinetic is achieved with pores of 0.82 µm diameter, whereas sustained substance delivery is obtained with nanoporous membranes. In all cases threshold concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 0.015 µM acetylcholine independent of pore size were determined.

  7. Dopamine modulates acetylcholine release via octopamine and CREB signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Satoshi Suo

    Full Text Available Animals change their behavior and metabolism in response to external stimuli. cAMP response element binding protein (CREB is a signal-activated transcription factor that enables the coupling of extracellular signals and gene expression to induce adaptive changes. Biogenic amine neurotransmitters regulate CREB and such regulation is important for long-term changes in various nervous system functions, including learning and drug addiction. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the amine neurotransmitter octopamine activates a CREB homolog, CRH-1, in cholinergic SIA neurons, whereas dopamine suppresses CREB activation by inhibiting octopamine signaling in response to food stimuli. However, the physiological role of this activation is unknown. In this study, the effect of dopamine, octopamine, and CREB on acetylcholine signaling was analyzed using the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb. Mutants with decreased dopamine signaling exhibited reduced acetylcholine signaling, and octopamine and CREB functioned downstream of dopamine in this regulation. This study demonstrates that the regulation of CREB by amine neurotransmitters modulates acetylcholine release from the neurons of C. elegans.

  8. Effects of dichlorobenzene on acetylcholine receptors in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ren-Ming; Chiung, Yin-Mei; Pan, Chien-Yuan; Liu, Jenn-Hwa; Liu, Pei-Shan

    2008-11-20

    para-Dichlorobenzene (DCB), a deodorant and an industrial chemical, is a highly volatile compound and is known to be an indoor air contaminant. Because of its widespread use and volatility, the toxicity of DCB presents a concern to industrial workers and public. Some toxic aspects of DCB have already been focused but its effects on neuronal signal transduction have been hitherto unknown. The effects of DCB on the cytosolic calcium homeostasis are investigated in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells in this study. DCB, above 200 microM, was found to induce a rise in cytosolic calcium concentration that could not be counteracted by nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonists but was partially inhibited by thapsigargin. To understand the actions of DCB on the acetylcholine receptors, we investigated its effects on the changes of cytosolic calcium concentration following nicotinic AChR stimulation with epibatidine and muscarinic AChR stimulation with methacholine in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. DCB inhibited the cytosolic calcium concentration rise induced by epibatidine and methacholine with respective IC(50)s of 34 and 294 microM. The inhibitions of DCB were not the same as thapsigargin's inhibition. In the electrophysiological observations, DCB blocked the influx currents induced by epibatidine. Our findings suggest that DCB interferes with the functional activities of AChR, including its coupling influx currents and cytosolic calcium elevations.

  9. Acetylcholine Attenuates Hypoxia/ Reoxygenation-Induced Mitochondrial and Cytosolic ROS Formation in H9c2 Cells via M2 Acetylcholine Receptor

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    Yi Miao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anti-infammatory and cardioprotective effect of acetylcholine (ACh has been reported; nevertheless, whether and how ACh exhibits an antioxidant property against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R-induced oxidative stress remains obscure. Methods: In the present study, H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R to mimic I/R injury. We estimated intracellular different sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS by measuring mitochondrial ROS (mtROS, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA copy number, xanthine oxidase (XO and NADPH oxidase (NOX activity and expression of rac 1. Cell injury was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release and cleaved caspase-3 expression. The siRNA transfection was performed to knockdown of M2 acetylcholine receptor (M2 AChR expression. Results: 12-h hypoxia followed by 2-h reoxygenation resulted in an abrupt burst of ROS in H9c2 cells. Administration of ACh reduced the levels of ROS in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to the H/R group, ACh decreased mtROS, recovered mtDNA copy number, diminished XO and NOX activity, rac 1 expression as well as cell injury. Co- treatment with atropine rather than hexamethonium abolished the antioxidant and cardioprotective effect of ACh. Moreover, knockdown of M2 AChR by siRNA showed the similar trends as atropine co-treatment group. Conclusions: ACh inhibits mitochondria-, XO- and NOX-derived ROS production thus protecting H9c2 cells against H/R-induced oxidative stress, and these benefcial effects are mainly mediated by M2 AChR. Our findings suggested that increasing ACh release could be a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment and prevention of I/R injury.

  10. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and acetylcholine stimulate exocrine secretion of epidermal growth factor from the rat submandibular gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1986-01-01

    The effect of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and acetylcholine on secretion of epidermal growth factor (EGF) from the rat salivary glands was investigated. VIP in doses of 3 X 10(-10) to 3 X 10(-8) mol/kg per h stimulated secretion of saliva and total output of EGF dose-dependently. Acet......The effect of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and acetylcholine on secretion of epidermal growth factor (EGF) from the rat salivary glands was investigated. VIP in doses of 3 X 10(-10) to 3 X 10(-8) mol/kg per h stimulated secretion of saliva and total output of EGF dose......-dependently. Acetylcholine also stimulated salivation and output of EGF. VIP in a dose of 3 X 10(-11) to 3 X 10(-10) mol/kg per h enhanced the stimulatory effect of acetylcholine, but this effect disappeared when the dose of VIP was increased. Adrenalectomy decreased acetylcholine stimulated total output of EGF...

  11. Effects of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator on lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammatory pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Muzaffar; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2016-07-15

    Evidence indicates that microglial activation contributes to the pathophysiology and maintenance of neuroinflammatory pain involving central nervous system alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of 3a,4,5,9b-Tetrahydro-4-(1-naphthalenyl)-3H-cyclopentan[c]quinoline-8-sulfonamide (TQS), an alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM), on tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia following lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation in hippocampus, a neuroinflammatory pain model in mice. In addition, we examined the effects of TQS on microglial activation marker, an ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1), in the hippocampus may be associated with neuroinflammatory pain. Pretreatment of TQS (4mg/kg) significantly reduced LPS (1mg/kg)-induced tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Moreover, pretreatment of methyllycaconitine (3mg/kg) significantly reversed TQS-induced antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic responses indicating the involvement of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Pretreatment of TQS significantly decreased LPS-induced increased in hippocampal Iba-1 expression. Overall, these results suggest that TQS reduces LPS-induced neuroinflammatory pain like symptoms via modulating microglial activation likely in the hippocampus and/or other brain region by targeting alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Therefore, alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor PAM such as TQS could be a potential drug candidate for the treatment of neuroinflammatory pain.

  12. Limitations of RNAi of α6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits for assessing the in vivo sensitivity to spinosad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank D.Rinkevich; Jeffrey G.Scott

    2013-01-01

    Spinosad is a widely used insecticide that exerts its toxic effect primarily through interactions with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.The α6 nicotinic acetyl-choline receptor subunit is involved in spinosad toxicity as demonstrated by the high levels of resistance observed in strains lacking α6.RNAi was performed against the Dα6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit in Drosophila melanogaster using the Ga14-UAS system to examine if RNAi would yield results similar to those of Dα6 null mutants.These Dα6-deficient flies were subject to spinosad contact bioassays to evaluate the role of the Dα6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit on spinosad sensitivity.The expression of Dα6 was reduced 60%-75% as verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction.However,there was no change in spinosad sensitivity in D.melanogaster.We repeated RNAi experiments in Tribolium castaneum using injection of dsRNA for Tcasα6.RNAi of Tcasα6 did not result in changes in spinosad sensitivity,similar to results obtained with D.melanogaster.The lack of change in spinosad sensitivity in both D.melanogaster and T.castaneum using two routes of dsRNA administration shows that RNAi may not provide adequate conditions to study the role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits on insecticide sensitivity due to the inability to completely eliminate expression of the α6 subunit in both species.Potential causes for the lack of change in spinosad sensitivity are discussed.

  13. A novel labeling approach identifies three stability levels of acetylcholine receptors in the mouse neuromuscular junction in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Strack

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The turnover of acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction is regulated in an activity-dependent manner. Upon denervation and under various other pathological conditions, receptor half-life is decreased. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate a novel approach to follow the kinetics of acetylcholine receptor lifetimes upon pulse labeling of mouse muscles with ¹²⁵I-α-bungarotoxin in vivo. In contrast to previous assays where residual activity was measured ex vivo, in our setup the same animals are used throughout the whole measurement period, thereby permitting a dramatic reduction of animal numbers at increased data quality. We identified three stability levels of acetylcholine receptors depending on the presence or absence of innervation: one pool of receptors with a long half-life of ∼13 days, a second with an intermediate half-life of ∼8 days, and a third with a short half-life of ∼1 day. Data were highly reproducible from animal to animal and followed simple exponential terms. The principal outcomes of these measurements were reproduced by an optical pulse-labeling assay introduced recently. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A novel assay to determine kinetics of acetylcholine receptor turnover with small animal numbers is presented. Our data show that nerve activity acts on muscle acetylcholine receptor stability by at least two different means, one shifting receptor lifetime from short to intermediate and another, which further increases receptor stability to a long lifetime. We hypothesize on possible molecular mechanisms.

  14. A neuronal acetylcholine receptor regulates the balance of muscle excitation and inhibition in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Maelle Jospin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, cholinergic motor neurons stimulate muscle contraction as well as activate GABAergic motor neurons that inhibit contraction of the contralateral muscles. Here, we describe the composition of an ionotropic acetylcholine receptor that is required to maintain excitation of the cholinergic motor neurons. We identified a gain-of-function mutation that leads to spontaneous muscle convulsions. The mutation is in the pore domain of the ACR-2 acetylcholine receptor subunit and is identical to a hyperactivating mutation in the muscle receptor of patients with myasthenia gravis. Screens for suppressors of the convulsion phenotype led to the identification of other receptor subunits. Cell-specific rescue experiments indicate that these subunits function in the cholinergic motor neurons. Expression of these subunits in Xenopus oocytes demonstrates that the functional receptor is comprised of three alpha-subunits, UNC-38, UNC-63 and ACR-12, and two non-alpha-subunits, ACR-2 and ACR-3. Although this receptor exhibits a partially overlapping subunit composition with the C. elegans muscle acetylcholine receptor, it shows distinct pharmacology. Recordings from intact animals demonstrate that loss-of-function mutations in acr-2 reduce the excitability of the cholinergic motor neurons. By contrast, the acr-2(gf mutation leads to a hyperactivation of cholinergic motor neurons and an inactivation of downstream GABAergic motor neurons in a calcium dependent manner. Presumably, this imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory input into muscles leads to convulsions. These data indicate that the ACR-2 receptor is important for the coordinated excitation and inhibition of body muscles underlying sinusoidal movement.

  15. The Validation of Nematode-Specific Acetylcholine-Gated Chloride Channels as Potential Anthelmintic Drug Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, Claudia M.; Farrington, Danielle; Dent, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    New compounds are needed to treat parasitic nematode infections in humans, livestock and plants. Small molecule anthelmintics are the primary means of nematode parasite control in animals; however, widespread resistance to the currently available drug classes means control will be impossible without the introduction of new compounds. Adverse environmental effects associated with nematocides used to control plant parasitic species are also motivating the search for safer, more effective compounds. Discovery of new anthelmintic drugs in particular has been a serious challenge due to the difficulty of obtaining and culturing target parasites for high-throughput screens and the lack of functional genomic techniques to validate potential drug targets in these pathogens. We present here a novel strategy for target validation that employs the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to demonstrate the value of new ligand-gated ion channels as targets for anthelmintic discovery. Many successful anthelmintics, including ivermectin, levamisole and monepantel, are agonists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, suggesting that the unexploited pentameric ion channels encoded in parasite genomes may be suitable drug targets. We validated five members of the nematode-specific family of acetylcholine-gated chloride channels as targets of agonists with anthelmintic properties by ectopically expressing an ivermectin-gated chloride channel, AVR-15, in tissues that endogenously express the acetylcholine-gated chloride channels and using the effects of ivermectin to predict the effects of an acetylcholine-gated chloride channel agonist. In principle, our strategy can be applied to validate any ion channel as a putative anti-parasitic drug target. PMID:26393923

  16. m1 Acetylcholine Receptor Expression is Decreased in Hippocampal CA1 region of Aged Epileptic Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Cavarsan, Clarissa Fantin; Avanzi, Renata Della Torre; Queiroz, Claudio Marcos; Xavier, Gilberto Fernando; Mello, Luiz Eugênio; Covolan, Luciene

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the possible additive effects of epilepsy and aging on the expression of m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) in the rat hippocampus. Young (3 months) and Aged (20 months) male, Wistar rats were treated with pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus (SE). Immunohistochemical procedure for m1 AChR detection was performed 2 months after pilocarpine-induced SE. In the CA1 pyramidal region m1 AChR staining was significantly decreased in aged epileptic ...

  17. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Chuan-Xi; Dong Ke; Shao Ya-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast synaptic cholinergic transmission in the insect central nervous system. The insect nAChR is the molecular target of a class of insecticides, neonicotinoids. Like mammalian nAChRs, insect nAChRs are considered to be made up of five subunits, coded by homologous genes belonging to the same family. The nAChR subunit genes of Drosophila melanogaster, Apis mellifera and Anopheles gambiae have been cloned previously based o...

  18. INFLUENCE OF ANTIBIOTICS ON THE MECHANICAL RESPONSES OF GUINEA-PIG ILEUM TO ACETYLCHOLINE AND HISTAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petroianu Andy

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The side effects of antibiotics have been extensively described during the last decades, however, their role on digestive motility must be better investigated. Following a line of research, the influence of penicillin, chloranfenicol tetracycline and gentamicine on longitudinal smooth muscle responses to acetylcholine and histamine were studied on guinea-pig ileum. There were no differences between the responses before and after the addition of each antibiotic. Further investigations must be performed in order to find a possible influence of antibiotics on digestive motility.

  19. Expression of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in human lung cells

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    Schuller Hildegard M

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We and others have shown that one of the mechanisms of growth regulation of small cell lung cancer cell lines and cultured pulmonary neuroendocrine cells is by the binding of agonists to the α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. In addition, we have shown that the nicotine-derived carcinogenic nitrosamine, 4(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK, is a high affinity agonist for the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. In the present study, our goal was to determine the extent of α7 mRNA and protein expression in the human lung. Methods Experiments were done using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, a nuclease protection assay and western blotting using membrane proteins. Results We detected mRNA for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 receptor in seven small cell lung cancer (SCLC cell lines, in two pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell lines, in cultured normal human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC, one carcinoid cell line, three squamous cell lines and tissue samples from nine patients with various types of lung cancer. A nuclease protection assay showed prominent levels of α7 in the NCI-H82 SCLC cell line while α7 was not detected in SAEC, suggesting that α7 mRNA levels may be higher in SCLC compared to normal cells. Using a specific antibody to the α7 nicotinic receptor, protein expression of α7 was determined. All SCLC cell lines except NCI-H187 expressed protein for the α7 receptor. In the non-SCLC cells and normal cells that express the α7 nAChR mRNA, only in SAEC, A549 and NCI-H226 was expression of the α7 nicotinic receptor protein shown. When NCI-H69 SCLC cell line was exposed to 100 pm NNK, protein expression of the α7 receptor was increased at 60 and 150 min. Conclusion Expression of mRNA for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 seems to be ubiquitously expressed in all human lung cancer cell lines tested (except for NCI-H441 as well as normal

  20. A synthetic combinatorial strategy for developing a-conotoxin analogs as potent a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armishaw, Christopher J; Singh, Narender; Medina-Franco, Jose L;

    2010-01-01

    alpha-Conotoxins are peptide neurotoxins isolated from venomous cone snails that display exquisite selectivity for different subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). They are valuable research tools that have profound implications in the discovery of new drugs for a myriad of neurop......alpha-Conotoxins are peptide neurotoxins isolated from venomous cone snails that display exquisite selectivity for different subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). They are valuable research tools that have profound implications in the discovery of new drugs for a myriad...... of an acetylcholine-binding protein. Finally, a third series of refined analogs was synthesized based on modeling studies, which led to several analogs with refined pharmacological properties. Of the 96 individual alpha-conotoxin analogs synthesized, three displayed > or =10-fold increases in antagonist potency...

  1. Intravenously administered oxotremorine and atropine, in doses known to affect pain threshold, affect the intraspinal release of acetylcholine in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Höglund, A Urban

    2002-01-01

    muscarinic agonists and antagonists modify nociceptive threshold by affecting intraspinal release of acetylcholine (ACh). Catheters were inserted into the femoral vein in rats maintained on isoflurane anaesthesia for administration of oxotremorine (10-300 microg/kg) and atropine (0.1, 10, 5000 microg....../kg). Spinal microdialysis probes were placed intraspinally at approximately the C2-C5 spinal level for sampling of acetylcholine and dialysis delivery of atropine (0.1, 1, 10 nM). Additionally, the tail-flick behaviour was tested on conscious rats injected intraperitoneally with saline, atropine (10, 100...... and 5000 microg/kg), or subcutaneously with oxotremorine (30, 100, 300 microg/kg). Subcutaneous administration of oxotremorine (30, 100, 300 microg/kg) significantly increased the tail-flick latency. These doses of oxotremorine dose-dependently increased the intraspinal release of acetylcholine...

  2. An extract of lionfish (Pterois volitans) spine tissue contains acetylcholine and a toxin that affects neuromuscular transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, A S; Olek, A J

    1989-01-01

    A soluble toxic extract derived from spine tissue of the lionfish (Pterois volitans) decreased heart rate and force of contraction in isolated clam and frog hearts. These actions were due to the presence of micromolar concentrations of acetylcholine in the extract. Toxicity was retained after hydrolysis of acetylcholine by exogenous acetylcholinesterase, but heart function was no longer affected. Toxin treated in this way induced muscle fibrillation in an isolated nerve-muscle preparation, followed by blockade of neuromuscular transmission. Bursts of transient depolarizations were recorded at the muscle endplate shortly after toxin addition that correlated in time with the duration of toxin-induced muscle fibrillation. These effects are thought to be due to the increased release and then depletion of acetylcholine from the nerve terminal. PMID:2560846

  3. Critical Evaluation of Acetylcholine Determination in Rat Brain Microdialysates using Ion-Pair Liquid Chromatography with Amperometric Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette Michotte

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Liquid chromatography with amperometric detection remains the most widely used method for acetylcholine quantification in microdialysis samples. Separation of acetylcholine from choline and other matrix components on a microbore chromatographic column (1 mm internal diameter, conversion of acetylcholine in an immobilized enzyme reactor and detection of the produced hydrogen peroxide on a horseradish peroxidase redox polymer coated glassy carbon electrode, achieves sufficient sensitivity for acetylcholine quantification in rat brain microdialysates. However, a thourough validation within the concentration range required for this application has not been carried out before. Furthermore, a rapid degradation of the chromatographic columns and enzyme systems have been reported. In the present study an ion-pair liquid chromatography assay with amperometric detection was validated and its long-term stability evaluated. Working at pH 6.5 dramatically increased chromatographic stability without a loss in sensitivity compared to higher pH values. The lower limit of quantification of the method was 0.3 nM. At this concentration the repeatability was 15.7%, the inter-day precision 8.7% and the accuracy 103.6%. The chromatographic column was stable over 4 months, the immobilized enzyme reactor up to 2-3 months and the enzyme coating of the amperometric detector up to 1-2 months. The concentration of acetylcholine in 30 μl microdialysates obtained under basal conditions from the hippocampus of freely moving rats was 0.40 ± 0.12 nM (mean ± SD, n = 30. The present method is therefore suitable for acetylcholine determination in rat brain microdialysates.

  4. Topological dispositions of lysine α380 and lysine γ486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine α380 and lysine γ486 in the α subunit and the γ subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the α subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the γ subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium [3H]-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine α380 and lysine γ486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine α380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine γ486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for α-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine α380 and lysine γ486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor

  5. Topological dispositions of lysine. alpha. 380 and lysine. gamma. 486 in the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, B.P. (Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla (USA))

    1991-04-23

    The locations have been determined, with respect to the plasma membrane, of lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 in the {alpha} subunit and the {gamma} subunit, respectively, of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica. Immunoadsorbents were constructed that recognize the carboxy terminus of the peptide GVKYIAE released by proteolytic digestion from positions 378-384 in the amino acid sequence of the {alpha} subunit of the acetylcholine receptor and the carboxy terminus of the peptide KYVP released by proteolytic digestion from positions 486-489 in the amino acid sequence of the {gamma} subunit. They were used to isolate these peptides from proteolytic digests of polypeptides from the acetylcholine receptor. Sealed vesicles containing the native acetylcholine receptor were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium ({sup 3}H)-borohydride. The effect of saponin on the incorporation of pyridoxamine phosphate into lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 from the acetylcholine receptor in these vesicles was assessed with the immunoadsorbents. The conclusions that follow from these results are that lysine {alpha}380 is on the inside surface of a vesicle and lysine {gamma}486 is on the outside surface. Because a majority (85%) of the total binding sites for {alpha}-bungarotoxin bind the toxin in the absence of saponin, the majority of the vesicles are right side out with the inside of the vesicle corresponding to the cytoplasmic surface and the outside of the vesicle corresponding to the extracytoplasmic, synaptic surface. Because lysine {alpha}380 and lysine {gamma}486 lie on opposite sides of the membrane, a membrane-spanning segment must be located between the two positions occupied by these two amino acids in the common sequence of a polypeptide of the acetylcholine receptor.

  6. Subtype-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists enhance the responsiveness to citalopram and reboxetine in the mouse forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jesper T; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Christensen, Jeppe K; Olsen, Gunnar M; Peters, Dan; Mirza, Naheed R; Redrobe, John P

    2011-10-01

    Nicotine increases serotonergic and noradrenergic neuronal activity and facilitates serotonin and noradrenaline release. Accordingly, nicotine enhances antidepressant-like actions of reuptake inhibitors selective for serotonin or noradrenaline in the mouse forced swim test and the mouse tail suspension test. Both high-affinity α4β2 and low-affinity α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes are implicated in nicotine-mediated release of serotonin and noradrenaline. The present study therefore investigated whether selective agonism of α4β2 or α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors would affect the mouse forced swim test activity of two antidepressants with distinct mechanisms of action, namely the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. Subthreshold and threshold doses of citalopram (3 and 10 mg/kg) or reboxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg) were tested alone and in combination with the novel α4β2-selective partial nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, NS3956 (0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg) or the α7-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, PNU-282987 (10 and 30 mg/kg). Alone, NS3956 and PNU-282987 were devoid of activity in the mouse forced swim test, but both 1.0 mg/kg NS3956 and 30 mg/kg PNU-282987 enhanced the effect of citalopram and also reboxetine. The data suggest that the activity of citalopram and reboxetine in the mouse forced swim test can be enhanced by agonists at either α4β2 or α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting that both nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes may be involved in the nicotine-enhanced action of antidepressants.

  7. Contrasting Effects of Allosteric and Orthosteric Agonists on M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Internalization and Down-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Rachel L.; Christopher J Langmead; Wood, Martyn D; Challiss, R.A. John

    2009-01-01

    A new class of subtype-selective muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor agonist that activates the receptor through interaction at a site distinct from the orthosteric acetylcholine binding site has been reported recently. Here, we have compared the effects of orthosteric (oxotremorine-M, arecoline, pilocarpine) and allosteric [4-n-butyl-1-[4-(2-methylphenyl)-4-oxo-1-butyl] piperidine (AC-42); 1-[3-(4-butyl-1-piperidinyl)propyl]-3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone (77-LH-28-1)] agonists on M1 mAC...

  8. Effects of arterial infusions of adrenalin and acetylcholine on luteal secretion of progesterone and oxytocin in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, R G; Payne, J H

    1998-07-15

    The effects of close intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine and adrenalin on ovarian secretion of progesterone and oxytocin were examined on Day 10 of the estrous cycle in goats (estrus = Day 0). Acetylcholine (15 micrograms/min) was without effect, but adrenalin (10 micrograms/min) significantly (P < 0.001) raised both progesterone and oxytocin concentrations in ovarian vein plasma. These results show that luteal hormone secretion is enhanced in the goat by beta-adrenergic stimulation and suggest that, as in the sheep and cow, there may be neuroendocrine involvement in the regulation of caprine luteal function. PMID:10734492

  9. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Bojesen, Stig E; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne;

    2011-01-01

    We examined the associations between the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism (rs1051730) on chromosome 15q25 marking the gene cluster CHRNA3-CHRNB4-CHRNA5, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases in the general population.......We examined the associations between the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism (rs1051730) on chromosome 15q25 marking the gene cluster CHRNA3-CHRNB4-CHRNA5, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases in the general population....

  10. Luminescent silica nanoparticles for sensing acetylcholinesterase-catalyzed hydrolysis of acetylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhametshina, Alsu R; Fedorenko, Svetlana V; Zueva, Irina V; Petrov, Konstantin A; Masson, Patrick; Nizameev, Irek R; Mustafina, Asiya R; Sinyashin, Oleg G

    2016-03-15

    This work highlights the H-function of Tb(III)-doped silica nanoparticles in aqueous solutions of acetic acid as a route to sense acetylcholinesterase-catalyzed hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh). The H-function results from H(+)-induced quenching of Tb(III)-centered luminescence due to protonation of Tb(III) complexes located close to silica/water interface. The H-function can be turned on/switched off by the concentration of complexes within core or nanoparticle shell zones, by the silica surface decoration and adsorption of both organic and inorganic cations on silica surface. Results indicate the optimal synthetic procedure for making nanoparticles capable of sensing acetic acid produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of acetylcholine. The H-function of nanoparticles was determined at various concentrations of ACh and AChE. The measurements show experimental conditions for fitting the H-function to Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Results confirm that reliable fluorescent monitoring AChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of ACh is possible through the H-function properties of Tb(III)-doped silica nanoparticles.

  11. Mode of action of triflumezopyrim: A novel mesoionic insecticide which inhibits the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Daniel; Benner, Eric A; Schroeder, Mark E; Holyoke, Caleb W; Zhang, Wenming; Pahutski, Thomas F; Leighty, Robert M; Vincent, Daniel R; Hamm, Jason C

    2016-07-01

    Triflumezopyrim, a newly commercialized molecule from DuPont Crop Protection, belongs to the novel class of mesoionic insecticides. This study characterizes the biochemical and physiological action of this novel insecticide. Using membranes from the aphid, Myzus persicae, triflumezopyrim was found to displace (3)H-imidacloprid with a Ki value of 43 nM with competitive binding results indicating that triflumezopyrim binds to the orthosteric site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). In voltage clamp studies using dissociated Periplaneta americana neurons, triflumezopyrim inhibits nAChR currents with an IC50 of 0.6 nM. Activation of nAChR currents was minimal and required concentrations ≥100 μM. Xenopus oocytes expressing chimeric nAChRs (Drosophila α2/chick β2) showed similar inhibitory effects from triflumezopyrim. In P. americana neurons, co-application experiments with acetylcholine reveal the inhibitory action of triflumezopyrim to be rapid and prolonged in nature. Such physiological action is distinct from other insecticides in IRAC Group 4 in which the toxicological mode of action is attributed to nAChR agonism. Mesoionic insecticides act via inhibition of the orthosteric binding site of the nAChR despite previous beliefs that such action would translate to poor insect control. Triflumezopyrim is the first commercialized insecticide from this class and provides outstanding control of hoppers, including the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, which is already displaying strong resistance to neonicotinoids such as imidacloprid.

  12. Label-Free Acetylcholine Image Sensor Based on Charge Transfer Technology for Biological Phenomenon Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaga, Shoko; Tamai, Yui; Okumura, Koichi; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2012-02-01

    A 32 ×32 charge-transfer enzyme-type acetylcholine (ACh) image sensor array was produced for label-free tracking of images of ACh distribution and its performance in repeatable measurements without enzyme deactivation was examined. The proposed sensor was based on a charge-transfer-type pH image sensor, which was modified using an enzyme membrane (acetylcholine esterase, AChE) for each pixel. The ACh image sensor detected hydrogen ions generated by the ACh-AChE reaction. A polyion complex membrane composed of poly(L-lysine) and poly(4-styrenesulfonate) was used to immobilize the enzyme on the sensor. The improved uniformity and adhesion of the polyion complex membrane were evaluated in this study. As a result, temporal and spatial fluctuations of the ACh image sensor were successfully minimized using this approach. The sensitivity of the sensor was 4.2 mV/mM, and its detection limit was 20 µM. In five repeated measurements, the repeatability was 8.8%.

  13. The Anti-Acetylcholine Receptor Antibody Test in Suspected Ocular Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Jin Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate the clinical significance of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (anti-AChR-Ab levels in suspected ocular myasthenia gravis. Methods. In total, 144 patients complaining of fluctuating diplopia and ptosis were evaluated for serum levels of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody and their medical charts were retrospectively reviewed. Subjects were classified into three groups: variable diplopia only, ptosis only, and both variable diplopia and ptosis. We investigated serum anti-AChR-Ab titer levels and performed thyroid autoantibody tests. Results. Patients’ chief complaints were diplopia (N=103, ptosis (N=12, and their concurrence (N=29. Abnormal anti-AChR-Ab was observed in 21 of 144 patients (14.1%. Between the three groups, mean age, number of seropositive patients, and mean anti-AChR-Ab level were not significantly different (P=0.224, 0.073, and 0.062, resp.. Overall, 27.5% of patients had abnormal thyroid autoantibodies. Conclusion. The sensitivity of anti-AChR-Ab was 14.1% in suspected ocular myasthenia gravis and seropositivity in myasthenia gravis patients showed a high correlation with the presence of thyroid autoantibodies.

  14. A Mathematical Model of Neonatal Rat Atrial Monolayers with Constitutively Active Acetylcholine-Mediated K+ Current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Rupamanjari; Jangsangthong, Wanchana; Feola, Iolanda; Ypey, Dirk L; Pijnappels, Daniël A; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2016-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequent form of arrhythmia occurring in the industrialized world. Because of its complex nature, each identified form of AF requires specialized treatment. Thus, an in-depth understanding of the bases of these arrhythmias is essential for therapeutic development. A variety of experimental studies aimed at understanding the mechanisms of AF are performed using primary cultures of neonatal rat atrial cardiomyocytes (NRAMs). Previously, we have shown that the distinct advantage of NRAM cultures is that they allow standardized, systematic, robust re-entry induction in the presence of a constitutively-active acetylcholine-mediated K+ current (IKACh-c). Experimental studies dedicated to mechanistic explorations of AF, using these cultures, often use computer models for detailed electrophysiological investigations. However, currently, no mathematical model for NRAMs is available. Therefore, in the present study we propose the first model for the action potential (AP) of a NRAM with constitutively-active acetylcholine-mediated K+ current (IKACh-c). The descriptions of the ionic currents were based on patch-clamp data obtained from neonatal rats. Our monolayer model closely mimics the action potential duration (APD) restitution and conduction velocity (CV) restitution curves presented in our previous in vitro studies. In addition, the model reproduces the experimentally observed dynamics of spiral wave rotation, in the absence and in the presence of drug interventions, and in the presence of localized myofibroblast heterogeneities. PMID:27332890

  15. A Mathematical Model of Neonatal Rat Atrial Monolayers with Constitutively Active Acetylcholine-Mediated K+ Current.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupamanjari Majumder

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most frequent form of arrhythmia occurring in the industrialized world. Because of its complex nature, each identified form of AF requires specialized treatment. Thus, an in-depth understanding of the bases of these arrhythmias is essential for therapeutic development. A variety of experimental studies aimed at understanding the mechanisms of AF are performed using primary cultures of neonatal rat atrial cardiomyocytes (NRAMs. Previously, we have shown that the distinct advantage of NRAM cultures is that they allow standardized, systematic, robust re-entry induction in the presence of a constitutively-active acetylcholine-mediated K+ current (IKACh-c. Experimental studies dedicated to mechanistic explorations of AF, using these cultures, often use computer models for detailed electrophysiological investigations. However, currently, no mathematical model for NRAMs is available. Therefore, in the present study we propose the first model for the action potential (AP of a NRAM with constitutively-active acetylcholine-mediated K+ current (IKACh-c. The descriptions of the ionic currents were based on patch-clamp data obtained from neonatal rats. Our monolayer model closely mimics the action potential duration (APD restitution and conduction velocity (CV restitution curves presented in our previous in vitro studies. In addition, the model reproduces the experimentally observed dynamics of spiral wave rotation, in the absence and in the presence of drug interventions, and in the presence of localized myofibroblast heterogeneities.

  16. Regulation of phosphorylation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in mouse BC3H1 myocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.M.; Merlie, J.P.; Lawrence, J.C. Jr.

    1987-09-01

    By using /sup 32/P-labeling methods and performing immunoprecipitations with specific antibodies, the authors have found that three subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and phosphorylated in mouse skeletal muscle cells. In nonstimulated cells, the molar ratios of phosphate estimated in ..cap alpha.., ..beta.., and delta subunits were 0.02, 0.05, and 0.5, respectively. All three subunits contained predominantly phosphoserine with some phosphothreonine; the ..beta.., subunit also contained phosphotyrosine. Incubating cells with agents that stimulate cAMP-dependent pathways (isoproterenol, forskolin, 8-Br-cAMP) increased the phosphorylation of the delta subunit by 50%, but phosphate labeling of the ..beta.. subunit was depressed by a third. In contrast, when cells were incubated with the divalent cation ionophores A-23187 or ionomycin, phosphorylation of both the delta and ..beta.. subunits increased. The results indicate that acetylcholine receptors are phosphorylated to significant levels in skeletal muscle cells and that cAMP-dependent and Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent pathways exist for controlling the phosphorylation state of the receptor subunits.

  17. Acetylcholine-Binding Protein Engineered to Mimic the α4-α4 Binding Pocket in α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reveals Interface Specific Interactions Important for Binding and Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A;

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are attractive drug targets for psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and smoking cessation aids. Recently, a third agonist binding site between two α4 subunits in the (α4)(3)(β2)(2) receptor subpopulation was discovered. In particular, three...

  18. Maximal acetylcholine dose of 200 μg into the left coronary artery as a spasm provocation test: comparison with 100 μg of acetylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueda, Shozo; Kohno, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Toru; Sakaue, Tomoki; Sasaki, Yasuhiro; Habara, Hirokazu

    2015-11-01

    As a spasm provocation test of acetylcholine (ACH), incremental dose up (20/50/100 μg) into the left coronary artery (LCA) is recommended in the guidelines established by Japanese Circulation Society. Recently, Ong et al. reported the ACOVA study which maximal ACH dose was 200 μg in the LCA. We compared the angiographic findings between ACH 100 μg and ACH 200 μg in the LCA and also examined the usefulness and safety of ACH 200 μg in Japanese patients without variant angina. As a spasm provocation test, we performed intracoronary injection of ACH 200 μg after ACH 100 μg in 88 patients (55 males, 68.4 ± 11.7 years old) including 59 ischemic heart disease (IHD) patients and 29 non-IHD patients. Positive spasm was defined as >99 % transient stenosis (focal spasm) or 90 % severe diffuse vasoconstriction (diffuse spasm). Positive spasm by ACH 200 μg was significantly higher than that by ACH 100 μg (36 pts: 40.9 % vs. 17 pts: 19.3 %, p LCA was safe and useful. We may reexamine the maximal ACH dose into the LCA. PMID:25179297

  19. AMYGDALA KINDLING-INDUCED SEIZURES SELECTIVELY IMPAIR SPATIAL MEMORY .2. EFFECTS ON HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONAL AND GLIAL MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BELDHUIS, HJA; EVERTS, HGJ; VANDERZEE, EA; LUITEN, PGM; BOHUS, B

    1992-01-01

    The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor is linked via hydrolysis of phosphoinositides to the protein kinase C pathway. In a preceding paper (Beldhuis, H. J. A., H. G. J. Everts, E. A. Vander Zee, P. G. M. Luiten, and B. Bohus (1992) Amygdala kindling-induced seizures selectively impair spatial memory.

  20. Effects of acetylcholine and electrical stimulation on glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor production in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianney, John-Mary; Miller, Damon A; Spitsbergen, John M

    2014-11-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a neurotrophic factor required for survival of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system. Specifically, GDNF has been characterized as a survival factor for spinal motor neurons. GDNF is synthesized and secreted by neuronal target tissues, including skeletal muscle in the peripheral nervous system; however, the mechanisms by which GDNF is synthesized and released by skeletal muscle are not fully understood. Previous results suggested that cholinergic neurons regulate secretion of GDNF by skeletal muscle. In the current study, GDNF production by skeletal muscle myotubes following treatment with acetylcholine was examined. Acetylcholine receptors on myotubes were identified with labeled alpha-bungarotoxin and were blocked using unlabeled alpha-bungarotoxin. The question of whether electrical stimulation has a similar effect to that of acetylcholine was also investigated. Cells were stimulated with voltage pulses; at 1 and 5 Hz frequencies for times ranging from 30 min to 48 h. GDNF content in myotubes and GDNF in conditioned culture medium were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Results suggest that acetylcholine and short-term electrical stimulation reduce GDNF secretion, while treatment with carbachol or long-term electrical stimulation enhances GDNF production by skeletal muscle.

  1. Dilatory responses to acetylcholine, calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P in the congestive heart failure rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdahl, A; Valdemarsson, S; Nilsson, T;

    1999-01-01

    It was examined to what extent congestive heart failure (CHF) in rats, induced by ligation of the left coronary artery, affects the vascular responses to the vasodilatory substances acetylcholine (ACh), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and substance P (SP). After induction of CHF status...

  2. Elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the striatum reveals regulation of behaviour by cholinergic-glutamatergic co-transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Monica S; De Jaeger, Xavier; Raulic, Sanda; Souza, Ivana A; Li, Alex X; Schmid, Susanne; Menon, Ravi S; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Caron, Marc G; Bartha, Robert; Prado, Vania F; Prado, Marco A M

    2011-11-01

    Cholinergic neurons in the striatum are thought to play major regulatory functions in motor behaviour and reward. These neurons express two vesicular transporters that can load either acetylcholine or glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Consequently cholinergic neurons can release both neurotransmitters, making it difficult to discern their individual contributions for the regulation of striatal functions. Here we have dissected the specific roles of acetylcholine release for striatal-dependent behaviour in mice by selective elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) from striatal cholinergic neurons. Analysis of several behavioural parameters indicates that elimination of VAChT had only marginal consequences in striatum-related tasks and did not affect spontaneous locomotion, cocaine-induced hyperactivity, or its reward properties. However, dopaminergic sensitivity of medium spiny neurons (MSN) and the behavioural outputs in response to direct dopaminergic agonists were enhanced, likely due to increased expression/function of dopamine receptors in the striatum. These observations indicate that previous functions attributed to striatal cholinergic neurons in spontaneous locomotor activity and in the rewarding responses to cocaine are mediated by glutamate and not by acetylcholine release. Our experiments demonstrate how one population of neurons can use two distinct neurotransmitters to differentially regulate a given circuitry. The data also raise the possibility of using VAChT as a target to boost dopaminergic function and decrease high striatal cholinergic activity, common neurochemical alterations in individuals affected with Parkinson's disease. PMID:22087075

  3. Activation and desensitization of peripheral muscle and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by selected, naturally-occurring pyridine alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teratogenic alkaloids can cause developmental defects due to inhibition of fetal movement that results from desensitization of fetal muscletype nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We investigated the ability of two known teratogens, the piperidinyl-pyridine anabasine and its 1,2-dehydropiper...

  4. The role of the a7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the acute toxicosis of methyllycaconitine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adverse physiological effects of methyllycaconitine (MLA) have been attributed to its competitive antagonism of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Recent research demonstrated a correlation between the LD50 of MLA and the amount of a7 nAChR in various mouse strains, suggesting that mice...

  5. Hippocampal α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor levels in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Weyn, Annelies; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is involved in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity. Consequently, changes in α7 nAChR function have been implicated in a variety of mental disorders, especially schizophrenia. However, there is little knowledge regarding the levels of the α7 n...

  6. Carbamoylcholine analogs as nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists--structural modifications of 3-(dimethylamino)butyl dimethylcarbamate (DMABC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Petrycer; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Balle, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    Compounds based on the 3-(dimethylamino)butyl dimethylcarbamate (DMABC) scaffold were synthesized and pharmacologically characterized at the alpha(4)beta(2), alpha(3)beta(4,) alpha(4)beta(4) and alpha(7) neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The carbamate functionality and a small...

  7. Impaired hippocampal acetylcholine release parallels spatial memory deficits in Tg2576 mice subjected to basal forebrain cholinergic degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bettina; Mørk, Arne; Plath, Niels;

    2013-01-01

    , respectively. Conversely, there was no deterioration of cognitive functioning in sham lesioned Tg2576 mice or wild type littermates (wt) receiving the immunotoxin. At 10 months of age, release of acetylcholine (ACh) was addressed by microdialysis in conscious mice. Scopolamine-induced increases in hippocampal...

  8. Selective activation of M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors reverses MK-801-induced behavioral impairments and enhances associative learning in rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubser, Michael; Bridges, Thomas M; Dencker, Ditte;

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) represent a novel approach for the treatment of psychotic symptoms associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently reported that the selective M4 PAM VU0152100 produced...

  9. An allosteric enhancer of M(4) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function inhibits behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ditte Dencker; Weikop, Pia; Sørensen, Gunnar;

    2012-01-01

    The mesostriatal dopamine system plays a key role in mediating the reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. The muscarinic M(4) acetylcholine receptor subtype is centrally involved in the regulation of dopamine release in striatal areas. Consequently, striatal M(4) receptors could...

  10. Utrophin abundance is reduced at neuromuscular junctions of patients with both inherited and acquired acetylcholine receptor deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slater, CR; Young, C; Wood, SJ; Bewick, GS; Anderson, LVB; Baxter, P; Fawcett, PRW; Roberts, M; Jacobson, L; Kuks, J; Vincent, A; NewsomDavis, J

    1997-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a heterogenous group of conditions in which muscle weakness resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission is often present from infancy. One form of congenital myasthenic syndrome is due to a reduction of the number of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) at the n

  11. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Bojesen, Stig E; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne;

    2011-01-01

    We examined the associations between the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism (rs1051730) on chromosome 15q25 marking the gene cluster CHRNA3-CHRNB4-CHRNA5, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases in the general population....

  12. Elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the striatum reveals regulation of behaviour by cholinergic-glutamatergic co-transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica S Guzman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neurons in the striatum are thought to play major regulatory functions in motor behaviour and reward. These neurons express two vesicular transporters that can load either acetylcholine or glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Consequently cholinergic neurons can release both neurotransmitters, making it difficult to discern their individual contributions for the regulation of striatal functions. Here we have dissected the specific roles of acetylcholine release for striatal-dependent behaviour in mice by selective elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT from striatal cholinergic neurons. Analysis of several behavioural parameters indicates that elimination of VAChT had only marginal consequences in striatum-related tasks and did not affect spontaneous locomotion, cocaine-induced hyperactivity, or its reward properties. However, dopaminergic sensitivity of medium spiny neurons (MSN and the behavioural outputs in response to direct dopaminergic agonists were enhanced, likely due to increased expression/function of dopamine receptors in the striatum. These observations indicate that previous functions attributed to striatal cholinergic neurons in spontaneous locomotor activity and in the rewarding responses to cocaine are mediated by glutamate and not by acetylcholine release. Our experiments demonstrate how one population of neurons can use two distinct neurotransmitters to differentially regulate a given circuitry. The data also raise the possibility of using VAChT as a target to boost dopaminergic function and decrease high striatal cholinergic activity, common neurochemical alterations in individuals affected with Parkinson's disease.

  13. Rat neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing a7 subunit: pharmacological properties of ligand binding and function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingxian XIAO; Galya R ABDRAKHMANOVA; Maryna BAYDYUK; Susan HERNANDEZ; Kenneth J KELLAR

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To compare pharmacological properties of heterologously expressed homomeric a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (a.7 nAChRs) with those of native nAChRs containing a.7 subunit (a.7* nAChRs) in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Methods: We established a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line that expresses homomeric rat a7 nAChRs. We studies ligand binding profiles and functional properties of nAChRs expressed in this cell line and native rat a.7* nAChRs in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. We used [125IJ-a-bungarotoxin to compare ligand binding profiles in these cells with those in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The functional properties of the a.7 nAChRs expressed in this cell line were studied using whole-cell current recording.Results: The newly established cell line, KXa7Rl, expresses homomeric a7 nAChRs that bind [125I]-a-bungarotoxin with a Kd value of 0.38±0.06 nmol/L, similar to Kj values of native rat a.7* nAChRs from hippocampus (Kd=0.28±0.03 nmol/L) and cerebral cortex (Kd=0.33±0.05 nmol/L). Using whole-cell current recording, the homomeric a7 nAChRs expressed in the cells were activated by acetylcholine and (-)-nicotine with EC50 values of 280±19 nmol/L and 180±40 nmol/L, respectively. The acetylcholine activated currents were potently blocked by two selective antagonists of a.7 nAChRs, a-bungarotoxin (IC5o=19±2 nmol/L) and methyllycaconitine (IC50=100±10 pmol/L). A comparative study of ligand binding profiles, using 13 nicotinic ligands, showed many similarities between the homomeric a.7 nAChRs and native a.7* receptors in rat brain, but it also revealed several notable differences.Conclusion: This newly established stable cell line should be very useful for studying the properties of homomeric a7 nAChRs and comparing these properties to native a.7* nAChRs.

  14. Apolipoprotein E4 reduces evoked hippocampal acetylcholine release in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolejší, Eva; Liraz, Ori; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; Michaelson, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) is the most prevalent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. We utilized apoE4-targeted replacement mice (approved by the Tel Aviv University Animal Care Committee) to investigate whether cholinergic dysfunction, which increases during aging and is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, is accentuated by apoE4. This revealed that levels of the pre-synaptic cholinergic marker, vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the hippocampus and the corresponding electrically evoked release of acetylcholine, are similar in 4-month-old apoE4 and apolipoprotein E3 (apoE3) mice. Both parameters decrease with age. This decrease is, however, significantly more pronounced in the apoE4 mice. The levels of cholinacetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) were similar in the hippocampus of young apoE4 and apoE3 mice and decreased during aging. For ChAT, this decrease was similar in the apoE4 and apoE3 mice, whereas it was more pronounced in the apoE4 mice, regarding their corresponding AChE and BuChE levels. The level of muscarinic receptors was higher in the apoE4 than in the apoE3 mice at 4 months and increased to similar levels with age. However, the relative representation of the M1 receptor subtype decreased during aging in apoE4 mice. These results demonstrate impairment of the evoked release of acetylcholine in hippocampus by apoE4 in 12-month-old mice but not in 4-month-old mice. The levels of ChAT and the extent of the M2 receptor-mediated autoregulation of ACh release were similar in the adult mice, suggesting that the apoE4-related inhibition of hippocampal ACh release in these mice is not driven by these parameters. Evoked ACh release from hippocampal and cortical slices is similar in 4-month-old apoE4 and apoE3 mice but is specifically and significantly reduced in hippocampus, but not cortex, of 12-month-old apoE4 mice. This effect is accompanied by decreased VAChT levels. These findings show that

  15. Real-time detection of acetylcholine release from the human endocrine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Dando, Robin; Huang, Y Anthony; Berggren, Per-Olof; Roper, Stephen D; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2012-05-03

    Neurons, sensory cells and endocrine cells secrete neurotransmitters and hormones to communicate with other cells and to coordinate organ and system function. Validation that a substance is used as an extracellular signaling molecule by a given cell requires a direct demonstration of its secretion. In this protocol we describe the use of biosensor cells to detect neurotransmitter release from endocrine cells in real-time. Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor M3 were used as ACh biosensors to record ACh release from human pancreatic islets. We show how ACh biosensors loaded with the Ca(2+) indicator Fura-2 and pressed against isolated human pancreatic islets allow the detection of ACh release. The biosensor approach is simple; the Ca(2+) signal generated in the biosensor cell reflects the presence (release) of a neurotransmitter. The technique is versatile because biosensor cells expressing a variety of receptors can be used in many applications. The protocol takes ∼3 h.

  16. Relationship between Polymorphism of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Gene CHRNA3 and Susceptibility of Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Bo; Shi Meiqi; Mei Jinfeng; Hong Zhuan; Cao Guochun; Lu Jianwei; Feng Jifeng

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationship between polymorphism of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene CHRNA3 and susceptibility of lung cancer. Methods:Sixty hundred patients with lung cancer and 600 healthy people were respectively selected. TaqMan-MGB probe technique was applied to detect rs3743073 (T > G) genotypes at SNPs site on CHRNA3. The difference of genotype distribution among groups was compared, and its relationship with lung cancer was also investigated. Results:There was statistical signiifcance regarding the distributions of CHRNA3 rs3743073 (T>G) genotype and allele frequencies in patients with lung cancer and healthy people (P Conclusion:The risk of developing lung cancer in patients with rs3743073G mutant genotypes of CHRNA3 gene is increased markedly, especially in those more than 60 years old, males and smoking ones.

  17. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Gene Family of the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi-peng; LIN Ke-jian; LIU Yang; GUI Fu-rong; WANG Gui-rong

    2013-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAchRs) are cholinergic receptors that form ligand-gated ion channels by ifve subunits in insect and vertebrate nervous systems. The insect nAChR is the molecular target of a class of insecticides, neonicotinoids. Here, we identiifed and cloned 11 candidate nAChR subunit genes in Acyrthosiphon pisum using genome-based bioinformatics combined modern molecular techniques. Most A. pisum nAChRs including α1, α2, α3, α4, α6, α8, and β1 show highly sequence identities with the counterparts of other insects examined. Expression proifles analysis showed that all subunit genes were expressed in adult head. At least two subunits have alternative splicing that obviously increase A. pisum nicotinic receptor diversity. This study will be invaluable for exploring the molecular mechanisms of neonicotinoid-like insecticides in sucking pests, and for ultimately establishing the screening platform of novel insecticides.

  18. Primary structure of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Report for 7 April 1989-6 October 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, J.W.

    1990-10-06

    Although we now understand the general principles of chemical signalling between nerve cells in the brain, our appreciation of the molecular mechanisms involved has been limited by the complexity of the system and the scarcity of material. In our work we have taken a new approach to this problem and have focused our attention on nicotinic cholinergic synaptic transmission in the brain. Using the techniques of molecular biology, we have discovered a family of genes that encode proteins that associate in a large variety of combinations to produce many different nicotinic acetylcholine receptor molecules. We have shown that the receptors thus formed differ in their structures, their pharmacologies, their functional properties,and their distribution in the adult brain. This unexpected diversity changes the way we think about nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the brain, forcing us to consider them as sites of action of pharmacological agents and making available to us a more precise family of targets for therapeutic drugs.

  19. DESENSITIZATION OF ACETYLCHOLINE ON THE INHIBITION EFFECTS OF BLOOD PRESSURE IN ANESTHETIZED CANINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈莉娜; 吕军; 臧伟进; 于晓江; 孙晓东; 高小利

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the desensitization of acetylcholine (Ach) on the inhibition effects of blood pressure (BP) in anesthetized canine and build a model for studying desensitization in vivo. Methods Through changing the intervals (120, 100, 80, 60, 40, 20 seconds) of twice Ach administration (each was 15μg*kg-1,I.v.), the desensitization on the effect of systemic blood pressure of the first Ach injection towards the subsequent Ach administration was observed. Results When Ach administration intervals were 40, 60, 80, 100 seconds, the percentages of desensitization of Ach on systemic blood pressure were significantly increased (P0.05). Conclusion The results indicated that Ach contents in blood might influence the action of next Ach administration. To some extent, the higher the concentration of Ach in blood, the bigger the ratio of desensitization of exogenous Ach is. In addition, this method of twice drug administration could be used as a model of studying desensitization in vivo.

  20. The effect of cooling on the acetylcholine-induced current of identified Helix pomatia Br neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljkovic, Miodrag; Kartelija, Gordana; Radenovic, Lidija; Todorovic, Natasa

    2005-05-01

    The Br neuron of the snail Helix pomatia, involved in neuronal regulation of various homeostatic and adaptive mechanisms, represents an interesting model for studying effects of temperature changes on neuronal activity of poikilotherms. The acetylcholine (ACh) induces a transient, inward dose-dependent current in the identified Br neuron. In the work presented, we analyses the effects of cooling on the ACh-induced inward current. The amplitude of ACh-induced inward current was markedly decreased after cooling and the speed of the decay of ACh response was decreased. Sensitivity to cooling of Ach-activated current on the Br neuron is mediated by a mechanism that does not involve change in the apparent receptor affinity or the cooperativity of binding. PMID:15759140

  1. Cognitive improvement by activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: from animal models to human pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H; Timmerman, Daniel B;

    2010-01-01

    AChR agonists improves learning, memory, and attentional function in variety of animal models, and pro-cognitive effects of alpha(7) nAChR agonists have recently been demonstrated in patients with schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. The alpha(7) nAChR desensitizes rapidly in vitro, and this has been a major......Agonists and positive allosteric modulators of the alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) are currently being developed for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in patients with schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. This review describes the neurobiological properties of the alpha n...... concern in the development of alpha(7) nAChR agonists as putative drugs. Our review of the existing literature shows that development of tolerance to the behavioral effects of alpha(7) nAChR agonists does not occur in animal models or humans. However, the long-term memory-enhancing effects seen in animal...

  2. Conformational and stereoeletronic investigations of muscarinic agonists of acetylcholine by NMR and theoretical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Julio Cesar A.; Ducati, Lucas C.; Rittner, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    NMR solvent effects and theoretical calculations showed muscarinic agonists present a large stability for their near synclinal conformations, indicating the presence of significant stabilization factors. Analysis of the results clearly indicated that this stability is not determined by the dihedral around the substituted C-C ethane bond, as stated by some authors, but a consequence of the geometry adopted in order to maximize N+/O interactions in this type of molecules. It can be assumed that acetylcholine and its muscarinic agonists exhibit their biologic activity when the positively charged nitrogen and the oxygen atoms are in the same side of the molecule within an interatomic distance ranging from 3.0 to 6.0 Å.

  3. Dynamic heterogeneity and non-Gaussian statistics for acetylcholine receptors on live cell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W.; Song, H.; Su, Y.; Geng, L.; Ackerson, B. J.; Peng, H. B.; Tong, P.

    2016-05-01

    The Brownian motion of molecules at thermal equilibrium usually has a finite correlation time and will eventually be randomized after a long delay time, so that their displacement follows the Gaussian statistics. This is true even when the molecules have experienced a complex environment with a finite correlation time. Here, we report that the lateral motion of the acetylcholine receptors on live muscle cell membranes does not follow the Gaussian statistics for normal Brownian diffusion. From a careful analysis of a large volume of the protein trajectories obtained over a wide range of sampling rates and long durations, we find that the normalized histogram of the protein displacements shows an exponential tail, which is robust and universal for cells under different conditions. The experiment indicates that the observed non-Gaussian statistics and dynamic heterogeneity are inherently linked to the slow-active remodelling of the underlying cortical actin network.

  4. Vector-averaged gravity does not alter acetylcholine receptor single channel properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitstetter, R.; Gruener, R.

    1994-01-01

    To examine the physiological sensitivity of membrane receptors to altered gravity, we examined the single channel properties of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), in co-cultures of Xenopus myocytes and neurons, to vector-averaged gravity in the clinostat. This experimental paradigm produces an environment in which, from the cell's perspective, the gravitational vector is "nulled" by continuous averaging. In that respect, the clinostat simulates one aspect of space microgravity where the gravity force is greatly reduced. After clinorotation, the AChR channel mean open-time and conductance were statistically not different from control values but showed a rotation-dependent trend that suggests a process of cellular adaptation to clinorotation. These findings therefore suggest that the ACHR channel function may not be affected in the microgravity of space despite changes in the receptor's cellular organization.

  5. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors serve as sensitive targets that mediate β-amyloid neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang LIU; Jie WU

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of brain dementia characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) and loss of forebrain cholinergic neurons. Aβ accumulation and aggregation are thought to contribute to cholinergic neuronal degeneration, in turn causing learning and memory deficits, but the specific targets that mediate Aβ neurotoxicity remain elusive. Recently, accumlating lines of evidence have demonstrated that Aβ directly modulates the function of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which leads to the new hypothesis that neuronal nAChRs may serve as important targets that mediate Aβ neurotoxicity. In this review, we summarize current studies performed in our laboratory and in others to address the question of how Aβ modulates neuronal nAChRs, especially nAChR subunit function.

  6. Involvement of Ca2+/CaM in the signal transduction of acetylcholine regulating stomatal movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    It has been known that the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) also exists in plants and is able to regulate the movement of stomata. In another aspect, Ca2+/CaM as the second messengers have a critical role of signal transduction in stomatal guard-cell. Here we showed that Ca2+/CaM were also involved in theACh regulated stomatal movement. In the medium containing Ca2+, the Ca2+ channel blockers (NIF and Ver) and CaM inhibitors (TFP and W7) could neutralize the ACh induced stomatal opening, however, they are ineffective in the medium containing K+. Those results indicated that Ca2+/CaM were involved in the signal transduction pathway of ACh regulating stomatal movement.

  7. Expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on human B-lymphoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skok M. V.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To find a correlation between the level of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR expression and B lymphocyte differentiation or activation state. Methods. Expression of nAChRs in the REH, Ramos and Daudi cell lines was studied by flow cytometry using nAChR subunit-specific antibodies; cell proliferation was studied by MTT test. Results. It is shown that the level of 42/4 and 7 nAChRs expression increased along with B lymphocyte differentiation (Ramos > REH and activation (Daudi > > Ramos and depended on the antigen-specific receptor expression. The nAChR stimulation/blockade did not influence the intensity of cell proliferation.

  8. Theoretical studies of interaction models of human acetylcholine esterase with different inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG QingChuan; CHU HuiYing; NIU RuiJuan; SUN ChiaChung

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and one of the most common causes of dementia in the elderly.Acetyicholine esterase inhibitors (AChEl) are the main drugs used in the treatment of AD.In this work,docking studies have been performed in order to understand the interaction between a number of inhibitors (tacrine,rivastigmine,huperzine A,TV-3326 (ladostigil),donepezil and anseculin) and acetylcholine esterase (AChE).The calculated binding affinities between inhibitors and AChE increase in the order tacrine<rivastigmine<huperzine A<TV-3326<donepezil<anseculin,which reflects the experimental inhibitory activity expressed in terms of the half maximal inhibitory concentration (the IC50 value).Of the above inhibitors,anseculin is the most useful drug for the treatment of dementia.

  9. Analogues of neuroactive polyamine wasp toxins that lack inner basic sites exhibit enhanced antagonism toward a muscle-type mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stromgaard, K; Brierley, M J; Andersen, K;

    1999-01-01

    properties (stepwise macroscopic pK(a) values) were determined by (13)C NMR titrations. All analogues are fully protonated at physiological pH. The effects of these compounds on acetylcholine-induced currents in TE671 cells clamped at various holding potentials were determined. All of the analogues...... noncompetitively antagonized the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in a concentration-, time-, and voltage-dependent manner. The amplitudes of acetylcholine-induced currents were compared at their peaks and at the end of a 1 s application in the presence or absence of the analogues. Most of the analogues...

  10. Natural genetic variability of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit genes in mice: Consequences and confounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilking, Jennifer A; Stitzel, Jerry A

    2015-09-01

    Recent human genetic studies have identified genetic variants in multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit genes that are associated with risk for nicotine dependence and other smoking-related measures. Genetic variability also exists in the nAChR subunit genes in mice. Most studies on mouse nAChR subunit gene variability to date have focused on Chrna4, the gene that encodes the α4 nAChR subunit and Chrna7, the gene that encodes the α7 nAChR subunit. However, genetic variability exists for all nAChR genes in mice. In this review, we will describe what is known about nAChR subunit gene polymorphisms in mice and how it relates to variability in nAChR expression and function in brain. The relationship between nAChR genetic variability in mice and the effects of nicotine on several behavioral and physiological measures also will be discussed. In addition, an overview of the contribution of other genetic variation to nicotine sensitivity in mice will be provided. Finally, the potential for natural genetic variability to confound and/or modify the results of studies that utilize genetically engineered mice will be considered. As an example of the ability of a natural genetic variant to modify the effect of an engineered mutation, data will be presented that demonstrate that the effect of Chrna5 deletion on oral nicotine intake is dependent upon naturally occurring variant alleles of Chrna4. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. PMID:25498233

  11. Pulmonary inflammation is regulated by the levels of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia M Pinheiro

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh plays a crucial role in physiological responses of both the central and the peripheral nervous system. Moreover, ACh was described as an anti-inflammatory mediator involved in the suppression of exacerbated innate response and cytokine release in various organs. However, the specific contributions of endogenous release ACh for inflammatory responses in the lung are not well understood. To address this question we have used mice with reduced levels of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT, a protein required for ACh storage in secretory vesicles. VAChT deficiency induced airway inflammation with enhanced TNF-α and IL-4 content, but not IL-6, IL-13 and IL-10 quantified by ELISA. Mice with decreased levels of VAChT presented increased collagen and elastic fibers deposition in airway walls which was consistent with an increase in inflammatory cells positive to MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in the lung. In vivo lung function evaluation showed airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine in mutant mice. The expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (p65-NF-kB in lung of VAChT-deficient mice were higher than in wild-type mice, whereas a decreased expression of janus-kinase 2 (JAK2 was observed in the lung of mutant animals. Our findings show the first evidence that cholinergic deficiency impaired lung function and produce local inflammation. Our data supports the notion that cholinergic system modulates airway inflammation by modulation of JAK2 and NF-kB pathway. We proposed that intact cholinergic pathway is necessary to maintain the lung homeostasis.

  12. The role of visual cortex acetylcholine in learning to discriminate temporally modulated visual stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor H Minces

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain innervate discrete regions of the cortical mantle, bestowing the cholinergic system with the potential to dynamically modulate sub-regions of the cortex according to behavioral demands. Cortical cholinergic activity has been shown to facilitate learning and modulate attention. Experiments addressing these issues have primarily focused on widespread cholinergic depletions, extending to areas involved in general cognitive processes and sleep cycle regulation, making a definitive interpretation of the behavioral role of cholinergic projections difficult. Furthermore, a review of the electrophysiological literature suggests that cholinergic modulation is particularly important in representing the fine temporal details of stimuli, an issue rarely addressed in behavioral experimentation. The goal of this work is to understand the role cholinergic projections, specific to the sensory cortex, in learning to discriminate fine differences in the temporal structure of stimuli. A novel visual Go/No-Go task was developed to assess the ability of rats to learn and discriminate fine differences in the temporal structure of visual stimuli (lights flashing at various frequencies. The cholinergic contribution to this task was examined by selectively eliminating acetylcholine projections to visual cortex (using 192 IgG-saporin, either before or after discrimination training.We find that in the face of compromised cholinergic input to the visual cortex, the rats’ ability to learn to perform fine discriminations is impaired, whereas their ability to perform discriminations remains unaffected.These results suggest that acetylcholine serves the role of facilitating plastic changes in the sensory cortices that are needed for an animal to refine their sensitivity to the temporal characteristics of relevant stimuli.

  13. The role of visual cortex acetylcholine in learning to discriminate temporally modulated visual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minces, V H; Alexander, A S; Datlow, M; Alfonso, S I; Chiba, A A

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain innervate discrete regions of the cortical mantle, bestowing the cholinergic system with the potential to dynamically modulate sub-regions of the cortex according to behavioral demands. Cortical cholinergic activity has been shown to facilitate learning and modulate attention. Experiments addressing these issues have primarily focused on widespread cholinergic depletions, extending to areas involved in general cognitive processes and sleep cycle regulation, making a definitive interpretation of the behavioral role of cholinergic projections difficult. Furthermore, a review of the electrophysiological literature suggests that cholinergic modulation is particularly important in representing the fine temporal details of stimuli, an issue rarely addressed in behavioral experimentation. The goal of this work is to understand the role of cholinergic projections, specific to the sensory cortices, in learning to discriminate fine differences in the temporal structure of stimuli. A novel visual Go/No-Go task was developed to assess the ability of rats to learn to discriminate fine differences in the temporal structure of visual stimuli (lights flashing at various frequencies). The cholinergic contribution to this task was examined by selective reduction of acetylcholine projections to visual cortex (VCx) (using 192 IgG-saporin), either before or after discrimination training. We find that in the face of compromised cholinergic input to the VCx, the rats' ability to learn to perform fine discriminations is impaired, whereas their ability to perform previously learned discriminations remains unaffected. These results suggest that acetylcholine serves the role of facilitating plastic changes in the sensory cortices that are necessary for an animal to refine its sensitivity to the temporal characteristics of relevant stimuli. PMID:23519084

  14. Carbon monoxide-induced delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and change in acetylcholine concentration in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabeshima, T.; Katoh, A.; Ishimaru, H.; Yoneda, Y.; Ogita, K.; Murase, K.; Ohtsuka, H.; Inari, K.; Fukuta, T.; Kameyama, T. (Meijo Univ., Nagoya (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the interrelationship of delayed amnesia, delayed neuronal death and changes in acetylcholine concentration induced by carbon monoxide (CO)-exposure in mice. In the test for retention of the passive avoidance task, amnesia was observed 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure when the mice were exposed to CO 1 day after training; in the case when the mice were exposed to CO 5 and 7 days before training, amnesia was also observed in a retention test given 1 day after training. The number of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was lower than that of the control 3, 5 and 7 days after CO-exposure. But the neurodegeneration in the parietal cortex, area 1, was not observed until 7 days after CO-exposure. The findings indicated that the amnesia and the neuronal death were produced after a delay when the mice were exposed to CO. In addition, the delayed amnesia was closely related to the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Moreover, (3H)glutamate and (3H)glycine binding sites did not change after CO-exposure but, 7 days after CO-exposure, the concentration of acetylcholine and the binding of (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in the frontal cortex and the striatum were found to have significantly changed, but those in the hippocampus did not show significant change. Therefore, we suggest that delayed amnesia induced by CO-exposure may result from delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 subfield and dysfunction in the acetylcholinergic neurons, in the frontal cortex, the striatum and/or the hippocampus.

  15. Propoxur-induced acetylcholine esterase inhibition and impairment of cognitive function: attenuation by Withania somnifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, C S; Kumar, V; Suke, S G; Ahmed, R S; Mediratta, P K; Banerjee, B D

    2010-04-01

    Propoxur (2-isopropoxyphenyl N-methylcarbamate) is widely used as an acaricide in agriculture and public health programs. Studies have shown that sub-chronic exposure to propoxur can cause oxidative stress and immuno-suppression in rats. Carbamates are also known to exhibit inhibitory effect on cholinesterase activity, which is directly related to their cholinergic effects. In the present study, the effect of Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), a widely used herbal drug possessing anti-stress and immunomodulatory properties was studied on propoxur-induced acetylcholine esterase inhibition and impairment of cognitive function in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups. Group I was treated with olive oil and served as control. Group II was administered orally with propoxur (10 mg/kg b.wt.) in olive oil, group III received a combination of propoxur (10 mg/kg b.wt.) and W. somnifera (100 mg/kg b.wt.) suspension and group IV W. somnifera (100 mg/kg b.wt.) only. All animals were treated for 30 days. Cognitive behaviour was assessed by transfer latency using elevated plus maze. Blood and brain acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity was also assessed. Oral administration of propoxur (10 mg/kg b.wt.) resulted in a significant reduction of brain and blood AChE activity. A significant prolongation of the acquisition as well as retention transfer latency was observed in propoxur-treated rats. Oral treatment of W. somnifera exerts protective effect and attenuates AChE inhibition and cognitive impairment caused by sub-chronic exposure to propoxur.

  16. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crittenden Elizabeth L

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. Results The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusions Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion.

  17. Acetylcholine modulates human working memory and subsequent familiarity based recognition via alpha oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart, Cindy; Woźniak-Kwaśniewska, Agata; Herweg, Nora A; Fuentemilla, Lluis; Bunzeck, Nico

    2016-08-15

    Working memory (WM) can be defined as the ability to maintain and process physically absent information for a short period of time. This vital cognitive function has been related to cholinergic neuromodulation and, in independent work, to theta (4-8Hz) and alpha (9-14Hz) band oscillations. However, the relationship between both aspects remains unclear. To fill this apparent gap, we used electroencephalography (EEG) and a within-subject design in healthy humans who either received the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galantamine (8mg) or a placebo before they performed a Sternberg WM paradigm. Here, sequences of sample images were memorized for a delay of 5s in three different load conditions (two, four or six items). On the next day, long-term memory (LTM) for the images was tested according to a remember/know paradigm. As a main finding, we can show that both theta and alpha oscillations scale during WM maintenance as a function of WM load; this resembles the typical performance decrease. Importantly, cholinergic stimulation via galantamine administration slowed down retrieval speed during WM and reduced associated alpha but not theta power, suggesting a functional relationship between alpha oscillations and WM performance. At LTM, this pattern was accompanied by impaired familiarity based recognition. These findings show that stimulating the healthy cholinergic system impairs WM and subsequent recognition, which is in line with the notion of a quadratic relationship between acetylcholine levels and cognitive functions. Moreover, our data provide empirical evidence for a specific role of alpha oscillations in acetylcholine dependent WM and associated LTM formation. PMID:27222217

  18. Tramadol state-dependent memory: involvement of dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari-Sabet, Majid; Jafari-Sabet, Ali-Reza; Dizaji-Ghadim, Ali

    2016-08-01

    The effects on tramadol state-dependent memory of bilateral intradorsal hippocampal (intra-CA1) injections of physostigmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, and atropine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, were examined in adult male NMRI mice. A single-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. Post-training intra-CA1 administration of an atypical μ-opioid receptor agonist, tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse), dose dependently impaired memory retention. Pretest injection of tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under the influence of post-training tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). A pretest intra-CA1 injection of physostigmine (1 μg/mouse) reversed the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). Moreover, pretest administration of physostigmine (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) with an ineffective dose of tramadol (0.25 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) also significantly restored retrieval. Pretest administration of physostigmine (0.25, 0.5, and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. A pretest intra-CA1 injection of the atropine (1 and 2 μg/mouse) 5 min before the administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) dose dependently inhibited tramadol state-dependent memory. Pretest administration of atropine (0.5, 1, and 2 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. It can be concluded that dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor mechanisms play an important role in the modulation of tramadol state-dependent memory.

  19. Escherichia coli Protein Expression System for Acetylcholine Binding Proteins (AChBPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Abraham

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR are ligand gated ion channels, identified as therapeutic targets for a range of human diseases. Drug design for nAChR related disorders is increasingly using structure-based approaches. Many of these structural insights for therapeutic lead development have been obtained from co-crystal structures of nAChR agonists and antagonists with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP. AChBP is a water soluble, structural and functional homolog of the extracellular, ligand-binding domain of nAChRs. Currently, AChBPs are recombinantly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems for structural and biophysical studies. Here, we report the establishment of an Escherichia coli (E. coli expression system that significantly reduces the cost and time of production compared to the existing expression systems. E. coli can efficiently express unglycosylated AChBP for crystallography and makes the expression of isotopically labelled forms feasible for NMR. We used a pHUE vector containing an N-terminal His-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein to facilitate AChBP expression in the soluble fractions, and thus avoid the need to recover protein from inclusion bodies. The purified protein yield obtained from the E. coli expression system is comparable to that obtained from existing AChBP expression systems. E. coli expressed AChBP bound nAChR agonists and antagonists with affinities matching those previously reported. Thus, the E. coli expression system significantly simplifies the expression and purification of functional AChBP for structural and biophysical studies.

  20. Bispyridinium Compounds Inhibit Both Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Human Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Avi; Strom, Bjorn Oddvar; Turner, Simon R; Timperley, Christopher M; Bird, Michael; Green, A Christopher; Chad, John E; Worek, Franz; Tattersall, John E H

    2015-01-01

    Standard treatment of poisoning by organophosphorus anticholinesterases uses atropine to reduce the muscarinic effects of acetylcholine accumulation and oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase (the effectiveness of which depends on the specific anticholinesterase), but does not directly address the nicotinic effects of poisoning. Bispyridinium molecules which act as noncompetitive antagonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been identified as promising compounds and one has been shown to improve survival following organophosphorus poisoning in guinea-pigs. Here, we have investigated the structural requirements for antagonism and compared inhibitory potency of these compounds at muscle and neuronal nicotinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase. A series of compounds was synthesised, in which the length of the polymethylene linker between the two pyridinium moieties was increased sequentially from one to ten carbon atoms. Their effects on nicotinic receptor-mediated calcium responses were tested in muscle-derived (CN21) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cells. Their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity was tested using human erythrocyte ghosts. In both cell lines, the nicotinic response was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory potency of the compounds increased with greater linker length between the two pyridinium moieties, as did their inhibitory potency for human acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that bispyridinium compounds inhibit both neuronal and muscle nicotinic receptors and that their potency depends on the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the two pyridinium moieties. Knowledge of structure-activity relationships will aid the optimisation of molecular structures for therapeutic use against the nicotinic effects of organophosphorus poisoning.

  1. Bispyridinium Compounds Inhibit Both Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Human Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avi Ring

    Full Text Available Standard treatment of poisoning by organophosphorus anticholinesterases uses atropine to reduce the muscarinic effects of acetylcholine accumulation and oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase (the effectiveness of which depends on the specific anticholinesterase, but does not directly address the nicotinic effects of poisoning. Bispyridinium molecules which act as noncompetitive antagonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been identified as promising compounds and one has been shown to improve survival following organophosphorus poisoning in guinea-pigs. Here, we have investigated the structural requirements for antagonism and compared inhibitory potency of these compounds at muscle and neuronal nicotinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase. A series of compounds was synthesised, in which the length of the polymethylene linker between the two pyridinium moieties was increased sequentially from one to ten carbon atoms. Their effects on nicotinic receptor-mediated calcium responses were tested in muscle-derived (CN21 and neuronal (SH-SY5Y cells. Their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity was tested using human erythrocyte ghosts. In both cell lines, the nicotinic response was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory potency of the compounds increased with greater linker length between the two pyridinium moieties, as did their inhibitory potency for human acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that bispyridinium compounds inhibit both neuronal and muscle nicotinic receptors and that their potency depends on the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the two pyridinium moieties. Knowledge of structure-activity relationships will aid the optimisation of molecular structures for therapeutic use against the nicotinic effects of organophosphorus poisoning.

  2. Molecular-Dynamics Simulations of ELIC a Prokaryotic Homologue of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL; Ivanov, Ivaylo N [ORNL; Wang, Hailong [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine; McCammon, Jonathan [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The ligand-gated ion channel from Erwinia chrysanthemi (ELIC) is a prokaryotic homolog of the eukaryotic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) that responds to the binding of neurotransmitter acetylcholine and mediates fast signal transmission. ELIC is similar to the nAChR in its primary sequence and overall subunit organization, but despite their structural similarity, it is not clear whether these two ligand-gated ion channels operate in a similar manner. Further, it is not known to what extent mechanistic insights gleaned from the ELIC structure translate to eukaryotic counterparts such as the nAChR. Here we use molecular-dynamics simulations to probe the conformational dynamics and hydration of the transmembrane pore of ELIC. The results are compared with those from our previous simulation of the human ?7 nAChR. Overall, ELIC displays increased stability compared to the nAChR, whereas the two proteins exhibit remarkable similarity in their global motion and flexibility patterns. The majority of the increased stability of ELIC does not stem from the deficiency of the models used in the simulations, and but rather seems to have a structural basis. Slightly altered dynamical correlation features are also observed among several loops within the membrane region. In sharp contrast to the nAChR, ELIC is completely dehydrated from the pore center to the extracellular end throughout the simulation. Finally, the simulation of an ELIC mutant substantiates the important role of F246 on the stability, hydration and possibly function of the ELIC channel.

  3. Comparison of the activation kinetics of the M3 acetylcholine receptor and a constitutively active mutant receptor in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Nuber, Susanne; Zabel, Ulrike; Ziegler, Nicole; Winkler, Christiane; Hein, Peter; Berlot, Catherine H; Bünemann, Moritz; Lohse, Martin J

    2012-08-01

    Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors is the first step of the signaling cascade triggered by binding of an agonist. Here we compare the activation kinetics of the G(q)-coupled M(3) acetylcholine receptor (M(3)-AChR) with that of a constitutively active mutant receptor (M(3)-AChR-N514Y) using M(3)-AChR constructs that report receptor activation by changes in the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal. We observed a leftward shift in the concentration-dependent FRET response for acetylcholine and carbachol with M(3)-AChR-N514Y. Consistent with this result, at submaximal agonist concentrations, the activation kinetics of M(3)-AChR-N514Y were significantly faster, whereas at maximal agonist concentrations the kinetics of receptor activation were identical. Receptor deactivation was significantly faster with carbachol than with acetylcholine and was significantly delayed by the N514Y mutation. Receptor-G-protein interaction was measured by FRET between M(3)-AChR-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-Gγ(2). Agonist-induced receptor-G-protein coupling was of a time scale similar to that of receptor activation. As observed for receptor deactivation, receptor-G-protein dissociation was slower for acetylcholine than that for carbachol. Acetylcholine-stimulated increases in receptor-G-protein coupling of M(3)-AChR-N514Y reached only 12% of that of M(3)-AChR and thus cannot be kinetically analyzed. G-protein activation was measured using YFP-tagged Gα(q) and CFP-tagged Gγ(2). Activation of G(q) was significantly slower than receptor activation and indistinguishable for the two agonists. However, G(q) deactivation was significantly prolonged for acetylcholine compared with that for carbachol. Consistent with decreased agonist-stimulated coupling to G(q), agonist-stimulated G(q) activation by M(3)-AChR-N514Y was not detected. Taken together, these results indicate that the N514Y mutation produces constitutive activation of M(3

  4. Supplementing female rats with DHA-lysophosphatidylcholine increases docosahexaenoic acid and acetylcholine contents in the brain and improves the memory and learning capabilities of the pups.

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas, I.; Zañartu, P.; Nieto, S.; Sanhueza, J.; Morgado, N.; A. Valenzuela

    2010-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is supplied to the foetus and newborn through the mother from their own reserves and their diet. No consensus about the best form to supplement DHA has been established. We propose that DHAcontaining lysophosphatidylcholine (DHA-LPC), obtained from DHA-rich eggs may be a suitable form of DHA and choline (the precursor of acetylcholine) supplementation. We evaluated the effectiveness of DHA-LPC to increase DHA and acetylcholine concentration in the brain of pups born...

  5. Investigation of the presence and antinociceptive function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristine B.; Krogh-Jensen, Karen; Pickering, Darryl S;

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the cholinergic system in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) with focus on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes M1 and M4. The protein sequences for the subtypes m 1–5 of the naked mole-rat were compared to that of the house mouse (Mus...... musculus) using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST). The presence and function of M1 and M4 was investigated in vivo, using the formalin test with the muscarinic receptor agonists xanomeline and VU0152100. Spinal cord tissue from the naked mole-rat was used for receptor saturation binding studies...... with [3H]-N-methylscopolamine. The BLAST test revealed 95 % protein sequence homology showing the naked mole-rat to have the genetic potential to express all five muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. A significant reduction in pain behavior was demonstrated after administration of 8.4 mg...

  6. A subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors plays a critical role in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeon, Jongrye; Nielsen, Ditte Dencker; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M(1)-M(5) mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M(4) mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M(4) mAChRs are coexpres......Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M(1)-M(5) mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M(4) mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M(4) m...

  7. Secreted Isoform of Human Lynx1 (SLURP-2): Spatial Structure and Pharmacology of Interactions with Different Types of Acetylcholine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, E. N.; Shulepko, M. A.; Shenkarev, Z. O.; Bychkov, M. L.; Paramonov, A. S.; Chugunov, A. O.; Kulbatskii, D. S.; Arvaniti, M.; Dolejsi, Eva; Schaer, T.; Arseniev, A. S.; Efremov, R. G.; Thomsen, M. S.; Dolezal, V.; Bertrand, D.; Dolgikh, D. A.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Human-secreted Ly-6/uPAR-related protein-2 (SLURP-2) regulates the growth and differentiation of epithelial cells. Previously, the auto/paracrine activity of SLURP-2 was considered to be mediated via its interaction with the α3β2 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here, we describe the structure and pharmacology of a recombinant analogue of SLURP-2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a ‘three-finger’ fold of SLURP-2 with a conserved β-structural core and three protruding loops. Affinity purification using cortical extracts revealed that SLURP-2 could interact with the α3, α4, α5, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits, revealing its broader pharmacological profile. SLURP-2 inhibits acetylcholine-evoked currents at α4β2 and α3β2-nAChRs (IC50 ~0.17 and >3 μM, respectively) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, at α7-nAChRs, SLURP-2 significantly enhances acetylcholine-evoked currents at concentrations <1 μM but induces inhibition at higher concentrations. SLURP-2 allosterically interacts with human M1 and M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) that are overexpressed in CHO cells. SLURP-2 was found to promote the proliferation of human oral keratinocytes via interactions with α3β2-nAChRs, while it inhibited cell growth via α7-nAChRs. SLURP-2/mAChRs interactions are also probably involved in the control of keratinocyte growth. Computer modeling revealed possible SLURP-2 binding to the ‘classical’ orthosteric agonist/antagonist binding sites at α7 and α3β2-nAChRs. PMID:27485575

  8. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor down-regulation limits the extent of inhibition of cell cycle progression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Detjen, K.; Yang, J; Logsdon, C D

    1995-01-01

    Cellular desensitization is believed to be important for growth control but direct evidence is lacking. In the current study we compared effects of wild-type and down-regulation-resistant mutant m3 muscarinic receptors on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cell desensitization, proliferation, and transformation. We found that down-regulation of m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was the principal mechanism of desensitization of receptor-activated inositol phosphate phospholipid hydrolysis in t...

  9. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Agonists Attenuate Septic Acute Kidney Injury in Mice by Suppressing Inflammation and Proteasome Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Prodyot K.; Yeboah, Michael M.; Oonagh Dowling; Xiangying Xue; Powell, Saul R.; Yousef Al-Abed; Metz, Christine N

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of acute kidney injury (AKI). Septic patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI) are at increased risk of death. To date there is no effective treatment for AKI or septic AKI. Based on their anti-inflammatory properties, we examined the effects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists on renal damage using a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced AKI where localized LPS promotes inflammation-mediated kidney damage. Administration of nicotine...

  10. Microvascular involvement in systemic sclerosis: laser Doppler evaluation of reactivity to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside by iontophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Civita, L; Rossi, M.; Vagheggini, G; F. Storino; Credidio, L; Pasero, G; C. Giusti(INFN, Pavia); Ferri, C

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the skin vasodilatory response to iontophoretically applied acetylcholine (Ach), an endothelium dependent vasodilator, and to sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an endothelium independent vasodilator, in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc).
METHODS—Eleven SSc patients were preliminarily studied (10 females, mean age 40.5; mean disease duration 6.5 years), and 16 age and sex matched control subjects. By means of laser Doppler flowmetry skin blood flow was evaluated at thi...

  11. Whole-Retina Reduced Electrophysiological Activity in Mice Bearing Retina-Specific Deletion of Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake Bedore

    Full Text Available Despite rigorous characterization of the role of acetylcholine in retinal development, long-term effects of its absence as a neurotransmitter are unknown. One of the unanswered questions is how acetylcholine contributes to the functional capacity of mature retinal circuits. The current study investigates the effects of disrupting cholinergic signalling in mice, through deletion of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT in the developing retina, pigmented epithelium, optic nerve and optic stalk, on electrophysiology and structure of the mature retina.A combination of electroretinography, optical coherence tomography imaging and histological evaluation assessed retinal integrity in mice bearing retina- targeted (embryonic day 12.5 deletion of VAChT (VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox and littermate controls at 5 and 12 months of age. VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice did not show any gross changes in nuclear layer cellularity or synaptic layer thickness. However, VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice showed reduced electrophysiological response of the retina to light stimulus under scotopic conditions at 5 and 12 months of age, including reduced a-wave, b-wave, and oscillatory potential (OP amplitudes and decreased OP peak power and total energy. Reduced a-wave amplitude was proportional to the reduction in b-wave amplitude and not associated with altered a-wave 10%-90% rise time or inner and outer segment thicknesses.This study used a novel genetic model in the first examination of function and structure of the mature mouse retina with disruption of cholinergic signalling. Reduced amplitude across the electroretinogram wave form does not suggest dysfunction in specific retinal cell types and could reflect underlying changes in the retinal and/or extraretinal microenvironment. Our findings suggest that release of acetylcholine by VAChT is essential for the normal electrophysiological response of the mature mouse retina.

  12. Role of gap junctions in acetylcholine-induced vasodilation of proximal and distal arteries of the rat mesentery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C E; Hickey, H; Sandow, S L

    2000-07-01

    We have previously shown that myoendothelial gap junctions are more prevalent in distal than in proximal arteries of the rat mesentery. In the present study we have investigated the role of gap junctions in the mechanism of action of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in these same vessels following relaxation with acetylcholine. Arteries were pre-constricted with phenylephrine and concentration response curves to acetylcholine were constructed in the presence of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10(-5) M) and indomethacin (10(-5) M) to prevent effects due to the release of nitric oxide and prostacyclins. Nitric oxide was found to have only a small role in the relaxation of the proximal vessels and was not involved in the relaxations of the distal vessels. 18 alpha-Glycyrrhetinic acid (10(-5) M), a putative gap junction uncoupler, significantly reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxations by 50% in both proximal and distal vessels. Potassium channel antagonists, tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA; 10(-3) M) and barium chloride (10(-4) M), together abolished the dilatory response in the proximal mesenteric arteries, but did not completely block responses in the distal arteries. The data suggest that gap junctions contribute significantly to the acetylcholine-induced relaxation in both proximal and distal arteries of the rat mesentery. We hypothesize that the absence of a correlation between the role of gap junctions and the incidence of myoendothelial gap junctions in these same vessels is due to significant effects of the inhibitors on gap junctions located in the smooth muscle layers of the larger vessels.

  13. Cross-regulation between colocalized nicotinic acetylcholine and 5-HT3 serotonin receptors on presynaptic nerve terminals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John J DOUGHERTY; Robert A NICHOLS

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Substantial colocalization of functionally independent a4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and 5-HT3 serotonin receptors on presynaptic terminals has been observed in brain. The present study was aimed at addressing whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and 5-HT3 serotonin receptors interact on the same presynaptic terminal, suggesting a convergence of cholinergic and serotonergic regulation.Methods: Ca2+ responses in individual, isolated nerve endings purified from rat striatum were measured using confocal imaging.Results: Application of 500 nmol/L nicotine following sustained stimulation with the highly selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist m-chlorophenylbiguanide at 100 nmol/L resulted in markedly reduced Ca2* responses (28% of control) in only those striatal nerve endings that originally responded to m-chlorophenylbiguanide. The cross-regulation developed over several minutes. Presynaptic nerve endings that had not responded to m-chlorophenylbiguanide, indicating that 5-HT3 receptors were not present, displayed typical responses to nicotine. Application of m-chlorophenylbiguanide following sustained stimulation with nicotine resulted in partially attenuated Ca2* responses (49% of control). Application of m-chlorophenylbiguanide following sustained stimulation with m-chlorophenylbiguanide also resulted in a strong attenuation of Ca2+ responses (12% of control), whereas nicotine-induced Ca2t responses following sustained stimulation with nicotine were not significantly different from control.Conclusion: These results indicate that the presynaptic Ca2+ increases evoked by either 5-HT, receptor or nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation regulate subsequent responses to 5-HT3 receptor activation, but that only 5-HT3 receptors cross-regulate subsequent nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated responses. The findings suggest a specific interaction between the two receptor systems in the same striatal nerve terminal, likely involving Ca2+-dependent

  14. Secreted Isoform of Human Lynx1 (SLURP-2): Spatial Structure and Pharmacology of Interactions with Different Types of Acetylcholine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, E. N.; Shulepko, M. A.; Shenkarev, Z. O.; Bychkov, M. L.; Paramonov, A. S.; Chugunov, A. O.; Kulbatskii, D. S.; Arvaniti, M.; Dolejsi, Eva; Schaer, T.; Arseniev, A. S.; Efremov, R. G.; Thomsen, M. S.; Dolezal, V.; Bertrand, D.; Dolgikh, D. A.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2016-08-01

    Human-secreted Ly-6/uPAR-related protein-2 (SLURP-2) regulates the growth and differentiation of epithelial cells. Previously, the auto/paracrine activity of SLURP-2 was considered to be mediated via its interaction with the α3β2 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here, we describe the structure and pharmacology of a recombinant analogue of SLURP-2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a ‘three-finger’ fold of SLURP-2 with a conserved β-structural core and three protruding loops. Affinity purification using cortical extracts revealed that SLURP-2 could interact with the α3, α4, α5, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits, revealing its broader pharmacological profile. SLURP-2 inhibits acetylcholine-evoked currents at α4β2 and α3β2-nAChRs (IC50 ~0.17 and >3 μM, respectively) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, at α7-nAChRs, SLURP-2 significantly enhances acetylcholine-evoked currents at concentrations acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) that are overexpressed in CHO cells. SLURP-2 was found to promote the proliferation of human oral keratinocytes via interactions with α3β2-nAChRs, while it inhibited cell growth via α7-nAChRs. SLURP-2/mAChRs interactions are also probably involved in the control of keratinocyte growth. Computer modeling revealed possible SLURP-2 binding to the ‘classical’ orthosteric agonist/antagonist binding sites at α7 and α3β2-nAChRs.

  15. Acetylcholine release in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system during cocaine-seeking: Conditioned and unconditioned contributions to reward and motivation

    OpenAIRE

    You, Zhi-Bing; Wang, Bin; Zitzman, Dawnya; Wise, Roy A.

    2008-01-01

    Microdialysis was used to assess the contribution to cocaine-seeking of cholinergic input to the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system in ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA acetylcholine (ACh) was elevated in animals lever-pressing for IV cocaine and in cocaine-experienced and cocaine-naïve animals passively receiving similar “yoked” injections. In cocaine-trained animals, the elevations comprised an initial (first hour) peak to about 160% of baseline and a subsequent plateau of 140% of baseline f...

  16. A first principle study on the interaction between acetylcholinesterase and acetylcholine, and also rivastigmine in alzheimer's disease case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoirunisa, V.; Rusydi, F.; Kasai, H.; Gandaryus, A. G.; Dipojono, H. K.

    2016-08-01

    The catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE) relates to the symptom progress in Alzheimer's disease. Interaction of AChE with rivastigmine (from the medicine) can reduce its catalytic activity toward acetylcholine to decelerate the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This research attempts to study the interaction between AChE and rivastigmine, and also acetylcholine (without the presence of rivastigmine) using density functional theory by simplifying the reaction occurs in the active site, which is assumed to be C2H5OH, C3N2H3(Ch3), and CH3COO-. The results suggest that AChE interacts easier with acetylcholine than with rivastigmine, which implies that the medicine does not effectively reduce the catalytic activity of AChE. At this stage, no experimental data is available to be compared with the calculation results. Nonetheless, this study has shown a good prospect to understand the AChE-substrate interaction using a first-principles calculation.

  17. Influence of Y151 F mutation in loop B on the agonist potency in insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Song; Yi-Xi Zhang; Xiang-Mei Yao; Ze-Wen Liu

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels,which mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission in insect and vertebrate nervous systems.The nAChR agonist-binding site is present at the interface of adjacent subunits and is formed by loops A-C present in α subunits together with loops D-F present in either non-α subunits or homomer-forrning α subunits.Although Y151 in loop B has been identified as important in agonist binding,various residues at the 151-site are found among vertebrate and invertebrate nAChR ot subunits,such as F151.In Xenopus oocytes expressing N1α1 or N1α1~(Y151F) plus rat β2,Y151F mutation was found to significantly change the rate of receptor desensitization and altered the pharmacological properties of acetylcholine,but not imidacloprid,including the decrease of I_(max),the increase of EC_(50)(the concentration causing 50% of the maximum response) and the fast time-constant of decay (τ_f).By comparisons of residue structure,the hydroxyl group in the side chain of Y151 was thought to be important in the interaction between N1α1/β2 nAChRs and acetylcholine,and the phenyl group to be important between N1α1/β2 nAChRs and imidacloprid.

  18. Quantitative determination of acetylcholine in microdialysis samples using liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Lehtonen, Marko; Ihalainen, Jouni; Sarajärvi, Timo; Auriola, Seppo

    2007-01-01

    A fast, simple and sensitive liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of acetylcholine in rat brain microdialysis samples. The chromatographic separation was achieved in 3 min on a reversed-phase column with isocratic conditions using a mobile phase containing 2% (v/v) of acetonitrile and 0.05% (v/v) of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). A stable isotope-labeled internal standard was included in the analysis and detection was carried out with a linear ion trap mass spectrometer using selected reaction monitoring (SRM). Analyte ionization was performed with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source without applying discharge current (atmospheric pressure spray ionization). This special ionization technique offered significant advantages over electrospray ionization for the analysis of acetylcholine with reversed-phase ion-pairing chromatography. The lower limit of quantification was 0.15 nM (1.5 fmol on-column) and linearity was maintained over the range of 0.15-73 nM, providing a concentration range that is significantly wider than that of the existing LC/MS methods. Good accuracy and precision were obtained for concentrations within the standard curve range. The method was validated and has been used extensively for the determination of acetylcholine in rat brain microdialysis samples.

  19. Quinuclidine compounds differently act as agonists of Kenyon cell nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and induced distinct effect on insect ganglionic depolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Swale, Daniel; Leray, Xavier; Benzidane, Yassine; Lebreton, Jacques; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Thany, Steeve H

    2013-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a new quinuclidine benzamide compound named LMA10203 acted as an agonist of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Its specific pharmacological profile on cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons (DUM) helped to identify alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2 receptors. In the present study, we tested its effect on cockroach Kenyon cells. We found that it induced an inward current demonstrating that it bounds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on Kenyon cells. Interestingly, LMA10203-induced currents were completely blocked by the nicotinic antagonist α-bungarotoxin. We suggested that LMA10203 effect occurred through the activation of α-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors and did not involve α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2, previously identified in DUM neurons. In addition, we have synthesized two new compounds, LMA10210 and LMA10211, and compared their effects on Kenyon cells. These compounds were members of the 3-quinuclidinyl benzamide or benzoate families. Interestingly, 1 mM LMA10210 was not able to induce an inward current on Kenyon cells compared to LMA10211. Similarly, we did not find any significant effect of LMA10210 on cockroach ganglionic depolarization, whereas these three compounds were able to induce an effect on the central nervous system of the third instar M. domestica larvae. Our data suggested that these three compounds could bind to distinct cockroach nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. PMID:23884575

  20. The subpopulation of microglia expressing functional muscarinic acetylcholine receptors expands in stroke and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannell, Maria; Meier, Maria Almut; Szulzewsky, Frank; Matyash, Vitali; Endres, Matthias; Kronenberg, Golo; Prinz, Vincent; Waiczies, Sonia; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-03-01

    Microglia undergo a process of activation in pathology which is controlled by many factors including neurotransmitters. We found that a subpopulation (11 %) of freshly isolated adult microglia respond to the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist carbachol with a Ca(2+) increase and a subpopulation of similar size (16 %) was observed by FACS analysis using an antibody against the M3 receptor subtype. The carbachol-sensitive population increased in microglia/brain macrophages isolated from tissue of mouse models for stroke (60 %) and Alzheimer's disease (25 %), but not for glioma and multiple sclerosis. Microglia cultured from adult and neonatal brain contained a carbachol-sensitive subpopulation (8 and 9 %), which was increased by treatment with interferon-γ to around 60 %. This increase was sensitive to blockers of protein synthesis and correlated with an upregulation of the M3 receptor subtype and with an increased expression of MHC-I and MHC-II. Carbachol was a chemoattractant for microglia and decreased their phagocytic activity. PMID:25523105

  1. Alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Is a Target in Pharmacology and Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Pohanka

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR is an important part of the cholinergic nerve system in the brain. Moreover, it is associated with a cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the termination of the parasympathetic nervous system. Antagonists of α7 nAChR are a wide group represented by conotoxin and bungarotoxin. Even Alzheimer’s disease drug memantine acting as an antagonist in its side pathway belongs in this group. Agonists of α7 nAChR are suitable for treatment of multiple cognitive dysfunctions such as Alzheimer’s disease or schizophrenia. Inflammation or even sepsis can be ameliorated by the agonistic acting compounds. Preparations RG3487, SEN34625/WYE-103914, SEN12333, ABT-107, Clozapine, GTS-21, CNI-1493, and AR-R17779 are representative examples of the novel compounds with affinity toward the α7 nAChR. Pharmacological, toxicological, and medicinal significance of α7 nAChR are discussed throughout this paper.

  2. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Archundia, Marlet; Cordomi, Arnau; Garriga, Pere; Perez, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS). Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand. PMID:22500107

  3. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew K; Grauso, Marta; Sattelle, David B

    2005-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission in the insect nervous system and are targets of widely selling insecticides. We have identified the nAChR gene family from the genome of the malaria mosquito vector, Anopheles gambiae, to be the second complete insect nAChR gene family described following that of Drosophila melanogaster. Like Drosophila, Anopheles possesses 10 nAChR subunits with orthologous relationships evident between the two insects. Interestingly, the Anopheles orthologues of Dbeta2 and Dbeta3 possess the vicinal cysteines that define alpha subunits. As with Dalpha4 and Dalpha6, the Anopheles orthologues are alternatively spliced at equivalent exons. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis shows that RNA A-to-I editing sites conserved between Dalpha6 of Drosophila and alpha7-2 of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens, are not shared with the equivalent nAChR subunit of Anopheles. Indeed, RNA-editing sites identified in functionally significant regions of Dbeta1, Dalpha5, and Dalpha6 are not conserved in the mosquito orthologues, indicating considerable divergence of RNA molecules targeted for editing within the insect order Diptera. These findings shed further light on the diversity of nAChR subunits and may present a useful basis for the development of improved malaria control agents by enhancing our understanding of a validated mosquito insecticide target.

  4. Acetylcholine esterase activity in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herholz, Karl [University of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Clinical Neuroscience, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Impairment of cholinergic neurotransmission is a well-established fact in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but there is controversy about its relevance at the early stages of the disease and in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In vivo positron emission tomography imaging of cortical acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity as a marker of cholinergic innervation that is expressed by cholinergic axons and cholinoceptive neurons has demonstrated a reduction of this enzyme activity in manifest AD. The technique is also useful to measure the inhibition of cerebral AChE induced by cholinesterase inhibitors for treatment of dementia symptoms. A reduction of cortical AchE activity was found consistently in all studies of AD and in few cases of MCI who later concerted to AD. The in vivo findings in MCI and very mild AD are still preliminary, and studies seem to suggest that cholinergic innervation and AChE as the main degrading enzyme are both reduced, which might result in partial compensation of their effect. (orig.)

  5. Captopril augments acetylcholine-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions in vitro via kinin-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Naman; Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors therapy is aassociated with bothersome dry cough as an adverse effect. The mechanisms underlying this adverse effect are not clear. Therefore, influence of captopril (an ACE inhibitor) on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions was investigated. Further, the mechanisms underlying the captopril-induced changes were also explored. In vitro contractions of rat bronchial smooth muscle to cumulative concentrations of ACh were recorded before and after exposure to captopril. Further, the involvement of kinin and inositol triphosphate (IP₃) pathways for captopril-induced alterations were explored. ACh produced concentration-dependent (5-500 µM) increase in bronchial smooth muscle contractions. Pre-treatment with captopril augmented the ACh-induced contractions at each concentration significantly. Pre-treatment with aprotinin (kinin synthesis inhibitor) or heparin (inositol triphosphate, IP₃-inhibitor), blocked the captopril-induced augmentation of bronchial smooth muscle contractions evoked by ACh. Further, captopril-induced augmentation was absent in calcium-free medium. These results suggest that captopril sensitizes bronchial smooth muscles to ACh-induced contractions. This sensitization may be responsible for dry cough associated with captopril therapy. PMID:27468462

  6. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlet Martinez-Archundia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS. Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand.

  7. R-spondin 2 promotes acetylcholine receptor clustering at the neuromuscular junction via Lgr5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Fukudome, Takayasu; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Okuno, Tatsuya; Yoshimura, Toshiro; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Sobue, Gen; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    At the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering is mediated by spinal motor neuron (SMN)-derived agrin and its receptors on the muscle, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) and muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Additionally, AChR clustering is mediated by the components of the Wnt pathway. Laser capture microdissection of SMNs revealed that a secreted activator of Wnt signaling, R-spondin 2 (Rspo2), is highly expressed in SMNs. We found that Rspo2 is enriched at the NMJ, and that Rspo2 induces MuSK phosphorylation and AChR clustering. Rspo2 requires Wnt ligands, but not agrin, for promoting AChR clustering in cultured myotubes. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5), an Rspo2 receptor, is also accumulated at the NMJ, and is associated with MuSK via LRP4. Lgr5 is required for Rspo2-mediated AChR clustering in myotubes. In Rspo2-knockout mice, the number and density of AChRs at the NMJ are reduced. The Rspo2-knockout diaphragm has an altered ultrastructure with widened synaptic clefts and sparse synaptic vesicles. Frequency of miniature endplate currents is markedly reduced in Rspo2-knockout mice. To conclude, we demonstrate that Rspo2 and its receptor Lgr5 are Wnt-dependent and agrin-independent regulators of AChR clustering at the NMJ. PMID:27328992

  8. Mean field model of acetylcholine mediated dynamics in the thalamocortical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearwater, J M; Rennie, C J; Robinson, P A

    2008-12-01

    A recent continuum model of the large scale electrical activity of the thalamocortical system is generalized to include cholinergic modulation. The model is examined analytically and numerically to determine the effect of acetylcholine (ACh) on its steady states, linear stability, spectrum, and temporal responses. Changing the ACh concentration moves the system between zones of one, three, and five steady states, showing that neuromodulation of synaptic strength is a possible mechanism by which multiple steady states emerge in the brain. The lowest firing rate steady state is always stable, and subsequent fixed points alternate between stable and unstable. Increasing ACh concentration changes the form of the spectrum. Increasing the tonic level of ACh concentration increases the magnitudes of the N100 and P200 in the evoked response potential (ERP), without changing the timing of these peaks. Driving the system with a pulse of cholinergic activity results in a transient increase in the firing rate of cortical neurons that lasts over 10s. Step-like increases in cortical ACh concentration cause increases in the firing rate of cortical neurons, with rapid responses due to fast acting nicotinic receptors and slower responses due to muscarinic receptor suppression of intracortical connections.

  9. Expression of somatostatin receptor genes and acetylcholine receptor development in rat skeletal muscle during postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, M; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1998-05-01

    Our laboratory reported previously that somatostatin (SST) is transiently expressed in rat motoneurons during the first 14 days after birth. We investigated the possibility that the SST receptor (SSTR) is expressed in skeletal muscle. We found that two of the five subtypes of SSTR (SSTR3 and SSTR4) are expressed in skeletal muscle with a time course that correlates with the transient expression of SST in motoneurons. In addition, SSTR2A is expressed from birth to adulthood in skeletal muscle. Both SSTR2A and SSTR4 are also expressed in L6 cells, a skeletal muscle cell line. Somatostatin acting through its receptors has been shown to stimulate tyrosine phosphatase activity in a number of different tissues. We found that several proteins (50, 65, 90, 140, 180 and 200 kDa) exhibited a reduced degree of tyrosine phosphorylation following SST treatment. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphatase activity with sodium orthovanadate increased expression of the nicotinic acetyl-choline receptor (nAChR) epsilon subunit mRNA by three fold. Somatostatin reversed the elevated epsilon mRNA following orthovanadate treatment. These findings show that SSTR is expressed in skeletal muscle and that SST acting via the SSTR regulates tyrosine phosphorylation and expression of the epsilon subunit of the AChR in the rat skeletal muscle. PMID:9852305

  10. A D-peptide ligand of nicotine acetylcholine receptors for brain-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaoli; Zhan, Changyou; Shen, Qing; Fu, Wei; Xie, Cao; Gao, Jie; Peng, Chunmei; Zheng, Ping; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomes of brain capillary endothelial cells are implicated in nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated transcytosis and act as an enzymatic barrier for the transport of peptide ligands to the brain. A D-peptide ligand of nAChRs (termed (D)CDX), which binds to nAChRs with an IC50 value of 84.5 nM, was developed by retro-inverso isomerization. (D)CDX displayed exceptional stability in lysosomal homogenate and serum, and demonstrated significantly higher transcytosis efficiency in an in vitro blood-brain barrier monolayer compared with the parent L-peptide. When modified on liposomal surface, (D)CDX facilitated significant brain-targeted delivery of liposomes. As a result, brain-targeted delivery of (D)CDX modified liposomes enhanced therapeutic efficiency of encapsulated doxorubicin for glioblastoma. This study illustrates the importance of ligand stability in nAChRs-mediated transcytosis, and paves the way for developing stable brain-targeted entities.

  11. Boosting visual cortex function and plasticity with acetylcholine to enhance visual perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Il eKang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The cholinergic system is a potent neuromodulatory system that plays critical roles in cortical plasticity, attention and learning. In this review, we propose that the cellular effects of acetylcholine in the primary visual cortex during the processing of visual inputs might induce perceptual learning; i.e., long-term changes in visual perception. Specifically, the pairing of cholinergic activation with visual stimulation increases the signal-to-noise ratio, cue detection ability and long-term facilitation in the primary visual cortex. This cholinergic enhancement would increasesthe strength of thalamocortical afferents to facilitate the treatment of a novel stimulus while decreasing the cortico-cortical signaling to reduce recurrent or top-down modulation. This balance would be mediated by different cholinergic receptor subtypes that are located on both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons of the different cortical layers. The mechanisms of cholinergic enhancement are closely linked to attentional processes, long-term potentiation and modulation of the excitatory/inhibitory balance. Recently, it was found that boosting this system during visual training robustly enhances sensory perception in a long-term manner. Our hypothesis is that repetitive pairing of cholinergic and sensory stimulation over a long period of time induces long-term changes in the processing of trained stimuli that might improve perceptual ability. Various non-invasive approaches to the activation of the cholinergic neurons have strong potential to improve visual perception.

  12. Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: Neuroplastic Changes underlying Alcohol and Nicotine Addictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Anne Feduccia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Addictive drugs can activate systems involved in normal reward-related learning, creating long-lasting memories of the drug’s reinforcing effects and the environmental cues surrounding the experience. These memories significantly contribute to the maintenance of compulsive drug use as well as cue-induced relapse which can occur even after long periods of abstinence. Synaptic plasticity is thought to be a prominent molecular mechanism underlying drug-induced learning and memories. Ethanol and nicotine are both widely abused drugs that share a common molecular target in the brain, the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. The nAChRs are ligand-gated ion channels that are vastly distributed throughout the brain and play a key role in synaptic neurotransmission. In this review, we will delineate the role of nAChRs in the development of ethanol and nicotine addiction. We will characterize both ethanol and nicotine’s effects on nAChR-mediated synaptic transmission and plasticity in several key brain areas that are important for addiction. Finally, we will discuss some of the behavioral outcomes of drug-induced synaptic plasticity in animal models. An understanding of the molecular and cellular changes that occur following administration of ethanol and nicotine will lead to better therapeutic strategies.

  13. Studies of two naturally occurring compounds which effect release of acetylcholine from synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two naturally occurring compounds which effect the release of neurotransmitter from synaptosomes have been purified to apparent homogeneity. Iotrochotin (IOT) isolated from wound exudate of the Caribbean purple bleeder sponge promotes release in a manner that is independent of the extracellular Ca2+ ion concentration. Leptinotarsin (LPT-d), a protein taken from hemolymph of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, stimulates Ca2+-dependent release. IOT is slightly acidic and has a molecular weight of approximately 18 kD. [3H]acetylcholine which has been introduced into synaptosomes as [3H]choline can be released by IOT. The toxin releasable pool of labelled neurotransmitter is not depleted by depolarization of the synaptosomes with high potassium, and therefore seems to be primarily extravesicular. LPT-d is a larger protein (molecular weight = 45 kD) than IOT, and seems to effect primarily vesicular release by opening at least one type of presynaptic Ca2+ channel. The facilitatory effects of the toxin on synaptosomal release can be inhibited by inorganic Ca2+ channel antagonists, but are not generally affected by organic antagonists

  14. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supavilai, P.; Karobath, M.

    1985-02-04

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with /sup 3/H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 ..mu..M. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table.

  15. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with 3H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 μM. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table

  16. Elemental maps in human allantochorial placental vessels cells: 1. High K + and acetylcholine effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelet-Habchi, C.; Barberet, Ph.; Dutta, R. K.; Guiet-Bara, A.; Bara, M.; Moretto, Ph.

    2003-09-01

    Regulation of vascular tone in the fetal extracorporeal circulation most likely depends on circulating hormones, local paracrine mechanisms and changes in membrane potential of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and of vascular endothelial cells (VECs). The membrane potential is a function of the physiological activities of ionic channels (particularly, K + and Ca 2+ channels in these cells). These channels regulate the ionic distribution into these cells. Micro-particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis was applied to determine the ionic composition of VSMC and of VEC in the placental human allantochorial vessels in a physiological survival medium (Hanks' solution) modified by the addition of acetylcholine (ACh: which opens the calcium-sensitive K + channels, K Ca) and of high concentration of K + (which blocks the voltage-sensitive K + channels, K df). In VSMC (media layer), the addition of ACh induced no modification of the Na, K, Cl, P, S, Mg and Ca concentrations and high K + medium increased significantly the Cl and K concentrations, the other ion concentrations remaining constant. In endothelium (VEC), ACh addition implicated a significant increase of Na and K concentration, and high K + medium, a significant increase in Cl and K concentration. These results indicated the importance of K df, K Ca and K ATP channels in the regulation of K + intracellular distribution in VSMC and VEC and the possible intervention of a Na-K-2Cl cotransport and corroborated the previous electrophysiological data.

  17. Elemental maps in human allantochorial placental vessels cells: 1. High K+ and acetylcholine effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulation of vascular tone in the fetal extracorporeal circulation most likely depends on circulating hormones, local paracrine mechanisms and changes in membrane potential of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and of vascular endothelial cells (VECs). The membrane potential is a function of the physiological activities of ionic channels (particularly, K+ and Ca2+ channels in these cells). These channels regulate the ionic distribution into these cells. Micro-particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis was applied to determine the ionic composition of VSMC and of VEC in the placental human allantochorial vessels in a physiological survival medium (Hanks' solution) modified by the addition of acetylcholine (ACh: which opens the calcium-sensitive K+ channels, KCa) and of high concentration of K+ (which blocks the voltage-sensitive K+ channels, Kdf). In VSMC (media layer), the addition of ACh induced no modification of the Na, K, Cl, P, S, Mg and Ca concentrations and high K+ medium increased significantly the Cl and K concentrations, the other ion concentrations remaining constant. In endothelium (VEC), ACh addition implicated a significant increase of Na and K concentration, and high K+ medium, a significant increase in Cl and K concentration. These results indicated the importance of Kdf, KCa and KATP channels in the regulation of K+ intracellular distribution in VSMC and VEC and the possible intervention of a Na-K-2Cl cotransport and corroborated the previous electrophysiological data

  18. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α4 Subunit Gene Variation Associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xuezhu; XU Yong; LI Qianqian; LIU Pozi; YANG Yuan; ZHANG Fuquan; GUO Tianyou; YANG Chuang; GUO Lanting

    2009-01-01

    Previous pharmacological, human genetics, and animal models have implicated the nicotinic ace-tylcholine receptor a4 subunit (CHRNA4) gene in the pathogenesis of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The objective of this study is to examine the genetic association between single nucleotide poly-morphisms in the CHRNA4 gene (rs2273502, rs1044396, rs1044397, and rs3827020 loci) and ADHD. Both case-control and family-based designs are used. Children aged 6 to 16 years were interviewed and as-sessed with the children behavior checklist and the revised conner' parent rating scale to identify probands. No significant differences in the frequency distribution of genotypes or alleles were found between the case and control groups. However, further haplotype analyses showed the CCGG haplotype on dsk for ADHD in 164 case-control samples and the standard transmission disequilibrium test analyses suggest that the allele C of rs2273502 was over-transferred in 98 ADHD parent-offspring tdos. These findings suggest that the CHRNA4 gene may play a role in the pathogenesis of ADHD.

  19. Different patterns of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit transcription in human thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Roxana; Sabater, Lidia; Tolosa, Eva; Sospedra, Mireia; Ferrer-Francesch, Xavier; Coll, Jaume; Foz, Marius; Melms, Arthur; Pujol-Borrell, Ricardo

    2004-04-01

    Clinical observations suggest that the thymus is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis (MG), but questions such as the level and location of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunit expression that are fundamental to postulate any pathogenic mechanism, remain controversial. We have re-examined this question by combining calibrated RT-PCR and real-time PCR to study nicotinic AChR subunit mRNA expression in a panel of normal and myasthenic thymi. The results suggest that the expression of the different AChR subunits follows three distinct patterns: constitutive for, neonatal for gamma and individually variable for alpha1, beta1 and delta. Experiments using confocal laser microdissection suggest that AChR is mainly expressed in the medullary compartment of the thymus but there is not a clear compartmentalization of subunit expression. The different patterns of subunit expression may influence decisively the level of central tolerance to the subunits and explain the focusing of the T cell response to the alpha and gamma subunits. PMID:15020075

  20. Methanol extract of Tephrosia vogelii leaves potentiates the contractile action of acetylcholine on isolated rabbit jejunum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tavershima Dzenda; Joseph Olusegun Ayo; Alexander Babatunde Adelaiye; Ambrose Osemattah Adaudi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the modulating role of methanol extract of Tephrosia vogelii leaves on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced contraction of isolated rabbit jejunum. Methods: Rabbit jejunum segment was removed and placed in an organ bath containing Tyrode’s solution, and its contractions were recorded isometrically. Results: ACh (2.0 × 10-10 g/mL) and the extract (2.0 × 10-4 g/mL) individually increased the frequency of contraction (mean ± SEM) of the isolated smooth muscle tissue by 47.6% ± 9.5%and 77.8% ± 66.5%, respectively. When ACh and the extract were combined, the frequency of contraction of the tissue was increased by 222.2% ± 25.9%, representing a 366.7% increase (P < 0.001) over the effect of ACh alone. Similarly, ACh (2.0 × 10-9 g/mL) and the extract individually increased significantly (P < 0.001) the amplitude of contraction of the tissue by 685.7% ± 61.1% and 455.2% ± 38.1%, respectively. When ACh and the extract were combined, the amplitude of contraction of the tissue rose by 1263.8% ± 69.0%, representing 84.3% increase over the effect of ACh alone. Conclusions: The findings demonstrate that methanol extract of Tephrosia vogelii leaves potentiates the contractile effect of ACh on intestinal smooth muscle, supporting the traditional claim that the plant is purgative.

  1. Medial prefrontal cortex acetylcholine injection-induced hypotension: the role of hindlimb vasodilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, G. E.; Lewis, S. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Correa, F. M.

    2000-01-01

    The injection of acetylcholine (ACh) into the cingulate region of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) causes a marked fall in arterial blood pressure which is not accompanied by changes in heart rate. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the hemodynamic basis for this stimulus-induced hypotension in Sprague-Dawley rats. The study was designed to determine whether a change in the vascular resistance of hindlimb, renal or mesenteric vascular beds contributes to the fall in arterial pressure in response to ACh injection into the cingulate cortex. Miniature pulsed-Doppler flow probes were used to measure changes in regional blood flow and vascular resistance. The results indicated that the hypotensive response was largely due to a consistent and marked vasodilation in the hindlimb vascular bed. On this basis, an additional experiment was then undertaken to determine the mechanisms that contribute to hindlimb vasodilation. The effect of interrupting the autonomic innervation of one leg on the hindlimb vasodilator response was tested. Unilateral transection of the lumbar sympathetic chain attenuated the cingulate ACh-induced vasodilation in the ipsilateral, but not in the contralateral hindlimb. These results suggest that the hypotensive response to cingulate cortex-ACh injection is caused by skeletal muscle vasodilation mediated by a sympathetic chain-related vasodilator system.

  2. Intermolecular forces between acetylcholine and acetylcholinesterases studied with atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张英鸽; 白春礼; 王琛; 赵德禄; 苏明; 林璋; 田芳

    1999-01-01

    With the aid of atomic force microscopy, the intermolecular forces between acetyleholinesterases (AChE) and its natural substrate acetylcholine (ACh) have been studied. Through force spectrum measurement based on imaging of AChE molecules it was found that the attraction force between individual molecule pairs of ACh and AChE was (10±1) pN just before the quaternary ammonium head of ACh got into contact with the negative end of AChE and the decaying distance of attraction was (4±1) nm from the surface of ACHE. The adhesion force between individual ACh and AChE molecule pairs was (25±2) pN, which had a decaying feature of fast-slow-fast (FSF). The attraction forces between AChE and choline (Ch), the quaternary ammonium moiety and hydrolysate of ACh molecule, were similar to those between AChE and ACh. The adhesion forces between AChE and Ch were (20±2) pN, a little weaker than that between ACh and ACHE. These results indicated that AChE had a steering role for the diffusion of ACh toward it and had r

  3. Relationship between Vasodilation Effect of Anisodamine and Endothelial Target for Acetylcholine on Microvessels in Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍颖霞; 李庆平; 汪海

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of anisodamine on microvessels and its relatwn-ship with endothelium target for acetylcholine (ETA). Methods Norepinephrine precontracted mesen-teric vascular beds in rat were used to determine changes of tension of vessels in response to anisodamineafter removal of endothelium , coincubated with L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, in-domethacin , cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor and glibenclamide , ATP-dependent K+ channels (K ATP ) inhibitor.Results Anisodamine produced a vasodilation effect on mesenteric vascular beds, which was remark-ably inhibited after removal of endothelium (P< 0.01). The vasodilation effect of anisodamine was al-so significantly inhibited after coincubated with indomethacin (1 μmol/ L), NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester ( L- NAME, 100 μrmol / L) and glibenclamide (1 μmol/L, P<0. 01, vs control). Conclu-sion The vasodilation effect of ani.sodamine on microvessels was mediated by ETA. This is related toprostacyclin , endothelium derived relaxing factor (EDRF) and KATP besides M, a-receptor on vascularmooth muscle cell (VSMC) and calcium-antagonistic effects.

  4. Stoichiometry for α-bungarotoxin block of α7 acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacosta, Corrie J. B.; Free, Chris R.; Sine, Steven M.

    2015-08-01

    α-Bungarotoxin (α-Btx) binds to the five agonist binding sites on the homopentameric α7-acetylcholine receptor, yet the number of bound α-Btx molecules required to prevent agonist-induced channel opening remains unknown. To determine the stoichiometry for α-Btx blockade, we generate receptors comprised of wild-type and α-Btx-resistant subunits, tag one of the subunit types with conductance mutations to report subunit stoichiometry, and following incubation with α-Btx, monitor opening of individual receptor channels with defined subunit stoichiometry. We find that a single α-Btx-sensitive subunit confers nearly maximal suppression of channel opening, despite four binding sites remaining unoccupied by α-Btx and accessible to the agonist. Given structural evidence that α-Btx locks the agonist binding site in an inactive conformation, we conclude that the dominant mechanism of antagonism is non-competitive, originating from conformational arrest of the binding sites, and that the five α7 subunits are interdependent and maintain conformational symmetry in the open channel state.

  5. Acetylcholine-induced calcium oscillation in isolated outer hair cells in guinea pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ding-hua; XIAO Zi-an; YANG Shu

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study is to explore the relationship between acetylcholine (ACh)-induced calcium release from intracellular Ca2+ stores and function of outer hair cell (OHC) motors, in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of OHC electromotility at resting state. Methods OHCs were isolated from adult guinea pig (200-300 g) cochlea and loaded with Fluo-3/AM. The cells were treated with ACh/dHBSS, ACh/HBSS, dHBSS only or HBSS only. Intracellular [Ca2+]i variations in cells under the four treatments were observed using an Ar-Kr laser scan confocal microscope. Results [Ca2+]i oscillations were recorded in five OHCs treated with ACh/dHBSS but not in other cells. This is the first time that Ach-excited [Ca2+]i oscillations are reported in guinea pig OHCs independent of extracellular calcium. Conclusions ACh-excited [Ca2+]i oscillations in OHCs originates from intracellular calcium release and may play a crucial role in maintaining active mechanical motility of the OHC at resting and modulating OHC electromotility.

  6. α7-Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: role in early odor learning preference in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Hellier

    Full Text Available Recently, we have shown that mice with decreased expression of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 in the olfactory bulb were associated with a deficit in odor discrimination compared to wild-type mice. However, it is unknown if mice with decreased α7-receptor expression also show a deficit in early odor learning preference (ELP, an enhanced behavioral response to odors with attractive value observed in rats. In this study, we modified ELP methods performed in rats and implemented similar conditions in mice. From post-natal days 5-18, wild-type mice were stroked simultaneously with an odor presentation (conditioned odor for 90 s daily. Control mice were only stroked, exposed to odor, or neither. On the day of testing (P21, mice that were stroked in concert with a conditioned odor significantly investigated the conditioned odor compared to a novel odor, as observed similarly in rats. However, mice with a decrease in α7-receptor expression that were stroked during a conditioned odor did not show a behavioral response to that odorant. These results suggest that decreased α7-receptor expression has a role in associative learning, olfactory preference, and/or sensory processing deficits.

  7. Neonicotinoids target distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and neurons, leading to differential risks to bumblebees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Christopher; Buckland, Stephen T.; Samson, Andrew J.; McArthur, Robin; Chamosa Pino, Victor; Bollan, Karen A.; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2016-04-01

    There is growing concern over the risk to bee populations from neonicotinoid insecticides and the long-term consequences of reduced numbers of insect pollinators to essential ecosystem services and food security. Our knowledge of the risk of neonicotinoids to bees is based on studies of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam and these findings are extrapolated to clothianidin based on its higher potency at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. This study addresses the specificity and consequences of all three neonicotinoids to determine their relative risk to bumblebees at field-relevant levels (2.5 ppb). We find compound-specific effects at all levels (individual cells, bees and whole colonies in semi-field conditions). Imidacloprid and clothianidin display distinct, overlapping, abilities to stimulate Kenyon cells, indicating the potential to differentially influence bumblebee behavior. Bee immobility was induced only by imidacloprid, and an increased vulnerability to clothianidin toxicity only occurred following chronic exposure to clothianidin or thiamethoxam. At the whole colony level, only thiamethoxam altered the sex ratio (more males present) and only clothianidin increased queen production. Finally, both imidacloprid and thiamethoxam caused deficits in colony strength, while no detrimental effects of clothianidin were observed. Given these findings, neonicotinoid risk needs to be considered independently for each compound and target species.

  8. Segregation of acetylcholine and GABA in the rat superior cervical ganglia: functional correlation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eElinos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic neurons have the capability to segregate their neurotransmitters (NTs and co-transmitters to separate varicosities of single axons; furthermore, in culture, these neurons can even segregate classical transmitters. In vivo sympathetic neurons employ acetylcholine (ACh and other classical NTs such as gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA. Herein, we explore whether these neurons in vivo segregate these classical NTs in the superior cervical ganglia of the rat. We determined the topographical distribution of GABAergic varicosities, somatic GABAA receptor, as well as the regional distribution of the segregation of ACh and GABA. We evaluated possible regional differences in efficacy of ganglionic synaptic transmission, in the sensitivity of GABAA receptor to GABA and to the competitive antagonist picrotoxin (PTX. We found that sympathetic preganglionic neurons in vivo do segregate ACh and GABA. GABAergic varicosities and GABAA receptor expression showed a rostro-caudal gradient along ganglia; in contrast, segregation exhibited a caudo-rostral gradient. These uneven regional distributions in expression of GABA, GABAA receptors, and level segregation correlate with stronger synaptic transmission found in the caudal region. Accordingly, GABAA receptors of rostral region show larger sensitivity to GABA and PTX. These results suggest the presence of different types of GABAA receptors in each region that result in a different regional levels of endogenous GABA inhibition. Finally, we discuss a possible correlation of these different levels of GABA modulation and the function of the target organs innervated by rostral and caudal ganglionic neurons.

  9. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor reconstitution in Au(111)-supported thiolipid monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pissinis, Diego E.; Diaz, Carolina; Maza, Eliana; Bonini, Ida C.; Barrantes, Francisco J.; Salvarezza, Roberto C.; Schilardi, Patricia L.

    2015-09-01

    The insertion and function of the muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in Au(111)-supported thiolipid self-assembled monolayers have been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and electrochemical techniques. It was possible for the first time to resolve the supramolecular arrangement of the protein spontaneously inserted in a thiolipid monolayer in an aqueous solution. Geometric supramolecular arrays of nAChRs were observed, most commonly in a triangular form compatible with three nAChR dimers of ~20 nm each. Addition of the full agonist carbamoylcholine activated and opened the nAChR ion channel, as revealed by the increase in capacitance relative to that of the nAChR-thiolipid system under basal conditions. Thus, the self-assembled system appears to be a viable biomimetic model to measure ionic conductance mediated by ion-gated ion channels under different experimental conditions, with potential applications in biotechnology and pharmacology.

  10. Gating of long-term potentiation by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the cerebellum input stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Prestori

    Full Text Available The brain needs mechanisms able to correlate plastic changes with local circuit activity and internal functional states. At the cerebellum input stage, uncontrolled induction of long-term potentiation or depression (LTP or LTD between mossy fibres and granule cells can saturate synaptic capacity and impair cerebellar functioning, which suggests that neuromodulators are required to gate plasticity processes. Cholinergic systems innervating the cerebellum are thought to enhance procedural learning and memory. Here we show that a specific subtype of acetylcholine receptors, the α7-nAChRs, are distributed both in cerebellar mossy fibre terminals and granule cell dendrites and contribute substantially to synaptic regulation. Selective α7-nAChR activation enhances the postsynaptic calcium increase, allowing weak mossy fibre bursts, which would otherwise cause LTD, to generate robust LTP. The local microperfusion of α7-nAChR agonists could also lead to in vivo switching of LTD to LTP following sensory stimulation of the whisker pad. In the cerebellar flocculus, α7-nAChR pharmacological activation impaired vestibulo-ocular-reflex adaptation, probably because LTP was saturated, preventing the fine adjustment of synaptic weights. These results show that gating mechanisms mediated by specific subtypes of nicotinic receptors are required to control the LTD/LTP balance at the mossy fibre-granule cell relay in order to regulate cerebellar plasticity and behavioural adaptation.

  11. Effects of Isoflurane on the Actions of Neuromuscular Blockers on the Muscle Nicotine Acetylcholine Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李传翔; 姚尚龙; 聂辉; 吕斌

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that volatile anesthetic enhancement of muscle relaxation is the result of combined drug effects on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The poly A m RNA from muscle by isolation were microinjected into Xenopus oocytes for receptor expression.Concentration-effect curves for the inhibition of Ach-induced currents were established for vecuronium, rocuranium, and isoflurane. Subsequently, inhibitory effects of NDMRs were studied in the presence of the isoflurane at a concentration equivalent to half the concentration producing a 50 %inhibition alone. All tested drugs produced rapid and readily reversible concentration-dependent inhibition. The 50 % inhibitory concentration values were 889 μmol/L (95 % CI: 711-1214μmol),33.4 μmol (95 % CI: 27.1-41.7 nmol) and 9.2 nmol (95 % CI: 7.9-12.3 nmol) for isoflurane,rocuranium and vecuronium, respectively. Coapplication of isoflurane significantly enhanced the inhibitory effects of rocuranium and vecuronium, and it was especially so at low concentration of NMDRs. Isoflurane increases the potency of NDMRs, possibly by enhancing antagonist affinity at the receptor site.

  12. Thrombin action decreases acetylcholine receptor aggregate number and stability in cultured mouse myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, R W; Lanuza, M; Kim, S; Jia, M; Snyder, E; Nelson, P G

    2000-08-30

    Neurons develop and make very stable, long-term synaptic connections with other nerve cells and with muscle. Synaptic stability at the neuromuscular junction changes over development in that a proliferation of synaptic input are made to individual myotubes and synapses from all but one neuron are lost during development. In an established co-culture paradigm in which spinal motoneurons synaptically contact myotubes, thrombin and associated protease inhibitors have been shown to affect the loss of functional synaptic contacts [6]. Evidence has not been provided which clearly demonstrate whether protease/protease inhibitors affect either the pre- or postsynaptic terminal, or both. In an effort to determine whether these reagents directly affect postsynaptic receptors on myotubes, myotubes were cultured in the absence of neurons and the spontaneous presence and stability of aggregates of acetylcholine receptors (AChR) in control and thrombin-containing media were evaluated. In dishes fixed after treatment and in dishes in which individual aggregates were observed live, thrombin action appeared to increase loss of AChR aggregates over time. Hirudin, a specific inhibitor of the thrombin protease, diminished this loss. Neither reagent affected the overall incorporation or degradation of AChR; therefore, it appears these protease/protease inhibitors affect the state of AChR aggregation. PMID:10960680

  13. Tetrodotoxin effects in the stimulated acetylcholine release by agonist of glutamate in mice striatum tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxins of animal venoms have been used as important tools for biochemical studies of physiological and pathological processes of diverse systems. In this work we used the action of tetrodotoxin on sodium channels to map the localization of glutamate receptors in cholinergic neurons from striatum tissue of rats. All glutamate receptors are exciting, so they promote the release of other neurotransmitters. In this work we focus on acetylcholine. The localization of glutamate receptor, on the soma or on the excitatory terminal, may contribute for a better understanding of its function. For this work we applied the in vitro method of tritiated neurotransmitter release. The agonists of glutamate receptors chosen were glutamic acid 500μM, NMDA 100μM, kainic acid 300μM, quisqualic acid 300μM and AMPA 1mM. In the first part of the assay the basal and stimulated releases were measured and in the second, the same protocol was performed in the presence of tetrodotoxin 1μM. The reductions observed in basal and stimulated release in the presence of tetrodotoxin suggested that the receptors type AMPA and NMDA were located in soma of cholinergic cell preferentially and the other ones presented a more equilibrate distribution among the axons and the soma. (author)

  14. Synthesis of carbon-11 labeled dexetimide and levetimide for studying muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The localization and quantitation of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m-AChR) in the living human brain using a non-invasive method, such as positron emission tomography (PET), may provide valuable information about receptor changes which have been observed post mortem in patients with Huntington's chorea and Alzheimer's dementia, as well as normal brain mechanisms mediated by the m-AChR. Although quinuclidinyl benzilate has been radioiodinated and radiomethylatd, the former is not useful with PET and the latter does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier; therefore, the authors chose to radiolabel dexetimide, a ligand which labels m-AChR in vitro and in vivo, and levetimide, its inactive enantiomer. Carbon-11 labeled carbon dioxide is bubbled through a tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution of phenylmagnesium chloride (1 M, l ml) after which 2 mg of lithium aluminium hydride is added in THF (500 μl). After evaporation of the solvent, 48% hydriodic acid (l ml) is added and the solution is heated for 1 minute. Carbon-11 labeled benzyl iodide is extracted into methylene chloride, added to a solution of nor-benzyl dexetimide or levetimide, and heated for several minutes. Purification is accomplished using semi-preparative reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Analytical HPLC is used to determine the radiochemical purity and specific activity

  15. Alpha9 alpha10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as target for the treatment of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bufalo, Alessandra; Cesario, Alfredo; Salinaro, Gianluca; Fini, Massimo; Russo, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a widespread healthcare problem affecting not only the patient but in many ways all the society. Chronic pain is a disease itself that endures for a long period of time and it is resistant to the majority of medical treatments that provide modest improvements in pain and minimum improvements in physical and emotional functioning. More co-existing chronic pain conditions may be present in the same individual (patient). The α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) may be a potential target in the pathophysiology of chronic pain, as well in the development of breast and lung cancers. α-conotoxins (α-CNT) are small peptides used offensively by carnivorous marine snails known as Conus that target nAChR. Among α-CNT there are potent and selective antagonists of α9α10 nAChR such as RgIA and Vc1.1 that produces both acute and long lasting analgesia. Moreover, these peptides accelerate the recovery of nerve function after injury, likely through immune/inflammatory-mediated mechanisms. We review the background, findings, implications and problems in using compounds that act on α9α10 nAChR. PMID:24641230

  16. Impaired acetylcholine release from the myenteric plexus of Trichinella-infected rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the release of acetylcholine (ACh) from jejunal longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations in noninfected control rats and in rats infected 6, 23, or 40 days previously with Trichinella spiralis. ACh release was assessed by preincubating the tissue with [3H]choline and measuring the evoked release of tritium. The uptake of 3H was significantly less in tissue from T. spiralis-infected rats compared with control. In tissues from either infected or control animals, electrical field stimulation (30 V, 0.5 ms, 10 Hz for 1 min), or veratridine (6-30 microM) induced 3H release that was tetrodotoxin sensitive. Depolarization by KCl (25-75 mM) also caused 3H release, but this was only partially reduced by tetrodotoxin. Radiochromatographic analysis indicated evoked release of 3H to be almost entirely [3H]ACh. In rats infected 6 days previously with T. spiralis, [3H]ACh release induced by KCl, veratridine, and field stimulation were decreased at least 80%. The suppression of [3H]ACh release induced by veratridine or KCl was fully reversible after 40 days postinfection, but field-stimulated responses remained approximately 50% of control values. These results indicate that T. spiralis infection in the rat is accompanied by a reversible suppression of ACh release from the longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the jejunum

  17. Expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits from parasitic nematodes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Megan A; Reaves, Barbara J; Maclean, Mary J; Storey, Bob E; Wolstenholme, Adrian J

    2015-11-01

    The levamisole-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptor present at nematode neuromuscular junctions is composed of multiple different subunits, with the exact composition varying between species. We tested the ability of two well-conserved nicotinic receptor subunits, UNC-38 and UNC-29, from Haemonchus contortus and Ascaris suum to rescue the levamisole-resistance and locomotion defects of Caenorhabditis elegans strains with null deletion mutations in the unc-38 and unc-29 genes. The parasite cDNAs were cloned downstream of the relevant C. elegans promoters and introduced into the mutant strains via biolistic transformation. The UNC-38 subunit of H. contortus was able to completely rescue both the locomotion defects and levamisole resistance of the null deletion mutant VC2937 (ok2896), but no C. elegans expressing the A. suum UNC-38 could be detected. The H. contortus UNC-29.1 subunit partially rescued the levamisole resistance of a C. elegans null mutation in unc-29 VC1944 (ok2450), but did cause increased motility in a thrashing assay. In contrast, only a single line of worms containing the A. suum UNC-29 subunit showed a partial rescue of levamisole resistance, with no effect on thrashing.

  18. Synthesis of carbon-11 labeled dexetimide and levetimide for studying muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannals, R.F.; Langstrom, B.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    The localization and quantitation of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m-AChR) in the living human brain using a non-invasive method, such as positron emission tomography (PET), may provide valuable information about receptor changes which have been observed post mortem in patients with Huntington's chorea and Alzheimer's dementia, as well as normal brain mechanisms mediated by the m-AChR. Although quinuclidinyl benzilate has been radioiodinated and radiomethylatd, the former is not useful with PET and the latter does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier; therefore, the authors chose to radiolabel dexetimide, a ligand which labels m-AChR in vitro and in vivo, and levetimide, its inactive enantiomer. Carbon-11 labeled carbon dioxide is bubbled through a tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution of phenylmagnesium chloride (1 M, l ml) after which 2 mg of lithium aluminium hydride is added in THF (500 ..mu..l). After evaporation of the solvent, 48% hydriodic acid (l ml) is added and the solution is heated for 1 minute. Carbon-11 labeled benzyl iodide is extracted into methylene chloride, added to a solution of nor-benzyl dexetimide or levetimide, and heated for several minutes. Purification is accomplished using semi-preparative reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Analytical HPLC is used to determine the radiochemical purity and specific activity.

  19. Synthesis and 125I labelling of a precursor for imaging nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors (nAChRs) are involved in various pharmacological effects or diseases, such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and tobacco addiction. It will be very appealing to image nAChRs in vivo, diagnose and treat the above diseases, and probe the mechanism of nAChRs in tobacco addiction if the suitable radioactive labeled compound can be synthesized. In this study, (s)-5-(tri-butylstannyl)-3{[1-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-2-azetidinyl]methoxy} pyridine, a precursor for imaging nAChRs, was synthesized with commercial 2-furfurylamine and (s)-2-azetidinecarboxylic acid as starting materials, and was further labeled with 125/123I. The whole procedure for radiosynthesis needs 50-55 min and more than 30% of the 125I are found in the purified 5-[125I]-A-85380. Even staying for 3 days at room temperature in vitro, the purified 5-[125I]-I-85380 can maintain its stability, with a radiochemical purity of more than 95%. (authors)

  20. A New Role for Attentional Corticopetal Acetylcholine in Cortical Memory Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hiroshi; Kanamaru, Takashi; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Tsuda, Ichiro

    2011-09-01

    Although the role of corticopetal acetylcholine (ACh) in higher cognitive functions is increasingly recognized, the questions as (1) how ACh works in attention(s), memory dynamics and cortical state transitions, and also (2) why and how loss of ACh is involved in dysfunctions such as visual hallucinations in dementia with Lewy bodies and deficit of attention(s), are not well understood. From the perspective of a dynamical systems viewpoint, we hypothesize that transient ACh released under top-down attention serves to temporarily invoke attractor-like memories, while a background level of ACh reverses this process returning the dynamical nature of the memory structure back to attractor ruins (quasi-attractors). In fact, transient ACh loosens inhibitions of py ramidal neurons (PYRs) by P V+ fas t spiking (FS) i nterneurons, while a baseline ACh recovers inhibitory actions of P V+ FS. Attentional A Ch thus dynamically modifies brain's connectivity. Th e core of this process is in the depression of GABAergic inhibitory currents in PYRs due to muscarinic (probably M2 subtype) presyn aptic effects on GABAergic synapses of PV+ FS neurons

  1. Discovery of potent carbonic anhydrase and acetylcholine esterase inhibitors: novel sulfamoylcarbamates and sulfamides derived from acetophenones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akıncıoğlu, Akın; Akıncıoğlu, Hülya; Gülçin, İlhami; Durdagi, Serdar; Supuran, Claudiu T; Göksu, Süleyman

    2015-07-01

    In this study, several novel sulfamides were synthesized and evaluated for their acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and human carbonic anhydrase I, and II isoenzymes (hCA I and II) inhibition profiles. Reductive amination of methoxyacetophenones was used for the synthesis of amines. Amines were converted to sulfamoylcarbamates with chlorosulfonyl isocyanate (CSI) in the presence of BnOH. Pd-C catalyzed hydrogenolysis of sulfamoylcarbamates afforded sulfamides. These novel compounds were good inhibitors of the cytosolic hCA I, and hCA II with Ki values in the range of 45.9±8.9-687.5±84.3 pM for hCA I, and 48.80±8.2-672.2±71.9pM for hCA II. The inhibitory effects of the synthesized novel compounds on AChE were also investigated. The Ki values of these compounds were in the range of 4.52±0.61-38.28±6.84pM for AChE. These results show that hCA I, II, and AChE were effectively inhibited by the novel sulfamoylcarbamates 17-21 and sulfamide derivatives 22-26. All investigated compounds were docked within the active sites of the corresponding enzymes revealing the reasons of the effective inhibitory activity. PMID:25921269

  2. Neuronal Acetylcholine Nicotinic Receptors as New Targets for Lung Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucchietto, Vanessa; Crespi, Arianna; Fasoli, Francesca; Clementi, Francesco; Gotti, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Smoking accounts for approximately 70% of the cases of non- small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 90% of the cases of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), although some patients develop lung cancer without a history of smoking. Nicotine is the most active addictive component of tobacco smoke. It does not initiate tumorigenesis in humans and rodents, but it alters the pathophysiology of lung cells by inducing the secretion of growth factors, neurotransmitters and cytokines, and promotes tumour growth and metastases by inducing cell cycle progression, migration, invasion, angiogenesis and the evasion of apoptosis. Most of these effects are a result of nicotine binding and activation of cell-surface neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and downstream intracellular signalling cascades, and many are blocked by nAChR subtype-selective antagonists. Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms of nAChR subunits that influence nicotine dependence and lung cancer. This review describes the molecular basis of nAChR structural and functional diversity in normal and cancer lung cells, and the genetic alterations facilitating smoking-induced lung cancers. It also summarises current knowledge concerning the intracellular pathways activated by nicotine and other compounds present in tobacco smoke. PMID:26845123

  3. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression in human airway correlates with lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, David Chi-Leung; Luo, Susan Yang; Fu, Kin-Hang; Lui, Macy Mei-Sze; Chan, Koon-Ho; Wistuba, Ignacio Ivans; Gao, Boning; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Ip, Mary Sau-Man; Minna, John Dorrance

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine and its derivatives, by binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) on bronchial epithelial cells, can regulate cellular signaling and inflammatory processes. Delineation of nAChR subtypes and their responses to nicotine stimulation in bronchial epithelium may provide information for therapeutic targeting in smoking-related inflammation in the airway. Expression of nAChR subunit genes in 60 bronchial epithelial biopsies and immunohistochemical staining for the subcellular locations of nAChR subunit expression were evaluated. Seven human bronchial epithelial cell lines (HBECs) were exposed to nicotine in vitro for their response in nAChR subunit gene expression to nicotine exposure and removal. The relative normalized amount of expression of nAChR α4, α5, and α7 and immunohistochemical staining intensity of nAChR α4, α5, and β3 expression showed significant correlation with lung function parameters. Nicotine stimulation in HBECs resulted in transient increase in the levels of nAChR α5 and α6 but more sustained increase in nAChR α7 expression. nAChR expression in bronchial epithelium was found to correlate with lung function. Nicotine exposure in HBECs resulted in both short and longer term responses in nAChR subunit gene expression. These results gave insight into the potential of targeting nAChRs for therapy in smoking-related inflammation in the airway. PMID:26608528

  4. Nitric oxide modulates the cardiovascular effects elicited by acetylcholine in the NTS of awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Liana Gouveia; Dias, Ana Carolina Rodrigues; Furlan, Elaina; Colombari, Eduardo

    2008-12-01

    Microinjection of acetylcholine chloride (ACh) in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) of awake rats caused a transient and dose-dependent hypotension and bradycardia. Because it is known that cardiovascular reflexes are affected by nitric oxide (NO) produced in the NTS, we investigated whether these ACh-induced responses depend on NO in the NTS. Responses to ACh (500 pmol in 100 nl) were strongly reduced by ipsilateral microinjection of the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10 nmol in 100 nl) in the NTS: mean arterial pressure (MAP) fell by 50 +/- 5 mmHg before L-NAME to 9 +/- 4 mmHg, 10 min after L-NAME, and HR fell by 100 +/- 26 bpm before L-NAME to 20 +/- 10 bpm, 10 min after L-NAME (both P NTS also reduced responses to ACh: MAP fell from 42 +/- 3 mmHg before TRIM to 27 +/- 6 mmHg, 10 min after TRIM (P NTS of conscious rats induces hypotension and bradycardia, and these effects may be mediated at least partly by NO produced in NTS neurons.

  5. Acetylcholine, GABA and neuronal networks: a working hypothesis for compensations in the dystrophic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Erez James; Quarta, Eros; Fulgenzi, Gianluca; Minciacchi, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a genetic disease arising from a mutation in the dystrophin gene, is characterized by muscle failure and is often associated with cognitive deficits. Studies of the dystrophic brain on the murine mdx model of DMD provide evidence of morphological and functional alterations in the central nervous system (CNS) possibly compatible with the cognitive impairment seen in DMD. However, while some of the alterations reported are a direct consequence of the absence of dystrophin, others seem to be associated only indirectly. In this review we reevaluate the literature in order to formulate a possible explanation for the cognitive impairments associated with DMD. We present a working hypothesis, demonstrated as an integrated neuronal network model, according to which within the cascade of events leading to cognitive impairments there are compensatory mechanisms aimed to maintain functional stability via perpetual adjustments of excitatory and inhibitory components. Such ongoing compensatory response creates continuous perturbations that disrupt neuronal functionality in terms of network efficiency. We have theorized that in this process acetylcholine and network oscillations play a central role. A better understating of these mechanisms could provide a useful diagnostic index of the disease's progression and, perhaps, the correct counterbalance of this process might help to prevent deterioration of the CNS in DMD. Furthermore, the involvement of compensatory mechanisms in the CNS could be extended beyond DMD and possibly help to clarify other physio-pathological processes of the CNS.

  6. Effect of tissue-specific acetylcholinesterase inhibitor C-547 on α3β4 and αβεδ acetylcholine receptors in COS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindovský, Jiří; Petrov, Konstantin; Krůšek, Jan; Reznik, Vladimir S; Nikolsky, Eugeny E; Vyskočil, František

    2012-08-01

    The C-547 is the most effective muscle and tissue-specific anticholinesterase among alkylammonium derivatives of 6-methyluracil (ADEMS) acting in nanomolar concentrations on locomotor muscles but not on respiratory muscles, smooth muscles and heart and brain acetylcholine esterases (AChE). When applied systematically it could influence peripheral acetylcholine receptors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of C-547 on rat α3β4 (ganglionic type) and αβεδ (muscle type) nicotinic receptors expressed in COS cells. Currents evoked by rapid application of acetylcholine or nicotine were recorded in whole-cell mode by electrophysiological patch-clamp technique 2-4 days after cell transfection by plasmids coding the α3β4 or αβεδ combination of receptor subunits. In cells sensitive to acetylcholine, the application of C-547 evoked no responses. When acetylcholine was applied during an already running application of C-547, acetylcholine responses were only inhibited at concentrations higher than 10(-7)M. This inhibition is not voltage-dependent, but is accompanied by an increased rate of desensitization. Thus in both types of receptors, effective doses are approximately 100 times higher than those inhibiting AChE in leg muscles and similar to those inhibiting respiratory diaphragm muscles and external intercostal muscles. These observations show that C-547 can be considered for symptomatic treatment of myasthenia gravis and other congenital myasthenic syndromes as an inhibitor of AChE in leg muscles at concentrations much lower than those inhibiting muscle and ganglion types of acetylcholine receptors. PMID:22634638

  7. “Warming yang and invigorating qi” acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai-peng; Pan, Hong; Wang, Hong-feng

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. “Warming yang and invigorating qi” acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following “warming yang and invigorating qi” acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10), Zusanli (ST36), Pishu (BL20), and Shenshu (BL23) once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that “warming yang and invigorating qi” acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis. PMID:27127487

  8. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai-Peng; Pan, Hong; Wang, Hong-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10), Zusanli (ST36), Pishu (BL20), and Shenshu (BL23) once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis. PMID:27127487

  9. Aspects of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by glutamate receptors; Aspectos das liberacoes de dopamina e acetilcolina mediadas por receptores de glutamato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda

    2002-07-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in the motor control of rats and humans. This control involves different neurotransmitters and the mutual control of these key elements has been subject to several studies. In this work we determined the role of glutamate on the release of radioactively labelled dopamine and acetylcholine from chopped striatal tissue in vitro. The values of Effective Concentration 50% for glutamate, NMDA, kainic, quisqualic acids and AMPA on the release of dopamine and acetylcholine were obtained. The inhibitory effects of magnesium, tetrodotoxin, MK-801, AP5 and MCPG, as well as the effects of glycin were evaluated. The results suggested that dopamine is influenced by the NMDA type glutamate receptor while acetylcholine seems to be influenced by NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptors. Tetrodotoxin experiments suggested that kainate receptors are both present in cholinergic terminals and cell bodies while AMPA and NMDA receptors are preferentially distributed in cell bodies. Magnesium effectively blocked the NMDA stimulation and unexpectedly also AMPA- and quisqualate-induced acetylcholine release. The latter could not be blocked by MCPG ruling out the participation of methabotropic receptors. MK-801 also blocked NMDA-receptors. Results point out the importance of the glutamic acid control of dopamine and acetylcholine release in striatal tissue. (author)

  10. “Warmingyang and invigoratingqi” acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-peng Huang; Hong Pan; Hong-feng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. “Warmingyang and invigoratingqi” acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inlfammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental au-toimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following “warmingyang and invigoratingqi” acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure pointsShou-sanli (LI10),Zusanli(ST36),Pishu (BL20), and Shenshu (BL23) once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was signiifcantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These ifndings suggest that “warmingyangand invigoratingqi” acu-puncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

  11. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-peng Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10, Zusanli (ST36, Pishu (BL20, and Shenshu (BL23 once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

  12. Complete definite positive spasm on acetylcholine spasm provocation tests: comparison of clinical positive spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueda, Shozo; Miyoshi, Toru; Sasaki, Yasuhiro; Ohshima, Kousei; Sakaue, Tomoki; Habara, Hirokazu; Kohno, Hiroaki

    2016-02-01

    In the clinical grounds, patients with ≥90 % luminal narrowing during acetylcholine (ACh) testing had variable response. We investigated ischemic findings and chest symptoms in patients with ≥90 % luminal narrowing when performing ACh tests, retrospectively. We performed 763 ACh tests over 13 years (2001-2013). We analyzed chest symptoms and positive ischemic ECG changes during ACh tests. More than 90 % luminal narrowing was found in 441 patients (57.8 %) including 355 patients in the right coronary artery (RCA) and 363 patients in the left coronary artery (LCA). Chest symptom was observed in 386 patients (87.5 %) including 293 patients in the RCA and 304 patients in the LCA. ST elevation was found in 161 patients including 110 in the RCA and 85 patients in the LCA, while ST depression was recognized in 146 patients including 119 patients in the RCA and 117 patients in the LCA. Three quarter of patients with ≥90 % luminal narrowing had significant ischemic ECG changes, whereas two-third of patients with ≥90 % luminal narrowing complained usual chest pain accompanied with significant ischemic ECG changes. Unusual chest symptom was complained in 7.3 % patients with ≥90 % luminal narrowing. Neither chest symptom nor ECG changes were found in 30 patients (6.8 %) with ≥90 % luminal narrowing. A third of these patients had ischemic findings on non-invasive tests before catheterization and six patients had subtotal or total occlusion. We should realize some limitation to define positive coronary spasm based on the ischemic ECG change and chest symptom during ACh tests. PMID:25366988

  13. Gender differences in sensitivity of acetylcholine and ergonovine to coronary spasm provocation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueda, Shozo; Miyoshi, Toru; Sasaki, Ysuhiro; Sakaue, Tomoki; Habara, Hirokazu; Kohno, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    We examined the sex difference concerning the coronary artery response between ACh and ER in this study. We already reported the difference of coronary response between acetylcholine (ACh) and ergonovine (ER). We performed both ACh and ER tests of 461 patients (male 294 patients, female 167 patients, mean age 64.4 ± 11.3 years) during 23 years. Positive coronary spasm was defined as >99 % transient luminal narrowing with usual chest pain and/or ischemic ECG changes. Firstly, ACh was administered in incremental doses of 20/50/(80) μg into the RCA and 20/50/100/(200) μg into the LCA over 20 s. Secondly, ER was administered in a total dose of 40 μg into the RCA and of 64 μg into the LCA over 2-4 min. Intracoronary injection of ACh and ER provoked spasm in 221 patients consisting of 160 male patients and 61 female patients. In female patients, the spasm provoked by ACh was almost perfect except in two patients (59 patients, 96.7 %), while ER provoked spasm in only 20 patients (32.8 %). In male patients, provoked spasm by ACh (129 patients, 80.6 %) was significantly higher than ER (97 patients, 60.6 %). As a spasm provocation test, ACh is more sensitive than ER in both sexes and especially in females. We may select two pharmacological agents by sex differences to provoke coronary artery spasm in the cardiac catheterization laboratory in the future. PMID:25539623

  14. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the honey bee, Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew K; Raymond-Delpech, Valerie; Thany, Steeve H; Gauthier, Monique; Sattelle, David B

    2006-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission and play roles in many cognitive processes. They are under intense research as potential targets of drugs used to treat neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Invertebrate nAChRs are targets of anthelmintics as well as a major group of insecticides, the neonicotinoids. The honey bee, Apis mellifera, is one of the most beneficial insects worldwide, playing an important role in crop pollination, and is also a valuable model system for studies on social interaction, sensory processing, learning, and memory. We have used the A. mellifera genome information to characterize the complete honey bee nAChR gene family. Comparison with the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae shows that the honey bee possesses the largest family of insect nAChR subunits to date (11 members). As with Drosophila and Anopheles, alternative splicing of conserved exons increases receptor diversity. Also, we show that in one honey bee nAChR subunit, six adenosine residues are targeted for RNA A-to-I editing, two of which are evolutionarily conserved in Drosophila melanogaster and Heliothis virescens orthologs, and that the extent of editing increases as the honey bee lifecycle progresses, serving to maximize receptor diversity at the adult stage. These findings on Apis mellifera enhance our understanding of nAChR functional genomics and provide a useful basis for the development of improved insecticides that spare a major beneficial insect species.

  15. Functional Human α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) Generated from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Tommy S; Alvarez, Frances J D; Reinert, Nathan J; Liu, Chuang; Wang, Dawei; Xu, Yan; Xiao, Kunhong; Zhang, Peijun; Tang, Pei

    2016-08-26

    Human Cys-loop receptors are important therapeutic targets. High-resolution structures are essential for rational drug design, but only a few are available due to difficulties in obtaining sufficient quantities of protein suitable for structural studies. Although expression of proteins in E. coli offers advantages of high yield, low cost, and fast turnover, this approach has not been thoroughly explored for full-length human Cys-loop receptors because of the conventional wisdom that E. coli lacks the specific chaperones and post-translational modifications potentially required for expression of human Cys-loop receptors. Here we report the successful production of full-length wild type human α7nAChR from E. coli Chemically induced chaperones promote high expression levels of well-folded proteins. The choice of detergents, lipids, and ligands during purification determines the final protein quality. The purified α7nAChR not only forms pentamers as imaged by negative-stain electron microscopy, but also retains pharmacological characteristics of native α7nAChR, including binding to bungarotoxin and positive allosteric modulators specific to α7nAChR. Moreover, the purified α7nAChR injected into Xenopus oocytes can be activated by acetylcholine, choline, and nicotine, inhibited by the channel blockers QX-222 and phencyclidine, and potentiated by the α7nAChR specific modulators PNU-120596 and TQS. The successful generation of functional human α7nAChR from E. coli opens a new avenue for producing mammalian Cys-loop receptors to facilitate structure-based rational drug design. PMID:27385587

  16. Association of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit alpha-4 polymorphisms with smoking behaviors in Chinese male smokers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Cheng-jing; YANG Yan-chun; WEI Jin-xue; ZHANG Lan

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been reported that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit a4 gene (CHRNA4) might be associated with smoking behaviors in the previous studies. Up to now, there are few reports on the relationship between CHRNA4 and smoking initiation. In this study, we tried to explore the role of two polymorphisms in CHRNA4 (rs 1044396 and rs 1044397) in smoking initiation and nicotine dependence in Chinese male smokers.Methods Nine hundred and sixty-six Chinese male lifetime nonsmokers and smokers were assessed by the Fagerstr(o)m test for nicotine dependence (FTND), smoking quantity (SQ) and the heaviness of smoking index (HSI). All subjects were divided into four groups based on their tobacco use history and the FTND scores. The polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to find two polymorphisms of CHRNA4 in these subjects.Results The x2 test showed that rs1044396 was significantly associated with smoking initiation (x2=4.65, P=0.031),while both rs1044396 and rs1044397 were significantly associated with nicotine dependence (x2=5.42, P=0.020; x2=758,P=0.005). Furthermore, the T-G (3.9%) haplotype of rs1044396-rs1044397 showed significant association with smoking initiation (x2=6.30, P=0.012) and the C-G haplotype (58.9%) remained positive association with nicotine dependence (x2=8.64, P=0.003) after Bonferroni correction. The C-G haplotype also significantly increased the HSI (P=0.002) and FTND scores (P=0.001) after Bonferroni correction.Conclusion These findings suggest that CHRNA4 may be associated with smoking initiation and the C-G haplotype of rs1044396-rs1044397 might increase the vulnerability to nicotine dependence in Chinese male smokers.

  17. Clinical significance of detection of antibodies to fetal and adult acetylcholine receptors in myasthenia gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Guang Shi; Zhi-Hong Wang; Xiao-Wei Ma; Da-Qi Zhang; Chun-Sheng Yang; Fu-Dong Shi; Li Yang

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the frequency,distribution and clinical significance of the antibodies to the fetal and/or adult acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG).Methods AChR antibodies were detected by cell-based assay in the serum of ocular MG (OMG) (n =90) and generalized MG (GMG) patients (n =110).The fetaltype (2α∶ β∶ γ∶ δ) and adult-type (2α∶ β∶ ε∶ δ) AChR were used as antigens,and their relevance to disease presentation was assessed.Results The overall frequencies of anti-adult and anti-fetal AChR antibodies were similar in all 200 patients examined,with 14 having serum specific to the AChR-γ subunit,and 22 to the AChR-ε subunit.The overall sensitivity when using the fetal and adult AChR antibodies was higher than that when using the fetal AChR antibody only (P =0.015).Compared with OMG patients,the mean age at disease onset and the positive ratio of antibodies to both isoforms of the AChR were significantly higher in patients who subsequently progressed to GMG.Older patients and patients with both anti-fetal and anti-adult AChR antibodies had a greater risk for developing generalized disease [odds ratio (OR),1.03;95% confidence interval (CI),1.01-1.06 and OR,5.09;95% CI,2.23-11.62].Conclusion Using both fetal-and adulttype AChRs as the antigens may be more sensitive than using either subtype.Patients with serum specific to both isoforms are at a greater risk of progressing to GMG.Patients with disease onset at an advanced age appear to have a higher frequency of GMG conversion.

  18. Signal transduction by M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUO, LIQIANG; LIU, YUQIANG; DING, ZHIBO; SUN, WENDONG; YUAN, MINGZHEN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms used during signal transduction by M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRM3) in prostate cancer. The microarray datasets of GSE3325, including 5 clinically localized primary prostate cancers and 4 benign prostate tissues, were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) in primary prostate cancer tissues compared with benign controls were screened using the Limma package. Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Next, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed. Additionally, microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with DEGs were predicted and miRNA-target DEG analysis was performed using a Web-based Gene Set Analysis Toolkit. Finally, the PPI network and the miRNA-target DEG network were integrated using Cytoscape. In total, 224 DEGs were screened in the prostate cancer tissues, including 113 upregulated and 111 downregulated genes. CHRM3 and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were enriched in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. EGF and v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (Myc) were enriched in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. EGF with the highest degree of connectivity was the hub node in the PPI network, and miR-34b could interact with Myc directly in the miRNA-target DEG network. EGF and Myc may exhibit significant roles in the progression of prostate cancer via regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and the MAPK signaling pathway. CHRM3 may activate these two pathways in prostate cancer progression. Thus, these two key factors and pathways may be crucial mechanisms during signal transduction by CHRM3 in prostate cancer. PMID:26870222

  19. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and PAMs as adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia. An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Monica M; Björkholm, Carl; Malmerfelt, Anna; Möller, Annie; Påhlsson, Ninni; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; Feltmann, Kristin; Jardemark, Kent; Schilström, Björn; Svensson, Torgny H

    2016-09-01

    Nicotine has been found to improve cognition and reduce negative symptoms in schizophrenia and a genetic and pathophysiological link between the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and schizophrenia has been demonstrated. Therefore, there has been a large interest in developing drugs affecting the α7 nAChRs for schizophrenia. In the present study we investigated, in rats, the effects of a selective α7 agonist (PNU282987) and a α7 positive allosteric modulator (PAM; NS1738) alone and in combination with the atypical antipsychotic drug risperidone for their utility as adjunct treatment in schizophrenia. Moreover we also investigated their utility as adjunct treatment in depression in combination with the SSRI citalopram. We found that NS1738 and to some extent also PNU282987, potentiated a subeffective dose of risperidone in the conditioned avoidance response test. Both drugs also potentiated the effect of a sub-effective concentration of risperidone on NMDA-induced currents in pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex. Moreover, NS1738 and PNU282987 enhanced recognition memory in the novel object recognition test, when given separately. Both drugs also potentiated accumbal but not prefrontal risperidone-induced dopamine release. Finally, PNU282987 reduced immobility in the forced swim test, indicating an antidepressant-like effect. Taken together, our data support the utility of drugs targeting the α7 nAChRs, perhaps especially α7 PAMs, to potentiate the effect of atypical antipsychotic drugs. Moreover, our data suggest that α7 agonists and PAMs can be used to ameliorate cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia and depression. PMID:27474687

  20. Prostate stem cell antigen interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and is affected in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Majbrit M; Arvaniti, Maria; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Michalski, Dominik; Pinborg, Lars H; Härtig, Wolfgang; Thomsen, Morten S

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving impaired cholinergic neurotransmission and dysregulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ly-6/neurotoxin (Lynx) proteins have been shown to modulate cognition and neural plasticity by binding to nAChR subtypes and modulating their function. Hence, changes in nAChR regulatory proteins such as Lynx proteins could underlie the dysregulation of nAChRs in AD. Using Western blotting, we detected bands corresponding to the Lynx proteins prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) and Lypd6 in human cortex indicating that both proteins are present in the human brain. We further showed that PSCA forms stable complexes with the α4 nAChR subunit and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells. In addition, we analyzed protein levels of PSCA and Lypd6 in postmortem tissue of medial frontal gyrus from AD patients and found significantly increased PSCA levels (approximately 70%). In contrast, no changes in Lypd6 levels were detected. In concordance with our findings in AD patients, PSCA levels were increased in the frontal cortex of triple transgenic mice with an AD-like pathology harboring human transgenes that cause both age-dependent β-amyloidosis and tauopathy, whereas Tg2576 mice, which display β-amyloidosis only, had unchanged PSCA levels compared to wild-type animals. These findings identify PSCA as a nAChR-binding protein in the human brain that is affected in AD, suggesting that PSCA-nAChR interactions may be involved in the cognitive dysfunction observed in AD. PMID:25680266

  1. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated calcium signaling in the nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-xin SHEN; Jerrel L YAKEL

    2009-01-01

    Based on the composition of the five subunits forming functional neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), they are grouped into either heteromeric (comprising both α and β subunits) or homomeric (comprising only α subunits) recep-tors. The nAChRs are known to be differentially permeable to calcium ions, with the α7 nAChR subtype having one of the highest permeabilities to calcium. Calcium influx through nAChRs, particularly through the α-bungarotoxin-sensitive α7-containing nAChRs, is a very efficient way to raise cytoplasmic calcium levels. The activation of nAChRs can mediate three types of cytoplasmic calcium signals: (1) direct calcium influx through the nAChRs, (2) indirect calcium influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) which are activated by the nAChR-mediated depolarization, and (3) calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) (triggered by the first two sources) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the ryanodine receptors and inositol (1,4,5)-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs). Downstream signaling events mediated by nAChR-mediated calcium responses can be grouped into instantaneous effects (such as neurotransmitter release, which can occur in milliseconds after nAChR activation), short-term effects (such as the recovery of nAChR desensitization through cellular signaling cascades), and long-term effects (such as neuroprotection via gene expression). In addition, nAChR activity can be regulated by cytoplasmic calcium levels, suggesting a complex reciprocal relationship. Further advances in imaging techniques, animal models, and more potent and subtype-selective ligands for neuronal nAChRs would help in understand-ing the neuronal nAChR-mediated calcium signaling, and lead to the development of improved therapeutic treatments.

  2. Effects of Acetylcholine, Cytochalasin B and Amiprophos methyl on Phloem Transport in Radish (Raphanus sativas)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong-Jun Yang; Zhi-Xi Zhai; Yu-Hai Guo; Peng Gao

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the role of the "sieve tube-companion cell complex" lining the tube periphery, particularly the microfilament and microtubule, in assisting the pushing of phloem sap flow. We made a simple phloem transport system with a living radish plant, in which the conducting channel was exposed for local treatment with chemicals that are effective in modulating protoplasmic movement (acetylcholine, (ACh) a neurotransmitter in animals and insects; cytochalasin B, (CB) a specific inhibitor of many cellular responses that are mediated by microfilament systems and amiprophos-methyl, (APM) a specific inhibitor of many cellular responses that are mediated by microtubule systems). Their effects on phloem transport were estimated by two experimental devices: (i) a comparison of changes in the amount of assimilates in terms of carbohydrates and 14C-labeled photosynthetic production that is left in the leaf blade of treated plants; and (ii) distribution patterns of 14C-labeled leaf assimilates in the phloem transport system. The results indicate that CB and APM markedly inhibited the transfer of photosynthetic product from leaf to root via the leaf vein, while ACh enhanced the transfer of photosynthetic product in low concentrations (5.0×10-4 mol/L) but inhibited it in higher concentrations (2.0×10-3 mol/L) from leaf to root via the leaf vein. Autoradiograph imaging clearly reveals that ACh treatment is more effective than the control, and both CB and APM treatments effectively inhibit the passage of radioactive assimilates. All of the results support the postulation that the peripheral protoplasm in the sieve tube serves not only as a passive semi-permeable membrane, but is also directly involved in phloem transport.

  3. Effects of acetylcholine and noradrenalin on action potentials of isolated rabbit sinoatrial and atrial myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie O. Verkerk

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system controls heart rate and contractility through sympathetic and parasympathetic inputs to the cardiac tissue, with acetylcholine (ACh and noradrenalin (NA as the chemical transmitters. In recent years, it has become clear that specific Regulators of G protein Signalling proteins (RGS proteins suppress muscarinic sensitivity and parasympathetic tone, identifying RGS proteins as intriguing potential therapeutic targets. In the present study, we have identified the effects of 1 µM ACh and 1 µM NA on the intrinsic action potentials of sinotrial (SA nodal and atrial myocytes. Single cells were enzymatically isolated from the SA node or from the left atrium of rabbit hearts. Action potentials were recorded using the amphotericin-perforated patch-clamp technique in the absence and presence of ACh, NA or a combination of both. In SA nodal myocytes, ACh increased cycle length and decreased diastolic depolarization rate, whereas NA decreased cycle length and increased diastolic depolarization rate. Both ACh and NA increased maximum upstroke velocity. Furthermore, ACh hyperpolarized the maximum diastolic potential. In atrial myocytes stimulated at 2 Hz, both ACh and NA hyperpolarized the maximum diastolic potential, increased the action potential amplitude, and increased the maximum upstroke velocity. Action potential duration at 50 and 90% repolarization was decreased by ACh, but increased by NA. The effects of both ACh and NA on action potential duration showed a dose dependence in the range of 1–1,000 nM, while a clear-cut frequency dependence in the range of 1–4 Hz was absent. Intermediate results were obtained in the combined presence of ACh and NA in both SA nodal and atrial myocytes. Our data uncover the extent to which SA nodal and atrial action potentials are intrinsically dependent on ACh, NA or a combination of both and may thus guide further experiments with RGS proteins.

  4. (E)-[125I]-5-AOIBV: a SPECT radioligand for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The premise that, over the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), changes in the levels of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) occur in parallel with changes to other cholinergic marker proteins provides the basis for the applicability of benzovesamicol derivatives as radioligands for AD studies by single photon emission computed tomography or positron emission tomography. We report the synthesis of enantiopure benzovesamicol derivatives: (R,R) or (S,S)-(E)-2-hydroxy-5-(3-iodoprop-2-en-1-oxy)-3- (4-phenylpiperidino)tetralin [(R,R)-AOIBV: Kd=0.45 nM or (S,S)-5-AOIBV: Kd=4.3 nM] and their corresponding tributyltin precursors for radioiodination. (R,R or S,S)-5-AOIBV was labeled with iodine-125 from their corresponding n-tributyltin precursors. Both compounds were obtained with radiochemical and optical purity greater than 97% and in radiochemical yields ranging 34-36%. To determine if these compounds could provide an advantage when compared to [125I]-iodo benzovesamicol (IBVM), IBVM was also labeled and used as the reference compound in all ex vivo experiments. Ex vivo biodistribution experiments in rats revealed that [125I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV displayed the most suitable pharmacological profile as the radioactivity distribution corresponded well with the known VAChT brain density. Moreover, pre-injection of vesamicol prevented the uptake of [125I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV in striatum, cortex and hippocampus, demonstrating selectivity for the VAChT. However, even if time activity curves of [125I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV confirmed that this compound could be used to visualize the VAChT in vivo, at each point of the kinetic study, [125I]-(R,R)-5-AOIBV showed a lower specific binding compared to [125I]-IBVM. These results made [125I]-( R,R)-5-AOIBV inferior to [125I]-IBVM for the VAChT exploration in vivo

  5. Spontaneous release of acetylcholine and acetylhomocholine from mouse forebrain minces: cytoplasmic or vesicular origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to determine the subcellular origin of cholinergic transmitter released spontaneously from mouse forebrain minces. To accomplish this objective, minces were pretreated in ionic media and then loaded with [14C]homocholine, an analog of choline, to form the false transmitter [14Cy]acetylhomocholine [( 14C]AHCh). The ratio of the false transmitter [14C]AHCh to the true transmitter ACh was then used as an index of cholinergic transmitter contents for both the cytoplasmic (S3) and vesicle-bound (P3) fractions. Three different pretreatment procedures were used to cause the following changes in S3 and P3 false to true transmitter ratios prior to spontaneous release: 1) a small increase in the S3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to acetylcholine (ACh) and a large increase in the P3 ratio of [14C] AHCh to ACh; 2) a decrease in the S3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh and an increase in the P3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh; 3) an increase in the P3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh without affecting the S3 ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh. The influence of each pretreatment on these subcellular ratios was then compared with its influence on the spontaneous release ratio of [14C]AHCh to ACh. In all 3 instances, the influence of pretreatment on the ratio of spontaneously released false and true cholinergic transmitters from minces coincided with the effect of pretreatment on the pre-release ratio of false to true transmitter in the S3 fraction. These results suggest that much of the cholinergic transmitter which is spontaneously released from mouse forebrain occurs from the cytoplasmic fraction

  6. Differential acetylcholine release in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus during pavlovian trace and delay conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesher, M Melissa; Butt, Allen E; Kinney-Hurd, Brandee L

    2011-09-01

    Pavlovian trace conditioning critically depends on the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus (HPC), whereas delay conditioning does not depend on these brain structures. Given that the cholinergic basal forebrain system modulates activity in both the mPFC and HPC, it was reasoned that the level of acetylcholine (ACh) release in these regions would show distinct profiles during testing in trace and delay conditioning paradigms. To test this assumption, microdialysis probes were implanted unilaterally into the mPFC and HPC of rats that were pre-trained in appetitive trace and delay conditioning paradigms using different conditional stimuli in the two tasks. On the day of microdialysis testing, dialysate samples were collected during a quiet baseline interval before trials were initiated, and again during performance in separate blocks of trace and delay conditioning trials in each animal. ACh levels were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection techniques. Consistent with our hypothesis, results showed that ACh release in the mPFC was greater during trace conditioning than during delay conditioning. The level of ACh released during trace conditioning in the HPC was also greater than the levels observed during delay conditioning. While ACh efflux in both the mPFC and HPC selectively increased during trace conditioning, ACh levels in the mPFC during trace conditioning testing showed the greatest increases observed. These results demonstrate a dissociation in cholinergic activation of the mPFC and HPC during performance in trace but not delay appetitive conditioning, where this cholinergic activity may contribute to attentional mechanisms, adaptive response timing, or memory consolidation necessary for successful trace conditioning.

  7. Methanol extract of Tephrosia vogelii leaves potentiates the contractile action of acetylcholine on isolated rabbit jejunum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tavershima; Dzenda; Joseph; Olusegun; Ayo; Alexander; Babatunde; Adelaiye; Ambrose; Osemattah; Adaudi

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the modulating role of methanol extract of Tephrosia vogelii leaves on acetylcholine(ACh)-induced contraction of isolated rabbit jejunum.Methods: Rabbit jejunum segment was removed and placed in an organ bath containing Tyrode’s solution, and its contractions were recorded isometrically.Results: ACh(2.0 × 10-10 g/m L) and the extract(2.0 × 10-4 g/m L) individually increased the frequency of contraction(mean ± SEM) of the isolated smooth muscle tissue by 47.6% ± 9.5% and 77.8% ± 66.5%, respectively. When ACh and the extract were combined, the frequency of contraction of the tissue was increased by 222.2% ± 25.9%, representing a 366.7% increase(P < 0.001) over the effect of ACh alone. Similarly, ACh(2.0 × 10-9 g/m L) and the extract individually increased significantly(P < 0.001) the amplitude of contraction of the tissue by 685.7% ± 61.1% and 455.2% ± 38.1%, respectively. When ACh and the extract were combined, the amplitude of contraction of the tissue rose by 1263.8% ± 69.0%, representing 84.3% increase over the ef ect of ACh alone. Conclusions: The findings demonstrate that methanol extract of Tephrosia vogelii leaves potentiates the contractile ef ect of ACh on intestinal smooth muscle, supporting the traditional claim that the plant is purgative.

  8. [Treatment approach to congenital myasthenic syndrome in a patient with acetylcholine receptor deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Keiko; Murakami, Terumi; Ito, Yasushi; Yanagisawa, Akiko; Kodaira, Kayano; Shishikura, Keiko; Suzuki, Haruko; Hirayama, Yoshito; Osawa, Makiko

    2009-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are rare heterogeneous disorders of neurotransmission caused by genetic defects of neuromuscular junction molecules. While CMS patients have been reported worldwide, in Japan there have been only a few descriptions of adult CMS patients with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) deficiency and slow channel syndrome. Herein, we report a Japanese CMS patient with acetylcholine receptor (AChR) deficiency, diagnosed during childhood, and our treatment approach to the patient. This 13-year-old Japanese boy had had severe myasthenic symptoms since infancy. Ptosis, his first symptom, appeared at 5 months and nasal voice was recognized at 2 years of age. AchR and anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (Musk) antibody remained negative. A positive tensilon test and decremental response on electromyogram supported the diagnosis of sero-negative myasthenia gravis. Despite thymectomy and strong immunosuppressive therapy including steroid pulse and FK 506, he gradually deteriorated and became wheelchair bound. Genetic analyses for AchR, Rapsyn, Musk and AChE were negative. At age 11 years, a muscle biopsy was performed in the deltoid muscle for neuromuscular junction sampling. Electron microscopic and confocal microscopic analysis of endplates showed almost complete loss of AChR and the diagnosis of CMS with AChR deficiency was confirmed. All immunosuppressive therapies were discontinued. Instead, we started Ubretide and 3,4-diaminopyridine (DAP) after obtaining informed consent. Although not approved in Japan for this use, 3,4-DAP is reportedly effective in refractory cases of CMS. The patient experienced no side effects. Despite all of the objective data were improving, his subjective symptoms and ADL remained poor. There are still many challenges in the treatment of the patient. PMID:19172815

  9. Partial blockade of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors improves the counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia in recurrently hypoglycemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGamma, Edmund F; Kirtok, Necla; Chan, Owen; Nankova, Bistra B

    2014-10-01

    Recurrent exposure to hypoglycemia can impair the normal counterregulatory hormonal responses that guard against hypoglycemia, leading to hypoglycemia unawareness. This pathological condition known as hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) is the main adverse consequence that prevents individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus from attaining the long-term health benefits of tight glycemic control. The underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the progressive loss of the epinephrine response to subsequent bouts of hypoglycemia, a hallmark sign of HAAF, are largely unknown. Normally, hypoglycemia triggers both the release and biosynthesis of epinephrine through activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) on the adrenal glands. We hypothesize that excessive cholinergic stimulation may contribute to impaired counterregulation. Here, we tested whether administration of the nAChR partial agonist cytisine to reduce postganglionic synaptic activity can preserve the counterregulatory hormone responses in an animal model of HAAF. Compared with nicotine, cytisine has limited efficacy to activate nAChRs and stimulate epinephrine release and synthesis. We evaluated adrenal catecholamine production and secretion in nondiabetic rats subjected to two daily episodes of hypoglycemia for 3 days, followed by a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp on day 4. Recurrent hypoglycemia decreased epinephrine responses, and this was associated with suppressed TH mRNA induction (a measure of adrenal catecholamine synthetic capacity). Treatment with cytisine improved glucagon responses as well as epinephrine release and production in recurrently hypoglycemic animals. These data suggest that pharmacological manipulation of ganglionic nAChRs may be promising as a translational adjunctive therapy to avoid HAAF in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  10. High Throughput Random Mutagenesis and Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing of the Muscle Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot-Kormelink, Paul J.; Ferrand, Sandrine; Kelley, Nicholas; Bill, Anke; Freuler, Felix; Imbert, Pierre-Eloi; Marelli, Anthony; Gerwin, Nicole; Sivilotti, Lucia G.; Miraglia, Loren; Orth, Anthony P.; Oakeley, Edward J.; Schopfer, Ulrich; Siehler, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    High throughput random mutagenesis is a powerful tool to identify which residues are important for the function of a protein, and gain insight into its structure-function relation. The human muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was used to test whether this technique previously used for monomeric receptors can be applied to a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel. A mutant library for the α1 subunit of the channel was generated by error-prone PCR, and full length sequences of all 2816 mutants were retrieved using single molecule real time sequencing. Each α1 mutant was co-transfected with wildtype β1, δ, and ε subunits, and the channel function characterized by an ion flux assay. To test whether the strategy could map the structure-function relation of this receptor, we attempted to identify mutations that conferred resistance to competitive antagonists. Mutant hits were defined as receptors that responded to the nicotinic agonist epibatidine, but were not inhibited by either α-bungarotoxin or tubocurarine. Eight α1 subunit mutant hits were identified, six of which contained mutations at position Y233 or V275 in the transmembrane domain. Three single point mutations (Y233N, Y233H, and V275M) were studied further, and found to enhance the potencies of five channel agonists tested. This suggests that the mutations made the channel resistant to the antagonists, not by impairing antagonist binding, but rather by producing a gain-of-function phenotype, e.g. increased agonist sensitivity. Our data show that random high throughput mutagenesis is applicable to multimeric proteins to discover novel functional mutants, and outlines the benefits of using single molecule real time sequencing with regards to quality control of the mutant library as well as downstream mutant data interpretation. PMID:27649498

  11. Effect of α₇ nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kevin D; Pfister, James A; Lima, Flavia G; Green, Benedict T; Gardner, Dale R

    2013-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline.

  12. High Throughput Random Mutagenesis and Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing of the Muscle Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot-Kormelink, Paul J; Ferrand, Sandrine; Kelley, Nicholas; Bill, Anke; Freuler, Felix; Imbert, Pierre-Eloi; Marelli, Anthony; Gerwin, Nicole; Sivilotti, Lucia G; Miraglia, Loren; Orth, Anthony P; Oakeley, Edward J; Schopfer, Ulrich; Siehler, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    High throughput random mutagenesis is a powerful tool to identify which residues are important for the function of a protein, and gain insight into its structure-function relation. The human muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was used to test whether this technique previously used for monomeric receptors can be applied to a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel. A mutant library for the α1 subunit of the channel was generated by error-prone PCR, and full length sequences of all 2816 mutants were retrieved using single molecule real time sequencing. Each α1 mutant was co-transfected with wildtype β1, δ, and ε subunits, and the channel function characterized by an ion flux assay. To test whether the strategy could map the structure-function relation of this receptor, we attempted to identify mutations that conferred resistance to competitive antagonists. Mutant hits were defined as receptors that responded to the nicotinic agonist epibatidine, but were not inhibited by either α-bungarotoxin or tubocurarine. Eight α1 subunit mutant hits were identified, six of which contained mutations at position Y233 or V275 in the transmembrane domain. Three single point mutations (Y233N, Y233H, and V275M) were studied further, and found to enhance the potencies of five channel agonists tested. This suggests that the mutations made the channel resistant to the antagonists, not by impairing antagonist binding, but rather by producing a gain-of-function phenotype, e.g. increased agonist sensitivity. Our data show that random high throughput mutagenesis is applicable to multimeric proteins to discover novel functional mutants, and outlines the benefits of using single molecule real time sequencing with regards to quality control of the mutant library as well as downstream mutant data interpretation. PMID:27649498

  13. Inducibility of human atrial fibrillation in an in silico model reflecting local acetylcholine distribution and concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Minki; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Pak, Hui-Nam; Shim, Eun Bo

    2016-01-01

    Vagal nerve activity has been known to play a crucial role in the induction and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unclear how the distribution and concentration of local acetylcholine (ACh) promotes AF. In this study, we investigated the effect of the spatial distribution and concentration of ACh on fibrillation patterns in an in silico human atrial model. A human atrial action potential model with an ACh-dependent K(+) current (IKAch) was used to examine the effect of vagal activation. A simulation of cardiac wave dynamics was performed in a realistic 3D model of the atrium. A model of the ganglionated plexus (GP) and nerve was developed based on the "octopus hypothesis". The pattern of cardiac wave dynamics was examined by applying vagal activation to the GP areas or randomly. AF inducibility in the octopus hypothesis-based GP and nerve model was tested. The effect of the ACh concentration level was also examined. In the single cell simulation, an increase in the ACh concentration shortened APD90 and increased the maximal slope of the restitution curve. In the 3D simulation, a random distribution of vagal activation promoted wavebreaks while ACh secretion limited to the GP areas did not induce a noticeable change in wave dynamics. The octopus hypothesis-based model of the GP and nerve exhibited AF inducibility at higher ACh concentrations. In conclusion, a 3D in silico model of the GP and parasympathetic nerve based on the octopus model exhibited higher AF inducibility with higher ACh concentrations. PMID:26807030

  14. A robust homogeneous binding assay for α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin HUI; Jie GAO; Xin XIE; Naoki SUTO; Tsuyoshi OGIKU; Ming-Wei WANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To develop a homogeneous high-throughput screening (HTS) assay based on scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology for identification of novel α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) modulators. Methods: Membrane preparation of HEK293 cells expressing α4β2 nAChR, [3H]cytisine and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-coupled microbeads were used to develop an HTS assay based on SPA technology. This method was validated against a conventional filter binding approach and applied to large-scale screening of a library containing 32 000 synthetic compounds. Intracellular calcium measurement was carried out to verify the bioactivities of the hits found by the SPA assay. Results: IC50 values of 2 reference compounds (epibatidine and RJR 2403) determined by SPA and filter binding methods were comparable and consistent with those reported elsewhere. A total of 54 compounds, showing more than 60% competitive inhibition on [3H]cytisine binding to α4β2 nAChR, were identified initially following an HTS campaign. Secondary screening confirmed that 17 compounds with novel chemical structures possessed relatively high binding affinity to α4β2 nAChR (Ki<2 μmol/L). Eight compounds displayed antagonistic effects with >50% inhibition on ABT-594-induced calcium mobilization while none showed any agonist activity. Conclusions: This homogeneous binding assay is a highly efficient,amenable to automation and robust tool to screen potential α4β2 nAChR modulators in an HTS setting. Its application may be expanded to other membrane receptors and ion channels.

  15. Centrally injected histamine increases posterior hypothalamic acetylcholine release in hemorrhage-hypotensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinbas, Burcin; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Savci, Vahide; Jochem, Jerzy; Yalcin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, acting centrally as a neurotransmitter, evokes a reversal of hemorrhagic hypotension in rats due to the activation of the sympathetic and the renin-angiotensin systems as well as the release of arginine vasopressin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides. We demonstrated previously that central nicotinic cholinergic receptors are involved in the pressor effect of histamine. The aim of the present study was to examine influences of centrally administrated histamine on acetylcholine (ACh) release at the posterior hypothalamus-a region characterized by location of histaminergic and cholinergic neurons involved in the regulation of the sympathetic activity in the cardiovascular system-in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. Hemodynamic and microdialysis studies were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats. Hemorrhagic hypotension was induced by withdrawal of a volume of 1.5 ml blood/100 g body weight over a period of 10 min. Acute hemorrhage led to a severe and long-lasting decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and an increase in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and choline (Ch) levels by 56% and 59%, respectively. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered histamine (50, 100, and 200 nmol) dose- and time-dependently increased MAP and HR and caused an additional rise in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch levels at the most by 102%, as compared to the control saline-treated group. Histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) completely blocked histamine-evoked hemodynamic and extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch changes, whereas H2 and H3/H4 receptor blockers ranitidine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) and thioperamide (50 nmol; i.c.v.) had no effect. In conclusion, centrally administered histamine, acting via H1 receptors, increases ACh release at the posterior hypothalamus and causes a pressor and tachycardic response in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats.

  16. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor variants are related to smoking habits, but not directly to COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona E Budulac

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs cluster as a risk factor for nicotine dependency and COPD. We investigated whether SNPs in the nAChR cluster are associated with smoking habits and lung function decline, and if these potential associations are independent of each other. The SNPs rs569207, rs1051730 and rs8034191 in the nAChR cluster were analyzed in the Vlagtwedde-Vlaardingen cohort (n = 1,390 that was followed for 25 years. We used GEE and LME models to analyze the associations of the SNPs with quitting or restarting smoking and with the annual FEV(1 decline respectively. Individuals homozygote (CC for rs569207 were more likely to quit smoking (OR (95%CI = 1.58 (1.05-2.38 compared to wild-type (TT individuals. Individuals homozygote (TT for rs1051730 were less likely to quit smoking (0.64 (0.42; 0.97 compared to wild-type (CC individuals. None of the SNPs was significantly associated with the annual FEV(1 decline in smokers and ex-smokers. We show that SNPs in the nAChR region are associated with smoking habits such as quitting smoking, but have no significant effect on the annual FEV(1 decline in smokers and ex-smokers, suggesting a potential role of these SNPs in COPD development via smoking habits rather than via direct effects on lung function.

  17. Activation of a7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Prevents Monosodium Iodoacetate-Induced Osteoarthritis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although some evidence suggests that the prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA is lower in smokers compared to nonsmokers, the mechanisms of nicotine-induced protection remain unclear. Stimulation of the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7-nAChR appears to be a critical mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory potential of cholinergic agonists in immune cells. The inhibition of secreted inflammatory molecules and the subsequent inflammatory processes have been proposed as a novel strategy for the treatment of OA. The objective of the present study was to determine whether nicotine-induced protection in a monosodium iodoacetate (MIA rat model of OA occurs via a7-nAChR-mediated inhibition of chondrocytes. Methods: Both in vivo (MIA and in vitro (MIA; Interleukin-1ß, IL-1ß models of OA were used to investigate the roles and the possible mechanisms whereby a7-nAChRs protect against knee joint degradation. Multiple experimental approaches, including macroscopic, histological analysis, chondrocyte cell cultures, confocal microscopy, and western blotting, were employed to elucidate the mechanisms of a7-nAChR-mediated protection. Results: Systemic administration of nicotine alleviated MIA-induced joint degradation. The protective effects of nicotine were abolished by administration of the a7-nAChR-selective antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA. In primary cultured rat chondrocytes, pretreatment with nicotine suppressed both p38, extracellular regulated kinase (Erk 1/2 and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK phosphorylation and phosphorylated nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB p65 activation induced by MIA- or IL-1ß, and these effects were also reversed by MLA. Conclusion: Taken together, our results suggest that activation a7-nAChRs is an important mechanism underlying the protective effects of nicotine.

  18. Regional pulmonary ventilation and perfusion studies with sup(81m)Kr after acetylcholine inhalation in bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    sup(81m)Kr is a radioactive noble gas with an ultrashort halflife of 13 seconds, and can be produced in gaseous form or in solution from its parent, 81Rb(T1/2=4.7hours). Using sup(81m)Kr both regional pulmonary ventilation and perfusion were studied simultaneously in 32 asthmatic patients during remission just before and after acetylcholine inhalation. Twenty-five patients were studied in the sitting position and 7 patients supine : the former were examined once, the latter repeatedly after acetylcholine inhalation. The results were as follows : 1. Changes in regional ventilation 1) Ventilatory abnormalities after acetylcholine inhalation appeared to be localized. Their appearances were related to the percentage decrease in FEVsub(1.0). 2) The lower zones were involved most frequently and the upper zones least frequently. 3) On serial examination, the time courses of regional ventilatory function showed the same patterns as those of percentage decrease in FEVsub(1.0). in hypoventilated areas. But regional ventilatory recovery times were different in each area. 2. Regional ventilation and perfusion relationships 1) Hypoventilated areas generally showed hypoperfusion (similar distribution), but ventilatory abnormalities were greater than those of perfusion (low regional ventilation /perfusion ratio). These findings indicate that perfusion abnormalities are secondary to the ventilatory abnormalities. 2) Abnormalities of regional ventilation/perfusion ratios were related to the ventilatory abnormalities but almost never to the percentage decrease in FEVsub(1.0). 3) In upper (middle) zones, there were some cases with increased perfusion in spite of decreased ventilation. 4) Hypoperfusion reached a maximum witnin 2-3 minutes after the start of the hypoventilated plateau. (author)

  19. The selective alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist A-582941 activates immediate early genes in limbic regions of the forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, M S; Mikkelsen, J D; Timmermann, D B;

    2008-01-01

    Due to the cognitive-enhancing properties of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7 nAChR) agonists, they have attracted interest for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia typically presents in late adolescence or early adulthood. It is therefore important...... regions critically involved in working memory and attention. Furthermore, this effect is more pronounced in juvenile than adult rats, indicating that the juvenile forebrain is more responsive to alpha7 nAChR stimulation. This observation may be relevant in the treatment of juvenile-onset schizophrenia....

  20. Expression of the α-bungarotoxin binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by Escherichia coli transformants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restriction fragments of DNA derived from a cDNA clone of the α subunit of the acetylcholine receptor were subcloned in Escherichia coli by using the trpE fusion vector, pATH2. Transformants expressing the amino acid sequences 166-315 or 166-200 are shown to produce a chimeric protein that bound α-bungarotoxin. Moreover, it is shown that sufficient amounts of toxin-binding proteins can be generated by individual colonies of bacteria. This provides a new approach for gene selection via functional expression-i.e., ligand overlays of colony blots

  1. Study of acetylcholine and barium receptors in the rat duodeno-jejunum by means of labelled molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is the determination of the number and the localization of Acetylcholine and Barium receptors in the rat intestine. We used 'radioactive labelled' drugs to reach a high sensitiveness of detection. So we were able to point out the number of 'effective' molecules of drugs, that is to say the only ones combining with receptors. With the aid of some assumptions, we determine on the one hand the receptors localization by an assessment of the drug penetration depth before reaching their level and on the other hand the number of these receptors. (author)

  2. The regulation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor desensitization by synaptic activity in cultured hippocampal neurons1

    OpenAIRE

    Willets, Jonathon M.; Nelson, Carl P.; Nahorski, Stefan R; Challiss, R.A. John

    2007-01-01

    To better understand metabotropic/ionotropic integration in neurons we have examined the regulation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor signalling in mature (> 14 days in vitro), synaptically-active hippocampal neurons in culture. Using a protocol where neurons are exposed to an EC50 concentration of the muscarinic agonist methacholine (MCh) prior to (R1), and following (R2) a desensitizing pulse of a high concentration of this agonist, we have found that the reduction in M1 mACh r...

  3. Reductions in [3H]nicotinic acetylcholine binding in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease: an autoradiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), dysfunction in the basal forebrain cholinergic system is accompanied by a consistent loss of presynaptic cholinergic markers in cortex, but changes in cholinergic receptor binding sites are poorly understood. In the present study, we used receptor autoradiography to map the distribution of nicotinic [3H]acetylcholine binding sites in cortices of individuals with AD and PD and matched control subjects. In both diseases, a profound loss of nicotinic receptors occurs in all cortical layers, particularly the deepest layers

  4. Impairment of bidirectional synaptic plasticity in the striatum of a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia: role of endogenous acetylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, Giuseppina; Tassone, Annalisa; Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Platania, Paola; Cuomo, Dario; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Bonsi, Paola; Cacci, Emanuele; Biagioni, Stefano; Usiello, Alessandro; Bernardi, Giorgio; Sharma, Nutan

    2009-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia is a severe form of inherited dystonia, characterized by involuntary twisting movements and abnormal postures. It is linked to a deletion in the dyt1 gene, resulting in a mutated form of the protein torsinA. The penetrance for dystonia is incomplete, but both clinically affected and non-manifesting carriers of the DYT1 mutation exhibit impaired motor learning and evidence of altered motor plasticity. Here, we characterized striatal glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in transgenic mice expressing either the normal human torsinA or its mutant form, in comparison to non-transgenic (NT) control mice. Medium spiny neurons recorded from both NT and normal human torsinA mice exhibited normal long-term depression (LTD), whereas in mutant human torsinA littermates LTD could not be elicited. In addition, although long-term potentiation (LTP) could be induced in all the mice, it was greater in magnitude in mutant human torsinA mice. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) can revert potentiated synapses to resting levels, a phenomenon termed synaptic depotentiation. LFS induced synaptic depotentiation (SD) both in NT and normal human torsinA mice, but not in mutant human torsinA mice. Since anti-cholinergic drugs are an effective medical therapeutic option for the treatment of human dystonia, we reasoned that an excess in endogenous acetylcholine could underlie the synaptic plasticity impairment. Indeed, both LTD and SD were rescued in mutant human torsinA mice either by lowering endogenous acetylcholine levels or by antagonizing muscarinic M1 receptors. The presence of an enhanced acetylcholine tone was confirmed by the observation that acetylcholinesterase activity was significantly increased in the striatum of mutant human torsinA mice, as compared with both normal human torsinA and NT littermates. Moreover, we found similar alterations of synaptic plasticity in muscarinic M2/M4 receptor knockout mice, in which an increased striatal acetylcholine level has been

  5. Multiple Transmembrane Binding Sites for p-Trifluoromethyldiazirinyl-etomidate, a Photoreactive Torpedo Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Allosteric Inhibitor*

    OpenAIRE

    Hamouda, Ayman K.; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Husain, S. Shaukat; Cohen, Jonathan B.

    2011-01-01

    Photoreactive derivatives of the general anesthetic etomidate have been developed to identify their binding sites in γ-aminobutyric acid, type A and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. One such drug, [3H]TDBzl-etomidate (4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzyl-[3H]1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate), acts as a positive allosteric potentiator of Torpedo nACh receptor (nAChR) and binds to a novel site in the transmembrane domain at the γ-α subunit interface. To extend our unders...

  6. Spintronic characteristics of self-assembled neurotransmitter acetylcholine molecular complexes enable quantum information processing in neural networks and brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulis, Arvydas; Majauskaite, Kristina; Kairys, Visvaldas; Zborowski, Krzysztof; Adhikari, Kapil; Krisciukaitis, Sarunas

    2016-09-01

    Implementation of liquid state quantum information processing based on spatially localized electronic spin in the neurotransmitter stable acetylcholine (ACh) neutral molecular radical is discussed. Using DFT quantum calculations we proved that this molecule possesses stable localized electron spin, which may represent a qubit in quantum information processing. The necessary operating conditions for ACh molecule are formulated in self-assembled dimer and more complex systems. The main quantum mechanical research result of this paper is that the neurotransmitter ACh systems, which were proposed, include the use of quantum molecular spintronics arrays to control the neurotransmission in neural networks.

  7. Effects of their nutrient precursors on the synthesis and release of serotonin, the catecholamines, and acetylcholine - Implications for behavioral disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Authentic foods affect brain serotonin synthesis by modifying brain tryptophan levels, carbohydrates increasing and proteins decreasing these levels. The carbohydrate-induced rise in brain serotonin tends to diminish the likelihood that one carbohydrate-rich, protein-poor meal or snack will be followed by another. This mechanism is apparently disturbed in carbohydrate-craving obesity, which may explain why this syndrome responds well to d-fenfluramine, a serotoninergic drug. Pure nutrients like tyrosine or choline can also affect the rates at which their neurotransmitter products, the catecholamines and acetylcholine, are synthesized in and released from nerve terminals, suggesting that these compounds may find uses as drugs.

  8. A Subpopulation of Neuronal M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Plays a Critical Role in Modulating Dopamine-Dependent Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Jongrye; Dencker, Ditte; Wortwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P.D.; Cui, Yinghong; Davis, Albert A.; Levey, Allan I.; Schütz, Günther; Sager, Thomas; Mørk, Arne; Li, Cuiling; Deng, Chu-Xia; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Wess, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M1–M5 mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M4 mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M4 mAChRs are coexpressed with D1 dopamine receptors in a specific subset of striatal projection neurons. To investigate the physiological relevance of this M4 mAChR subpopulation in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors, we use...

  9. Human Secreted Ly-6/uPAR Related Protein-1 (SLURP-1) Is a Selective Allosteric Antagonist of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Kudryavtsev, Denis;

    2016-01-01

    of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively, and anti-α7-nAChRs antibodies revealed α7 type nAChRs as an rSLURP-1 target in keratinocytes. Using affinity purification from human cortical extracts, we confirmed that rSLURP-1 binds selectively to the α7-n......AChRs. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7-nAChRs to rSLURP-1 caused a significant non-competitive inhibition of the response to acetylcholine (up to ~ 70%, IC50 ~ 1 μM). It was shown that rSLURP-1 binds to α7-nAChRs overexpressed in GH4Cl cells, but does not compete with 125I-α-bungarotoxin for binding...

  10. PI3K/Akt-independent NOS/HO activation accounts for the facilitatory effect of nicotine on acetylcholine renal vasodilations: modulation by ovarian hormones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Y Gohar

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of chronic nicotine on cholinergically-mediated renal vasodilations in female rats and its modulation by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS/heme oxygenase (HO pathways. Dose-vasodilatory response curves of acetylcholine (0.01-2.43 nmol were established in isolated phenylephrine-preconstricted perfused kidneys obtained from rats treated with or without nicotine (0.5-4.0 mg/kg/day, 2 weeks. Acetylcholine vasodilations were potentiated by low nicotine doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg/day in contrast to no effect for higher doses (2 and 4 mg/kg/day. The facilitatory effect of nicotine was acetylcholine specific because it was not observed with other vasodilators such as 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, adenosine receptor agonist or papaverine. Increases in NOS and HO-1 activities appear to mediate the nicotine-evoked enhancement of acetylcholine vasodilation because the latter was compromised after pharmacologic inhibition of NOS (L-NAME or HO-1 (zinc protoporphyrin, ZnPP. The renal protein expression of phosphorylated Akt was not affected by nicotine. We also show that the presence of the two ovarian hormones is necessary for the nicotine augmentation of acetylcholine vasodilations to manifest because nicotine facilitation was lost in kidneys of ovariectomized (OVX and restored after combined, but not individual, supplementation with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA and estrogen (E2. Together, the data suggests that chronic nicotine potentiates acetylcholine renal vasodilation in female rats via, at least partly, Akt-independent HO-1 upregulation. The facilitatory effect of nicotine is dose dependent and requires the presence of the two ovarian hormones.

  11. Engineered α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as models for measuring agonist binding and effect at the orthosteric low-affinity α4-α4 interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Philip K.; Olsen, Jeppe A.; Nielsen, Elsebet O.;

    2015-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 4 beta 2 is important for normal mammalian brain function and is known to express in two different stoichiometries, (alpha 4)(2)(beta 2)(3) and (alpha 4)(3)(beta 2)(2). While these are similar in many aspects, the (alpha 4)(3)(beta 2)(2) stoichiometry...... differs by harboring a third orthosteric acetylcholine binding site located at the alpha 4-alpha 4 interface. Interestingly, the third binding site has, so far, only been documented using electrophysiological assays, actual binding affinities of nicotinic receptor ligands to this site are not known...

  12. 11C-NS14492 as a novel PET radioligand for imaging cerebral alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: in vivo evaluation and drug occupancy measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Lehel, Szabolcs;

    2011-01-01

    Small-molecule a(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a(7)nAChR) agonists are currently validated for use as treatment for cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia and in Alzheimer disease. A suitable radiolabeled a(7)nAChR PET tracer would be important for in vivo quantification of a(7)nAChR bind......Small-molecule a(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a(7)nAChR) agonists are currently validated for use as treatment for cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia and in Alzheimer disease. A suitable radiolabeled a(7)nAChR PET tracer would be important for in vivo quantification of a(7)n...

  13. Dianicline, a novel α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist, for smoking cessation: a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonstad, Serena; Holme, Ingar; Tønnesen, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Dianicline is a α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist, a class of drugs that includes varenicline and cytisine. Varenicline is efficacious for smoking cessation, while cytisine has not been studied systematically. The efficacy of dianicline has not been previously tested in an ade......Dianicline is a α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist, a class of drugs that includes varenicline and cytisine. Varenicline is efficacious for smoking cessation, while cytisine has not been studied systematically. The efficacy of dianicline has not been previously tested...

  14. 11C-NS14492 as a novel PET radioligand for imaging cerebral alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: in vivo evaluation and drug occupancy measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Lehel, Szabolcs;

    2011-01-01

    Small-molecule α(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α(7)nAChR) agonists are currently validated for use as treatment for cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia and in Alzheimer disease. A suitable radiolabeled α(7)nAChR PET tracer would be important for in vivo quantification of α(7)nAChR bind......Small-molecule α(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α(7)nAChR) agonists are currently validated for use as treatment for cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia and in Alzheimer disease. A suitable radiolabeled α(7)nAChR PET tracer would be important for in vivo quantification of α(7)n...

  15. The fade of the response to acetylcholine at the rabbit isolated sino-atrial node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyett, M R; Roberts, A

    1987-12-01

    1. The effect of acetylcholine (ACh) on the frequency of spontaneous action potentials, recorded with glass microelectrodes from small preparations of the sino-atrial node of the rabbit, has been investigated. 2. On application of ACh there was a rapid increase in cycle length (the interval between successive action potentials) but then, despite the continued presence of the ACh, cycle length decreased once again; i.e. the response to ACh 'faded' in the presence of ACh. This fade of the chronotropic response to ACh has been characterized. 3. To observe fade it was found to be important to use a fast flow bath in order to increase the ACh concentration at the preparation abruptly. In other words, the response to ACh was sensitive to the rate of increase in the ACh concentration at the tissue. This may explain why in one study of the sino-atrial node of the guinea-pig the authors failed to observe fade. 4. The concentration dependence of fade was studied in two ways: either as the fade in the response with different doses of ACh, or as the decrease in the response to a fixed test dose applied after a variable conditioning dose. Both methods indicated that fade increased with concentration over the range of roughly 10(-7) to 10(-5) M-ACh. 5. The onset of fade, i.e. the decline in cycle length during an exposure to ACh, was monophasic with low doses of ACh and biphasic (with fast and slow phases) with higher doses. The mean half-times of the fast and slow phases of fade were 10 +/- 2 s and 240 +/- 30 s (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 5). However, in some preparations, rather than a smooth decrease in cycle length, there were discontinuities and cycle length could decrease in a stepwise fashion or even transiently alternate between two distinct states. 6. Time was required for recovery from fade because a response to a test dose applied soon after a conditioning dose was depressed. Recovery was studied by applying test doses at different times after conditioning doses. Recovery

  16. Honeybees Produce Millimolar Concentrations of Non-Neuronal Acetylcholine for Breeding: Possible Adverse Effects of Neonicotinoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessler, Ignaz; Gärtner, Hedwig-Annabel; Michel-Schmidt, Rosmarie; Brochhausen, Christoph; Schmitz, Luise; Anspach, Laura; Grünewald, Bernd; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide use of neonicotinoid pesticides has caused concern on account of their involvement in the decline of bee populations, which are key pollinators in most ecosystems. Here we describe a role of non-neuronal acetylcholine (ACh) for breeding of Apis mellifera carnica and a so far unknown effect of neonicotinoids on non-target insects. Royal jelly or larval food are produced by the hypopharyngeal gland of nursing bees and contain unusually high ACh concentrations (4–8 mM). ACh is extremely well conserved in royal jelly or brood food because of the acidic pH of 4.0. This condition protects ACh from degradation thus ensuring delivery of intact ACh to larvae. Raising the pH to ≥5.5 and applying cholinesterase reduced the content of ACh substantially (by 75–90%) in larval food. When this manipulated brood was tested in artificial larval breeding experiments, the survival rate was higher with food supplemented by 100% with ACh (6 mM) than with food not supplemented with ACh. ACh release from the hypopharyngeal gland and its content in brood food declined by 80%, when honeybee colonies were exposed for 4 weeks to high concentrations of the neonicotinoids clothianidin (100 parts per billion [ppb]) or thiacloprid (8,800 ppb). Under these conditions the secretory cells of the gland were markedly damaged and brood development was severely compromised. Even field-relevant low concentrations of thiacloprid (200 ppb) or clothianidin (1 and 10 ppb) reduced ACh level in the brood food and showed initial adverse effects on brood development. Our findings indicate a hitherto unknown target of neonicotinoids to induce adverse effects on non-neuronal ACh which should be considered when re-assessing the environmental risks of these compounds. To our knowledge this is a new biological mechanism, and we suggest that, in addition to their well documented neurotoxic effects, neonicotinoids may contribute to honeybee colony losses consecutive to a reduction of the ACh content

  17. Structural and functional changes induced in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by membrane phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Carvajal, Asia M; Encinar, José A; Poveda, José Antonio; de Juan, Entilio; Martínez-Pinna, Juan; Ivorra, Isabel; Ferragut, José Antonio; Morales, Andrés; González-Ros, José Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) constitute an important family of complex membrane proteins acting as receptors for neurotransmitters (Barnard, 1992; Ortells and Lunt, 1995). The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo is the most extensively studied member of the LGIC family and consists of a pentameric transmembrane glycoprotein composed of four different polypeptide subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta) in a 2:1:1:1 stoichiometry (Galzi and Changeux, 1995; Hucho et al., 1996) that are arranged pseudosymmetrically around a central cation-selective ion channel. Conformational transitions, from the closed (nonconducting), to agonist-induced open (ion-conducting), to desensitized (nonconducting) states, are critical for functioning of the nAChR (Karlin, 2002). The ability of the nAChR to undergo these transitions is profoundly influenced by the lipid composition of the bilayer (Barrantes, 2004). Despite existing information on lipid dependence of AChR function, no satisfactory explanation has been given on the molecular events by which specific lipids exert such effects on the activity of an integral membrane protein. To date, several hypotheses have been entertained, including (1) indirect effects of lipids through the alteration of properties of the bilayer, such as fluidity (an optimal fluidity hypothesis [Fong and McNamee, 1986]) or membrane curvature and lateral pressure (Cantor, 1997; de Kruijff, 1997), or (2) direct effects through binding of lipids to defined sites on the transmembrane portion of the protein (Jones and McNamee, 1988; Blanton and Wang, 1990; Fernández et al., 1993; Fernández-Ballester et al., 1994), which has led to the postulation of a possible role of certain lipids as peculiar allosteric ligands of the protein. In this paper we have reconstituted purified AChRs from Torpedo into complex multicomponent lipid vesicles in which the phospholipid composition has been systematically altered. Stopped-flow rapid kinetics of

  18. Trophic factor-induced excitatory synaptogenesis involves postsynaptic modulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodin, Melanie A; Munno, David W; Syed, Naweed I

    2002-01-15

    Neurotrophic factors have well established roles in neuronal development, although their precise involvement in synapse formation and plasticity is yet to be fully determined. Using soma-soma synapses between identified Lymnaea neurons, we have shown recently that trophic factors are required for excitatory but not inhibitory synapse formation. However, neither the precise site (presynaptic versus postsynaptic cell) nor the underlying mechanisms have yet been defined. In the present study, synapse formation between the presynaptic cell visceral dorsal 4 (VD4) and its postsynaptic partner right pedal dorsal 1 (RPeD1) was examined to define the cellular mechanisms mediating trophic factor-induced excitatory synaptogenesis in cell culture. When paired in a soma-soma configuration in the presence of defined media (DM, nonproteinacious), mutually inhibitory synapses were appropriately reconstructed between VD4 and RPeD1. However, when cells were paired in the presence of increasing concentrations of Lymnaea brain-conditioned medium (CM), a biphasic synapse (initial excitatory synaptic component followed by inhibition) developed. The CM-induced excitatory synapse formation required trophic factor-mediated activation of receptor tyrosine kinases in the postsynaptic cell, RPeD1, and a concomitant modulation of existing postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Specifically, when RPeD1 was isolated in DM, exogenously applied ACh induced a hyperpolarizing response that was sensitive to the AChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA). In contrast, a single RPeD1 isolated in CM exhibited a biphasic response to exogenously applied ACh. The initial depolarizing phase of the biphasic response was sensitive to both mecamylamine and hexamethonium chloride, whereas the hyperpolarizing phase was blocked by MLA. In soma-soma-paired neurons, the VD4-induced synaptic responses in RPeD1 were sensitive to the cholinergic antagonists in a concentration range similar to that

  19. Expression of five acetylcholine receptor subunit genes in Brugia malayi adult worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ben-Wen; Rush, Amy C; Weil, Gary J

    2015-12-01

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are required for body movement in parasitic nematodes and are targets of "classical" anthelmintic drugs such as levamisole and pyrantel and of newer drugs such as tribendimidine and derquantel. While neurotransmission explains the effects of these drugs on nematode movement, their effects on parasite reproduction are unexplained. The levamisole AChR type (L-AChRs) in Caenorhabditis elegans is comprised of five subunits: Cel-UNC-29, Cel-UNC-38, Cel-UNC-63, Cel-LEV-1 and Cel-LEV-8. The genome of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi contains nine AChRs subunits including orthologues of Cel-unc-29, Cel-unc-38, and Cel-unc-63. We performed in situ hybridization with RNA probes to localize the expression of five AChR genes (Bm1_35890-Bma-unc-29, Bm1_20330-Bma-unc-38, Bm1_38195-Bma-unc-63, Bm1_48815-Bma-acr-26 and Bm1_40515-Bma-acr-12) in B. malayi adult worms. Four of these genes had similar expression patterns with signals in body muscle, developing embryos, spermatogonia, uterine wall adjacent to stretched microfilariae, wall of V as deferens, and lateral cord. Three L-AChR subunit genes (Bma-unc-29, Bma-unc-38 and Bma-unc-63) were expressed in body muscle, which is a known target of levamisole. Bma-acr-12 was co-expressed with these levamisole subunit genes in muscle, and this suggests that its protein product may form receptors with other alpha subunits. Bma-acr-26 was expressed in male muscle but not in female muscle. Strong expression signals of these genes in early embryos and gametes in uterus and testis suggest that AChRs may have a role in nervous system development of embryogenesis and spermatogenesis. This would be consistent with embryotoxic effects of drugs that target these receptors in filarial worms. Our data show that the expression of these receptor genes is tightly regulated with regard to localization in adult worms and developmental stage in embryos and gametes. These results may help to explain the broad effects of

  20. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chuan-Xi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs mediate fast synaptic cholinergic transmission in the insect central nervous system. The insect nAChR is the molecular target of a class of insecticides, neonicotinoids. Like mammalian nAChRs, insect nAChRs are considered to be made up of five subunits, coded by homologous genes belonging to the same family. The nAChR subunit genes of Drosophila melanogaster, Apis mellifera and Anopheles gambiae have been cloned previously based on their genome sequences. The silkworm Bombyx mori is a model insect of Lepidoptera, among which are many agricultural pests. Identification and characterization of B. mori nAChR genes could provide valuable basic information for this important family of receptor genes and for the study of the molecular mechanisms of neonicotinoid action and resistance. Results We searched the genome sequence database of B. mori with the fruit fly and honeybee nAChRs by tBlastn and cloned all putative silkworm nAChR cDNAs by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE methods. B. mori appears to have the largest known insect nAChR gene family to date, including nine α-type subunits and three β-type subunits. The silkworm possesses three genes having low identity with others, including one α and two β subunits, α9, β2 and β3. Like the fruit fly and honeybee counterparts, silkworm nAChR gene α6 has RNA-editing sites, and α4, α6 and α8 undergo alternative splicing. In particular, alternative exon 7 of Bmα8 may have arisen from a recent duplication event. Truncated transcripts were found for Bmα4 and Bmα5. Conclusion B. mori possesses a largest known insect nAChR gene family characterized to date, including nine α-type subunits and three β-type subunits. RNA-editing, alternative splicing and truncated transcripts were found in several subunit genes, which might enhance the diversity of the gene family.

  1. Neonicotinoid binding, toxicity and expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliane Taillebois

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoid insecticides act on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and are particularly effective against sucking pests. They are widely used in crops protection to fight against aphids, which cause severe damage. In the present study we evaluated the susceptibility of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum to the commonly used neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid (IMI, thiamethoxam (TMX and clothianidin (CLT. Binding studies on aphid membrane preparations revealed the existence of high and low-affinity binding sites for [3H]-IMI (Kd of 0.16 ± 0.04 nM and 41.7 ± 5.9 nM and for the nicotinic antagonist [125I]-α-bungarotoxin (Kd of 0.008 ± 0.002 nM and 1.135 ± 0.213 nM. Competitive binding experiments demonstrated that TMX displayed a higher affinity than IMI for [125I]-α-bungarotoxin binding sites while CLT affinity was similar for both [125I]-α-bungarotoxin and [3H]-IMI binding sites. Interestingly, toxicological studies revealed that at 48 h, IMI (LC50 = 0.038 µg/ml and TMX (LC50 = 0.034 µg/ml were more toxic than CLT (LC50 = 0.118 µg/ml. The effect of TMX could be associated to its metabolite CLT as demonstrated by HPLC/MS analysis. In addition, we found that aphid larvae treated either with IMI, TMX or CLT showed a strong variation of nAChR subunit expression. Using semi-quantitative PCR experiments, we detected for all insecticides an increase of Apisumα10 and Apisumβ1 expressions levels, whereas Apisumβ2 expression decreased. Moreover, some other receptor subunits seemed to be differently regulated according to the insecticide used. Finally, we also demonstrated that nAChR subunit expression differed during pea aphid development. Altogether these results highlight species specificity that should be taken into account in pest management strategies.

  2. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Roskams, Tania [Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, University of Leuven (Belgium); Oben, Jude A., E-mail: j.oben@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  3. Role of acetylcholine and polyspecific cation transporters in serotonin-induced bronchoconstriction in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koepsell Hermann

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that serotonin (5-HT-mediated constriction of the murine trachea is largely dependent on acetylcholine (ACh released from the epithelium. We recently demonstrated that ACh can be released from non-neuronal cells by corticosteroid-sensitive polyspecific organic cation transporters (OCTs, which are also expressed by airway epithelial cells. Hence, the hypothesis emerged that 5-HT evokes bronchoconstriction by inducing release of ACh from epithelial cells via OCTs. Methods We tested this hypothesis by analysing bronchoconstriction in precision-cut murine lung slices using OCT and muscarinic ACh receptor knockout mouse strains. Epithelial ACh content was measured by HPLC, and the tissue distribution of OCT isoforms was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Epithelial ACh content was significantly higher in OCT1/2 double-knockout mice (42 ± 10 % of the content of the epithelium-denuded trachea, n = 9 than in wild-type mice (16.8 ± 3.6 %, n = 11. In wild-type mice, 5-HT (1 μM caused a bronchoconstriction that slightly exceeded that evoked by muscarine (1 μM in intact bronchi but amounted to only 66% of the response to muscarine after epithelium removal. 5-HT-induced bronchoconstriction was undiminished in M2/M3 muscarinic ACh receptor double-knockout mice which were entirely unresponsive to muscarine. Corticosterone (1 μM significantly reduced 5-HT-induced bronchoconstriction in wild-type and OCT1/2 double-knockout mice, but not in OCT3 knockout mice. This effect persisted after removal of the bronchial epithelium. Immunohistochemistry localized OCT3 to the bronchial smooth muscle. Conclusion The doubling of airway epithelial ACh content in OCT1/2-/- mice is consistent with the concept that OCT1 and/or 2 mediate ACh release from the respiratory epithelium. This effect, however, does not contribute to 5-HT-induced constriction of murine intrapulmonary bronchi. Instead, this activity involves 1 a non

  4. Calcium ion requirement for acetylcholine-stimulated breakdown of triphosphoinositide in rabbit iris smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, R A; Abdel-Latif, A A

    1978-03-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory have established that addition of acetylcholine (ACh) or norepinephrine to 32P-labeled rabbit iris smooth muscle increases significantly the breakdown of triphosphoinositide (TPI) and that these stimulatory effects are blocked by atropine and phentolamine, respectively. The present studies were undertaken in order to show the effect of Ca++ on the ACh-stimulated breakdown of TPI ("TPI effect") in this tissue. Paired iris smooth muscles were prelabeled with 32Pi for 30 minutes at 37 degrees C in Ca++-free iso-osmotic salt medium. The prelabeled irises were then washed and incubated for 10 minutes in nonradioactive Ca++-free medium which contained 10 mM 2-deoxyglucose under various conditions. The phospholipids were isolated by means of two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography and their radioactivities were determined. In the absence of Ca++, 50 micrometer ACh increased TPI breakdown and phosphatidic acid (PA) labeling by 16 and 38%, respectively. In the absence of ACh, 0.75 micrometer Ca++ increased TPI breakdown and PA labeling by 11 and 20%, respectively. When both ACh and Ca++ were added, the increase in TPI breakdown and PA labeling rose to 32 and 74%, respectively. The labeling of phosphatidylinositol was found to be insensitive to the presence of Ca++. Ca++ was determined in the iris smooth muscle and it was found to contain 3.13 mumol of Ca++ per g of tissue. This was reduced by 80% after the muscle was washed and incubated in a medium which contained 0.25 micrometer ethyleneglycol bis (beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). The TPI effect was abolished by 0.25 micrometer EGTA and restored when excess Ca++ (1.25 micrometer) was added. Concentrations of Ca++ as low as 50 micrometer provoked a TPI effect. Sr++ (2 micrometer), but not Ba++ or Mn++, was found to substitute partially for Ca++. Ionophore A-23187 (20 micrometer) was found to increase the breakdown of TPI and labeling of PA by 11 and 24

  5. Effect of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline. -- Highlights: ► Mice treated with nAChR agonists and antagonists have a loss in motor function. ► These deficits are temporary as near normal motor function returns within 10 min. ► There are compound-specific differences in the effects on motor function.

  6. Mood and anxiety regulation by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: A potential pathway to modulate aggression and related behavioral states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciotto, Marina R; Lewis, Alan S; van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I; Mineur, Yann S

    2015-09-01

    The co-morbidity between smoking and mood disorders is striking. Preclinical and clinical studies of nicotinic effects on mood, anxiety, aggression, and related behaviors, such as irritability and agitation, suggest that smokers may use the nicotine in tobacco products as an attempt to self-medicate symptoms of affective disorders. The role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in circuits regulating mood and anxiety is beginning to be elucidated in animal models, but the mechanisms underlying the effects of nicotine on aggression-related behavioral states (ARBS) are still not understood. Clinical trials of nicotine or nicotinic medications for neurological and psychiatric disorders have often found effects of nicotinic medications on ARBS, but few trials have studied these outcomes systematically. Similarly, the increase in ARBS resulting from smoking cessation can be resolved by nicotinic agents, but the effects of nicotinic medications on these types of mental states and behaviors in non-smokers are less well understood. Here we review the literature on the role of nAChRs in regulating mood and anxiety, and subsequently on the closely related construct of ARBS. We suggest avenues for future study to identify how nAChRs and nicotinic agents may play a role in these clinically important areas. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. PMID:25582289

  7. Phosphocholine - an agonist of metabotropic but not of ionotropic functions of α9-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, K; Mathes, V; Fronius, M; Althaus, M; Hecker, A; Krasteva-Christ, G; Padberg, W; Hone, A J; McIntosh, J M; Zakrzewicz, A; Grau, V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that phosphocholine and phosphocholine-modified macromolecules efficiently inhibit ATP-dependent release of interleukin-1β from human and murine monocytes by a mechanism involving nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Interleukin-1β is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine of innate immunity that plays pivotal roles in host defence. Control of interleukin-1β release is vital as excessively high systemic levels cause life threatening inflammatory diseases. In spite of its structural similarity to acetylcholine, there are no other reports on interactions of phosphocholine with nAChR. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphocholine inhibits ion-channel function of ATP receptor P2X7 in monocytic cells via nAChR containing α9 and α10 subunits. In stark contrast to choline, phosphocholine does not evoke ion current responses in Xenopus laevis oocytes, which heterologously express functional homomeric nAChR composed of α9 subunits or heteromeric receptors containing α9 and α10 subunits. Preincubation of these oocytes with phosphocholine, however, attenuated choline-induced ion current changes, suggesting that phosphocholine may act as a silent agonist. We conclude that phophocholine activates immuno-modulatory nAChR expressed by monocytes but does not stimulate canonical ionotropic receptor functions. PMID:27349288

  8. Phosphocholine – an agonist of metabotropic but not of ionotropic functions of α9-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, K.; Mathes, V.; Fronius, M.; Althaus, M.; Hecker, A.; Krasteva-Christ, G.; Padberg, W.; Hone, A. J.; McIntosh, J. M.; Zakrzewicz, A.; Grau, V.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that phosphocholine and phosphocholine-modified macromolecules efficiently inhibit ATP-dependent release of interleukin-1β from human and murine monocytes by a mechanism involving nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Interleukin-1β is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine of innate immunity that plays pivotal roles in host defence. Control of interleukin-1β release is vital as excessively high systemic levels cause life threatening inflammatory diseases. In spite of its structural similarity to acetylcholine, there are no other reports on interactions of phosphocholine with nAChR. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphocholine inhibits ion-channel function of ATP receptor P2X7 in monocytic cells via nAChR containing α9 and α10 subunits. In stark contrast to choline, phosphocholine does not evoke ion current responses in Xenopus laevis oocytes, which heterologously express functional homomeric nAChR composed of α9 subunits or heteromeric receptors containing α9 and α10 subunits. Preincubation of these oocytes with phosphocholine, however, attenuated choline-induced ion current changes, suggesting that phosphocholine may act as a silent agonist. We conclude that phophocholine activates immuno-modulatory nAChR expressed by monocytes but does not stimulate canonical ionotropic receptor functions. PMID:27349288

  9. Pharmacokinetics and dopamine/acetylcholine releasing effects of ginsenoside Re in hippocampus and mPFC of freely moving rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing SHI; Wei XUE; Wen-jie ZHAO; Ke-xin LI

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the pharmacokinetics and dopamine/acetylcholine-releasing effects of ginsenoside Re (Re) in brain regions related to learning and memory,and to clarify the neurochemical mechanisms underlying its anti-dementia activity.Methods: Microdialysis was conducted on awake,freely moving adult male SD rats with dialysis probes implanted into the hippocampus,medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) or the third ventricle.The concentrations of Re,dopamine (DA) and acetylcholine (ACh) in dialysates were determined using LC-MS/MS.Results: Subcutaneous administration of a single dose of Re (12.5,25 or 50 mg/kg) rapidly distributed to the cerebrospinal fluid and exhibited linear pharmacokinetics.The peak concentration (Cmax) occurred at 60 min for all doses.Re was not detectable after 240 min in the dialysates for the low dose of 12.5 mg/kg.At the same time,Re dose-dependently increased extracellular levels of DA and ACh in the hippocampus and mPFC,and more prominent effects were observed in the hippocampus.Conclusion: The combined study of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Re demonstrate that increase of extracellular levels of DA and ACh,particularly in the hippocampus,may contribute,at least in part,to the anti-dementia activity of Re.

  10. PASSIVE-AVOIDANCE TRAINING INDUCES ENHANCED LEVELS OF IMMUNOREACTIVITY FOR MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR AND COEXPRESSED PKC-GAMMA AND MAP-2 IN RAT CORTICAL-NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; DOUMA, BRK; BOHUS, B; LUITEN, PGM

    1994-01-01

    Changes in neocortical immunoreactivity (ir) for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), protein kinase C gamma (PKC gamma), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PARV) induced by the performance of a one-trial passive shock avoidance (PSA) task

  11. Role of the cholinergic nervous system in rheumatoid arthritis: aggravation of arthritis in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha7 subunit gene knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. van Maanen; S.P. Stoof; G.J. Larosa; M.J. Vervoordeldonk; P.P. Tak

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The alpha7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha7nAChR) can negatively regulate the synthesis and release of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages and fibroblast-like synoviocytes in vitro. In addition, stimulation of the alpha7nAChR can reduce the severity of arthritis

  12. Structural differences in the two agonist binding sites of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor revealed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, K. L.; Corringer, P. J.; Edelstein, S. J.;

    2000-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo marmorata carries two nonequivalent agonist binding sites at the αδ and αγ subunit interfaces. These sites have been characterized by time-resolved fluorescence with the partial nicotinic agonist dansyl-C6-choline (Dnscho). When bound to t...

  13. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands methyllycaconitine, NS6740 and GTS-21 reduce lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α release from microglia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory properties of, particularly the α7, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the peripheral immune system are well documented. There are also reports of anti-inflammatory actions of nicotine in the CNS, but it is unclear, whether this is due to activation or inhibition...

  14. Type I and II positive allosteric modulators differentially modulate agonist-induced up-regulation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    Long-term treatment with nicotine or selective α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists increases the number of α7 nAChRs and this up-regulation may be involved in the mechanism underlying the sustained procognitive effect of these compounds. Here, we investigate the influence of type I...

  15. Solid-phase synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of analogues of PhTX-12-A potent and selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian R; Andersen, Kim;

    2002-01-01

    Philanthotoxin-12 (PhTX-12) is a novel potent and selective, noncompetitive antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Homologues of PhTX-12 with 7-11 methylene groups between the primary amino group and the aromatic head-group were synthesized using solid-phase methodology. In vitro...

  16. The nicotinic alpha7 acetylcholine receptor agonist ssr180711 is unable to activate limbic neurons in mice overexpressing human amyloid-beta1-42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soderman, A.; Spang-Thomsen, Mogens; Hansen, H.;

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that amyloid-beta1-42 (Abeta1-42) binds to the nicotinergic alpha7 acetylcholine receptor (alpha7 nAChR) and that the application of Abeta1-42 to cells inhibits the function of the alpha7 nAChR. The in vivo consequences of the pharmacological activation of the alpha...

  17. The role of the a7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor on motor coordination in mice treated with methyllcaconitine and anabasine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adverse effects of methyllycaconitine (MLA) have been attributed to competitive antagonism of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Research has indicated a correlation between the LD50 of MLA and the amount of a7 nAChR in various mouse strains, suggesting that mice with more a7 nAChR requi...

  18. COMPARISON OF HISTAMINE AND ACETYLCHOLINE FOR USE IN BRONCHIAL CHALLENGE TESTING IN ATOPIC AND NONATOPIC SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC AIRWAYS OBSTRUCTION - A REVIEW OF 180 CASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GIMENO, F; KOETER, GH; DEMONCHY, JGR; VANALTENA, R

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the diagnostic yield for bronchial hyperresponsiveness from histamine and acetylcholine challenge tests. The records of 180 cases from the last 10 years were analysed. They were selected because their hyperresponsiveness to inhaled histamine or acetylc

  19. The α4β2 nicotine acetylcholine receptor agonist ispronicline induces c-Fos expression in selective regions of the rat forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Julie; Hansen, Henrik H; Kiss, Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    The dominant nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype in the brain is the pentameric receptor containing both α4 and β2 subunits (α4β2). Due to the lack of selective agonists it has not been ruled out what neuronal circuits that are stimulated after systemic administration with nicotine. W...

  20. The effects of postnatal alcohol exposure and galantamine on the context pre-exposure facilitation effect and acetylcholine efflux using in vivo microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Amy E; Fadel, Jim R; Kelly, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are characterized by damage to multiple brain regions, including the hippocampus, which is involved in learning and memory. The acetylcholine neurotransmitter system provides major input to the hippocampus and is a possible target of developmental alcohol exposure. Alcohol (3.0 g/kg/day) was administered via intubation to male rat pups (postnatal day [PD] 2-10; ethanol-treated [ET]). Controls received a sham intubation (IC) or no treatment (NC). Acetylcholine efflux was measured using in vivo microdialysis (PD 32-35). ET animals were not different at baseline, but had decreased K(+)/Ca(2+)-induced acetylcholine efflux compared to NC animals and an enhanced acetylcholine response to galantamine (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor; 2.0 mg/kg) compared to both control groups. A separate cohort of animals was tested in the context pre-exposure facilitation effect task (CPFE; PD 30-32) following postnatal alcohol exposure and administration of galantamine (2.0 mg/kg; PD 11-30). Neither chronic galantamine nor postnatal alcohol exposure influenced performance in the CPFE task. Using immunohistochemistry, we found that neither alcohol exposure nor behavioral testing significantly altered the density of vesicular acetylcholine transporter or alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the ventral hippocampus (CA1). In the medial septum, the average number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT+) cells was increased in ET animals that displayed the context-shock association; there were no changes in IC and NC animals that learned the context-shock association or in any animals that were in the control task that entailed no learning. Taken together, these results indicate that the hippocampal acetylcholine system is significantly disrupted under conditions of pharmacological manipulations (e.g., galantamine) in alcohol-exposed animals. Furthermore, ChAT was up‑regulated in ET animals that learned the CPFE, which may account for their ability

  1. Characterization of opioid receptor types modulating acetylcholine release in septal regions of the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazyakan, E; Hennegriff, M; Haaf, A; Landwehrmeyer, G B; Feuerstein, T J; Jackisch, R

    2000-07-01

    Presynaptic opioid receptors of the delta- and mu-types have been shown to inhibit the release of acetylcholine (ACh) in the rat striatum and hippocampus, respectively, but it is unknown whether opioid receptors modulate the release of ACh also in the region of origin of the hippocampal cholinergic innervation, the septum. To answer this question, slices (350 microm) of the medial septal area and of the diagonal band of Broca, as well as (for comparison) of the hippocampus, were prepared from adult male Wistar rats. The slices were incubated with [3H]choline, superfused in the presence of hemicholinium-3 (10 microM) and stimulated twice (S1, S2) by electrical fields (360 pulses, 3 Hz, 2 ms, 60 mA); opioid receptor agonists were present during S2. The preferential mu-agonist [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]enkephalin (DAMGO) inhibited the evoked ACh release by maximally about 40% in hippocampal slices and acted even more strongly in the medial septal area, or the diagonal band of Broca (about 60% or 75% maximal inhibition, respectively). These effects were reduced or abolished by the preferential mu-antagonist naloxone, which showed no effects when given alone. Using naloxone in the presence of a cocktail of peptidase inhibitors, no evidence for an endogenous tone of opioid peptides was found in the medial septal area, diagonal band of Broca or the hippocampus. Using the preferential delta-agonist [D-Pen2, D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE) and the delta-antagonist naltrindole, a delta-opioid receptor inhibiting evoked ACh release was clearly detectable both in the medial septal area and the diagonal band of Broca, but not in the hippocampus, whereas the preferential kappa-agonist trans-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclo-hexyl] benzeneacetamide (U50,488H) had only weak or no effects. In addition to the functional experiments, double in-situ hybridization studies were performed, in which cells containing mRNA for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) were labeled by an

  2. Characterization of the retina in the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marci L.

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are involved in visual processing and are expressed by inner retinal neurons in all species studied to date (Keyser et al., 2000; Dmitrieva et al., 2007; Liu et al., 2009), but their distribution in the mouse retina remains unknown. Reductions in alpha7 nicotinic AChRs (nAChRs) are thought to contribute to memory and visual deficits observed in Alzheimer's and schizophrenia (Coyle et al., 1983; Nordberg et al., 1999; Leonard et al., 2006). However, the alpha7 nAChR knockout (KO) mouse has a mild phenotype (Paylor et al., 1998; Fernandes et al., 2006; Young et al., 2007; Origlia et al., 2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of AChRs in wildtype (WT) mouse retina and to assess whether up-regulation of other AChRs in the alpha7 nAChR KO retina may explain the minimal deficits described in the KO mouse. Reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) showed that mRNA transcripts for alpha2-7, alpha 9, alpha10, beta2-4 nAChR subunits and m1-m5 muscarinic AChR (mAChR) subtypes were present in WT murine retina. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of alpha3-5, alpha9, and m1-m5 AChR proteins and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated nAChR and mAChR proteins expressed by subsets of bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells. This is the first reported expression of alpha9 and alpha10 nAChR transcripts and alpha9 nAChR proteins in the retina of any species. Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) showed changes in AChR transcript expression in the alpha7 nAChR KO mouse retina relative to WT. Within whole retina alpha2, alpha9, alpha10, beta4, m1 and m4 AChR transcripts were up-regulated, while alpha5 nAChR transcripts were down-regulated. However, cell populations showed subtle differences; m4 mAChR transcripts were up-regulated in the ganglion cell layer and outer portion of the inner nuclear layer (oINL),while beta4 nAChR transcript up-regulation was limited to the oINL. Surprisingly, alpha2, alpha9, beta4, m2 and m4 transcripts were

  3. Multiple transmembrane binding sites for p-trifluoromethyldiazirinyl-etomidate, a photoreactive Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor allosteric inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ayman K; Stewart, Deirdre S; Husain, S Shaukat; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2011-06-10

    Photoreactive derivatives of the general anesthetic etomidate have been developed to identify their binding sites in γ-aminobutyric acid, type A and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. One such drug, [(3)H]TDBzl-etomidate (4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzyl-[(3)H]1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate), acts as a positive allosteric potentiator of Torpedo nACh receptor (nAChR) and binds to a novel site in the transmembrane domain at the γ-α subunit interface. To extend our understanding of the locations of allosteric modulator binding sites in the nAChR, we now characterize the interactions of a second aryl diazirine etomidate derivative, TFD-etomidate (ethyl-1-(1-(4-(3-trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl)phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate). TFD-etomidate inhibited acetylcholine-induced currents with an IC(50) = 4 μM, whereas it inhibited the binding of [(3)H]phencyclidine to the Torpedo nAChR ion channel in the resting and desensitized states with IC(50) values of 2.5 and 0.7 mm, respectively. Similar to [(3)H]TDBzl-etomidate, [(3)H]TFD-etomidate bound to a site at the γ-α subunit interface, photolabeling αM2-10 (αSer-252) and γMet-295 and γMet-299 within γM3, and to a site in the ion channel, photolabeling amino acids within each subunit M2 helix that line the lumen of the ion channel. In addition, [(3)H]TFD-etomidate photolabeled in an agonist-dependent manner amino acids within the δ subunit M2-M3 loop (δIle-288) and the δ subunit transmembrane helix bundle (δPhe-232 and δCys-236 within δM1). The fact that TFD-etomidate does not compete with ion channel blockers at concentrations that inhibit acetylcholine responses indicates that binding to sites at the γ-α subunit interface and/or within δ subunit helix bundle mediates the TFD-etomidate inhibitory effect. These results also suggest that the γ-α subunit interface is a binding site for Torpedo nAChR negative allosteric modulators (TFD-etomidate) and for positive

  4. Supplementing female rats with DHA-lysophosphatidylcholine increases docosahexaenoic acid and acetylcholine contents in the brain and improves the memory and learning capabilities of the pups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, A.; Nieto, S.; Sanhueza, J.; Morgado, N.; Rojas, I.; Zanartu, P.

    2010-07-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (Dha) is supplied to the foetus and newborn through the mother from their own reserves and their diet. No consensus about the best form to supplement DHA has been established. We propose that DHA containing lysophosphatidylcholine (DHA-LPC), obtained from DHA-rich eggs may be a suitable form of DHA and choline (the precursor of acetylcholine) supplementation. We evaluated the effectiveness of DHA-LPC to increase DHA and acetylcholine concentration in the brain of pups born from female rats supplemented with DHA-LPC before and during pregnancy. We also evaluated the effect of DHA supplementation on learning and memory capabilities of pups through the Skinner test for operant conditioning. Female Wistar rats received 40-day supplementation of DHA-LPC (8 mg DHA/kg b.w/daily.), before and during pregnancy. After delivery, plasma, erythrocyte, liver, and adipose tissue DHA and plasma choline were analyzed. Brains from 60 day-old pups separated into frontal cortex, cerebellum, striatum, hippocampus, and occipital cortex, were assessed for DHA, acetylcholine, and acetylcholine transferase (CAT) activity. Pups were subjected to the Skinner box test. DHA-LPC supplementation produces higher choline and liver DHA contents in the mothers plasma and increases the pups DHA and acetylcholine in the cerebellum and hippocampus. CAT was not modified by supplementation. The Skinner test shows that pups born from DHA-LPC supplemented mothers exhibit better scores of learning and memory than the controls. Conclusion: DHA-LPC may be an adequate form for DHA supplementation during the perinatal period. (Author) 66 refs.

  5. Flow- and acetylcholine-induced dilation in small arteries from rats with renovascular hypertension - effect of tempol treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Frank Holden; Stankevicius, Edgaras; Hansen, Thomas;

    2007-01-01

    with either vehicle or tempol (from weeks 5 to 10 after placement of the clip), and uninephrectomized control rats were investigated. In renal hypertensive rats systolic blood pressure increased to 171±6 mmHg (n=10), while in tempol-treated rats systolic blood pressure remained normal (139±7 mmHg, n=5...... blood pressure and tempol treatment. Simultaneous measurements of NO-concentration and relaxation were performed in isolated coronary arteries from the same animals. As compared to vehicle-treated rats, both acetylcholine-induced relaxation and NO-concentration increased in arteries from tempol......-treated animals, while only the relaxation was improved by the NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). In conclusion renovascular hypertension selectively inhibits flow-induced NO-mediated vasodilatation, while EDHF-type vasodilatation remains unaffected, suggesting that high blood pressure leads...

  6. Automated production of [¹⁸F]VAT suitable for clinical PET study of vesicular acetylcholine transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xuyi; Bognar, Christopher; Zhang, Xiang; Gaehle, Gregory G; Moerlein, Stephen M; Perlmutter, Joel S; Tu, Zhude

    2016-01-01

    Automated production of a promising radiopharmaceutical (-)-(1-(8-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethoxy)-3-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-yl)-piperidin-4-yl)(4-fluorophenyl)methanone ([(18)F]VAT) for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter(VAChT) was achieved using a two-step procedure in a current Good Manufacturing Practices fashion. The production of [(18)F]VAT was accomplished in approximately 140 min, with radiochemical yield of ~15.0% (decay corrected), specific activity>111 GBq/µmol, radiochemical purity>99% and mass of VAT ~3.4 μg/batch (n>10). The radiopharmaceutical product meets all quality control criteria for human use, and is suitable for clinical PET studies of VAChT. PMID:26408913

  7. Rapid antidepressant actions of scopolamine: Role of medial prefrontal cortex and M1-subtype muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarria, Andrea; Wohleb, Eric S; Voleti, Bhavya; Ota, Kristie T; Dutheil, Sophie; Lepack, Ashley E; Dwyer, Jason M; Fuchikami, Manabu; Becker, Astrid; Drago, Filippo; Duman, Ronald S

    2015-10-01

    Clinical studies demonstrate that scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAchR) antagonist, produces rapid therapeutic effects in depressed patients, and preclinical studies report that the actions of scopolamine require glutamate receptor activation and the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The present study extends these findings to determine the role of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and specific muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M-AchR) subtypes in the actions of scopolamine. The administration of scopolamine increases the activity marker Fos in the mPFC, including the infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PrL) subregions. Microinfusions of scopolamine into either the IL or the PrL produced significant antidepressant responses in the forced swim test, and neuronal silencing of IL or PrL blocked the antidepressant effects of systemic scopolamine. The results also demonstrate that the systemic administration of a selective M1-AChR antagonist, VU0255035, produced an antidepressant response and stimulated mTORC1 signaling in the PFC, similar to the actions of scopolamine. Finally, we used a chronic unpredictable stress model as a more rigorous test of rapid antidepressant actions and found that a single dose of scopolamine or VU0255035 blocked the anhedonic response caused by CUS, an effect that requires the chronic administration of typical antidepressants. Taken together, these findings indicate that mPFC is a critical mediator of the behavioral actions of scopolamine and identify the M1-AChR as a therapeutic target for the development of novel and selective rapid-acting antidepressants. PMID:26102021

  8. Trace eyeblink conditioning is impaired in α7 but not in β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knock-out mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L Brown

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are essentially involved in learning and memory. A neurobiologically and behaviorally well-characterized measure of learning and memory, eyeblink classical conditioning, is sensitive to disruptions in acetylcholine neurotransmission. The two most common forms of eyeblink classical conditioning – the delay and trace paradigms - differentially engage forebrain areas densely-populated with nAChRs. The present study used genetically modified mice to investigate the effects of selective nAChR subunit deletion on delay and trace eyeblink classical conditioning. α7 and β2 nAChR subunit knockout (KO mice and their wild-type littermates were trained for 10 daily sessions in a 500 ms delay or 500 ms trace eyeblink conditioning task, matched for the interstimulus interval (ISI between conditioned stimulus (CS and unconditioned stimulus (US onset. Impairments in conditioned responding were found in α7 KO mice trained in trace – but not delay – eyeblink conditioning. Relative to littermate controls, β2 KO mice were unimpaired in the trace task but displayed higher levels of conditioned responding in delay eyeblink conditioning. Elevated conditioned response levels in delay-conditioned β2 KOs corresponded to elevated levels of alpha responding in this group. These findings suggest that α7 nAChRs play a role in normal acquisition of 500 ms trace eyeblink classical conditioning in mice. The prominent distribution of α7 nAChRs in the hippocampus and other forebrain regions may account for these genotype-specific acquisition effects in this hippocampus-dependent trace paradigm.

  9. Toxicity of the synthetic polymeric 3-alkylpyridinium salt (APS3) is due to specific block of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandič, Marjana; Aráoz, Romulo; Molgó, Jordi; Turk, Tom; Sepčić, Kristina; Benoit, Evelyne; Frangež, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The in vivo and in vitro toxic effects of the synthetic polymeric 3-alkylpyridinium salt (APS3), from the Mediterranean marine sponge Reniera sarai, were evaluated on mammals, with emphasis to determine its mode of action. The median lethal doses of APS3 were 7.25 and higher that 20mg/kg in mouse and rat, respectively. Intravenous administration of 7.25 and 20mg/kg APS3 to rat caused a significant fall followed by an increase in mean arterial blood pressure accompanied by tachycardia. In addition, cumulative doses of APS3 (up to 60 mg/kg) inhibited rat nerve-evoked skeletal muscle contraction in vivo, with a median inhibitory dose (ID(50)) of 37.25mg/kg. When administrated locally by intramuscular injection to mouse, APS3 decreased the compound muscle action potential recorded in response to in vivo nerve stimulation, with an ID(50) of 0.5mg/kg. In vitro experiments confirmed the inhibitory effect of APS3 on mouse hemidiaphragm nerve-evoked muscle contraction with a median inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 20.3 μM, without affecting directly elicited muscle contraction. The compound inhibited also miniature endplate potentials and nerve-evoked endplate potentials with an IC(50) of 7.28 μM in mouse hemidiaphragm. Finally, APS3 efficiently blocked acetylcholine-activated membrane inward currents flowing through Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) incorporated to Xenopus oocytes, with an IC(50) of 0.19 μM. In conclusion, our results strongly suggest that APS3 blocks muscle-type nAChRs, and show for the first time that in vivo toxicity of APS3 is likely to occur through an antagonist action of the compound on these receptors.

  10. Natural Compounds Interacting with Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: From Low-Molecular Weight Ones to Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Kudryavtsev

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs fulfill a variety of functions making identification and analysis of nAChR subtypes a challenging task. Traditional instruments for nAChR research are d-tubocurarine, snake venom protein α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgt, and α-conotoxins, neurotoxic peptides from Conus snails. Various new compounds of different structural classes also interacting with nAChRs have been recently identified. Among the low-molecular weight compounds are alkaloids pibocin, varacin and makaluvamines C and G. 6-Bromohypaphorine from the mollusk Hermissenda crassicornis does not bind to Torpedo nAChR but behaves as an agonist on human α7 nAChR. To get more selective α-conotoxins, computer modeling of their complexes with acetylcholine-binding proteins and distinct nAChRs was used. Several novel three-finger neurotoxins targeting nAChRs were described and α-Bgt inhibition of GABA-A receptors was discovered. Information on the mechanisms of nAChR interactions with the three-finger proteins of the Ly6 family was found. Snake venom phospholipases A2 were recently found to inhibit different nAChR subtypes. Blocking of nAChRs in Lymnaea stagnalis neurons was shown for venom C-type lectin-like proteins, appearing to be the largest molecules capable to interact with the receptor. A huge nAChR molecule sensible to conformational rearrangements accommodates diverse binding sites recognizable by structurally very different compounds.

  11. Identification and Functional Characterization of a Novel Acetylcholine-binding Protein from the Marine Annelid Capitella teleta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormack, T.; Petrovich,; Mercier, K; DeRose, E; Cuneo, M; Williams, J; Johnson, K; Lamb, P; London, R; Yakel, J

    2010-01-01

    We identified a homologue of the molluscan acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP) in the marine polychaete Capitella teleta, from the annelid phylum. The amino acid sequence of C. teleta AChBP (ct-AChBP) is 21-30% identical with those of known molluscan AChBPs. Sequence alignments indicate that ct-AChBP has a shortened Cys loop compared to other Cys loop receptors, and a variation on a conserved Cys loop triad, which is associated with ligand binding in other AChBPs and nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) {alpha} subunits. Within the D loop of ct-AChBP, a conserved aromatic residue (Tyr or Trp) in nAChRs and molluscan AChBPs, which has been implicated directly in ligand binding, is substituted with an isoleucine. Mass spectrometry results indicate that Asn122 and Asn216 of ct-AChBP are glycosylated when expressed using HEK293 cells. Small-angle X-ray scattering data suggest that the overall shape of ct-AChBP in the apo or unliganded state is similar to that of homologues with known pentameric crystal structures. NMR experiments show that acetylcholine, nicotine, and {alpha}-bungarotoxin bind to ct-AChBP with high affinity, with KD values of 28.7 {micro}M, 209 nM, and 110 nM, respectively. Choline bound with a lower affinity (K{sub D} = 163 {micro}M). Our finding of a functional AChBP in a marine annelid demonstrates that AChBPs may exhibit variations in hallmark motifs such as ligand-binding residues and Cys loop length and shows conclusively that this neurotransmitter binding protein is not limited to the phylum Mollusca.

  12. TC-1734: an orally active neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulator with antidepressant, neuroprotective and long-lasting cognitive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Gregory J; Bohme, G Andrees; Caldwell, William S; Letchworth, Sharon R; Traina, Vincent M; Obinu, M Carmen; Laville, Michel; Reibaud, Michel; Pradier, Laurent; Dunbar, Geoffrey; Bencherif, Merouane

    2004-01-01

    The development of selective ligands targeting neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors to alleviate symptoms associated with neurodegenerative diseases presents the advantage of affecting multiple deficits that are the hallmarks of these pathologies. TC-1734 is an orally active novel neuronal nicotinic agonist with high selectivity for neuronal nicotinic receptors. Microdialysis studies indicate that TC-1734 enhances the release of acetylcholine from the cortex. TC-1734, by either acute or repeated administration, exhibits memory enhancing properties in rats and mice and is neuroprotective following excitotoxic insult in fetal rat brain in cultures and against alterations of synaptic transmission induced by deprivation of glucose and oxygen in hippocampal slices. At submaximal doses, TC-1734 produced additive cognitive effects when used in combination with tacrine or donepezil. Unlike (-)-nicotine, behavioral sensitization does not develop following repeated administration of TC-1734. Its pharmacokinetic (PK) profile (half-life of 2 h) contrasts with the long lasting improvement in working memory (18 h) demonstrating that cognitive improvement extends beyond the lifetime of the compound. The very low acute toxicity of TC-1734 and its receptor activity profile provides additional mechanistic basis for its suggested potential as a clinical candidate. TC-1734 was very well tolerated in acute and chronic oral toxicity studies in mice, rats and dogs. Phase I clinical trials demonstrated TC-1734's favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profile by acute oral administration at doses ranging from 2 to 320 mg. The bioavailability, pharmacological, pharmacokinetic, and safety profile of TC-1734 provides an example of a safe, potent and efficacious neuronal nicotinic modulator that holds promise for the management of the hallmark symptomatologies observed in dementia. PMID:15179444

  13. Synthesis of 2-[18F]fluoro-3-[2(S)-2-azetidinylmethoxy]pyridine as a radioligand for imaging nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nChRs) are involved in the variouspharmacological effects or disease states. In order to study the central nChRs by PETor SPECT, some radioligands have been investigated. In this paper, the procedurefor synthesis of 2-[18F]fluoro-3-[2(S)-2-azetidinylmethoxy]pyridine (2-[18F]-A-85380), apotential PET ligand for in vivo imaging nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was described.2-[18F]-A-85380 was prepared from the precursor, 2-nitro-3-[(1-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)-2-(S)-azetidinyl)methoxy]pyridine(4), which was synthesized with commercial (S)-2-azetid- inecarboxylic acid as starting material. The whole procedure for radiosynthesisand purification was executed in about lh and 45-55% of the added fluorine-18 wasfound in the purified 2-[18F]-A-85380, with specific activity of 1.0-2.2 × 1011 Bq/μmol.``

  14. Interaction of Sulfonated Calix[n]arenes with Rhodamine B and Its Application to Determine Acetylcholine in a Real Neutral Aqueous Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG,Yong-Jun(张拥军); CAO,Wei-Xiao(曹维孝); XU,Jian(徐坚)

    2002-01-01

    Complexation between Rhodamine B (RB) and sulfonated calix [n]arenes (SCnA) were studied by means of UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. In the presence of sulfonated calix[n ]arones, the absorption band of Rhodamine B shifts to longer wavelength and its intensity decreases. The formation of a host-guest type complex also results in the fluorescence quenching of Rhodamine B. The association constants for the RB/SCnA complexes increase in the order of SC4A <SC6A < SC8A and show dependence on the size of the cavities of the calixarenes. The fluorescence is selectively regenerated by adding acetylcholine. Based on this observation, a method to determine acetylcholine in a real neutral aqueous medium was developed.

  15. Interaction of Sulfonated Calix [n] arenes with Rhodamine B and Its Application to Determine Acetylcholine in a Real Neutral Aqueous Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG,Yong-Jun; XU,Jian; 等

    2002-01-01

    Complexation between Rhodamine B(RB) and sulfonated calix [n] arenes (SCnA) were studied by means of UV-vis spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy.In the presence of sulfonated calix [n] arenes,the absorption hand of Rhodamine B shifts to longer wavelength and its intensity decreases.The formation of a host-guest type complex also results in the fluorescence quenching of Rhodamine B.The accociation constants for the RB/SCn A complexes increase in the order of SC4Aacetylcholine.Based on this observation,a method to determine acetylcholine in real neutral aqueous medium was developed.

  16. Relationship between the tissue redox state potential and dak/dt changes of [K+]0 activity during k-strophantoside or acetylcholine induced contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, I; Puppi, A; Dely, M

    1982-01-01

    It was established that oxidosis evoked by methylene blue during k-strophantoside and acetylcholine contractures in skeletal muscle was accompanied by an increase in the changes of [K+]0 activity, while redosis evoked by ascorbate under the same conditions was accompanied by a decrease in the changes of [K+]0 activity. These changes in [K+]0 activity parallelled the alterations of contractures caused by oxidosis or redosis suggesting that changes in the [K+]0 transient play an important role in these phenomena.

  17. Identifying Barbiturate Binding Sites in a Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor with [3H]Allyl m-Trifluoromethyldiazirine Mephobarbital, a Photoreactive Barbiturate

    OpenAIRE

    Hamouda, Ayman K.; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Chiara, David C.; Savechenkov, Pavel Y.; Bruzik, Karol S.; Cohen, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    At concentrations that produce anesthesia, many barbituric acid derivatives act as positive allosteric modulators of inhibitory GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and inhibitors of excitatory nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Recent research on [3H]R-mTFD-MPAB ([3H]R-5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyldiazirinylphenyl)barbituric acid), a photoreactive barbiturate that is a potent and stereoselective anesthetic and GABAAR potentiator, has identified a second class of intersubunit binding si...

  18. Pharmacological characterisation of α6β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors assembled from three different α6/α3 subunit chimeras in tsA201 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Bjørnskov; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Jensen, Anders A.

    2014-01-01

    by their inefficient functional expression in vitro. In the present study we have characterized and compared the pharmacological properties displayed by α6β4 and α6β4β3 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors assembled in tsA201 cells from the classical α6/α3 chimera (C1) and two novel α6/α3 chimeras (C6F223L and C16F223L...

  19. Visualizing calcium responses to acetylcholine convection along endothelium of arteriolar networks in Cx40BAC-GCaMP2 transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bagher, Pooneh; Davis, Michael J.; Segal, Steven S.

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholine evokes endothelium-dependent vasodilation subsequent to a rise in intracellular calcium. Despite widespread application in human and animal studies, calcium responses to intravascular ACh have not been visualized in vivo. Microiontophoresis of ACh in tissue adjacent to an arteriole activates abluminal muscarinic receptors on endothelial cells within a “local” region of diffusion, but it is unknown whether ACh released in such fashion gains access to the flow stream resulting in ...

  20. The Drosophila nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits Dα5 and Dα7 form functional homomeric and heteromeric ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansdell Stuart J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play an important role as excitatory neurotransmitters in vertebrate and invertebrate species. In insects, nAChRs are the site of action of commercially important insecticides and, as a consequence, there is considerable interest in examining their functional properties. However, problems have been encountered in the successful functional expression of insect nAChRs, although a number of strategies have been developed in an attempt to overcome such difficulties. Ten nAChR subunits have been identified in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster (Dα1-Dα7 and Dβ1-Dβ3 and a similar number have been identified in other insect species. The focus of the present study is the Dα5, Dα6 and Dα7 subunits, which are distinguished by their sequence similarity to one another and also by their close similarity to the vertebrate α7 nAChR subunit. Results A full-length cDNA clone encoding the Drosophila nAChR Dα5 subunit has been isolated and the properties of Dα5-, Dα6- and Dα7-containing nAChRs examined in a variety of cell expression systems. We have demonstrated the functional expression, as homomeric nAChRs, of the Dα5 and Dα7 subunits in Xenopus oocytes by their co-expression with the molecular chaperone RIC-3. Also, using a similar approach, we have demonstrated the functional expression of a heteromeric ‘triplet’ nAChR (Dα5 + Dα6 + Dα7 with substantially higher apparent affinity for acetylcholine than is seen with other subunit combinations. In addition, specific cell-surface binding of [125I]-α-bungarotoxin was detected in both Drosophila and mammalian cell lines when Dα5 was co-expressed with Dα6 and RIC-3. In contrast, co-expression of additional subunits (including Dα7 with Dα5 and Dα6 prevented specific binding of [125I]-α-bungarotoxin in cell lines, suggesting that co-assembly with other nAChR subunits can block maturation of correctly folded nAChRs in

  1. α4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulated by galantamine on nigrostriatal terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated rotational behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inden, Masatoshi; Takata, Kazuyuki; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Ashihara, Eishi; Tooyama, Ikuo; Shimohama, Shun; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    Galantamine, an acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibitor used to treat dementia symptoms, also acts as an allosteric potentiating ligand (APL) at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). This study was designed to evaluate the allosteric effect of galantamine on nAChR regulation of nigrostrial dopaminergic neuronal function in the hemiparkinsonian rat model established by unilateral nigral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection. Methamphetamine, a dopamine releaser, induced ipsilateral rotation, whereas dopamine agonists apomorphine (a non-selective dopamine receptor agonist), SKF38393 (a selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist), and quinpirole (a selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist) induced contralateral rotation. When 6-OHDA-injected rats were co-treated with nomifensine, a dopamine transporter inhibitor, a more pronounced and a remarkable effect of nicotine and galantamine was observed. Under these conditions, the combination of nomifensine with nicotine or galantamine induced the ipsilateral rotation similar to the methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior, indicating that nicotine and galantamine also induce dopamine release from striatal terminals. Both nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotations were significantly blocked by flupenthixol (an antagonist of both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors) and mecamylamine (an antagonist of nAChRs), suggesting that galantamine modulation of nAChRs on striatal dopaminergic terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated movement. Immunohistochemical staining showed that α4 nAChRs were highly expressed on striatal dopaminergic terminals, while no α7 nAChRs were detected. Pretreatment with the α4 nAChR antagonist dihydroxy-β-erythroidine significantly inhibited nicotine- and galantamine-induced rotational behaviors, whereas pretreatment with the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine was ineffective. Moreover, the α4 nAChR agonist ABT-418 induced ipsilateral rotation, while the α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987 had no

  2. An Antibody Biosensor Establishes the Activation of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor during Learning and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Adrian J; Bradley, Sophie J; Prihandoko, Rudi; Brooke, Simon M; Mogg, Adrian; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer M; Bottrill, Andrew R; Challiss, R A John; Broad, Lisa M; Felder, Christian C; Tobin, Andrew B

    2016-04-22

    Establishing the in vivo activation status of G protein-coupled receptors would not only indicate physiological roles of G protein-coupled receptors but would also aid drug discovery by establishing drug/receptor engagement. Here, we develop a phospho-specific antibody-based biosensor to detect activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 mAChR) in vitro and in vivo Mass spectrometry phosphoproteomics identified 14 sites of phosphorylation on the M1 mAChR. Phospho-specific antibodies to four of these sites established that serine at position 228 (Ser(228)) on the M1 mAChR showed extremely low levels of basal phosphorylation that were significantly up-regulated by orthosteric agonist stimulation. In addition, the M1 mAChR-positive allosteric modulator, 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid, enhanced acetylcholine-mediated phosphorylation at Ser(228) These data supported the hypothesis that phosphorylation at Ser(228) was an indicator of M1 mAChR activation. This was further supported in vivo by the identification of phosphorylated Ser(228) on the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus of mice following administration of the muscarinic ligands xanomeline and 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid. Finally, Ser(228) phosphorylation was seen to increase in the CA1 region of the hippocampus following memory acquisition, a response that correlated closely with up-regulation of CA1 neuronal activity. Thus, determining the phosphorylation status of the M1 mAChR at Ser(228) not only provides a means of establishing receptor activation following drug treatment both in vitro and in vivo but also allows for the mapping of the activation status of the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus following memory acquisition thereby establishing a link between M1 mAChR activation and hippocampus-based memory and learning. PMID:26826123

  3. The non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitor APS12-2 is a potent antagonist of skeletal muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandič, Marjana [Institute of Physiology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Veterinary Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Gerbičeva 60, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Aráoz, Romulo; Molgó, Jordi [CNRS, Institut de Neurobiologie Alfred Fessard, FRC 2118, Laboratoire de Neurobiologie et Développement, UPR 3294, F-91198 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Turk, Tom; Sepčić, Kristina [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Večna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Benoit, Evelyne [CNRS, Institut de Neurobiologie Alfred Fessard, FRC 2118, Laboratoire de Neurobiologie et Développement, UPR 3294, F-91198 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Frangež, Robert, E-mail: robert.frangez@vf.uni-lj.si [Institute of Physiology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Veterinary Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Gerbičeva 60, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-12-01

    APS12-2, a non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, is one of the synthetic analogs of polymeric alkylpyridinium salts (poly-APS) isolated from the marine sponge Reniera sarai. In the present work the effects of APS12-2 were studied on isolated mouse phrenic nerve–hemidiaphragm muscle preparations, using twitch tension measurements and electrophysiological recordings. APS12-2 in a concentration-dependent manner blocked nerve-evoked isometric muscle contraction (IC{sub 50} = 0.74 μM), without affecting directly-elicited twitch tension up to 2.72 μM. The compound (0.007–3.40 μM) decreased the amplitude of miniature endplate potentials until a complete block by concentrations higher than 0.68 μM, without affecting their frequency. Full size endplate potentials, recorded after blocking voltage-gated muscle sodium channels, were inhibited by APS12-2 in a concentration-dependent manner (IC{sub 50} = 0.36 μM) without significant change in the resting membrane potential of the muscle fibers up to 3.40 μM. The compound also blocked acetylcholine-evoked inward currents in Xenopus oocytes in which Torpedo (α1{sub 2}β1γδ) muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been incorporated (IC{sub 50} = 0.0005 μM), indicating a higher affinity of the compound for Torpedo (α1{sub 2}β1γδ) than for the mouse (α1{sub 2}β1γε) nAChR. Our data show for the first time that APS12-2 blocks neuromuscular transmission by a non-depolarizing mechanism through an action on postsynaptic nAChRs of the skeletal neuromuscular junction. -- Highlights: ► APS12-2 produces concentration-dependent inhibition of nerve-evoked muscle contraction in vitro. ► APS12-2 blocks MEPPs and EPPs at the neuromuscular junction. APS12-2 blocks ACh-activated current in Xenopus oocytes incorporated with Torpedo nAChRs.

  4. The non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitor APS12-2 is a potent antagonist of skeletal muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    APS12-2, a non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, is one of the synthetic analogs of polymeric alkylpyridinium salts (poly-APS) isolated from the marine sponge Reniera sarai. In the present work the effects of APS12-2 were studied on isolated mouse phrenic nerve–hemidiaphragm muscle preparations, using twitch tension measurements and electrophysiological recordings. APS12-2 in a concentration-dependent manner blocked nerve-evoked isometric muscle contraction (IC50 = 0.74 μM), without affecting directly-elicited twitch tension up to 2.72 μM. The compound (0.007–3.40 μM) decreased the amplitude of miniature endplate potentials until a complete block by concentrations higher than 0.68 μM, without affecting their frequency. Full size endplate potentials, recorded after blocking voltage-gated muscle sodium channels, were inhibited by APS12-2 in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.36 μM) without significant change in the resting membrane potential of the muscle fibers up to 3.40 μM. The compound also blocked acetylcholine-evoked inward currents in Xenopus oocytes in which Torpedo (α12β1γδ) muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been incorporated (IC50 = 0.0005 μM), indicating a higher affinity of the compound for Torpedo (α12β1γδ) than for the mouse (α12β1γε) nAChR. Our data show for the first time that APS12-2 blocks neuromuscular transmission by a non-depolarizing mechanism through an action on postsynaptic nAChRs of the skeletal neuromuscular junction. -- Highlights: ► APS12-2 produces concentration-dependent inhibition of nerve-evoked muscle contraction in vitro. ► APS12-2 blocks MEPPs and EPPs at the neuromuscular junction. APS12-2 blocks ACh-activated current in Xenopus oocytes incorporated with Torpedo nAChRs.

  5. Agonist-induced hump current production in heterologously-expressed human α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang LIE; Ke-wei YU; Yong-chang CHANG; Ronald J LUKAS; Jie WU

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To characterize the functional and pharmacological features of agonist-induced hump currents in human α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR).Methods:Whole-cell and outside-out patch recordings were performed using human α4β2-nAChR heterologously expressed in stably-transfected,native nAChR-null subclonal human epithelial 1 (SH-EP1) cells.RT-PCR was used to test the mRNA expression of transfected nAChR.Homology modeling and ace-tylcholine (Ach) docking were applied to show the possible Ach-binding site in the channel pore.Results:The rapid exposure of 10 mmol/L Ach induced an inward current with a decline from peak to steady-state.However,after the re-moval of Ach,an additional inward current,called "hump" current,reoccurred.The ability of agonists to produce these hump currents cannot be easily explained based on drug size,charge,acute potency,or actions as full or partial agonists.Hump currents were associated with a rebound increase in whole-cell conductance,and they had voltage dependence-like peak currents induced by agonist action.Hump currents blocked by the α4β2-nAChR antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine were reduced when α4β2-nAChR were desensitized,and were more pronounced in the absence of external Ca2+.Outside-out single-channel recordings demon-strated that compared to 1 μmol/L nicotine,100 μmol/L nicotine reduced channel current amplitude,shortened the channel mean open time,and prolonged the channel mean closed time,supporting an agonist-induced open-channel block before hump current production.A docking model also simulated the agonist-binding site in the channel pore.Conclusion:These results support the hypoth-esis that hump currents reflect a rapid release of agonists from the α4β2-nAChR channel pore and a rapid recovery from desensitized α4β2-nAChR.

  6. The formation and continuous turnover of a fraction of phosphatidic acid on stimulation of NaC1 secretion by acetylcholine in the salt gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokin, M R; Hokin, L E

    1967-03-01

    Acetylcholine, which stimulates NaCl secretion in the avian salt gland, causes the rapid formation of a fraction of phosphatidic acid, as measured by (32)P incorporation, which amounts maximally to about 0.18 micromoles per g of fresh tissue. This does not appear to involve synthesis of the diglyceride moiety of phosphatidic acid, as measured by glycerol-1-(14)C incorporation. It presumably involves formation of phosphatidic acid by the diglyceride kinase pathway from preformed diglyceride and ATP. The specific activity of the AT(32)P of the tissue is not increased in the presence of acetylcholine. At time intervals after addition of acetylcholine during which a full response, measured as increased O(2) uptake, may be observed, phosphatidic acid appears to be the only phosphatide which shows any increase either in total (32)P radioactivity or in net specific acitvity. This responsive fraction of phosphatidic acid undergoes continuous turnover of its phosphate moiety. There is no evidence that this turnover is due to the phosphatidic acid acting as a pool of intermediate for the synthesis of other phospholipids or glycerides. The responsive fraction amounts to not more than 20% of the total phosphatidic acid of the tissue; it does not mix with the other (non-responsive) phosphatidic acid of the tissue. The observations suggest that this phosphatidic acid plays some role in the over-all secretory process.

  7. Repeated administration of almonds increases brain acetylcholine levels and enhances memory function in healthy rats while attenuates memory deficits in animal model of amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batool, Zehra; Sadir, Sadia; Liaquat, Laraib; Tabassum, Saiqa; Madiha, Syeda; Rafiq, Sahar; Tariq, Sumayya; Batool, Tuba Sharf; Saleem, Sadia; Naqvi, Fizza; Perveen, Tahira; Haider, Saida

    2016-01-01

    Dietary nutrients may play a vital role in protecting the brain from age-related memory dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases. Tree nuts including almonds have shown potential to combat age-associated brain dysfunction. These nuts are an important source of essential nutrients, such as tocopherol, folate, mono- and poly-unsaturated fatty acids, and polyphenols. These components have shown promise as possible dietary supplements to prevent or delay the onset of age-associated cognitive dysfunction. This study investigated possible protective potential of almond against scopolamine induced amnesia in rats. The present study also investigated a role of acetylcholine in almond induced memory enhancement. Rats in test group were orally administrated with almond suspension (400 mg/kg/day) for four weeks. Both control and almond-treated rats were then divided into saline and scopolamine injected groups. Rats in the scopolamine group were injected with scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg) five minutes before the start of each memory test. Memory was assessed by elevated plus maze (EPM), Morris water maze (MWM) and novel object recognition (NOR) task. Cholinergic function was determined in terms of hippocampal and frontal cortical acetylcholine content and acetylcholinesterase activity. Results of the present study suggest that almond administration for 28 days significantly improved memory retention. This memory enhancing effect of almond was also observed in scopolamine induced amnesia model. Present study also suggests a role of acetylcholine in the attenuation of scopolamine induced amnesia by almond. PMID:26548495

  8. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation ameliorates scopolamine-induced behavioural changes in a modified continuous Y-maze task in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redrobe, John P; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Christensen, Jeppe K; Peters, Dan; Timmermann, Daniel B; Olsen, Gunnar M

    2009-01-01

    The alpha7 (alpha7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor may represent a drug target for the treatment of disorders associated with working memory/attentional dysfunction. We investigated the effects of three distinct alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists: 2-methyl-5-(6-phenyl-pyridazin-3-yl)-octahydro-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (A-582941; 0.01-0.1 mg/kg), 4-bromophenyl 1,4-diazabicyclo(3.2.2) nonane-4-carboxylate (SSR180711; 0.3-3 mg/kg) and N-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl]-4-chlorobenzamide (PNU-282987; 1-10 mg/kg), on scopolamine-induced deficits in a modified Y-maze procedure. Mice were forced to choose one of two visually distinct arms, and were confined there for a 5 min exploration period before being allowed to explore both arms for a 2 min test session, immediately thereafter. The time spent in each arm, entries and total distance travelled were recorded using an automated system. Characterisation experiments showed that scopolamine-treated (1 mg/kg) mice spent less time exploring the unfamiliar arm, when compared with vehicle-treated animals. Combination experiments showed that all three alpha7 agonists ameliorated scopolamine-induced changes in unfamiliar arm exploration. In conclusion, the present data support the idea that alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors may represent an interesting target for the treatment of conditions associated with attentional/working memory dysfunction.

  9. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a comparison of the nAChRs of Caenorhabditis elegans and parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden-Dye, Lindy; Joyner, Michelle; O'Connor, Vincent; Walker, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play a key role in the normal physiology of nematodes and provide an established target site for anthelmintics. The free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, has a large number of nAChR subunit genes in its genome and so provides an experimental model for testing novel anthelmintics which act at these sites. However, many parasitic nematodes lack specific genes present in C. elegans, and so care is required in extrapolating from studies using C. elegans to the situation in other nematodes. In this review the properties of C. elegans nAChRs are reviewed and compared to those of parasitic nematodes. This forms the basis for a discussion of the possible subunit composition of nAChRs from different species of parasitic nematodes. Currently our knowledge on this is largely based on studies using heterologous expression and pharmacological analysis of receptor subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes. It is concluded that more information is required regarding the subunit composition and pharmacology of endogenous nAChRs in parasitic nematodes. PMID:23500392

  10. Mouse mutants for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ß2 subunit display changes in cell adhesion and neurodegeneration response genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol M Rubin

    Full Text Available Mice lacking expression of the ß2 subunit of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNB2 display abnormal retinal waves and a dispersed projection of retinal ganglion cell (RGC axons to their dorsal lateral geniculate nuclei (dLGNs. Transcriptomes of LGN tissue from two independently generated Chrnb2-/- mutants and from wildtype mice were obtained at postnatal day 4 (P4, during the normal period of segregation of eye-specific afferents to the LGN. Microarray analysis reveals reduced expression of genes located on the cell membrane or in extracellular space, and of genes active in cell adhesion and calcium signaling. In particular, mRNA for cadherin 1 (Cdh1, a known axon growth regulator, is reduced to nearly undetectable levels in the LGN of P4 mutant mice and Lypd2 mRNA is similarly suppressed. Similar analysis of retinal tissue shows increased expression of crumbs 1 (Crb1 and chemokine (C-C motif ligand 21 (Ccl21 mRNAs in Chrnb2-/- mutant animals. Mutations in these genes are associated with retinal neuronal degeneration. The retinas of Chrnb2-/- mutants are normal in appearance, but the increased expression of these genes may also be involved in the abnormal projection patterns of RGC to the LGN. These data may provide the tools to distinguish the interplay between neural activity and molecular expression. Finally, comparison of the transcriptomes of the two different Chrnb2-/- mutant strains reveals the effects of genetic background upon gene expression.

  11. Postnatal nicotine effects on the expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the developing piglet hippocampus and brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandarajah, Arunnjah; Waters, Karen A; Machaalani, Rita

    2015-12-01

    Postnatal exposure to cigarette smoke during infancy is associated with increased number of respiratory illnesses, impaired pulmonary function, and the occurrence of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). It is also associated with reduced cognitive functioning and attention deficits in childhood. Nicotine, the major neurotoxic component of cigarette smoke, induces its actions by binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Using a piglet model of postnatal nicotine exposure, we studied the immunohistochemical expression of nAChR subunits α2, α3, α4, α5, α7, α9, β1 and β2 in the brainstem medulla and the hippocampus, given the role of these structures in cardiorespiratory control and cognition, respectively. We compared piglets exposed postnatally to 2mg/kg/day nicotine for 14 days (n=14: 7 males: 7 females) to controls (n=14: 7 males: 7 females). In the hippocampus, decreased expression was seen for α3 in CA1 (p=0.017), α9 in CA1 (pnicotine in the developing brain, and the implications are discussed. PMID:26440997

  12. α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonists with low intrinsic efficacy have antidepressant-like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineur, Yann S.; Einstein, Emily B.; Seymour, Patricia A.; Coe, Jotham W.; O’Neill, Brian T.; Rollema, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that treatment with antagonists or partial agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing the β2 subunit (β2* nAChRs) results in antidepressant-like effects. In the current study we tested 3 novel compounds with different affinity and functional efficacy at α4β2* nAChRs, which were synthesized as part of nAChR discovery projects at Pfizer in the tail suspension, forced swim and novelty-suppressed feeding tests of antidepressant efficacy. All compounds tested reduced immobility in the forced swim test and one of the compounds also reduced immobility in the tail suspension test. All the compounds appeared to affect food intake on their own, with 2 compounds reducing feeding significantly in the home cage, precluding a clear interpretation of the results in the novelty-suppressed feeding test. None of the compounds altered locomotor activity at the doses and time points used here. Therefore, a subset of these compounds has pharmacological and behavioral properties that demonstrate the potential of nicotinic compounds as a treatment of mood disorders. Further development of nicotinic-based antidepressants should focus on increasing nAChR subtype selectivity to obtain consistent antidepressant properties with an acceptable side effect profile. PMID:21566524

  13. Distribution of the a2, a3, and a5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the chick brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrão A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are ionotropic receptors comprised of a and ß subunits. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system, and previous studies have revealed specific patterns of localization for some nAChR subunits in the vertebrate brain. In the present study we used immunohistochemical methods and monoclonal antibodies to localize the a2, a3, and a5 nAChR subunits in the chick mesencephalon and diencephalon. We observed a differential distribution of these three subunits in the chick brain, and showed that the somata and neuropil of many central structures contain the a5 nAChR subunit. The a2 and a3 subunits, on the other hand, exhibited a more restricted distribution than a5 and other subunits previously studied, namely a7, a8 and ß2. The patterns of distribution of the different nAChR subunits suggest that neurons in many brain structures may contain several subtypes of nAChRs and that in a few regions one particular subtype may determine the cholinergic nicotinic responses

  14. Targeted deletion of the mouse α2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit gene (Chrna2) potentiates nicotine-modulated behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfipour, Shahrdad; Byun, Janet S; Leach, Prescott; Fowler, Christie D; Murphy, Niall P; Kenny, Paul J; Gould, Thomas J; Boulter, Jim

    2013-05-01

    Baseline and nicotine-modulated behaviors were assessed in mice harboring a null mutant allele of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit gene α2 (Chrna2). Homozygous Chrna2(-/-) mice are viable, show expected sex and Mendelian genotype ratios, and exhibit no gross neuroanatomical abnormalities. A broad range of behavioral tests designed to assess genotype-dependent effects on anxiety (elevated plus maze and light/dark box), motor coordination (narrow bean traverse and gait), and locomotor activity revealed no significant differences between mutant mice and age-matched wild-type littermates. Furthermore, a panel of tests measuring traits, such as body position, spontaneous activity, respiration, tremors, body tone, and startle response, revealed normal responses for Chrna2-null mutant mice. However, Chrna2(-/-) mice do exhibit a mild motor or coordination phenotype (a decreased latency to fall during the accelerating rotarod test) and possess an increased sensitivity to nicotine-induced analgesia in the hotplate assay. Relative to wild-type, Chrna2(-/-) mice show potentiated nicotine self-administration and withdrawal behaviors and exhibit a sex-dependent enhancement of nicotine-facilitated cued, but not trace or contextual, fear conditioning. Overall, our results suggest that loss of the mouse nAChR α2 subunit has very limited effects on baseline behavior but does lead to the potentiation of several nicotine-modulated behaviors.

  15. Selective disruption of acetylcholine synthesis in subsets of motor neurons: a new model of late-onset motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Marie-José; Bertolus, Chloé; Santamaria, Julie; Bauchet, Anne-Laure; Herbin, Marc; Saurini, Françoise; Misawa, Hidemi; Maisonobe, Thierry; Pradat, Pierre-François; Nosten-Bertrand, Marika; Mallet, Jacques; Berrard, Sylvie

    2014-05-01

    Motor neuron diseases are characterized by the selective chronic dysfunction of a subset of motor neurons and the subsequent impairment of neuromuscular function. To reproduce in the mouse these hallmarks of diseases affecting motor neurons, we generated a mouse line in which ~40% of motor neurons in the spinal cord and the brainstem become unable to sustain neuromuscular transmission. These mice were obtained by conditional knockout of the gene encoding choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the biosynthetic enzyme for acetylcholine. The mutant mice are viable and spontaneously display abnormal phenotypes that worsen with age including hunched back, reduced lifespan, weight loss, as well as striking deficits in muscle strength and motor function. This slowly progressive neuromuscular dysfunction is accompanied by muscle fiber histopathological features characteristic of neurogenic diseases. Unexpectedly, most changes appeared with a 6-month delay relative to the onset of reduction in ChAT levels, suggesting that compensatory mechanisms preserve muscular function for several months and then are overwhelmed. Deterioration of mouse phenotype after ChAT gene disruption is a specific aging process reminiscent of human pathological situations, particularly among survivors of paralytic poliomyelitis. These mutant mice may represent an invaluable tool to determine the sequence of events that follow the loss of function of a motor neuron subset as the disease progresses, and to evaluate therapeutic strategies. They also offer the opportunity to explore fundamental issues of motor neuron biology.

  16. Differences in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the central nervous system of long sleep and short sleep mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differences in voluntary ethanol consumption have been noted in various inbred strains of mice and pharmacogenetic approaches have been used to study the mechanisms of action of many drugs such as ethanol. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, selectively bred for differences in ethanol induced narcosis, provide a method by which a relationship between the differential responsiveness of these geno-types and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) may be evaluated. Sleep times after injection of 3ml ethanol/kg (i.p.) verified the higher sensitivity of LS vs. SS. Mean body weights of LS (26.5g) vs. SS (22g) were also significantly (p3H](-) quinuclidinylbenzilate ([3H](-)QNB), a specific but nonsubtype selective mAChR antagonist, [3H]pirenzepine ([3H]PZ), a specific M1 mAChR antagonist and [3H]11-2-[[2-[(diethylamino) methyl]-1-piperidinyl] acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepine-6-one, ([3H]AF-DX 116), an M2 selective antagonist were performed to determine mAChR affinity (Kd) and density (Bmax) in CNS regions such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, corpus striatum and other areas. Significantly lower (30-40%) [3H](-)QNB binding suggests that SS have fewer mAChR's than LS in many areas. These differences may relate to their differential ethanol sensitivity

  17. On-line anti-acetylcholine esterase activity of extracts of oxystelma esculentum, aerva javanica and zanthoxylum armatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a disease of brain, resulting in memory impairment and the loss of thinking. The main reason of Alzheimer's disease is firmly associated with some impairment in cholinergic transmission. This impairment may be improved by diminishing the breakdown of acetylcholine at the synaptic site in the brain by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). In this work, extracts of three different plants Oxystelma esculentum (OEM), Aerva javanica (AJM) and Zanthoxylum armatum (ZAA) have been screened for their anti-AchE activity. Results of the study demonstrate that of the studied extracts, ZAA (IC/sub 50/ 55.5 micro g/ml) acquired stronger anti-AChE activity. While OEM with IC/sub 50/ 107.2 micro g/ml showed moderate and ZAE and AJM showed weaker action (IC/sub 50/ 182.5 and 275.2 micro g/ml). Galanthamine was used as a positive control (IC/sub 50/ 1.47 micro g/ml). (author)

  18. Decreased binding capacity (Bmax) of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in fibroblasts from boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jessica; Landgren, Magnus; Fernell, Elisabeth; Lewander, Tommy; Venizelos, Nikolaos

    2013-09-01

    Monoaminergic dysregulation is implicated in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and methylphenidate and amphetamines are the most frequently prescribed pharmacological agents for treating ADHD. However, it has recently been proposed that the core symptoms of the disorder might be due to an imbalance between monoaminergic and cholinergic systems. In this study, we used fibroblast cell homogenates from boys with and without ADHD as an extraneural cell model to examine the cholinergic receptor density, that is, muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). We found that the binding capacity (Bmax) of [³H] Quinuclidinyl benzilate (³H-QNB) to mAChRs was decreased by almost 50 % in the children with ADHD (mean = 30.6 fmol/mg protein, SD = 25.6) in comparison with controls [mean = 63.1 fmol/mg protein, SD = 20.5, p ≤ 0.01 (Student's unpaired t test)]. The decreased Bmax indicates a reduced cholinergic receptor density, which might constitute a biomarker for ADHD. However, these preliminary findings need to be replicated in larger ADHD and comparison cohorts.

  19. A tale of two receptors: Dual roles for ionotropic acetylcholine receptors in regulating motor neuron excitation and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbrook, Alison; Barbagallo, Belinda; Francis, Michael M

    2013-07-01

    Nicotinic or ionotropic acetylcholine receptors (iAChRs) mediate excitatory signaling throughout the nervous system, and the heterogeneity of these receptors contributes to their multifaceted roles. Our recent work has characterized a single iAChR subunit, ACR-12, which contributes to two distinct iAChR subtypes within the C. elegans motor circuit. These two receptor subtypes regulate the coordinated activity of excitatory (cholinergic) and inhibitory (GABAergic) motor neurons. We have shown that the iAChR subunit ACR-12 is differentially expressed in both cholinergic and GABAergic motor neurons within the motor circuit. In cholinergic motor neurons, ACR-12 is incorporated into the previously characterized ACR-2 heteromeric receptor, which shows non-synaptic localization patterns and plays a modulatory role in controlling circuit function.(1) In contrast, a second population of ACR-12-containing receptors in GABAergic motor neurons, ACR-12GABA, shows synaptic expression and regulates inhibitory signaling.(2) Here, we discuss the two ACR-12-containing receptor subtypes, their distinct expression patterns, and functional roles in the C. elegans motor circuit. We anticipate our continuing studies of iAChRs in the C. elegans motor circuit will lead to novel insights into iAChR function in the nervous system as well as mechanisms for their regulation. PMID:24778941

  20. Automated high-throughput in vitro screening of the acetylcholine esterase inhibiting potential of environmental samples, mixtures and single compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froment, Jean; Thomas, Kevin V; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2016-08-01

    A high-throughput and automated assay for testing the presence of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibiting compounds was developed, validated and applied to screen different types of environmental samples. Automation involved using the assay in 96-well plates and adapting it for the use with an automated workstation. Validation was performed by comparing the results of the automated assay with that of a previously validated and standardised assay for two known AChE inhibitors (paraoxon and dichlorvos). The results show that the assay provides similar concentration-response curves (CRCs) when run according to the manual and automated protocol. Automation of the assay resulted in a reduction in assay run time as well as in intra- and inter-assay variations. High-quality CRCs were obtained for both of the model AChE inhibitors (dichlorvos IC50=120µM and paraoxon IC50=0.56µM) when tested alone. The effect of co-exposure of an equipotent binary mixture of the two chemicals were consistent with predictions of additivity and best described by the concentration addition model for combined toxicity. Extracts of different environmental samples (landfill leachate, wastewater treatment plant effluent, and road tunnel construction run-off) were then screened for AChE inhibiting activity using the automated bioassay, with only landfill leachate shown to contain potential AChE inhibitors. Potential uses and limitations of the assay were discussed based on the present results. PMID:27085000

  1. Regulating role of acetylcholine and its antagonists in inward rectified K+ channels from guard cell protoplasts of Vicia faba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The inward rectified potassium current of Vicia faba guard cell protoplasts treated with acetylcholine (ACh) or the antagonists of its receptors were recorded by employing the patch clamp technique. The results show that ACh at lower concentrations increases the inward K+ current, in contrast, ACh at higher concentrations inhibits it. Treated with d-Tubocurarine (d-Tub), an antagonist of the nicotine ACh receptor (nAChR) inhibits the inward K+ current by 30%. Treated with atropine (Atr), an antagonist of the muscarine (Mus) ACh receptor (mAChR) also inhibits it by 36%.However,if guard cell protoplasts are treated with d-Tub and Atr together, the inward K+ current is inhibited by 60%-75%. Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA), a strong inhibitor of K+ channels has no effect on the inward K+ current regulated by ACh, suggesting that there are inward K+ channels modulated by AChRs on the membrane of the guard cell protoplasts. These data demonstrate an ACh-regulated mechanism for stomatal movement.

  2. Colorimetric microtiter plate receptor-binding assay for the detection of freshwater and marine neurotoxins targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Fernando; Kamp, Lisa; Carpino, Justin; Faltin, Erin; Loftin, Keith A.; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo

    2014-01-01

    Anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a, produced by cyanobacteria, are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Pinnatoxins, spirolides, and gymnodimines, produced by dinoflagellates, are antagonists of nAChRs. In this study we describe the development and validation of a competitive colorimetric, high throughput functional assay based on the mechanism of action of freshwater and marine toxins against nAChRs. Torpedo electrocyte membranes (rich in muscle-type nAChR) were immobilized and stabilized on the surface of 96-well microtiter plates. Biotinylated α-bungarotoxin (the tracer) and streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase (the detector) enabled the detection and quantitation of anatoxin-a in surface waters and cyclic imine toxins in shellfish extracts that were obtained from different locations across the US. The method compares favorably to LC/MS/MS and provides accurate results for anatoxin-a and cyclic imine toxins monitoring. Study of common constituents at the concentrations normally found in drinking and environmental waters, as well as the tolerance to pH, salt, solvents, organic and inorganic compounds did not significantly affect toxin detection. The assay allowed the simultaneous analysis of up to 25 samples within 3.5 h and it is well suited for on-site or laboratory monitoring of low levels of toxins in drinking, surface, and ground water as well as in shellfish extracts.

  3. Regulating role of acetylcholine and its antagonists in inward rectified K~+ channels from guard cell protoplasts of Vicia faba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冷强; 花宝光; 郭玉海; 娄成后

    2000-01-01

    The inward rectified potassium current of Vicia faba guard cell protoplasts treated with acetylcholine (ACh) or the antagonists of its receptors were recorded by employing the patch clamp technique. The results show that ACh at lower concentrations increases the inward K+ current, in contrast, ACh at higher concentrations inhibits it. Treated with d-Tubocurarine (d-Tub), an antagonist of the nicotine ACh receptor (nAChR) inhibits the inward K+ current by 30%. Treated with atropine (Atr), an antagonist of the muscarine (Mus) ACh receptor (mAChR) also inhibits it by 36%. However, if guard cell protoplasts are treated with d-Tub and Atr together, the inward K+ current is inhibited by 60%-75%. Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA), a strong inhibitor of K+ channels has no effect on the inward K+ current regulated by ACh, suggesting that there are inward K+ channels modulated by AChRs on the membrane of the guard cell protoplasts. These data demonstrate an ACh-regulated mechanism for stomatal movement.

  4. Highly Selective and Sensitive Detection of Acetylcholine Using Receptor-Modified Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shihong; Kim, Byeongju; Song, Hyun Seok; Jin, Hye Jun; Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Sang Hun; Lee, Byung Yang; Park, Tai Hyun; Hong, Seunghun

    2015-03-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a neurotransmitter in a human central nervous system and is related to various neural functions such as memory, learning and muscle contractions. Dysfunctional ACh regulations in a brain can induce several neuropsychiatric diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and myasthenia gravis. In researching such diseases, it is important to measure the concentration of ACh in the extracellular fluid of the brain. Herein, we developed a highly sensitive and selective ACh sensor based on single-walled carbon nanotube-field effect transistors (swCNT-FETs). In our work, M1 mAChR protein, an ACh receptor, was expressed in E.coli and coated on swCNT-FETs with lipid membranes. Here, the binding of ACh onto the receptors could be detected by monitoring the change of electrical currents in the underlying swCNT-FETs, allowing the real-time detection of ACh at a 100 pM concentration. Furthermore, our sensor could selectively detect ACh from other neurotransmitters. This is the first report of the real-time sensing of ACh utilizing specific binding between the ACh and M1 mAChR, and it may lead to breakthroughs in various biomedical applications such as drug screening and disease diagnosis.

  5. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  6. Virtual screening studies of Chinese medicine Coptidis Rhizoma as alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists for treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Li; Xu, Youdong; Zhang, Yan; Meng, Xianli; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease. Extensive in vitro and in vivo experiments have proved that the decreased activity of the cholinergic neuron is responsible for the memory and cognition deterioration. The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) is proposed to a drug target of AD, and compounds which acting as α7-nAChR agonists are considered as candidates in AD treatment. Chinese medicine CoptidisRhizoma and its compounds are reported in various anti-AD effects. In this study, virtual screening, docking approaches and hydrogen bond analyses were applied to screen potential α7-nAChR agonists from CoptidisRhizome. The 3D structure of the protein was obtained from PDB database. 87 reported compounds were included in this research and their structures were accessed by NCBI Pubchem. Docking analysis of the compounds was performed using AutoDock 4.2 and AutoDock Vina. The images of the binding modes hydrogen bonds and the hydrophobic interaction were rendered with PyMOL1.5.0.4. and LigPlot+ respectively. Finally, N-tran-feruloyltyramine, isolariciresinol, flavanone, secoisolariciresinol, (+)-lariciresinol and dihydrochalcone, exhibited the lowest docking energy of protein-ligand complex. The results indicate these 6 compounds are potential α7 nAChR agonists, and expected to be effective in AD treatment.

  7. Simultaneous determination of pH, urea, acetylcholine and heavy metals using array-based enzymatic optical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiao-chung; Doong, Ruey-an

    2005-03-15

    An array-based optical biosensor for the simultaneous analysis of multiple samples in the presence of unrelated multi-analytes was fabricated. Urease and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were used as model enzymes and were co-entrapped with the sensing probe, FITC-dextran, in the sol-gel matrix to measure pH, urea, acetylcholine (ACh) and heavy metals (enzyme inhibitors). Environmental and biological samples spiked with metal ions were also used to evaluate the application of the array biosensor to real samples. The biosensor exhibited high specificity in identifying multiple analytes. No obvious cross-interference was observed when a 50-spot array biosensor was used for simultaneous analysis of multiple samples in the presence of multiple analytes. The sensing system can determine pH over a dynamic range from 4 to 8.5. The limits of detection (LODs) of 2.5-50 microM with a dynamic range of 2-3 orders of magnitude for urea and ACh measurements were obtained. Moreover, the urease-encapsulated array biosensor was used to detect heavy metals. The analytical ranges of Cd(II), Cu(II), and Hg(II) were between 10 nM and 100 mM. When real samples were spiked with heavy metals, the array biosensor also exhibited potential effectiveness in screening enzyme inhibitors.

  8. At-Line Cellular Screening Methodology for Bioactives in Mixtures Targeting the α7-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otvos, Reka A; Mladic, Marija; Arias-Alpizar, Gabriela; Niessen, Wilfried M A; Somsen, Govert W; Smit, August B; Kool, Jeroen

    2016-06-01

    The α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) is a ligand-gated ion channel expressed in different regions of the central nervous system (CNS). The α7-nAChR has been associated with Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and schizophrenia, and therefore is extensively studied as a drug target for the treatment of these diseases. Important sources for new compounds in drug discovery are natural extracts. Since natural extracts are complex mixtures, identification of the bioactives demands the use of analytical techniques to separate a bioactive from inactive compounds. This study describes screening methodology for identifying bioactive compounds in mixtures acting on the α7-nAChR. The methodology developed combines liquid chromatography (LC) coupled via a split with both an at-line calcium (Ca(2+))-flux assay and high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS). This allows evaluation of α7-nAChR responses after LC separation, while parallel MS enables compound identification. The methodology was optimized for analysis of agonists and positive allosteric modulators, and was successfully applied to screening of the hallucinogen mushroom Psilocybe Mckennaii The crude mushroom extract was analyzed using both reversed-phase and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. Matching retention times and peak shapes of bioactives found with data from the parallel MS measurements allowed rapid pinpointing of accurate masses corresponding to the bioactives. PMID:26738519

  9. Effects of memantine and donepezil on cortical and hippocampal acetylcholine levels and object recognition memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihalainen, Jouni; Sarajärvi, Timo; Rasmusson, Doug; Kemppainen, Susanna; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Lehtonen, Marko; Banerjee, Pradeep K; Semba, Kazue; Tanila, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    This preclinical study investigated the ability of memantine (MEM) to stimulate brain acetylcholine (ACh) release, potentially acting synergistically with donepezil (DON, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor). Acute systemic administration of either MEM or DON to anesthetized rats caused dose-dependent increases of ACh levels in neocortex and hippocampus, and the combination of MEM (5 mg/kg) and DON (0.5 mg/kg) produced significantly greater increases than either drug alone. To determine whether ACh release correlated with cognitive improvement, rats with partial fimbria-fornix (FF) lesions were treated with acute or chronic MEM or DON. Acute MEM treatment significantly elevated baseline hippocampal ACh release but did not significantly improve task performance on a delayed non-match-to-sample (DNMS) task, whereas chronic MEM treatment significantly improved DNMS performance but only marginally elevated baseline ACh levels. Acute or chronic treatment with DON (in the presence of neostigmine to allow ACh collection) did not significantly improve DNMS performance or alter ACh release. In order to investigate the effect of adding MEM to ongoing DON therapy, lesioned rats pretreated with DON for 3 weeks were given a single intraperitoneal dose of MEM. MEM significantly elevated baseline hippocampal ACh levels, but did not significantly improve DNMS task scores compared to chronic DON-treated animals. These data indicate that MEM, in addition to acting as an NMDA receptor antagonist, can also augment ACh release; however, in this preclinical model, increased ACh levels did not directly correlate with improved cognitive performance.

  10. A multi-enzyme microreactor-based online electrochemical system for selective and continuous monitoring of acetylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuqing; Yu, Ping; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-06-01

    This study demonstrates an online electrochemical system (OECS) for selective and continuous measurements of acetylcholine (ACh) through efficiently integrating in vivo microdialysis, a multi-enzyme microreactor and an electrochemical detector. A multi-enzyme microreactor was prepared first by co-immobilizing two kinds of enzymes, i.e. choline oxidase (ChOx) and catalase (Cat), onto magnetite nanoparticles and then confining the as-formed nanoparticles into a fused-silica capillary with the assistance of an external magnet. The multi-enzyme microreactor was settled between an in vivo microdialysis sampling system and an electrochemical detector to suppress the interference from choline toward ACh detection. Selective detection of ACh was accomplished using the electrochemical detector with ACh esterase (AChE) and ChOx as the recognition units for ACh and Prussian blue (PB) as the electrocatalyst for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The current recorded with the OECS was linear with the concentration of ACh (I/nA = -3.90CACh/μM + 1.21, γ = 0.998) within a concentration range of 5 μM to 100 μM. The detection limit, based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, was calculated to be 1 μM. Interference investigation demonstrates that the OECS did not produce an observable current response toward physiological levels of common electroactive species, such as ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and uric acid (UA). The high selectivity and the good linearity in combination with the high stability may enable the OECS developed here as a potential system for continuous monitoring of cerebral ACh release in some physiological and pathological processes. PMID:25529471

  11. Nicotine deteriorates the osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells through α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor regulating Wnt pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifei Zhou

    Full Text Available AIMS: Cigarette smoking is one of the high risk factors of adult chronic periodontitis and nicotine is the well established toxic substance in cigarette. However, the mechanism of nicotine induced periodontitis is still unknown. Here we studied whether nicotine impaired the osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs through activating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR. METHODS: hPDLSCs with multi differentiation potential and surface makers for mesenchymal stem cells were harvested by limiting dilution technique. The level of mineralized nodule formation was assessed by alizarin red S staining. Expression level of ostegenic related genes and proteins were detected by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. The expression of α7 nAChR and its downstream signaling pathway were examined by western blot. The role of the receptor and related signaling pathway in nicotine impairing the osteogenic potential of hPDLSCs were also studied in different levels. RESULTS: Nicotine deteriorated the ostegenic differentiation of hPDLSCs in a dose dependent manner. Activation of α7 nAChR by nicotine treatment activated wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, leading to osteogenic deficiency of hPDLSCs. Blockage of α7 nAChR and wnt pathway inhibitor treatment rescued nicotine induced osteogenic differentiation deficiency. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggested that nicotine activated α7 nAChR expressed on PDLSCs and further activated wnt signaling downstream, thus deteriorating the osteogenic potential of PDLSCs. The impairment of osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs by nicotine might lead to cigarette smoking related periodontitis.

  12. Nicotine acts on growth plate chondrocytes to delay skeletal growth through the alpha7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Kawakita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking adversely affects endochondral ossification during the course of skeletal growth. Among a plethora of cigarette chemicals, nicotine is one of the primary candidate compounds responsible for the cause of smoking-induced delayed skeletal growth. However, the possible mechanism of delayed skeletal growth caused by nicotine remains unclarified. In the last decade, localization of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, a specific receptor of nicotine, has been widely detected in non-excitable cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that nicotine affect growth plate chondrocytes directly and specifically through nAChR to delay skeletal growth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the effect of nicotine on human growth plate chondrocytes, a major component of endochondral ossification. The chondrocytes were derived from extra human fingers. Nicotine inhibited matrix synthesis and hypertrophic differentiation in human growth plate chondrocytes in suspension culture in a concentration-dependent manner. Both human and murine growth plate chondrocytes expressed alpha7 nAChR, which constitutes functional homopentameric receptors. Methyllycaconitine (MLA, a specific antagonist of alpha7 nAChR, reversed the inhibition of matrix synthesis and functional calcium signal by nicotine in human growth plate chondrocytes in vitro. To study the effect of nicotine on growth plate in vivo, ovulation-controlled pregnant alpha7 nAChR +/- mice were given drinking water with or without nicotine during pregnancy, and skeletal growth of their fetuses was observed. Maternal nicotine exposure resulted in delayed skeletal growth of alpha7 nAChR +/+ fetuses but not in alpha7 nAChR -/- fetuses, implying that skeletal growth retardation by nicotine is specifically mediated via fetal alpha7 nAChR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that nicotine, from cigarette smoking, acts directly on growth plate chondrocytes to decrease

  13. Putative nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits express differentially through the life cycle of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jessica A; Garczynski, Stephen F

    2016-04-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the targets of neonicotinoids and spinosads, two insecticides used in orchards to effectively control codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Orchardists in Washington State are concerned about the possibility of codling moth field populations developing resistance to these two insecticides. In an effort to help mitigate this issue, we initiated a project to identify and characterize codling moth nAChR subunits expressed in heads. This study had two main goals; (i) identify transcripts from a codling moth head transcriptome that encode for nAChR subunits, and (ii) determine nAChR subunit expression profiles in various life stages of codling moth. From a codling moth head transcriptome, 24 transcripts encoding for 12 putative nAChR subunit classes were identified and verified by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequence determination. Characterization of the deduced protein sequences encoded by putative nAChR transcripts revealed that they share the distinguishing features of the cys-loop ligand-gated ion channel superfamily with 9 α-type subunits and 3 β-type subunits identified. Phylogenetic analysis comparing these protein sequences to those of other insect nAChR subunits supports the identification of these proteins as nAChR subunits. Stage expression studies determined that there is clear differential expression of many of these subunits throughout the codling moth life cycle. The information from this study will be used in the future to monitor for potential target-site resistance mechanisms to neonicotinoids and spinosads in tolerant codling moth populations.

  14. Influence of environmental enrichment and depleted uranium on behaviour, cholesterol and acetylcholine in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestaevel, P; Airault, F; Racine, R; Bensoussan, H; Dhieux, B; Delissen, O; Manens, L; Aigueperse, J; Voisin, P; Souidi, M

    2014-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is associated with genetic risk factors, of which the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is the most prevalent, and is affected by environmental factors that include education early in life and exposure to metals. The industrial and military use of depleted uranium (DU) resulted in an increase of its deposition in some areas and led to a possible environmental factor. The present study aims to ascertain the effects on the behaviour and the metabolism of cholesterol and acetylcholine of ApoE-/- mice exposed to enriched environment (EE) and exposed to DU (20 mg/L) for 14 weeks. Here we show that ApoE-/- mice were unaffected by the EE and their learning and memory were similar to those of the non-enriched ApoE-/- mice. ApoE-/- mice showed a significant decrease in total (-16 %) and free (-16 %) cholesterol in the entorhinal cortex in comparison to control wild-type mice. Whatever the housing conditions, the exposure to DU of ApoE-/- mice impaired working memory, but had no effect on anxiety-like behaviour, in comparison to control ApoE-/- mice. The exposure of ApoE-/- mice to DU also induced a trend toward higher total cholesterol content in the cerebral cortex (+15 %) compared to control ApoE-/- mice. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that enriched environment does not ameliorate neurobehaviour in ApoE-/- mice and that ApoE mutation induced specific effects on the brain cholesterol. These findings also suggested that DU exposure could modify the pathology in this ApoE model, with no influence of housing conditions. PMID:23749703

  15. Novel role for cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in neuregulin-induced acetylcholine receptor epsilon subunit expression in differentiated myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gang; Seta, Karen A; Millhorn, David E

    2005-06-10

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinases. CDK2 acts as a checkpoint for the G(1)/S transition in the cell cycle. Despite a down-regulation of CDK2 activity in postmitotic cells, many cell types, including muscle cells, maintain abundant levels of CDK2 protein. This led us to hypothesize that CDK2 may have a function in postmitotic cells. We show here for the first time that CDK2 can be activated by neuregulin (NRG) in differentiated C2C12 myotubes. In addition, this activity is required for expression of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon subunit. The switch from the fetal AChRgamma subunit to the adult-type AChRepsilon is required for synapse maturation and the neuromuscular junction. Inhibition of CDK2 activity with either the specific CDK2 inhibitory peptide Tat-LFG or by RNA interference abolished neuregulin-induced AChRepsilon expression. Neuregulin-induced activation of CDK2 also depended on the ErbB receptor, MAPK, and PI3K, all of which have previously been shown to be required for AChRepsilon expression. Neuregulin regulated CDK2 activity through coordinating phosphorylation of CDK2 on Thr-160, accumulation of CDK2 in the nucleus, and down-regulation of the CDK2 inhibitory protein p27 in the nucleus. In addition, we also observed a novel mechanism of regulation of CDK2 activity by a low molecular weight variant of cyclin E in response to NRG. These findings establish CDK2 as an intermediate molecule that integrates NRG-activated signals from both the MAPK and PI3K pathways to AChRepsilon expression and reveal an undiscovered physiological role for CDK2 in postmitotic cells. PMID:15824106

  16. 6-Bromohypaphorine from Marine Nudibranch Mollusk Hermissenda crassicornis is an Agonist of Human α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

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    Igor E. Kasheverov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available 6-Bromohypaphorine (6-BHP has been isolated from the marine sponges Pachymatisma johnstoni, Aplysina sp., and the tunicate Aplidium conicum, but data on its biological activity were not available. For the nudibranch mollusk Hermissenda crassicornis no endogenous compounds were known, and here we describe the isolation of 6-BHP from this mollusk and its effects on different nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR. Two-electrode voltage-clamp experiments on the chimeric α7 nAChR (built of chicken α7 ligand-binding and glycine receptor transmembrane domains or on rat α4β2 nAChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes revealed no action of 6-BHP. However, in radioligand analysis, 6-BHP competed with radioiodinated α-bungarotoxin for binding to human α7 nAChR expressed in GH4C1 cells (IC50 23 ± 1 μM, but showed no competition on muscle-type nAChR from Torpedo californica. In Ca2+-imaging experiments on the human α7 nAChR expressed in the Neuro2a cells, 6-BHP in the presence of PNU120596 behaved as an agonist (EC50 ~80 μM. To the best of our knowledge, 6-BHP is the first low-molecular weight compound from marine source which is an agonist of the nAChR subtype. This may have physiological importance because H. crassicornis, with its simple and tractable nervous system, is a convenient model system for studying the learning and memory processes.

  17. Chronic nicotine modifies skeletal muscle Na,K-ATPase activity through its interaction with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and phospholemman.

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    Alexander V Chibalin

    Full Text Available Our previous finding that the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR and the Na,K-ATPase interact as a regulatory complex to modulate Na,K-ATPase activity suggested that chronic, circulating nicotine may alter this interaction, with long-term changes in the membrane potential. To test this hypothesis, we chronically exposed rats to nicotine delivered orally for 21-31 days. Chronic nicotine produced a steady membrane depolarization of ∼3 mV in the diaphragm muscle, which resulted from a net change in electrogenic transport by the Na,K-ATPase α2 and α1 isoforms. Electrogenic transport by the α2 isoform increased (+1.8 mV while the activity of the α1 isoform decreased (-4.4 mV. Protein expression of Na,K-ATPase α1 or α2 isoforms and the nAChR did not change; however, the content of α2 subunit in the plasma membrane decreased by 25%, indicating that its stimulated electrogenic transport is due to an increase in specific activity. The physical association between the nAChR, the Na,K-ATPase α1 or α2 subunits, and the regulatory subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, phospholemman (PLM, measured by co-immuno precipitation, was stable and unchanged. Chronic nicotine treatment activated PKCα/β2 and PKCδ and was accompanied by parallel increases in PLM phosphorylation at Ser(63 and Ser(68. Collectively, these results demonstrate that nicotine at chronic doses, acting through the nAChR-Na,K-ATPase complex, is able to modulate Na,K-ATPase activity in an isoform-specific manner and that the regulatory range includes both stimulation and inhibition of enzyme activity. Cholinergic modulation of Na,K-ATPase activity is achieved, in part, through activation of PKC and phosphorylation of PLM.

  18. Differences in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the central nervous system of long sleep and short sleep mice. [Ethanol effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, M.; Ming, X.; McArdle, J.J. (Univ of Medical, Newark, NJ (USA))

    1989-02-09

    Differences in voluntary ethanol consumption have been noted in various inbred strains of mice and pharmacogenetic approaches have been used to study the mechanisms of action of many drugs such as ethanol. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, selectively bred for differences in ethanol induced narcosis, provide a method by which a relationship between the differential responsiveness of these geno-types and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) may be evaluated. Sleep times after injection of 3ml ethanol/kg (i.p.) verified the higher sensitivity of LS vs. SS. Mean body weights of LS (26.5g) vs. SS (22g) were also significantly (p<.01) greater. Binding assays for ({sup 3}H)(-) quinuclidinylbenzilate (({sup 3}H)(-)QNB), a specific but nonsubtype selective mAChR antagonist, ({sup 3}H)pirenzepine (({sup 3}H)PZ), a specific M1 mAChR antagonist and ({sup 3}H)11-2-((2-((diethylamino) methyl)-1-piperidinyl) acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepine-6-one, (({sup 3}H)AF-DX 116), an M2 selective antagonist were performed to determine mAChR affinity (K{sub d}) and density (B{sub max}) in CNS regions such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, corpus striatum and other areas. Significantly lower (30-40%) ({sup 3}H)(-)QNB binding suggests that SS have fewer mAChR's than LS in many areas. These differences may relate to their differential ethanol sensitivity.

  19. Acetylcholine mobilization in a sympathetic ganglion in the presence and absence of 2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (AH5183)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabeza, R.; Collier, B.

    1988-01-01

    The present experiments measured the release of acetylcholine (ACh) by the cat superior cervical ganglia in the presence of, and after exposure to, 2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (AH5183), a compound known to block the uptake of ACh by cholinergic synaptic vesicles. We confirmed that AH5183 blocks evoked ACh release during preganglionic nerve stimulation when approximately 13-14% of the initial ganglial ACh stores had been released; periods of rest in the presence of the drug did not promote recovery from the block, but ACh release recovered following the washout of AH5183. ACh was synthesized in AH5183-treated ganglia, as determined by the synthesis of (/sup 3/H)ACh from (/sup 3/H)choline, and this (/sup 3/H)ACh could be released by stimulation following drug washout. The specific activity of the released ACh matched that of the tissue's ACh, and thus we conclude that ACh synthesized in the presence of AH5183 is a releasable as pre-existing ACh stores once the drug is removed. We tested the relative releasability of ACh synthesized during AH5183 exposure (perfusion with (/sup 3/H)choline) and that synthesized during recovery from the drug's effects (perfusion with (/sup 14/C)choline: the ratio of (/sup 3/H)ACh to (/sup 14/C)ACh released by stimulation was similar to the ratio in the tissue. These results suggest that the mobilization of ACh for release by ganglia during recovery from an AH5183-induced block is independent of the conditions under which the ACh was synthesized. Unlike nerve impulses, black widow spider venom (BWSV) induced the release of ACh from AH5183-blocked ganglia, even in the drug's continued presence. Venom-induced release of ACh from AH5183-treated ganglia was not less than the venom-induced release from tissues not exposed to AH5183.

  20. Positive allosteric modulators of alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors reverse ketamine-induced schizophrenia-like deficits in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforuk, Agnieszka; Kos, Tomasz; Hołuj, Małgorzata; Potasiewicz, Agnieszka; Popik, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs) have generated great interest as targets of new pharmacological treatments for cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. One promising recent approach is based on the use of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α7-nAChRs, which demonstrate several advantages over direct agonists. Nevertheless, the efficacy of these newly introduced α7-nAChR agents has not been extensively characterised in animal models of schizophrenia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of type I and II PAMs, N-(5-chloro-2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-N'-(5-methyl-3-isoxazolyl)urea (PNU-120596) and N-(4-chlorophenyl)-[[(4-chlorophenyl)amino]methylene]-3-methyl-5-isoxazoleacet-amide (CCMI), respectively, and galantamine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChE) that also allosterically modulates nAChRs, against ketamine-induced cognitive deficits and social withdrawal in rats. The orthosteric α7-nAChR agonist octahydro-2-methyl-5-(6-phenyl-3-pyridazinyl)-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (A-582941) was used as a positive control. Additionally, the antipsychotic activities of the tested compounds were assessed using the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test. PNU-120596, CCMI, galantamine and A-582941 reversed ketamine-induced cognitive inflexibility, as assessed in the attentional set-shifting task (ASST). The tested compounds were also effective against ketamine-induced impairment in the novel object recognition task (NORT). PNU-120596, CCMI, and A-582941 ameliorated ketamine-induced social interaction deficits, whereas galantamine was ineffective. Moreover, all tested compounds selectively suppressed the CAR. The positive allosteric modulation of α7-nAChRs demonstrates preclinical efficacy not only against schizophrenia-like cognition impairments but also positive and negative symptoms. Therefore, the use of α7-nAChR PAMs as a potential treatment strategy in schizophrenia is supported.

  1. A novel inhibitor of α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from Conus vexillum delineates a new conotoxin superfamily.

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    Sulan Luo

    Full Text Available Conotoxins (CTxs selectively target a range of ion channels and receptors, making them widely used tools for probing nervous system function. Conotoxins have been previously grouped into superfamilies according to signal sequence and into families based on their cysteine framework and biological target. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of a new conotoxin, from Conus vexillum, named αB-conotoxin VxXXIVA. The peptide does not belong to any previously described conotoxin superfamily and its arrangement of Cys residues is unique among conopeptides. Moreover, in contrast to previously characterized conopeptide toxins, which are expressed initially as prepropeptide precursors with a signal sequence, a ''pro'' region, and the toxin-encoding region, the precursor sequence of αB-VxXXIVA lacks a ''pro'' region. The predicted 40-residue mature peptide, which contains four Cys, was synthesized in each of the three possible disulfide arrangements. Investigation of the mechanism of action of αB-VxXXIVA revealed that the peptide is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR antagonist with greatest potency against the α9α10 subtype. (1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectra indicated that all three αB-VxXXIVA isomers were poorly structured in aqueous solution. This was consistent with circular dichroism (CD results which showed that the peptides were unstructured in buffer, but adopted partially helical conformations in aqueous trifluoroethanol (TFE solution. The α9α10 nAChR is an important target for the development of analgesics and cancer chemotherapeutics, and αB-VxXXIVA represents a novel ligand with which to probe the structure and function of this protein.

  2. Agonist and antagonist effects of tobacco-related nitrosamines on human α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

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    Simone eBrusco

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of the ‘neuronal’ nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs is implicated in both tobacco addiction and smoking-dependent tumor promotion. Some of these effects are caused by the tobacco-derived N-nitrosamines, which are carcinogenic compounds that avidly bind to nAChRs. However, the functional effects of these drugs on specific nAChR subtypes are largely unknown. By using patch-clamp methods, we tested 4-(methylnitrosamine-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK and N’-nitrosonornicotine (NNN on human α4β2 nAChRs. These latter are widely distributed in the mammalian brain and are also frequently expressed outside the nervous system. NNK behaved as a partial agonist, with an apparent EC50 of 16.7 μM. At 100 μM, it activated 16 % of the maximal current activated by nicotine. When NNK was co-applied with nicotine, it potentiated the currents elicited by nicotine concentrations ≤ 100 nM. At higher concentrations of nicotine, NNK always inhibited the α4β2 nAChR. In contrast, NNN was a pure inhibitor of this nAChR subtype, with IC50 of approximately 1 nM in the presence of 10 μM nicotine. The effects of both NNK and NNN were mainly competitive and largely independent of Vm. The different actions of NNN and NNK must be taken into account when interpreting their biological effects in vitro and in vivo.

  3. N-methyl-D-aspartate increases acetylcholine release from rat striatum and cortex: its effect is augmented by choline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulus, I. H.; Buyukuysal, R. L.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), a glutamate agonist, and of glutamate itself, on acetylcholine (ACh) release from superfused rat striatal slices. In a Mg(++)-free medium, NMDA (32-1000 microM) as well as glutamate (1 mM) increased basal ACh release by 35 to 100% (all indicated differences, P less than .05), without altering tissue ACh or choline contents. This augmentation was blocked by Mg++ (1.2 mM) or by MK-801 (10 microM). Electrical stimulation (15 Hz, 75 mA) increased ACh release 9-fold (from 400 to 3660 pmol/mg of protein): this was enhanced (to 4850 pmol/mg of protein) by NMDA (100 microM). ACh levels in stimulated slices fell by 50 or 65% depending on the absence or presence of NMDA. The addition of choline (40 microM) increased ACh release both basally (570 pmol/mg of protein) and with electrical stimulation (6900 pmol/mg of protein). In stimulated slices choline acted synergistically with NMDA, raising ACh release to 10,520 pmol/mg of protein. The presence of choline also blocked the fall in tissue ACh. No treatment affected tissue phospholipid or protein levels. NMDA (32-320 microM) also augmented basal ACh release from cortical but not hippocampal slices. Choline efflux from striatal and cortical (but not hippocampal) slices decreased by 34 to 50% in Mg(++)-free medium. These data indicate that NMDA-like drugs may be useful, particularly in combination with choline, to enhance striatal and cortical cholinergic activity. ACh release from rat hippocampus apparently is not affected by NMDA receptors.

  4. HIV gp120 induces mucus formation in human bronchial epithelial cells through CXCR4/α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

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    Sravanthi Gundavarapu

    Full Text Available Lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, asthma, and lung infections are major causes of morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients even in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART. Many of these diseases are strongly associated with smoking and smoking is more common among HIV-infected than uninfected people; however, HIV is an independent risk factor for chronic bronchitis, COPD, and asthma. The mechanism by which HIV promotes these diseases is unclear. Excessive airway mucus formation is a characteristic of these diseases and contributes to airway obstruction and lung infections. HIV gp120 plays a critical role in several HIV-related pathologies and we investigated whether HIV gp120 promoted airway mucus formation in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE cells. We found that NHBE cells expressed the HIV-coreceptor CXCR4 but not CCR5 and produced mucus in response to CXCR4-tropic gp120. The gp120-induced mucus formation was blocked by the inhibitors of CXCR4, α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAAR but not the antagonists of CCR5 and epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR. These results identify two distinct pathways (α7-nAChR-GABAAR and EGFR for airway mucus formation and demonstrate for the first time that HIV-gp120 induces and regulates mucus formation in the airway epithelial cells through the CXCR4-α7-nAChR-GABAAR pathway. Interestingly, lung sections from HIV ± ART and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV ± ART have significantly more mucus and gp120-immunoreactivity than control lung sections from humans and macaques, respectively. Thus, even after ART, lungs from HIV-infected patients contain significant amounts of gp120 and mucus that may contribute to the higher incidence of obstructive pulmonary diseases in this population.

  5. Taurolithocholic acid promotes intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell growth via muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonyingcharoen, Sumet; Suriyo, Tawit; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a malignant cancer of the biliary tract and its occurrence is associated with chronic cholestasis which causes an elevation of bile acids in the liver and bile duct. The present study aimed to investigate the role and mechanistic effect of bile acids on the CCA cell growth. Intrahepatic CCA cell lines, RMCCA-1 and HuCCA-1, were treated with bile acids and their metabolites to determine the growth promoting effect. Cell viability, cell cycle analysis, EdU incorporation assays were conducted. Intracellular signaling proteins were detected by western immunoblotting. Among eleven forms of bile acids and their metabolites, only taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) concentration dependently (1-40 µM) increased the cell viability of RMCCA-1, but not HuCCA-1 cells. The cell cycle analysis showed induction of cells in the S phase and the EdU incorporation assay revealed induction of DNA synthesis in the TLCA-treated RMCCA-1 cells. Moreover, TLCA increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, ERK 1/2 and also increased the expression of cyclin D1 in RMCCA-1 cells. Furthermore, TLCA-induced RMCCA-1 cell growth could be inhibited by atropine, a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist, AG 1478, a specific EGFR inhibitor, or U 0126, a specific MEK 1/2 inhibitor. These results suggest that TLCA induces CCA cell growth via mAChR and EGFR/EKR1/2 signaling pathway. Moreover, the functional presence of cholinergic system plays a certain role in TLCA-induced CCA cell growth.

  6. Agonist actions of clothianidin on synaptic and extrasynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on cockroach sixth abdominal ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thany, Steeve H

    2009-11-01

    Clothianidin is new neonicotinoid insecticide acting selectively on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Its effects on nAChRs expressed on cercal afferent/giant interneuron synapses and DUM neurons have been studied using mannitol-gap and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques, respectively. Bath-application of clothianidin-induced dose-dependent depolarizations of cockroach cercal afferent/giant interneuron synapses which were not reversed after wash-out suggesting a strong desensitization of postsynaptic interneurons at the 6th abdominal ganglion (A6). Clothinidin activity on the nerve preparation was characterized by an increased firing rate of action potentials which then ceased when the depolarization reached a peak. Clothianidin responses were insensitive to all muscarinic antagonists tested but were blocked by co-application of specific nicotinic antagonists methyllicaconitine, alpha-bungarotoxin and d-tubocurarine. In a second round of experiment, clothianidin actions were tested on DUM neurons isolated from the A6. There was a strong desensitization of nAChRs which was not affected by muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine and atropine, but was reduced with nicotinic antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin. In addition, clothianidin-induced currents were completely blocked by methyllicaconitine suggesting that (1) clothianidin acted as a specific agonist of nAChR subtypes and (2) a small proportion of receptors blocked by MLA was insensitive to alpha-bungarotoxin. Moreover, because clothianidin currents were blocked by d-tubocurarine and mecamylamine, we provided that clothianidin was an agonist of both nAChRs: imidacloprid-sensitive nAChR1 and -insensitive nAChR2 subtypes. PMID:19583978

  7. Interfacial Recognition of Acetylcholine by an Amphiphilic p-Sulfonatocalix[8]arene Derivative Incorporated into Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylcholine Vesicles

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    Yasuhiro Ooi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Dodecyl ether derivatives 1-3 of p-sulfonatocalix[n]arene were incorporated into dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC vesicles, and their binding abilities for acetylcholine (ACh were examined by using steady-state fluorescence/fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS. For the detection of ACh binding to the DMPC vesicles containing 5 mol % of 1-3, competitive fluorophore displacement experiments were performed, where rhodamine 6G (Rh6G was used as a fluorescent guest. The addition of Rh6G to the DMPC vesicles containing 3 resulted in a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of Rh6G with an increase of its fluorescence anisotropy, indicating that Rh6G binds to the DMPC-3 vesicles. In the case of DMPC-1 and DMPC-2 vesicles, significant changes in the fluorescence spectra of Rh6G were not observed. When ACh was added to the DMPC-3 vesicles in the presence of Rh6G ([3]/[Rh6G]=100, the fluorescence intensity of Rh6G increased with a decrease in its fluorescence anisotropy. From the analysis of fluorescence titration data, the association constants were determined to be 7.1×105 M-1 for Rh6G-3 complex and 1.1×102 M-1 for ACh-3 complex at the DMPC-3 vesicles. To get a direct evidence for the binding of Rh6G and its displacement by ACh at the DMPC-3 vesicles, diffusion times of the Rh6G were measured by using FCS. Binding selectivity of the DMPC-3 vesicles for ACh, choline, GABA, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-arginine, L-lysine, L-histamine and ammonium chloride was also evaluated using FCS.

  8. Evaluation of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor-Associated Proteome at Baseline and Following Nicotine Exposure in Human and Mouse Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterlis, Irina; Stone, Kathryn L.; Grady, Sharon R.; Lindstrom, Jon M.; Marks, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) support the initiation and maintenance of smoking, but the long-term changes occurring in the protein complex as a result of smoking and the nicotine in tobacco are not known. Human studies and animal models have also demonstrated that increasing cholinergic tone increases behaviors related to depression, suggesting that the nAChR-associated proteome could be altered in individuals with mood disorders. We therefore immunopurified nAChRs and associated proteins for quantitative proteomic assessment of changes in protein–protein interactions of high-affinity nAChRs containing the β2 subunit (β2*-nAChRs) from either cortex of mice treated with saline or nicotine, or postmortem human temporal cortex tissue from tobacco-exposed and nonexposed individuals, with a further comparison of diagnosed mood disorder to control subjects. We observed significant effects of nicotine exposure on the β2*-nAChR-associated proteome in human and mouse cortex, particularly in the abundance of the nAChR subunits themselves, as well as putative interacting proteins that make up core components of neuronal excitability (Na/K ATPase subunits), presynaptic neurotransmitter release (syntaxins, SNAP25, synaptotagmin), and a member of a known nAChR protein chaperone family (14-3-3ζ). These findings identify candidate-signaling proteins that could mediate changes in cholinergic signaling via nicotine or tobacco use. Further analysis of identified proteins will determine whether these interactions are essential for primary function of nAChRs at presynaptic terminals. The identification of differences in the nAChR-associated proteome and downstream signaling in subjects with various mood disorders may also identify novel etiological mechanisms and reveal new treatment targets.

  9. The Dinoflagellate Toxin 20-Methyl Spirolide-G Potently Blocks Skeletal Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couesnon, Aurélie; Aráoz, Rómulo; Iorga, Bogdan I.; Benoit, Evelyne; Reynaud, Morgane; Servent, Denis; Molgó, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic imine toxin 20-methyl spirolide G (20-meSPX-G), produced by the toxigenic dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii/Alexandrium peruvianum, has been previously reported to contaminate shellfish in various European coastal locations, as revealed by mouse toxicity bioassay. The aim of the present study was to determine its toxicological profile and its molecular target selectivity. 20-meSPX-G blocked nerve-evoked isometric contractions in isolated mouse neuromuscular preparations, while it had no action on contractions elicited by direct electrical stimulation, and reduced reversibly nerve-evoked compound muscle action potential amplitudes in anesthetized mice. Voltage-clamp recordings in Xenopus oocytes revealed that 20-meSPX-G potently inhibited currents evoked by ACh on Torpedo muscle-type and human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), whereas lower potency was observed in human α4β2 nAChR. Competition-binding assays showed that 20-meSPX-G fully displaced [3H]epibatidine binding to HEK-293 cells expressing the human α3β2 (Ki = 0.040 nM), whereas a 90-fold lower affinity was detected in human α4β2 nAChR. The spirolide displaced [125I]α-bungarotoxin binding to Torpedo membranes (Ki = 0.028 nM) and in HEK-293 cells expressing chick chimeric α7-5HT3 nAChR (Ki = 0.11 nM). In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate that 20-meSPX-G is a potent antagonist of nAChRs, and its subtype selectivity is discussed on the basis of molecular docking models. PMID:27563924

  10. Acetylcholine induces GABA release onto rod bipolar cells through heteromeric nicotinic receptors expressed in A17 amacrine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgueta, Claudio; Vielma, Alex H.; Palacios, Adrian G.; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a major retinal neurotransmitter that modulates visual processing through a large repertoire of cholinergic receptors expressed on different retinal cell types. ACh is released from starburst amacrine cells (SACs) under scotopic conditions, but its effects on cells of the rod pathway have not been investigated. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings in slices of rat retina, we found that ACh application triggers GABA release onto rod bipolar (RB) cells. GABA was released from A17 amacrine cells and activated postsynaptic GABAA and GABAC receptors in RB cells. The sensitivity of ACh-induced currents to nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) antagonists (TMPH ~ mecamylamine > erysodine > DhβE > MLA) together with the differential potency of specific agonists to mimic ACh responses (cytisine >> RJR2403 ~ choline), suggest that A17 cells express heteromeric nAChRs containing the β4 subunit. Activation of nAChRs induced GABA release after Ca2+ accumulation in A17 cell dendrites and varicosities mediated by L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and intracellular Ca2+ stores. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase depolarized A17 cells and increased spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in RB cells, indicating that endogenous ACh enhances GABAergic inhibition of RB cells. Moreover, injection of neostigmine or cytisine reduced the b-wave of the scotopic flash electroretinogram (ERG), suggesting that cholinergic modulation of GABA release controls RB cell activity in vivo. These results describe a novel regulatory mechanism of RB cell inhibition and complement our understanding of the neuromodulatory control of retinal signal processing. PMID:25709566

  11. Nicotine signals through muscle-type and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in both human bronchial epithelial cells and airway fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luketich James D

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-neuronal cells, including those derived from lung, are reported to express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR. We examined nAChR subunit expression in short-term cultures of human airway cells derived from a series of never smokers, ex-smokers, and active smokers. Methods and Results At the mRNA level, human bronchial epithelial (HBE cells and airway fibroblasts expressed a range of nAChR subunits. In multiple cultures of both cell types, mRNA was detected for subunits that constitute functional muscle-type and neuronal-type pentomeric receptors. Two immortalized cell lines derived from HBE cells also expressed muscle-type and neuronal-type nAChR subunits. Airway fibroblasts expressed mRNA for three muscle-type subunits (α1, δ, and ε significantly more often than HBE cells. Immunoblotting of HBE cell and airway fibroblast extracts confirmed that mRNA for many nAChR subunits is translated into detectable levels of protein, and evidence of glycosylation of nAChRs was observed. Some minor differences in nAChR expression were found based on smoking status in fibroblasts or HBE cells. Nicotine triggered calcium influx in the immortalized HBE cell line BEAS2B, which was blocked by α-bungarotoxin and to a lesser extent by hexamethonium. Activation of PKC and MAPK p38, but not MAPK p42/44, was observed in BEAS2B cells exposed to nicotine. In contrast, nicotine could activate p42/44 in airway fibroblasts within five minutes of exposure. Conclusions These results suggest that muscle-type and neuronal-type nAChRs are functional in airway fibroblasts and HBE cells, that prior tobacco exposure does not appear to be an important variable in nAChR expression, and that distinct signaling pathways are observed in response to nicotine.

  12. Inhibition of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by cobra venom α-neurotoxins: is there a perspective in lung cancer treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Alama

    Full Text Available Nicotine exerts its oncogenic effects through the binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and the activation of downstream pathways that block apoptosis and promote neo-angiogenesis. The nAChRs of the α7 subtype are present on a wide variety of cancer cells and their inhibition by cobra venom neurotoxins has been proposed in several articles and reviews as a potential innovative lung cancer therapy. However, since part of the published results was recently retracted, we believe that the antitumoral activity of cobra venom neurotoxins needs to be independently re-evaluated.We determined the activity of α-neurotoxins from Naja atra (short-chain neurotoxin, α-cobrotoxin and Naja kaouthia (long-chain neurotoxin, α-cobratoxin in vitro by cytotoxicity measurements in 5 lung cancer cell lines, by colony formation assay with α7nAChRs expressing and non-expressing cell lines and in vivo by assessing tumor growth in an orthotopic Non-Obese Diabetic/Severe Combined Immunodeficient (NOD/SCID mouse model system utilizing different treatment schedules and dosages.No statistically significant reduction in tumor growth was observed in the treatment arms in comparison to the control for both toxins. Paradoxically α-cobrotoxin from Naja atra showed the tendency to enhance tumor growth although, even in this case, the statistical significance was not reached.In conclusion our results show that, in contrast with other reports, the nAChR inhibitors α-cobratoxin from N. kaouthia and α-cobrotoxin from N. atra neither suppressed tumor growth nor prolonged the survival of the treated animals.

  13. Assessment of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor availability in juvenile pig brain with [18F]NS10743

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To conduct a quantitative PET assessment of the specific binding sites in the brain of juvenile pigs for [18F]NS10743, a novel diazabicyclononane derivative targeting α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChRs). Dynamic PET recordings were made in isoflurane-anaesthetized juvenile pigs during 120 min after administration of [18F]NS10743 under baseline conditions (n = 3) and after blocking of the α7 nAChR with NS6740 (3 mg.kg-1 bolus + 1 mg.kg-1.h-1 continuous infusion; n = 3). Arterial plasma samples were collected for determining the input function of the unmetabolized tracer. Kinetic analysis of regional brain time-radioactivity curves was performed, and parametric maps were calculated relative to arterial input. Plasma [18F]NS10743 passed readily into the brain, with peak uptake occurring in α7 nAChR-expressing brain regions such as the colliculi, thalamus, temporal lobe and hippocampus. The highest SUVmax was approximately 2.3, whereas the lowest uptake was in the olfactory bulb (SUVmax 1.53 ± 0.32). Administration of NS6740 significantly decreased [18F]NS10743 binding late in the emission recording throughout the brain, except in the olfactory bulb, which was therefore chosen as reference region for calculation of BPND. The baseline BPND ranged from 0.39 ± 0.08 in the cerebellum to 0.76 ± 0.07 in the temporal lobe. Pretreatment and constant infusion with NS6740 significantly reduced the BPND in regions with high [18F]NS10743 binding (temporal lobe -29%, p = 0.01; midbrain: -35%, p = 0.02), without significantly altering the BPND in low binding regions (cerebellum: -16%, p = 0.2). This study confirms the potential of [18F]NS10743 as a target-specific radiotracer for the molecular imaging of central α7 nAChRs by PET. (orig.)

  14. IL-13R alpha 2 reverses the effects of IL-13 and IL-4 on bronchial reactivity and acetylcholine-induced Ca2+ signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Kellner, Julia; Gamarra, Fernando; Welsch, Ulrich; Joerres, Rudolf A.; Huber, Rudolf M; Bergner, Albrecht

    2007-01-01

    Background: The interleukins IL-4 and IL-13 play a key role in the pathophysiology of asthma. The interleukin receptor IL-13R alpha 2 is believed to act as a decoy receptor, but until now, the functional significance of IL-13R alpha 2 remains vague. Methods: Bronchial reactivity was quantified in murine lung slices by digital video microscopy and acetylcholine (ACH)-induced Ca2+ signaling was measured in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) using fluorescence microscopy. Results: IL-4 or I...

  15. The essential oil of Eucalyptus tereticornis, and its constituents alpha- and beta-pinene, potentiate acetylcholine-induced contractions in isolated rat trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Francisco J B; Brito, Teresinha S; Freire, Walter B S; Costa, Roberta C; Linhares, Maria I; Sousa, Francisca C F; Lahlou, Saad; Leal-Cardoso, José H; Santos, Armênio A; Magalhães, Pedro J C

    2010-09-01

    The effects of the essential oil of Eucalyptus tereticornis (EOET), especially the effects of its constituents alpha- and beta-pinene, were studied on rat trachea in vitro. In tracheal rings, EOET, alpha- or beta-pinene potentiated the contractions induced by acetylcholine (ACh). Contractions induced by K(+) (60mM) were also potentiated by alpha- and beta-pinene, but were reduced by EOET. Our findings show that EOET has myorelaxant effects on rat airways, but potentiates ACh-induced contractions. Monoterpenes alpha- and beta-pinene are involved in its potentiating actions, but are not responsible for its myorelaxant effects. A putative inhibition of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme is involved.

  16. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological characterization of novel spirocyclic quinuclidinyl-Delta2 -isoxazoline derivatives as potent and selective agonists of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallanoce, Clelia; Magrone, Pietro; Matera, Carlo;

    2011-01-01

    A set of racemic spirocyclic quinuclidinyl-¿(2) -isoxazoline derivatives was synthesized using a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition-based approach. Target compounds were assayed for binding affinity toward rat neuronal homomeric (a7) and heteromeric (a4ß2) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. ¿(2) -Isoxazol...... (-)-dibenzoyl-D-tartaric acid as resolving agents. Enantiomer (R)-(-)-6¿a was found to be the eutomer, with K(i) values of 4.6 and 48.7 nM against rat and human a7 receptors, respectively....

  17. Effects of mutations of a glutamine residue in loop D of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor on agonist profiles for neonicotinoid insecticides and related ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Shimomura, Masaru; Okuda, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Komai, Koichiro; Akamatsu, Miki; Sattelle, David B

    2002-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are agonists of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and show selective toxicity for insects over vertebrates. To elucidate the molecular basis of the selectivity, amino acid residues influencing neonicotinoid sensitivity were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of the chicken α7 nicotinic AChR subunit, based on the crystal structure of an ACh binding protein (AChBP).In the ligand binding site of AChBP, Q55 in loop D is close to Y164 in loop F that...

  18. An acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit promoter confers intrathymic expression in transgenic mice. Implications for tolerance of a transgenic self-antigen and for autoreactivity in myasthenia gravis.

    OpenAIRE

    Salmon, A M; Bruand, C; Cardona, A; Changeux, J P; Berrih-Aknin, S.

    1998-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease targeting the skeletal muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Although the autoantigen is present in the thymus, it is not tolerated in MG patients. In addition, the nature of the cell bearing the autoantigen is controversial. To approach these questions, we used two lineages of transgenic mice in which the beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) gene is under the control of a 842-bp (Tg1) or a 3300-bp promoter fragment (Tg2) of the chick muscle alpha subu...

  19. Different sensitivities to rocuronium of the neuromuscular junctions innervated by normal/damaged facial nerves and somatic nerve in rats: the role of the presynaptic acetylcholine quantal release

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jun-liang; LI Shao-qin; CHI Fang-lu; CHEN Lian-hua; LI Shi-tong

    2012-01-01

    Background Muscles present different responses to muscle relaxants,a mechanism of importance in surgeries requiring facial nerve evoked electromyography under general anaesthesia.The non-depolarizing muscle relaxants have multiple reaction formats in the neuromuscular junction,in which pre-synaptic quantal release of acetylcholine was one of the important mechanisms.This study was to compare the pre-synaptic quantal release of acetylcholine from the neuromuscular junctions innervated by normal/damaged facial nerves and somatic nerve under the effect of rocuronium in rats in vitro.Methods Acute right-sided facial nerve injury was induced by nerve crush axotomies.Both sided facial nerve connected orbicularis oris strips and tibial nerve connected gastrocnemius strips were isolated to measure endplate potentials (EPP) and miniature endplate potentials (MEPP) using an intracellular microelectrode gauge under different rocuronium concentrations.Then,the pre-synaptic quantal releases of acetylcholine were calculated by the ratios of the EPPs and the MEPPs,and compared among the damaged or normal facial nerve innervated orbicularis oris and tibial nerve innervated gastrocnemius.Results The EPP/MEPP ratios of the three neuromuscular junctions decreased in a dose dependent manner with the increase of the rocuronium concentration.With the concentrations of rocuronium being 5 μg/ml,7.5 μg/ml and 10 μg/ml,the decrease of the EPP/MEPP ratio in the damaged facial nerve group was greater than that in the normal facial nerve group.The decrease in the somatic nerve group was the biggest,with significant differences.Conclusions Rocuronium presented different levels of inhibition on the pre-synaptic quantal release of acetylcholine in the three groups of neuromuscular junctions.The levels of the inhibition showed the following sequence:somatic nerve >damaged facial nerve > normal facial nerve.The difference may be one of the reasons causing the different sensitivities to

  20. Structural and functional studies of the modulator NS9283 reveal agonist-like mechanism of action at α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jeppe A; Ahring, Philip K; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen;

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of Cys loop receptor ion channels is a proven drug discovery strategy, but many underlying mechanisms of the mode of action are poorly understood. We report the x-ray structure of the acetylcholine-binding protein from Lymnaea stagnalis with NS9283, a stoichiometry selective positive...... that in a mutant receptor with one natural and two engineered α4-α4 interfaces, NS9283 is an agonist. Modulation via extracellular binding sites is well known for benzodiazepines acting at γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors. Like NS9283, benzodiazepines increase the apparent agonist potency with a minimal effect...

  1. Transcriptomic effects of depleted uranium on acetylcholine and cholesterol metabolisms in Alzheimer's disease model; Effets transcriptomiques de l'uranium appauvri sur les metabolismes de l'acetylcholine et du cholesterol chez un modele de maladie d'Alzheimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestaevel, Ph.; Bensoussan, H.; Racine, R.; Airault, F.; Gourmelon, P.; Souidi, M. [Direction de la radioprotection de l' Homme, service de radiobiologie et d' epidemiologie, laboratoire de radiotoxicologie experimentale, institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire, BP no 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France)

    2011-02-15

    Some heavy metals, or aluminium, could participate in the development of Alzheimer disease (AD). Depleted uranium (DU), another heavy metal, modulates the cholinergic system and the cholesterol metabolism in the brain of rats, but without neurological disorders. The aim of this study was to determine what happens in organisms exposed to DU that will/are developing the AD. This study was thus performed on a transgenic mouse model for human amyloid precursor protein (APP), the Tg2576 strain. The possible effects of DU through drinking water (20 mg/L) over an 8-month period were analyzed on acetylcholine and cholesterol metabolisms at gene level in the cerebral cortex. The mRNA levels of choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABC A1) decreased in control Tg2576 mice in comparison with wild-type mice (respectively -89%, -86% and -44%, p < 0.05). Chronic exposure of Tg2576 mice to DU increased mRNA levels of ChAT (+189%, p < 0.05), VAChT (+120%, p < 0.05) and ABC A1 (+52%, p < 0.05) compared to control Tg2576 mice. Overall, these modifications of acetylcholine and cholesterol metabolisms did not lead to increased disturbances that are specific of AD, suggesting that chronic DU exposure did not worsen the pathology in this experimental model. (authors)

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi infection induces up-regulation of cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Peraza-Cruces

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of chagasic cardiomyopathy is not completely understood, but it has been correlated with parasympathetic denervation (neurogenic theory and inflammatory activity (immunogenic theory that could affect heart muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR expression. In order to further understand whether neurogenic and/or immunogenic alterations are related to changes in mAChR expression, we studied two models of Trypanosoma cruzi infection: 1 in 3-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats chronically infected with T. cruzi and 2 isolated primary cardiomyocytes co-cultured with T. cruzi and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Using [³H]-quinuclidinylbenzilate ([³H]-QNB binding assays, we evaluated mAChR expression in homogenates from selected cardiac regions, PBMC, and cultured cardiomyocytes. We also determined in vitro protein expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in serum and cell culture medium by ELISA. Our results showed that: 1 mAChR were significantly (P < 0.05 up-regulated in right ventricular myocardium (means ± SEM; control: 58.69 ± 5.54, N = 29; Chagas: 72.29 ± 5.79 fmol/mg, N = 34 and PBMC (control: 12.88 ± 2.45, N = 18; Chagas: 20.22 ± 1.82 fmol/mg, N = 19, as well as in cardiomyocyte transmembranes cultured with either PBMC/T. cruzi co-cultures (control: 24.33 ± 3.83; Chagas: 43.62 ± 5.08 fmol/mg, N = 7 for both or their conditioned medium (control: 37.84 ± 3.84, N = 4; Chagas: 54.38 ± 6.28 fmol/mg, N = 20; 2 [³H]-leucine uptake was increased in cardiomyocytes co-cultured with PBMC/T. cruzi-conditioned medium (Chagas: 21,030 ± 2321; control 10,940 ± 2385 dpm, N = 7 for both; P < 0.05; 3 plasma IL-6 was increased in chagasic rats, IL-1β, was increased in both plasma of chagasic rats and in the culture medium, and TNF-α level was decreased in the culture medium. In conclusion, our results suggest that cytokines are involved in the up-regulation of mAChR in chronic Chagas disease.

  3. Subtype-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists can improve cognitive flexibility in an attentional set shifting task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Christopher; Kohli, Shivali; Malcolm, Emma; Allison, Claire; Shoaib, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are considered to be viable targets to enhance cognition in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Activation of nAChRs with selective nicotinic receptor agonists may provide effective means to pharmacologically treat cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. Cognitive flexibility is one aspect of cognition, which can be assessed in a rodent model of the attentional set-shifting task (ASST). The aim of the present study was two-fold, firstly, to evaluate the efficacy of a series of subtype selective nAChR agonists, such as those that target α7 and α4β2 nAChR subtypes in non-compromised rodents. Secondly, nicotine as a prototypic agonist was evaluated for its effects to restore attentional deficits produced by sub-chronic ketamine exposure in the ASST. Male hooded Lister rats underwent habituation, consisting of a simple odour and medium discrimination with subsequent assessment 24 h later. In experimentally naïve rats, α7 subtype selective agonists, compound-A and SSR180711 along with PNU-120596, an α7 positive allosteric modulator (PAM), were compared against the β2* selective agonist, 5IA-85380. All compounds except for PNU-120596 were observed to significantly improve extra-dimensional (ED) shift performance, nicotine, 5IA-85380 and SSR180711 further enhanced the final reversal (REV3) stage of the task. In another experiment, sub-chronic ketamine treatment produced robust deficits during the ED and the REV3 stages of the discriminations; rodents required significantly more trials to reach criterion during these discriminations. These deficits were attenuated in rodents treated acutely with nicotine (0.1 mg/kg SC) 10 min prior to the ED shift. These results highlight the potential utility of targeting nAChRs to enhance cognitive flexibility, particularly the α7 and β2* receptor subtypes. The improvement with nicotine was much greater in rodents that were impaired following the sub-chronic ketamine

  4. SPET imaging of central muscarinic acetylcholine receptors with iodine-123 labelled E-IQNP and Z-IQNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobuhara, K.; Farde, L.; Halldin, C.; Karlsson, P.; Swahn, C.G.; Olsson, H.; Sedvall, G. [Dept. of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Bergstroem, K.A. [Dept. of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio (Finland); Larsson, S.A.; Schnell, P.-O. [Dept. of Radiation Physics, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); McPherson, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Nuclear Medicine Group, TN (United States); Savonen, A.; Hiltunen, J. [MAP Medical Technologies Oy, Tikkakoski (Finland)

    2001-01-01

    1-Azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (IQNP) is a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist and the racemic ligand contains eight stereoisomers. In a single-photon emission tomography (SPET) study in monkeys we recently confirmed that [{sup 123}I]E-(R,R)-IQNP ([{sup 123}I]E-IQNP) is a radioligand with modest selectivity for the M{sub 1} and M{sub 4} subtypes, whereas [{sup 123}I]Z-(R,R)-IQNP ([{sup 123}I]Z-IQNP) is non-subtype selective. In the present SPET study, E- and Z-IQNP were examined in human subjects. SPET examination was performed on three male subjects after i.v. injection of [{sup 123}I]E-IQNP and in another three after i.v. injection of [{sup 123}I]Z-IQNP. The binding potential (BP) for [{sup 123}I]E-IQNP was calculated using several quantitative approaches with the cerebellum as a reference region. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure radioligand metabolism in plasma. Following [{sup 123}I]E-IQNP, the radioactivity was high in the neocortex and striatum, intermediate in the thalamus and low in the pons and cerebellum, which is consistent with the rank order for the regional density of M{sub 1} and M{sub 4} subtypes in vitro. For all regions, peak equilibrium was identified within the 48-h data acquisition. The simplified reference tissue approach using SPET data from 0 to 48 h was the most reliable in this limited series of subjects. Following injection of [{sup 123}I]Z-IQNP, radioactivity was high in the neocortex and striatum, intermediate in the thalamus and pons and low in the cerebellum, which is in agreement with the density of M{sub 1}, M{sub 2} and M{sub 4} subtypes as measured in vitro. Quantitative analyses provided indirect support for specific M{sub 2} binding of Z-IQNP in the cerebellum. The high selectivity of [{sup 123}I]E-IQNP for M{sub 1} and M{sub 4} receptors allowed the use of cerebellum as a reference region devoid of specific binding, and

  5. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 subunits with a C2 cytoplasmic loop yellow fluorescent protein insertion form functional receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teresa A MURRAY; Qiang LIU; Paul WHITEAKER; Jie WU; Ronald J LUKAS

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Several nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits have been engineered as fluorescent protein (FP) fusions and exploited to illuminate features of nAChRs. The aim of this work was to create a FP fusion in the nAChR a.7 subunit without compromising formation of functional receptors.Methods: A gene construct was generated to introduce yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), in frame, into the otherwise unaltered, large, second cytoplamsic loop between the third and fourth transmembrane domains of the mouse nAChR al sub-unit (a7Y). SH-EP1 cells were transfected with mouse nAChR wild type a.7 subunits (a.7) or with a7Y subunits, alone or with the chaperone protein, hRJC-3. Receptor function was assessed using whole-cell current recording. Receptor expression was measured with 125I-labeled a-bungarotoxin (I-Bgt) binding, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.Results: Whole-cell currents revealed that a7Y nAChRs and al nAChRs were functional with comparable EC50 values for the a7 nAChR-selective agonist, choline, and IC50 values for the a.7 nAChR-selective antagonist, methyllycaconitine. I-Bgt binding was detected only after co-expression with hRIC-3. Confocal microscopy revealed that a7Y had primarily intracel-lular rather than surface expression. TIRF microscopy confirmed that little a7Y localized to the plasma membrane, typical of a7 nAChRs.Conclusion: nAChRs composed as homooligomers of a7Y subunits containing cytoplasmic loop YFP have functional, ligand binding, and trafficking characteristics similar to those of a.7 nAChRs. a7Y nAChRs may be used to elucidate properties of a.7 nAChRs and to identify and develop novel probes for these receptors, perhaps in high-throughput fashion.

  6. Molecular imaging of acetylcholine vesicular transporter (VAChT) in demented patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) by IBVM-SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's disease (A.D.) is characterized by a premature decline of cholinergic neurons. The 5-I.B.V.M. is an analogue of the Vesamicol that binds to the presynaptic vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). The exploration of this target should be useful to make an early diagnosis of A.D.. Our first aim was to propose a method of non invasive VAChT quantification according to 5-I.B.V.M. kinetic. 5-I.B.V.M. was injected to four A.D. patients (age = 77 ± 3.9 years and M.M.S.E. = 24.5 ± 1.02) were included in this methodological study. The single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images were obtained at five, 20, 35 and 50 minutes, at then at three, five and 22 hours after intravenous injection of 5-I.B.V.M. (185 MBq). The time activity curves were obtained after SPECT images co registration on a MRI masque. Specific volume of interest (S.P.E. SPEcific) were manually drawn on striatum, pons, thalamus and para-hippocampic gyrus including hippocampus; reference volumes of interest (R.E.F. = REFerence) were drawn on frontal and occipital cerebral cortex. On the basis of uptake kinetic, two modeling approaches were considered: transient equilibrium model for reversible ligand (binding potential (B.P.) (S.P.E. - R.E.F.)/R.E.F.) and Patlak graphical analysis for irreversible tracers (slope given by Ki/DVref where Ki is the influx constant and DVref is the distribution volume of the reference region). We observed an inflection or a steady state of the activity curves in the different regions studied between 250 and 1400 minutes, what seems to confirm that the tracer is little reversible. B.P. values obtained at 21 hours with occipital areas as reference and Ki/DVref values were respectively 4.62 ± 0.42 and 0.07 ± 0.01. The S.P.E. classification according to B.P. and Ki/DVref values were similar to the classification according to the compartmental analysis (Kuhl 1994). The transient equilibrium model with late acquisition seems the more suitable because I

  7. Studies for transitional changes of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and mRNA distribution by focal ischemia using nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessing stress-induced brain receptor responses is important in understanding clinical brain receptor images for nuclear medicine. It is known that cholinergic neurons are decreased by Alzheimer's disease and that there is a close relationship between cholinergic neurons and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAchR). Thus, this study assessed the response of mAchR to focal ischemia using infarction model rats (prepared by middle cerebral artery occlusion) and sham-operated rats. In the same rats, three kinds of images -- ex vivo regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) images with 99mTc-hexametyl-propyleneamine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO), in vitro mAchR binding images with [3H] quinuclidinyl benzilate (3H-QNB), and mAchR-mRNA images by in situ hybridization method using 35S-labeled-oligonucleotide probes specific for mAchR gene subtypes of m1 to m5 -- were obtained in acute and chronic phases. Each image datum was digitalized and assessed semi-quantitatively. There were significant changes in global distribution among rCBF, mAchR and mAchR-mRNAs. In the acute phase, there was no significant change in mAchR in the infarcted area, although rCBF markedly decreased. In the chronic phase, there was a significant decrease in mAchR in the infarct-sided thalamus, although there was no change in rCBF; and there was a significant decrease in mAchR of the infarct-sided substantia nigra in spite of increase in rCBF. In the acute phase, mAchR-mRNAs of the infarct-sided caudate-putamen was decreased, suggesting that the ability of cholinergic neuron to synthesize receptor protein had decreased in the acute phase. Because mAchR was not decreased in the acute phase, some viable neurons with no normal function may be preserved in the acute phase. These results were encouraging in understanding mAchR brain images of patients with memory disturbances such as cerebrovascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. (N.K.)

  8. Effects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists in assays of acute pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Kelen C; Carroll, F Ivy; Negus, S Stevens

    2015-11-01

    Agonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) constitute one drug class being evaluated as candidate analgesics. Previous preclinical studies have implicated α4β2 and α7 nAChRs as potential mediators of the antinociceptive effects of (–)-nicotine hydrogen tartrate (nicotine) and other nAChR agonists; however, these studies have relied exclusively on measures of pain-stimulated behavior, which can be defined as behaviors that increase in frequency, rate, or intensity after presentation of a noxious stimulus. Pain is also associated with depression of many behaviors, and drug effects can differ in assays of pain-stimulated versus pain-depressed behavior. Accordingly, this study compared the effects of nicotine, the selective α4/6β2 agonist 5-(123I)iodo-3-[2(S)-2-azetidinylmethoxy]pyridine (5-I-A-85380), and the selective α7 agonist N-(3R)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-4-chlorobenzamide in assays of pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Intraperitoneal injection of dilute lactic acid served as an acute noxious stimulus to either stimulate a stretching response or depress the operant responding, which is maintained by electrical brain stimulation in an intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure. Nicotine produced a dose-dependent, time-dependent, and mecamylamine-reversible blockade of both acid-stimulated stretching and acid-induced depression of ICSS. 5-I-A-85380 also blocked both acid-stimulated stretching and acid-induced depression of ICSS, whereas N-(3R)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-4-chlorobenzamide produced no effect in either procedure. Both nicotine and 5-I-A-85380 were ≥10-fold more potent in blocking the acid-induced depression of ICSS than in blocking the acid-induced stimulation of stretching. These results suggest that stimulation of α4β2 and/or α6β2 nAChRs may be especially effective to alleviate the signs of pain-related behavioral depression in rats; however, nonselective behavioral effects

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of new imaging agent for central nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}{sub 7} subtype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Mikako [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan); Nishiyama, Shingo; Tsukada, Hideo [PET Center, Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Hamamatsu (Japan); Hatano, Kentaro [National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu (Japan); Fuchigami, Takeshi [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hiroshi [National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu (Japan); Molecular Imaging Frontier Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan); Matsushima, Yoshitaka [Department of Chemistry, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan); Ito, Kengo [National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu (Japan); Magata, Yasuhiro [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan); Molecular Imaging Frontier Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu (Japan)], E-mail: magata@hama-med.ac.jp

    2010-04-15

    Introduction: The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) {alpha}7 subtype ({alpha}{sub 7} nAChR) is one of the major nAChR subtypes in the brain. We synthesized C-11 labeled {alpha}{sub 7} nAChR ligands, (R)-2-[{sup 11}C]methylamino-benzoic acid 1-aza-bicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl ester ([{sup 11}C](R)-MeQAA) and its isomer (S)-[{sup 11}C]MeQAA, for in vivo investigation with positron emission tomography (PET). Then, the potential of (R)- and (S)-[{sup 11}C]MeQAA for in vivo imaging of {alpha}{sub 7} nAChR in the brain was evaluated in mice and monkeys. Methods: The binding affinity for {alpha}{sub 7} nAChR was measured using rat brain. Biodistribution and in vivo receptor blocking studies were undertaken in mice. Dynamic PET scans were performed in conscious monkeys. Results: The affinity for {alpha}{sub 7} nAChR was 41 and 182 nM for (R)- and (S)-MeQAA, respectively. The initial uptake in the mouse brain was high ([{sup 11}C](R)-MeQAA: 7.68 and [{sup 11}C](S)-MeQAA: 6.65 %dose/g at 5 min). The clearance of [{sup 11}C](R)-MeQAA was slow in the hippocampus ({alpha}{sub 7} nAChR-rich region) but was rapid in the cerebellum ({alpha}{sub 7} nAChR-poor region). On the other hand, the clearance was fast for [{sup 11}C](S)-MeQAA in all regions. The brain uptake of [{sup 11}C](R)-MeQAA was decreased by methyllycaconitine ({alpha}{sub 7} nAChR antagonist) treatment. In monkeys, {alpha}{sub 7} nAChRs were highly distributed in the thalamus and cortex but poorly distributed in the cerebellum. The high accumulation was observed in the cortex and thalamus for [{sup 11}C](R)-MeQAA, while the uptake was rather homogeneous for [{sup 11}C](S)-MeQAA. Conclusions: [{sup 11}C](R)-MeQAA was successfully synthesized and showed high uptake to the brain. However, since the in vivo selectivity for {alpha}{sub 7} nAChR was not enough, further PET kinetic analysis or structure optimization is needed for specific visualization of brain {alpha}{sub 7} nAChRs in vivo.

  10. Effect of α{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Kevin D., E-mail: kevin.welch@ars.usda.gov [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States); Pfister, James A. [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States); Lima, Flavia G. [Federal University of Goías, School of Veterinary Medicine, Goiânia, Goías (Brazil); Green, Benedict T.; Gardner, Dale R. [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline. -- Highlights: ► Mice treated with nAChR agonists and antagonists have a loss in motor function. ► These deficits are temporary as near normal motor function returns within 10 min. ► There are compound-specific differences in the effects on motor function.

  11. Assessment of {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor availability in juvenile pig brain with [{sup 18}F]NS10743

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Fischer, Steffen; Hiller, Achim; Funke, Uta; Brust, Peter [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmacy, Leipzig (Germany); Becker, Georg; Sabri, Osama [Univ. of Leipzig, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Cumming, Paul; Xiong, Guoming [Univ. of Munich, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Peters, Dan [NeuroSearch A/S, Ballerup (Denmark)

    2011-08-15

    To conduct a quantitative PET assessment of the specific binding sites in the brain of juvenile pigs for [{sup 18}F]NS10743, a novel diazabicyclononane derivative targeting {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors ({alpha}7 nAChRs). Dynamic PET recordings were made in isoflurane-anaesthetized juvenile pigs during 120 min after administration of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 under baseline conditions (n = 3) and after blocking of the {alpha}7 nAChR with NS6740 (3 mg.kg{sup -1} bolus + 1 mg.kg{sup -1}.h{sup -1} continuous infusion; n = 3). Arterial plasma samples were collected for determining the input function of the unmetabolized tracer. Kinetic analysis of regional brain time-radioactivity curves was performed, and parametric maps were calculated relative to arterial input. Plasma [{sup 18}F]NS10743 passed readily into the brain, with peak uptake occurring in {alpha}7 nAChR-expressing brain regions such as the colliculi, thalamus, temporal lobe and hippocampus. The highest SUV{sub max} was approximately 2.3, whereas the lowest uptake was in the olfactory bulb (SUV{sub max} 1.53 {+-} 0.32). Administration of NS6740 significantly decreased [{sup 18}F]NS10743 binding late in the emission recording throughout the brain, except in the olfactory bulb, which was therefore chosen as reference region for calculation of BP{sub ND}. The baseline BP{sub ND} ranged from 0.39 {+-} 0.08 in the cerebellum to 0.76 {+-} 0.07 in the temporal lobe. Pretreatment and constant infusion with NS6740 significantly reduced the BP{sub ND} in regions with high [{sup 18}F]NS10743 binding (temporal lobe -29%, p = 0.01; midbrain: -35%, p = 0.02), without significantly altering the BP{sub ND} in low binding regions (cerebellum: -16%, p = 0.2). This study confirms the potential of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 as a target-specific radiotracer for the molecular imaging of central {alpha}7 nAChRs by PET. (orig.)

  12. NSC23766, a widely used inhibitor of Rac1 activation, additionally acts as a competitive antagonist at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levay, Magdolna; Krobert, Kurt Allen; Wittig, Karola; Voigt, Niels; Bermudez, Marcel; Wolber, Gerhard; Dobrev, Dobromir; Levy, Finn Olav; Wieland, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Small molecules interfering with Rac1 activation are considered as potential drugs and are already studied in animal models. A widely used inhibitor without reported attenuation of RhoA activity is NSC23766 [(N(6)-[2-[[4-(diethylamino)-1-methylbutyl]amino]-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl]-2-methyl-4,6-quinolinediamine trihydrochloride]. We found that NSC23766 inhibits the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 mAChR)-induced Rac1 activation in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. Surprisingly, NSC27366 concomitantly suppressed the carbachol-induced RhoA activation and a M2 mAChR-induced inotropic response in isolated neonatal rat hearts requiring the activation of Rho-dependent kinases. We therefore aimed to identify the mechanisms by which NSC23766 interferes with the differentially mediated, M2 mAChR-induced responses. Interestingly, NSC23766 caused a rightward shift of the carbachol concentration response curve for the positive inotropic response without modifying carbachol efficacy. To analyze the specificity of NSC23766, we compared the carbachol and the similarly Giβγ-mediated, adenosine-induced activation of Gi protein-regulated potassium channel (GIRK) channels in human atrial myocytes. Application of NSC23766 blocked the carbachol-induced K(+) current but had no effect on the adenosine-induced GIRK current. Similarly, an adenosine A1 receptor-induced positive inotropic response in neonatal rat hearts was not attenuated by NSC23766. To investigate its specificity toward the different mAChR types, we studied the carbachol-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells expressing M1, M2, or M3 mAChRs. NSC23766 caused a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the carbachol concentration response curves at all mAChRs. Thus, NSC23766 is not only an inhibitor of Rac1 activation, but it is within the same concentration range a competitive antagonist at mAChRs. Molecular docking analysis at M2 and M3 mAChR crystal

  13. Nicotine attenuates activation of tissue resident macrophages in the mouse stomach through the β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Nemethova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is an endogenous mechanism by which the autonomic nervous system attenuates macrophage activation via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR. This concept has however not been demonstrated at a cellular level in intact tissue. To this end, we have studied the effect of nicotine on the activation of resident macrophages in a mouse stomach preparation by means of calcium imaging. METHODS: Calcium transients ([Ca(2+]i in resident macrophages were recorded in a mouse stomach preparation containing myenteric plexus and muscle layers by Fluo-4. Activation of macrophages was achieved by focal puff administration of ATP. The effects of nicotine on activation of macrophages were evaluated and the nAChR involved was pharmacologically characterized. The proximity of cholinergic nerves to macrophages was quantified by confocal microscopy. Expression of β2 and α7 nAChR was evaluated by β2 immunohistochemistry and fluorophore-tagged α-bungarotoxin. RESULTS: In 83% of macrophages cholinergic varicose nerve fibers were detected at distances <900 nm. The ATP induced [Ca(2+]i increase was significantly inhibited in 65% or 55% of macrophages by 100 µM or 10 µM nicotine, respectively. This inhibitory effect was reversed by the β2 nAChR preferring antagonist dihydro-β-eryhtroidine but not by hexamethonium (non-selective nAChR-antagonist, mecamylamine (α3β4 nAChR-preferring antagonist, α-bungarotoxin or methyllycaconitine (both α7 nAChR-preferring antagonist. Macrophages in the stomach express β2 but not α7 nAChR at protein level, while those in the intestine express both receptor subunits. CONCLUSION: This study is the first in situ demonstration of an inhibition of macrophage activation by nicotine suggesting functional signaling between cholinergic neurons and macrophages in the stomach. The data suggest that the β2 subunit of the nAChR is critically involved in the nicotine-induced inhibition

  14. Age-related Hearing Loss: GABA, Nicotinic Acetylcholine and NMDA Receptor Expression Changes in Spiral Ganglion Neurons of the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaolan; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Ding, Bo; Walton, Joseph P.; Frisina, Robert D.; Su, Jiping

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss – presbycusis – is the number one communication disorder and most prevalent neurodegenerative condition of our aged population. Although speech understanding in background noise is quite difficult for those with presbycusis, there are currently no biomedical treatments to prevent, delay or reverse this condition. A better understanding of the cochlear mechanisms underlying presbycusis will help lead to future treatments. Objectives of the present study were to investigate gamma-amino butyric acid A (GABAA) receptor subunit α1, nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor subunit β2, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR1 mRNA and protein expression changes in spiral ganglion neurons of the CBA/CaJ mouse cochlea, that occur in age-related hearing loss, utilizing quantitative immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative RT-PCR techniques. We found that auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds shifted over 40 dB from 3–48 kHz in old mice compared to young adults. DPOAE thresholds also shifted over 40 dB from 6–49 kHz in old mice, and their amplitudes were significantly decreased or absent in the same frequency range. Spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) density decreased with age in basal, middle and apical turns, and SGN density of the basal turn declined the most. A positive correlation was observed between SGN density and ABR wave 1 amplitude. mRNA and protein expression of GABAAR α1 and AChR β2 decreased with age in SGNs in the old mouse cochlea. mRNA and protein expression of NMDAR NR1 increased with age in SGNs of the old mice. These findings demonstrate that there are functionally-relevant age-related changes of GABAAR, nAChR, NMDAR expression in CBA mouse SGNs reflecting their degeneration, which may be related to functional changes in cochlear synaptic transmission with age, suggesting biological mechanisms for peripheral age-related hearing loss. PMID:24316061

  15. Mice deficient for striatal Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT) display impaired short-term but normal long-term object recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Daniel; Creighton, Samantha; Prado, Vania F; Prado, Marco A M; Choleris, Elena; Winters, Boyer D

    2016-09-15

    Substantial evidence implicates Acetylcholine (ACh) in the acquisition of object memories. While most research has focused on the role of the cholinergic basal forebrain and its cortical targets, there are additional cholinergic networks that may contribute to object recognition. The striatum contains an independent cholinergic network comprised of interneurons. In the current study, we investigated the role of this cholinergic signalling in object recognition using mice deficient for Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT) within interneurons of the striatum. We tested whether these striatal VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice would display normal short-term (5 or 15min retention delay) and long-term (3h retention delay) object recognition memory. In a home cage object recognition task, male and female VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice were impaired selectively with a 15min retention delay. When tested on an object location task, VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice displayed intact spatial memory. Finally, when object recognition was tested in a Y-shaped apparatus, designed to minimize the influence of spatial and contextual cues, only females displayed impaired recognition with a 5min retention delay, but when males were challenged with a 15min retention delay, they were also impaired; neither males nor females were impaired with the 3h delay. The pattern of results suggests that striatal cholinergic transmission plays a role in the short-term memory for object features, but not spatial location.

  16. Identification and functional expression of a family of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the central nervous system of the mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nierop, Pim; Bertrand, Sonia; Munno, David W; Gouwenberg, Yvonne; van Minnen, Jan; Spafford, J David; Syed, Naweed I; Bertrand, Daniel; Smit, August B

    2006-01-20

    We described a family of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits underlying cholinergic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS) of the mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis. By using degenerate PCR cloning, we identified 12 subunits that display a high sequence similarity to nAChR subunits, of which 10 are of the alpha-type, 1 is of the beta-type, and 1 was not classified because of insufficient sequence information. Heterologous expression of identified subunits confirms their capacity to form functional receptors responding to acetylcholine. The alpha-type subunits can be divided into groups that appear to underlie cation-conducting (excitatory) and anion-conducting (inhibitory) channels involved in synaptic cholinergic transmission. The expression of the Lymnaea nAChR subunits, assessed by real time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization, indicates that it is localized to neurons and widespread in the CNS, with the number and localization of expressing neurons differing considerably between subunit types. At least 10% of the CNS neurons showed detectable nAChR subunit expression. In addition, cholinergic neurons, as indicated by the expression of the vesicular ACh transporter, comprise approximately 10% of the neurons in all ganglia. Together, our data suggested a prominent role for fast cholinergic transmission in the Lymnaea CNS by using a number of neuronal nAChR subtypes comparable with vertebrate species but with a functional complexity that may be much higher.

  17. Mice deficient for striatal Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT) display impaired short-term but normal long-term object recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Daniel; Creighton, Samantha; Prado, Vania F; Prado, Marco A M; Choleris, Elena; Winters, Boyer D

    2016-09-15

    Substantial evidence implicates Acetylcholine (ACh) in the acquisition of object memories. While most research has focused on the role of the cholinergic basal forebrain and its cortical targets, there are additional cholinergic networks that may contribute to object recognition. The striatum contains an independent cholinergic network comprised of interneurons. In the current study, we investigated the role of this cholinergic signalling in object recognition using mice deficient for Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter (VAChT) within interneurons of the striatum. We tested whether these striatal VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice would display normal short-term (5 or 15min retention delay) and long-term (3h retention delay) object recognition memory. In a home cage object recognition task, male and female VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice were impaired selectively with a 15min retention delay. When tested on an object location task, VAChT(D2-Cre-flox/flox) mice displayed intact spatial memory. Finally, when object recognition was tested in a Y-shaped apparatus, designed to minimize the influence of spatial and contextual cues, only females displayed impaired recognition with a 5min retention delay, but when males were challenged with a 15min retention delay, they were also impaired; neither males nor females were impaired with the 3h delay. The pattern of results suggests that striatal cholinergic transmission plays a role in the short-term memory for object features, but not spatial location. PMID:27233822

  18. The distribution of cerebral muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in vivo in patients with dementia. A controlled study with 123IQNB and single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-affinity muscarinic receptor antagonist, 123IQNB (3-quinuclidinyl-4-iodobenzilate labeled with iodine 123), was used with single photon emission computed tomography to image muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in 14 patients with dementia and in 11 healthy controls. High-resolution single photon emission computed tomographic scanning was performed 21 hours after the intravenous administration of approximately 5 mCi of IQNB. In normal subjects, the images of retained ligand showed a consistent regional pattern that correlated with postmortem studies of the relative distribution of muscarinic receptors in the normal human brain, having high radioactivity counts in the basal ganglia, occipital cortex, and insular cortex, low counts in the thalamus, and virtually no counts in the cerebellum. Eight of 12 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease had obvious focal cortical defects in either frontal or posterior temporal cortex. Both patients with a clinical diagnosis of Pick's disease had obvious frontal and anterior temporal defects. A region of interest statistical analysis of relative regional activity revealed a significant reduction bilaterally in the posterior temporal cortex of the patients with Alzheimer's disease compared with controls. This study demonstrates the practicability of acetylcholine receptor imaging with 123IQNB and single photon emission computed tomography. The data suggest that focal abnormalities in muscarinic binding in vivo may characterize some patients with Alzheimer's disease and Pick's disease, but further studies are needed to address questions about partial volume artifacts and receptor quantification

  19. Acetylcholine-Based Entropy in Response Selection: A Model of How Striatal Interneurons Modulate Exploration, Exploitation, and Response Variability in Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eStocco

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The basal ganglia play a fundamental role in decision making. Their contribution is typically modeled within a reinforcement learning framework, with the basal ganglia learning to select the options associated with highest value and their dopamine inputs conveying performance feedback. This basic framework, however, does not account for the role of cholinergic interneurons in the striatum, and does not easily explain certain dynamic aspects of decision-making and skill acquisition like the generation of exploratory actions. This paper describes BABE (Basal ganglia Acetylcholine-Based Entropy, a model of the acetylcholine system in the striatum that provides a unified explanation for these phenomena. According to this model, cholinergic interneurons in the striatum control the level of variability in behavior by modulating the number of possible responses that are considered by the basal ganglia, as well as the level of competition between them. This mechanism provides a natural way to account for the role of basal ganglia in generating behavioral variability during the acquisition of certain cognitive skills, as well as for modulating exploration and exploitation in decision making. Compared to a typical reinforcement learning model, BABE showed a greater modulation of response variability in the face of changes in the reward contingencies, allowing for faster learning (and re-learning of option values. Finally, the paper discusses the possible applications of the model to other domains.

  20. Individual response speed is modulated by variants of the gene encoding the alpha 4 sub-unit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNA4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Katja Kerstin; Schote, Andrea B; Meyer, Jobst; Markett, Sebastian; Reuter, Martin; Frings, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a known modulator of several domains of cognition, among them attention, memory and learning. The neurotransmitter also influences the speed of information processing, particularly the detection of targets and the selection of suitable responses. We examined the effect of the rs1044396 (C/T) polymorphism of the gene encoding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4-subunit (CHRNA4) on response speed and selective visual attention. To this end, we administered a Stroop task, a Negative priming task and an exogenous Posner-Cuing task to healthy participants (n = 157). We found that the CHRNA4 rs1044396 polymorphism modulated the average reaction times (RTs) across all three tasks. Dependent on the C allele dosage, the RTs linearly increased. Homozygous T allele carriers were always fastest, while homozygous C allele carriers were always slowest. We did not observe effects of this polymorphism on selective attention. In sum, we conclude that naturally occurring variations within the cholinergic system influence an important factor of information processing. This effect might possibly be produced by the neuromodulator system rather than the deterministic system of cortical ACh. PMID:25639542

  1. Supplementing female rats with DHA-lysophosphatidylcholine increases docosahexaenoic acid and acetylcholine contents in the brain and improves the memory and learning capabilities of the pups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas, I.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA is supplied to the foetus and newborn through the mother from their own reserves and their diet. No consensus about the best form to supplement DHA has been established. We propose that DHAcontaining lysophosphatidylcholine (DHA-LPC, obtained from DHA-rich eggs may be a suitable form of DHA and choline (the precursor of acetylcholine supplementation. We evaluated the effectiveness of DHA-LPC to increase DHA and acetylcholine concentration in the brain of pups born from female rats supplemented with DHA-LPC before and during pregnancy. We also evaluated the effect of DHA supplementation on learning and memory capabilities of pups through the Skinner test for operant conditioning. Female Wistar rats received 40-day supplementation of DHA-LPC (8 mg DHA/kg b.w/daily., before and during pregnancy. After delivery, plasma, erythrocyte, liver, and adipose tissue DHA and plasma choline were analyzed. Brains from 60 day-old pups separated into frontal cortex, cerebellum, striatum, hippocampus, and occipital cortex, were assessed for DHA, acetylcholine, and acetylcholine transferase (CAT activity. Pups were subjected to the Skinner box test. DHA-LPC supplementation produces higher choline and liver DHA contents in the mother’s plasma and increases the pups’ DHA and acetylcholine in the cerebellum and hippocampus. CAT was not modified by supplementation. The Skinner test shows that pups born from DHA-LPC supplemented mothers exhibit better scores of learning and memory than the controls. Conclusion: DHA-LPC may be an adequate form for DHA supplementation during the perinatal period.El ácido docosahexaenoico (DHA que requiere el feto y el recién nacido lo aporta la madre desde sus reservas y la dieta, por lo cual se sugiere suplementar a la madre con DHA. No hay consenso sobre la mejor forma de suplementación. Proponemos que un lisofosfolípido que contiene DHA y colina (DHA-LPC obtenido de huevos con alto contenido de DHA es

  2. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... 1/2015 Updated by: Daniel Kantor, MD, Kantor Neurology, Coconut Creek, FL and immediate past president of ...

  3. Repeated administration of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, but not positive allosteric modulators, increases alpha7 nAChR levels in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ditte Z; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Hansen, Henrik H;

    2010-01-01

    The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is an important target for treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. However, the receptor desensitizes rapidly in vitro, which has led to concern regarding its applicability as a clinically relevant drug target...

  4. The Novel 7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Agonist N-[(3R)-1-Azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl]-7-[2-(methoxy)phenyl]-1-benzofuran-2-carboxamide Improves Working and Recognition Memory in Rodents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boess, F.G.; Vry, de J.; Erb, C.; Flessner, T.; Luithle, J.; Methfessel, C.; Schnizler, K.; Staay, van der F.J.; Kampen, van M.; Wiese, W.B.; Hendrix, M.; König, G.

    2007-01-01

    The relative contribution of alpha 4 beta 2, alpha 7 and other nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ( nAChR) subtypes to the memory enhancing versus the addictive effects of nicotine is the subject of ongoing debate. In the present study, we characterized the pharmacological and behavioral properties of

  5. Exploration of the molecular architecture of the orthosteric binding site in the α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with analogs of 3-(dimethylamino)butyl dimethylcarbamate (DMABC) and 1-(pyridin-3-yl)-1,4-diazepane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Tinna Brøbech; Jensen, Anders A.; Petersen, Jette G.;

    2015-01-01

    X-ray crystal structures of acetylcholine binding proteins (AChBPs) have revealed two different possible extensions to the classical ligand binding pocket known to accommodate various nicotinic agonists. One of the pockets is limited in size while the other is of considerable dimensions and protr...

  6. A new {sup 18}F-labeled fluoroacetylmorpholino derivative of vesamicol for neuroimaging of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorger, Dietlind [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)], E-mail: sord@medizin.uni-leipzig.de; Scheunemann, Matthias [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Grossmann, Udo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Fischer, Steffen; Vercouille, Johnny; Hiller, Achim; Wenzel, Barbara [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Roghani, Ali [Department of Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 39430 (United States); Schliebs, Reinhard [Paul-Flechsig Institute of Brain Research, University of Leipzig, 04109 Leipzig (Germany); Brust, Peter [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Sabri, Osama [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Steinbach, Joerg [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    With the aim of producing selective radiotracers for in vivo imaging of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) using positron mission tomography (PET), here, we report synthesis and analysis of a new class of conformationally constrained vesamicol analogues with moderate lipophilicity. The sequential ring opening on trans-1,4-cyclohexadiene dioxide enabled an approach to synthesize 6-arylpiperidino-octahydrobenzo[1,4]oxazine-7-ols [morpholino vesamicols]. The radiosynthesis of the [{sup 18}F]fluoroacetyl-substituted derivative ([{sup 18}F]FAMV) was achieved starting from a corresponding bromo precursor [2-Bromo-1-[7-hydroxy-6-(4-phenyl-piperidin-1-yl)-octahydro-benzo[1,4] oxazin-4-yl]-ethanone] and using a modified commercial computer-controlled module system with a radiochemical yield of 27{+-}4%, a high radiochemical purity (99%) and a specific activity of 35 GBq/{mu}mol. In competitive binding assays using a PC12 cell line overexpressing VAChT and [{sup 3}H]-(-) vesamicol, 2-fluoro-1-[7-hydroxy-6-(4-phenyl-piperidin-1-yl)-octahydro-benzo[1,4] oxazin-4yl]-ethanone (FAMV) demonstrated a high selectivity for binding to VAChT (K{sub i}: 39.9{+-}5.9 nM) when compared to its binding to sigma{sub 1/2} receptors (K{sub i}>1500 nM). The compound showed a moderate lipophilicity (logD{sub (pH7)}=1.9) and a plasma protein binding of 49%. The brain uptake of [{sup 18}F]FAMV was about 0.1% injected dose per gram at 5 min after injection and decreased continuously with time. Notably, an increasing accumulation of radioactivity in the lateral brain ventricles was observed. After 1 h, the accumulation of [{sup 18}F]FAMV, expressed as ratio to the cerebellum, was 4.5 for the striatum, 2.0 for the cortical and 1.5 for the hippocampal regions, measured on brain slices using ex vivo autoradiography. At the present time, 75% of [{sup 18}F]FAMV in the plasma was shown to be metabolized to various hydrophilic compounds, as detected by high-performance liquid chromatography

  7. Human Secreted Ly-6/uPAR Related Protein-1 (SLURP-1 Is a Selective Allosteric Antagonist of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina N Lyukmanova

    Full Text Available SLURP-1 is a secreted toxin-like Ly-6/uPAR protein found in epithelium, sensory neurons and immune cells. Point mutations in the slurp-1 gene cause the autosomal inflammation skin disease Mal de Meleda. SLURP-1 is considered an autocrine/paracrine hormone that regulates growth and differentiation of keratinocytes and controls inflammation and malignant cell transformation. The majority of previous studies of SLURP-1 have been made using fusion constructs containing, in addition to the native protein, extra polypeptide sequences. Here we describe the activity and pharmacological profile of a recombinant analogue of human SLURP-1 (rSLURP-1 differing from the native protein only by one additional N-terminal Met residue. rSLURP-1 significantly inhibited proliferation (up to ~ 40%, EC50 ~ 4 nM of human oral keratinocytes (Het-1A cells. Application of mecamylamine and atropine,--non-selective inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively, and anti-α7-nAChRs antibodies revealed α7 type nAChRs as an rSLURP-1 target in keratinocytes. Using affinity purification from human cortical extracts, we confirmed that rSLURP-1 binds selectively to the α7-nAChRs. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7-nAChRs to rSLURP-1 caused a significant non-competitive inhibition of the response to acetylcholine (up to ~ 70%, IC50 ~ 1 μM. It was shown that rSLURP-1 binds to α7-nAChRs overexpressed in GH4Cl cells, but does not compete with 125I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to the receptor. These findings imply an allosteric antagonist-like mode of SLURP-1 interaction with α7-nAChRs outside the classical ligand-binding site. Contrary to rSLURP-1, other inhibitors of α7-nAChRs (mecamylamine, α-bungarotoxin and Lynx1 did not suppress the proliferation of keratinocytes. Moreover, the co-application of α-bungarotoxin with rSLURP-1 did not influence antiproliferative activity of the latter. This supports the

  8. [{sup 123}I]-3-Iodcytisin as possible radiotracer for the imaging of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors using single photon emission computer tomography; [{sup 123}I]-3-Iodcytisin als moeglicher Radiotracer fuer die Darstellung der nikotinergen Acetylcholin Rezeptoren mittels Single-Photon-Emissions-Computertomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulik, Dagmar Julia

    2015-03-06

    For the synthesis of [{sup 123}I]-3-Iodcytisin as possible radiotracer for the imaging of nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors using SPECT two different technologies were used: the radio-iodination with iodogen and the radio-iodination with nitric acid. The latter one showed higher efficiency. The radiotracer will allow to detect degenerative processes and other nACh-depending diseases in the brain (Alzheimer, Parkinson) and to observe the progress. The autoradiography is aimed to the imaging of the nACh receptors in the brain bypassing the brain-blood barrier. The highest activity was measured in the thalamus of mice and rat brains.

  9. Repeated potentiation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulates behavioural and GABAergic deficits induced by early postnatal phencyclidine (PCP) treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerby, Celia; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Fejgin, Kim;

    2013-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of the GABAergic deficits observed in schizophrenia has been proposed to involve NMDA receptor hypofunction. An emerging treatment strategy therefore aims at enhancing GABAergic signalling by increasing the excitatory transmission onto interneurons. We wanted to determine......GluR5), ADX47273, and the partial agonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR), SSR180711. Adolescent rats (4-5 weeks) subjected to PCP treatment during the second postnatal week displayed a consistent deficit in prepulse inhibition (PPI), which was reversed by a one-week treatment...... treatment, pyramidal neurons displayed a reduced mIPSC frequency and up-regulation of extrasynaptic THIP-induced current. ADX47273 treatment restored this up-regulation of THIP-induced current. Reduced receptor function seems to be the underlying cause of the reported changes, since repeated treatment...

  10. Acetylcholine suppresses shoot formation and callusing in leaf explants of in vitro raised seedlings of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var. Pusa Ruby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamel, Kiran; Gupta, Rajendra; Gupta, Shirish C

    2016-06-01

    We present experimental evidence to show that acetylcholine (ACh) causes decrease in shoot formation in leaf explants of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var Pusa Ruby) when cultured on shoot regeneration medium. The optimum response was obtained at 10(-4) M ACh-enriched medium. ACh also causes decrease in percentage of cultures forming callus and reduces the callus mass. Inhibitors of enzymatic hydrolysis of ACh, neostigmine and physostigmine, also suppresses callogenesis and caulogenesis. On the other hand, the breakdown products of Ach, choline and acetate, do not alter the morphogenic response induced on the shoot regeneration medium. Neostigmine showed optimal reduction in shoot formation at 10(-5) M. The explants cultured on neostigmine augmented medium showed decline in the activity of ACh hydrolyzing enzyme acetylcholinesterase. ACh and neostigmine added together showed marked reduction in callus mass. These results strongly support the role of ACh as a natural regulator of morphogenesis in tomato plants.

  11. Acetylcholine suppresses shoot formation and callusing in leaf explants of in vitro raised seedlings of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var. Pusa Ruby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamel, Kiran; Gupta, Rajendra; Gupta, Shirish C

    2016-06-01

    We present experimental evidence to show that acetylcholine (ACh) causes decrease in shoot formation in leaf explants of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Miller var Pusa Ruby) when cultured on shoot regeneration medium. The optimum response was obtained at 10(-4) M ACh-enriched medium. ACh also causes decrease in percentage of cultures forming callus and reduces the callus mass. Inhibitors of enzymatic hydrolysis of ACh, neostigmine and physostigmine, also suppresses callogenesis and caulogenesis. On the other hand, the breakdown products of Ach, choline and acetate, do not alter the morphogenic response induced on the shoot regeneration medium. Neostigmine showed optimal reduction in shoot formation at 10(-5) M. The explants cultured on neostigmine augmented medium showed decline in the activity of ACh hydrolyzing enzyme acetylcholinesterase. ACh and neostigmine added together showed marked reduction in callus mass. These results strongly support the role of ACh as a natural regulator of morphogenesis in tomato plants. PMID:27348536

  12. Resolution of complex fluorescence spectra of lipids and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor by multivariate analysis reveals protein-mediated effects on the receptor's immediate lipid microenvironment

    CERN Document Server

    Wenz, Jorge J; 10.1186/1757-5036-1-6

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of fluorescent spectra from complex biological systems containing various fluorescent probes with overlapping emission bands is a challenging task. Valuable information can be extracted from the full spectra, however, by using multivariate analysis (MA) of measurements at different wavelengths. We applied MA to spectral data of purified Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) protein reconstituted into liposomes made up of dioleoylphosphatidic acid (DOPA) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) doped with two extrinsic fluorescent probes (NBD-cholesterol/pyrene-PC). Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was observed between the protein and pyrene-PC and between pyrene-PC and NBD-cholesterol, leading to overlapping emission bands. Partial least squares analysis was applied to ...

  13. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter knock down-mice are more susceptible to inflammation, c-Fos expression and sickness behavior induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Hércules Ribeiro; Oliveira-Lima, Onésia Cristina de; Pereira, Luciana de Melo; Oliveira, Vinícius Elias de Moura; Prado, Vania Ferreira; Prado, Marco Antônio Máximo; Pereira, Grace Schenatto; Massensini, André Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    In addition to the well-known functions as a neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh) can modulate of the immune system. Nonetheless, how endogenous ACh release inflammatory responses is still not clear. To address this question, we took advantage of an animal model with a decreased ACh release due a reduction (knockdown) in vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) expression (VAChT-KD(HOM)). These animals were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Afterwards, we evaluated sickness behavior and quantified systemic and cerebral inflammation as well as neuronal activation in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC). VAChT-KD(HOM) mice that were injected with LPS (10mg/kg) showed increased mortality rate as compared to control mice. In line with this result, a low dose of LPS (0.1mg/kg) increased the levels of pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines in the spleen and brain of VAChT-KD(HOM) mice in comparison with controls. Similarly, serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were increased in VAChT-KD(HOM) mice. This excessive cytokine production was completely prevented by administration of a nicotinic receptor agonist (0.4mg/kg) prior to the LPS injection. Three hours after the LPS injection, c-Fos expression increased in the DVC region of VAChT-KD(HOM) mice compared to controls. In addition, VAChT-KD(HOM) mice showed behavioral changes such as lowered locomotor and exploratory activity and reduced social interaction after the LPS challenge, when compared to control mice. Taken together, our results show that the decreased ability to release ACh exacerbates systemic and cerebral inflammation and promotes neural activation and behavioral changes induced by LPS. In conclusion, our findings support the notion that activity of cholinergic pathways, which can be modulated by VAChT expression, controls inflammatory and neural responses to LPS challenge.

  14. Decreased cerebral α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor availability in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease assessed with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postmortem studies indicate a loss of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In order to establish whether these changes in the cholinergic system occur at an early stage of AD, we carried out positron emission tomography (PET) with a specific radioligand for the α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4β2* nAChR) in patients with mild to moderate AD and in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), who have a high risk to progress to AD. Nine patients with moderate AD, eight patients with MCI and seven age-matched healthy controls underwent 2-[18F]fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (2-[18F]FA-85380) PET. After coregistration with individual magnetic resonance imaging the binding potential (BPND) of 2-[18F]FA-85380 was calculated using either the corpus callosum or the cerebellum as reference regions. PET data were analysed by region of interest analysis and by voxel-based analysis. Both patients with AD and MCI showed a significant reduction in 2-[18F]FA-85380 BPND in typical AD-affected brain regions. Thereby, the corpus callosum was identified as the most suitable reference region. The 2-[18F]FA-85380 BPND correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment. Only MCI patients that converted to AD in the later course (n = 5) had a reduction in 2-[18F]FA-85380 BPND. 2-[18F]FA-85380 PET appears to be a sensitive and feasible tool for the detection of a reduction in α4β2* nAChRs which seems to be an early event in AD. In addition, 2-[18F]FA-85380 PET might give prognostic information about a conversion from MCI to AD. (orig.)

  15. Two novel α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands: in vitro properties and their efficacy in collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein A van Maanen

    Full Text Available The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can downregulate inflammation via the release of acetylcholine (ACh by the vagus nerve. This neurotransmitter binds to the α7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChR, expressed on macrophages and other immune cells. We tested the pharmacological and functional profile of two novel compounds, PMP-311 and PMP-072 and investigated their role in modulating collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in mice.Both compounds were characterized with binding, electrophysiological, and pharmacokinetic studies. For in vivo efficacy studies in the CIA model the compounds were administered daily by oral gavage from day 20 till sacrifice at day 34. Disease progression was monitored by visual clinical scoring and measurement of paw swelling. Inflammation and joint destruction were examined by histology and radiology.Treatment with PMP-311 was effective in preventing disease onset, reducing clinical signs of arthritis, and reducing synovial inflammation and bone destruction. PMP-072 also showed a trend in arthritis reduction at all concentrations tested. The data showed that while both compounds bind to α7nAChR with high affinity, PMP-311 acts like a classical agonist of ion channel activity, and PMP-072 can actually act as an ion channel antagonist. Moreover, PMP-072 was clearly distinct from typical competitive antagonists, since it was able to act as a silent agonist. It synergizes with the allosteric modulator PNU-120596, and subsequently activates desensitized α7nAChR. However, PMP-072 was less efficacious than PMP-311 at both channel activation and desensitization, suggesting that both conducting and non-conducting states maybe of importance in driving an anti-inflammatory response. Finally, we found that the anti-arthritic effect can be observed despite limited penetration of the central nervous system.These data provide direct evidence that the α7nAChR in immune cells does not require typical ion channel

  16. Kinetics of desensitization and recovery from desensitization for human a4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors stably expressed in SH-EP1 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kewei D YU; Qiang LIU; Jie WU; Ronald J LUKAS

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Studies were conducted to define the kinetics of the onset of and recovery from desensitization for human a4p2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) heterologously expressed in the SH-EP1 human epithelial cell line. Methods: Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed to evaluate a4p2-nAChR currents.Results: Application of 0.1 nmol/L nicotine or 1 mmol/L acetylcholine (ACh) for 1 s or longer induced two phases, with time constants of ~70 and ~700 ms, for the onset of a4(32-nAChR desensitization. For a given duration of agonist exposure, recovery from desensitization induced by nicotine was slower than recovery from ACh-induced desensitization. Comparisons with published reports indicate that time constants for the recovery of a4p2-nAChRs from desensitization are smaller than those for the recovery of human muscle-type nAChRs'1' from desensitization produced by the same concentrations and durations of exposure to an agonist. Moreover, the extent of human a4p2-nAChR desensitization and rate of recovery are the same, regardless of whether they are measured using whole-cell recording or based on published findings'21 using isotopic ion flux assays; this equality demonstrates the equivalent legitimacy of these techniques in the evaluation of nAChR desensitization. Perhaps most significantly, recovery from desensitization also was best fit to a biphasic process. Regardless of whether it was fit to single or double exponentials, however, half-times for recovery from desensitization grew progressively longer with an increased duration of agonist exposure during the desensitizing pulse.Conclusion: These findings indicate the existence of a4p2-nAChRs in many distinctive states of desensitization, as well as the induction of progressively deeper states of desensitization with the increased duration of agonist exposure.

  17. Decreased cerebral {alpha}4{beta}2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor availability in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease assessed with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendziorra, Kai; Meyer, Philipp Mael; Barthel, Henryk; Hesse, Swen; Becker, Georg Alexander; Luthardt, Julia; Schildan, Andreas; Patt, Marianne; Sorger, Dietlind; Seese, Anita; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Wolf, Henrike [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); University of Zurich, Department of Old Age Psychiatry and Psychiatry Research, Psychiatric University Hospital (PUK) Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Gertz, Herman-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Postmortem studies indicate a loss of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In order to establish whether these changes in the cholinergic system occur at an early stage of AD, we carried out positron emission tomography (PET) with a specific radioligand for the {alpha}4{beta}2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}4{beta}2* nAChR) in patients with mild to moderate AD and in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), who have a high risk to progress to AD. Nine patients with moderate AD, eight patients with MCI and seven age-matched healthy controls underwent 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (2-[{sup 18}F]FA-85380) PET. After coregistration with individual magnetic resonance imaging the binding potential (BP{sub ND}) of 2-[{sup 18}F]FA-85380 was calculated using either the corpus callosum or the cerebellum as reference regions. PET data were analysed by region of interest analysis and by voxel-based analysis. Both patients with AD and MCI showed a significant reduction in 2-[{sup 18}F]FA-85380 BP{sub ND} in typical AD-affected brain regions. Thereby, the corpus callosum was identified as the most suitable reference region. The 2-[{sup 18}F]FA-85380 BP{sub ND} correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment. Only MCI patients that converted to AD in the later course (n = 5) had a reduction in 2-[{sup 18}F]FA-85380 BP{sub ND}. 2-[{sup 18}F]FA-85380 PET appears to be a sensitive and feasible tool for the detection of a reduction in {alpha}4{beta}2* nAChRs which seems to be an early event in AD. In addition, 2-[{sup 18}F]FA-85380 PET might give prognostic information about a conversion from MCI to AD. (orig.)

  18. Effect of acetylcholine receptors on the pain-related electrical activities in the hippocampal CA3 region of morphine-addicted rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Zeng Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:To determine the effect of acetylcholine (ACh, pilocarpine, and atropine on pain evoked responses of pain excited neurons (PEN and pain inhibited neurons (PIN in hippocampal CA3 region of morphine addicted rats. Materials and Methods:Female Wistar rats, weighing between 230-260 g were used in this study. Morphine addicted rats were generated by subcutaneous injection of increasing concentrations of morphine hydrochloride for six days. Trains of electrical impulses applied to the sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation and the evoked electrical activities of PEN or PIN in hippocampal CA3 area were recorded using extracellular electrophysiological recording techniques in hippocampal slices. The effect of acetylcholine receptor stimulation byACh, the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, and the muscarinic antagonist atropine on the pain evoked responses of pain related electrical activities was analyzed in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Results:Intra-CA3 microinjection of ACh (2 μg/1 μl or pilocarpine (2 μg/1 μl decreased the discharge frequency and prolonged the firing latency of PEN, but increased the discharge frequency and shortened the firing inhibitory duration (ID of PIN. The intra-CA3 administration of atropine (0.5 μg/1 μl produced opposite effect. The peak activity of cholinergic modulators was 2 to 4 min later in morphine addicted rats compared to peak activity previously observed in normal rats. Conclusion: ACh dependent modulation of noxious stimulation exists in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Morphine treatment may shift the sensitivity of pain related neurons towards a delayed response to muscarinergic neurotransmission in hippocampal CA3 region.

  19. A fungal metabolite asperparaline a strongly and selectively blocks insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: the first report on the mode of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Hirata

    Full Text Available Asperparalines produced by Aspergillus japonicus JV-23 induce paralysis in silkworm (Bombyx mori larvae, but the target underlying insect toxicity remains unknown. In the present study, we have investigated the actions of asperparaline A on ligand-gated ion channels expressed in cultured larval brain neurons of the silkworm using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Bath-application of asperparaline A (10 µM had no effect on the membrane current, but when delivered for 1 min prior to co-application with 10 µM acetylcholine (ACh, it blocked completely the ACh-induced current that was sensitive to mecamylamine, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR-selective antaogonist. In contrast, 10 µM asperparaline A was ineffective on the γ-aminobutyric acid- and L-glutamate-induced responses of the Bombyx larval neurons. The fungal alkaloid showed no-use dependency in blocking the ACh-induced response with distinct affinity for the peak and slowly-desensitizing current amplitudes of the response to 10 µM ACh in terms of IC(50 values of 20.2 and 39.6 nM, respectively. Asperparaline A (100 nM reduced the maximum neuron response to ACh with a minimal shift in EC(50, suggesting that the alkaloid is non-competitive with ACh. In contrast to showing marked blocking action on the insect nAChRs, it exhibited only a weak blocking action on chicken α3β4, α4β2 and α7 nAChRs expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a high selectivity for insect over certain vertebrate nAChRs.

  20. Forebrain deletion of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter results in deficits in executive function, metabolic, and RNA splicing abnormalities in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolisnyk, Benjamin; Al-Onaizi, Mohammed A; Hirata, Pedro H F; Guzman, Monica S; Nikolova, Simona; Barbash, Shahar; Soreq, Hermona; Bartha, Robert; Prado, Marco A M; Prado, Vania F

    2013-09-11

    One of the key brain regions in cognitive processing and executive function is the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which receives cholinergic input from basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. We evaluated the contribution of synaptically released acetylcholine (ACh) to executive function by genetically targeting the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) in the mouse forebrain. Executive function was assessed using a pairwise visual discrimination paradigm and the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRT). In the pairwise test, VAChT-deficient mice were able to learn, but were impaired in reversal learning, suggesting that these mice present cognitive inflexibility. Interestingly, VAChT-targeted mice took longer to reach criteria in the 5-CSRT. Although their performance was indistinguishable from that of control mice during low attentional demand, increased attentional demand revealed striking deficits in VAChT-deleted mice. Galantamine, a cholinesterase inhibitor used in Alzheimer's disease, significantly improved the performance of control mice, but not of VAChT-deficient mice on the 5-CSRT. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed altered levels of two neurochemical markers of neuronal function, taurine and lactate, suggesting altered PFC metabolism in VAChT-deficient mice. The PFC of these mice displayed a drastic reduction in the splicing factor heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNPA2/B1), whose cholinergic-mediated reduction was previously demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease. Consequently, several key hnRNPA2/B1 target transcripts involved in neuronal function present changes in alternative splicing in VAChT-deficient mice, including pyruvate kinase M, a key enzyme involved in lactate metabolism. We propose that VAChT-targeted mice can be used to model and to dissect the neurochemical basis of executive abnormalities. PMID:24027290