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Sample records for acetylcholine receptor blockade

  1. Partial neuromuscular blockade in humans enhances muscle blood flow during exercise independently of muscle oxygen uptake and acetylcholine receptor blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Krustrup, Peter; Iaia, F Marcello

    2009-01-01

    conductance during exercise, events that are not associated with either acetylcholine or an increased oxygen demand. The results do not support an essential role for acetylcholine, released form the neuromuscular junction, in exercise hyperaemia or for the enhanced blood flow during neuromuscular blockade...

  2. Partial blockade of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors improves the counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia in recurrently hypoglycemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGamma, Edmund F; Kirtok, Necla; Chan, Owen; Nankova, Bistra B

    2014-10-01

    Recurrent exposure to hypoglycemia can impair the normal counterregulatory hormonal responses that guard against hypoglycemia, leading to hypoglycemia unawareness. This pathological condition known as hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) is the main adverse consequence that prevents individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus from attaining the long-term health benefits of tight glycemic control. The underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the progressive loss of the epinephrine response to subsequent bouts of hypoglycemia, a hallmark sign of HAAF, are largely unknown. Normally, hypoglycemia triggers both the release and biosynthesis of epinephrine through activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) on the adrenal glands. We hypothesize that excessive cholinergic stimulation may contribute to impaired counterregulation. Here, we tested whether administration of the nAChR partial agonist cytisine to reduce postganglionic synaptic activity can preserve the counterregulatory hormone responses in an animal model of HAAF. Compared with nicotine, cytisine has limited efficacy to activate nAChRs and stimulate epinephrine release and synthesis. We evaluated adrenal catecholamine production and secretion in nondiabetic rats subjected to two daily episodes of hypoglycemia for 3 days, followed by a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp on day 4. Recurrent hypoglycemia decreased epinephrine responses, and this was associated with suppressed TH mRNA induction (a measure of adrenal catecholamine synthetic capacity). Treatment with cytisine improved glucagon responses as well as epinephrine release and production in recurrently hypoglycemic animals. These data suggest that pharmacological manipulation of ganglionic nAChRs may be promising as a translational adjunctive therapy to avoid HAAF in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  3. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  4. Acetylcholinesterase and Acetylcholine Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-30

    placing the ester group at th- estera - tic site. K. values for AcCh and DMBAc are similar, indicating no substantial coulombic effe,-t, and the...V. P. (1950) Biochim. BioDhys. Acta 4, 543-558. 2. "Studies on Cholinesterase. VII. The Active Surface of Acetylcholine Esterase Derived from Effects...L., Chang, H. W., and Chen-, Y. T. (1972) J. Biol. Chem. 247, 1555-1565. 42. "Rapid and Complete Purification of Acetylcholin- esterases of Electric

  5. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor is involved in acetylcholine regulating stomatal movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In animal cells, action of acetylcholine depends on its binding with its two specific receptors on the plasma membrane: the nicotinic and muscarinic respectively. The present investigation has shown that agonists of muscarinic receptor (muscarine) could induce stomatal opening, while the antagonists (atropine) could block stomatal opening induced by acetylcholine. Their effects can only be realized in medium containing Ca2+, but not in medium containing K+. The results tend to reveal that the muscarinic receptor is involved in acetylcholine-induced stomatal movement.

  6. Docking to flexible nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Tommy; Bruun, Anne T; Balle, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Computational docking to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and other members of the Cys-loop receptor family is complicated by the flexibility of the so-called C-loop. As observed in the large number of published crystal structures of the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), a structural...

  7. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Sensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metherate, Raju

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine release in sensory neocortex contributes to higher-order sensory function, in part by activating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Molecular studies have revealed a bewildering array of nAChR subtypes and cellular actions; however, there is some consensus emerging about the major nAChR subtypes and their functions in…

  8. Palmitoylation of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J. K.; Govind, A. P.; Drisdel, R. C.; Blanton, M. P.; Vallejo, Y.; Lam, T. T.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) undergo a number of different post-translational modifications, such as disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, and phosphorylation. Recently, our laboratory has developed more sensitive assays of protein palmitoylation that have allowed us and others to detect the palmitoylation of relatively low abundant proteins such as ligand-gated ion channels. Here, we present evidence that palmitoylation is prevalent on many subunits of different nAChR subtypes, both muscle-type nAChRs and the neuronal “α4β2” and “α7” subtypes most abundant in brain. The loss of ligand binding sites that occurs when palmitoylation is blocked with the inhibitor bromopalmitate suggests that palmitoylation of α4β2 and α7 subtypes occurs during subunit assembly and regulates the formation of ligand binding sites. However, additional experiments are needed to test whether nAChR subunit palmitoylation is involved in other aspects of nAChR trafficking or whether palmitoylation regulates nAChR function. Further investigation would be aided by identifying the sites of palmitoylation on the subunits, and here we propose a mass spectrometry strategy for identification of these sites. PMID:19693711

  9. THE NATURE OF ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. TASHAYOD

    1983-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work with consideratlon to the autoradiographic pictures, suggests that cholinergic receptors are located at the gate of a channel originating from synaptic cleft coming to lie within the muscle fibre. AChE molecules stand at the gate of this channel,controlling the entrance of different cholinergic agents. It was report- ••• ed previously that dtc molecules s t.abD ;:.2e the AChE rnolecules and will obstruct the gate. This blocks the acess of ionic flux within the channel thus producing a non-depolarizing neuromuscular paralysis.The presented experiments imply that depolarizing agent will bring a considerable change in conformation of AChE mole cule and this causes the opening of the gate allowing ioni flux and depolarization .In case of ACh this process is repeated in a fraction of milli second, due to rapid regeneration of AChE while in case of suxamethonium and neostigmine(given in high dose, the regeneration of AChE takes much longer time thus will produce a depolarizing blockade. In this hypothepis the main responsa~ility of AChE"nis confined to identification of cholinergic agents and Cooperation in their function so,it can be accepted as Cholinergic receptor. In regard to clinic, this work suggests that only the use of minimum effective dose of neostigmine is advisable, in reversing curarisation. In contrast to general belief , the dose of neostigmine should be s elec t ed in relation to r eceptor dtc occupation and not depending on pati ent 's weight . As it was demonstrated , the early use"nof high dose o f neostigmine may a lso potent i a te curar i s a tion

  10. Alcohol and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsong Tang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The frequent co-abuse of alcohol and tobacco may suggest that they share some common neurological mechanisms. For example, nicotine acts on Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs in the brain to release dopamine to sustain addiction. Might nAChRs be entwined with alcohol? Objectives This review summarizes recent studies on the relationship between alcohol and nAChRs, including the role of nAChRs in molecular biological studies, genetic studies and pharmacological studies on alcohol, which indicate that nAChRs have been potently modulated by alcohol. Methods We performed a cross-referenced literature search on biological, genetic and pharmacological studies of alcohol and nAChRs. Results Molecular biological and genetic studies indicated that nAChR (genes may be important in mediating alcohol intake, but we still lack substantial evidence about how it works. Pharmacological studies proved the correlation between nAChRs and alcohol intake, and the association between nicotine and alcohol at the nAChRs. The positive findings of varenicline (a partial agonist at the _4_2 nAChR, smoking-cessation pharmaceutical treatment for alcoholism, provides a new insight for treating co-abuse of these two substances. >Conclusions Molecular biological, genetic and pharmacological studies of alcohol at the nAChR level, provide a new sight for preventing and treating the co-abuse of alcohol and nicotine. Given the important role of nAChRs in nicotine dependence, the interaction between alcohol and nAChRs would provide a new insight in finding effective pharmacological treatments, in decreasing or stopping alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking concurrently.

  11. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily that play important roles in control of neurotransmitter release in the central and peripheral nervous system. These receptors are important therapeutic targets for development of drugs...

  12. Primary Structure of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    quantities of starting material (for reviews of receptor, see Popot and Changeux, 1984; Stroud and Finer-Moore, 1985). This work led to the...Cloning of the Acetylcholine Receptor. Cold Spring Harbor Symp. on Quant. Biol. XLVIH: 71-78. 15. Popot , J-L. and Changeux, J-P. (1984) The

  13. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds and prote......The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds...

  14. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds and prote......The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds...

  15. Conotoxins Targeting Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Marine snails of the genus Conus are a large family of predatory gastropods with an unparalleled molecular diversity of pharmacologically active compounds in their venom. Cone snail venom comprises of a rich and diverse cocktail of peptide toxins which act on a wide variety of ion channels such as voltage-gated sodium- (NaV), potassium- (KV), and calcium- (CaV) channels as well as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) which are classified as ligand-gated ion channels. The mode of action ...

  16. Cellular trafficking of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul A ST JOHN

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play critical roles throughout the body. Precise regulation of the cellular location and availability of nAChRs on neurons and target cells is critical to their proper function. Dynamic, post-translational regulation of nAChRs, particularly control of their movements among the different compartments of cells, is an important aspect of that regulation. A combination of new information and new techniques has the study of nAChR trafficking poised for new breakthroughs.

  17. Alcohol's actions on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tiffany J; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2006-01-01

    Although it has been known for many years that alcoholism and tobacco addiction often co-occur, relatively little information is available on the biological factors that regulate the co-use and abuse of nicotine and alcohol. In the brain, nicotine acts at several different types of receptors collectively known as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Alcohol also acts on at least some of these receptors, enhancing the function of some nAChR subtypes and inhibiting the activity of others. Chronic alcohol and nicotine administration also lead to changes in the numbers of nAChRs. Natural variations (i.e., polymorphisms) in the genes encoding different nAChR subunits may be associated with individual differences in the sensitivity to some of alcohol's and nicotine's effects. Finally, at least one subtype of nAChR may help protect cells against alcohol-induced neurotoxicity.

  18. Modulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by strychnine

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    García-Colunga, Jesús; Miledi, Ricardo

    1999-01-01

    Strychnine, a potent and selective antagonist at glycine receptors, was found to inhibit muscle (α1β1γδ, α1β1γ, and α1β1δ) and neuronal (α2β2 and α2β4) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AcChoRs) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Strychnine alone (up to 500 μM) did not elicit membrane currents in oocytes expressing AcChoRs, but, when applied before, concomitantly, or during superfusion of acetylcholine (AcCho), it rapidly and reversibly inhibited the current elicited by AcCho (AcCho-current). Although in the three cases the AcCho-current was reduced to the same level, its recovery was slower when the oocytes were preincubated with strychnine. The amount of AcCho-current inhibition depended on the receptor subtype, and the order of blocking potency by strychnine was α1β1γδ > α2β4 > α2β2. With the three forms of drug application, the Hill coefficient was close to one, suggesting a single site for the receptor interaction with strychnine, and this interaction appears to be noncompetitive. The inhibitory effects on muscle AcChoRs were voltage-independent, and the apparent dissociation constant for AcCho was not appreciably changed by strychnine. In contrast, the inhibitory effects on neuronal AcChoRs were voltage-dependent, with an electrical distance of ≈0.35. We conclude that strychnine regulates reversibly and noncompetitively the embryonic type of muscle AcChoR and some forms of neuronal AcChoRs. In the former case, strychnine presumably inhibits allosterically the receptor by binding at an external domain whereas, in the latter case, it blocks the open receptor-channel complex. PMID:10097172

  19. Both A1 and A2a purine receptors regulate striatal acetylcholine release.

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    Brown, S J; James, S; Reddington, M; Richardson, P J

    1990-07-01

    The receptors responsible for the adenosine-mediated control of acetylcholine release from immunoaffinity-purified rat striatal cholinergic nerve terminals have been characterized. The relative affinities of three analogues for the inhibitory receptor were (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine greater than cyclohexyladenosine greater than N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), with binding being dependent of the presence of Mg2+ and inhibited by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] and adenosine receptor antagonists. Adenosine A1 receptor agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cholinergic adenylate cyclase activity, with an IC50 of 0.5 nM for (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine and 500 nM for (S)-phenylisopropyladenosine. A1 agonists inhibited acetylcholine release at concentrations approximately 10% of those required to inhibit the cholinergic adenylate cyclase. High concentrations (1 microM) of adenosine A1 agonists were less effective in inhibiting both adenylate cyclase and acetylcholine release, due to the presence of a lower affinity stimulatory A2 receptor. Blockade of the A1 receptor with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine revealed a half-maximal stimulation by NECA of the adenylate cyclase at 10 nM, and of acetylcholine release at approximately 100 nM. NECA-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity copurified with choline acetyltransferase in the preparation of the cholinergic nerve terminals, suggesting that the striatal A2 receptor is localized to cholinergic neurones. The possible role of feedback inhibitory and stimulatory receptors on cholinergic nerve terminals is discussed.

  20. Molecular recognition of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine by an acetylcholine binding protein reveals determinants of binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

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    Jeppe A Olsen

    Full Text Available Despite extensive studies on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and homologues, details of acetylcholine binding are not completely resolved. Here, we report the crystal structure of acetylcholine bound to the receptor homologue acetylcholine binding protein from Lymnaea stagnalis. This is the first structure of acetylcholine in a binding pocket containing all five aromatic residues conserved in all mammalian nAChRs. The ligand-protein interactions are characterized by contacts to the aromatic box formed primarily by residues on the principal side of the intersubunit binding interface (residues Tyr89, Trp143 and Tyr185. Besides these interactions on the principal side, we observe a cation-π interaction between acetylcholine and Trp53 on the complementary side and a water-mediated hydrogen bond from acetylcholine to backbone atoms of Leu102 and Met114, both of importance for anchoring acetylcholine to the complementary side. To further study the role of Trp53, we mutated the corresponding tryptophan in the two different acetylcholine-binding interfaces of the widespread α4β2 nAChR, i.e. the interfaces α4(+β2(- and α4(+α4(-. Mutation to alanine (W82A on the β2 subunit or W88A on the α4 subunit significantly altered the response to acetylcholine measured by oocyte voltage-clamp electrophysiology in both interfaces. This shows that the conserved tryptophan residue is important for the effects of ACh at α4β2 nAChRs, as also indicated by the crystal structure. The results add important details to the understanding of how this neurotransmitter exerts its action and improves the foundation for rational drug design targeting these receptors.

  1. Expression and function of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in stem cells

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    Herman S. Cheung

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are prototypical ligand gated ion channels typically found in muscular and neuronal tissues. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, however, have also recently been identified on other cell types, including stem cells. Activation of these receptors by the binding of agonists like choline, acetylcholine, or nicotine has been implicated in many cellular changes. In regards to stem cell function, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation leads to changes in stem cell proliferation, migration and differentiation potential. In this review we summarize the expression and function of known nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different classes of stem cells including: pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, periodontal ligament derived stem cells, and neural progenitor cells and discuss the potential downstream effects of receptor activation on stem cell function.

  2. Activities of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors modulate neurotransmission and synaptic architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Oda; Hidekazu Tanaka

    2014-01-01

    The cholinergic system is involved in a broad spectrum of brain function, and its failure has been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. Acetylcholine transduces signals through muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, both of which inlfuence synaptic plasticity and cognition. However, the mechanisms that relate the rapid gating of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors to per-sistent changes in brain function have remained elusive. Recent evidence indicates that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors activities affect synaptic morphology and density, which result in per-sistent rearrangements of neural connectivity. Further investigations of the relationships between nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and rearrangements of neural circuitry in the central nervous system may help understand the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease.

  3. Impulsive behavior and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

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    Ohmura, Yu; Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Higher impulsivity is thought to be a risk factor for drug addiction, criminal involvement, and suicide. Excessive levels of impulsivity are often observed in several psychiatric disorders including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are involved in impulsive behavior. Here, we introduce recent advances in this field and describe the role of the following nAChR-related brain mechanisms in modulating impulsive behavior: dopamine release in the ventral striatum; α4β2 nAChRs in the infralimbic cortex, which is a ventral part of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); and dopamine release in the mPFC. We also suggest several potential therapeutic drugs to address these mechanisms in impulsivity-related disorders and explore future directions to further elucidate the roles of central nAChRs in impulsive behavior.

  4. Conotoxins Targeting Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: An Overview

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    Eline K. M. Lebbe

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine snails of the genus Conus are a large family of predatory gastropods with an unparalleled molecular diversity of pharmacologically active compounds in their venom. Cone snail venom comprises of a rich and diverse cocktail of peptide toxins which act on a wide variety of ion channels such as voltage-gated sodium- (NaV, potassium- (KV, and calcium- (CaV channels as well as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs which are classified as ligand-gated ion channels. The mode of action of several conotoxins has been the subject of investigation, while for many others this remains unknown. This review aims to give an overview of the knowledge we have today on the molecular pharmacology of conotoxins specifically interacting with nAChRs along with the structure–function relationship data.

  5. Modal gating of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Ridhima

    Many ion channels exhibit multiple patterns of kinetic activity in single-channel currents. This behavior is rare in WT mouse muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), where A2C↔A2O gating events are well-described by single exponentials. Also, single-channel open probability (PO) is essentially homogeneous at a given agonist concentration in the WT receptors. Here I report that perturbations of almost all the residues in loop C (alpha188-alpha199, at the agonist binding site) generate heterogeneity in PO ('modes'). Such unsettled activity was apparent with an alanine substitution at all positions in loop C (except alphaY190 and alphaY198) and with different side chain substitutions at alphaP197 for both adult- and fetal-type AChRs. I used single channel electrophysiology along with site-directed mutagenesis to study modal gating in AChRs consequent to mutations/deletions in loop C. The multiple patterns of kinetic activity arose from the difference in agonist affinity rather than in intrinsic AChR gating. Out of the four different agonists used to study the modal behavior, acetylcholine (ACh) showed a higher degree of kinetic heterogeneity compared to others. The time constant for switching between modes was long (~mins), suggesting that they arise from alternative, stable protein conformations. By studying AChRs having only 1 functional binding site, I attempted to find the source of the affinity difference, which was traced mainly to the alphadelta agonist site. Affinity at the neurotransmitter binding site is mainly determined by a core of five aromatic residues (alphaY93, alphaW149, alphaY190, alphaY198 and deltaW57). Phenylalanine substitutions at all aromatic residues except alphaY93 resulted in elimination of modes. Modes were also eliminated by alanine mutation at deltaW57 on the complementary side but not at other aromatics. Also, by substituting four gamma subunit residues into the delta subunit on the complementary beta sheet, I found that

  6. Binding of quinolizidine alkaloids to nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeller, T; Sauerwein, M; Sporer, F; Wink, M; Müller, W E

    1994-09-01

    Fourteen quinolizidine alkaloids, isolated from Lupinus albus, L. mutabilis, and Anagyris foetida, were analyzed for their affinity for nicotinic and/or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Of the compounds tested, the alpha-pyridones, N-methylcytisine and cytisine, showed the highest affinities at the nicotinic receptor, while several quinolizidine alkaloid types were especially active at the muscarinic receptor.

  7. Binding of tropane alkaloids to nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

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    Schmeller, T; Sporer, F; Sauerwein, M; Wink, M

    1995-07-01

    Fourteen tropane and related alkaloids were analyzed for their affinity for nicotinic and/or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The biogenetic intermediates littorine, 6 beta-hydroxyhyoscyamine, 7 beta-hydroxyhyoscyamine exhibit similar affinities at the muscarinic receptor as scopolamine and atropine. The quarternary derivatives N-methylatropine and N-methylscopolamine show the highest binding with IC50 values of less than 100 pM and 300 pM, respectively. The tropane alkaloids (including cocaine) also bind to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, albeit with much lower affinities.

  8. Purification of acetylcholine receptors from the muscle of Electrophorus electricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, J M; Cooper, J F; Swanson, L W

    1983-08-02

    Muscle from the electric eel Electrophorus electricus contains acetylcholine receptors at 50 times the concentration of normal mammalian muscle and fully one-tenth the concentration of receptors in its electric organ tissue. Receptor is organized much more diffusely over the surface of Electrophorus muscle cells than is the case in normally innervated mammalian skeletal muscle. Receptor was purified from Electrophorus muscle by affinity chromatography on cobra toxin-agarose and found to contain subunits which correspond immunochemically to the alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunits of receptor from electric organ tissue of Torpedo californica. Receptor purified from Electrophorus muscle appears virtually identical with receptor purified from Electrophorus electric organ tissue.

  9. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Andreasen, Jesper Tobias; Arvaniti, Maria;

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been pursued for decades as potential molecular targets to treat cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to their positioning within regions of the brain critical in learning and memory, such as the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus......, and their demonstrated role in processes underlying cognition such as synaptic facilitation, and theta and gamma wave activity. Historically, activity at these receptors is facilitated in AD by use of drugs that increase the levels of their endogenous agonist acetylcholine, and more recently nAChR selective ligands have...

  10. Weak neurotoxin from Naja kaouthia cobra venom affects haemodynamic regulation by acting on acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogay, Alexey Ya; Rzhevsky, Dmitry I; Murashev, Arkady N; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2005-01-01

    Recent in vitro studies of weak neurotoxins from snake venoms have demonstrated their ability to interact with both muscle-type and neuronal alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). However, the biological activity in vivo of weak neurotoxins remains largely unknown. We have studied the influence of weak neurotoxin (WTX) from the venom of cobra Naja kaouthia on arterial blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in rats and mice. It was found that intravenous injection of WTX induced a dose-dependent decrease in BP and an increase in HR in both species, the rats being more sensitive to WTX. Application of WTX following blockade of nAChRs or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) by hexamethonium or atropine, respectively, showed that both nAChRs and mAChRs are involved in the haemodynamic effects of WTX. Blockade of either nAChRs or mAChRs affected WTX action differently in rats and mice, thus reflecting interspecies differences in haemodynamic regulation.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to acetylcholine receptor degradation by promoting endocytosis in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ailian; Huang, Shiqian; Zhao, Xiaonan; Zhang, Yun; Zhu, Lixun; Ding, Ji; Xu, Congfeng

    2016-01-15

    After binding by acetylcholine released from a motor neuron, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction produces a localized end-plate potential, which leads to muscle contraction. Improper turnover and renewal of acetylcholine receptors contributes to the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. In the present study, we demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contributes to acetylcholine receptor degradation in C2C12 myocytes. We further show that ER stress promotes acetylcholine receptor endocytosis and lysosomal degradation, which was dampened by blocking endocytosis or treating with lysosome inhibitor. Knockdown of ER stress proteins inhibited acetylcholine receptor endocytosis and degradation, while rescue assay restored its endocytosis and degradation, confirming the effects of ER stress on promoting endocytosis-mediated degradation of junction acetylcholine receptors. Thus, our studies identify ER stress as a factor promoting acetylcholine receptor degradation through accelerating endocytosis in muscle cells. Blocking ER stress and/or endocytosis might provide a novel therapeutic approach for myasthenia gravis.

  12. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Andreasen T., Jesper; Arvaniti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been pursued for decades as potential molecular targets to treat cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to their positioning within regions of the brain critical in learning and memory, such as the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus...

  13. Functional interaction between Lypd6 and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M; Soni, Neeraj;

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) affect multiple physiological functions in the brain and their functions are modulated by regulatory proteins of the Lynx family. Here, we report for the first time a direct interaction of the Lynx protein LY6/PLAUR domain-containing 6 (Lypd6) with n...

  14. Expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on human B-lymphoma cells

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    Skok M. V.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To find a correlation between the level of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR expression and B lymphocyte differentiation or activation state. Methods. Expression of nAChRs in the REH, Ramos and Daudi cell lines was studied by flow cytometry using nAChR subunit-specific antibodies; cell proliferation was studied by MTT test. Results. It is shown that the level of 42/4 and 7 nAChRs expression increased along with B lymphocyte differentiation (Ramos > REH and activation (Daudi > > Ramos and depended on the antigen-specific receptor expression. The nAChR stimulation/blockade did not influence the intensity of cell proliferation.

  15. Optochemical control of genetically engineered neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitsky, Ivan; Banghart, Matthew R.; Mourot, Alexandre; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Gaub, Benjamin; Kramer, Richard H.; Trauner, Dirk

    2012-02-01

    Advances in synthetic chemistry, structural biology, molecular modelling and molecular cloning have enabled the systematic functional manipulation of transmembrane proteins. By combining genetically manipulated proteins with light-sensitive ligands, innately ‘blind’ neurobiological receptors can be converted into photoreceptors, which allows them to be photoregulated with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we present the optochemical control of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with photoswitchable tethered agonists and antagonists. Using structure-based design, we produced heteromeric α3β4 and α4β2 nAChRs that can be activated or inhibited with deep-violet light, but respond normally to acetylcholine in the dark. The generation of these engineered receptors should facilitate investigation of the physiological and pathological functions of neuronal nAChRs and open a general pathway to photosensitizing pentameric ligand-gated ion channels.

  16. Revisiting the Endocytosis of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Wymke Ockenga; Ritva Tikkanen

    2015-01-01

    The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimul...

  17. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: from basic science to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Raymond; Rollema, Hans; Bertrand, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Substantial progress in the identification of genes encoding for a large number of proteins responsible for various aspects of neurotransmitter release, postsynaptic detection and downstream signaling, has advanced our understanding of the mechanisms by which neurons communicate and interact. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors represent a large and well-characterized family of ligand-gated ion channels that is expressed broadly throughout the central and peripheral nervous system, and in non-neuronal cells. With 16 mammalian genes identified that encode for nicotinic receptors and the ability of the subunits to form heteromeric or homomeric receptors, the repertoire of conceivable receptor subtype combinations is enormous and offers unique possibilities for the design and development of new therapeutics that target nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with recent insights in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from genes, structure and function to diseases, and with the latest findings on the pharmacology of these receptors. Although so far only a few nicotinic drugs have been marketed or are in late stage development, much progress has been made in the design of novel chemical entities that are being explored for the treatment of various diseases, including addiction, depression, ADHD, cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease, pain and inflammation. A pharmacological analysis of these compounds, including those that were discontinued, can improve our understanding of the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic requirements for nicotinic 'drug-like' molecules and will reveal if hypotheses on therapies based on targeting specific nicotinic receptor subtypes have been adequately tested in the clinic.

  18. Localization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in plant guard cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), as an important neurotransmitter in animals, also plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. But relatively little is known about its receptors in plants. A green fluorescence BODIPY FL-labeled ABT, which is a high affinity ligand of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), was used to localize mAChR in plant guard cells. In Vicia faba L. and Pisum sativum L., mAChR was found both on the plasma membrane of guard cells. mAChR may also be distributed on guard cell chloroplast membrane of Vicia faba L. The evidence that mAChR localizes in the guard cells provides a new possible signal transduction pathway in ACh mediated stomata movement.

  19. Subunit structure of the acetylcholine receptor from Electrophorus electricus.

    OpenAIRE

    Conti-Tronconi, B M; Hunkapiller, M. W.; Lindstrom,J.M.; Raftery, M A

    1982-01-01

    The amino-terminal amino acid sequences of the four major peptides (Mr 41,000, 50,000, 55,000, and 62,000) present in purified preparations of Electrophorus electricus nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) have been determined for 24 cycles by automated sequence analysis procedures yielding four unique polypeptide sequences. The sequences showed a high degree of similarity, having identical residues in a number of positions ranging between 37% and 50% for specific pairs of subunits. Compa...

  20. Peripheral metabolic effects of endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeli, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system consists of endogenous arachidonic acid derivates that activate cannabinoid receptors. The two most prominent endocannabinoids are anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol. In obesity, increased concentrations of circulating and tissue endocannabinoid levels have been described, suggesting increased activity of the endocannabinoid system. Increased availability of endocannabinoids in obesity may over-stimulate cannabinoid receptors. Blockade of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors was the only successful clinical development of an anti-obesity drug during the last decade. Whereas blockade of CB1 receptors acutely reduces food intake, the long-term effects on metabolic regulation are more likely mediated by peripheral actions in liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and the pancreas. Lipogenic effects of CB1 receptor signalling in liver and adipose tissue may contribute to regional adipose tissue expansion and insulin resistance in the fatty liver. The association of circulating 2-arachidonoyl glycerol levels with decreased insulin sensitivity strongly suggests further exploration of the role of endocannabinoid signalling for insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue. A few studies have suggested a specific role for the regulation of adiponectin secretion from adipocytes by endocannabinoids, but that has to be confirmed by more experiments. Also, the potential role of CB1 receptor blockade for the stimulation of energy expenditure needs to be studied in the future. Despite the current discussion of safety issues of cannabinoid receptor blockade, these findings open a new and exciting perspective on endocannabinoids as regulators of body weight and metabolism.

  1. Gold nanoparticle–choline complexes can block nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chur Chin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Chur Chin1, In Kyeom Kim2, Dong Yoon Lim3, Ki Suk Kim4, Hyang Ae Lee4, Eun Joo Kim41Department of Pediatrics, Fatima Hospital, Daegu, Korea; 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea; 3Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju, Korea; 4Korea Institute of Toxicology, Daejeon, KoreaAbstract: We identified a novel class of direct ion-channel blockers of ligand-gated ion channels called the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. Negatively charged gold nanoparticles (1.4 nm block ion pores by binding to the sulfur group of the cysteine loop of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, and currents evoked by acetylcholine (Ach can break these bonds. The current evoked by ACh in nAChRs was blocked directly in ion pores by the gold nanoparticle–choline complex. In adrenal-gland perfusion studies, the complex also blocked nAChRs by diminishing catecholamine release by about 75%. An in vivo study showed muscle relaxation in rats after injection of the complex. These results will foster the application of gold nanoparticles as a direct ion-channel blocker. Keywords: negatively charged gold nanoparticle, choline, gold–sulfur bond, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, direct ion-channel blocker

  2. Alternative splicing in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits from Locusta migratoria and its influence on acetylcholine potencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Yang; Bao, Haibo; Sun, Huahua; Liu, Zewen

    2017-01-18

    Due to the great abundance within insect central nervous system (CNS), nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play key roles in insect CNS, which makes it to be the targets of several classes of insecticides, such as neonicotinoids. Insect nAChRs are pentameric complexes consisting of five subunits, and a dozen subunits in one insect species can theoretically comprise diverse nAChRs. The alternative splicing in insect nAChR subunits may increase the diversity of insect nAChRs. In the oriental migratory locust (Locusta migratoria manilensis Meyen), a model insect species with agricultural importance, the alternative splicing was found in six α subunits among nine α and two β subunits, such as missing conserved residues in Loop D from Locα1, Locα6 and Locα9, a 34-residue insertion in Locα8 cytoplasmic loop, and truncated transcripts for Locα4, Locα7 and Locα9. Hybrid nAChRs were successfully constructed in Xenopus oocytes through co-expression with rat β2 and one α subunit from L. migratoria, which included Locα1, Locα2, Locα3, Locα4, Locα5, Locα8 and Locα9. Influences of alternative splicing in Locα1, Locα8 and Locα9 on acetylcholine potency were tested on hybrid nAChRs. The alternative splicing in Locα1 and Locα9 could increase acetylcholine sensitivities on recombinant receptors, while the splicing in Locα8 showed significant influences on the current amplitudes of oocytes. The results revealed that the alternative splicing at or close to the ligand-binding sites, as well as at cytoplasmic regions away from the ligand-binding sites, in insect nAChR subunits would change the agonist potencies on the receptors, which consequently increased nAChR diversity in functional and pharmacological properties.

  3. Molecular alteration of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor system during synaptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Large, T.H.; Cho, N.J.; De Mello, F.G.; Klein, W.L.

    1985-07-25

    Biochemical properties of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor system of the avian retina were found to change during the period when synapses form in ovo. Comparison of ligand binding to membranes obtained before and after synaptogenesis showed a significant increase in the affinity, but not proportion, of the high affinity agonist-binding state. There was no change in receptor sensitivity to antagonists during this period. Pirenzepine binding, which can discriminate muscarinic receptor subtypes, showed the presence of a single population of low affinity sites (M2) before and after synaptogenesis. The change in agonist binding was not due to the late development of receptor function. However, detergent-solubilization of membranes eliminated differences in agonist binding between receptors from embryos and hatched chicks, suggesting a developmental change in interactions of the receptor with functionally related membrane components. A possible basis for altered interactions was obtained from isoelectric point data showing that the muscarinic receptor population underwent a transition from a predominantly low pI form (4.25) in 13 day embryos to a predominantly high pI form (4.50) in newly hatched chicks. The possibility that biochemical changes in the muscarinic receptor play a role in differentiation of the system by controlling receptor position on the surface of nerve cells is discussed.

  4. Structure and dynamics of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Hu, Jianxin; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rosemond, Erica; Green, Hillary F.; Liu, Tong; Chae, Pil Seok; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.; Weis, William I.; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford); (NIH); (D.E. Shaw); (Hanyang); (UTSMC)

    2012-03-01

    Acetylcholine, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, exerts many of its physiological actions via activation of a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Although the five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) share a high degree of sequence homology, they show pronounced differences in G-protein coupling preference and the physiological responses they mediate. Unfortunately, despite decades of effort, no therapeutic agents endowed with clear mAChR subtype selectivity have been developed to exploit these differences. We describe here the structure of the G{sub q/11}-coupled M3 mAChR ('M3 receptor', from rat) bound to the bronchodilator drug tiotropium and identify the binding mode for this clinically important drug. This structure, together with that of the G{sub i/o}-coupled M2 receptor, offers possibilities for the design of mAChR subtype-selective ligands. Importantly, the M3 receptor structure allows a structural comparison between two members of a mammalian GPCR subfamily displaying different G-protein coupling selectivities. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tiotropium binds transiently to an allosteric site en route to the binding pocket of both receptors. These simulations offer a structural view of an allosteric binding mode for an orthosteric GPCR ligand and provide additional opportunities for the design of ligands with different affinities or binding kinetics for different mAChR subtypes. Our findings not only offer insights into the structure and function of one of the most important GPCR families, but may also facilitate the design of improved therapeutics targeting these critical receptors.

  5. Effects of antihistamines on the function of human α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Bassem; Khanian, Seyedeh Soha; Ashoor, Abrar; Prytkova, Tatiana; Ghattas, Mohammad A; Atatreh, Noor; Nurulain, Syed M; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Oz, Murat

    2015-01-05

    Effects of the histamine H₁ receptor (H1R) antagonists (antihistamines), promethazine (PMZ), orphenadrine (ORP), chlorpheniramine (CLP), pyrilamine (PYR), diphenhydramine (DPH), citerizine (CTZ), and triprolidine (TRP) on the functional properties of the cloned α7 subunit of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes were investigated. Antihistamines inhibited the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the order PYR>CLP>TRP>PMZ>ORP≥DPH≥CTZ. Among the antihistamines, PYR showed the highest reversible inhibition of acetylcholine (100 µM)-induced responses with IC₅₀ of 6.2 µM. PYR-induced inhibition was independent of the membrane potential and could not be reversed by increasing the concentration of acetylcholine. Specific binding of [¹²⁵I] α-bungarotoxin, a selective antagonist for α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, was not changed in the presence of PYR suggesting a non-competitive inhibition of nicotinic receptors. In line with functional experiments, docking studies indicated that PYR can potentially bind allosterically with the α7 transmembrane domain. Our results indicate that the H₂-H₄ receptor antagonists tested in this study (10 µM) showed negligible inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. On the other hand, H₁ receptor antagonists inhibited the function of human α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, with varying potencies. These results emphasize the importance of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor for future pharmacological/toxicological profiling.

  6. Cell-surface translational dynamics of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Barrantes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synapse efficacy heavily relies on the number of neurotransmitter receptors available at a given time. In addition to the equilibrium between the biosynthetic production, exocytic delivery and recycling of receptors on the one hand, and the endocytic internalization on the other, lateral diffusion and clustering of receptors at the cell membrane play key roles in determining the amount of active receptors at the synapse. Mobile receptors traffic between reservoir compartments and the synapse by thermally driven Brownian motion, and become immobilized at the peri-synaptic region or the synapse by: a clustering mediated by homotropic inter-molecular receptor-receptor associations; b heterotropic associations with non-receptor scaffolding proteins or the subjacent cytoskeletal meshwork, leading to diffusional trapping, and c protein-lipid interactions, particularly with the neutral lipid cholesterol. This review assesses the contribution of some of these mechanisms to the supramolecular organization and dynamics of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor of muscle and neuronal cells -the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR. Currently available information stemming from various complementary biophysical techniques commonly used to interrogate the dynamics of cell-surface components is critically discussed. The translational mobility of nAChRs at the cell surface differs between muscle and neuronal receptors in terms of diffusion coefficients and residence intervals at the synapse, which cover an ample range of time regimes. A peculiar feature of brain 7 nAChR is its ability to spend much of its time confined peri-synaptically, vicinal to glutamatergic (excitatory and GABAergic (inhibitory synapses. An important function of the 7 nAChR may thus be visiting the territories of other neurotransmitter receptors, differentially regulating the dynamic equilibrium between excitation and inhibition, depending on its residence time in each domain.

  7. Adult celiac disease with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh J Freeman; Helen R Gillett; Peter M Gillett; Joel Oger

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease has been associated with some autoimmune disorders. A 40-year-old competitive strongman with celiac disease responded to a glutenfree diet, but developed profound and generalized motor weakness with acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis, a disorder reported to occur in about 1 in 5000. This possible relationship between myasthenia gravis and celiac disease was further explored in serological studies. Frozen stored serum samples from 23 acetylcholine receptor antibody positive myasthenia gravis patients with no intestinal symptoms were used to screen for celiac disease. Both endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies were examined. One of 23 (or, about 4.3%) was positive for both IgA-endomysial and IgA tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Endoscopic studies subsequently showed duodenal mucosal scalloping and biopsies confirmed the histopathological changes of celiac disease. Celiac disease and myasthenia gravis may occur together more often than is currently appreciated. The presence of motor weakness in celiac disease may be a clue to occult myasthenia gravis, even in the absence of intestinal symptoms.

  8. Characterisation of an acetylcholine receptor gene of Haemonchus contortus in relation to levamisole resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Visser, A.; Wiley, L.; Weiss, A.S.; Sangster, N.C.; Roos, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    The anthelmintic drug levamisole is thought to bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of nematodes. It is possible that resistance to this drug is associated with either a change in binding characteristics or a reduction in the number of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Therefore, the molecular

  9. Characterisation of an acetylcholine receptor gene of Haemonchus contortus in relation to levamisole resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Visser, A.; Wiley, L.; Weiss, A.S.; Sangster, N.C.; Roos, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    The anthelmintic drug levamisole is thought to bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of nematodes. It is possible that resistance to this drug is associated with either a change in binding characteristics or a reduction in the number of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Therefore, the molecular

  10. Rational design of a-conotoxin analogues targeting a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armishaw, Christopher; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Balle, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels and belong to the superfamily of Cys-loop receptors. Valuable insight into the orthosteric ligand binding to nAChRs in recent years has been obtained from the crystal structures of acetylcholine binding proteins (ACh...

  11. Acetylcholine elongates neuronal growth cone filopodia via activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Lei Ray; Estes, Stephen; Artinian, Liana; Rehder, Vincent

    2013-07-01

    In addition to acting as a classical neurotransmitter in synaptic transmission, acetylcholine (ACh) has been shown to play a role in axonal growth and growth cone guidance. What is not well understood is how ACh acts on growth cones to affect growth cone filopodia, structures known to be important for neuronal pathfinding. We addressed this question using an identified neuron (B5) from the buccal ganglion of the pond snail Helisoma trivolvis in cell culture. ACh treatment caused pronounced filopodial elongation within minutes, an effect that required calcium influx and resulted in the elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca]i ). Whole-cell patch clamp recordings showed that ACh caused a reduction in input resistance, a depolarization of the membrane potential, and an increase in firing frequency in B5 neurons. These effects were mediated via the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), as the nAChR agonist dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) mimicked the effects of ACh on filopodial elongation, [Ca]i elevation, and changes in electrical activity. Moreover, the nAChR antagonist tubucurarine blocked all DMPP-induced effects. Lastly, ACh acted locally at the growth cone, because growth cones that were physically isolated from their parent neuron responded to ACh by filopodial elongation with a similar time course as growth cones that remained connected to their parent neuron. Our data revealed a critical role for ACh as a modulator of growth cone filopodial dynamics. ACh signaling was mediated via nAChRs and resulted in Ca influx, which, in turn, caused filopodial elongation.

  12. Characteristics of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nukina,Itaru

    1983-06-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh receptors were studied in the rat central nervous system (CNS using 3H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB, an antagonist of muscarinic ACh receptors. Scatchard analysis indicated that the rat CNS had a single 3H-QNB binding site with an apparent dissociation constant (Kd of 5.0 X 10(-10 M. Li+, Zn++ and Cu++ had strong effects on 3H-QNB binding which indicates that these metal ions might play important roles at muscarinic ACh receptor sites in the brain. Since antidepressants and antischizophrenic drugs displaced the binding of 3H-QNB, the anticholinergic effects of these drugs need to be taken into account when they are applied clinically. The muscarinic ACh receptor was successfully solubilized with lysophosphatidylcholine. By gel chromatography, with a Sepharose 6B column, the solubilized muscarinic ACh receptor molecule eluted at the fraction corresponding to a Stokes' radius of 6.1 nm. With the use of sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation, the molecular weight of the solubilized muscarinic ACh receptor was determined to be about 90,000 daltons. The regional distribution of 3H-QNB binding in rat brain was examined, and the highest level of 3H-QNB binding was found to be in the striatum followed by cerebral cortex and hippocampus, indicating that muscarinic ACh mechanisms affect CNS function mainly through these areas.

  13. Inhibition of α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors prevents chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Haylie K.; Christensen, Sean B.; Gajewiak, Joanna; Ramachandra, Renuka; Elmslie, Keith S.; Vetter, Douglas E.; Ghelardini, Carla; Iadonato, Shawn P.; Mercado, Jose L.; Olivera, Baldomera M.; McIntosh, J. Michael

    2017-01-01

    Opioids are first-line drugs for moderate to severe acute pain and cancer pain. However, these medications are associated with severe side effects, and whether they are efficacious in treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain remains controversial. Medications that act through alternative molecular mechanisms are critically needed. Antagonists of α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been proposed as an important nonopioid mechanism based on studies demonstrating prevention of neuropathology after trauma-induced nerve injury. However, the key α9α10 ligands characterized to date are at least two orders of magnitude less potent on human vs. rodent nAChRs, limiting their translational application. Furthermore, an alternative proposal that these ligands achieve their beneficial effects by acting as agonists of GABAB receptors has caused confusion over whether blockade of α9α10 nAChRs is the fundamental underlying mechanism. To address these issues definitively, we developed RgIA4, a peptide that exhibits high potency for both human and rodent α9α10 nAChRs, and was at least 1,000-fold more selective for α9α10 nAChRs vs. all other molecular targets tested, including opioid and GABAB receptors. A daily s.c. dose of RgIA4 prevented chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain in rats. In wild-type mice, oxaliplatin treatment produced cold allodynia that could be prevented by RgIA4. Additionally, in α9 KO mice, chemotherapy-induced development of cold allodynia was attenuated and the milder, temporary cold allodynia was not relieved by RgIA4. These findings establish blockade of α9-containing nAChRs as the basis for the efficacy of RgIA4, and that α9-containing nAChRs are a critical target for prevention of chronic cancer chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:28223528

  14. Stoichiometry for α-bungarotoxin block of α7 acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacosta, Corrie J. B.; Free, Chris R.; Sine, Steven M.

    2015-08-01

    α-Bungarotoxin (α-Btx) binds to the five agonist binding sites on the homopentameric α7-acetylcholine receptor, yet the number of bound α-Btx molecules required to prevent agonist-induced channel opening remains unknown. To determine the stoichiometry for α-Btx blockade, we generate receptors comprised of wild-type and α-Btx-resistant subunits, tag one of the subunit types with conductance mutations to report subunit stoichiometry, and following incubation with α-Btx, monitor opening of individual receptor channels with defined subunit stoichiometry. We find that a single α-Btx-sensitive subunit confers nearly maximal suppression of channel opening, despite four binding sites remaining unoccupied by α-Btx and accessible to the agonist. Given structural evidence that α-Btx locks the agonist binding site in an inactive conformation, we conclude that the dominant mechanism of antagonism is non-competitive, originating from conformational arrest of the binding sites, and that the five α7 subunits are interdependent and maintain conformational symmetry in the open channel state.

  15. Flupyrimin: A Novel Insecticide Acting at the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozaki, Yasumichi; Horikoshi, Ryo; Ohno, Ikuya; Kitsuda, Shigeki; Durkin, Kathleen A; Suzuki, Tomonori; Asahara, Chiaki; Hiroki, Natsuko; Komabashiri, Rena; Shimizu, Rikako; Furutani, Shogo; Ihara, Makoto; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Mitomi, Masaaki; Kagabu, Shinzo; Uomoto, Katsuhito; Tomizawa, Motohiro

    2017-09-13

    A novel chemotype insecticide flupyrimin (FLP) [N-[(E)-1-(6-chloro-3-pyridinylmethyl)pyridin-2(1H)-ylidene]-2,2,2-trifluoroacetamide], discovered by Meiji Seika Pharma, has unique biological properties, including outstanding potency to imidacloprid (IMI)-resistant rice pests together with superior safety toward pollinators. Intriguingly, FLP acts as a nicotinic antagonist in American cockroach neurons, and [(3)H]FLP binds to the multiple high-affinity binding components in house fly nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (nAChR) preparation. One of the [(3)H]FLP receptors is identical to the IMI receptor, and the alternative is IMI-insensitive subtype. Furthermore, FLP is favorably safe to rats as predicted by the very low affinity to the rat α4β2 nAChR. Structure-activity relationships of FLP analogues in terms of receptor potency, featuring the pyridinylidene and trifluoroacetyl pharmacophores, were examined, thereby establishing the FLP molecular recognition at the Aplysia californica ACh-binding protein, a suitable structural surrogate of the insect nAChR. These FLP pharmacophores account for the excellent receptor affinity, accordingly revealing differences in its binding mechanism from IMI.

  16. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: Common molecular substrates of nicotine and alcohol dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linzy M. Hendrickson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol and nicotine are often co-abused. As many as 80-95% of alcoholics are also smokers, suggesting that ethanol and nicotine, the primary addictive component of tobacco smoke, may functionally interact in the central nervous system and/or share a common mechanism of action. While nicotine initiates dependence by binding to and activating neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, ligand-gated cation channels normally activated by endogenous acetylcholine (ACh, ethanol is much less specific with the ability to modulate multiple gene products including those encoding voltage-gated ion channels, and excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors. However, emerging data indicate that ethanol interacts with nAChRs, both directly and indirectly, in the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic (DAergic reward circuitry to affect brain reward systems. Like nicotine, ethanol activates DAergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA which project to the nucleus accumbens (NAc. Blockade of VTA nAChRs reduces ethanol-mediated activation of DAergic neurons, NAc DA release, consumption, and operant responding for ethanol in rodents. Thus, ethanol may increase ACh release into the VTA driving activation of DAergic neurons through nAChRs. In addition, ethanol potentiates distinct nAChR subtype responses to ACh and nicotine in vitro and in DAergic neurons. The smoking cessation therapeutic and nAChR partial agonist, varenicline, reduces alcohol consumption in heavy drinking smokers and rodent models of alcohol consumption. Finally, single nucleotide polymorphisms in nAChR subunit genes are associated with alcohol dependence phenotypes and smoking behaviors in human populations. Together, results from preclinical, clinical, and genetic studies indicate that nAChRs may have an inherent role in the abusive properties of ethanol, as well as in nicotine and alcohol co-dependence.

  17. Foetal vascular responses to thromboxane receptor blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Meyer

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that foetal administration of SQ-29,548, a putative thromboxane receptor blocker, would prevent foeto–placental vasoconstriction produced by the thromboxane mimic U46619. Arterial blood gases, continuous monitoring of maternal and foetal heart rates and blood pressures were performed in chronically catheterized pregnant ewes. Foetal blood flows and vascular resistance were determined with radioactive microspheres. SQ-29,548 effectively blocked the expected vasoconstrictive effects of thromboxane. However, prolonged infusion of SQ-29,548 resulted in significant decreases in umbilical–placental blood flow and foetal mean arterial pressure. This was accompanied by a respiratory acidemia. Potential therapy for the vasoconstrictive disorders of pregnancy with SQ-29,548 awaits further investigation of its intrinsic vasoactive properties in the umbilical–placental vasculature.

  18. Menthol binding and inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Al Kury, Lina; Shuba, Yaroslav; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Howarth, Frank C; Sadek, Bassem; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca(2+)-free bathing solution containing Ba(2+). Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [(125)I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca(2+) transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner.

  19. Menthol binding and inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Ashoor

    Full Text Available Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca(2+-dependent Cl(- channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca(2+ chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca(2+-free bathing solution containing Ba(2+. Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [(125I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca(2+ transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner.

  20. Schizophrenia and the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laura F; Freedman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the devastating symptoms of psychosis, many people with schizophrenia also suffer from cognitive impairment. These cognitive symptoms lead to marked dysfunction and can impact employability, treatment adherence, and social skills. Deficits in P50 auditory gating are associated with attentional impairment and may contribute to cognitive symptoms and perceptual disturbances. This nicotinic cholinergic-mediated inhibitory process represents a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in schizophrenia. This chapter will review evidence implicating the nicotinic cholinergic, and specifically, the alpha7 nicotinic receptor system in the pathology of schizophrenia. Impaired auditory sensory gating has been linked to the alpha7 nicotinic receptor gene on the chromosome 15q14 locus. A majority of persons with schizophrenia are heavy smokers. Although nicotine can acutely reverse diminished auditory sensory gating in people with schizophrenia, this effect is lost on a chronic basis due to receptor desensitization. The alpha7 nicotinic agonist 3-(2,4 dimethoxy)benzylidene-anabaseine (DMXBA) can also enhance auditory sensory gating in animal models. DMXBA is well tolerated in humans and a new study in persons with schizophrenia has found that DMXBA enhances both P50 auditory gating and cognition. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists appear to be viable candidates for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia.

  1. Functional interaction between Lypd6 and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M; Soni, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) affect multiple physiological functions in the brain and their functions are modulated by regulatory proteins of the Lynx family. Here, we report for the first time a direct interaction of the Lynx protein LY6/PLAUR domain-containing 6 (Lypd6) with n...... brain. Additionally, soluble recombinant Lypd6 protein attenuates nicotine-induced hippocampal inward currents in rat brain slices and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells, suggesting that binding of Lypd6 is sufficient to inhibit n......AChR-mediated intracellular signaling. We further show that perinatal nicotine exposure in rats (4 mg/kg/day through minipumps to dams from embryonic day 7 to post-natal day 21) significantly increases Lypd6 protein levels in the hippocampus in adulthood, which did not occur after exposure to nicotine in adulthood only. Our...

  2. Functional interaction between Lypd6 and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M; Soni, Neeraj;

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) affect multiple physiological functions in the brain and their functions are modulated by regulatory proteins of the Lynx family. Here, we report for the first time a direct interaction of the Lynx protein LY6/PLAUR domain-containing 6 (Lypd6) with n......AChRs in human brain extracts, identifying Lypd6 as a novel regulator of nAChR function. Using protein cross-linking and affinity purification from human temporal cortical extracts, we demonstrate that Lypd6 is a synaptically enriched membrane-bound protein that binds to multiple nAChR subtypes in the human...... brain. Additionally, soluble recombinant Lypd6 protein attenuates nicotine-induced hippocampal inward currents in rat brain slices and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells, suggesting that binding of Lypd6 is sufficient to inhibit n...

  3. Effect of organophosphorus insecticides on phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuyin Li; Liming Zou; Carry Pope

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organophosphorus insecticides may promote the accumulation of acetylcholine at synapses and the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity to cause disturbance of neural signal conduction and induce a toxic reaction. Organophosphorus insecticides may act on M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, whose combination with G proteins is regulated by phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of organophosphorus insecticides on the phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2-mediated M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and to reveal other possible actions of organophosphorus insecticides.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An observational study, which was performed in the Central Laboratory of Shenyang Medical College, and Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University from June 2002 to December 2004.METHODS: The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor was extracted and purified from pig brain using affinity chromatography. Subsequently, the purified M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, and [OP32] ATP were incubated with different concentrations of paraoxon and chlorpyrifos oxon together. The mixture then underwent polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the gel film was dried and radioactively autographed to detect phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Finally, the radio-labeled phosphorylated M2 receptor protein band was excised for counting with an isotope liquid scintillation counter.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effects of chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon, chlorpyrifos, and parathion in different concentrations on the phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor; effects of chlorpyrifos oxon on the phosphorylation of the adrenergic receptor.CONCLUSION: Different kinds of organophosphorus insecticides have different effects on the phosphorylation of the G protein

  4. Muscle-type nicotinic receptor blockade by diethylamine, the hydrophilic moiety of lidocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando eAlberola-Die

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine bears in its structure both an aromatic ring and a terminal amine, which can be protonated at physiological pH, linked by an amide group. Since lidocaine causes multiple inhibitory actions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, this work was aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of diethylamine (DEA, a small molecule resembling the hydrophilic moiety of lidocaine, on Torpedo marmorata nAChRs microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes. Similarly to lidocaine, DEA reversibly blocked acetylcholine-elicited currents (IACh in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 close to 70 μM, but unlike lidocaine, DEA did not affect IACh desensitization. IACh inhibition by DEA was more pronounced at negative potentials, suggesting an open-channel blockade of nAChRs, although roughly 30% inhibition persisted at positive potentials, indicating additional binding sites outside the pore. DEA block of nAChRs in the resting state (closed channel was confirmed by the enhanced IACh inhibition when pre-applying DEA before its co-application with ACh, as compared with solely DEA and ACh co-application. Virtual docking assays provide a plausible explanation to the experimental observations in terms of the involvement of different sets of drug binding sites. So, at the nAChR transmembrane (TM domain, DEA and lidocaine shared binding sites within the channel pore, giving support to their open-channel blockade; besides, lidocaine, but not DEA, interacted with residues at cavities among the M1, M2, M3 and M4 segments of each subunit and also at intersubunit crevices. At the extracellular (EC domain, DEA and lidocaine binding sites were broadly distributed, which aids to explain the closed channel blockade observed. Interestingly, some DEA clusters were located at the α-γ interphase of the EC domain, in a cavity near the orthosteric binding site pocket; by contrast, lidocaine contacted with all α-subunit loops conforming the ACh binding site, both in α-γ and

  5. Microtransplantation of acetylcholine receptors from normal or denervated rat skeletal muscles to frog oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernareggi, Annalisa; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Lorenzon, Paola; Ruzzier, Fabio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Cell membranes, carrying neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels, can be ‘microtransplanted’ into frog oocytes. This technique allows a direct functional characterization of the original membrane proteins, together with any associated molecules they may have, still embedded in their natural lipid environment. This approach has been previously demonstrated to be very useful to study neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels contained in cell membranes isolated from human brains. Here, we examined the possibility of using the microtransplantation method to study acetylcholine receptors from normal and denervated rat skeletal muscles. We found that the muscle membranes, carrying their fetal or adult acetylcholine receptor isoforms, could be efficiently microtransplanted to the oocyte membrane, making the oocytes become sensitive to acetylcholine. These results show that oocytes injected with skeletal muscle membranes efficiently incorporate functional acetylcholine receptors, thus making the microtransplantation approach a valuable tool to further investigate receptors and ion channels of human muscle diseases. PMID:21224230

  6. The formation of acetylcholine receptor clusters visualized with quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng H Benjamin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Motor innervation of skeletal muscle leads to the assembly of acetylcholine receptor (AChR clusters in the postsynaptic membrane at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction (NMJ. Synaptic AChR aggregation, according to the diffusion-mediated trapping hypothesis, involves the establishment of a postsynaptic scaffold that "traps" freely diffusing receptors into forming high-density clusters. Although this hypothesis is widely cited to explain the formation of postsynaptic AChR clusters, direct evidence at molecular level is lacking. Results Using quantum dots (QDs and live cell imaging, we provide new measurements supporting the diffusion-trap hypothesis as applied to AChR cluster formation. Consistent with published works, experiments on cultured Xenopus myotomal muscle cells revealed that AChRs at clusters that formed spontaneously (pre-patterned clusters, also called hot spots and at those induced by nerve-innervation or by growth factor-coated latex beads were very stable whereas diffuse receptors outside these regions were mobile. Moreover, despite the restriction of AChR movement at sites of synaptogenic stimulation, individual receptors away from these domains continued to exhibit free diffusion, indicating that AChR clustering at NMJ does not involve an active attraction of receptors but is passive and diffusion-driven. Conclusion Single-molecular tracking using QDs has provided direct evidence that the clustering of AChRs in muscle cells in response to synaptogenic stimuli is achieved by two distinct cellular processes: the Brownian motion of receptors in the membrane and their trapping and immobilization at the synaptic specialization. This study also provides a clearer picture of the "trap" that it is not a uniformly sticky area but consists of discrete foci at which AChRs are immobilized.

  7. Revisiting the endocytosis of the m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockenga, Wymke; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2015-05-12

    The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles.

  8. Revisiting the Endocytosis of the M2 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wymke Ockenga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The agonist-induced endocytosis of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 is different from that of the other members of the muscarinic receptor family. The uptake of the M2 receptor involves the adapter proteins of the β-arrestin family and the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6. However, it has remained inconclusive if M2 endocytosis is dependent on clathrin or the large GTPase dynamin. We here show by means of knocking down the clathrin heavy chain that M2 uptake upon agonist stimulation requires clathrin. The expression of various dominant-negative dynamin-2 mutants and the use of chemical inhibitors of dynamin function revealed that dynamin expression and membrane localization as such appear to be necessary for M2 endocytosis, whereas dynamin GTPase activity is not required for this process. Based on the data from the present and from previous studies, we propose that M2 endocytosis takes place by means of an atypical clathrin-mediated pathway that may involve a specific subset of clathrin-coated pits/vesicles.

  9. Conformationally restrained carbamoylcholine homologues. Synthesis, pharmacology at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and biostructural considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Fuente Revenga, M; Balle, Thomas; Jensen, Anders A.

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of small selective ligands for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) based on acetylcholine (ACh) has led to the development of potent agonists with clear preference for the α4β2 nAChR, the most prevalent nAChR subtype in the central nervous system. In this work we present th...

  10. Two types of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila and other arthropods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Caitlin Alexis; Hauser, Frank; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I

    2013-01-01

    ). In this study, we cloned two structurally related GPCRs from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which, after expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells, proved to be muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. One mAChR (the A-type; encoded by gene CG4356) is activated by acetylcholine (EC50, 5 × 10(-8) M...

  11. Vagus Nerve Activity Augments Intestinal Macrophage Phagocytosis via Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor alpha 4 beta 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zanden, Esmerij P.; Snoek, Susanne A.; Heinsbroek, Sigrid E.; Stanisor, Oana I.; Verseijden, Caroline; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Greaves, David R.; Gordon, Siamon; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The vagus nerve negatively regulates macrophage cytokine production via the release of acetylcholine (ACh) and activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). In various models of intestinal inflammation, vagus nerve efferent stimulation ameliorates disease. Given the act

  12. Immunological relationship between acetylcholine receptor and thymus: a possible significance in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonov, A; Tarrab-Hazdai, R; Abramsky, O; Fuchs, S

    1975-01-01

    A defined immunological cross-reaction was observed between acetylcholine receptor fraction from the electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, and two calf thymus fractions. The cross-reaction was demonstrated on the cellular level by means of the lymphocyte transformation technique, and on the humoral level, by means of the microcomplement fixation assay. In the human disease myasthenia gravis both acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction and the thymus are affected, probably by an autoimmune mechanism. The immunological cross-reaction between acetylcholine receptor and thymic components may explain the association between endplate and thymus disorders in myasthenia gravis. PMID:1055418

  13. Physiological characterization of human muscle acetylcholine receptors from ALS patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Eleonora; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Conti, Luca; Deflorio, Cristina; Frasca, Vittorio; Manteca, Alessia; Pichiorri, Floriana; Roseti, Cristina; Torchia, Gregorio; Limatola, Cristina; Grassi, Francesca; Miledi, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by progressive degeneration of motor neurons leading to muscle paralysis. Research in transgenic mice suggests that the muscle actively contributes to the disease onset, but such studies are difficult to pursue in humans and in vitro models would represent a good starting point. In this work we show that tiny amounts of muscle from ALS or from control denervated muscle, obtained by needle biopsy, are amenable to functional characterization by two different technical approaches: “microtransplantation” of muscle membranes into Xenopus oocytes and culture of myogenic satellite cells. Acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked currents and unitary events were characterized in oocytes and multinucleated myotubes. We found that ALS acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) retain their native physiological characteristics, being activated by ACh and nicotine and blocked by α-bungarotoxin (α-BuTX), d-tubocurarine (dTC), and galantamine. The reversal potential of ACh-evoked currents and the unitary channel behavior were also typical of normal muscle AChRs. Interestingly, in oocytes injected with muscle membranes derived from ALS patients, the AChRs showed a significant decrease in ACh affinity, compared with denervated controls. Finally, riluzole, the only drug currently used against ALS, reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the ACh-evoked currents, indicating that its action remains to be fully characterized. The two methods described here will be important tools for elucidating the role of muscle in ALS pathogenesis and for developing drugs to counter the effects of this disease. PMID:22128328

  14. [Effects of steroid hormones on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channel kinetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurowska, E; Dworakowska, B; Dołowy, K

    2000-01-01

    Classically steroid hormones acts through genomic mechanism. In the last period there is more evidence that some steroid hormones exert fast (in order of seconds) effects on membrane receptors. In the presented work we analysed the effects of some steroid hormones on muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR) channel kinetics. We divided steroid hormone on two groups which exert different effects. The first group including hydrocortisone (HC), corticosterone (COR), dexamethasone decrease the mean open time increasing the number of openings in bursts. The effects do not depend on agonist concentration. Some effects of HC and COR are voltage-dependent. The mechanism of such voltage dependent action caused by steroids hormones that are uncharged molecules, is unknown. Some experiments suggest however that an agonist molecule is involved in the mechanism of steroid action. The second group consists of progesterone, some of its derivatives and deoxycorticosterone. For this group the most evident effect was decrease in the probability of openings without a decrease in the mean open time. The effect depends on agonist concentration, suggesting an involvement of an agonist molecule in the mechanism. For this hormones an involvement of an charged agonist molecule does not however induce a voltage dependency. Most probably two groups of steroids acts on different part of the AChR. The localization of a steroid action site can be crucial for inducing voltage dependency.

  15. Subunit structure of the acetylcholine receptor from Electrophorus electricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti-Tronconi, B M; Hunkapiller, M W; Lindstrom, J M; Raftery, M A

    1982-11-01

    The amino-terminal amino acid sequences of the four major peptides (Mr 41,000, 50,000, 55,000, and 62,000) present in purified preparations of Electrophorus electricus nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) have been determined for 24 cycles by automated sequence analysis procedures yielding four unique polypeptide sequences. The sequences showed a high degree of similarity, having identical residues in a number of positions ranging between 37% and 50% for specific pairs of subunits. Comparison of the sequences obtained with those of the subunits of similar molecular weight from Torpedo californica AcChoR revealed an even higher degree of homology (from 46% to 71%) for these two highly diverged species. Simultaneous sequence analysis of the amino termini present in native, purified Electrophorus AcChoR showed that these four related sequences were the only ones present and that they occur in a ratio of 2:1:1:1, with the smallest subunit ("alpha 1") being present in two copies. Genealogical analysis suggests that the subunits of both Torpedo and Electrophorus AcChoRs derive from a common ancestral gene, the divergence having occurred early in the evolution of the receptor. This shared ancestry and the very early divergence of the four subunits, as well as the highly conserved structure of the AcChoR complex along animal evolution, suggest that each of the subunits evolved to perform discrete crucial roles in the physiological function of the AcChoR.

  16. Circulating antibodies against nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in chagasic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    GOIN, J C; VENERA, G; BONINO, M BISCOGLIO DE JIMÉNEZ; STERIN-BORDA, L

    1997-01-01

    Human and experimental Chagas' disease causes peripheral nervous system damage involving neuromuscular transmission alterations at the neuromuscular junction. Additionally, autoantibodies directed to peripheral nerves and sarcolemmal proteins of skeletal muscle have been described. In this work, we analyse the ability of serum immunoglobulin factors associated with human chagasic infection to bind the affinity-purified nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from electric organs of Discopyge tschudii and to identify the receptor subunits involved in the interaction. The frequency of serum anti-nAChR reactivity assayed by dot-blot was higher in seropositive chagasic patients than in uninfected subjects. Purified IgG obtained from chagasic patients immunoprecipitated a significantly higher fraction of the solubilized nAChR than normal IgG. Furthermore, immunoblotting assays indicated that α and β are the main subunits involved in the interaction. Chagasic IgG was able to inhibit the binding of α-bungarotoxin to the receptor in a concentration-dependent manner, confirming the contribution of the α-subunit in the autoantibody-receptor interaction. The presence of anti-nAChR antibodies was detected in 73% of chagasic patients with impairment of neuromuscular transmission in conventional electromyographical studies, indicating a strong association between seropositive reactivity against nAChR and electromyographical abnormalities in chagasic patients. The chronic binding of these autoantibodies to the nAChR could induce a decrease in the population of functional nAChRs at the neuromuscular junction and consequently contribute to the electrophysiological neuromuscular alterations described in the course of chronic Chagas' disease. PMID:9367405

  17. Antagonism of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Alters Synaptic ERK Phosphorylation in the Rat Forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Li-Min; Wang, Henry H; Wang, John Q

    2016-12-28

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key transmitter in the mesocorticolimbic circuit. By interacting with muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChR) enriched in the circuit, ACh actively regulates various neuronal and synaptic activities. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is one of members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family and is subject to the regulation by dopamine receptors, although the regulation of ERKs by limbic mAChRs is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of mAChRs in the regulation of ERK phosphorylation (activation) in the mesocorticolimbic system of adult rat brains in vivo. We targeted a sub-pool of ERKs at synaptic sites. We found that a systemic injection of the mAChR antagonist scopolamine increased phosphorylation of synaptic ERKs in the striatum (caudate putamen and nucleus accumbens) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Increases in ERK phosphorylation in both forebrain regions were rapid and transient. Notably, pretreatment with a dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonist SCH23390 blocked the scopolamine-stimulated ERK phosphorylation in these brain regions, while a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride did not. Scopolamine and SCH23390 did not change the amount of total ERK proteins. These results demonstrate that mAChRs inhibit synaptic ERK phosphorylation in striatal and mPFC neurons under normal conditions. Blockade of this inhibitory mAChR tone leads to the upregulation of ERK phosphorylation likely through a mechanism involving the level of D1R activity.

  18. Role of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in Alzheimer's disease pathology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Sylvia; Maskos, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the major form of senile dementia, characterized by neuronal loss, extracellular deposits, and neurofibrillary tangles. It is accompanied by a loss of cholinergic tone, and acetylcholine (ACh) levels in the brain, which were hypothesized to be responsible for the cognitive decline observed in AD. Current medication is restricted to enhancing cholinergic signalling for symptomatic treatment of AD patients. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor family (nAChR) and the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor family (mAChR) are the target of ACh in the brain. Both families of receptors are affected in AD. It was demonstrated that amyloid beta (Aβ) interacts with nAChRs. Here we discuss how Aβ activates or inhibits nAChRs, and how this interaction contributes to AD pathology. We will discuss the potential role of nAChRs as therapeutic targets. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'.

  19. Differences in the interaction of acetylcholine receptor antibodies with receptor from normal, denervated and myasthenic human muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Lefvert, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of acetylcholine receptor antibodies with different kinds of human skeletal muscle receptor was investigated. The reaction of most receptor antibodies was strongest with receptor from a patient with myasthenia gravis and with receptor from denervated muscle. Results obtained with these receptors were well correlated. The binding of most receptor antibodies to receptor from functionally normal muscle was much weaker and also qualitatively different. In a few patients with moder...

  20. A novel congenital myasthenic syndrome due to decreased acetylcholine receptor ion-channel conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Richard; Maxwell, Susan; Spearman, Hayley; Tai, Kaihsu; Beckstein, Oliver; Sansom, Mark; Beeson, David

    2012-04-01

    Muscle acetylcholine receptor ion channels mediate neurotransmission by depolarizing the postsynaptic membrane at the neuromuscular junction. Inherited disorders of neuromuscular transmission, termed congenital myasthenic syndromes, are commonly caused by mutations in genes encoding the five subunits of the acetylcholine receptor that severely reduce endplate acetylcholine receptor numbers and/or cause kinetic abnormalities of acetylcholine receptor function. We tracked the cause of the myasthenic disorder in a female with onset of first symptoms at birth, who displayed mildly progressive bulbar, respiratory and generalized limb weakness with ptosis and ophthalmoplegia. Direct DNA sequencing revealed heteroallelic mutations in exon 8 of the acetylcholine receptor ε-subunit gene. Two alleles were identified: one with the missense substitution p.εP282R, and the second with a deletion, c.798_800delCTT, which result in the loss of a single amino acid, residue F266, within the M2 transmembrane domain. When these acetylcholine receptor mutations were expressed in HEK 293 cells, the p.εP282R mutation caused severely reduced expression on the cell surface, whereas p.εΔF266 gave robust surface expression. Single-channel analysis for p.εΔF266 acetylcholine receptor channels showed the longest burst duration population was not different from wild-type acetylcholine receptor (4.39 ± 0.6 ms versus 4.68 ± 0.7 ms, n = 5 each) but that the amplitude of channel openings was reduced. Channel amplitudes at different holding potentials showed that single-channel conductance was significantly reduced in p.εΔF266 acetylcholine receptor channels (42.7 ± 1.4 pS, n = 8, compared with 70.9 ± 1.6 pS for wild-type, n = 6). Although a phenylalanine residue at this position within M2 is conserved throughout ligand-gated excitatory cys-loop channel subunits, deletion of equivalent residues in the other subunits of muscle acetylcholine receptor did not

  1. Activity blockade and GABAA receptor blockade produce synaptic scaling through chloride accumulation in embryonic spinal motoneurons and interneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casie Lindsly

    Full Text Available Synaptic scaling represents a process whereby the distribution of a cell's synaptic strengths are altered by a multiplicative scaling factor. Scaling is thought to be a compensatory response that homeostatically controls spiking activity levels in the cell or network. Previously, we observed GABAergic synaptic scaling in embryonic spinal motoneurons following in vivo blockade of either spiking activity or GABAA receptors (GABAARs. We had determined that activity blockade triggered upward GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, thus increasing the driving force for these currents. To determine whether chloride accumulation also underlies GABAergic scaling following GABAAR blockade we have developed a new technique. We expressed a genetically encoded chloride-indicator, Clomeleon, in the embryonic chick spinal cord, which provides a non-invasive fast measure of intracellular chloride. Using this technique we now show that chloride accumulation underlies GABAergic scaling following blockade of either spiking activity or the GABAAR. The finding that GABAAR blockade and activity blockade trigger scaling via a common mechanism supports our hypothesis that activity blockade reduces GABAAR activation, which triggers synaptic scaling. In addition, Clomeleon imaging demonstrated the time course and widespread nature of GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, as it was also observed in spinal interneurons. This suggests that homeostatic scaling via chloride accumulation is a common feature in many neuronal classes within the embryonic spinal cord and opens the possibility that this process may occur throughout the nervous system at early stages of development.

  2. Early Life Stress, Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Alcohol Use Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Y. Holgate

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a major driving force in alcohol use disorders (AUDs. It influences how much one consumes, craving intensity and whether an abstinent individual will return to harmful alcohol consumption. We are most vulnerable to the effects of stress during early development, and exposure to multiple traumatic early life events dramatically increases the risk for AUDs. However, not everyone exposed to early life stress will develop an AUD. The mechanisms determining whether an individual’s brain adapts and becomes resilient to the effects of stress or succumbs and is unable to cope with stress remain elusive. Emerging evidence suggests that neuroplastic changes in the nucleus accumbens (NAc following early life stress underlie the development of AUDs. This review discusses the impact of early life stress on NAc structure and function, how these changes affect cholinergic signaling within the mesolimbic reward pathway and the role nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play in this process. Understanding the neural pathways and mechanism determining stress resilience or susceptibility will improve our ability to identify individuals susceptible to developing AUDs, formulate cognitive interventions to prevent AUDs in susceptible individuals and to elucidate and enhance potential therapeutic targets, such as the nAChRs, for those struggling to overcome an AUD.

  3. Cycloxaprid insecticide: nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding site and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xusheng; Swenson, Tami L; Casida, John E

    2013-08-21

    Cycloxaprid (CYC) is a novel neonicotinoid prepared from the (nitromethylene)imidazole (NMI) analogue of imidacloprid. In this study we consider whether CYC is active per se or only as a proinsecticide for NMI. The IC50 values (nM) for displacing [(3)H]NMI binding are 43-49 for CYC and 2.3-3.2 for NMI in house fly and honeybee head membranes and 302 and 7.2, respectively, in mouse brain membranes, potency relationships interpreted as partial conversion of some CYC to NMI under the assay conditions. The 6-8-fold difference in toxicity of injected CYC and NMI to house flies is consistent with their relative potencies as in vivo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) inhibitors in brain measured with [(3)H]NMI binding assays. CYC metabolism in mice largely involves cytochrome P450 pathways without NMI as a major intermediate. Metabolites of CYC tentatively assigned are five monohydroxy derivatives and one each of dihydroxy, nitroso, and amino modifications. CYC appears be a proinsecticide, serving as a slow-release reservoir for NMI with selective activity for insect versus mammalian nAChRs.

  4. Alpha-conotoxins as pharmacological probes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Layla AZAM; J Michael MCINTOSH

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine-rich peptides from the venom of cone snails (Conus) target a wide variety of different ion channels. One family of conopeptides, the a-conotoxins, specifically target different isoforms of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) found both in the neuromuscular junction and central nervous system. This family is further divided into subfamilies based on the number of amino acids between cysteine residues. The exquisite subtype selectivity of certain a-conotoxins has been key to the characterization of native nAChR isoforms involved in modulation of neurotransmitter release, the pathophysiol-ogy of Parkinson's disease and nociception. Structure/function characterization of a-conotoxins has led to the development of analogs with improved potency and/or subtype selectivity. Cyclization of the backbone structure and addition of lipo-philic moieties has led to improved stability and bioavailability of a-conotoxins, thus paving the way for orally available therapeutics. The recent advances in phylogeny, exogenomics and molecular modeling promises the discovery of an even greater number of a-conotoxins and analogs with improved selectivity for specific subtypes of nAChRs.

  5. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist attenuates ILC2-dependent airway hyperreactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle-Treger, Lauriane; Suzuki, Yuzo; Patel, Nisheel; Sankaranarayanan, Ishwarya; Aron, Jennifer L.; Maazi, Hadi; Chen, Lin; Akbari, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a complex and chronic inflammatory disorder that is associated with airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and driven by Th2 cytokine secretion. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) produce large amounts of Th2 cytokines and contribute to the development of AHR. Here, we show that ILC2s express the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR), which is thought to have an anti-inflammatory role in several inflammatory diseases. We show that engagement of a specific agonist with α7nAChR on ILC2s reduces ILC2 effector function and represses ILC2-dependent AHR, while decreasing expression of ILC2 key transcription factor GATA-3 and critical inflammatory modulator NF-κB, and reducing phosphorylation of upstream kinase IKKα/β. Additionally, the specific α7nAChR agonist reduces cytokine production and AHR in a humanized ILC2 mouse model. Collectively, our data suggest that α7nAChR expressed by ILC2s is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of ILC2-mediated asthma. PMID:27752043

  6. Actions of piperidine alkaloid teratogens at fetal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Benedict T; Lee, Stephen T; Panter, Kip E; Welch, Kevin D; Cook, Daniel; Pfister, James A; Kem, William R

    2010-01-01

    Teratogenic alkaloids are found in many species of plants including Conium maculatum L., Nicotiana glauca, Nicotiana tabaccum, and multiple Lupinus spp. Fetal musculoskeletal defects produced by alkaloids from these plants include arthrogyropisis, scoliosis, torticollis, kyposis, lordosis, and cleft palate. A pharmacodynamic comparison of the alkaloids ammodendrine, anabasine, anabaseine, anagyrine, and coniine in SH-SY5Y cells and TE-671 cells was made. These alkaloids and their enantiomers were more effective in depolarizing TE-671 cells which express the human fetal-muscle type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) relative to SH-SY5Y cells which predominately express autonomic nAChRs. The rank order of potency in TE-671 cells was: anabaseine>(+)-anabasine>(-)-anabasine > (+/-)-anabasine>anagyrine>(-)-coniine > (+/-)-coniine>(+)-coniine>(+/-)-ammodendrine>(+)-ammodendrine. The rank order potency in SH-SY5Y cells was: anabaseine>(+)-anabasine>(-)-coniine>(+)-coniine>(+)-ammodendrine>anagyrine>(-)-anabasine>(+/-)-coniine>(+/-)-anabasine>(-)-ammodendrine. The actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs in both cell lines could be distinguished by their maximum effects in depolarizing cell membrane potential. The teratogenic action of these compounds may be related to their ability to activate and subsequently desensitize nAChRs.

  7. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex : colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A.D.; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluores

  8. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies to Study the Structure and Function of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors on Electric Organ and Muscle and to Determine the Structure of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors on Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-16

    1982. Subunit structure of the acetylcholine receptor from Eltetrobho2s electricus . Proc Natl Aced Sci USA79:5489-6493. 4. Lindstrom J, J Cooper, L...Swanson. 1983. Purification of acetylcholine receptors from the muscles of Eelctrophorus electricus . Biochemistry 2203796-3800. 5. Karlin A, D Cowburn...1973. The affinity-labeling of partially purified acetylcholine receptor from electric tissue of Electrophorus . Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 70&3636-3640. 6

  9. CTLA4 blockade broadens the peripheral T cell receptor repertoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Lidia; Tsoi, Jennifer; Wang, Xiaoyan; Emerson, Ryan; Homet, Blanca; Chodon, Thinle; Mok, Stephen; Huang, Rong Rong; Cochran, Alistair J.; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Koya, Richard C.; Graeber, Thomas G.; Robins, Harlan; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of CTLA-4 blockade with tremelimumab in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Experimental Design We used next generation sequencing to study the complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) from the rearranged T cell receptor (TCR) variable beta (V-beta) in PBMC of 21 patients, at baseline and 30–60 days after receiving tremelimumab. Results After receiving tremelimumab there was a median of 30% increase in unique productive sequences of TCR V-beta CDR3 in 19 out of 21 patients, and a median decrease of 30% in only 2 out of 21 patients. These changes were significant for richness (p=0.01) and for Shannon index diversity (p=0.04). In comparison, serially collected PBMC from four healthy donors did not show a significant change in TCR V-beta CDR3 diversity over one year. There was a significant difference in the total unique productive TCR V-beta CDR3 sequences between patients experiencing toxicity with tremelimumab compared to patients without toxicity (p=0.05). No relevant differences were noted between clinical responders and non-responders. Conclusions CTLA4 blockade with tremelimumab diversifies the peripheral T cell pool, representing a pharmacodynamic effect of how this class of antibodies modulates the human immune system. PMID:24583799

  10. High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellar, K.J.; Martino, A.M.; Hall, D.P. Jr.; Schwartz, R.D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic sites in rat CNS and peripheral tissues was measured in the presence of cytisin, which occupies nicotinic cholinergic receptors. The muscarinic sites were characterized with regard to binding kinetics, pharmacology, anatomical distribution, and regulation by guanyl nucleotides. These binding sites have characteristics of high-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors with a Kd of approximately 30 nM. Most of the muscarinic agonist and antagonist drugs tested have high affinity for the (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding site, but pirenzepine, an antagonist which is selective for M-1 receptors, has relatively low affinity. The ratio of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding sites to total muscarinic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate varies from 9 to 90% in different tissues, with the highest ratios in the pons, medulla, and heart atrium. In the presence of guanyl nucleotides, (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine binding is decreased, but the extent of decrease varies from 40 to 90% in different tissues, with the largest decreases being found in the pons, medulla, cerebellum, and heart atrium. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binds to high-affinity M-1 and M-2 muscarinic receptors, and they suggest that most M-2 sites have high affinity for acetylcholine but that only a small fraction of M-1 sites have such high affinity.

  11. Influence of antiseptics on microcirculation after neuronal and receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, Ole; Hirsch, Tobias; Ring, Andrej; Muehlberger, Thomas; Steinau, Hans U; Tilkorn, Daniel; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Homann, Heinz H

    2011-08-01

    The topical application of the antiseptics octenidine and polyhexanide on wounds seems to improve microcirculation. These two antiseptics were tested in combination with neuronal inhibition and sympathethic receptor blockade to verify these findings, explore the influence of β blockers on these microcirculative effects, and find out the principle of operation. Investigations were carried out on a standardised cremaster muscle model in rats (n = 66). The tested antiseptics, octenidine and polyhexanide were investigated alone (n = 12) and in combination with bupivacaine (n = 12), metoprolol (n = 12), phentolamine (n = 12) and surgical denervation (n = 12). Physiological saline was used for control (n = 6). The arteriolar diameter and functional capillary density (FCD) were investigated via trans-illumination microscopy before, as well as 60 and 120 minutes after application. Polyhexanide caused a significant increase in arteriolar diameter (86·5 ± 3·8 µm versus 100·0 ± 3·6 µm) and, like octenidine (7·2 ± 0·7 n/0·22 mm(2) versus 11·6 ± 0·6 n/0·22 mm(2) ), in FCD (9·2 ± 0·5 versus 12·6 ± 0·9) as well. When the antiseptics are used in combination with bupivacaine, metoprolol, phentolamine or surgical sympathectomy, these effects were eliminated or inverted. Assessing the results of the different blockades in combination with polyhexanide, we surmise that the antiseptic polyhexanide acts on the microcirculation mainly by blocking α receptors. This study shows that polyhexanide and octenidine improve muscular perfusion. Interestingly, the benefit of polyhexanide and octenidine on muscular perfusion is eliminated when the antiseptics are combined with other vasoactive agents, especially β blockers. © 2011 The Authors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  12. Allosteric modulation of alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by HEPES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltzin, Maegan M; Huang, Yanzhou; Schulte, Marvin K

    2014-06-05

    A number of new positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) have been reported that enhance responses of neuronal alpha7 and alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes to orthosteric ligands. PAMs represent promising new leads for the development of therapeutic agents for disorders involving alterations in nicotinic neurotransmission including Autism, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. During our recent studies of alpha4beta2 PAMs, we identified a novel effect of 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES). The effects of HEPES were evaluated in a phosphate buffered recording solution using two-electrode voltage clamp techniques and alpha4beta2 and alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Acetylcholine induced responses of high-sensitivity alpha4beta2 receptors were potentiated 190% by co-exposure to HEPES. Responses were inhibited at higher concentrations (bell-shaped concentration/response curve). Coincidentally, at concentrations of HEPES typically used in oocyte recording (5-10mM), the potentiating effects of HEPES are matched by its inhibitory effects, thus producing no net effect. Mutagenesis results suggest HEPES potentiates the high-sensitivity stoichiometry of the alpha4beta2 receptors through action at the beta2+/beta2- interface and is dependent on residue beta2D218. HEPES did not potentiate low-sensitivity alpha4beta2 receptors and did not produce any observable effect on acetylcholine induced responses on alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  13. Differential effects of M1 muscarinic receptor blockade and nicotinic receptor blockade in the dorsomedial striatum on response reversal learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzavos, Arianna; Jih, Jane; Ragozzino, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    The present studies determined whether blockade of M1-like muscarinic or nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the dorsomedial striatum affects acquisition or reversal learning of a response discrimination. Testing occurred in a modified cross-maze across two consecutive sessions. In the acquisition phase, a rat learned to turn to the left or to the right. In the reversal learning phase, a rat learned to turn in the opposite direction as required during acquisition. Experiment 1 investigated the effects of the M1-like muscarinic receptor antagonist, pirenzepine infused into the dorsomedial striatum on acquisition and reversal learning. Experiment 2 examined the effects of the nicotinic cholinergic antagonist, mecamylamine injected into the dorsomedial striatum on acquisition and reversal learning. Bilateral injections of pirenzepine at 10 µg, but not 1 µg, selectively impaired reversal learning. Analysis of the errors indicated that pirenzepine treatment did not impair the initial shift, but increased reversions back to the original response choice following the initial shift. Bilateral injections of mecamylamine, 6 or 18 µg, did not affect acquisition or reversal learning. The results suggest that activation of M1 muscarinic cholinergic receptors, but not nicotinic cholinergic receptors, in the dorsomedial striatum is important for facilitating the flexible shifting of response patterns. PMID:15302131

  14. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I.; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K.; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya (Stanford-MED); (Kyoto); (Gakushuin); (Kyushu)

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  15. Subunit profiling and functional characteristics of acetylcholine receptors in GT1-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yuki; Ishii, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Makito; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2017-03-01

    GnRH neurons form a final common pathway for the central regulation of reproduction. Although the involvement of acetylcholine in GnRH secretion has been reported, direct effects of acetylcholine and expression profiles of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) still remain to be studied. Using immortalized GnRH neurons (GT1-7 cells), we analyzed molecular expression and functionality of AChRs. Expression of the mRNAs were identified in the order α7 > β2 = β1 ≧ α4 ≧ α5 = β4 = δ > α3 for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits and m4 > m2 for muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes. Furthermore, this study revealed that α7 nAChRs contributed to Ca(2+) influx and GnRH release and that m2 and m4 mAChRs inhibited forskolin-induced cAMP production and isobutylmethylxanthine-induced GnRH secretion. These findings demonstrate the molecular profiles of AChRs, which directly contribute to GnRH secretion in GT1-7 cells, and provide one possible regulatory action of acetylcholine in GnRH neurons.

  16. Influence of melatonin on the development of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cultured chick retinal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F.S. Sampaio

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of melatonin on the developmental pattern of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors was investigated in embryonic 8-day-old chick retinal cells in culture. The functional response to acetylcholine was measured in cultured retina cells by microphysiometry. The maximal functional response to acetylcholine increased 2.7 times between the 4th and 5th day in vitro (DIV4, DIV5, while the Bmax value for [125I]-alpha-bungarotoxin was reduced. Despite the presence of alpha8-like immunoreactivity at DIV4, functional responses mediated by alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors were observed only at DIV5. Mecamylamine (100 µM was essentially without effect at DIV4 and DIV5, while dihydro-ß-erythroidine (10-100 µM blocked the response to acetylcholine (3.0 nM-2.0 µM only at DIV4, with no effect at DIV5. Inhibition of melatonin receptors with the antagonist luzindole, or melatonin synthesis by stimulation of D4 dopamine receptors blocked the appearance of the alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive response at DIV5. Therefore, alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors were expressed in retinal cells as early as at DIV4, but they reacted to acetylcholine only after DIV5. The development of an alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive response is dependent on the production of melatonin by the retinal culture. Melatonin, which is produced in a tonic manner by this culture, and is a key hormone in the temporal organization of vertebrates, also potentiates responses mediated by alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors in rat vas deferens and cerebellum. This common pattern of action on different cell models that express alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors probably reflects a more general mechanism of regulation of these receptors.

  17. Block of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by philanthotoxins is strongly dependent on their subunit composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kachel, Hamid S; Patel, Rohit N; Franzyk, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    -fold selectivity of PhTX-12 over PhTX-343 for embryonic muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in TE671 cells. We investigated their inhibition of different neuronal nAChR subunit combinations as well as of embryonic muscle receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Whole-cell currents...

  18. Abundance, distribution, mobility and oligomeric state of M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in live cardiac muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Nenasheva, Tatiana A.; Neary, Marianne; Gregory I. Mashanov; Birdsall, Nigel J.M.; Breckenridge, Ross A.; Molloy, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors modulate cardiac rhythm via regulation of the inward potassium current. To increase our understanding of M2 receptor physiology we used Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy to visualize individual receptors at the plasma membrane of transformed CHOM2 cells, a cardiac cell line (HL-1), primary cardiomyocytes and tissue slices from pre- and post-natal mice. Receptor expression levels between individual cells in dissociated cardiomyocytes and he...

  19. Effect of 5-HT7 receptor blockade on liver regeneration after 60-70% partial hepatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Tzirogiannis, Konstantinos N; Kourentzi, Kalliopi T; Zyga, Sofia; Papalimneou, Vassiliki; Tsironi, Maria; Grypioti, Agni D; Protopsaltis, Ioannis; Panidis, Dimitrios; Panoutsopoulos, Georgios I

    2014-01-01

    Background Serotonin exhibits a vast repertoire of actions including cell proliferation and differentiation. The effect of serotonin, as an incomplete mitogen, on liver regeneration has recently been unveiled and is mediated through 5-HT2 receptor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of 5-HT7 receptor blockade on liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. Methods Male Wistar rats were subjected to 60-70% partial hepatectomy. 5-HT7 receptor blockade was applied by int...

  20. Theoretical investigation of interaction between the set of ligands and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Prytkova, T. R.; Shmygin, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are neuron receptor proteins that provide a transmission of nerve impulse through the synapses. They are composed of a pentametric assembly of five homologous subunits (5 α7 subunits for α7nAChR, for example), oriented around the central pore. These receptors might be found in the chemical synapses of central and peripheral nervous system, and also in the neuromuscular synapses. Transmembrane domain of the one of such receptors constitutes ion channel. The conductive properties of ion channel strongly depend on the receptor conformation changes in the response of binding with some molecule, f.e. acetylcholine. Investigation of interaction between ligands and acetylcholine receptor is important for drug design. In this work we investigate theoretically the interaction between the set of different ligands (such as vanillin, thymoquinone, etc.) and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (primarily with subunit of the α7nAChR) by different methods and packages (AutodockVina, GROMACS, KVAZAR, HARLEM, VMD). We calculate interaction energy between different ligands in the subunit using molecular dynamics. On the base of obtained calculation results and using molecular docking we found an optimal location of different ligands in the subunit.

  1. Insensitive Acetylcholine Receptor Conferring Resistance of Plutella xylostella to Nereistoxin Insecticides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Luo-gen; YU Guang; CHEN Zi-hao; LI Zhong-yin

    2008-01-01

    The combinative rate measurement of (3-[Ⅰ125] iodotyrosyl) α-bungarotoxin was applied in the analysis of the relation between nerve acetylcholine receptor and three types of insecticide resistance in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). In the dimehypo-resistant strain and in the cartap-resistant strain, the nerve acetylcholine receptor showed the remarkable insensitivity to dimehypo and cartap, of which the binding rate to ligand was approximately 66 and 60%, respectively, of the susceptible strain. The sensitivity to deltamethrin in the deltamethrin-resistant strain did not show visible change. These results indicated that the decline in the sensitivity of nerve acetylcholine receptor to insecticide might be a potential mechanism to nereistoxin insecticides resistance in the diamondback moth.

  2. Recent Duplication and Functional Divergence in Parasitic Nematode Levamisole-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas B Duguet

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Helminth parasites rely on fast-synaptic transmission in their neuromusculature to experience the outside world and respond to it. Acetylcholine plays a pivotal role in this and its receptors are targeted by a wide variety of both natural and synthetic compounds used in human health and for the control of parasitic disease. The model, Caenorhabditis elegans is characterized by a large number of acetylcholine receptor subunit genes, a feature shared across the nematodes. This dynamic family is characterized by both gene duplication and loss between species. The pentameric levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor has been characterized from C. elegans, comprised of five different subunits. More recently, cognate receptors have been reconstituted from multiple parasitic nematodes that are found to vary in subunit composition. In order to understand the implications of receptor composition change and the origins of potentially novel drug targets, we investigated a specific example of subunit duplication based on analysis of genome data for 25 species from the 50 helminth genome initiative. We found multiple independent duplications of the unc-29, acetylcholine receptor subunit, where codon substitution rate analysis identified positive, directional selection acting on amino acid positions associated with subunit assembly. Characterization of four gene copies from a model parasitic nematode, Haemonchus contortus, demonstrated that each copy has acquired unique functional characteristics based on phenotype rescue of transgenic C. elegans and electrophysiology of receptors reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes. We found evidence that a specific incompatibility has evolved for two subunits co-expressed in muscle. We demonstrated that functional divergence of acetylcholine receptors, driven by directional selection, can occur more rapidly than previously thought and may be mediated by alteration of receptor assembly. This phenomenon is common among the

  3. Recent Duplication and Functional Divergence in Parasitic Nematode Levamisole-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, Thomas B; Charvet, Claude L; Forrester, Sean G; Wever, Claudia M; Dent, Joseph A; Neveu, Cedric; Beech, Robin N

    2016-07-01

    Helminth parasites rely on fast-synaptic transmission in their neuromusculature to experience the outside world and respond to it. Acetylcholine plays a pivotal role in this and its receptors are targeted by a wide variety of both natural and synthetic compounds used in human health and for the control of parasitic disease. The model, Caenorhabditis elegans is characterized by a large number of acetylcholine receptor subunit genes, a feature shared across the nematodes. This dynamic family is characterized by both gene duplication and loss between species. The pentameric levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor has been characterized from C. elegans, comprised of five different subunits. More recently, cognate receptors have been reconstituted from multiple parasitic nematodes that are found to vary in subunit composition. In order to understand the implications of receptor composition change and the origins of potentially novel drug targets, we investigated a specific example of subunit duplication based on analysis of genome data for 25 species from the 50 helminth genome initiative. We found multiple independent duplications of the unc-29, acetylcholine receptor subunit, where codon substitution rate analysis identified positive, directional selection acting on amino acid positions associated with subunit assembly. Characterization of four gene copies from a model parasitic nematode, Haemonchus contortus, demonstrated that each copy has acquired unique functional characteristics based on phenotype rescue of transgenic C. elegans and electrophysiology of receptors reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes. We found evidence that a specific incompatibility has evolved for two subunits co-expressed in muscle. We demonstrated that functional divergence of acetylcholine receptors, driven by directional selection, can occur more rapidly than previously thought and may be mediated by alteration of receptor assembly. This phenomenon is common among the clade V parasitic

  4. Functional Characterization of a Novel Class of Morantel-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors in Nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Courtot

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine receptors are pentameric ligand-gated channels involved in excitatory neuro-transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In nematodes, they represent major targets for cholinergic agonist or antagonist anthelmintic drugs. Despite the large diversity of acetylcholine-receptor subunit genes present in nematodes, only a few receptor subtypes have been characterized so far. Interestingly, parasitic nematodes affecting human or animal health possess two closely related members of this gene family, acr-26 and acr-27 that are essentially absent in free-living or plant parasitic species. Using the pathogenic parasitic nematode of ruminants, Haemonchus contortus, as a model, we found that Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 are co-expressed in body muscle cells. We demonstrated that co-expression of Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to the functional expression of an acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to the anthelmintics morantel and pyrantel. Importantly we also reported that ACR-26 and ACR-27, from the distantly related parasitic nematode of horses, Parascaris equorum, also formed a functional acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to these two drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living model nematode, we demonstrated that heterologous expression of the H. contortus and P. equorum receptors drastically increased its sensitivity to morantel and pyrantel, mirroring the pharmacological properties observed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results are the first to describe significant molecular determinants of a novel class of nematode body wall muscle AChR.

  5. Functional Characterization of a Novel Class of Morantel-Sensitive Acetylcholine Receptors in Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtot, Elise; Charvet, Claude L; Beech, Robin N; Harmache, Abdallah; Wolstenholme, Adrian J; Holden-Dye, Lindy; O'Connor, Vincent; Peineau, Nicolas; Woods, Debra J; Neveu, Cedric

    2015-12-01

    Acetylcholine receptors are pentameric ligand-gated channels involved in excitatory neuro-transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In nematodes, they represent major targets for cholinergic agonist or antagonist anthelmintic drugs. Despite the large diversity of acetylcholine-receptor subunit genes present in nematodes, only a few receptor subtypes have been characterized so far. Interestingly, parasitic nematodes affecting human or animal health possess two closely related members of this gene family, acr-26 and acr-27 that are essentially absent in free-living or plant parasitic species. Using the pathogenic parasitic nematode of ruminants, Haemonchus contortus, as a model, we found that Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 are co-expressed in body muscle cells. We demonstrated that co-expression of Hco-ACR-26 and Hco-ACR-27 in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to the functional expression of an acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to the anthelmintics morantel and pyrantel. Importantly we also reported that ACR-26 and ACR-27, from the distantly related parasitic nematode of horses, Parascaris equorum, also formed a functional acetylcholine-receptor highly sensitive to these two drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living model nematode, we demonstrated that heterologous expression of the H. contortus and P. equorum receptors drastically increased its sensitivity to morantel and pyrantel, mirroring the pharmacological properties observed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results are the first to describe significant molecular determinants of a novel class of nematode body wall muscle AChR.

  6. Covalent attachment of antagonists to the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: synthesis and reactivity of substituted maleimides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrus, Joseph I; Halliday, Jill I; Kanizaj, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The 3-methylmaleimide congeners of the natural product methyllycaconitine (MLA) and an analogue covalently attach to functional cysteine mutants of the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR).......The 3-methylmaleimide congeners of the natural product methyllycaconitine (MLA) and an analogue covalently attach to functional cysteine mutants of the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)....

  7. Covalent attachment of antagonists to the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: synthesis and reactivity of substituted maleimides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrus, Joseph I; Halliday, Jill I; Kanizaj, Nicholas;

    2012-01-01

    The 3-methylmaleimide congeners of the natural product methyllycaconitine (MLA) and an analogue covalently attach to functional cysteine mutants of the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR).......The 3-methylmaleimide congeners of the natural product methyllycaconitine (MLA) and an analogue covalently attach to functional cysteine mutants of the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)....

  8. Cellular approaches to the interaction between cannabinoid receptor ligands and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Murat; Al Kury, Lina; Keun-Hang, Susan Yang; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Galadari, Sehamuddin

    2014-05-15

    Cannabinoids are among the earliest known drugs to humanity. Cannabis plant contains various phytochemicals that bind to cannabinoid receptors. In addition, synthetic and endogenously produced cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) constitute other classes of cannabinoid receptor ligands. Although many pharmacological effects of these cannabinoids are mediated by the activation of cannabinoid receptors, recent studies indicate that cannabinoids also modulate the functions of various integral membrane proteins including ion channels, receptors, neurotransmitter transporters, and enzymes by mechanism(s) not involving the activation of known cannabinoid receptors. Currently, the mechanisms of these effects were not fully understood. However, it is likely that direct actions of cannabinoids are closely linked to their lipophilic structures. This report will focus on the actions of cannabinoids on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and will examine the results of recent studies in this field. In addition some mechanistic approaches will be provided. The results discussed in this review indicate that, besides cannabinoid receptors, further molecular targets for cannabinoids exist and that these targets may represent important novel sites to alter neuronal excitability.

  9. Ca2+ is involved in muscarine-acetylcholine-receptor-mediated acetylcholine signal transduction in guard cells of Vicia faba L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Fanxia; MIAO Long; ZHANG Shuqiu; LOU Chenghou

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is an important neurochemical transmitter in animals; it also exists in plants and plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. ACh has been known to induce the stomatal opening. By monitoring the changes of cytosolic Ca2+ with fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM under the confocal microscopy,we found that exogenous ACh increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration of guard cells of Vicia faba L. Muscarine, an agonist of muscarine acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), could do so as well. In contrast, atropine, the antagonist of mAChR abolished the ability of ACh to increase Ca2+ in guard cells.This mechanism is similar to mAChR in animals. When EGTA was used to chelate Ca2+ or ruthenium red to block Ca2+ released from vacuole respectively, the results showed that the increased cytosolic Ca2+ mainly come from intracellular Ca2+ store. The evidence supports that Ca2+ is involved in guard-cell response to ACh and that Ca2+ signal is coupled to mAChRs in ACh signal transduction in guard cells.

  10. Inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, a novel facet in the pleiotropic activities of snake venom phospholipases A2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Vulfius

    Full Text Available Phospholipases A2 represent the most abundant family of snake venom proteins. They manifest an array of biological activities, which is constantly expanding. We have recently shown that a protein bitanarin, isolated from the venom of the puff adder Bitis arietans and possessing high phospholipolytic activity, interacts with different types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and with the acetylcholine-binding protein. To check if this property is characteristic to all venom phospholipases A2, we have studied the capability of these enzymes from other snakes to block the responses of Lymnaea stagnalis neurons to acetylcholine or cytisine and to inhibit α-bungarotoxin binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and acetylcholine-binding proteins. Here we present the evidence that phospholipases A2 from venoms of vipers Vipera ursinii and V. nikolskii, cobra Naja kaouthia, and krait Bungarus fasciatus from different snake families suppress the acetylcholine- or cytisine-elicited currents in L. stagnalis neurons and compete with α-bungarotoxin for binding to muscle- and neuronal α7-types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, as well as to acetylcholine-binding proteins. As the phospholipase A2 content in venoms is quite high, under some conditions the activity found may contribute to the deleterious venom effects. The results obtained suggest that the ability to interact with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors may be a general property of snake venom phospholipases A2, which add a new target to the numerous activities of these enzymes.

  11. Inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, a novel facet in the pleiotropic activities of snake venom phospholipases A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfius, Catherine A; Kasheverov, Igor E; Starkov, Vladislav G; Osipov, Alexey V; Andreeva, Tatyana V; Filkin, Sergey Yu; Gorbacheva, Elena V; Astashev, Maxim E; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipases A2 represent the most abundant family of snake venom proteins. They manifest an array of biological activities, which is constantly expanding. We have recently shown that a protein bitanarin, isolated from the venom of the puff adder Bitis arietans and possessing high phospholipolytic activity, interacts with different types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and with the acetylcholine-binding protein. To check if this property is characteristic to all venom phospholipases A2, we have studied the capability of these enzymes from other snakes to block the responses of Lymnaea stagnalis neurons to acetylcholine or cytisine and to inhibit α-bungarotoxin binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and acetylcholine-binding proteins. Here we present the evidence that phospholipases A2 from venoms of vipers Vipera ursinii and V. nikolskii, cobra Naja kaouthia, and krait Bungarus fasciatus from different snake families suppress the acetylcholine- or cytisine-elicited currents in L. stagnalis neurons and compete with α-bungarotoxin for binding to muscle- and neuronal α7-types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, as well as to acetylcholine-binding proteins. As the phospholipase A2 content in venoms is quite high, under some conditions the activity found may contribute to the deleterious venom effects. The results obtained suggest that the ability to interact with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors may be a general property of snake venom phospholipases A2, which add a new target to the numerous activities of these enzymes.

  12. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of DHβE analogs as neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Tue H.; Jensen, Anders A.; Lund, Mads Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    Dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) is a member of the Erythrina family of alkaloids and a potent competitive antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Guided by an X-ray structure of DHβE in complex with an ACh binding protein, we detail the design, synthesis...

  13. Distinct neural pathways mediate alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent activation of the forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Hansen, Henrik H

    2010-01-01

    alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists are candidates for the treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Selective alpha(7) nAChR agonists, such as SSR180711, activate neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens shell (ACCshell) in rats, regions...

  14. Heteromeric α7β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jie; Liu, Qiang; Tang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) is highly expressed in the brain, where it maintains various neuronal functions including (but not limited to) learning and memory. In addition, the protein expression levels of α7 nAChRs are altered in various brain disorders. The classic rule...

  15. Demonstration of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-like immunoreactivity in the rat forebrain and upper brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Matsuyama, T.; Strosberg, A.D.; Traber, J.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor protein (mAChR) in the rat forebrain and upper brainstem was described by using a monoclonal antibody (M35) raised against mAChR purified from bovine forebrain homogenates. A method is investigated for light microscopic (LM) and electronmicroscop

  16. Tying up Nicotine: New Selective Competitive Antagonist of the Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Crestey, François; Jensen, Anders A

    2015-01-01

    Conformational restriction of the pyrrolidine nitrogen in nicotine by the introduction of an ethylene bridge provided a potent and selective antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Resolution by chiral SFC, pharmacological characterization of the two enantiomers...

  17. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of Erythrina alkaloid analogues as neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crestey, François; Jensen, Anders A.; Borch, Morten

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of a new series of Erythrina alkaloid analogues and their pharmacological characterization at various nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes are described. The compounds were designed to be simplified analogues of aromatic erythrinanes with the aim of obtaining subtype...

  18. GABA receptors and benzodiazepine binding sites modulate hippocampal acetylcholine release in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, E; de Boer, P; Westerink, B.H.C.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, the regulation of acetylcholine release from the ventral hippocampus by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was investigated in vivo. GABA receptor agonists and antagonists were administered locally in the medial septum and the adjacent vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca, o

  19. INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS. A.S. Bale*; P.J. Bushnell; C.A. Meacham; T.J. Shafer Neurotoxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA Toluene (TOL...

  20. Cognitive improvement by activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: from animal models to human pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H; Timmerman, Daniel B;

    2010-01-01

    Agonists and positive allosteric modulators of the alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) are currently being developed for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in patients with schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. This review describes the neurobiological properties of the alpha n...

  1. Prostate stem cell antigen interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and is affected in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majbrit Myrup; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; Arvaniti, Maria;

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving impaired cholinergic neurotransmission and dysregulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ly-6/neurotoxin (Lynx) proteins have been shown to modulate cognition and neural plasticity by binding to nAChR subtypes...

  2. Effect of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChR located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The...

  3. Functional aspects of dexamethasone upregulated nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in C2C12 myotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maestrone, E; Lagostena, L; Henning, RH; DenHertog, A; Nobile, M

    1995-01-01

    Three days of treatment with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (1 nM-mu M) induced a concentration-dependent up-regulation of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in C2C12 mouse myotubes (EC(50)=10+/-7.3 nM), as assessed by [H-3]alpha-BuTx binding. The maximum increase in binding amounted

  4. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Variants Are Related to Smoking Habits, but Not Directly to COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budulac, Simona E.; Vonk, Judith M.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Timens, Wim; Boezen, Marike H

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) cluster as a risk factor for nicotine dependency and COPD. We investigated whether SNPs in the nAChR cluster are associated with smoking habits and lung function

  5. Parvalbumin-Positive Neurons in Rat Dorsal Hippocampus Contain Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; de Jong, Giena; Strosberg, A.D.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The present study describes the colocalization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PARV) in nonpyramidal neurons of the rat dorsal hippocampus by means of dual-label immunocytochemistry. Fifty-two percent of all muscarinic cholinoceptive

  6. The role of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in modulation of heart rate dynamics in endotoxemic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roham Mazloom

    Full Text Available Previous reports have indicated that artificial stimulation of the vagus nerve reduces systemic inflammation in experimental models of sepsis. This phenomenon is a part of a broader cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway which activates the vagus nerve to modulate inflammation through activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nACHR. Heart rate variability represents the complex interplay between autonomic nervous system and cardiac pacemaker cells. Reduced heart rate variability and increased cardiac cycle regularity is a hallmark of clinical conditions that are associated with systemic inflammation (e.g. endotoxemia and sepsis. The present study was aimed to assess the role of α7nACHR in modulation of heart rate dynamics during systemic inflammation. Systemic inflammation was induced by injection of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide in rats. Electrocardiogram and body temperature were recorded in conscious animals using a telemetric system. Linear and non-linear indices of heart rate variability (e.g. sample entropy and fractal-like temporal structure were assessed. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed that α7nACHR is expressed in rat atrium and is mainly localized at the endothelial layer. Systemic administration of an α7nACHR antagonist (methyllycaconitine did not show a significant effect on body temperature or heart rate dynamics in naïve rats. However, α7nACHR blockade could further reduce heart rate variability and elicit a febrile response in endotoxemic rats. Pre-treatment of endotoxemic animals with an α7nACHR agonist (PHA-543613 was unable to modulate heart rate dynamics in endotoxemic rats but could prevent the effect of endotoxin on body temperature within 24 h experiment. Neither methyllycaconitine nor PHA-543613 could affect cardiac beating variability of isolated perfused hearts taken from control or endotoxemic rats. Based on our observations we suggest a tonic role for nicotinic acetylcholine

  7. Comparison of the subunit structure of acetylcholine receptors from muscle and electric organ of Electrophorus electricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullick, W J; Lindstrom, J M

    1983-08-02

    The acetylcholine receptors of the electric organ and muscle tissues of Electrophorus electricus are composed of alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunits. Receptor subunits from the two tissues were compared by peptide mapping with monoclonal antibodies, an affinity-labeling reagent, and a lectin to characterize particular peptide fragments. These experiments indicate that the corresponding receptor subunits from the two tissues are extensively homologous or identical throughout their amino acid sequences. Small differences in the electrophoresis of peptide fragments of alpha subunits between the two tissues occurred on fragments which bound labeled lectin. These results suggest that the acetylcholine receptors in electric organ and muscle tissues of Electrophorus differ in structure only by minor posttranslational modifications perhaps involving carbohydrate.

  8. Binding of antibodies to acetylcholine receptors in Electrophorus and Torpedo electroplax membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Antisera against purified acetylcholine receptors from the electric tissues of Torpedo californica and of Electrophorus electricus were raised in rabbits. The antisera contain antibodies which bind to both autologous and heterologous receptors in solution as shown by an immunoprecipitation assay. Antibodies in both types of antisera bind specifically to the postjunctional membrane on the innervated surface of the intact electroplax from Electrophorus electric tissue as demonstrated by an indirect immunohistochemical procedure using horseradish peroxidase conjugated to anti-rabbit IgG. Only anti- Electrophorus receptor antisera, however, cause inhibition of the receptor-mediated depolarization of the intact Electrophorus electroplax. The lack of inhibition by anti-Torpedo receptor antibodies, which do bind, suggests that the receptor does not undergo extensive movement during activity. The binding of anti-Torpedo antibodies to receptor-rich vesicles prepared by subcellular fractionation of Torpedo electric tissue was demonstrated by both direct and indirect immunohistochemical methods using ferritin conjugates. These vesicles can be conveniently collected and prepared for electron microscopy on Millipore filters, a procedure requiring only 25 micrograms of membrane protein per filter. In addition, it was possible to visualize the binding of anti-Torpedo receptor antibodies directly, without ferritin. These anti-Torpedo receptor antibodies, however, do not inhibit the binding of acetylcholine or of alpha- neurotoxin to receptor in Torpedo microsacs but do inhibit binding of alpha-neurotoxin to Torpedo receptor in Triton X-100 solution. It is likely that the principal antigenic determinants on receptor are at sites other than the acetylcholine-binding sites and that inhibition of receptor function, when it occurs, may be due to a stabilization by antibody binding of an inactive conformational state. PMID:344325

  9. Posttranslational modifications of human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor: zooming in its functional implications

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Fernández, Wilber

    2011-01-01

    The human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R) regulates many important physiological roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems, and it is involved in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases, representing attractive potential pharmacological target for intervention. However, the lack of structural information on this receptor hampered the development of new potent antagonist with increased selectivity and lower side effects. Such structural inf...

  10. Binding of N-methylscopolamine to the extracellular domain of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Zimčík, Pavel; El-Fakahany, Esam E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Interaction of orthosteric ligands with extracellular domain was described at several aminergic G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The orthosteric antagonists quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and N-methylscopolamine (NMS) bind to the binding pocket of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor formed by transmembrane α-helices. We show that high concentrations of either QNB or NMS slow down dissociation of their radiolabeled species from all five subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting allosteric binding. The affinity of NMS at the allosteric site is in the micromolar range for all receptor subtypes. Using molecular modelling of the M2 receptor we found that E172 and E175 in the second extracellular loop and N419 in the third extracellular loop are involved in allosteric binding of NMS. Mutation of these amino acids to alanine decreased affinity of NMS for the allosteric binding site confirming results of molecular modelling. The allosteric binding site of NMS overlaps with the binding site of some allosteric, ectopic and bitopic ligands. Understanding of interactions of NMS at the allosteric binding site is essential for correct analysis of binding and action of these ligands.

  11. Alpha-receptor blockade improves muscle perfusion and glucose uptake in heart failure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, M.E.R.; Mulder, A.; Bellersen, L.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Smits, P.; Tack, C.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: Alpha-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasoconstriction might underlie the insulin resistance seen in conditions associated with increased sympathetic tone, like chronic heart failure (CHF). Alpha-adrenergic receptor blockade by phentolamine could improve forearm blood flow (FBF) and forearm gluco

  12. Electrophysiological characterization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cat petrosal ganglion neurons in culture: effects of cytisine and its bromo derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas, Rodrigo; Valdés, Viviana; Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Cassels, Bruce K; Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Alcayaga, Julio

    2006-02-09

    Petrosal ganglion neurons are depolarized and fire action potentials in response to acetylcholine and nicotine. However, little is known about the subtype(s) of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors involved, although alpha4 and alpha7 subunits have been identified in petrosal ganglion neurons. Cytisine, an alkaloid unrelated to nicotine, and its bromo derivatives are agonists exhibiting different affinities, potencies and efficacies at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing alpha4 or alpha7 subunits. To characterize the receptors involved, we studied the effects of these agonists and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists hexamethonium and alpha-bungarotoxin in isolated petrosal ganglion neurons. Petrosal ganglia were excised from anesthetized cats and cultured for up to 16 days. Using patch-clamp technique, we recorded whole-cell currents evoked by 5-10 s applications of acetylcholine, cytisine or its bromo derivatives. Agonists and antagonists were applied by gravity from a pipette near the neuron surface. Neurons responded to acetylcholine, cytisine, 3-bromocytisine and 5-bromocytisine with fast inward currents that desensitized during application of the stimuli and were reversibly blocked by 1 microM hexamethonium or 10 nM alpha-bungarotoxin. The order of potency of the agonists was 3-bromocytisine > acetylcholine approximately = cytisine > 5-bromocytisine, suggesting that homomeric alpha7 neuronal nicotinic receptors predominate in cat petrosal ganglion neurons in culture.

  13. Crosslinking of. cap alpha. -bungarotoxin to the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata by ultraviolet light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oswald, R.E. (New York State Veterinary Coll., Ithaca (USA)); Changeux, J.P. (Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France))

    1982-03-22

    The acetylcholine (ACh) receptor purified from the electric organ of Torpedo (sp) is an oligomer composed of 4 different subunits. The ..cap alpha.. subunit is labeled by affinity reagents known to bind to, or in the close vicinity of, the ACh binding site. The ..cap alpha..-toxins from snake venoms behave as competitive antagonists of ACh for its site. The authors have found that ..cap alpha..-/sup 125/I-bungarotoxin (Bgt) can be crosslinked covalently to ACh receptor subunits by simple UV irradiation. This allows the analysis of toxin-receptor crosslinked products without the complication of an intervening 'crosslinking arm'.

  14. The structure of the third intracellular loop of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiyama, Susumu; Oka, Yoshiaki; Haga, Kazuko; Kojima, Shuichi; Tateishi, Yukihiro; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Haga, Tatsuya

    2006-01-09

    We have examined whether the long third intracellular loop (i3) of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype has a rigid structure. Circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of M2i3 expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli indicated that M2i3 consists mostly of random coil. In addition, the differential CD spectrum between the M2 and M2deltai3 receptors, the latter of which lacks most of i3 except N- and C-terminal ends, gave no indication of secondary structure. These results suggest that the central part of i3 of the M2 receptor has a flexible structure.

  15. A neuronal acetylcholine receptor regulates the balance of muscle excitation and inhibition in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maelle Jospin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, cholinergic motor neurons stimulate muscle contraction as well as activate GABAergic motor neurons that inhibit contraction of the contralateral muscles. Here, we describe the composition of an ionotropic acetylcholine receptor that is required to maintain excitation of the cholinergic motor neurons. We identified a gain-of-function mutation that leads to spontaneous muscle convulsions. The mutation is in the pore domain of the ACR-2 acetylcholine receptor subunit and is identical to a hyperactivating mutation in the muscle receptor of patients with myasthenia gravis. Screens for suppressors of the convulsion phenotype led to the identification of other receptor subunits. Cell-specific rescue experiments indicate that these subunits function in the cholinergic motor neurons. Expression of these subunits in Xenopus oocytes demonstrates that the functional receptor is comprised of three alpha-subunits, UNC-38, UNC-63 and ACR-12, and two non-alpha-subunits, ACR-2 and ACR-3. Although this receptor exhibits a partially overlapping subunit composition with the C. elegans muscle acetylcholine receptor, it shows distinct pharmacology. Recordings from intact animals demonstrate that loss-of-function mutations in acr-2 reduce the excitability of the cholinergic motor neurons. By contrast, the acr-2(gf mutation leads to a hyperactivation of cholinergic motor neurons and an inactivation of downstream GABAergic motor neurons in a calcium dependent manner. Presumably, this imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory input into muscles leads to convulsions. These data indicate that the ACR-2 receptor is important for the coordinated excitation and inhibition of body muscles underlying sinusoidal movement.

  16. The influence of allosteric modulators and transmembrane mutations on desensitisation and activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzidaki, A.; D Oyley, J. M.; Gill-Thind, J. K.; Sheppard, T. D.; Millar, N S

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by binding at an extracellular orthosteric site. Previous studies have described several positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that are selective for homomeric α7 nAChRs. These include type I PAMs, which exert little or no effect on the rate of receptor desensitisation, and type II PAMs, which cause a dramatic loss of agonist-induced desensitisation. Here we report evidence that transmembrane mutations in α7 nAChRs have divers...

  17. The influence of allosteric modulators and transmembrane mutations on desensitisation and activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzidaki, Anna; D'Oyley, Jarryl M; Gill-Thind, JasKiran K.; Sheppard, Tom D; Millar, Neil S.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by binding at an extracellular orthosteric site. Previous studies have described several positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that are selective for homomeric α7 nAChRs. These include type I PAMs, which exert little or no effect on the rate of receptor desensitisation, and type II PAMs, which cause a dramatic loss of agonist-induced desensitisation. Here we report evidence that transmembrane mutations in α7 nAChRs have divers...

  18. Central Insulin Action Activates Kupffer Cells by Suppressing Hepatic Vagal Activation via the Nicotinic Alpha 7 Acetylcholine Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumi Kimura

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Central insulin action activates hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling, which suppresses the gene expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes. The vagus nerve plays an important role in this centrally mediated hepatic response; however, the precise mechanism underlying this brain-liver interaction is unclear. Here, we present our findings that the vagus nerve suppresses hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling via α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAchR on Kupffer cells, and that central insulin action activates hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling by suppressing vagal activity. Indeed, central insulin-mediated hepatic IL-6/STAT3 activation and gluconeogenic gene suppression were impeded in mice with hepatic vagotomy, pharmacological cholinergic blockade, or α7-nAchR deficiency. In high-fat diet-induced obese and insulin-resistant mice, control of the vagus nerve by central insulin action was disturbed, inducing a persistent increase of inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that dysregulation of the α7-nAchR-mediated control of Kupffer cells by central insulin action may affect the pathogenesis of chronic hepatic inflammation in obesity.

  19. Competitive inhibition of the nondepolarizing muscle relaxant rocuronium on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels in the rat superior cervical ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengmi; Wang, Zhenmeng; Zhang, Jinmin; Qiu, Haibo; Sun, Yuming; Yang, Liqun; Wu, Feixiang; Zheng, Jijian; Yu, Weifeng

    2014-05-01

    A number of case reports now indicate that rocuronium can induce a number of serious side effects. We hypothesized that these side effects might be mediated by the inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) at superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons. Conventional patch clamp recordings were used to study the effects of rocuronium on nAChR currents from enzymatically dissociated rat SCG neurons. We found that ACh induced a peak transient inward current in rat SCG neurons. Additionally, rocuronium suppressed the peak ACh-evoked currents in rat SCG neurons in a concentration-dependent and competitive manner, and it increased the extent of desensitization of nAChRs. The inhibitory rate of rocuronium on nAChR currents did not change significantly at membrane potentials between -70 and -20 mV, suggesting that this inhibition was voltage independent. Lastly, rocuronium preapplication enhanced its inhibitory effect, indicating that this drug might prefer to act on the closed state of nAChR channels. In conclusion, rocuronium, at clinically relevant concentrations, directly inhibits nAChRs at the SCG by interacting with both opened and closed states. This inhibition is competitive, dose dependent, and voltage independent. Blockade of synaptic transmission in the sympathetic ganglia by rocuronium might have potentially inhibitory effects on the cardiovascular system.

  20. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes: localization and structure/function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brann, M R; Ellis, J; Jørgensen, H

    1993-01-01

    Based on the sequence of the five cloned muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5), subtype selective antibody and cDNA probes have been prepared. Use of these probes has demonstrated that each of the five subtypes has a markedly distinct distribution within the brain and among peripheral tissues....... The distributions of these subtypes and their potential physiological roles are discussed. By use of molecular genetic manipulation of cloned muscarinic receptor cDNAs, the regions of muscarinic receptors that specify G-protein coupling and ligand binding have been defined in several recent studies. Overall...

  1. BDNF Up-Regulates α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Levels on Subpopulations of Hippocampal Interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Massey, Kerri A; Zago, Wagner M.; Berg, Darwin K.

    2006-01-01

    In the hippocampus, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates a number of synaptic components. Among these are nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α7 subunits (α7-nAChRs), which are interesting because of their relative abundance in the hippocampus and their high relative calcium permeability. We show here that BDNF elevates surface and intracellular pools of α7-nAChRs on cultured hippocampal neurons and that glutamatergic activity is both necessary and sufficient for the ef...

  2. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the honey bee, Apis mellifera

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Andrew K.; Raymond-Delpech, Valerie; Steeve H Thany; Gauthier, Monique; Sattelle, David B.

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission and play roles in many cognitive processes. They are under intense research as potential targets of drugs used to treat neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Invertebrate nAChRs are targets of anthelmintics as well as a major group of insecticides, the neonicotinoids. The honey bee, Apis mellifera, is one of the most beneficial insects worldw...

  3. Acetylcholine receptors from human muscle as pharmacological targets for ALS therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, Eleonora; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Lopergolo, Diego; Roseti, Cristina; Bertollini, Cristina; Ruffolo, Gabriele; Cifelli, Pierangelo; Onesti, Emanuela; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Inghilleri, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal disease leading to motor neuron degeneration and progressive paralysis. Other studies have revealed defects in skeletal muscle even in the absence of motor neuron anomalies, focusing on acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and supporting the so-called “dying-back” hypothesis. Our results indicate that the endocannabinoid palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) reduces the rundown of AChRs currents in ALS muscle and can clinically improve patients’ pulmonary funct...

  4. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signalling: Roles in Alzheimer's Disease and Amyloid Neuroprotection

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the major contributor to dementia in the elderly, involves accumulation in the brain of extracellular plaques containing the β-amyloid protein (Aβ) and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. AD is also characterized by a loss of neurons, particularly those expressing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), thereby leading to a reduction in nAChR numbers. The Aβ1–42 protein, which is toxic to neurons, is critical to the onset and...

  5. Role for M5 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in cocaine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Fedorova, Irina; Wörtwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P D; Rasmussen, Thøger; Thomsen, Morgane; Bolwig, Tom G; Knitowski, Karen M; McKinzie, David L; Yamada, Masahisa; Wess, Jürgen; Basile, Anthony

    2003-10-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors of the M5 subtype are expressed by dopamine-containing neurons of the ventral tegmentum. These M5 receptors modulate the activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, which play an important role in mediating reinforcing properties of abused psychostimulants like cocaine. The potential role of M5 receptors in the reinforcing effects of cocaine was investigated using M5 receptor-deficient mice in a model of acute cocaine self-administration. The M5-deficient mice self-administered cocaine at a significantly lower rate than wild-type controls. In the conditioned place preference procedure, a classic test for evaluating the rewarding properties of drugs, M5-deficient mice spent significantly less time in the cocaine-paired compartment than control mice. Moreover, the severity of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome (withdrawal-associated anxiety measured in the elevated plus-maze) was significantly attenuated in mice lacking the M5 receptor. These results demonstrate that M5 receptors play an important role in mediating both cocaine-associated reinforcement and withdrawal.

  6. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies to Study the Structural Basis of the Function of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors on Electric Organ and Muscle, and to Determine the Structure of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors on Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-16

    chromatography using mAb 35 to the main immunogenic region of receptors from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus . 2 9 These purified receptors...Berg, and J. Lindstrom (1984) A shared antigenic determinant between the Electrophorus acetylcholine receptor and a synaptic component on chick

  7. A novel labeling approach identifies three stability levels of acetylcholine receptors in the mouse neuromuscular junction in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Strack

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The turnover of acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction is regulated in an activity-dependent manner. Upon denervation and under various other pathological conditions, receptor half-life is decreased. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate a novel approach to follow the kinetics of acetylcholine receptor lifetimes upon pulse labeling of mouse muscles with ¹²⁵I-α-bungarotoxin in vivo. In contrast to previous assays where residual activity was measured ex vivo, in our setup the same animals are used throughout the whole measurement period, thereby permitting a dramatic reduction of animal numbers at increased data quality. We identified three stability levels of acetylcholine receptors depending on the presence or absence of innervation: one pool of receptors with a long half-life of ∼13 days, a second with an intermediate half-life of ∼8 days, and a third with a short half-life of ∼1 day. Data were highly reproducible from animal to animal and followed simple exponential terms. The principal outcomes of these measurements were reproduced by an optical pulse-labeling assay introduced recently. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A novel assay to determine kinetics of acetylcholine receptor turnover with small animal numbers is presented. Our data show that nerve activity acts on muscle acetylcholine receptor stability by at least two different means, one shifting receptor lifetime from short to intermediate and another, which further increases receptor stability to a long lifetime. We hypothesize on possible molecular mechanisms.

  8. Effects of dichlorobenzene on acetylcholine receptors in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ren-Ming; Chiung, Yin-Mei; Pan, Chien-Yuan; Liu, Jenn-Hwa; Liu, Pei-Shan

    2008-11-20

    para-Dichlorobenzene (DCB), a deodorant and an industrial chemical, is a highly volatile compound and is known to be an indoor air contaminant. Because of its widespread use and volatility, the toxicity of DCB presents a concern to industrial workers and public. Some toxic aspects of DCB have already been focused but its effects on neuronal signal transduction have been hitherto unknown. The effects of DCB on the cytosolic calcium homeostasis are investigated in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells in this study. DCB, above 200 microM, was found to induce a rise in cytosolic calcium concentration that could not be counteracted by nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonists but was partially inhibited by thapsigargin. To understand the actions of DCB on the acetylcholine receptors, we investigated its effects on the changes of cytosolic calcium concentration following nicotinic AChR stimulation with epibatidine and muscarinic AChR stimulation with methacholine in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. DCB inhibited the cytosolic calcium concentration rise induced by epibatidine and methacholine with respective IC(50)s of 34 and 294 microM. The inhibitions of DCB were not the same as thapsigargin's inhibition. In the electrophysiological observations, DCB blocked the influx currents induced by epibatidine. Our findings suggest that DCB interferes with the functional activities of AChR, including its coupling influx currents and cytosolic calcium elevations.

  9. The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α5 Subunit Plays a Key Role in Attention Circuitry and Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Craig D. C.; De Biasi, Mariella; Fletcher, Paul J.; Lambe, Evelyn K.

    2010-01-01

    Stimulation of the prefrontal cortex by acetylcholine is critical for attention; however, the cellular mechanisms underlying its influence on attention pathways within the brain are not well understood. Pyramidal neurons in layer VI of the prefrontal cortex are believed to play an important role in this process because they are excited by acetylcholine and provide a major source of feedback projections to the thalamus. Here, we show using whole-cell electrophysiology that the relatively rare α5 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor powerfully enhances nicotinic currents in layer VI pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortical brain slices from adult mice. In addition, behavioral experiments using the five-choice serial reaction time test show that the presence of the nicotinic receptor α5 subunit also increases the accuracy of adult mice on this visual attention task under highly demanding conditions. Together, these findings demonstrate a novel and important role for the nicotinic receptor α5 subunit in adult brain circuitry required for attentional performance. PMID:20610759

  10. Dopamine D3 receptor antagonism contributes to blonanserin-induced cortical dopamine and acetylcholine efflux and cognitive improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei; Kwon, Sunoh; Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Miyauchi, Masanori; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2015-11-01

    Blonanserin is a novel atypical antipsychotic drug (APD), which, unlike most atypical APDs, has a slightly higher affinity for dopamine (DA) D2 than serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors, and is an antagonist at both, as well as at D3 receptors. The effects of atypical APDs to enhance rodent cortical, hippocampal, limbic, and dorsal striatal (dSTR) DA and acetylcholine (ACh) release, contribute to their ability to improve novel object recognition (NOR) in rodents treated with sub-chronic (sc) phencyclidine (PCP) and cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia (CIAS). Here we determined the ability of blonanserin, the D3 antagonist NGB 2904, and the typical APD, haloperidol, a D2 antagonist, to enhance neurotransmitter efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dSTR of mice, and to ameliorate the scPCP-induced deficit in NOR in rats. Blonanserin, 10mg/kg, i.p., increased DA, norepinephrine (NE), and ACh efflux in mPFC and dSTR. NGB 2904, 3mg/kg, increased DA and ACh, but not NE, efflux in mPFC, and DA, but not ACh, efflux in dSTR. Haloperidol increased DA and NE efflux in dSTR only. The selective D3 agonist PD 128907 partially blocked the blonanserin-induced cortical ACh, DA, NE and striatal DA efflux. NGB 2904, 3mg/kg, like blonanserin, 1mg/kg, and the combination of sub-effective doses of NGB 2904 and blonanserin (both 0.3mg/kg), ameliorated the scPCP-induced NOR deficit in rats. These results suggest that D3 receptor blockade may contribute to the ability of blonanserin to increase cortical DA and ACh efflux, as well as to restore NOR and improve CIAS.

  11. Blockade of CRF1 receptors in the central nucleus of the amygdala attenuates the dysphoria associated with nicotine withdrawal in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W; Ford, Jenna; Rogers, Jessica A; Scheick, Stacey; Ji, Yue; Bishnoi, Mahendra; Alexander, Jon C

    2012-03-01

    The majority of smokers relapse during the acute withdrawal phase when withdrawal symptoms are most severe. The goal of the present studies was to investigate the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and noradrenergic transmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in the dysphoria associated with smoking cessation. It was investigated if blockade of CRF1 receptors, blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors, or stimulation of α2-adrenergic receptors in the CeA diminishes the deficit in brain reward function associated with nicotine withdrawal in rats. Nicotine dependence was induced by implanting minipumps that delivered a nicotine solution. Withdrawal was precipitated with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine. A discrete-trial intracranial self-stimulation procedure was used to assess the negative affective aspects of nicotine withdrawal. Elevations in brain reward thresholds are indicative of a deficit in brain reward function. In all the experiments, mecamylamine elevated the brain reward thresholds of the rats chronically treated with nicotine and did not affect the brain reward thresholds of the saline-treated control rats. Intra-CeA administration of the CRF1 receptor antagonist R278995/CRA0450 completely prevented the mecamylamine-induced elevations in brain reward thresholds in the nicotine-treated rats and did not affect the brain reward thresholds of the saline-treated control rats. R278995/CRA0450 has also been shown to block sigma-1 receptors but there is no evidence that this could affect negative mood states. Intra-CeA administration of the α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin or the α2-adrenergic receptor agonist clonidine did not affect the brain reward thresholds of the nicotine or saline-treated rats. These studies suggest that CRF1 receptor antagonists may diminish the dysphoria associated with smoking cessation by blocking CRF1 receptors in the CeA.

  12. Functional partial agonism at cloned human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R

    1996-01-01

    , and a competitive antagonist, atropine or pirenzepine, at fixed ratios display functional partial agonism. The levels of apparent intrinsic activity of the functional partial agonist responses were shown to be dependent of the receptor density and G-protein concentration in the same manner as that determined...... agonist response, which is dependent on the agonist/antagonist ratio, is predictable from the Waud equation, describing competitive receptor/ligand interactions. In agreement with the relative antagonist potencies of pirenzepine at m1 and m5, a 10:1 ratio of carbachol and pirenzepine produced very low...

  13. Magnesium sulfate enhances non-depolarizing muscle relaxant vecuronium action at adult muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong WANG; Qi-sheng LIANG; Lan-ren CHENG; Xiao-hong LI; Wei FU; Wen-tao DAI; Shi-tong LI

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of magnesium sulfate and its interaction with the non-depolarizing muscle relaxant vecuronium at adult muscle-type acetylcholine receptors in vitro.Methods:Adult muscle-type acetylcholine receptors were expressed in HEK293 cells.Drug-containing solution was applied via a gravity-driven perfusion system.The inward currents were activated by brief application of acetylcholine (ACh),and recorded using whole-cell voltage-clamp technique.Results:Magnesium sulfate (1-100 mmol/L) inhibited the inward currents induced ACh (10 μmol/L) in a concentration-dependent manner (IC5o=29.2 mmol/L).The inhibition of magnesium sulfate was non-competitive.In contrast,vecuronium produced a potent inhibition on the adult muscle-type acetylcholine receptor (IC50=8.7 nmol/L) by competitive antagonism.Magnesium sulfate at the concentrations of 1,3,and 6 mmol/L markedly enhanced the inhibition of vecuronium (10 nmol/L) on adult muscle-type acetylcholine receptors.Conclusion:Clinical enhancement of vecuronium-induced muscle relaxation by magnesium sulfate can be attributed partly to synergism between magnesium sulfate and non-depolarizing muscle relaxants at adult muscle-type acetylcholine receptors.

  14. Glucagon and plasma catecholamines during beta-receptor blockade in exercising man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Holst, Janett; Christensen, N J

    1976-01-01

    Seven men ran at 60% of individual maximal oxygen uptake to exhaustion during beta-adrenergic blockade with propranolol (P), during lipolytic blockade with nicotinic acid (N), or without drugs (C). The total work times (83 +/- 9 (P), 122 +/- 8 (N), 166 +/- 10 (C) min, mean and SE) differed...... decrease glucagon concentrations increased progressively in parallel with declining plasma glucose and were at exhaustion always three times preexercise values. Thus beta-adrenergic blockade did not diminish the glucagon response. Nor was this response increased when alpha-receptor stimulation in P...... experiments was intensified. Carbohydrate combustion was smaller and NEFA and glycerol concentrations in serum larger during C experiments. Alanine concentrations were never raised at exhaustion. Accordingly, neither stimulation of adrenergic receptors nor NEFA and alanine concentrations are major...

  15. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of hippocampal acetylcholine release is preserved in aged mice

    OpenAIRE

    Redmer, Agnes; Kathmann, Markus; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2003-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor inverse agonist/antagonist SR 141716 increases acetylcholine release in rodent hippocampus and improves memory in some experimental paradigms. Since drugs like SR 141716 may represent a novel class of cognition-enhancing drugs, we wanted to check whether the function of the CB1 receptor is preserved during ageing.Hippocampal and striatal slices from 2- to 3- and 24- to 28-month-old C57BL/6J mice were preincubated with [3H]-choline or [3H]-noradrenaline ([3H]-NA) a...

  16. Nicotine-morphine interactions at α4β2, α7 and α3(⁎) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talka, Reeta; Salminen, Outi; Whiteaker, Paul; Lukas, Ronald J; Tuominen, Raimo K

    2013-02-15

    Nicotine and opioids share several behavioral and rewarding properties. Although both opioids and nicotine have their own specific mechanism of action, there is empirical and experimental evidence of interactions between these drugs. We studied receptor-level interactions of nicotine and morphine at α4β2, α7 and α3(⁎) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. [(3)H]epibatidine displacement was used to determine if morphine binds competitively to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Functional interactions of morphine and nicotine were studied with calcium fluorometry and (86)Rb(+) efflux assays. Morphine displaced [(3)H]epibatidine from nicotinic agonist binding sites in all cell lines studied. The Ki values for morphine were 13.2μM in SH-EP1-hα4β2 cells, 0.16μM and 126μM in SH-SY5Y cells and 43.7μM in SH-EP1-hα7 cells. In SH-EP1-hα4β2 cells expressing α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, morphine acted as a partial agonist of (86)Rb(+) efflux comparable to cytisine (with EC50 values of 53.3μM for morphine and 5.38μM for cytisine). The effect of morphine was attenuated concentration-dependently by the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine. In the SH-SY5Y cell line expressing several subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors morphine had an inhibitory effect on nicotine induced (86)Rb(+) ion efflux mediated by α3(⁎) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These results suggest that morphine acts as a partial agonist at α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and as a weak antagonist at α3(⁎) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  17. Monkey adrenal chromaffin cells express α6β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Hernández-Vivanco

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs that contain α6 and β4 subunits have been demonstrated functionally in human adrenal chromaffin cells, rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, and on noradrenergic terminals in the hippocampus of adolescent mice. In human adrenal chromaffin cells, α6β4* nAChRs (the asterisk denotes the possible presence of additional subunits are the predominant subtype whereas in rodents, the predominant nAChR is the α3β4* subtype. Here we present molecular and pharmacological evidence that chromaffin cells from monkey (Macaca mulatta also express α6β4* receptors. PCR was used to show the presence of transcripts for α6 and β4 subunits and pharmacological characterization was performed using patch-clamp electrophysiology in combination with α-conotoxins that target the α6β4* subtype. Acetylcholine-evoked currents were sensitive to inhibition by BuIA[T5A,P6O] and MII[H9A,L15A]; α-conotoxins that inhibit α6-containing nAChRs. Two additional agonists were used to probe for the expression of α7 and β2-containing nAChRs. Cells with currents evoked by acetylcholine were relatively unresponsive to the α7-selctive agonist choline but responded to the agonist 5-I-A-85380. These studies provide further insights into the properties of natively expressed α6β4* nAChRs.

  18. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors act in synergy to facilitate learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaderbrand, Katherine; Chen, Helen J; Corcoran, Kevin A; Guedea, Anita L; Jovasevic, Vladimir; Wess, Jurgen; Radulovic, Jelena

    2016-11-01

    Understanding how episodic memories are formed and retrieved is necessary if we are to treat disorders in which they malfunction. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in the hippocampus and cortex underlie memory formation, but there is conflicting evidence regarding their role in memory retrieval. Additionally, there is no consensus on which mAChR subtypes are critical for memory processing. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we found that (1) encoding and retrieval of contextual memory requires mAChR in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) and retrosplenial cortex (RSC), (2) memory formation requires hippocampal M3 and cooperative activity of RSC M1 and M3, and (3) memory retrieval is more impaired by inactivation of multiple M1-M4 mAChR in DH or RSC than inactivation of individual receptor subtypes. Contrary to the view that acetylcholine supports learning but is detrimental to memory retrieval, we found that coactivation of multiple mAChR is required for retrieval of both recently and remotely acquired context memories. Manipulations with higher receptor specificity were generally less potent than manipulations targeting multiple receptor subtypes, suggesting that mAChR act in synergy to regulate memory processes. These findings provide unique insight into the development of therapies for amnestic symptoms, suggesting that broadly acting, rather than receptor-specific, mAchR agonists and positive allosteric modulators may be the most effective therapeutic approach. © 2016 Leaderbrand et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Functional Characterization of CCHamide and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large and ancient superfamily of membraneproteins responsible for the transduction of extracellular signals to the inside of the cells. In thisPh.D. thesis, Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) was used as a model organism to investigate a numberof topics...... is a newly discovered insect peptide hormone. The function of this novel peptide hasnot been well characterised. In this Ph.D. thesis, I identified CCHamide-2 peptides in endocrinecells of the gut and neurones of the brain of larvae and endocrine cells of the gut of adultDrosophila. Behavioural assays...... little is known about muscarinic acetylcholine receptorsignalling in insects. In this study, I found that two types of mAChRs occur in D. melanogaster, onecoupling to Gq (A-type) and the other to Gi (B-type). Both A- and B-type Dm-mAChRs can beactivated by acetylcholine (ACh), but the classical...

  20. Evidence of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the retinal centrifugal system of the chick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calaza K.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we characterize the presence of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR in the isthmo-optic nucleus (ION of chicks by immunohistochemistry with the M35 antibody. Some M35-immunoreactive fibers were observed emerging from the retinal optic nerve insertion, suggesting that they could be centrifugal fibers. Indeed, intraocular injections of cholera toxin B (CTb, a retrograde tracer, and double-labeling with M35 and CTb in the ION confirmed this hypothesis. The presence of M35-immunoreactive cells and the possible mAChR expression in ION and ectopic neuron cells in the chick brain strongly suggest the existence of such a cholinergic system in this nucleus and that acetylcholine release from amacrine cells may mediate interactions between retinal cells and ION terminals.

  1. Functional Characterization of CCHamide and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large and ancient superfamily of membraneproteins responsible for the transduction of extracellular signals to the inside of the cells. In thisPh.D. thesis, Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) was used as a model organism to investigate a numberof topics...... is a newly discovered insect peptide hormone. The function of this novel peptide hasnot been well characterised. In this Ph.D. thesis, I identified CCHamide-2 peptides in endocrinecells of the gut and neurones of the brain of larvae and endocrine cells of the gut of adultDrosophila. Behavioural assays...... little is known about muscarinic acetylcholine receptorsignalling in insects. In this study, I found that two types of mAChRs occur in D. melanogaster, onecoupling to Gq (A-type) and the other to Gi (B-type). Both A- and B-type Dm-mAChRs can beactivated by acetylcholine (ACh), but the classical...

  2. Peripheral cannabinoid 1 receptor blockade activates brown adipose tissue and diminishes dyslipidemia and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, M.R.; Kooijman, S.; Dam, A.D. van; Pelgrom, L.R.; Berbée, J.F.P.; Visseren, C.A.R.; Aggele, R.C. van; Hoek, A.M. van den; Sips, H.C.M.; Lombès, M.; Havekes, L.M.; Tamsma, J.T.; Guigas, B.; Meijer, O.C.; Jukema, J.W.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is an important player in energy metabolism by regulating appetite, lipolysis, and energy expenditure. Chronic blockade of the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) leads to long-term maintenance of weight loss and reduction of dyslipidemia in experimental and human obesity. The m

  3. Peripheral cannabinoid 1 receptor blockade activates brown adipose tissue and diminishes dyslipidemia and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, M.R.; Kooijman, S.; Dam, A.D. van; Pelgrom, L.R.; Berbée, J.F.P.; Visseren, C.A.R.; Aggele, R.C. van; Hoek, A.M. van den; Sips, H.C.M.; Lombès, M.; Havekes, L.M.; Tamsma, J.T.; Guigas, B.; Meijer, O.C.; Jukema, J.W.; Rensen, P.C.N.

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is an important player in energy metabolism by regulating appetite, lipolysis, and energy expenditure. Chronic blockade of the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) leads to long-term maintenance of weight loss and reduction of dyslipidemia in experimental and human obesity. The m

  4. Impact of Growth Hormone Receptor Blockade on Substrate Metabolism during Fasting in Healthy Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Moller, Louise; Norrelund, Helene; Jessen, Niels; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Steen B Pedersen; Bruce D Gaylinn; Liu, Jianhua; Thorner, Michael O.; Moller, Niels; Lunde Jorgensen, Jens Otto

    2009-01-01

    Context: Experimental studies in GH-deficient patients and in healthy subjects receiving somatostatin-infusion suggest that GH is an important regulator of substrate metabolism during fasting. These models may not adequately reflect the selective effects of GH, and GH receptor (GHR) blockade offers a new model to define the metabolic role of GH.

  5. Hepatic structural enhancement and insulin resistance amelioration due to AT1 receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Mello, Vanessa

    2017-01-18

    Over the last decade, the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) on the development of obesity and its comorbidities has been extensively addressed. Both circulating and local RAS components are up-regulated in obesity and involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease onset. Pharmacological manipulations of RAS are viable strategies to tackle metabolic impairments caused by the excessive body fat mass. Renin inhibitors rescue insulin resistance, but do not have marked effects on hepatic steatosis. However, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) yield beneficial hepatic remodeling. ARBs elicit body mass loss and normalize insulin levels, tackling insulin resistance. Also, this drug class increases adiponectin levels, besides countering interleukin-6, tumoral necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta 1. The latter is essential to prevent from liver fibrosis. When conjugated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha activation, ARB fully rescues fatty liver. These effects might be orchestrated by an indirect up-regulation of MAS receptor due to angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) blockade. These associations of ARB with PPAR activation and ACE2-angiotensin (ANG) (1-7)-MAS receptor axis deserve a better understanding. This editorial provides a brief overview of the current knowledge regarding AT1R blockade effects on sensitivity to insulin and hepatic structural alterations as well as the intersections of AT1R blockade with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activation and ACE2-ANG (1-7) - MAS receptor axis.

  6. A pharmacological analysis of serotonergic receptors: effects of their activation of blockade in learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, A; Hong, E

    1997-02-01

    1. The authors have tested several 5-HT selective agonists and antagonists (5-HT1A/1B, 5-HT2A/2B/2C, 5-HT3 or 5-HT4), an uptake inhibitor and 5-HT depletors in the autoshaping learning task. 2. The present work deals with the receptors whose stimulation increases or decreases learning. 3. Impaired consolidation of learning was observed after the presynaptic activation of 5-HT1B, 5-HT3 or 5-HT4 or the blockade of postsynaptic 5-HT2C/2B receptors. 4. In contrast, an improvement occurred after the presynaptic activation of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2C, and the blockade of presynaptic 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors. 5. The blockade of postsynaptic 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT3 or 5-HT4 receptors and 5-HT inhibition of synthesis and its depletion did no alter learning by themselves. 6. The present data suggest that multiple pre- and postsynaptic serotonergic receptors are involved in the consolidation of learning. 7. Stimulation of most 5-HT receptors increases learning, however, some of 5-HT subtypes seem to limit the data storage. 8. Furthermore, the role of 5-HT receptors in learning seem to require an interaction with glutamatergic, GABAergic and cholinergic neurotransmission systems.

  7. Systemic blockade of D2-like dopamine receptors facilitates extinction of conditioned fear in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Nissim, Helen A.; Barad, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Extinction of conditioned fear in animals is the explicit model of behavior therapy for human anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Based on previous data indicating that fear extinction in rats is blocked by quinpirole, an agonist of dopamine D2 receptors, we hypothesized that blockade of D2 receptors might facilitate extinction in mice, while agonists should block extinction, as they do in rats. One day after fear con...

  8. Differential blockade of rat α3β4 and α7 neuronal nicotinic receptors by ω-conotoxin MVIIC, ω-conotoxin GVIA and diltiazem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Carlos J; García-Palomero, Esther; Pintado, Antonio J; García, Antonio G; Montiel, Carmen

    1999-01-01

    Rat α3β4 or α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and the effects of various toxins and non-toxin Ca2+ channel blockers studied. Nicotinic AChR currents were elicited by 1 s pulses of dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP, 100 μM) applied at regular intervals.The N/P/Q-type Ca2+ channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC inhibited α3β4 currents with an IC50 of 1.3 μM; the blockade was non-competitive and reversible. The α7 currents were unaffected.At 1 μM, ω-conotoxin GVIA (N-type Ca2+ channel blocker) inhibited by 24 and 20% α3β4 and α7 currents, respectively. At 1 μM, ω-agatoxin IVA (a P/Q-type Ca2+ channel blocker) did not affect α7 currents and inhibited α3β4 currents by only 15%.L-type Ca2+ channel blockers furnidipine, verapamil and, particularly, diltiazem exhibited a preferential blocking activity on α3β4 nicotinic AChRs.The mechanism of α3β4 currents blockade by ω-conotoxins and diltiazem differed in the following aspects: (i) the onset and reversal of the blockade was faster for toxins; (ii) the blockade by the peptides was voltage-dependent, while that exerted by diltiazem was not; (iii) diltiazem promoted the inactivation of the current while ω-toxins did not.These data show that, at concentrations currently employed as Ca2+ channel blockers, some of these compounds also inhibit certain subtypes of nicotinic AChR currents. Our data calls for caution when interpreting many of the results obtained in neurons and other cell types, where nicotinic receptor and Ca2+ channels coexist. PMID:10455287

  9. Structural Characterization of the Putative Cholinergic Binding Region alpha(179-201) of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor. Part 1. Review and Experimental Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Dynamic Model for the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor, in Computer -Assisted Modeling of Receptor-Ligand Interactions: Theoretical Aspects and...Hunkapillar, M.W., Strader, C.D., Hood, LE.-Acetylcholine receptor: complex of homologous subunits. Sceince vol. 208, pp. 1454-1457, 1980 Ragone, R

  10. Reconstitution of Purified Acetylcholine Receptors with Functional Ion Channels in Planar Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, N.; Anholt, R.; Lindstrom, J.; Montal, M.

    1980-05-01

    Acetylcholine receptor, solubilized and purified from Torpedo californica electric organ under conditions that preserve the activity of its ion channel, was reconstituted into vesicles of soybean lipid by the cholate-dialysis technique. The reconstituted vesicles were then spread into monolayers at an air-water interface and planar bilayers were subsequently formed by apposition of two monolayers. Addition of carbamoylcholine caused an increase in membrane conductance that was transient and relaxed spontaneously to the base level (i.e., became desensitized). The response to carbamoylcholine was dose dependent and competitively inhibited by curare. Fluctuations of membrane conductance corresponding to the opening and closing of receptor channels were observed. Fluctuation analysis indicated a single-channel conductance of 16± 3 pS (in 0.1 M NaCl) with a mean channel open time estimated to be 35± 5 ms. Thus, purified acetylcholine receptor reconstituted into lipid bilayers exhibited the pharmacological specificity, activation, and desensitization properties expected of this receptor in native membranes.

  11. Selective effect of the anthelmintic bephenium on Haemonchus contortus levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvet, Claude L.; Robertson, Alan P.; Cabaret, Jacques; Martin, Richard J.; Neveu, Cédric

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels involved in the neurotransmission of both vertebrates and invertebrates. A number of anthelmintic compounds like levamisole and pyrantel target the AChRs of nematodes producing spastic paralysis of the worms. The muscle AChRs of nematode parasites fall into three pharmacological classes that are preferentially activated by the cholinergic agonists levamisole (L-type), nicotine (N-type) and bephenium (B-type), respectively. Despite a number of studies of the B-type AChR in parasitic species, this receptor remains to be characterized at the molecular level. Recently, we have reconstituted and functionally characterized two distinct L-AChR subtypes of the gastro-intestinal parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system by providing the cRNAs encoding the receptor subunits and three ancillary proteins (Boulin et al. in Br J Pharmacol 164(5):1421–1432, 2011). In the present study, the effect of the bephenium drug on Hco-L-AChR1 and Hco-L-AChR2 subtypes was examined using the two microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. We demonstrate that bephenium selectively activates the Hco-L-AChR1 subtype made of Hco-UNC-29.1, Hco-UNC-38, Hco-UNC-63, Hco-ACR-8 subunits that is more sensitive to levamisole than acetylcholine. Removing the Hco-ACR-8 subunit produced the Hco-L-AChR2 subtype that is more sensitive to pyrantel than acetylcholine and partially activated by levamisole, but which was bephenium-insensitive indicating that the bephenium-binding site involves Hco-ACR-8. Attempts were made to modify the subunit stoichiometry of the Hco-L-AChR1 subtype by injecting five fold more cRNA of individual subunits. Increased Hco-unc-29.1 cRNA produced no functional receptor. Increasing Hco-unc-63, Hco-unc-38 or Hco-acr-8 cRNAs did not affect the pharmacological characteristics of Hco-L-AChR1 but reduced the currents elicited by acetylcholine and the other agonists. Here

  12. Effects of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator on lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammatory pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Muzaffar; Rahman, Shafiqur

    2016-07-15

    Evidence indicates that microglial activation contributes to the pathophysiology and maintenance of neuroinflammatory pain involving central nervous system alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of 3a,4,5,9b-Tetrahydro-4-(1-naphthalenyl)-3H-cyclopentan[c]quinoline-8-sulfonamide (TQS), an alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM), on tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia following lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation in hippocampus, a neuroinflammatory pain model in mice. In addition, we examined the effects of TQS on microglial activation marker, an ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1), in the hippocampus may be associated with neuroinflammatory pain. Pretreatment of TQS (4mg/kg) significantly reduced LPS (1mg/kg)-induced tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Moreover, pretreatment of methyllycaconitine (3mg/kg) significantly reversed TQS-induced antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic responses indicating the involvement of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Pretreatment of TQS significantly decreased LPS-induced increased in hippocampal Iba-1 expression. Overall, these results suggest that TQS reduces LPS-induced neuroinflammatory pain like symptoms via modulating microglial activation likely in the hippocampus and/or other brain region by targeting alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Therefore, alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor PAM such as TQS could be a potential drug candidate for the treatment of neuroinflammatory pain.

  13. Limitations of RNAi of α6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits for assessing the in vivo sensitivity to spinosad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank D.Rinkevich; Jeffrey G.Scott

    2013-01-01

    Spinosad is a widely used insecticide that exerts its toxic effect primarily through interactions with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.The α6 nicotinic acetyl-choline receptor subunit is involved in spinosad toxicity as demonstrated by the high levels of resistance observed in strains lacking α6.RNAi was performed against the Dα6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit in Drosophila melanogaster using the Ga14-UAS system to examine if RNAi would yield results similar to those of Dα6 null mutants.These Dα6-deficient flies were subject to spinosad contact bioassays to evaluate the role of the Dα6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit on spinosad sensitivity.The expression of Dα6 was reduced 60%-75% as verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction.However,there was no change in spinosad sensitivity in D.melanogaster.We repeated RNAi experiments in Tribolium castaneum using injection of dsRNA for Tcasα6.RNAi of Tcasα6 did not result in changes in spinosad sensitivity,similar to results obtained with D.melanogaster.The lack of change in spinosad sensitivity in both D.melanogaster and T.castaneum using two routes of dsRNA administration shows that RNAi may not provide adequate conditions to study the role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits on insecticide sensitivity due to the inability to completely eliminate expression of the α6 subunit in both species.Potential causes for the lack of change in spinosad sensitivity are discussed.

  14. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alfredo; Crittenden, Elizabeth L; García, Dana M

    2004-01-01

    Background In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. Results The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl) carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusions Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion. PMID:15251036

  15. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crittenden Elizabeth L

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. Results The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusions Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion.

  16. Investigation of Prolactin Receptor Activation and Blockade Using Time-Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle eTallet

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The prolactin receptor (PRLR is emerging as a therapeutic target in oncology. Knowledge-based drug design led to the development of a pure PRLR antagonist (Del1-9-G129R-hPRL that was recently shown to prevent PRL-induced mouse prostate tumorogenesis. In humans, the first gain-of-function mutation of the PRLR (PRLRI146L was recently identified in breast tumor patients. At the molecular level, the actual mechanism of action of these two novel players in the PRL system remains elusive. In this study, we addressed whether constitutive PRLR activation (PRLRI146L or PRLR blockade (antagonist involved alteration of receptor oligomerization and/or of inter-chain distances compared to unstimulated and PRL-stimulated PRLR. Using a combination of various biochemical and spectroscopic approaches (co-IP, blue-native electrophoresis, BRET1, we demonstrated that preformed PRLR homodimers are altered neither by PRL- or I146L-induced receptor triggering, nor by antagonist-mediated blockade. These findings were confirmed using a novel time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET technology that allows monitoring distance changes between cell-surface tagged receptors. This technology revealed that PRLR blockade or activation did not involve detectable distance changes between extracellular domains of receptor chains within the dimer. This study merges with our previous structural investigations suggesting that the mechanism of PRLR activation solely involves intermolecular contact adaptations leading to subtle intramolecular rearrangements.

  17. Orexin-1 receptor blockade dysregulates REM sleep in the presence of orexin-2 receptor antagonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eDugovic

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the prominent role of orexins in the maintenance of wakefulness via activation of orexin-1 (OX1R and orexin-2 (OX2R receptors, various dual OX1/2R antagonists have been shown to promote sleep in animals and humans. While selective blockade of OX2R seems to be sufficient to initiate and prolong sleep, the beneficial effect of additional inhibition of OX1R remains controversial. The relative contribution of OX1R and OX2R to the sleep effects induced by a dual OX1/2R antagonist was further investigated in the rat, and specifically on rapid eye movement (REM sleep since a deficiency of the orexin system is associated with narcolepsy/cataplexy based on clinical and pre-clinical data. As expected, the dual OX1/2R antagonist SB-649868 was effective in promoting non-REM (NREM and REM sleep following oral dosing (10 and 30 mg/kg at the onset of the dark phase. However, a disruption of REM sleep was evidenced by a more pronounced reduction in the onset of REM as compared to NREM sleep, a marked enhancement of the REM/total sleep ratio, and the occurrence of a few episodes of direct wake to REM sleep transitions (REM intrusion. When administered subcutaneously, the OX2R antagonist JNJ-10397049 (10 mg/kg increased NREM duration whereas the OX1R antagonist GSK-1059865 (10 mg/kg did not alter sleep. REM sleep was not affected either by OX2R or OX1R blockade alone, but administration of the OX1R antagonist in combination with the OX2R antagonist induced a significant reduction in REM sleep latency and an increase in REM sleep duration at the expense of the time spent in NREM sleep. These results indicate that additional blockade of OX1R to OX2R antagonism elicits a dysregulation of REM sleep by shifting the balance in favor of REM sleep at the expense of NREM sleep that may increase the risk of adverse events. Translation of this hypothesis remains to be tested in the clinic.

  18. Endothelin-A receptor blockade slows the progression of renal injury in experimental renovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Silvia; Hall, John E; Chade, Alejandro R

    2011-07-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1, a potent renal vasoconstrictor with mitogenic properties, is upregulated by ischemia and has been shown to induce renal injury via the ET-A receptor. The potential role of ET-A blockade in chronic renovascular disease (RVD) has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported. We hypothesized that chronic ET-A receptor blockade would preserve renal hemodynamics and slow the progression of injury of the stenotic kidney in experimental RVD. Renal artery stenosis, a major cause of chronic RVD, was induced in 14 pigs and observed for 6 wk. In half of the pigs, chronic ET-A blockade was initiated (RVD+ET-A, 0.75 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) at the onset of RVD. Single-kidney renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and perfusion were quantified in vivo after 6 wk using multidetector computer tomography. Renal microvascular density was quantified ex vivo using three-dimensional microcomputer tomography, and growth factors, inflammation, apoptosis, and fibrosis were determined in renal tissue. The degree of stenosis and increase in blood pressure were similar in RVD and RVD+ET-A pigs. Renal hemodynamics, function, and microvascular density were decreased in the stenotic kidney but preserved by ET-A blockade, accompanied by increased renal expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and downstream mediators such as phosphorilated-Akt, angiopoietins, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. ET-A blockade also reduced renal apoptosis, inflammation, and glomerulosclerosis. This study shows that ET-A blockade slows the progression of renal injury in experimental RVD and preserves renal hemodynamics, function, and microvascular density in the stenotic kidney. These results support a role for ET-1/ET-A as a potential therapeutic target in chronic RVD.

  19. Selective actions of Lynx proteins on different nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the locust, Locusta migratoria manilensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Bao, Haibo; Sun, Huahua; Zhang, Yixi; Fang, Jichao; Liu, Qinghong; Liu, Zewen

    2015-08-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are major neurotransmitter receptors and targets of neonicotinoid insecticides in the insect nervous system. The full function of nAChRs is often dependent on associated proteins, such as chaperones, regulators and modulators. Here, three Lynx (Ly-6/neurotoxin) proteins, Loc-lynx1, Loc-lynx2 and Loc-lynx3, were identified in the locust, Locusta migratoria manilensis. Co-expression with Lynx resulted in a dramatic increase in agonist-evoked macroscopic currents on nAChRs Locα1/β2 and Locα2/β2 in Xenopus oocytes, but no changes in agonist sensitivity. Loc-lynx1 and Loc-lynx3 only modulated nAChRs Locα1/β2 while Loc-lynx2 modulated Locα2/β2 specifically. Meanwhile, Loc-lynx1 induced a more significant increase in currents evoked by imidacloprid and epibatidine than Loc-lynx3, and the effects of Loc-lynx1 on imidacloprid and epibatidine were significantly higher than those on acetylcholine. Among three lynx proteins, only Loc-lynx1 significantly increased [(3) H]epibatidine binding on Locα1/β2. The results indicated that Loc-lynx1 had different modulation patterns in nAChRs compared to Loc-lynx2 and Loc-lynx3. Taken together, these findings indicated that three Lynx proteins were nAChR modulators and had selective activities in different nAChRs. Lynx proteins might display their selectivities from three aspects: nAChR subtypes, various agonists and different modulation patterns. Insect Lynx (Ly-6/neurotoxin) proteins act as the allosteric modulators on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), the important targets of insecticides. We found that insect lynx proteins showed their selectivities from at least three aspects: nAChR subtypes, various agonists and different modulation patterns.

  20. Molecular determinants of subtype-selective efficacies of cytisine and the novel compound NS3861 at heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Hald, Helle; Timmermann, Daniel B

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering which specific agonist-receptor interactions affect efficacy levels is of high importance, because this will ultimately aid in designing selective drugs. The novel compound NS3861 and cytisine are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and both bind with high affinity...

  1. An allosteric enhancer of M(4) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function inhibits behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ditte Dencker; Weikop, Pia; Sørensen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    The mesostriatal dopamine system plays a key role in mediating the reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. The muscarinic M(4) acetylcholine receptor subtype is centrally involved in the regulation of dopamine release in striatal areas. Consequently, striatal M(4) receptors could...... be a novel target for modulating psychostimulant effects of cocaine....

  2. Peptides from puff adder Bitis arietans venom, novel inhibitors of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfius, Catherine A; Spirova, Ekaterina N; Serebryakova, Marina V; Shelukhina, Irina V; Kudryavtsev, Denis S; Kryukova, Elena V; Starkov, Vladislav G; Kopylova, Nina V; Zhmak, Maxim N; Ivanov, Igor A; Kudryashova, Ksenia S; Andreeva, Tatyana V; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2016-10-01

    Phospholipase A2 (named bitanarin) possessing capability to block nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) was isolated earlier (Vulfius et al., 2011) from puff adder Bitis arietans venom. Further studies indicated that low molecular weight fractions of puff adder venom inhibit nAChRs as well. In this paper, we report on isolation from this venom and characterization of three novel peptides called baptides 1, 2 and 3 that reversibly block nAChRs. To isolate the peptides, the venom of B. arietans was fractionated by gel-filtration and reversed phase chromatography. The amino acid sequences of peptides were established by de novo sequencing using MALDI mass spectrometry. Baptide 1 comprised 7, baptides 2 and 3-10 amino acid residues, the latter being acetylated at the N-terminus. This is the first indication for the presence of such post-translational modification in snake venom proteins. None of the peptides contain cysteine residues. For biological activity studies the peptides were prepared by solid phase peptide synthesis. Baptide 3 and 2 blocked acetylcholine-elicited currents in isolated Lymnaea stagnalis neurons with IC50 of about 50 μM and 250 μM, respectively. In addition baptide 2 blocked acetylcholine-induced currents in muscle nAChR heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes with IC50 of about 3 μM. The peptides did not compete with radioactive α-bungarotoxin for binding to Torpedo and α7 nAChRs at concentration up to 200 μM that suggests non-competitive mode of inhibition. Calcium imaging studies on α7 and muscle nAChRs heterologously expressed in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a cells showed that on α7 receptor baptide 2 inhibited acetylcholine-induced increasing intracellular calcium concentration with IC50 of 20.6 ± 3.93 μM. On both α7 and muscle nAChRs the suppression of maximal response to acetylcholine by about 50% was observed at baptide 2 concentration of 25 μM, the value being close to IC50 on α7 nAChR. These data are in

  3. Brain β2*-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor occupancy after use of a nicotine inhaler

    OpenAIRE

    Esterlis, Irina; Effie M Mitsis; Batis, Jeffery C.; Bois, Frederic; Picciotto, Marina R.; Stiklus, Stephanie M.; Kloczynski, Tracy; Perry, Edward; Seibyl, John P.; McKee, Sherry; Staley, Julie K.; Cosgrove, Kelly P.

    2010-01-01

    The Nicotrol® (Pfizer, USA) nicotine inhaler reduces craving by mimicking the behavioural component of cigarettes and delivering controlled doses of nicotine, which binds to the beta-2 subunit-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (β2*-nAChRs). Previous studies examined β2*-nAChR occupancy after administration of regular and low-nicotine cigarettes. Here, we measured occupancy of β2*-nAChRs after administration of nicotine via inhaler, and the relationship between occupancy and changes...

  4. [[sup 3]H]imidacloprid: synthesis of a candidate radioligand for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latli, B.; Casida, J.E. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Entomological Sciences)

    1992-08-01

    Imidacloprid is an exceptionally potent insecticide known from physiological studies to act at the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. To prepare [[sup 3]H]imidacloprid as a candidate radioligand, 6-chloronicotinoyl chloride was reduced with NaB[sup 2]H[sub 4] (in model studies) or NaB[sup 3]H[sub 4] in absolute ethanol to 2-chloro-5-pyridinylmethanol which was transformed to 2-chloro-5-chloromethylpyridine on refluxing with thionyl chloride. Coupling with 4,5-dihydro-N-nitro-1H-imidazol-2-amine then gave [[sup 2]H[sub 2

  5. An ER-resident membrane protein complex regulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit composition at the synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almedom, Ruta B; Liewald, Jana F; Hernando, Guillermina; Schultheis, Christian; Rayes, Diego; Pan, Jie; Schedletzky, Thorsten; Hutter, Harald; Bouzat, Cecilia; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are homo- or heteropentameric ligand-gated ion channels mediating excitatory neurotransmission and muscle activation. Regulation of nAChR subunit assembly and transfer of correctly assembled pentamers to the cell surface is only partially understood. Here, we characterize an ER transmembrane (TM) protein complex that influences nAChR cell-surface expression and functional properties in Caenorhabditis elegans muscle. Loss of either type I TM protein, NRA-2 or NRA-4 (nicotinic receptor associated), affects two different types of muscle nAChRs and causes in vivo resistance to cholinergic agonists. Sensitivity to subtype-specific agonists of these nAChRs is altered differently, as demonstrated by whole-cell voltage-clamp of dissected adult muscle, when applying exogenous agonists or after photo-evoked, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) mediated acetylcholine (ACh) release, as well as in single-channel recordings in cultured embryonic muscle. These data suggest that nAChRs desensitize faster in nra-2 mutants. Cell-surface expression of different subunits of the ‘levamisole-sensitive' nAChR (L-AChR) is differentially affected in the absence of NRA-2 or NRA-4, suggesting that they control nAChR subunit composition or allow only certain receptor assemblies to leave the ER. PMID:19609303

  6. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and its prokaryotic homologues: Structure, conformational transitions & allosteric modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Marco; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) play a central role in intercellular communications in the nervous system by converting the binding of a chemical messenger - a neurotransmitter - into an ion flux through the postsynaptic membrane. Here, we present an overview of the most recent advances on the signal transduction mechanism boosted by X-ray crystallography of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic homologues of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in conjunction with time-resolved analyses based on single-channel electrophysiology and Molecular Dynamics simulations. The available data consistently point to a global mechanism of gating that involves a large reorganization of the receptor mediated by two distinct quaternary transitions: a global twisting and a radial expansion/contraction of the extracellular domain. These transitions profoundly modify the organization of the interface between subunits, which host several sites for orthosteric and allosteric modulatory ligands. The same mechanism may thus mediate both positive and negative allosteric modulations of pLGICs ligand binding at topographically distinct sites. The emerging picture of signal transduction is expected to pave the way to new pharmacological strategies for the development of allosteric modulators of nAChR and pLGICs in general. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A fluorinated quinuclidine benzamide named LMA 10203 acts as an agonist of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Bodereau-Dubois, Béatrice; Lapied, Bruno; Lebreton, Jacques; Thany, Steeve H

    2012-06-01

    In the present study, we take advantage of the fact that cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons express different nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes to demonstrate that simple quinuclidine benzamides such as the 2-fluorinated benzamide LMA 10203, could act as an agonist of cockroach α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtype, called nAChR2. Indeed, 1 mM LMA 10203 induced ionic currents which were partially blocked by 0.5 μM α-bungarotoxin and methyllycaconitine and completely blocked by 5 μM mecamylamine. Moreover, the current-voltage curve revealed that the ionic current induced by LMA 10203 increased from -30 mV to +20 mV confirming that it acted as an agonist of α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2. In addition, 1 mM LMA 10203 induced a depolarization of the sixth abdominal ganglion and this neuroexcitatory activity was completely blocked by 5 μM mecamylamine. These data suggest that nAChR2 was also expressed at the postsynaptic level on the synapse between the cercal afferent nerve and the giant interneurons. Interestingly, despite LMA 10203 being an agonist of cockroach nicotinic receptors, it had a poor insecticidal activity. We conclude that LMA 10203 could be used as an interesting compound to identify specific insect nAChR subtypes.

  8. Biosynthesis of the Torpedo californica Acetylcholine Receptor α Subunit in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Norihisa; Nelson, Nathan; Fox, Thomas D.; Claudio, Toni; Lindstrom, Jon; Riezman, Howard; Hess, George P.

    1986-03-01

    Yeast cells were transformed with a plasmid containing complementary DNA encoding the α subunit of the Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor. These cells synthesized a protein that had the expected molecular weight, antigenic specificity, and ligand-binding properties of the α subunit. The subunit was inserted into the yeast plasma membrane, demonstrating that yeast has the apparatus to express a membrane-bound receptor protein and to insert such a foreign protein into its plasma membrane. The α subunit constituted approximately 1 percent of the total yeast membrane proteins, and its density was about the same in the plasma membrane of yeast and in the receptor-rich electric organ of Electrophorus electricus. In view of the available technology for obtaining large quantities of yeast proteins, it may now be possible to obtain amplified amounts of interesting membrane-bound proteins for physical and biochemical studies.

  9. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Gene Family of the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi-peng; LIN Ke-jian; LIU Yang; GUI Fu-rong; WANG Gui-rong

    2013-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAchRs) are cholinergic receptors that form ligand-gated ion channels by ifve subunits in insect and vertebrate nervous systems. The insect nAChR is the molecular target of a class of insecticides, neonicotinoids. Here, we identiifed and cloned 11 candidate nAChR subunit genes in Acyrthosiphon pisum using genome-based bioinformatics combined modern molecular techniques. Most A. pisum nAChRs including α1, α2, α3, α4, α6, α8, and β1 show highly sequence identities with the counterparts of other insects examined. Expression proifles analysis showed that all subunit genes were expressed in adult head. At least two subunits have alternative splicing that obviously increase A. pisum nicotinic receptor diversity. This study will be invaluable for exploring the molecular mechanisms of neonicotinoid-like insecticides in sucking pests, and for ultimately establishing the screening platform of novel insecticides.

  10. Vector-averaged gravity does not alter acetylcholine receptor single channel properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitstetter, R.; Gruener, R.

    1994-01-01

    To examine the physiological sensitivity of membrane receptors to altered gravity, we examined the single channel properties of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), in co-cultures of Xenopus myocytes and neurons, to vector-averaged gravity in the clinostat. This experimental paradigm produces an environment in which, from the cell's perspective, the gravitational vector is "nulled" by continuous averaging. In that respect, the clinostat simulates one aspect of space microgravity where the gravity force is greatly reduced. After clinorotation, the AChR channel mean open-time and conductance were statistically not different from control values but showed a rotation-dependent trend that suggests a process of cellular adaptation to clinorotation. These findings therefore suggest that the ACHR channel function may not be affected in the microgravity of space despite changes in the receptor's cellular organization.

  11. The binding of pirenzepine to digitonin-solubilized muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from the rat myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsall, N. J.; Hulme, E. C.; Keen, M.

    1986-01-01

    The binding of pirenzepine to digitonin-solubilized rat myocardial muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been examined at 4 degrees C. Solubilization produced only small changes in the binding of N-methylscopolamine and atropine. In contrast to the low affinity binding of pirenzepine found to be present in in the membranes, high affinity binding was detected in the soluble preparation. In both preparations, pirenzepine binding was complex. High affinity pirenzepine binding (KD approximately 3 X 10(-8)M) to the soluble myocardial receptors could be monitored directly using [3H]-pirenzepine. [3H]-pirenzepine-labelled soluble myocardial receptors have a sedimentation coefficient of 11.1 s. This indicates that [3H]-pirenzepine binds predominantly to the uncoupled form of the receptor. However, [3H]-pirenzepine-agonist competition experiments indicated that the high affinity pirenzepine binding sites are capable of coupling with a guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein. Pirenzepine affinities for the soluble myocardial receptors were unaffected by their state of association with the GTP-binding proteins found in the heart. The equilibrium binding properties of the soluble cortical and myocardial receptors were very similar. However, the binding kinetics of the myocardial receptor were much slower. It appears that the membrane environment can affect the affinity of pirenzepine for the rat myocardial muscarinic receptor. Removal of the constraint by solubilization allows the expression of high affinity pirenzepine binding. PMID:3754173

  12. Desensitization of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes is caused by their sequestration/internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T

    1998-10-01

    Desensitization of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (hm2 receptors) stably expressed in chinese hamster ovary cells was measured as decreases in the carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity in membrane preparations after pre-treatment of cells with carbamylcholine. The extent of carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was found to decrease to 64% following pretreatment of cells with 10 microM carbamylcholine for 30 min, and under the same conditions 51-59% of hm2 receptors were sequestered/internalized as assessed by decreases in the [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding activity on the cell surface. A similar reduction in the carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was observed by pretreatment of cells with 5 nM propylbenzylylcholine mustard, which irreversibly bound to and inactivated 58% of the hm2 receptors. When the cells were pretreated with 10 microM carbamylcholine in the presence of 0.32 M sucrose, which is known to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis, no sequestration/internalization of hm2 receptors was observed, and the extent of carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity did not change. These results indicate that desensitization of hm2 receptors may be caused by reduction of receptor number on the cell surface through sequestration/internalization rather than by loss of the function of receptors.

  13. Effects of lobeline and dimethylphenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP) on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-evoked acetylcholine release in vitro: evidence for a lack of involvement of classical neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, T S; Correa, L D; Lloyd, G K

    1997-01-01

    Biochemical, behavioral and electrophysiological evidence suggests interactions between pathways containing neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (NAChRs) and excitatory amino acid receptors. Recently, protective effects of nicotine against N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced toxicity in primary cortical cultures were reported. To address possible interactions between NAChR and NMDA receptor containing pathways, several NAChR agonists were evaluated for their effects on NMDA-evoked [3H]acetylcholine ([3H]ACh) release from slices of rat striatum. Nicotine, cytisine and epibatidine had no effect on NMDA-evoked release or basal release of [3H]ACh over a wide range of concentrations. Lobeline and dimethylphenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP), however, decreased basal [3H]ACh release and attenuated NMDA-evoked [3H]ACh release with EC50 values of 35 and 155 microM, respectively. The NAChR antagonists, dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DH beta E) and d-tubocurarine had no effect on NMDA-evoked [3H]ACh release, whereas mecamylamine attenuated the NMDA-evoked [3H]ACh evoked release with an EC50 value of 144 microM. Methyllycaconitine (MLA), a highly selective and potent antagonist of the alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive alpha 7 NAChR subtype, also had no effect on NMDA-evoked [3H]ACh release at concentrations upto 10 microM. The inhibitory effects of DMPP and lobeline on NMDA-evoked [3H[ACh release were relatively insensitive to mecamylamine, d-tubocurarine, MLA and DH beta E. In addition, DMPP or lobeline-induced attenuation of basal [3H]ACh release was insensitive to blockade by sulpiride, a dopamine (D2) receptor antagonist. In contrast to their effects on NMDA-evoked striatal [3H]ACh release, both DMPP and lobeline increased basal release of striatal [3H]DA and hippocampal [3H]norepinephrine ([3H]NE) and did not attenuate NMDA-evoked release of these two transmitters. Instead, DMPP and lobeline appeared to have an additive effect on both NMDA-evoked hippocampal [3H]NE release and

  14. Some properties of human neuronal α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors fused to the green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Eleonora; Mileo, Anna M.; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2002-01-01

    The functional properties and cellular localization of the human neuronal α7 nicotinic acetylcholine (AcCho) receptor (α7 AcChoR) and its L248T mutated (mut) form were investigated by expressing them alone or as gene fusions with the enhanced version of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Xenopus oocytes injected with wild-type (wt), mutα7, or the chimeric subunit cDNAs expressed receptors that gated membrane currents when exposed to AcCho. As already known, AcCho currents generated by wtα7 receptors decay much faster than those elicited by the mutα7 receptors. Unexpectedly, the fusion of GFP to the wt and mutated α7 receptors led to opposite results: the AcCho-current decay of the wt receptors became slower, whereas that of the mutated receptors was accelerated. Furthermore, repetitive applications of AcCho led to a considerable “run-down” of the AcCho currents generated by mutα7-GFP receptors, whereas those of the wtα7-GFP receptors remained stable or increased in amplitude. The AcCho-current run-down of mutα7-GFP oocytes was accompanied by a marked decrease of α-bungarotoxin binding activity. Fluorescence, caused by the chimeric receptors expressed, was seen over the whole oocyte surface but was more intense and abundant in the animal hemisphere, whereas it was much weaker in the vegetal hemisphere. We conclude that fusion of GFP to wtα7 and mutα7 receptors provides powerful tools to study the distribution and function of α7 receptors. We also conclude that fused genes do not necessarily recapitulate all of the properties of the original receptors. This fact must be borne close in mind whenever reporter genes are attached to proteins. PMID:11891308

  15. Hypotensive effect of angiotensin II after AT1-receptor blockade with losartan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, T; Pawlak, R; Kucharewicz, I; Chabielska, E; Buczko, W

    2000-03-01

    Recent data suggest that hypotensive effect of losartan may not be attributed solely to AT1-receptor blockade, but also to excessive AT2 or other receptors stimulation by elevated angiotensin II and its derivative peptides. Therefore in the present study we examined the effect of angiotensin II on mean blood pressure after AT -receptor blockade with losartan. Male Wistar rats were anaesthetised and received injection of either losartan (30 mg/kg, 1 ml/kg, i.v.) or saline (the same volume and route) followed by bolus injection of angiotensin II (100, 300 or 1,000 ng/kg; 1 ml/kg, i.v.) or 1-hour infusion of angiotensin II (200 ng/kg/min; 2.5 ml/kg/h, i.v.). Control animals received saline instead. Angiotensin II, given either as the injection or the infusion, caused an evident increase in mean blood pressure (p ranged from 0.05 to 0.001 depending on the experimental group). Losartan caused a rapid drop in mean blood pressure and blunted the hypertensive effect of angiotensin II (p < 0.01). Moreover, in the losartan-pretreated animals the hypotensive phase was enhanced by the infusion, but not single injection of angiotensin II, which was most evident from the 30 th minute of observation (p < 0.05 vs control). In conclusion, hypotensive effect of losartan may be amplified by simultaneous increase in angiotensin II level, the situation observed during chronic AT1-receptor blockade.

  16. Fear memory in a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia based on the postnatal blockade of NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latusz, Joachim; Radaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Bator, Ewelina; Wędzony, Krzysztof; Maćkowiak, Marzena

    2017-02-01

    Epidemiological data have indicated that memory impairment is observed during adolescence in groups at high risk for schizophrenia and might precede the appearance of schizophrenia symptoms in adulthood. In the present study, we used a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia based on the postnatal blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in rats to investigate fear memory in adolescence and adulthood. The rats were treated with increasing doses of CGP 37849 (CGP), a competitive antagonist of the NMDA receptor (1.25mg/kg on days 1, 3, 6, 9; 2.5mg/kg on days 12, 15, 18 and 5mg/kg on day 21). Fear memory was analysed in delay and trace fear conditioning. Sensorimotor gating deficit, which is another cognitive symptom of schizophrenia, was also determined in adolescent and adult CGP-treated rats. Postnatal CGP administration disrupted cue- and context-dependent fear memory in adolescent rats in both delay and trace conditioning. In contrast, CGP administration evoked impairment only in cue-dependent fear memory in rats exposed to trace but not delay fear conditioning. The postnatal blockade of NMDA receptors induced sensorimotor gating deficits in adult rats but not in adolescent rats. The postnatal blockade of NMDA receptors induced fear memory impairment in adolescent rats before the onset of neurobehavioral deficits associated with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  17. Eight genes are required for functional reconstitution of the Caenorhabditis elegans levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulin, Thomas; Gielen, Marc; Richmond, Janet E.; Williams, Daniel C.; Paoletti, Pierre; Bessereau, Jean-Louis

    2008-01-01

    Levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptors (L-AChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory neurotransmission at the neuromuscular junctions of nematodes. They constitute a major drug target for anthelminthic treatments because they can be activated by nematode-specific cholinergic agonists such as levamisole. Genetic screens conducted in Caenorhabditis elegans for resistance to levamisole toxicity identified genes that are indispensable for the biosynthesis of L-AChRs. These include 5 genes encoding distinct AChR subunits and 3 genes coding for ancillary proteins involved in assembly and trafficking of the receptors. Despite extensive analysis of L-AChRs in vivo, pharmacological and biophysical characterization of these receptors has been greatly hampered by the absence of a heterologous expression system. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to reconstitute functional L-AChRs by coexpressing the 5 distinct receptor subunits and the 3 ancillary proteins. Strikingly, this system recapitulates the genetic requirements for receptor expression in vivo because omission of any of these 8 genes dramatically impairs L-AChR expression. We demonstrate that 3 α- and 2 non-α-subunits assemble into the same receptor. Pharmacological analysis reveals that the prototypical cholinergic agonist nicotine is unable to activate L-AChRs but rather acts as a potent allosteric inhibitor. These results emphasize the role of ancillary proteins for efficient expression of recombinant neurotransmitter receptors and open the way for in vitro screening of novel anthelminthic agents. PMID:19020092

  18. Subtype-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists enhance the responsiveness to citalopram and reboxetine in the mouse forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jesper T; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Christensen, Jeppe K; Olsen, Gunnar M; Peters, Dan; Mirza, Naheed R; Redrobe, John P

    2011-10-01

    Nicotine increases serotonergic and noradrenergic neuronal activity and facilitates serotonin and noradrenaline release. Accordingly, nicotine enhances antidepressant-like actions of reuptake inhibitors selective for serotonin or noradrenaline in the mouse forced swim test and the mouse tail suspension test. Both high-affinity α4β2 and low-affinity α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes are implicated in nicotine-mediated release of serotonin and noradrenaline. The present study therefore investigated whether selective agonism of α4β2 or α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors would affect the mouse forced swim test activity of two antidepressants with distinct mechanisms of action, namely the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. Subthreshold and threshold doses of citalopram (3 and 10 mg/kg) or reboxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg) were tested alone and in combination with the novel α4β2-selective partial nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, NS3956 (0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg) or the α7-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, PNU-282987 (10 and 30 mg/kg). Alone, NS3956 and PNU-282987 were devoid of activity in the mouse forced swim test, but both 1.0 mg/kg NS3956 and 30 mg/kg PNU-282987 enhanced the effect of citalopram and also reboxetine. The data suggest that the activity of citalopram and reboxetine in the mouse forced swim test can be enhanced by agonists at either α4β2 or α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting that both nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes may be involved in the nicotine-enhanced action of antidepressants.

  19. Evidence that the positive inotropic effects of the alkylxanthines are not due to adenosine receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, M. G.; Keddie, J. R.; Torr, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    We investigated the possibility that the positive inotropic effects of the alkylxanthines are due to adenosine receptor blockade. The potency of 8-phenyltheophylline, theophylline and enprofylline as adenosine antagonists was assessed in vitro, using the guinea-pig isolated atrium, and in vivo, using the anaesthetized dog. The order of potency of the alkylxanthines as antagonists of the negative inotropic response to 2-chloroadenosine in vitro, and of the hypotensive response to adenosine in vivo was 8-phenyltheophylline greater than theophylline greater than enprofylline. The order of potency of the alkylxanthines as positive inotropic and chronotropic agents in the anaesthetized dog was enprofylline greater than theophylline greater than 8-phenyltheophylline. The results of this study indicate that the inotropic effects of the alkylxanthines in the anaesthetized dog are not due to adenosine receptor blockade. PMID:6322898

  20. The Anti-Acetylcholine Receptor Antibody Test in Suspected Ocular Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Jin Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate the clinical significance of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody (anti-AChR-Ab levels in suspected ocular myasthenia gravis. Methods. In total, 144 patients complaining of fluctuating diplopia and ptosis were evaluated for serum levels of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody and their medical charts were retrospectively reviewed. Subjects were classified into three groups: variable diplopia only, ptosis only, and both variable diplopia and ptosis. We investigated serum anti-AChR-Ab titer levels and performed thyroid autoantibody tests. Results. Patients’ chief complaints were diplopia (N=103, ptosis (N=12, and their concurrence (N=29. Abnormal anti-AChR-Ab was observed in 21 of 144 patients (14.1%. Between the three groups, mean age, number of seropositive patients, and mean anti-AChR-Ab level were not significantly different (P=0.224, 0.073, and 0.062, resp.. Overall, 27.5% of patients had abnormal thyroid autoantibodies. Conclusion. The sensitivity of anti-AChR-Ab was 14.1% in suspected ocular myasthenia gravis and seropositivity in myasthenia gravis patients showed a high correlation with the presence of thyroid autoantibodies.

  1. Nicotine enhances alcohol intake and dopaminergic responses through β2* and β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolu, Stefania; Marti, Fabio; Morel, Carole; Perrier, Carole; Torquet, Nicolas; Pons, Stephanie; de Beaurepaire, Renaud; Faure, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol and nicotine are the most widely co-abused drugs. Both modify the activity of dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) and lead to an increase in DA release in the Nucleus Accumbens, thereby affecting the reward system. Evidences support the hypothesis that distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), the molecular target of acetylcholine (ACh) and exogenous nicotine, are also in addition implicated in the response to alcohol. The precise molecular and neuronal substrates of this interaction are however not well understood. Here we used in vivo electrophysiology in the VTA to characterise acute and chronic interactions between nicotine and alcohol. Simultaneous injections of the two drugs enhanced their responses on VTA DA neuron firing and chronic exposure to nicotine increased alcohol-induced DA responses and alcohol intake. Then, we assessed the role of β4 * nAChRs, but not β2 * nAChRs, in mediating acute responses to alcohol using nAChR subtypes knockout mice (β2−/− and β4−/− mice). Finally, we showed that nicotine-induced modifications of alcohol responses were absent in β2−/− and β4−/− mice, suggesting that nicotine triggers β2* and β4 * nAChR-dependent neuroadaptations that subsequently modify the responses to alcohol and thus indicating these receptors as key mediators in the complex interactions between these two drugs. PMID:28332590

  2. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Bojesen, Stig E; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    We examined the associations between the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism (rs1051730) on chromosome 15q25 marking the gene cluster CHRNA3-CHRNB4-CHRNA5, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases in the general population.......We examined the associations between the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphism (rs1051730) on chromosome 15q25 marking the gene cluster CHRNA3-CHRNB4-CHRNA5, smoking behavior, and tobacco-related cancer and lung and cardiovascular diseases in the general population....

  3. Recovery of network-driven glutamatergic activity in rat hippocampal neurons during chronic glutamate receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Eric; Belousov, Andrei B

    2009-01-28

    Previous studies indicated that a long-term decrease in the activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors induces cholinergic activity in rat and mouse hypothalamic neuronal cultures. Here we studied whether a prolonged inactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors also induces cholinergic activity in hippocampal neurons. Receptor activity was chronically suppressed in rat hippocampal primary neuronal cultures with two proportionally increasing sets of concentrations of NMDA plus non-NMDA receptor antagonists: 100 microM/10 microM AP5/CNQX (1X cultures) and 200 microM/20 microM AP5/CNQX (2X cultures). Using calcium imaging we demonstrate that cholinergic activity does not develop in these cultures. Instead, network-driven glutamate-dependent activity, that normally is detected in hyper-excitable conditions, reappears in each culture group in the presence of these antagonists and can be reversibly suppressed by higher concentrations of AP5/CNQX. This activity is mediated by non-NMDA receptors and is modulated by NMDA receptors. Further, non-NMDA receptors, the general level of glutamate receptor activity and CaMK-dependent signaling are critical for development of this network-driven glutamatergic activity in the presence of receptor antagonists. Using electrophysiology, western blotting and calcium imaging we show that some neuronal parameters are either reduced or not affected by chronic glutamate receptor blockade. However, other parameters (including neuronal excitability, mEPSC frequency, and expression of GluR1, NR1 and betaCaMKII) become up-regulated and, in some cases, proportionally between the non-treated, 1X and 2X cultures. Our data suggest recovery of the network-driven glutamatergic activity after chronic glutamate receptor blockade. This recovery may represent a form of neuronal plasticity that compensates for the prolonged suppression of the activity of glutamate receptors.

  4. Enhanced self-administration of alcohol in muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Cour, Cecilie; Sørensen, Gunnar; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    -established. Moreover, the M4-/- mice displayed a reduced capacity to extinguish their alcohol-seeking behavior. Taken together, alcohol consumption is elevated in M4-/- mice, indicating that the M4 receptor is involved in mediating the reinforcing effects of alcohol. The M4 receptor should be further explored......Modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is known to alter alcohol-drinking behavior. It is not known if muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes have similar effects. The muscarinic M4 receptor is highly expressed in the brain reinforcement system...... and involved in regulation of cholinergic and dopaminergic transmission. Here we investigate, for the first time, the role of the M4 receptor in alcohol consumption using M4 knockout (M4-/-) and wild-type (M4+/+) mice. Experimentally naïve M4-/- and M4+/+ mice were trained to orally self-administer 5%, 8...

  5. Effect of {beta}{sub 1} adrenergic receptor blockade on myocardial blood flow and vasodilatory capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettcher, M.; Czernin, J.; Sun, K. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade reduces cardiac work and may thereby lower myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest. The effect of {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade on hyperemic MBF is unknown. To evaluate the effect of selective {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade on MBF at rest and during dipyridamole induced hyperemia, 10 healthy volunteers (8 men, 2 women, mean age 24 {+-} 5 yr) were studied using {sup 13}N-ammonia PET (two-compartment model) under control conditions and again during metoprolol (50 mg orally 12 hr and 1 hr before the study). The resting rate pressure product (6628 {+-} 504 versus 5225 {+-} 807) and heart rate (63 {+-} 6-54 {plus_minus} 5 bpm) declined during metoprolol (p < 0.05). Similarly, heart rate and rate pressure product declined from the baseline dipyridamole study to dipyridamole plus metoprolol (p < 0.05). Resting MBF declined in proportion to cardiac work by approximately 20% from 0.61 {+-} 0.09-0.51 {+-} 0.10 ml/g/min (p < 0.05). In contrast, hyperemic MBF increased when metoprolol was added to dipyridamole (1.86 {plus_minus} 0.27 {+-} 0.45 ml/g/min; p<0.05). The decrease in resting MBF together with the increase in hyperemic MBF resulted in a significant increase in the myocardial flow reserve during metoprolol (3.14 {+-} 0.80-4.61 {+-} 0.68; p<0.01). The {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade increases coronary vasodilatory capacity and myocardial flow reserve. However, the mechanisms accounting for this finding remain uncertain. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Acetylcholine Attenuates Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Intracellular Calcium Dyshomeostasis Through Both Muscarinic and Nicotinic Receptors in Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siripong Palee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Oxidative stress induced intracellular Ca2+ overload plays an important role in the pathophysiology of several heart diseases. Acetylcholine (ACh has been shown to suppress reactive oxygen species generation during oxidative stress. However, there is little information regarding the effects of ACh on the intracellular Ca2+ regulation in the presence of oxidative stress. Therefore, we investigated the effects of ACh applied before or after hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 treatment on the intracellular Ca2+ regulation in isolated cardiomyocytes. Methods: Single ventricular myocytes were isolated from the male Wistar rats for the intracellular Ca2+ transient study by a fluorimetric ratio technique. Results: H2O2 significantly decreased both of intracellular Ca2+ transient amplitude and decay rate. ACh applied before, but not after, H2O2 treatment attenuated the reduction of intracellular Ca2+ transient amplitude and decay rate. Both atropine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blocker and mecamylamine (a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor blocker significantly decreased the protective effects of acetylcholine on the intracellular Ca2+ regulation. Moreover, the combination of atropine and mecamylamine completely abolished the protective effects of acetylcholine on intracellular Ca2+ transient amplitude and decay rate. Conclusion: ACh pretreatment attenuates H2O2-induced intracellular Ca2+ dyshomeostasis through both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors.

  7. Opiate receptor blockade on human granulosa cells inhibits VEGF release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunger, Fabian; Vehmas, Anni P; Fürnrohr, Barbara G; Sopper, Sieghart; Wildt, Ludwig; Seeber, Beata

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether the main opioid receptor (OPRM1) is present on human granulosa cells and if exogenous opiates and their antagonists can influence granulosa cell vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production via OPRM1. Granulosa cells were isolated from women undergoing oocyte retrieval for IVF. Complementary to the primary cells, experiments were conducted using COV434, a well-characterized human granulosa cell line. Identification and localization of opiate receptor subtypes was carried out using Western blot and flow cytometry. The effect of opiate antagonist on granulosa cell VEGF secretion was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For the first time, the presence of OPRM1 on human granulosa cells is reported. Blocking of opiate signalling using naloxone, a specific OPRM1 antagonist, significantly reduced granulosa cell-derived VEGF levels in both COV434 and granulosa-luteal cells (P opiate receptors and opiate signalling in granulosa cells suggest a possible role in VEGF production. Targeting this signalling pathway could prove promising as a new clinical option in the prevention and treatment of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

  8. Steroids induce acetylcholine receptors on cultured human muscle: Implications for myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, I.; Blakely, B.T.; Pavlath, G.K.; Travis, M.; Blau, H.M. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), which are diagnostic of the human autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis, block AChR function and increase the rate of AChR degradation leading to impaired neuromuscular transmission. Steroids are frequently used to alleviate symptoms of muscle fatigue and weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis because of their well-documented immunosuppressive effects. The authors show here that the steroid dexamethasone significantly increases total surface AChRs on cultured human muscle exposed to myasthenia gravis sera. The results suggest that the clinical improvement observed in myasthenic patients treated with steroids is due not only to an effect on the immune system but also a direct effect on muscle. They propose that the identification and development of pharmacologic agents that augment receptors and other proteins that are reduced by human genetic or autoimmune disease will have broad therapeutic applications.

  9. The Protective Effect of Alpha 7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Activation on Critical Illness and Its Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    REN, Chao; TONG, Ya-lin; LI, Jun-cong; LU, Zhong-qiu; YAO, Yong-ming

    2017-01-01

    Critical illnesses and injuries are recognized as major threats to human health, and they are usually accompanied by uncontrolled inflammation and dysfunction of immune response. The alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAchR), which is a primary receptor of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP), exhibits great benefits for critical ill conditions. It is composed of 5 identical α7 subunits that form a central pore with high permeability for calcium. This putative structure is closely associated with its functional states. Activated α7nAChR exhibits extensive anti-inflammatory and immune modulatory reactions, including lowered pro-inflammatory cytokines levels, decreased expressions of chemokines as well as adhesion molecules, and altered differentiation and activation of immune cells, which are important in maintaining immune homeostasis. Well understanding of the effects and mechanisms of α7nAChR will be of great value in exploring effective targets for treating critical diseases. PMID:28123345

  10. Zebrafish M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor: cloning, pharmacological characterization, expression patterns and roles in embryonic bradycardia

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Liao, Ching-Fong

    2002-01-01

    A zebrafish M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) gene was cloned. It encodes 495 amino acids in a single exon. The derived amino acid sequence is 73.5% identical to its human homologue.Competitive binding studies of the zebrafish M2 receptor and [3H]-NMS gave negative log dissociation constants (pKi) for each antagonist as follows: atropine (9.16)>himbacine (8.05)⩾4-DAMP (7.83)>AF-DX 116 (7.26)⩾pirenzepine (7.18)⩾tropicamide (6.97)⩾methoctramine (6.82)⩾p-F-HHSiD (6.67)>carbachol (5.20...

  11. Immunological studies on the structure and function of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in mammalian muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The specificity of the antibodies in the serum of a patient with myasthenia gravis for a the {alpha}-bungarotoxin binding sites of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) was examined using AChRs in the C2 mouse muscle cell line as a model. The antibodies were shown to be specific for one of the two toxin-binding sites. The effect of the antibodies in this myasthenic serum on the functional response of the receptor to cholinergic agonists was also examined using carbamylcholine-induced {sup 22}Na uptake into C2 myotubes as a measured of the receptor function. Antibodies specific for the {gamma}, {delta}, and {epsilon} subunit, respectively, of mammalian muscle AChRs were developed using subunit-specific synthetic peptides as antigens. Using these antibodies and monoclonal antibodies for other subunits as probes, I have identified four ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, and {delta}) subunits of mammalian muscle AChRs on immunoblots. When AChRs from embryonic, neonatal, normal and denervated adult muscles were compared on immunoblots, the {alpha}, {beta}, and {delta} subunits were identical in all four receptor preparations, with or without endoglycosidase digestion. The spatial and temporal distribution of the {gamma}- and {epsilon}- AChRs in developing and in denervated muscles corresponds to the distribution of AChRs with slow and fast channels, respectively, and that the development changes in the channel properties of the receptor arise from a change in the subunit composition of the receptor, in which the {gamma} is replaced by {epsilon}.

  12. Aspects of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by glutamate receptors; Aspectos das liberacoes de dopamina e acetilcolina mediadas por receptores de glutamato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda

    2002-07-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in the motor control of rats and humans. This control involves different neurotransmitters and the mutual control of these key elements has been subject to several studies. In this work we determined the role of glutamate on the release of radioactively labelled dopamine and acetylcholine from chopped striatal tissue in vitro. The values of Effective Concentration 50% for glutamate, NMDA, kainic, quisqualic acids and AMPA on the release of dopamine and acetylcholine were obtained. The inhibitory effects of magnesium, tetrodotoxin, MK-801, AP5 and MCPG, as well as the effects of glycin were evaluated. The results suggested that dopamine is influenced by the NMDA type glutamate receptor while acetylcholine seems to be influenced by NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptors. Tetrodotoxin experiments suggested that kainate receptors are both present in cholinergic terminals and cell bodies while AMPA and NMDA receptors are preferentially distributed in cell bodies. Magnesium effectively blocked the NMDA stimulation and unexpectedly also AMPA- and quisqualate-induced acetylcholine release. The latter could not be blocked by MCPG ruling out the participation of methabotropic receptors. MK-801 also blocked NMDA-receptors. Results point out the importance of the glutamic acid control of dopamine and acetylcholine release in striatal tissue. (author)

  13. Cross-regulation between colocalized nicotinic acetylcholine and 5-HT3 serotonin receptors on presynaptic nerve terminals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John J DOUGHERTY; Robert A NICHOLS

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Substantial colocalization of functionally independent a4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and 5-HT3 serotonin receptors on presynaptic terminals has been observed in brain. The present study was aimed at addressing whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and 5-HT3 serotonin receptors interact on the same presynaptic terminal, suggesting a convergence of cholinergic and serotonergic regulation.Methods: Ca2+ responses in individual, isolated nerve endings purified from rat striatum were measured using confocal imaging.Results: Application of 500 nmol/L nicotine following sustained stimulation with the highly selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist m-chlorophenylbiguanide at 100 nmol/L resulted in markedly reduced Ca2* responses (28% of control) in only those striatal nerve endings that originally responded to m-chlorophenylbiguanide. The cross-regulation developed over several minutes. Presynaptic nerve endings that had not responded to m-chlorophenylbiguanide, indicating that 5-HT3 receptors were not present, displayed typical responses to nicotine. Application of m-chlorophenylbiguanide following sustained stimulation with nicotine resulted in partially attenuated Ca2* responses (49% of control). Application of m-chlorophenylbiguanide following sustained stimulation with m-chlorophenylbiguanide also resulted in a strong attenuation of Ca2+ responses (12% of control), whereas nicotine-induced Ca2t responses following sustained stimulation with nicotine were not significantly different from control.Conclusion: These results indicate that the presynaptic Ca2+ increases evoked by either 5-HT, receptor or nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation regulate subsequent responses to 5-HT3 receptor activation, but that only 5-HT3 receptors cross-regulate subsequent nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated responses. The findings suggest a specific interaction between the two receptor systems in the same striatal nerve terminal, likely involving Ca2+-dependent

  14. Prevention of atherosclerosis by specific AT1-receptor blockade with candesartan cilexetil

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    Vasilios Papademetriou

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies indicate that blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS can prevent atherosclerosis and vascular events, but the precise mechanisms involved are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of the AT 1-receptor blocker, candesartan, in the prevention of atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidaemic (WHHL rabbits and also the effect of AT1-receptor blockade in the uptake of oxidised LDL by macrophage cell cultures. In the first set of experiments, 12 WHHL rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups: placebo, atenolol 5 mg/kg daily or candesartan 2 mg/kg daily for six months. Compared with controls and atenolol-treated rabbits, candesartan treatment resulted in a significant 50—60% reduction of atherosclerotic plaque formation and a 66% reduction in cholesterol accumulation in the thoracic aorta.Studies in macrophage cultures indicated that candesartan prevented uptake of oxidised LDL-(oxLDL-cholesterol by cultured macrophages. Candesartan inhibited the uptake of oxLDL in a dose-dependent manner, reaching a maximum inhibition of 70% at concentrations of 5.6 µg/ml. Further studies in other animal models and well-designed trials in humans are warranted to further explore the role of AT1-receptor blockade in the prevention of atherosclerosis.

  15. Bispyridinium Compounds Inhibit Both Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Human Cell Lines.

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    Avi Ring

    Full Text Available Standard treatment of poisoning by organophosphorus anticholinesterases uses atropine to reduce the muscarinic effects of acetylcholine accumulation and oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase (the effectiveness of which depends on the specific anticholinesterase, but does not directly address the nicotinic effects of poisoning. Bispyridinium molecules which act as noncompetitive antagonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been identified as promising compounds and one has been shown to improve survival following organophosphorus poisoning in guinea-pigs. Here, we have investigated the structural requirements for antagonism and compared inhibitory potency of these compounds at muscle and neuronal nicotinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase. A series of compounds was synthesised, in which the length of the polymethylene linker between the two pyridinium moieties was increased sequentially from one to ten carbon atoms. Their effects on nicotinic receptor-mediated calcium responses were tested in muscle-derived (CN21 and neuronal (SH-SY5Y cells. Their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity was tested using human erythrocyte ghosts. In both cell lines, the nicotinic response was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory potency of the compounds increased with greater linker length between the two pyridinium moieties, as did their inhibitory potency for human acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that bispyridinium compounds inhibit both neuronal and muscle nicotinic receptors and that their potency depends on the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the two pyridinium moieties. Knowledge of structure-activity relationships will aid the optimisation of molecular structures for therapeutic use against the nicotinic effects of organophosphorus poisoning.

  16. Bispyridinium Compounds Inhibit Both Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Human Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Avi; Strom, Bjorn Oddvar; Turner, Simon R; Timperley, Christopher M; Bird, Michael; Green, A Christopher; Chad, John E; Worek, Franz; Tattersall, John E H

    2015-01-01

    Standard treatment of poisoning by organophosphorus anticholinesterases uses atropine to reduce the muscarinic effects of acetylcholine accumulation and oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase (the effectiveness of which depends on the specific anticholinesterase), but does not directly address the nicotinic effects of poisoning. Bispyridinium molecules which act as noncompetitive antagonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been identified as promising compounds and one has been shown to improve survival following organophosphorus poisoning in guinea-pigs. Here, we have investigated the structural requirements for antagonism and compared inhibitory potency of these compounds at muscle and neuronal nicotinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase. A series of compounds was synthesised, in which the length of the polymethylene linker between the two pyridinium moieties was increased sequentially from one to ten carbon atoms. Their effects on nicotinic receptor-mediated calcium responses were tested in muscle-derived (CN21) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cells. Their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity was tested using human erythrocyte ghosts. In both cell lines, the nicotinic response was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory potency of the compounds increased with greater linker length between the two pyridinium moieties, as did their inhibitory potency for human acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that bispyridinium compounds inhibit both neuronal and muscle nicotinic receptors and that their potency depends on the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the two pyridinium moieties. Knowledge of structure-activity relationships will aid the optimisation of molecular structures for therapeutic use against the nicotinic effects of organophosphorus poisoning.

  17. Blockade of mineralocorticoid receptor reverses adipocyte dysfunction and insulin resistance in obese mice.

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    Hirata, Ayumu; Maeda, Norikazu; Hiuge, Aki; Hibuse, Toshiyuki; Fujita, Koichi; Okada, Takuya; Kihara, Shinji; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2009-10-01

    In obesity, chronic low-grade inflammation and overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in fat contribute to the development of metabolic syndrome. Suppression of inflammation and ROS production in fat may attenuate the metabolic syndrome. Activation of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) promotes inflammation in heart, kidney, and vasculature via ROS generation. However, the significance of MR in fat remains elusive. Here we investigated whether MR blockade attenuates obesity-related insulin resistance and improves adipocyte dysfunction. Obese ob/ob and db/db mice were treated with eplerenone, a MR antagonist, for 3 weeks. 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with aldosterone or H2O2, with and without eplerenone or MR-siRNA. High levels of MR mRNA were detected in adipose tissue of obese ob/ob and db/db mice. Eplerenone treatment significantly reduced insulin resistance, suppressed macrophage infiltration and ROS production in adipose tissues, and corrected the mRNA levels of obesity-related genes in obese mice. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, aldosterone and H2O2 increased intracellular ROS levels and MR blockade inhibited such increases. H2O2 and aldosterone resulted in dysregulation of mRNAs of various genes related to ROS and cytokines, whereas MR blockade corrected such changes. MR blockade attenuates obesity-related insulin resistance partly through reduction of fat ROS production, inflammatory process, and induction of cytokines.

  18. In vivo evaluation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists [11C]A-582941 and [11C]A-844606 in mice and conscious monkeys.

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    Jun Toyohara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play an important role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. The goal of this study was to evaluate the two carbon-11-labeled alpha7 nAChR agonists [(11C]A-582941 and [(11C]A-844606 for their potential as novel positron emission tomography (PET tracers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The two tracers were synthesized by methylation of the corresponding desmethyl precursors using [(11C]methyl triflate. Effects of receptor blockade in mice were determined by coinjection of either tracer along with a carrier or an excess amount of a selective alpha7 nAChR agonist (SSR180711. Metabolic stability was investigated using radio-HPLC. Dynamic PET scans were performed in conscious monkeys with/without SSR180711-treatment. [(11C]A-582941 and [(11C]A-844606 showed high uptake in the mouse brain. Most radioactive compounds in the brain were detected as an unchanged form. However, regional selectivity and selective receptor blockade were not clearly observed for either compound in the mouse brain. On the other hand, the total distribution volume of [(11C]A-582941 and [(11C]A-844606 was high in the hippocampus and thalamus but low in the cerebellum in the conscious monkey brain, and reduced by pretreatment with SSR180711. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A nonhuman primate study suggests that [(11C]A-582941 and [(11C]A-844606 would be potential PET ligands for imaging alpha7 nAChRs in the human brain.

  19. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system mediates hypophagic and anxiety-like effects of CB₁ receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellocchio, Luigi; Soria-Gómez, Edgar; Quarta, Carmelo; Metna-Laurent, Mathilde; Cardinal, Pierre; Binder, Elke; Cannich, Astrid; Delamarre, Anna; Häring, Martin; Martín-Fontecha, Mar; Vega, David; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Bartsch, Dusan; Monory, Krisztina; Lutz, Beat; Chaouloff, Francis; Pagotto, Uberto; Guzman, Manuel; Cota, Daniela; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2013-03-19

    Complex interactions between periphery and the brain regulate food intake in mammals. Cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptor antagonists are potent hypophagic agents, but the sites where this acute action is exerted and the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. To dissect the mechanisms underlying the hypophagic effect of CB1 receptor blockade, we combined the acute injection of the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant with the use of conditional CB1-knockout mice, as well as with pharmacological modulation of different central and peripheral circuits. Fasting/refeeding experiments revealed that CB1 receptor signaling in many specific brain neurons is dispensable for the acute hypophagic effects of rimonabant. CB1 receptor antagonist-induced hypophagia was fully abolished by peripheral blockade of β-adrenergic transmission, suggesting that this effect is mediated by increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Consistently, we found that rimonabant increases gastrointestinal metabolism via increased peripheral β-adrenergic receptor signaling in peripheral organs, including the gastrointestinal tract. Blockade of both visceral afferents and glutamatergic transmission in the nucleus tractus solitarii abolished rimonabant-induced hypophagia. Importantly, these mechanisms were specifically triggered by lipid-deprivation, revealing a nutrient-specific component acutely regulated by CB1 receptor blockade. Finally, peripheral blockade of sympathetic neurotransmission also blunted central effects of CB1 receptor blockade, such as fear responses and anxiety-like behaviors. These data demonstrate that, independently of their site of origin, important effects of CB1 receptor blockade are expressed via activation of peripheral sympathetic activity. Thus, CB1 receptors modulate bidirectional circuits between the periphery and the brain to regulate feeding and other behaviors.

  20. Activation of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the nucleus accumbens core is necessary for the acquisition of drug reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Jose A; Sturm, Katja; Saria, Alois; Zernig, Gerald

    2006-05-31

    Neurotransmitter release in the nucleus accumbens core (NACore) during the acquisition of remifentanil or cocaine reinforcement was determined in an operant runway procedure by simultaneous tandem mass spectrometric analysis of dopamine, acetylcholine, and remifentanil or cocaine itself. Run times for remifentanil or cocaine continually decreased over the five consecutive runs of the experiment. Intra-NACore dopamine, acetylcholine, and drug peaked with each intravenous remifentanil or cocaine self-administration and decreased to pre-run baseline with half-lives of approximately 10 min. As expected, remifentanil or cocaine peaks did not vary between the five runs. Surprisingly, however, drug-contingent dopamine peaks also did not change over the five runs, whereas acetylcholine peaks did. Thus, the acquisition of drug reinforcement was paralleled by a continuous increase in acetylcholine overflow in the NACore, whereas the overflow of dopamine, the expected prime neurotransmitter candidate for conditioning in drug reinforcement, did not increase. Local intra-accumbens administration by reverse microdialysis of either atropine or mecamylamine completely and reversibly blocked the acquisition of remifentanil reinforcement. Our findings suggest that activation of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the NACore by acetylcholine volume transmission is necessary during the acquisition phase of drug reinforcement conditioning.

  1. Pharmacology, Distribution and Development of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes in the Optic Tectum of Rana Pipiens

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    Butt, C. M.; Pauly, J. R.; Wilkins, L. H.; Dwoskin, L. P.; Debski, E. A.

    2008-01-01

    Visually evoked behaviors mediated by the frog optic tectum require cholinergic activity, but the receptor subtypes through which acetylcholine acts are not yet identified. Using quantitative autoradiography and scintillation spectrometry, we examined the binding of [3H]pirenzepine and [3H]AF-DX 384 in the laminated optic tectum of the frog. In mammalian systems, these substances bind excitatory (m1 and m3 subtypes) and inhibitory (m2 and m4 subtypes) muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively. Pharmacological analyses, including the use of specific muscarinic toxins, confirmed the subtype selectivity of the radioligands in the frog brain. Binding sites for [3H]pirenzepine were distinct from those for [3H]AF-DX 384. In the adult tectum, [3H]pirenzepine demonstrated specific binding in tectal layers 5–9. [3H]Pirenzepine binding was also present in tadpoles as young as stage V, but all sampled stages of tadpole tectum had significantly less binding when compared to adults. Lesioning of the optic nerve had no effect on [3H]pirenzepine binding. Specific [3H]AF-DX 384 binding was found in all layers of the adult tectum. All sampled tadpole stages exhibited binding sites for [3H]AF-DX 384, but the densities of these sites were also significantly higher in adults than they were in developing stages. Short-term lesions of the optic nerve reduced [3H]AF-DX 384 binding in all tectal layers of the deafferented lobe when compared to the afferented one. Long-term lesions decreased [3H]AF-DX 384 sites in both lobes. These results indicate that multiple muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites reside in the frog optic tectum at all stages of development, and their pharmacology resembles that of mammalian m1/m3, m2 and m4 subtypes. Our data indicate that few, if any, of these receptors are likely to be located on retinal ganglion cell terminals. Furthermore, the expression of inhibitory muscarinic subtypes seems to be regulated by different mechanisms than that for

  2. Identification of novel α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists based on an isoxazole ether scaffold that demonstrate antidepressant-like activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li-Fang; Tückmantel, Werner; Eaton, J Brek; Caldarone, Barbara; Fedolak, Allison; Hanania, Taleen; Brunner, Dani; Lukas, Ronald J; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2012-01-26

    There is considerable evidence to support the hypothesis that the blockade of nAChR is responsible for the antidepressant action of nicotinic ligands. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist, mecamylamine, has been shown to be an effective add-on in patients that do not respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. This suggests that nAChR ligands may address an unmet clinical need by providing relief from depressive symptoms in refractory patients. In this study, a new series of nAChR ligands based on an isoxazole-ether scaffold have been designed and synthesized for binding and functional assays. Preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) efforts identified a lead compound 43, which possesses potent antidepressant-like activity (1 mg/kg, IP; 5 mg/kg, PO) in the classical mouse forced swim test. Early stage absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADME-Tox) studies also suggested favorable drug-like properties, and broad screening toward other common neurotransmitter receptors indicated that compound 43 is highly selective for nAChRs over the other 45 neurotransmitter receptors and transporters tested.

  3. A novel muscarinic receptor-independent mechanism of KCNQ2/3 potassium channel blockade by Oxotremorine-M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Ruud; Reed, Hannah; Clarke, Sophie; Sher, Emanuele

    2016-11-15

    Inhibition of KCNQ (Kv7) potassium channels by activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been well established, and the ion currents through these channels have been long known as M-currents. We found that this cross-talk can be reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes by co-transfection of human recombinant muscarinic M1 receptors and KCNQ2/3 potassium channels. Application of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist Oxotremorine-methiodide (Oxo-M) between voltage pulses to activate KCNQ2/3 channels caused inhibition of the subsequent KCNQ2/3 responses. This effect of Oxo-M was blocked by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine. We also found that KCNQ2/3 currents were inhibited when Oxo-M was applied during an ongoing KCNQ2/3 response, an effect that was not blocked by atropine, suggesting that Oxo-M inhibits KCNQ2/3 channels directly. Indeed, also in oocytes that were transfected with only KCNQ2/3 channels, but not with muscarinic M1 receptors, Oxo-M inhibited the KCNQ2/3 response. These results show that besides the usual muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated inhibition, Oxo-M also inhibits KCNQ2/3 channels by a direct mechanism. We subsequently tested xanomeline, which is a chemically distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, and oxotremorine, which is a close analogue of Oxo-M. Both compounds inhibited KCNQ2/3 currents via activation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors but, in contrast to Oxo-M, they did not directly inhibit KCNQ2/3 channels. Xanomeline and oxotremorine do not contain a positively charged trimethylammonium moiety that is present in Oxo-M, suggesting that such a charged moiety could be a crucial component mediating this newly described direct inhibition of KCNQ2/3 channels.

  4. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors controlling attention: behavior, circuits and sensitivity to disruption by nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorthuis, Rogier B; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2013-10-15

    Attention is a central cognitive function that enables long-term engagement in a task and suppression of irrelevant information to obtain future goals. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is the main link in integrating emotional and motivational state of an animal to regulate top-down attentional processes. Acetylcholine modulates PFC neuronal networks by activating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) to support attention. However, how neuronal activity changes in the PFC during attention and which nAChR subtypes mediate this is only rudimentarily understood, but progress is being made. Recently, exciting new insights were obtained in the dynamics of cholinergic signaling in the PFC and modes of acetylcholine transmission via nAChRs in the cortex. In addition, mechanisms are uncovered on how the PFC circuitry is regulated by nAChRs. Novel studies show that endogenous activation of nAChRs in the PFC plays a central role in controlling attention. Here, we review current insights into how different subtypes of nAChRs expressed by distinct types of neurons in the PFC circuitry shape attention. In addition we discuss the impact of nicotine on the cholinergic system and prefrontal cortical circuits. Low concentrations of nicotine, as experienced by smokers, interfere with cholinergic signaling. In the long-term exposure to nicotine during adolescence leads to maladaptive adaptations of the PFC circuitry, which ultimately leads to a decrement in attention performance, again emphasizing the importance of nAChRs in attention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Azemiopsin from Azemiops feae Viper Venom, a Novel Polypeptide Ligand of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, Yuri N.; Weise, Christoph; Kasheverov, Igor E.; Andreeva, Tatyana V.; Kryukova, Elena V.; Zhmak, Maxim N.; Starkov, Vladislav G.; Hoang, Ngoc Anh; Bertrand, Daniel; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Sieghart, Werner; Thompson, Andrew J.; Lummis, Sarah C. R.; Tsetlin, Victor I.

    2012-01-01

    Azemiopsin, a novel polypeptide, was isolated from the Azemiops feae viper venom by combination of gel filtration and reverse-phase HPLC. Its amino acid sequence (DNWWPKPPHQGPRPPRPRPKP) was determined by means of Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. It consists of 21 residues and, unlike similar venom isolates, does not contain cysteine residues. According to circular dichroism measurements, this peptide adopts a β-structure. Peptide synthesis was used to verify the determined sequence and to prepare peptide in sufficient amounts to study its biological activity. Azemiopsin efficiently competed with α-bungarotoxin for binding to Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) (IC50 0.18 ± 0.03 μm) and with lower efficiency to human α7 nAChR (IC50 22 ± 2 μm). It dose-dependently blocked acetylcholine-induced currents in Xenopus oocytes heterologously expressing human muscle-type nAChR and was more potent against the adult form (α1β1ϵδ) than the fetal form (α1β1γδ), EC50 being 0.44 ± 0.1 μm and 1.56 ± 0.37 μm, respectively. The peptide had no effect on GABAA (α1β3γ2 or α2β3γ2) receptors at a concentration up to 100 μm or on 5-HT3 receptors at a concentration up to 10 μm. Ala scanning showed that amino acid residues at positions 3–6, 8–11, and 13–14 are essential for binding to Torpedo nAChR. In biological activity azemiopsin resembles waglerin, a disulfide-containing peptide from the Tropidechis wagleri venom, shares with it a homologous C-terminal hexapeptide, but is the first natural toxin that blocks nAChRs and does not possess disulfide bridges. PMID:22613724

  6. Azemiopsin from Azemiops feae viper venom, a novel polypeptide ligand of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, Yuri N; Weise, Christoph; Kasheverov, Igor E; Andreeva, Tatyana V; Kryukova, Elena V; Zhmak, Maxim N; Starkov, Vladislav G; Hoang, Ngoc Anh; Bertrand, Daniel; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Sieghart, Werner; Thompson, Andrew J; Lummis, Sarah C R; Tsetlin, Victor I

    2012-08-03

    Azemiopsin, a novel polypeptide, was isolated from the Azemiops feae viper venom by combination of gel filtration and reverse-phase HPLC. Its amino acid sequence (DNWWPKPPHQGPRPPRPRPKP) was determined by means of Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. It consists of 21 residues and, unlike similar venom isolates, does not contain cysteine residues. According to circular dichroism measurements, this peptide adopts a β-structure. Peptide synthesis was used to verify the determined sequence and to prepare peptide in sufficient amounts to study its biological activity. Azemiopsin efficiently competed with α-bungarotoxin for binding to Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) (IC(50) 0.18 ± 0.03 μm) and with lower efficiency to human α7 nAChR (IC(50) 22 ± 2 μm). It dose-dependently blocked acetylcholine-induced currents in Xenopus oocytes heterologously expressing human muscle-type nAChR and was more potent against the adult form (α1β1εδ) than the fetal form (α1β1γδ), EC(50) being 0.44 ± 0.1 μm and 1.56 ± 0.37 μm, respectively. The peptide had no effect on GABA(A) (α1β3γ2 or α2β3γ2) receptors at a concentration up to 100 μm or on 5-HT(3) receptors at a concentration up to 10 μm. Ala scanning showed that amino acid residues at positions 3-6, 8-11, and 13-14 are essential for binding to Torpedo nAChR. In biological activity azemiopsin resembles waglerin, a disulfide-containing peptide from the Tropidechis wagleri venom, shares with it a homologous C-terminal hexapeptide, but is the first natural toxin that blocks nAChRs and does not possess disulfide bridges.

  7. Tramadol state-dependent memory: involvement of dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari-Sabet, Majid; Jafari-Sabet, Ali-Reza; Dizaji-Ghadim, Ali

    2016-08-01

    The effects on tramadol state-dependent memory of bilateral intradorsal hippocampal (intra-CA1) injections of physostigmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, and atropine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, were examined in adult male NMRI mice. A single-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. Post-training intra-CA1 administration of an atypical μ-opioid receptor agonist, tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse), dose dependently impaired memory retention. Pretest injection of tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under the influence of post-training tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). A pretest intra-CA1 injection of physostigmine (1 μg/mouse) reversed the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). Moreover, pretest administration of physostigmine (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) with an ineffective dose of tramadol (0.25 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) also significantly restored retrieval. Pretest administration of physostigmine (0.25, 0.5, and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. A pretest intra-CA1 injection of the atropine (1 and 2 μg/mouse) 5 min before the administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) dose dependently inhibited tramadol state-dependent memory. Pretest administration of atropine (0.5, 1, and 2 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. It can be concluded that dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor mechanisms play an important role in the modulation of tramadol state-dependent memory.

  8. Halogenated cytisine derivatives as agonists at human neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Y E; Houlihan, L M; Maskell, P D; Exley, R; Bermúdez, I; Lukas, R J; Valdivia, A C; Cassels, B K

    2003-03-01

    Cytisine (cy) is a potent and competitive partial agonist at alpha4 subunit-containing nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors while at homomeric alpha7-nACh receptors it behaves as a full agonist with a relatively lower potency. In the present study, we assessed the effects of bromination or iodination of the pyridone ring of cy and N-methylcytisine (N-Me-cy) on the effects of these compounds on recombinant human (h) alpha7, halpha4beta2 and halpha4beta4 nACh receptors expressed in clonal cell lines and Xenopus oocytes. Halogenation at C(3) of cy or N-Me-cy usually brings about a marked increase in both affinity and efficacy at halpha7, halpha4beta2 and halpha4beta4 nACh, the extent of which depends on whether the halogen is bromine or iodine, and upon receptor subtype. The effects of halogenation at C(5) are strongly influenced by the specific halogen substituent so that bromination causes a decrease in both affinity and efficacy while iodination decreases affinity but its effects on efficacy range from a decrease (halpha7, halpha4beta4 nACh receptors) to a marked increase (halpha4beta2 nACh receptors). Based on these findings, which differ from those showing that neither the affinity nor efficacy of nicotine, 3-(2-azetidinylmethoxy)-pyridine or epibatidine are greatly affected by halogenation, dehalogenation or halogen exchange at equivalent positions, we suggest that cy, N-Me-cy and their halo-isosteres bind to neuronal nACh receptors in a different orientation allowing the halogen atom to interact with a hydrophobic halogen-accepting region within the predominantly hydrophobic agonist-binding pocket of the receptors.

  9. Paradoxical proepileptic response to NMDA receptor blockade linked to cortical interneuron defect in stargazer mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul eMaheshwari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Paradoxical seizure exacerbation by antiepileptic medication is a well-known clinical phenomenon in epilepsy, but the cellular mechanisms remain unclear. One possibility is enhanced network disinhibition by unintended suppression of inhibitory interneurons. We investigated this hypothesis in the stargazer mouse model of absence epilepsy, which bears a mutation in stargazin, an AMPA receptor trafficking protein. If AMPA signaling onto inhibitory GABAergic neurons is impaired, their activation by glutamate depends critically upon NMDA receptors. Indeed, we find that stargazer seizures are exacerbated by NMDA receptor blockade with CPP and MK-801, whereas other genetic absence epilepsy models are sensitive to these antagonists. To determine how an AMPA receptor trafficking defect could lead to paradoxical network activation, we analyzed stargazin and AMPA receptor localization and found that stargazin is detected exclusively in parvalbumin-positive (PV+ fast-spiking interneurons in somatosensory cortex, where it is co-expressed with the AMPA receptor subunit GluA4. PV+ cortical interneurons in stargazer show a near two-fold decrease in the dendrite:soma GluA4 expression ratio compared to wild type littermates. We explored the functional consequence of this trafficking defect on network excitability in neocortical slices. Both NMDA receptor antagonists suppressed 0 Mg2+ induced network discharges in wild type but augmented bursting in stargazer cortex. Interneurons mediate this paradoxical response, since the difference between genotypes was masked by GABA receptor blockade. Our findings provide a cellular locus for AMPA receptor-dependent signaling defects in stargazer cortex and define an interneuron-dependent mechanism for paradoxical seizure exacerbation in absence epilepsy.

  10. Adenosine receptor blockade reduces splanchnic hyperemia in cirrhotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S S; Chilton, E L; Pak, J M

    1992-06-01

    To explore a possible role for adenosine in the pathogenesis of the splanchnic hyperemia of cirrhosis, we administered 8-phenyltheophylline, a specific adenosine receptor antagonist, to rats with biliary cirrhosis caused by bile duct ligation and to control sham-operated rats. Micro-Doppler flow studies showed that a 10-mumol/kg dose of 8-phenyltheophylline completely abolished the superior mesenteric hyperemic response to infusions of exogenous adenosine in both cirrhotic and control rats. Analysis of regional blood flows by radioactive microspheres demonstrated that this dose of 8-phenyltheophylline in cirrhotic rats significantly increased portal tributary vascular resistance by 60% and decreased portal tributary blood flow by 26%. This decrease was entirely the result of a 42% reduction in the intestinal blood flow. 8-phenyltheophylline did not affect cardiac output, arterial pressure or any other extrasplanchnic hemodynamic variables in cirrhotic rats. No detectable effect of 8-phenyltheophylline was seen in sham-operated rats. These results suggest that adenosine may be involved in the genesis of splanchnic hyperemia in cirrhotic rats.

  11. AMYGDALA KINDLING-INDUCED SEIZURES SELECTIVELY IMPAIR SPATIAL MEMORY .2. EFFECTS ON HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONAL AND GLIAL MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BELDHUIS, HJA; EVERTS, HGJ; VANDERZEE, EA; LUITEN, PGM; BOHUS, B

    1992-01-01

    The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor is linked via hydrolysis of phosphoinositides to the protein kinase C pathway. In a preceding paper (Beldhuis, H. J. A., H. G. J. Everts, E. A. Vander Zee, P. G. M. Luiten, and B. Bohus (1992) Amygdala kindling-induced seizures selectively impair spatial memory.

  12. Hippocampal α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor levels in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Weyn, Annelies; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is involved in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity. Consequently, changes in α7 nAChR function have been implicated in a variety of mental disorders, especially schizophrenia. However, there is little knowledge regarding the levels of the α7 n......AChR in patients with bipolar disorder....

  13. Carbamoylcholine analogs as nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists--structural modifications of 3-(dimethylamino)butyl dimethylcarbamate (DMABC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Petrycer; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Balle, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Compounds based on the 3-(dimethylamino)butyl dimethylcarbamate (DMABC) scaffold were synthesized and pharmacologically characterized at the alpha(4)beta(2), alpha(3)beta(4,) alpha(4)beta(4) and alpha(7) neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The carbamate functionality and a small...

  14. Activation and desensitization of peripheral muscle and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by selected, naturally-occurring pyridine alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teratogenic alkaloids can cause developmental defects due to inhibition of fetal movement that results from desensitization of fetal muscletype nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We investigated the ability of two known teratogens, the piperidinyl-pyridine anabasine and its 1,2-dehydropiper...

  15. The role of the a7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the acute toxicosis of methyllycaconitine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adverse physiological effects of methyllycaconitine (MLA) have been attributed to its competitive antagonism of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Recent research demonstrated a correlation between the LD50 of MLA and the amount of a7 nAChR in various mouse strains, suggesting that mice...

  16. Direct actions of organophosphate anticholinesterases on nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakry, N.M.; el-Rashidy, A.H.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    Four nerve agents and one therapeutic organophosphate (OP) anticholinesterase (anti-ChE) bind to acetylcholine (ACh) receptors, inhibit or modulate binding of radioactive ligands to these receptors, and modify events regulated by them. The affinity of nicotinic (n) ACh receptors of Torpedo electric organs and most muscarinic (m) ACh receptors of rat brain and N1E-115 neuroblastoma cultures for the OP compounds was usually two to three orders of magnitude lower than concentrations required to inhibit 50% (IC-50) of ACh-esterase activity. However, a small population of m-ACh receptors had an affinity as high as that of ACh-esterase for the OP compound. This population is identified by its high-affinity (3H)-cis-methyldioxolane ((3H)-CD) binding. Although sarin, soman, and tabun had no effect, (O-ethyl S(2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl)) methyl phosphonothionate (VX) and echothiophate inhibited competitively the binding of (3H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate ((3H)-QNB) and (3H)-pirenzepine ((3H)-PZ) to m-ACh receptors. However, VX was more potent than echothiophate in inhibiting this binding and 50-fold more potent in inhibiting carbamylcholine (carb)-stimulated (3H)-cGMP synthesis in N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells--both acting as m receptor antagonist. All five OPs inhibited (3H)-CD binding, with IC-50s of 3, 10, 40, 100, and 800 nM for VX, soman, sarin, echothiophate, and tabun, respectively. The OP anticholinesterases also bound to allosteric sites on the n-ACh receptor (identified by inhibition of (3H)-phencyclidine binding), but some bound as well to the receptor's recognition site (identified by inhibition of (125I)-alpha-bungarotoxin binding). Soman and echothiophate in micromolar concentrations acted as partial agonists of the n-ACh receptor and induced receptor desensitization. On the other hand, VX acted as an open channel blocker of the activated receptor and also enhanced receptor desensitization.

  17. Autoregulation of acetylcholine release from vagus nerve terminals through activation of muscarinic receptors in the dog trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Y.; Yoshitomi, T.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of pirenzepine and gallamine on the membrane and contractile properties of smooth muscle cells and on excitatory neuro-effector transmission in the dog trachea were investigated by means of microelectrode, double sucrose gap and tension recording methods. 2. Pirenzepine (10(-7) M) and gallamine (10(-5) M) had no effect on the resting membrane potential or the input resistance of the smooth muscle cells. 3. Pirenzepine (10(-10)-10(-9) M) and gallamine (10(-7) M) enhanced the amplitude of twitch contractions evoked by field stimulation in the combined presence of indomethacin (10(-5) M) and propranolol (10(-6) M). At higher concentrations pirenzepine (10(-8) M) inhibited the twitch contractions in a dose-dependent manner. Both pirenzepine and gallamine in doses over 10(-7) and 10(-5) M, respectively, reduced muscle tone. 4. Pirenzepine (10(-10)-10(-9) M) and gallamine (10(-7) M) enhanced the amplitude of excitatory junction potentials (e.j.ps) evoked by field stimulation (single or repetitive stimulation). However, a high concentration of pirenzepine (10(-8) M) reduced the amplitude of e.j.ps. In parallel with its action on e.j.ps, pirenzepine (over 10(-9) M) reduced the response of smooth muscle cells to acetylcholine (ACh), in a dose-dependent manner. Gallamine (5 X 10(-5) M) markedly enhanced the amplitude of e.j.ps but also reduced the response of muscle cells to ACh. 5. ACh (10(-10)-10(-9) M) inhibited twitch contractions evoked by field stimulation, with a slight increase of resting tension. 6. Gallamine enhanced the summation of e.j.ps during repetitive field stimulation at a high frequency (20 Hz), but was without effect on the depression phenomena of e.j.ps observed during double stimulus experiments at different time intervals (5-60 s). 7. These results indicate that both pirenzepine and gallamine have dual actions on pre- and post-junctional muscarinic receptors in dog tracheal tissue. At low concentrations both agents potentiate excitatory

  18. Oncogenic fingerprint of epidermal growth factor receptor pathway and emerging epidermal growth factor receptor blockade resistance in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobani, Zain A; Sawant, Ashwin; Jafri, Mikram; Correa, Amit Keith; Sahin, Ibrahim Halil

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been an attractive target for treatment of epithelial cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Evidence from clinical trials indicates that cetuximab and panitumumab (anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies) have clinical activity in patients with metastatic CRC. The discovery of intrinsic EGFR blockade resistance in Kirsten RAS (KRAS)-mutant patients led to the restriction of anti-EGFR antibodies to KRAS wild-type patients by Food and Drug Administration and European Medicine Agency. Studies have since focused on the evaluation of biomarkers to identify appropriate patient populations that may benefit from EGFR blockade. Accumulating evidence suggests that patients with mutations in EGFR downstream signaling pathways including KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and PTEN could be intrinsically resistant to EGFR blockade. Recent whole genome studies also suggest that dynamic alterations in signaling pathways downstream of EGFR leads to distinct oncogenic signatures and subclones which might have some impact on emerging resistance in KRAS wild-type patients. While anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies have a clear potential in the management of a subset of patients with metastatic CRC, further studies are warranted to uncover exact mechanisms related to acquired resistance to EGFR blockade. PMID:27777877

  19. From Smoking to Cancers: Novel Targets to Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hwa Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking bears a strong etiological association with many neovascularization-related diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and age-related macular degeneration. Cigarette smoke is a complex mixture of many compounds, including nicotine, which is the major active and addictive component of tobacco. Nicotine and its specific metabolized carcinogens directly bind to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs on cell membranes and trigger the nAChR signal cascade. The nAChRs were originally thought to be ligand-gated ion channels that modulate physiological processes ranging from neurotransmission to cancer signaling. For several decades, the nAChRs served as a prototypic molecule for neurotransmitter receptors; however, they are now important therapeutic targets for various diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, schizophrenia, and even cancer. This paper describes recent advances in our understanding of the assembly, activity, and biological functions of nicotinic receptors, as well as developments in the therapeutic application of nicotinic receptor ligands.

  20. α7-Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: role in early odor learning preference in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Hellier

    Full Text Available Recently, we have shown that mice with decreased expression of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 in the olfactory bulb were associated with a deficit in odor discrimination compared to wild-type mice. However, it is unknown if mice with decreased α7-receptor expression also show a deficit in early odor learning preference (ELP, an enhanced behavioral response to odors with attractive value observed in rats. In this study, we modified ELP methods performed in rats and implemented similar conditions in mice. From post-natal days 5-18, wild-type mice were stroked simultaneously with an odor presentation (conditioned odor for 90 s daily. Control mice were only stroked, exposed to odor, or neither. On the day of testing (P21, mice that were stroked in concert with a conditioned odor significantly investigated the conditioned odor compared to a novel odor, as observed similarly in rats. However, mice with a decrease in α7-receptor expression that were stroked during a conditioned odor did not show a behavioral response to that odorant. These results suggest that decreased α7-receptor expression has a role in associative learning, olfactory preference, and/or sensory processing deficits.

  1. Action of nereistoxin on recombinant neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond Delpech, Valérie; Ihara, Makoto; Coddou, Claudio; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, David B

    2003-11-01

    Nereistoxin (NTX), a natural neurotoxin from the salivary glands of the marine annelid worm Lumbriconereis heteropoda, is highly toxic to insects. Its synthetic analogue, Cartap, was the first commercial insecticide based on a natural product. We have used voltage-clamp electrophysiology to compare the actions of NTX on recombinant nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nicotinic AChRs) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes following nuclear injection of cDNAs. The recombinant nicotinic AChRs investigated were chicken alpha7, chicken alpha4beta2 and the Drosophila melanogaster/chicken hybrid receptors SAD/beta2 and ALS/beta2. No agonist action of NTX (0.1-100 microM) was observed on chicken alpha7, chicken alpha4beta2 and the Drosophila/chicken hybrid nicotinic AChRs. Currents elicited by ACh were reduced in amplitude by NTX in a dose-dependent manner. The toxin was slightly more potent on recombinant Drosophila/vertebrate hybrid receptors than on vertebrate homomeric (alpha7) or heteromeric (alpha4beta2) nicotinic AChRs. Block by NTX of the chicken alpha7, chicken alpha4beta2 and the SAD/beta2 and ALS/beta2 Drosophila/chicken hybrid receptors is in all cases non-competitive. Thus, the site of action on nicotinic AChRs of NTX, to which the insecticide Cartap is metabolised in insects, differs from that of the major nicotinic AChR-active insecticide, imidacloprid.

  2. Design and synthesis of isoxazole containing bioisosteres of epibatidine as potent nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S; Avor, K S; Pouw, B; Seale, T W; Basmadjian, G P

    1999-10-01

    An efficient synthesis of isoxazole containing isosteres of epibatidine is described. The synthesis proceeded from N-tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc)-exo-2-(methoxycarbonyl)-7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane (9). Compound 9 was reacted with the dilithium salt of an appropriately substituted oxime in tetrahydrofuran (THF). Cyclodehydration of the resultant beta-keto oxime and deprotection of the N-Boc group in 5 N aqueous HCl afforded the isoxazole containing isosteres of epibatidine (6-8). The binding affinities of these compounds were determined at the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor for the displacement of [3H]cystisine. The unsubstituted isoxazole containing isostere (6) showed the lower binding potency compared to the 3'-methylisoxazole isostere (7). Substitution with a phenyl group at the 3'-position of the isoxazole significantly reduced the binding potency. The in vivo toxicological studies of these analogs were also performed. The LD50 of the analogs ranged in the order: Me > H > Ph.

  3. alpha(7) Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation prevents behavioral and molecular changes induced by repeated phencyclidine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Christensen, Ditte Z; Hansen, Henrik H;

    2009-01-01

    , and administration of the NMDA-antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) in rodents is a well validated model of such cognitive deficits. Here we show that repeated PCP treatment (10 mg/kg/day for 10 days) decreased the expression of parvalbumin and synaptophysin mRNA in the mouse PFC, which corresponds to changes seen...... in patients with schizophrenia. In addition, PCP increased the basal mRNA expression in the PFC of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc), a molecule involved in synaptic plasticity. These molecular changes produced by PCP were accompanied by a behavioral impairment as determined...... in a modified Y-maze test. Polymorphisms in the alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) gene have been linked to schizophrenia. Here we demonstrate that acute administration of the selective alpha(7) nAChR partial agonist SSR180711 dose-dependently reversed the behavioral impairment induced by PCP...

  4. Relationship between Polymorphism of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Gene CHRNA3 and Susceptibility of Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Bo; Shi Meiqi; Mei Jinfeng; Hong Zhuan; Cao Guochun; Lu Jianwei; Feng Jifeng

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationship between polymorphism of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene CHRNA3 and susceptibility of lung cancer. Methods:Sixty hundred patients with lung cancer and 600 healthy people were respectively selected. TaqMan-MGB probe technique was applied to detect rs3743073 (T > G) genotypes at SNPs site on CHRNA3. The difference of genotype distribution among groups was compared, and its relationship with lung cancer was also investigated. Results:There was statistical signiifcance regarding the distributions of CHRNA3 rs3743073 (T>G) genotype and allele frequencies in patients with lung cancer and healthy people (P Conclusion:The risk of developing lung cancer in patients with rs3743073G mutant genotypes of CHRNA3 gene is increased markedly, especially in those more than 60 years old, males and smoking ones.

  5. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors serve as sensitive targets that mediate β-amyloid neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang LIU; Jie WU

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of brain dementia characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) and loss of forebrain cholinergic neurons. Aβ accumulation and aggregation are thought to contribute to cholinergic neuronal degeneration, in turn causing learning and memory deficits, but the specific targets that mediate Aβ neurotoxicity remain elusive. Recently, accumlating lines of evidence have demonstrated that Aβ directly modulates the function of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which leads to the new hypothesis that neuronal nAChRs may serve as important targets that mediate Aβ neurotoxicity. In this review, we summarize current studies performed in our laboratory and in others to address the question of how Aβ modulates neuronal nAChRs, especially nAChR subunit function.

  6. M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonism alters sleep without affecting memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Christoph; Power, Ann E; Nofzinger, Eric A; Feige, Bernd; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Kloepfer, Corinna; Waldheim, Bernhard; Radosa, Marc-Philipp; Berger, Mathias; Riemann, Dieter

    2006-11-01

    Preclinical studies have implicated cholinergic neurotransmission, specifically M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activation, in sleep-associated memory consolidation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of administering the direct M1 mAChR agonist RS-86 on pre-post sleep memory consolidation. Twenty healthy human participants were tested in a declarative word-list task and a procedural mirror-tracing task. RS-86 significantly reduced rapid eye movement (REM) sleep latency and slow wave sleep (SWS) duration in comparison with placebo. Presleep acquisition and postsleep recall rates were within the expected ranges. However, recall rates in both tasks were almost identical for the RS-86 and placebo conditions. These results indicate that selective M1 mAChR activation in healthy humans has no clinically relevant effect on pre-post sleep consolidation of declarative or procedural memories at a dose that reduces REM sleep latency and SWS duration.

  7. Prostate stem cell antigen interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and is affected in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majbrit Myrup; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; Arvaniti, Maria

    2015-01-01

    and modulating their function. Hence, changes in nAChR regulatory proteins such as Lynx proteins could underlie the dysregulation of nAChRs in AD. Using Western blotting, we detected bands corresponding to the Lynx proteins prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) and Lypd6 in human cortex indicating that both proteins......Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving impaired cholinergic neurotransmission and dysregulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ly-6/neurotoxin (Lynx) proteins have been shown to modulate cognition and neural plasticity by binding to nAChR subtypes...... are present in the human brain. We further showed that PSCA forms stable complexes with the α4 nAChR subunit and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells. In addition, we analyzed protein levels of PSCA and Lypd6 in postmortem tissue of medial frontal...

  8. Dynamic heterogeneity and non-Gaussian statistics for acetylcholine receptors on live cell membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W.; Song, H.; Su, Y.; Geng, L.; Ackerson, B. J.; Peng, H. B.; Tong, P.

    2016-05-01

    The Brownian motion of molecules at thermal equilibrium usually has a finite correlation time and will eventually be randomized after a long delay time, so that their displacement follows the Gaussian statistics. This is true even when the molecules have experienced a complex environment with a finite correlation time. Here, we report that the lateral motion of the acetylcholine receptors on live muscle cell membranes does not follow the Gaussian statistics for normal Brownian diffusion. From a careful analysis of a large volume of the protein trajectories obtained over a wide range of sampling rates and long durations, we find that the normalized histogram of the protein displacements shows an exponential tail, which is robust and universal for cells under different conditions. The experiment indicates that the observed non-Gaussian statistics and dynamic heterogeneity are inherently linked to the slow-active remodelling of the underlying cortical actin network.

  9. Cognitive improvement by activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: from animal models to human pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H; Timmerman, Daniel B

    2010-01-01

    Agonists and positive allosteric modulators of the alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) are currently being developed for the treatment of cognitive disturbances in patients with schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. This review describes the neurobiological properties of the alpha n......AChR and the cognitive effects of alpha(7) nAChR activation, focusing on the translational aspects in the development of these drugs. The functional properties and anatomical localization of the alpha(7) nAChR makes it well suited to modulate cognitive function. Accordingly, systemic administration of alpha(7) n......AChR agonists improves learning, memory, and attentional function in variety of animal models, and pro-cognitive effects of alpha(7) nAChR agonists have recently been demonstrated in patients with schizophrenia or Alzheimer's disease. The alpha(7) nAChR desensitizes rapidly in vitro, and this has been a major...

  10. Age dependence of the rapid antidepressant and synaptic effects of acute NMDA receptor blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eNosyreva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a NMDA receptor antagonist that produces rapid antidepressant responses in individuals with major depressive disorder. The antidepressant action of ketamine has been linked to blocking NMDA receptor activation at rest, which inhibits eukaryotic elongation factor2 kinase leading to desuppression of protein synthesis and synaptic potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Here, we investigated ketamine mediated antidepressant response and the resulting synaptic potentiation in juvenile animals. We found that ketamine did not produce an antidepressant response in juvenile animals in the novelty suppressed feeding or the forced swim test. In addition ketamine application failed to trigger synaptic potentiation in hippocampal slices obtained from juvenile animals, unlike its action in slices from older animals (6-9 weeks old. The inability of ketamine to trigger an antidepressant response or subsequent synaptic plasticity processes suggests a developmental component to ketamine mediated antidepressant efficacy. We also show that the NMDAR antagonist AP5 triggers synaptic potentiation in mature hippocampus similar to the action of ketamine, demonstrating that global competitive blockade of NMDA receptors is sufficient to trigger this effect. These findings suggest that global blockade of NMDA receptors in developmentally mature hippocampal synapses are required for the antidepressant efficacy of ketamine.

  11. Computational determination of the binding mode of α-conotoxin to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Nargis; Yu, Rilei; Jiang, Tao

    2016-12-01

    Conotoxins belong to the large families of disulfide-rich peptide toxins from cone snail venom, and can act on a broad spectrum of ion channels and receptors. They are classified into different subtypes based on their targets. The α-conotoxins selectively inhibit the current of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Because of their unique selectivity towards distinct nAChR subtypes, α-conotoxins become valuable tools in nAChR study. In addition to the X-ray structures of α-conotoxins in complex with acetylcholine-binding protein, a homolog of the nAChR ligand-binding domain, the high-resolution crystal structures of the extracellular domain of the α1 and α9 subunits are also obtained. Such structures not only revealed the details of the configuration of nAChR, but also provided higher sequence identity templates for modeling the binding modes of α-conotoxins to nAChR. This mini-review summarizes recent modeling studies for the determination of the binding modes of α-conotoxins to nAChR. As there are not crystal structures of the nAChR in complex with conotoxins, computational modeling in combination of mutagenesis data is expected to reveal the molecular recognition mechanisms that govern the interactions between α-conotoxins and nAChR at molecular level. An accurate determination of the binding modes of α-conotoxins on AChRs allows rational design of α-conotoxin analogues with improved potency or selectivity to nAChRs.

  12. Modes of action, resistance and toxicity of insecticides targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Makoto; Buckingham, Steven D; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, David B

    2017-02-06

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the cys-loop superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels (cys-loop LGICs) and mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission in the nervous system of insects. The completion of many insect genome projects has greatly enhanced our understanding of the individual subunits that make up nAChR gene families from an insect genetic model organism (Drosophila melanogaster), crop pests, disease vectors and beneficial (pollinator) species. In addition to considerable insect nAChR subunit diversity, individual subunits can be subject to alternative splicing and RNA editing and these post-transcriptional modifications can add significantly to the diversity of nAChR receptor subtypes. The actions of insecticides targeting nAChRs, notably cartap, neonicotinoids, sulfoximines, flupyradifurone, spinosyns and triflumezopyrim are reviewed. Structural studies obtained using an acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) co-crystallised with neonicotinoids have yielded important new insights into the requirements for neonicotinoid insecticide - nAChR interactions. The persistent application of insecticides to crop pests leads to the onset of resistance and several examples of resistance to insecticides targeting nAChRs have been documented. Understanding the molecular basis of resistance can inform our understanding of the mechanism of insecticide action. It also provides an important driver for the development of new chemistry, diagnostic tests for resistance and the adoption of application strategies designed to attenuate such problems. Finally, we consider toxicity issues relating to nAChR-active insecticides, with particular reference to beneficial insect species (pollinators) as well as mammalian and avian toxicity. This review is part of the special issue "Insecticide Mode of Action: From Insect to Mammalian Toxicity.".

  13. Rat neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing a7 subunit: pharmacological properties of ligand binding and function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingxian XIAO; Galya R ABDRAKHMANOVA; Maryna BAYDYUK; Susan HERNANDEZ; Kenneth J KELLAR

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To compare pharmacological properties of heterologously expressed homomeric a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (a.7 nAChRs) with those of native nAChRs containing a.7 subunit (a.7* nAChRs) in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Methods: We established a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line that expresses homomeric rat a7 nAChRs. We studies ligand binding profiles and functional properties of nAChRs expressed in this cell line and native rat a.7* nAChRs in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. We used [125IJ-a-bungarotoxin to compare ligand binding profiles in these cells with those in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The functional properties of the a.7 nAChRs expressed in this cell line were studied using whole-cell current recording.Results: The newly established cell line, KXa7Rl, expresses homomeric a7 nAChRs that bind [125I]-a-bungarotoxin with a Kd value of 0.38±0.06 nmol/L, similar to Kj values of native rat a.7* nAChRs from hippocampus (Kd=0.28±0.03 nmol/L) and cerebral cortex (Kd=0.33±0.05 nmol/L). Using whole-cell current recording, the homomeric a7 nAChRs expressed in the cells were activated by acetylcholine and (-)-nicotine with EC50 values of 280±19 nmol/L and 180±40 nmol/L, respectively. The acetylcholine activated currents were potently blocked by two selective antagonists of a.7 nAChRs, a-bungarotoxin (IC5o=19±2 nmol/L) and methyllycaconitine (IC50=100±10 pmol/L). A comparative study of ligand binding profiles, using 13 nicotinic ligands, showed many similarities between the homomeric a.7 nAChRs and native a.7* receptors in rat brain, but it also revealed several notable differences.Conclusion: This newly established stable cell line should be very useful for studying the properties of homomeric a7 nAChRs and comparing these properties to native a.7* nAChRs.

  14. Pharmacological and ionic characterizations of the muscarinic receptors modulating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rat cortical synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, E.M.; Otero, D.H.

    1985-05-01

    The muscarinic receptors that modulate acetylcholine release from rat cortical synaptosomes were characterized with respect to sensitivity to drugs that act selectively at M1 or M2 receptor subtypes, as well as to changes in ionic strength and membrane potential. The modulatory receptors appear to be of the M2 type, since they are activated by carbachol, acetylcholine, methacholine, oxotremorine, and bethanechol, but not by pilocarpine, and are blocked by atropine, scopolamine, and gallamine (at high concentrations), but not by pirenzepine or dicyclomine. The ED50S for carbachol, acetylcholine, and oxotremorine are less than 10 microM, suggesting that the high affinity state of the receptor is functional. High ionic strength induced by raising the NaCl concentration has no effect on agonist (oxotremorine) potency, but increases the efficacy of this compound, which disagrees with receptor-binding studies. On the other hand, depolarization with either KCl or with veratridine (20 microM) reduces agonist potencies by approximately an order of magnitude, suggesting a potential mechanism for receptor regulation.

  15. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Archundia, Marlet; Cordomi, Arnau; Garriga, Pere; Perez, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS). Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand. PMID:22500107

  16. Effects of Isoflurane on the Actions of Neuromuscular Blockers on the Muscle Nicotine Acetylcholine Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李传翔; 姚尚龙; 聂辉; 吕斌

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that volatile anesthetic enhancement of muscle relaxation is the result of combined drug effects on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The poly A m RNA from muscle by isolation were microinjected into Xenopus oocytes for receptor expression.Concentration-effect curves for the inhibition of Ach-induced currents were established for vecuronium, rocuranium, and isoflurane. Subsequently, inhibitory effects of NDMRs were studied in the presence of the isoflurane at a concentration equivalent to half the concentration producing a 50 %inhibition alone. All tested drugs produced rapid and readily reversible concentration-dependent inhibition. The 50 % inhibitory concentration values were 889 μmol/L (95 % CI: 711-1214μmol),33.4 μmol (95 % CI: 27.1-41.7 nmol) and 9.2 nmol (95 % CI: 7.9-12.3 nmol) for isoflurane,rocuranium and vecuronium, respectively. Coapplication of isoflurane significantly enhanced the inhibitory effects of rocuranium and vecuronium, and it was especially so at low concentration of NMDRs. Isoflurane increases the potency of NDMRs, possibly by enhancing antagonist affinity at the receptor site.

  17. Mice Lacking M1 and M3 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Have Impaired Odor Discrimination and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wilson; Singh, Sanmeet; Keshav, Taj; Dewan, Ramita; Eberly, Christian; Maurer, Robert; Nunez-Parra, Alexia; Araneda, Ricardo C.

    2017-01-01

    The cholinergic system has extensive projections to the olfactory bulb (OB) where it produces a state-dependent regulation of sensory gating. Previous work has shown a prominent role of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (mAChRs) in regulating the excitability of OB neurons, in particular the M1 receptor. Here, we examined the contribution of M1 and M3 mAChR subtypes to olfactory processing using mice with a genetic deletion of these receptors, the M1−/− and the M1/M3−/− knockout (KO) mice. Genetic ablation of the M1 and M3 mAChRs resulted in a significant deficit in odor discrimination of closely related molecules, including stereoisomers. However, the discrimination of dissimilar molecules, social odors (e.g., urine) and novel object recognition was not affected. In addition the KO mice showed impaired learning in an associative odor-learning task, learning to discriminate odors at a slower rate, indicating that both short and long-term memory is disrupted by mAChR dysfunction. Interestingly, the KO mice exhibited decreased olfactory neurogenesis at younger ages, a deficit that was not maintained in older animals. In older animals, the olfactory deficit could be restored by increasing the number of new born neurons integrated into the OB after exposing them to an olfactory enriched environment, suggesting that muscarinic modulation and adult neurogenesis could be two different mechanism used by the olfactory system to improve olfactory processing. PMID:28210219

  18. BDNF up-regulates alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor levels on subpopulations of hippocampal interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Kerri A; Zago, Wagner M; Berg, Darwin K

    2006-12-01

    In the hippocampus, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates a number of synaptic components. Among these are nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing alpha7 subunits (alpha7-nAChRs), which are interesting because of their relative abundance in the hippocampus and their high relative calcium permeability. We show here that BDNF elevates surface and intracellular pools of alpha7-nAChRs on cultured hippocampal neurons and that glutamatergic activity is both necessary and sufficient for the effect. Blocking transmission through NMDA receptors with APV blocked the BDNF effect; increasing spontaneous excitatory activity with the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline replicated the BDNF effect. BDNF antibodies blocked the BDNF-mediated increase but not the bicuculline one, consistent with enhanced glutamatergic activity acting downstream from BDNF. Increased alpha7-nAChR clusters were most prominent on interneuron subtypes known to directly innervate excitatory neurons. The results suggest that BDNF, acting through glutamatergic transmission, can modulate hippocampal output in part by controlling alpha7-nAChR levels.

  19. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlet Martinez-Archundia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS. Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand.

  20. Inhibitory effect of strychnine on acetylcholine receptor activation in bovine adrenal medullary chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, G A; Vergara, L A; Calvo, S; Yadid, G

    1994-01-01

    1. Strychnine, which is known as a potent and selective antagonist of the inhibitory glycine receptor in the central nervous system, inhibits the nicotinic stimulation of catecholamine release from bovine cultured adrenal chromaffin cells in a concentration-dependent (1-100 microM) manner. At 10 microM nicotine, the IC50 value for strychnine is approximately 30 microM. Strychnine also inhibits the nicotine-induced membrane depolarization and increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. 2. The inhibitory action of strychnine is reversible and is selective for nicotinic stimulation, with no effect observed on secretion elicited by a high external K+ concentration, histamine or angiotensin II. 3. Strychnine competes with nicotine in its effect, but not modify the apparent positive cooperatively of the nicotine binding sites. In the absence of nicotine, strychnine has no effect on catecholamine release. Glycine does not affect catecholamine release nor the inhibitory action of strychnine on this release. 4. These results suggest that strychnine interacts with the agonist binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in chromaffin cells, thus exerting a pharmacological effect independently of the glycine receptor. PMID:7834198

  1. Binding affinities of anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, J.J.; Drachman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies directed against acetylcholine (ACh) receptors are present in the sera of nearly 90% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and are involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. However, the antibody titers measured by the standard radioimmunoassay correspond poorly with the clinical severity of the disease. To determine whether this disparity could be accounted for by differences in the binding affinities of anti-ACh receptor antibodies in different patients, we have measured the binding affinities of these autoantibodies in 15 sera from MG patients. The affinity constants (K/sub o/), as determined by Scatchard analysis, were all in the range of 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/, comparable to the highest values reported in immunized animals. The affinity constants were truly representative of the population of autoantibodies detected by the radioimmunoassay, as shown by the remarkable linearity of the Scatchard plots (r/sup 2/>0.90) and the close correlation between the antibody titers determined by extrapolation of the Scatchard plots and by saturation analysis (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). There was only a 6-fold variation in affinity constants measured in this series of patients despite widely differing antibody titers and severity of the disease. Factors other than the titer and affinity of anti-ACh receptor antibodies may correlate better with the clinical manifestations of MG.

  2. Effects of mineralocorticoid receptor blockade on empathy in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingenfeld, Katja; Kuehl, Linn K; Dziobek, Isabel; Roepke, Stefan; Otte, Christian; Hinkelmann, Kim

    2016-10-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is highly expressed in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex and is involved in social cognition. We recently found that pharmacological stimulation of the MR enhances emotional empathy but does not affect cognitive empathy. In the current study, we examined whether blockade of the MR impairs empathy in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and healthy individuals. In a placebo-controlled study, we randomized 28 patients with MDD without psychotropic medication and 43 healthy individuals to either placebo or 300 mg spironolactone, a MR antagonist. Subsequently, all participants underwent two tests of social cognition, the Multifaceted Empathy Test (MET) and the Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition (MASC), measuring cognitive and emotional facets of empathy. In the MET, we found no significant main effect of treatment or main effect of group for cognitive empathy but a highly significant treatment by group interaction (p empathy scores compared to controls in the placebo condition but not after spironolactone. Furthermore, in the spironolactone condition reduced cognitive empathy was seen in MDD patients but not in controls. Emotional empathy was not affected by MR blockade. In the MASC, no effect of spironolactone could be revealed. Depressed patients appear to exhibit greater cognitive empathy compared to healthy individuals. Blockade of MR reduced cognitive empathy in MDD patients to the level of healthy individuals. Future studies should further clarify the impact of MR functioning on different domains of social cognition in psychiatric patients.

  3. Blockade of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 1 Prevents Inflammation and Vascular Leakage in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a leading cause of blindness in working age adults. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1 blockade on the complications of DR. Experimental models of diabetes were induced with streptozotocin (STZ treatment or Insulin2 gene mutation (Akita in mice. Protein expression and localization were examined by western blots (WB and immunofluorescence (IF. mRNA expression was quantified by PCR array and real-time PCR. The activity of VEGFR1 signaling was blocked by a neutralizing antibody called MF1. Vascular leakage was evaluated by measuring the leakage of [3H]-mannitol tracer into the retina and the IF staining of albumin. VEGFR1 blockade significantly inhibited diabetes-related vascular leakage, leukocytes-endothelial cell (EC adhesion (or retinal leukostasis, expression of intercellular adhesion molecule- (ICAM- 1 protein, abnormal localization and degeneration of the tight junction protein zonula occludens- (ZO- 1, and the cell adhesion protein vascular endothelial (VE cadherin. In addition, VEGFR1 blockade interfered with the gene expression of 10 new cytokines and chemokines: cxcl10, il10, ccl8, il1f6, cxcl15, ccl4, il13, ccl6, casp1, and ccr5. These results suggest that VEGFR1 mediates complications of DR and targeting this signaling pathway represents a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of DR.

  4. EFFECTS OF SULPIRIDE-INDUCED D2 DOPAMINE RECEPTOR BLOCKADE ON IMMUNE RESPONSIVENESS OF RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hritcu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of catecholamine receptors (D2 dopamine was investigated in restraint stress, influence immune system, with concomitant changes in immune response. Adults rats pretreated once with LPS (a bacterial product (25μg/250μl, i.p., produce an immune response, were subjected to i.p. injection with sulpiride (4 mg/kg b.w., i.p., a selective antagonist for D2 dopamine receptors, after 3 days postimmunization. After 18 days later, we assessed the total protein number, antibody titer, lymphocyte number and albumin/globulin ratio. In summary, we provide that D2 dopamine receptor blockade impaired immune responsiveness in restraint stress.

  5. Normotensive sodium loading in conscious dogs: Regulation of renin secretion during beta receptor blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bie, Peter; Mølstrøm, Simon; Wamberg, Søren

    2009-01-01

    irrespective of diet. In conclusion, PRC depended on dietary sodium and beta1-adrenergic control as expected; however, the acute sodium-driven decrease in PRC at constant MAP and GFR was unaffected by beta1-receptor blockade demonstrating that renin may be regulated without changes in MAP, GFR, or beta1......Renin secretion is regulated in part by renal nerves operating through beta1-receptors of the renal juxtaglomerular cells. Slow sodium loading may decrease plasma renin (PRC) and cause natriuresis at constant mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). We hypothesized...... that in this setting, renin secretion and renin-dependent sodium excretion are controlled by via the renal nerves and therefore eliminated or reduced by blocking the action of norepinephrine on the juxtaglomerular cells with the beta1-receptor antagonist metoprolol. This was tested in conscious dogs by infusion of Na...

  6. Endothelin receptor a blockade is an ineffective treatment for adriamycin nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick J Tan

    Full Text Available Endothelin is a vasoconstricting peptide that plays a key role in vascular homeostasis, exerting its biologic effects via two receptors, the endothelin receptor A (ETA and endothelin receptor B (ETB. Activation of ETA and ETB has opposing actions, in which hyperactive ETA is generally vasoconstrictive and pathologic. Selective ETA blockade has been shown to be beneficial in renal injuries such as diabetic nephropathy and can improve proteinuria. Atrasentan is a selective pharmacologic ETA blocker that preferentially inhibits ETA activation. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of ETA blockade by atrasentan in ameliorating proteinuria and kidney injury in murine adriamycin nephropathy, a model of human focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. We found that ETA expression was unaltered during the course of adriamycin nephropathy. Whether initiated prior to injury in a prevention protocol (5 mg/kg/day, i.p. or after injury onset in a therapeutic protocol (7 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg three times a week, i.p., atrasentan did not significantly affect the initiation and progression of adriamycin-induced albuminuria (as measured by urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios. Indices of glomerular damage were also not improved in atrasentan-treated groups, in either the prevention or therapeutic protocols. Atrasentan also failed to improve kidney function as determined by serum creatinine, histologic damage, and mRNA expression of numerous fibrosis-related genes such as collagen-I and TGF-β1. Therefore, we conclude that selective blockade of ETA by atrasentan has no effect on preventing or ameliorating proteinuria and kidney injury in adriamycin nephropathy.

  7. Endothelin receptor a blockade is an ineffective treatment for adriamycin nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Roderick J; Zhou, Lili; Zhou, Dong; Lin, Lin; Liu, Youhua

    2013-01-01

    Endothelin is a vasoconstricting peptide that plays a key role in vascular homeostasis, exerting its biologic effects via two receptors, the endothelin receptor A (ETA) and endothelin receptor B (ETB). Activation of ETA and ETB has opposing actions, in which hyperactive ETA is generally vasoconstrictive and pathologic. Selective ETA blockade has been shown to be beneficial in renal injuries such as diabetic nephropathy and can improve proteinuria. Atrasentan is a selective pharmacologic ETA blocker that preferentially inhibits ETA activation. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of ETA blockade by atrasentan in ameliorating proteinuria and kidney injury in murine adriamycin nephropathy, a model of human focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. We found that ETA expression was unaltered during the course of adriamycin nephropathy. Whether initiated prior to injury in a prevention protocol (5 mg/kg/day, i.p.) or after injury onset in a therapeutic protocol (7 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg three times a week, i.p.), atrasentan did not significantly affect the initiation and progression of adriamycin-induced albuminuria (as measured by urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios). Indices of glomerular damage were also not improved in atrasentan-treated groups, in either the prevention or therapeutic protocols. Atrasentan also failed to improve kidney function as determined by serum creatinine, histologic damage, and mRNA expression of numerous fibrosis-related genes such as collagen-I and TGF-β1. Therefore, we conclude that selective blockade of ETA by atrasentan has no effect on preventing or ameliorating proteinuria and kidney injury in adriamycin nephropathy.

  8. Alpha-adrenergic receptor blockade by phentolamine increases the efficacy of vasodilators in penile corpus cavernosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, N N; Goldstein, I; Moreland, R B; Traish, A M

    2000-03-01

    Penile trabecular smooth muscle tone, a major determinant of erectile function, is highly regulated by numerous inter- and intracellular pathways. The interaction between pathways mediating contraction and relaxation has not been studied in detail. To this end, we investigated the functional effects of alpha adrenergic receptor blockade with phentolamine and its interaction with vasodilators (sildenafil, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and PGE1) that elevate cyclic nucleotides on penile cavernosal smooth muscle contractility. In organ bath preparations of cavernosal tissue strips contracted with phenylephrine, phentolamine significantly enhanced relaxation induced by sildenafil, VIP and PGE1. Sildenafil, VIP or PGE1 also significantly enhanced relaxation induced by phentolamine in cavernosal tissue strips contracted with phenylephrine. To study the effects of alpha adrenergic receptor blockade and modification of cyclic nucleotide metabolism during active neurogenic input, cavernosal tissue strips in organ bath preparations were contracted with the non-adrenergic agonist endothelin-1 and subjected to electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the absence or presence of phentolamine and/or sildenafil. EFS (5-40Hz) typically caused biphasic relaxation and contraction responses. Phentolamine alone enhanced relaxation and reduced or prevented contraction to EFS. Sildenafil enhanced relaxation to EFS at lower frequencies (phentolamine and sildenafil enhanced EFS-induced relaxation at all frequencies tested. EFS, in the presence of 10 nM phentolamine and 30 nM sildenafil, produced enhanced relaxation responses which were quantitatively similar to those obtained in the presence of 50 nM sildenafil alone. Thus, blockade of alpha-adrenergic receptors with phentolamine increases the efficacy of cyclic nucleotide-dependent vasodilators. Furthermore, phentolamine potentiates relaxation and attenuates contraction in response to endogenous neurotransmitters which are released

  9. Ryanodine is a positive modulator of acetylcholine receptor gating in cochlear hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorrilla de San Martín, Javier; Ballestero, Jimena; Katz, Eleonora; Elgoyhen, A Belén; Fuchs, Paul A

    2007-12-01

    The efferent synaptic specialization of hair cells includes a near-membrane synaptic cistern, whose presence suggests a role for internal calcium stores in cholinergic inhibition. Calcium release channels from internal stores include 'ryanodine receptors', whose participation is usually demonstrated by sensitivity to the eponymous plant alkaloid, ryanodine. However, use of this and other store-active compounds on hair cells could be confounded by the unusual pharmacology of the alpha9alpha10-containing hair cell nicotinic cholinergic receptor (nAChR), which has been shown to be antagonized by a broad spectrum of compounds. Surprisingly, we found that ryanodine, rather than antagonizing, is a positive modulator of the alpha9alpha10 nAChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes, the first such compound to be found. The effect of ryanodine was to increase the apparent affinity and efficacy for acetylcholine (ACh). Correspondingly, ACh-evoked currents through the isolated cholinergic receptors of inner hair cells in excised mouse cochleas were approximately doubled by 200 microM ryanodine, a concentration that inhibits gating of the ryanodine receptor itself. This unusual positive modulation was not unique to the mammalian receptor. The response to ACh of chicken 'short' hair cells likewise was enhanced in the presence of 100 microM ryanodine. This facilitatory effect on current through the AChR could enhance brief ( approximately 1 s) activation of associated calcium-dependent K(+) (SK) channels in both chicken short hair cells and rat outer hair cells. This novel effect of ryanodine provides new opportunities for the design of compounds that potentiate alpha9alpha10-mediated responses and for potential inner ear therapeutics based on this interaction.

  10. The effect of combined glutamate receptor blockade in the NTS on the hypoxic ventilatory response in awake rats differs from the effect of individual glutamate receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Nguyen, Jetson; Carr, John A; Powell, Frank L

    2014-08-01

    Ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH) increases the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and causes persistent hyperventilation when normoxia is restored, which is consistent with the occurrence of synaptic plasticity in acclimatized animals. Recently, we demonstrated that antagonism of individual glutamate receptor types (GluRs) within the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) modifies this plasticity and VAH (J. Physiol. 592(8):1839-1856); however, the effects of combined GluR antagonism remain unknown in awake rats. To evaluate this, we exposed rats to room air or chronic sustained hypobaric hypoxia (CSH, PiO2 = 70 Torr) for 7-9 days. On the experimental day, we microinjected artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF: sham) and then a "cocktail" of the GluR antagonists MK-801 and DNQX into the NTS. The location of injection sites in the NTS was confirmed by glutamate injections on a day before the experiment and with histology following the experiment. Ventilation was measured in awake, unrestrained rats breathing normoxia or acute hypoxia (10% O2) in 15-min intervals using barometric pressure plethysmography. In control (CON) rats, acute hypoxia increased ventilation; NTS microinjections of GluR antagonists, but not ACSF, significantly decreased ventilation and breathing frequency in acute hypoxia but not normoxia (P NTS significantly decreased ventilation in normoxia and breathing frequency in hypoxia. A persistent HVR after combined GluR blockade in the NTS contrasts with the effect of individual GluR blockade and also with results in anesthetized rats. Our findings support the hypotheses that GluRs in the NTS contribute to, but cannot completely explain, VAH in awake rats.

  11. Single-channel current recordings of acetylcholine receptors in electroplax isolated from the Electrophorus electricus Main and Sachs' electric organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquale, E B; Udgaonkar, J B; Hess, G P

    1986-01-01

    Extensive chemical kinetic measurements of acetylcholine receptor-controlled ion translocation in membrane vesicles isolated from the electroplax of Electrophorus electricus have led to the proposal of a minimum model which accounts for the activation, desensitization, and voltage-dependent inhibition of the receptor by acetylcholine, suberyldicholine, and carbamoylcholine. Comparison of chemical kinetic measurements of the dynamic properties of the acetylcholine receptor in vesicles with the properties of the receptor in cells obtained from the same organ and animal have been hampered by an inability to make the appropriate measurements with Electrophorus electricus electroplax cells. Here we report a method for exposing and cleaning the surface of electroplax cells obtained from both the Main electric organ and the organ of Sachs and the results of single-channel current recordings which have now become possible. The single-channel current recordings were made in the presence of either carbamoylcholine or suberyldicholine, as a function of temperature and transmembrane voltage. Both the channel open times and the single-channel conductance were measured. The data were found to be consistent with the model based on chemical kinetic measurements using receptor-rich membrane vesicles prepared from the Main electric organ of E. electricus.

  12. Quinuclidine compounds differently act as agonists of Kenyon cell nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and induced distinct effect on insect ganglionic depolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Swale, Daniel; Leray, Xavier; Benzidane, Yassine; Lebreton, Jacques; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Thany, Steeve H

    2013-12-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a new quinuclidine benzamide compound named LMA10203 acted as an agonist of insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Its specific pharmacological profile on cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons (DUM) helped to identify alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2 receptors. In the present study, we tested its effect on cockroach Kenyon cells. We found that it induced an inward current demonstrating that it bounds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on Kenyon cells. Interestingly, LMA10203-induced currents were completely blocked by the nicotinic antagonist α-bungarotoxin. We suggested that LMA10203 effect occurred through the activation of α-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors and did not involve α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR2, previously identified in DUM neurons. In addition, we have synthesized two new compounds, LMA10210 and LMA10211, and compared their effects on Kenyon cells. These compounds were members of the 3-quinuclidinyl benzamide or benzoate families. Interestingly, 1 mM LMA10210 was not able to induce an inward current on Kenyon cells compared to LMA10211. Similarly, we did not find any significant effect of LMA10210 on cockroach ganglionic depolarization, whereas these three compounds were able to induce an effect on the central nervous system of the third instar M. domestica larvae. Our data suggested that these three compounds could bind to distinct cockroach nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  13. Effects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists in assays of acute pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Kelen C; Carroll, F Ivy; Negus, S Stevens

    2015-11-01

    Agonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) constitute one drug class being evaluated as candidate analgesics. Previous preclinical studies have implicated α4β2 and α7 nAChRs as potential mediators of the antinociceptive effects of (–)-nicotine hydrogen tartrate (nicotine) and other nAChR agonists; however, these studies have relied exclusively on measures of pain-stimulated behavior, which can be defined as behaviors that increase in frequency, rate, or intensity after presentation of a noxious stimulus. Pain is also associated with depression of many behaviors, and drug effects can differ in assays of pain-stimulated versus pain-depressed behavior. Accordingly, this study compared the effects of nicotine, the selective α4/6β2 agonist 5-(123I)iodo-3-[2(S)-2-azetidinylmethoxy]pyridine (5-I-A-85380), and the selective α7 agonist N-(3R)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-4-chlorobenzamide in assays of pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Intraperitoneal injection of dilute lactic acid served as an acute noxious stimulus to either stimulate a stretching response or depress the operant responding, which is maintained by electrical brain stimulation in an intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure. Nicotine produced a dose-dependent, time-dependent, and mecamylamine-reversible blockade of both acid-stimulated stretching and acid-induced depression of ICSS. 5-I-A-85380 also blocked both acid-stimulated stretching and acid-induced depression of ICSS, whereas N-(3R)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-4-chlorobenzamide produced no effect in either procedure. Both nicotine and 5-I-A-85380 were ≥10-fold more potent in blocking the acid-induced depression of ICSS than in blocking the acid-induced stimulation of stretching. These results suggest that stimulation of α4β2 and/or α6β2 nAChRs may be especially effective to alleviate the signs of pain-related behavioral depression in rats; however, nonselective behavioral effects

  14. Purification and Characterization of Acetylcholine Receptor-I from Electrophorus electricus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hai Won

    1974-01-01

    A Triton X-100 extract of electric tissue was subjected to a single step affinity chromatography using either of two affinity gels: [N-(6-aminocaproyl)-p-aminobenzyl]trimethylammonium bromide or methyl[(6-aminocaproyl-6′-aminocaproyl)-3-amino]pyridinium bromide attached to Sepharose 4B. Specific elution of the acetylcholine receptor-I (AcChR-I) with low concentration of a bis-quaternary agonist, 3,3′-bis[α-(trimethylammonium)methyl]-azobenzene bromide (Bis-Q), gave a 35% yield of toxin-binding components in the crude extract. The purified AcChR-I readily underwent aggregation, which appeared to arise from the oxidation of titratable free sulfhydryl on the protein. The protein was characterized by the binding capacities for [125I]α-bungarotoxin (α-Bgt), [3H]acetylcholine, and [14C]Bis-Q; the ratio of these capacities were approximately 2:1:2, respectively, with 5-6:5 nmole of α-Bgt sites per mg of protein. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the disulfide-reduced and nonreduced polypeptide components indicated that a 41,500 dalton species was the major subunit component of AcChR-I. The binding of [14C]Bis-Q with a Triton X-100 crude extract showed sites with both high and low dissociation constants, whereas purified AcChR-I contained only high-affinity sites. A biphasic double-reciprocal plot and a Hill coefficient of 0.7 suggested negative cooperativity in the binding of Bis-Q with the purified AcChR-I. Images PMID:4525321

  15. Menthol Enhances the Desensitization of Human α3β4 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ton, Hoai T; Smart, Amanda E; Aguilar, Brittany L; Olson, Thao T; Kellar, Kenneth J; Ahern, Gerard P

    2015-08-01

    The α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype is widely expressed in the peripheral and central nervous systems, including in airway sensory nerves. The nAChR subtype transduces the irritant effects of nicotine in tobacco smoke and, in certain brain areas, may be involved in nicotine addiction and/or withdrawal. Menthol, a widely used additive in cigarettes, is a potential analgesic and/or counterirritant at sensory nerves and may also influence nicotine's actions in the brain. We examined menthol's effects on recombinant human α3β4 nAChRs and native nAChRs in mouse sensory neurons. Menthol markedly decreased nAChR activity as assessed by Ca(2+) imaging, (86)Rb(+) efflux, and voltage-clamp measurements. Coapplication of menthol with acetylcholine or nicotine increased desensitization, demonstrated by an increase in the rate and magnitude of the current decay and a reduction of the current integral. These effects increased with agonist concentration. Pretreatment with menthol followed by its washout did not affect agonist-induced desensitization, suggesting that menthol must be present during the application of agonist to augment desensitization. Notably, menthol acted in a voltage-independent manner and reduced the mean open time of single channels without affecting their conductance, arguing against a simple channel-blocking effect. Further, menthol slowed or prevented the recovery of nAChRs from desensitization, indicating that it probably stabilizes a desensitized state. Moreover, menthol at concentrations up to 1 mM did not compete for the orthosteric nAChR binding site labeled by [(3)H]epibatidine. Taken together, these data indicate that menthol promotes desensitization of α3β4 nAChRs by an allosteric action.

  16. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated effects in slices from human epileptogenic cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigout, S; Wierschke, S; Lehmann, T-N; Horn, P; Dehnicke, C; Deisz, R A

    2012-10-25

    Acetylcholine has been implicated in higher cortical functions such as learning, memory and cognition, yet the cellular effects of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activation are poorly understood in the human cortex. Here we investigated the effect of the mAChR agonist carbachol (CCh) and various mAChR antagonists in human cortical slices (from tissue removed during neurosurgical treatment of epilepsy) by intracellular and extracellular recordings. CCh increased neuronal firing, which was antagonised by atropine (non-selective mAChR antagonist) and pirenzepine (M(1)/M(4) mAChRs antagonist) when applied before or after CCh application. AF-DX 116 (M(2)/M(4) mAChRs antagonist) had no effect on CCh-induced increase of firing. CCh also reduced evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSP), and the CCh-induced depression of EPSP was fully reversed by atropine. Pirenzepine reversed the depression of CCh on EPSP, but failed to prevent the depression when applied before CCh. AF-DX 116 prevented the CCh-induced depression of evoked EPSP when applied before CCh. CCh also depressed GABAergic transmission and this effect was antagonised by AF-DX 116. Xanomeline (M(1)/M(4) mAChR agonist) increased neuronal firing and decreased EPSP, but had no effect on GABAergic transmission. Reduction (with linopirdine) and enhancement (with retigabine) of the M-current (mediated by K(V)7 channels), increased and decreased neuronal firing, respectively, but had marginal effects on the evoked EPSP. Our results indicate that three pharmacologically distinct mAChRs modulate neuronal firing, glutamatergic and GABAergic transmissions in the human epileptogenic neocortex. The data are discussed towards possible implications of altered mAChR signalling in hyperexcitability and cognitive functions in the human neocortex. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acetylcholine receptors from human muscle as pharmacological targets for ALS therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Eleonora; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Lopergolo, Diego; Roseti, Cristina; Bertollini, Cristina; Ruffolo, Gabriele; Cifelli, Pierangelo; Onesti, Emanuela; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Inghilleri, Maurizio

    2016-03-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons that leads to progressive paralysis of skeletal muscle. Studies of ALS have revealed defects in expression of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in skeletal muscle that occur even in the absence of motor neuron anomalies. The endocannabinoid palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) modified the clinical conditions in one ALS patient, improving muscle force and respiratory efficacy. By microtransplanting muscle membranes from selected ALS patients into Xenopus oocytes, we show that PEA reduces the desensitization of acetylcholine-evoked currents after repetitive neurotransmitter application (i.e., rundown). The same effect was observed using muscle samples from denervated (non-ALS) control patients. The expression of human recombinant α1β1γδ (γ-AChRs) and α1β1εδ AChRs (ε-AChRs) in Xenopus oocytes revealed that PEA selectively affected the rundown of ACh currents in ε-AChRs. A clear up-regulation of the α1 subunit in muscle from ALS patients compared with that from non-ALS patients was found by quantitative PCR, but no differential expression was found for other subunits. Clinically, ALS patients treated with PEA showed a lower decrease in their forced vital capacity (FVC) over time as compared with untreated ALS patients, suggesting that PEA can enhance pulmonary function in ALS. In the present work, data were collected from a cohort of 76 ALS patients and 17 denervated patients. Our results strengthen the evidence for the role of skeletal muscle in ALS pathogenesis and pave the way for the development of new drugs to hamper the clinical effects of the disease.

  18. Acetylcholine receptors from human muscle as pharmacological targets for ALS therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Eleonora; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Lopergolo, Diego; Roseti, Cristina; Bertollini, Cristina; Ruffolo, Gabriele; Cifelli, Pierangelo; Onesti, Emanuela; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Inghilleri, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons that leads to progressive paralysis of skeletal muscle. Studies of ALS have revealed defects in expression of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in skeletal muscle that occur even in the absence of motor neuron anomalies. The endocannabinoid palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) modified the clinical conditions in one ALS patient, improving muscle force and respiratory efficacy. By microtransplanting muscle membranes from selected ALS patients into Xenopus oocytes, we show that PEA reduces the desensitization of acetylcholine-evoked currents after repetitive neurotransmitter application (i.e., rundown). The same effect was observed using muscle samples from denervated (non-ALS) control patients. The expression of human recombinant α1β1γδ (γ-AChRs) and α1β1εδ AChRs (ε-AChRs) in Xenopus oocytes revealed that PEA selectively affected the rundown of ACh currents in ε-AChRs. A clear up-regulation of the α1 subunit in muscle from ALS patients compared with that from non-ALS patients was found by quantitative PCR, but no differential expression was found for other subunits. Clinically, ALS patients treated with PEA showed a lower decrease in their forced vital capacity (FVC) over time as compared with untreated ALS patients, suggesting that PEA can enhance pulmonary function in ALS. In the present work, data were collected from a cohort of 76 ALS patients and 17 denervated patients. Our results strengthen the evidence for the role of skeletal muscle in ALS pathogenesis and pave the way for the development of new drugs to hamper the clinical effects of the disease. PMID:26929355

  19. Molecular-Dynamics Simulations of ELIC a Prokaryotic Homologue of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL; Ivanov, Ivaylo N [ORNL; Wang, Hailong [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine; McCammon, Jonathan [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The ligand-gated ion channel from Erwinia chrysanthemi (ELIC) is a prokaryotic homolog of the eukaryotic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) that responds to the binding of neurotransmitter acetylcholine and mediates fast signal transmission. ELIC is similar to the nAChR in its primary sequence and overall subunit organization, but despite their structural similarity, it is not clear whether these two ligand-gated ion channels operate in a similar manner. Further, it is not known to what extent mechanistic insights gleaned from the ELIC structure translate to eukaryotic counterparts such as the nAChR. Here we use molecular-dynamics simulations to probe the conformational dynamics and hydration of the transmembrane pore of ELIC. The results are compared with those from our previous simulation of the human ?7 nAChR. Overall, ELIC displays increased stability compared to the nAChR, whereas the two proteins exhibit remarkable similarity in their global motion and flexibility patterns. The majority of the increased stability of ELIC does not stem from the deficiency of the models used in the simulations, and but rather seems to have a structural basis. Slightly altered dynamical correlation features are also observed among several loops within the membrane region. In sharp contrast to the nAChR, ELIC is completely dehydrated from the pore center to the extracellular end throughout the simulation. Finally, the simulation of an ELIC mutant substantiates the important role of F246 on the stability, hydration and possibly function of the ELIC channel.

  20. Selective endothelin B receptor blockade does not influence BNP-induced natriuresis in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zander, K; Houben, A J H M; Webb, D J; Udo, E; Kietselaer, B; Hofstra, L; De Mey, J G R; de Leeuw, P W

    2006-03-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) both exhibit natriuretic activity within the human kidney. Furthermore, they both act partly through activation of the endothelial nitric oxide pathway. Since ET-1 may cause vasodilation and natriuresis via stimulation of the ET-B receptor, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether renal ET-B receptors participate in the renal actions of BNP. In this placebo-controlled, crossover study, we infused BNP (4 pmol/kg/min) or placebo (i.v.) for 1 h, with or without co-infusion of the ET-B receptor antagonist BQ-788 (50 nmol/min) for 15 min on 4 separate days, in 10 healthy subjects (mean age 54+/-6 years.). During infusion, we measured effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using PAH/inulin clearance. Cardiac output was measured before and after infusion, using echocardiography. Blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were monitored as well. Urine and plasma samples were taken every hour to measure diuresis, natriuresis, cyclic 3',5' guanosine monophosphate, and ET-1 levels. BNP with or without ET-B receptor blockade increased natriuresis and diuresis. In addition, BNP alone increased GFR and filtered load, without changing ERPF. BQ-788 infusion did not affect renal hemodynamics or natriuresis. Neither BNP nor BQ-788 altered cardiac output, blood pressure, and heart rate. In conclusion, the present study shows that selective ET-B receptor blockade has no effect on the BNP-induced natriuresis and glomerular filtration rate.

  1. Mesoionic insecticides: a novel class of insecticides that modulate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyoke, Caleb W; Cordova, Daniel; Zhang, Wenming; Barry, James D; Leighty, Robert M; Dietrich, Robert F; Rauh, James J; Pahutski, Thomas F; Lahm, George P; Tong, My-Hanh Thi; Benner, Eric A; Andreassi, John L; Smith, Rejane M; Vincent, Daniel R; Christianson, Laurie A; Teixeira, Luis A; Singh, Vineet; Hughes, Kenneth A

    2017-04-01

    As the world population grows towards 9 billion by 2050, it is projected that food production will need to increase by 60%. A critical part of this growth includes the safe and effective use of insecticides to reduce the estimated 20-49% loss of global crop yields owing to pests. The development of new insecticides will help to sustain this protection and overcome insecticide resistance. A novel class of mesoionic compounds has been discovered, with exceptional insecticidal activity on a range of Hemiptera and Lepidoptera. These compounds bind to the orthosteric site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and result in a highly potent inhibitory action at the receptor with minimal agonism. The synthesis, biological activity, optimization and mode of action will be discussed. Triflumezopyrim insect control will provide a powerful tool for control of hopper species in rice throughout Asia. Dicloromezotiaz can provide a useful control tool for lepidopteran pests, with an underexploited mode of action among these pests. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supavilai, P.; Karobath, M.

    1985-02-04

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with /sup 3/H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 ..mu..M. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table.

  3. Transcriptomic Evaluation of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Pathway in Levamisole-resistant and -sensitive Oesophagostomum dentatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Nathan M.; Martin, Richard J.; Beetham, Jeffrey K.

    2014-01-01

    Nematode anthelminthic resistance is widespread for the 3 major drug classes commonly used in agriculture: benzamidazoles, macrocyclic lactones, and nicotinic agonists e.g. levamisole. In parasitic nematodes the genetics of resistance are unknown other than to the benzimidazoles which primarily involve a single gene. In previous work with a levamisole resistant Oesophagostomum dentatum isolate, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) exhibited decreased levamisole sensitivity. Here, using a transcriptomic approach on the same isolate, we investigate whether that decreased nAChR sensitivity is achieved via a 1-gene mechanism involving 1 of 27 nAChR pathway genes. 3 nAChR receptor subunit genes exhibited ≥ 2-fold change in transcript abundance: acr-21 and acr-25 increased, and unc-63 decreased. 4 SNPs having a ≥ 2-fold change in frequency were also identified. These data suggest that resistance is likely polygenic, involving modulated abundance of multiple subunits comprising the heteropentameric nAChR, and is not due to a simple 1-gene mechanism. PMID:24530453

  4. Autoradiographic localization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain of the zebra finch (Poephila guttata)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.T.; Adkins-Regan, E.; Whiting, P.; Lindstrom, J.M.; Podleski, T.R.

    1988-08-08

    We have localized nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the zebra finch brain by using three 125I-labelled ligands: alpha bungarotoxin and two monoclonal antibodies to neuronal nicotinic receptors. Unfixed brains from intact adult male and female zebra finches were prepared for in vitro autoradiography. Low-resolution film autoradiograms and high-resolution emulsion autoradiograms were prepared for each of the three ligands. The major brain structures that bind all three of the ligands are hippocampus; hyperstriatum dorsalis; hyperstriatum ventralis; nucleus lentiformis mesencephali; nucleus pretectalis, some layers of the optic tectum; nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis; pars dorsalis; locus ceruleus; and all cranial motor nuclei except nucleus nervi hypoglossi. The major structures labelled only by (125I)-alpha bungarotoxin binding included hyperstriatum accessorium and the nuclei: preopticus medialis, medialis hypothalami posterioris, semilunaris, olivarius inferior, and the periventricular organ. Of the song control nuclei, nucleus magnocellularis of the anterior neostriatum; hyperstriatum ventralis, pars caudalis; nucleus intercollicularis; and nucleus hypoglossus were labelled. The binding patterns of the two antibodies were similar to one another but not identical. Both labelled nucleus spiriformis lateralis and nucleus geniculatus lateralis, pars ventralis especially heavily and also labelled the nucleus habenula medialis; nucleus subpretectalis; nucleus isthmi, pars magnocellularis; nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis; nucleus reticularis lateralis; nucleus tractus solitarii; nucleus vestibularis dorsolateralis; nucleus vestibularis lateralis; nucleus descendens nervi trigemini; and the deep cerebellar nuclei.

  5. Role of calcium in the regulation of acetylcholine receptor synthese in cultured muscle cells*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, M; Reis, M A; Shainberg, A

    1980-05-01

    Embroyonic muscles differentiated in vitro were used to study the effects of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+1]i) variations on the amount of acetylcholine receptors ([AChR]) in the cell membrane. 2. Increased Ca2+ concentration in the growth medium ([Ca2+]o) caused a marked elevation of AChR levels, apparently through de novo synthesis. 3. Agents known to increase [Ca2+]i and its accumulation in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), such as ionophore A23187, sodium dantrolene (DaNa), or high [Mg2+]o all enhanced alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BGT) binding after 48 h of treatment. 4. Electrical stimulation or caffeine, both affectors of SR calcium release, brought about a decrease in [AChR] probably by suppressing its synthesis. 5. The effects of simultaneous treatment with two AChR-inducing agents, namely, high [Ca2+]o in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX) or high [Mg2+]o were not additive, thus suggesting action via a common saturable mediator. 6. Intermediate AChR levels obtained following simultaneous treatments with opposing effects, e.g., electrical stimulation in the presence of high [Ca2+]o or DaNa, suggest contradictory actions on a common mediator. 7. All these observations indicate a strong correlation between SR calcium levels and [AChR] on myotubes; while calcium accumulation in the Sr was followed by increased AChR synthesis, calcium release was accompanied by suppression of receptor synthesis.

  6. Gating of long-term potentiation by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at the cerebellum input stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Prestori

    Full Text Available The brain needs mechanisms able to correlate plastic changes with local circuit activity and internal functional states. At the cerebellum input stage, uncontrolled induction of long-term potentiation or depression (LTP or LTD between mossy fibres and granule cells can saturate synaptic capacity and impair cerebellar functioning, which suggests that neuromodulators are required to gate plasticity processes. Cholinergic systems innervating the cerebellum are thought to enhance procedural learning and memory. Here we show that a specific subtype of acetylcholine receptors, the α7-nAChRs, are distributed both in cerebellar mossy fibre terminals and granule cell dendrites and contribute substantially to synaptic regulation. Selective α7-nAChR activation enhances the postsynaptic calcium increase, allowing weak mossy fibre bursts, which would otherwise cause LTD, to generate robust LTP. The local microperfusion of α7-nAChR agonists could also lead to in vivo switching of LTD to LTP following sensory stimulation of the whisker pad. In the cerebellar flocculus, α7-nAChR pharmacological activation impaired vestibulo-ocular-reflex adaptation, probably because LTP was saturated, preventing the fine adjustment of synaptic weights. These results show that gating mechanisms mediated by specific subtypes of nicotinic receptors are required to control the LTD/LTP balance at the mossy fibre-granule cell relay in order to regulate cerebellar plasticity and behavioural adaptation.

  7. Expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits from parasitic nematodes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Megan A; Reaves, Barbara J; Maclean, Mary J; Storey, Bob E; Wolstenholme, Adrian J

    2015-11-01

    The levamisole-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptor present at nematode neuromuscular junctions is composed of multiple different subunits, with the exact composition varying between species. We tested the ability of two well-conserved nicotinic receptor subunits, UNC-38 and UNC-29, from Haemonchus contortus and Ascaris suum to rescue the levamisole-resistance and locomotion defects of Caenorhabditis elegans strains with null deletion mutations in the unc-38 and unc-29 genes. The parasite cDNAs were cloned downstream of the relevant C. elegans promoters and introduced into the mutant strains via biolistic transformation. The UNC-38 subunit of H. contortus was able to completely rescue both the locomotion defects and levamisole resistance of the null deletion mutant VC2937 (ok2896), but no C. elegans expressing the A. suum UNC-38 could be detected. The H. contortus UNC-29.1 subunit partially rescued the levamisole resistance of a C. elegans null mutation in unc-29 VC1944 (ok2450), but did cause increased motility in a thrashing assay. In contrast, only a single line of worms containing the A. suum UNC-29 subunit showed a partial rescue of levamisole resistance, with no effect on thrashing.

  8. Synthesis of carbon-11 labeled dexetimide and levetimide for studying muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannals, R.F.; Langstrom, B.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    The localization and quantitation of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m-AChR) in the living human brain using a non-invasive method, such as positron emission tomography (PET), may provide valuable information about receptor changes which have been observed post mortem in patients with Huntington's chorea and Alzheimer's dementia, as well as normal brain mechanisms mediated by the m-AChR. Although quinuclidinyl benzilate has been radioiodinated and radiomethylatd, the former is not useful with PET and the latter does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier; therefore, the authors chose to radiolabel dexetimide, a ligand which labels m-AChR in vitro and in vivo, and levetimide, its inactive enantiomer. Carbon-11 labeled carbon dioxide is bubbled through a tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution of phenylmagnesium chloride (1 M, l ml) after which 2 mg of lithium aluminium hydride is added in THF (500 ..mu..l). After evaporation of the solvent, 48% hydriodic acid (l ml) is added and the solution is heated for 1 minute. Carbon-11 labeled benzyl iodide is extracted into methylene chloride, added to a solution of nor-benzyl dexetimide or levetimide, and heated for several minutes. Purification is accomplished using semi-preparative reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Analytical HPLC is used to determine the radiochemical purity and specific activity.

  9. Segregation of lipids near acetylcholine-receptor channels imaged by cryo-EM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Unwin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid communication at the chemical synapse depends on the action of ion channels residing in the postsynaptic membrane. The channels open transiently upon the binding of a neurotransmitter released from the presynaptic nerve terminal, eliciting an electrical response. Membrane lipids also play a vital but poorly understood role in this process of synaptic transmission. The present study examines the lipid distribution around nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh receptors in tubular vesicles made from postsynaptic membranes of the Torpedo ray, taking advantage of the recent advances in cryo-EM. A segregated distribution of lipid molecules is found in the outer leaflet of the bilayer. Apparent cholesterol-rich patches are located in specific annular regions next to the transmembrane helices and also in a more extended `microdomain' between the apposed δ subunits of neighbouring receptors. The particular lipid distribution can be interpreted straightforwardly in relation to the gating movements revealed by an earlier time-resolved cryo-EM study, in which the membranes were exposed briefly to ACh. The results suggest that in addition to stabilizing the protein, cholesterol may play a mechanical role by conferring local rigidity to the membrane so that there is productive coupling between the extracellular and membrane domains, leading to opening of the channel.

  10. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout selectively enhances ethanol-, but not beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2005-01-03

    The alpha7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated as a potential site of action for two neurotoxins, ethanol and the Alzheimer's disease related peptide, beta-amyloid. Here, we utilized primary neuronal cultures of cerebral cortex from alpha7 nAChR null mutant mice to examine the role of this receptor in modulating the neurotoxic properties of subchronic, "binge" ethanol and beta-amyloid. Knockout of the alpha7 nAChR gene selectively enhanced ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a gene dosage-related fashion. Susceptibility of cultures to beta-amyloid induced toxicity, however, was unaffected by alpha7 nAChR gene null mutation. Further, beta-amyloid did not inhibit the binding of the highly alpha7-selective radioligand, [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin. On the other hand, in studies in Xenopus oocytes ethanol efficaciously inhibited alpha7 nAChR function. These data suggest that alpha7 nAChRs modulate the neurotoxic effects of binge ethanol, but not the neurotoxicity produced by beta-amyloid. It is hypothesized that inhibition of alpha7 nAChRs by ethanol provides partial protection against the neurotoxic properties of subchronic ethanol.

  11. Modelling and simulation of ion channels: applications to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansom, M S; Adcock, C; Smith, G R

    1998-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with experimentally derived restraints have been used to develop atomic models of M2 helix bundles forming the pore-lining domains of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and related ligand-gated ion channels. M2 helix bundles have been used in microscopic simulations of the dynamics and energetics of water and ions within an ion channel. Translational and rotational motion of water are restricted within the pore, and water dipoles are aligned relative to the pore axis by the surrounding helix dipoles. Potential energy profiles for translation of a Na+ ion along the pore suggest that the protein and water components of the interaction energy exert an opposing effect on the ion, resulting in a relatively flat profile which favors cation permeation. Empirical conductance calculations based on a pore radius profile suggest that the M2 helix model is consistent with a single channel conductance of ca. 50 pS. Continuum electrostatics calculations indicate that a ring of glutamate residues at the cytoplasmic mouth of the alpha 7 nicotinic receptor M2 helix bundle may not be fully ionized. A simplified model of the remainder of the channel protein when added to the M2 helix bundle plays a significant role in enhancing the ion selectivity of the channel.

  12. High Throughput Random Mutagenesis and Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing of the Muscle Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot-Kormelink, Paul J.; Ferrand, Sandrine; Kelley, Nicholas; Bill, Anke; Freuler, Felix; Imbert, Pierre-Eloi; Marelli, Anthony; Gerwin, Nicole; Sivilotti, Lucia G.; Miraglia, Loren; Orth, Anthony P.; Oakeley, Edward J.; Schopfer, Ulrich; Siehler, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    High throughput random mutagenesis is a powerful tool to identify which residues are important for the function of a protein, and gain insight into its structure-function relation. The human muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was used to test whether this technique previously used for monomeric receptors can be applied to a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel. A mutant library for the α1 subunit of the channel was generated by error-prone PCR, and full length sequences of all 2816 mutants were retrieved using single molecule real time sequencing. Each α1 mutant was co-transfected with wildtype β1, δ, and ε subunits, and the channel function characterized by an ion flux assay. To test whether the strategy could map the structure-function relation of this receptor, we attempted to identify mutations that conferred resistance to competitive antagonists. Mutant hits were defined as receptors that responded to the nicotinic agonist epibatidine, but were not inhibited by either α-bungarotoxin or tubocurarine. Eight α1 subunit mutant hits were identified, six of which contained mutations at position Y233 or V275 in the transmembrane domain. Three single point mutations (Y233N, Y233H, and V275M) were studied further, and found to enhance the potencies of five channel agonists tested. This suggests that the mutations made the channel resistant to the antagonists, not by impairing antagonist binding, but rather by producing a gain-of-function phenotype, e.g. increased agonist sensitivity. Our data show that random high throughput mutagenesis is applicable to multimeric proteins to discover novel functional mutants, and outlines the benefits of using single molecule real time sequencing with regards to quality control of the mutant library as well as downstream mutant data interpretation. PMID:27649498

  13. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated calcium signaling in the nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-xin SHEN; Jerrel L YAKEL

    2009-01-01

    Based on the composition of the five subunits forming functional neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), they are grouped into either heteromeric (comprising both α and β subunits) or homomeric (comprising only α subunits) recep-tors. The nAChRs are known to be differentially permeable to calcium ions, with the α7 nAChR subtype having one of the highest permeabilities to calcium. Calcium influx through nAChRs, particularly through the α-bungarotoxin-sensitive α7-containing nAChRs, is a very efficient way to raise cytoplasmic calcium levels. The activation of nAChRs can mediate three types of cytoplasmic calcium signals: (1) direct calcium influx through the nAChRs, (2) indirect calcium influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) which are activated by the nAChR-mediated depolarization, and (3) calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) (triggered by the first two sources) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the ryanodine receptors and inositol (1,4,5)-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs). Downstream signaling events mediated by nAChR-mediated calcium responses can be grouped into instantaneous effects (such as neurotransmitter release, which can occur in milliseconds after nAChR activation), short-term effects (such as the recovery of nAChR desensitization through cellular signaling cascades), and long-term effects (such as neuroprotection via gene expression). In addition, nAChR activity can be regulated by cytoplasmic calcium levels, suggesting a complex reciprocal relationship. Further advances in imaging techniques, animal models, and more potent and subtype-selective ligands for neuronal nAChRs would help in understand-ing the neuronal nAChR-mediated calcium signaling, and lead to the development of improved therapeutic treatments.

  14. Enhancement of Adipocyte Browning by Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukuda, Kana; Mogi, Masaki; Iwanami, Jun; Kanno, Harumi; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Wang, Xiao-Li; Bai, Hui-Yu; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Kukida, Masayoshi; Higaki, Akinori; Yamauchi, Toshifumi; Min, Li-Juan; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) has been highlighted as a new possible therapeutic target for obesity, diabetes and lipid metabolic disorders, because WAT browning could increase energy expenditure and reduce adiposity. The new clusters of adipocytes that emerge with WAT browning have been named ‘beige’ or ‘brite’ adipocytes. Recent reports have indicated that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a role in various aspects of adipose tissue physiology and dysfunction. The biological effects of angiotensin II, a major component of RAS, are mediated by two receptor subtypes, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and type 2 receptor (AT2R). However, the functional roles of angiotensin II receptor subtypes in WAT browning have not been defined. Therefore, we examined whether deletion of angiotensin II receptor subtypes (AT1aR and AT2R) may affect white-to-beige fat conversion in vivo. AT1a receptor knockout (AT1aKO) mice exhibited increased appearance of multilocular lipid droplets and upregulation of thermogenic gene expression in inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT) compared to wild-type (WT) mice. AT2 receptor-deleted mice did not show miniaturization of lipid droplets or alteration of thermogenic gene expression levels in iWAT. An in vitro experiment using adipose tissue-derived stem cells showed that deletion of the AT1a receptor resulted in suppression of adipocyte differentiation, with reduction in expression of thermogenic genes. These results indicate that deletion of the AT1a receptor might have some effects on the process of browning of WAT and that blockade of the AT1 receptor could be a therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:27992452

  15. GABAB receptor blockade enhances theta and gamma rhythms in the hippocampus of behaving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, L Stan; Shen, Bixia

    2007-01-01

    The participation of GABA(B) receptors in hippocampal EEG generation was studied by intracerebroventricular (icv) and intracerebral infusions of GABA(B) receptor antagonist p-(3-aminopropyl)-p-diethoxymethyl-phosphinic acid (CGP35348) in freely behaving rats. During awake-immobility, icv CGP35348 induced a theta rhythm and increased gamma waves (30-100 Hz) in the hippocampus. The immobility theta peaked at 6-7 Hz and had a theta phase in CA1 stratum radiatum of approximately 160 degrees with reference to the theta at the alveus, when compared with approximately 130 degrees during walking. Immobility theta power peaks at 6-7 Hz was also found in normal rats, and it was detected in 27% of the EEG segments during immobility. Incidence of immobility theta increased to 87.5% after 480 nmol of CGP35348 icv. Muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (5 mg/kg, ip) suppressed the induction of immobility theta and the gamma power increase after icv CGP35348. CGP35348 icv did not significantly change the hippocampal theta power at 7-8 Hz during walking (theta fundamental), but it increased power at 12-15 Hz, at the second harmonic of theta. CGP35348 icv also increased 30-50 Hz gamma power during walking. Medial septal infusion of CGP35348 (12 nmol in 0.4 microl) increased the power and the frequency of the hippocampal theta second harmonic during walking, but did not increase gamma activity. Infusion of CGP35348 (8 nmol in 0.4 microl) in the hippocampus increased the local gamma activity at 30-100 Hz, but did not induce immobility theta or affect the walking theta rhythm. In conclusion, icv GABA(B) receptor blockade increased an atropine-sensitive input that generated an immobility theta rhythm, while GABA(B) receptor blockade of the medial septum increased atropine-resistant theta harmonics possibly generated by apical dendritic spikes. GABA(B) receptor blockade may enhance cognitive task performance by activating hippocampal theta and gamma rhythms in behaving rats.

  16. FRET-Based Detection of M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Activation by Orthosteric and Allosteric Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Danijela; Holdich, Jonathan; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; Mistry, Rajendra; Krasel, Cornelius; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn P.; Challiss, R. A. John

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are 7-transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptors that regulate a variety of physiological processes and represent potentially important targets for therapeutic intervention. mAChRs can be stimulated by full and partial orthosteric and allosteric agonists, however the relative abilities of such ligands to induce conformational changes in the receptor remain unclear. To gain further insight into the actions of mAChR agonists, we have developed a fluorescently tagged M1 mAChR that reports ligand-induced conformational changes in real-time by changes in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Methods Variants of CFP and YFP were inserted into the third intracellular loop and at the end of the C-terminus of the mouse M1 mAChR, respectively. The optimized FRET receptor construct (M1-cam5) was expressed stably in HEK293 cells. Results The variant CFP/YFP-receptor chimera expressed predominantly at the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells and displayed ligand-binding affinities comparable with those of the wild-type receptor. It also retained an ability to interact with Gαq/11 proteins and to stimulate phosphoinositide turnover, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and undergo agonist-dependent internalization. Addition of the full agonist methacholine caused a reversible decrease in M1 FRET (FEYFP/FECFP) that was prevented by atropine pre-addition and showed concentration-dependent amplitude and kinetics. Partial orthosteric agonists, arecoline and pilocarpine, as well as allosteric agonists, AC-42 and 77-LH-28-1, also caused atropine-sensitive decreases in the FRET signal, which were smaller in amplitude and significantly slower in onset compared to those evoked by methacholine. Conclusion The M1 FRET-based receptor chimera reports that allosteric and orthosteric agonists induce similar conformational changes in the third intracellular loop and/or C-terminus, and should prove to be a valuable molecular reagent for

  17. FRET-based detection of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation by orthosteric and allosteric agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijela Markovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs are 7-transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptors that regulate a variety of physiological processes and represent potentially important targets for therapeutic intervention. mAChRs can be stimulated by full and partial orthosteric and allosteric agonists, however the relative abilities of such ligands to induce conformational changes in the receptor remain unclear. To gain further insight into the actions of mAChR agonists, we have developed a fluorescently tagged M(1 mAChR that reports ligand-induced conformational changes in real-time by changes in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET. METHODS: Variants of CFP and YFP were inserted into the third intracellular loop and at the end of the C-terminus of the mouse M(1 mAChR, respectively. The optimized FRET receptor construct (M(1-cam5 was expressed stably in HEK293 cells. RESULTS: The variant CFP/YFP-receptor chimera expressed predominantly at the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells and displayed ligand-binding affinities comparable with those of the wild-type receptor. It also retained an ability to interact with Gα(q/11 proteins and to stimulate phosphoinositide turnover, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and undergo agonist-dependent internalization. Addition of the full agonist methacholine caused a reversible decrease in M(1 FRET (F(EYFP/F(ECFP that was prevented by atropine pre-addition and showed concentration-dependent amplitude and kinetics. Partial orthosteric agonists, arecoline and pilocarpine, as well as allosteric agonists, AC-42 and 77-LH-28-1, also caused atropine-sensitive decreases in the FRET signal, which were smaller in amplitude and significantly slower in onset compared to those evoked by methacholine. CONCLUSION: The M(1 FRET-based receptor chimera reports that allosteric and orthosteric agonists induce similar conformational changes in the third intracellular loop and/or C-terminus, and should prove to be a

  18. Effects of donepezil treatment on rat nicotinic acetylcholine receptor levels in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Richard T; Sabbagh, Marwan N

    2003-12-01

    Research on acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) indicates that long term exposure increases the level of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) but the effects of donepezil on nAChRs are not well studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of sub-chronic donepezil administration on nAChRs in rats and rat pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells. Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered donepezil (0.7 and 2.4 micromoles/kg), nicotine (2.5 micromoles/kg) or saline subcutaneously twice daily for 14 days, PC-12 cells were incubated with 10(-6) to 10(-4) M donepezil for 72 hours and nAChR levels were determined by receptor binding assay using the nAChR ligands [3H]-epibatidine (EPI) for non-alpha 7 nAChRs and [3H]-methyllyconitine (MLA) for alpha 7 nAChRs. Chronic donepezil administration at 1.4 micromoles/kg/day and 4.8 micromoles/ kg/day significantly increased [3H]-epibatidine binding in the cortex to 126 +/- 1.3% and 127 +/- 3.2% of the saline control animals, respectively. [3H]-MLA binding in the cortex increased to 114 +/- 4.4% and 124 +/- 2.8% of the control group for the high and low dose groups, respectively. Hippocampal [3H]-EPI binding in the low dose and high dose groups significantly increased to 135 +/- 3.6% and 125 +/- 4.6% of the controls, respectively while there were no changes in the level of [3H]-MLA binding. In striatal homogenates, neither [3H]-EPI nor [3H]-MLA binding were significantly effected at either dose of donepezil. In PC-12 cells, [3H]-EPI binding was increased at the non-physiological 10(-4)M concentration only. There was no effect of donepezil on [3H]-MLA binding at any concentration examined. These results indicate that donepezil increases cortical alpha 7 and non-alpha 7 nAChRs, hippocampal non-alpha 7 nAChRs but does not influence striatal nAChR levels. Furthermore, the lack of an effect on the alpha 7-nAChRs in PC-12 cells suggests that the increase in cortical alpha 7 nAChRs may be an indirect effect of increased acetylcholine

  19. Cytisine, a partial agonist of high-affinity nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, has antidepressant-like properties in male C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineur, Yann S; Somenzi, Oli; Picciotto, Marina R

    2007-04-01

    The nicotine in tobacco is thought to modulate neuronal systems regulating mood. Moreover, it appears possible that blockade rather than activation of beta2-containing (beta2*) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) may lead to antidepressant-like effects. We used cytisine, a partial agonist of alpha4/beta2*nAChRs and a full agonist at alpha3/beta4*nAChRs, in several tests of antidepressant efficacy. Further, we used c-fos expression to identify potential neurobiological correlates of the antidepressant-like effects of cytisine. Cytisine had antidepressant-like effects in several animal models of antidepressant efficacy. In addition, immunohistochemical analyses indicated that cytisine could reduce c-fos immunoreactivity in the basolateral amygdala by approximately 50%. These data show that cytisine acts like classical antidepressants in rodent models of antidepressant efficacy. In addition, cytisine's ability to block alpha4/beta2*nAChRs may be responsible for its antidepressant-like properties, and these may be mediated through a reduction of neuronal activity in the basolateral amygdala. These studies also suggest that both antagonists and partial agonists of alpha4/beta2*nAChRs would be interesting targets for the development of novel antidepressant drugs.

  20. Cytisine, a partial agonist of high affinity nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, has antidepressant-like properties in male C57BL/6J mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineur, Yann S.; Somenzi, Oli; Picciotto, Marina R.

    2007-01-01

    The nicotine in tobacco is thought to modulate neuronal systems regulating mood. Moreover, it appears possible that blockade rather than activation of β2-containing (β2*) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) may lead to antidepressant-like effects. We used cytisine, a partial agonist of α4/β2* nAChRs and a full agonist at α3/β4* nAChRs, in several tests of antidepressant efficacy. Further, we used c-fos expression to identify potential neurobiological correlates of the antidepressant-like effects of cytisine. Cytisine had antidepressant-like effects in several animal models of antidepressant efficacy. In addition, immunohistochemical analyses indicated that cytisine could reduce c-fos immunoreactivity in the basolateral amygdala by ~ 50%. These data show that cytisine acts like classical antidepressants in rodent models of antidepressant efficacy. In addition, cytisine’s ability to block α4/β2* nAChRs may be responsible for its antidepressant-like properties, and these may be mediated through a reduction of neuronal activity in the basolateral amygdala. These studies also suggest that both antagonists and partial agonists of α4/β2* nAChRs would be interesting targets for the development of novel antidepressant drugs. PMID:17320916

  1. Alterations in the oxygen deficit-oxygen debt relationships with beta-adrenergic receptor blockade in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, R L

    1984-04-01

    The effects of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade (100 mg oral metoprolol) or matched placebo on gas exchange kinetics were studied in six males. Ventilation and gas exchange were monitored in four transitions for each treatment from loadless pedalling (0 W) to a selected work rate (100 W) and back to 0 W. Breath-by-breath data were averaged for analysis. Oxygen uptake (VO2) kinetics were significantly slowed at the onset of exercise and recovery by beta-blockade. This resulted in larger oxygen deficit and oxygen debt (671 +/- 115, 586 +/- 87 ml O2, respectively) for beta-blockade than for placebo (497 +/- 87, 474 +/- 104 ml O2). In addition, oxygen deficit was significantly larger than oxygen debt during beta-blockade tests. These results can be explained by greater utilization of oxygen and creatine phosphate stores as well as anaerobic glycolysis at the onset of 100 W exercise with beta-blockade. Carbon dioxide output (VCO2) kinetics were significantly slowed by beta-blockade only at the onset of exercise. Expired ventilation (VE) kinetics were not affected by beta-blockade. At 0 W, VE was significantly reduced by beta-blockade. Heart rate was lower at all times with beta-blockade. Kinetics of heart rate were not affected. These data for VO2 kinetics at the start and end of exercise indicate that even in moderate-intensity exercise, lactic acid production can contribute significantly to energy supply. The use of the term ' alactic ' to describe the deficit and debt associated with this exercise is not appropriate.

  2. Functional reconstitution of Haemonchus contortus acetylcholine receptors in Xenopus oocytes provides mechanistic insights into levamisole resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulin, T; Fauvin, A; Charvet, CL; Cortet, J; Cabaret, J; Bessereau, J-L; Neveu, C

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The cholinergic agonist levamisole is widely used to treat parasitic nematode infestations. This anthelmintic drug paralyses worms by activating a class of levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptors (L-AChRs) expressed in nematode muscle cells. However, levamisole efficacy has been compromised by the emergence of drug-resistant parasites, especially in gastrointestinal nematodes such as Haemonchus contortus. We report here the first functional reconstitution and pharmacological characterization of H. contortus L-AChRs in a heterologous expression system. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH In the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, five AChR subunit and three ancillary protein genes are necessary in vivo and in vitro to synthesize L-AChRs. We have cloned the H. contortus orthologues of these genes and expressed them in Xenopus oocytes. We reconstituted two types of H. contortus L-AChRs with distinct pharmacologies by combining different receptor subunits. KEY RESULTS The Hco-ACR-8 subunit plays a pivotal role in selective sensitivity to levamisole. As observed with C. elegans L-AChRs, expression of H. contortus receptors requires the ancillary proteins Hco-RIC-3, Hco-UNC-50 and Hco-UNC-74. Using this experimental system, we demonstrated that a truncated Hco-UNC-63 L-AChR subunit, which was specifically detected in a levamisole-resistant H. contortus isolate, but not in levamisole-sensitive strains, hampers the normal function of L-AChRs, when co-expressed with its full-length counterpart. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We provide the first functional evidence for a putative molecular mechanism involved in levamisole resistance in any parasitic nematode. This expression system will provide a means to analyse molecular polymorphisms associated with drug resistance at the electrophysiological level. PMID:21486278

  3. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the honey bee, Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew K; Raymond-Delpech, Valerie; Thany, Steeve H; Gauthier, Monique; Sattelle, David B

    2006-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission and play roles in many cognitive processes. They are under intense research as potential targets of drugs used to treat neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Invertebrate nAChRs are targets of anthelmintics as well as a major group of insecticides, the neonicotinoids. The honey bee, Apis mellifera, is one of the most beneficial insects worldwide, playing an important role in crop pollination, and is also a valuable model system for studies on social interaction, sensory processing, learning, and memory. We have used the A. mellifera genome information to characterize the complete honey bee nAChR gene family. Comparison with the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae shows that the honey bee possesses the largest family of insect nAChR subunits to date (11 members). As with Drosophila and Anopheles, alternative splicing of conserved exons increases receptor diversity. Also, we show that in one honey bee nAChR subunit, six adenosine residues are targeted for RNA A-to-I editing, two of which are evolutionarily conserved in Drosophila melanogaster and Heliothis virescens orthologs, and that the extent of editing increases as the honey bee lifecycle progresses, serving to maximize receptor diversity at the adult stage. These findings on Apis mellifera enhance our understanding of nAChR functional genomics and provide a useful basis for the development of improved insecticides that spare a major beneficial insect species.

  4. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blockade is neuroprotective in experimental autoimmune optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sühs, Kurt-Wolfram; Fairless, Richard; Williams, Sarah K; Heine, Katrin; Cavalié, Adolfo; Diem, Ricarda

    2014-06-01

    Optic neuritis is a common clinical manifestation of the chronic inflammatory CNS disease multiple sclerosis that can result in persistent visual impairment caused by degeneration of optic nerve axons and apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Using a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis with optic neuritis (Brown Norway rats), we show that administration of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists memantine or MK801 results in RGC protection, axon protection, and reduced demyelination of optic nerves. Calcium imaging revealed that RGC responses to glutamate stimulation predominantly occurred via NMDA receptors and were inhibited by memantine in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, oligodendrocytes were mainly responsive through the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/kainate receptor. This suggests that NMDA receptor blockade protected RGCs directly and that the protection was independent of effects on oligodendrocytes. Moreover, increased RGC survival was observed before the onset of optic nerve demyelination--when RGC degeneration had already started. These results indicate an important pathophysiologic role for NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate toxicity during the induction phase of this disease model and highlight a potential target for therapeutic neuroprotection in human optic neuritis.

  5. Dual Mechanism of Interleukin-3 Receptor Blockade by an Anti-Cancer Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie E. Broughton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-3 (IL-3 is an activated T cell product that bridges innate and adaptive immunity and contributes to several immunopathologies. Here, we report the crystal structure of the IL-3 receptor α chain (IL3Rα in complex with the anti-leukemia antibody CSL362 that reveals the N-terminal domain (NTD, a domain also present in the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, IL-5, and IL-13 receptors, adopting unique “open” and classical “closed” conformations. Although extensive mutational analyses of the NTD epitope of CSL362 show minor overlap with the IL-3 binding site, CSL362 only inhibits IL-3 binding to the closed conformation, indicating alternative mechanisms for blocking IL-3 signaling. Significantly, whereas “open-like” IL3Rα mutants can simultaneously bind IL-3 and CSL362, CSL362 still prevents the assembly of a higher-order IL-3 receptor-signaling complex. The discovery of open forms of cytokine receptors provides the framework for development of potent antibodies that can achieve a “double hit” cytokine receptor blockade.

  6. Differential Effects of Quercetin and Quercetin Glycosides on Human α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor-Mediated Ion Currents

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Byung-Hwan; Choi, Sun-Hye; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Jung, Seok-Won; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Pyo, Mi-Kyung; Rhim, Hyewhon; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Kim, Ho-Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Mok; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin is a flavonoid usually found in fruits and vegetables. Aside from its antioxidative effects, quercetin, like other flavonoids, has a various neuropharmacological actions. Quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (Rham1), quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (Rutin), and quercetin-3-(2(G)-rhamnosylrutinoside (Rham2) are mono-, di-, and tri-glycosylated forms of quercetin, respectively. In a previous study, we showed that quercetin can enhance α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR)-mediated ion currents....

  7. Thymus cells in myasthenia gravis selectively enhance production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by autologous blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newsom-Davis, J.; Willcox, N.; Calder, L.

    1981-11-26

    We investigated the role of the thymus in 16 patients with myasthenia gravis without thymoma by studying the production of anti-acetylcholine-receptor antibody by thymic and blood lymphocytes cultured alone or together. In 10 responders (with the highest receptor-antibody titers in their plasma), cultured thymic cells spontaneously produced measurable receptor antibody. Receptor-antibody production by autologous blood lymphocytes was enhanced by the addition of responder's thymic cells, irradiated to abrogate antibody production and suppression (P<0.01). This enhancement was greater and more consistent than that by pokeweed mitogen; it depended on viable thymic cells, appeared to be selective for receptor antibody, and correlated with the ratio of thymic helper (OKT4-positive or OKT4+) to suppressor (OKT8+) T cells (P<0.01). These results suggest that myasthenic thymus contains cell-bound acetylcholine-receptor-like material or specific T cells (or both) that can aid receptor-antibody production. This may be relevant to the benefits of thymectomy in myasthenia and to the breakdown in self-tolerance in this and other autoimmune diseases.

  8. Repeated blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors, but not of glucocorticoid receptors impairs food rewarded spatial learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, BRK; Korte, SM; Buwalda, B; la Fleur, SE; Bohus, B; Luiten, PGM

    1998-01-01

    Corticosteroids from the adrenal cortex influence a variety of behaviours including cognition, learning and memory. These hormones act via two intracellular receptors, the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These two receptor types display a high concentration and

  9. Repeated blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors, but not of glucocorticoid receptors impairs food rewarded spatial learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, B.R.; Korte, S.M.; Buwalda, B.; Fleur, la S.E.; Bohus, B.; Luiten, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    Corticosteroids from the adrenal cortex influence a variety of behaviours including cognition, learning and memory. These hormones act via two intracellular receptors, the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These two receptor types display a high concentration and

  10. Pathogenesis of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Role of Nicotine and Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong-Zhuang Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, proteolysis, smooth muscle cell apoptosis, and angiogenesis have been implicated in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs, although the well-defined initiating mechanism is not fully understood. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs such as MMP-2 and -9 and other proteinases degrading elastin and extracellular matrix are the critical pathogenesis of AAAs. Among the risk factors of AAAs, cigarette smoking is an irrefutable one. Cigarette smoke is practically involved in various aspects of the AAA pathogenesis. Nicotine, a major alkaloid in tobacco leaves and a primary component in cigarette smoke, can stimulate the MMPs expression by vascular SMCs, endothelial cells, and inflammatory cells in vascular wall and induce angiogenesis in the aneurysmal tissues. However, for the inflammatory and apoptotic processes in the pathogenesis of AAAs, nicotine seems to be moving in just the opposite direction. Additionally, the effects of nicotine are probably dose dependent or associated with the exposure duration and may be partly exerted by its receptors—nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. In this paper, we will mainly discuss the pathogenesis of AAAs involving inflammation, proteolysis, smooth muscle cell apoptosis and angiogenesis, and the roles of nicotine and nAChRs.

  11. Agents related to a potent activator of the acetylcholine receptor of Electrophorus electricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, N H; Erlanger, B F

    1981-09-01

    The synthesis of a number of compounds related to trans-3,3'-bis[alpha-(trimethylammonium)methyl]azobenzene dibromide (trans-3,3'-BisQ) (1) is described. Among the compounds are: [14C]-trans-3,3'-BisQ (1) diiodide, cis-3,3'-BisQ (2) dibromide, the trans-2,2' (7) and 4,4' (11) isomers of BisQ, 2,2', (12), 3,3' (13) and 4,4' (14) isomers of bis-benzyldimethylammonium analogues, and related compounds in which the azo bridge between the two aromatic rings is replaced by diketo and amide bridges. Of them all trans-3,3'-BisQ (1) was the most active cholinergic compound in the electroplax system of Electrophorus electricus; the pure cis isomer (2) was without activity. Intermediate activities were found for some of the other compounds and others were inhibitors. The relationship of the structure of these agents to a proposed conformation and topography of the binding site of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is discussed.

  12. A positive relationship between harm avoidance and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storage, Steven; Mandelkern, Mark A; Phuong, Jonathan; Kozman, Maggie; Neary, Meaghan K; Brody, Arthur L

    2013-12-30

    Prior research indicates that disturbance of cholinergic neurotransmission reduces anxiety, leading to the hypothesis that people with heightened cholinergic function have a greater tendency toward anxiety-like and/or harm-avoidant behavior. We sought to determine if people with elevated levels of harm avoidance (HA), a dimension of temperament from the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), have high α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) availability. Healthy adults (n=105; 47 non-smokers and 58 smokers) underwent bolus-plus-continuous infusion positron emission tomography (PET) scanning using the radiotracer 2-[18F]fluoro-3-(2(S)azetidinylmethoxy) pyridine (abbreviated as 2-FA). During the uptake period of 2-FA, participants completed the TCI. The central study analysis revealed a significant association between total HA and mean nAChR availability, with higher total HA scores being linked with greater nAChR availability. In examining HA subscales, both 'Fear of Uncertainty' and 'Fatigability' were significant, based on higher levels of these characteristics being associated with greater nAChR availabilities. This study adds to a growing body of knowledge concerning the biological basis of personality and may prove useful in understanding the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders (such as anxiety disorders) that have similar characteristics to HA. Study findings may indicate that heightened cholinergic neurotransmission is associated with increased anxiety-like traits. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Cruzipain induces autoantibodies against cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Functional and pathological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Giordanengo, Laura; Joensen, Lilian; Gea, Susana

    2003-09-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate whether cruzipain, a Trypanosoma cruzi immunodominant antigen, was able to induce antibodies reactive to the cardiac M(2) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M(2) mAChR). Immunization with cruzipain that was devoid of enzyme activity triggered IgG antibodies against cardiac M(2) mAChR. By radioligand competition assay we proved that the anti-cruzipain IgG fraction, purified from serum, inhibited binding of the specific M(2) mAChR radioligand [(3)H]quinuclidinyl benzilate. We also demonstrated that anti-cruzipain IgG reacted against the second extracellular loop of the M(2) mAChR. The corresponding affinity-purified serum anti-M(2)e2 IgG (reacting against a synthetic peptide corresponding to this loop in humans) displayed agonist-like activity associated with specific M(2) mAChR activation - increase of cGMP, inositol phosphate accumulation and nitric oxide synthase activity - triggering a decrease in myocardial contractility. Moreover, the same IgG fraction decreased heart frequency, related to inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity. These results imply that cruzipain plays a role in the production of antibodies against M(2) mAChR, which have been related to the pathogenesis of dysautonomic syndrome described in Chagas' disease.

  14. Alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Is a Target in Pharmacology and Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Pohanka

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR is an important part of the cholinergic nerve system in the brain. Moreover, it is associated with a cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the termination of the parasympathetic nervous system. Antagonists of α7 nAChR are a wide group represented by conotoxin and bungarotoxin. Even Alzheimer’s disease drug memantine acting as an antagonist in its side pathway belongs in this group. Agonists of α7 nAChR are suitable for treatment of multiple cognitive dysfunctions such as Alzheimer’s disease or schizophrenia. Inflammation or even sepsis can be ameliorated by the agonistic acting compounds. Preparations RG3487, SEN34625/WYE-103914, SEN12333, ABT-107, Clozapine, GTS-21, CNI-1493, and AR-R17779 are representative examples of the novel compounds with affinity toward the α7 nAChR. Pharmacological, toxicological, and medicinal significance of α7 nAChR are discussed throughout this paper.

  15. Metabolic stabilization of acetylcholine receptors in vertebrate neuromuscular junction by muscle activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotzler, S.; Brenner, H.R. (Univ. of Basel (Switzerland))

    1990-08-01

    The effects of muscle activity on the growth of synaptic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) accumulations and on the metabolic AChR stability were investigated in rat skeletal muscle. Ectopic end plates induced surgically in adult soleus muscle were denervated early during development when junctional AChR number and stability were still low and, subsequently, muscles were either left inactive or they were kept active by chronic exogenous stimulation. AChR numbers per ectopic AChR cluster and AChR stabilities were estimated from the radioactivity and its decay with time, respectively, of end plate sites whose AChRs had been labeled with {sup 125}I-alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-butx). The results show that the metabolic stability of the AChRs in ectopic clusters is reversibly increased by muscle activity even when innervation is eliminated very early in development. 1 d of stimulation is sufficient to stabilize the AChRs in ectopic AChR clusters. Muscle stimulation also produced an increase in the number of AChRs at early denervated end plates. Activity-induced cluster growth occurs mainly by an increase in area rather than in AChR density, and for at least 10 d after denervation is comparable to that in normally developing ectopic end plates. The possible involvement of AChR stabilization in end plate growth is discussed.

  16. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew K; Grauso, Marta; Sattelle, David B

    2005-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission in the insect nervous system and are targets of widely selling insecticides. We have identified the nAChR gene family from the genome of the malaria mosquito vector, Anopheles gambiae, to be the second complete insect nAChR gene family described following that of Drosophila melanogaster. Like Drosophila, Anopheles possesses 10 nAChR subunits with orthologous relationships evident between the two insects. Interestingly, the Anopheles orthologues of Dbeta2 and Dbeta3 possess the vicinal cysteines that define alpha subunits. As with Dalpha4 and Dalpha6, the Anopheles orthologues are alternatively spliced at equivalent exons. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis shows that RNA A-to-I editing sites conserved between Dalpha6 of Drosophila and alpha7-2 of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens, are not shared with the equivalent nAChR subunit of Anopheles. Indeed, RNA-editing sites identified in functionally significant regions of Dbeta1, Dalpha5, and Dalpha6 are not conserved in the mosquito orthologues, indicating considerable divergence of RNA molecules targeted for editing within the insect order Diptera. These findings shed further light on the diversity of nAChR subunits and may present a useful basis for the development of improved malaria control agents by enhancing our understanding of a validated mosquito insecticide target.

  17. Neonicotinoids target distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and neurons, leading to differential risks to bumblebees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Christopher; Buckland, Stephen T.; Samson, Andrew J.; McArthur, Robin; Chamosa Pino, Victor; Bollan, Karen A.; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2016-04-01

    There is growing concern over the risk to bee populations from neonicotinoid insecticides and the long-term consequences of reduced numbers of insect pollinators to essential ecosystem services and food security. Our knowledge of the risk of neonicotinoids to bees is based on studies of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam and these findings are extrapolated to clothianidin based on its higher potency at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. This study addresses the specificity and consequences of all three neonicotinoids to determine their relative risk to bumblebees at field-relevant levels (2.5 ppb). We find compound-specific effects at all levels (individual cells, bees and whole colonies in semi-field conditions). Imidacloprid and clothianidin display distinct, overlapping, abilities to stimulate Kenyon cells, indicating the potential to differentially influence bumblebee behavior. Bee immobility was induced only by imidacloprid, and an increased vulnerability to clothianidin toxicity only occurred following chronic exposure to clothianidin or thiamethoxam. At the whole colony level, only thiamethoxam altered the sex ratio (more males present) and only clothianidin increased queen production. Finally, both imidacloprid and thiamethoxam caused deficits in colony strength, while no detrimental effects of clothianidin were observed. Given these findings, neonicotinoid risk needs to be considered independently for each compound and target species.

  18. Lynx1 and Aβ1-42 bind competitively to multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M

    2016-01-01

    Lynx1 regulates synaptic plasticity in the brain by regulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). It is not known to which extent Lynx1 can bind to endogenous nAChR subunits in the brain or how this interaction is affected by Alzheimer's disease pathology. We apply affinity purification...... to demonstrate that a water-soluble variant of human Lynx1 (Ws-Lynx1) isolates α3, α4, α5, α6, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits from human and rat cortical extracts, and rat midbrain and olfactory bulb extracts, suggesting that Lynx1 forms complexes with multiple nAChR subtypes in the human and rodent brain....... Incubation with Ws-Lynx1 decreases nicotine-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells and striatal neurons, indicating that binding of Ws-Lynx1 is sufficient to inhibit signaling downstream of nAChRs. The effect of nicotine in PC12 cells is independent of α7 or α4β2 n...

  19. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits with cervical neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja-Macias, Itzel; Osann, Kathryn; Remedios-Chan, Mariana; Barrera-Saldana, Hugo A.; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Chikova, Anna K.; Grando, Sergei A.; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Aims Cholinergic signaling, particularly in response to non-physiological ligands like nicotine, stimulates carcinogenesis of a variety of tissue types including epithelia of the cervix uteri. Cholinergic signaling is mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which are pentamers formed by subsets of 16 nAChR subunits. Recent literature suggests that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of some of these subunits, notably alpha5, are risk factors for developing lung cancer in smokers as well as in non-smokers. Main methods We have studied the prevalence of four SNPs in the alpha5, alpha9, and beta1 subunits, which are expressed in cervical cells, in 456 patients with cervical cancers, precursor lesions, and healthy controls from two cohorts in Mexico. Key findings A SNP in the alpha9 subunit, the G allele of rs10009228 (alpha9, A>G) shows a significant trend in the combined cohort, indicating that this allele constitutes a risk factor for neoplastic progression. The A allele of the SNP rs16969968 (alpha5, G>A), which correlates with the development of lung cancer, shows a non-significant trend to be associated with cervical lesions. Two other SNPs, rs55633891 (alpha9, C>T) and rs17856697 (beta1, A>G), did not exhibit a significant trend. Significance Our study points to a potential risk factor of cervical carcinogenesis with importance for DNA diagnosis and as a target for intervention. PMID:22406075

  20. Recent developments in novel antidepressants targeting α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Han-Kun; Caldarone, Barbara J; Eaton, J Brek; Lukas, Ronald J; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2014-10-23

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been investigated for developing drugs that can potentially treat various central nervous system disorders. Considerable evidence supports the hypothesis that modulation of the cholinergic system through activation and/or desensitization/inactivation of nAChR holds promise for the development of new antidepressants. The introductory portion of this Miniperspective discusses the basic pharmacology that underpins the involvement of α4β2-nAChRs in depression, along with the structural features that are essential to ligand recognition by the α4β2-nAChRs. The remainder of this Miniperspective analyzes reported nicotinic ligands in terms of drug design considerations and their potency and selectivity, with a particular focus on compounds exhibiting antidepressant-like effects in preclinical or clinical studies. This Miniperspective aims to provide an in-depth analysis of the potential for using nicotinic ligands in the treatment of depression, which may hold some promise in addressing an unmet clinical need by providing relief from depressive symptoms in refractory patients.

  1. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α4 Subunit Gene Variation Associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xuezhu; XU Yong; LI Qianqian; LIU Pozi; YANG Yuan; ZHANG Fuquan; GUO Tianyou; YANG Chuang; GUO Lanting

    2009-01-01

    Previous pharmacological, human genetics, and animal models have implicated the nicotinic ace-tylcholine receptor a4 subunit (CHRNA4) gene in the pathogenesis of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The objective of this study is to examine the genetic association between single nucleotide poly-morphisms in the CHRNA4 gene (rs2273502, rs1044396, rs1044397, and rs3827020 loci) and ADHD. Both case-control and family-based designs are used. Children aged 6 to 16 years were interviewed and as-sessed with the children behavior checklist and the revised conner' parent rating scale to identify probands. No significant differences in the frequency distribution of genotypes or alleles were found between the case and control groups. However, further haplotype analyses showed the CCGG haplotype on dsk for ADHD in 164 case-control samples and the standard transmission disequilibrium test analyses suggest that the allele C of rs2273502 was over-transferred in 98 ADHD parent-offspring tdos. These findings suggest that the CHRNA4 gene may play a role in the pathogenesis of ADHD.

  2. A D-peptide ligand of nicotine acetylcholine receptors for brain-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaoli; Zhan, Changyou; Shen, Qing; Fu, Wei; Xie, Cao; Gao, Jie; Peng, Chunmei; Zheng, Ping; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomes of brain capillary endothelial cells are implicated in nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated transcytosis and act as an enzymatic barrier for the transport of peptide ligands to the brain. A D-peptide ligand of nAChRs (termed (D)CDX), which binds to nAChRs with an IC50 value of 84.5 nM, was developed by retro-inverso isomerization. (D)CDX displayed exceptional stability in lysosomal homogenate and serum, and demonstrated significantly higher transcytosis efficiency in an in vitro blood-brain barrier monolayer compared with the parent L-peptide. When modified on liposomal surface, (D)CDX facilitated significant brain-targeted delivery of liposomes. As a result, brain-targeted delivery of (D)CDX modified liposomes enhanced therapeutic efficiency of encapsulated doxorubicin for glioblastoma. This study illustrates the importance of ligand stability in nAChRs-mediated transcytosis, and paves the way for developing stable brain-targeted entities.

  3. Functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor reconstitution in Au(111)-supported thiolipid monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pissinis, Diego E.; Diaz, Carolina; Maza, Eliana; Bonini, Ida C.; Barrantes, Francisco J.; Salvarezza, Roberto C.; Schilardi, Patricia L.

    2015-09-01

    The insertion and function of the muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in Au(111)-supported thiolipid self-assembled monolayers have been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and electrochemical techniques. It was possible for the first time to resolve the supramolecular arrangement of the protein spontaneously inserted in a thiolipid monolayer in an aqueous solution. Geometric supramolecular arrays of nAChRs were observed, most commonly in a triangular form compatible with three nAChR dimers of ~20 nm each. Addition of the full agonist carbamoylcholine activated and opened the nAChR ion channel, as revealed by the increase in capacitance relative to that of the nAChR-thiolipid system under basal conditions. Thus, the self-assembled system appears to be a viable biomimetic model to measure ionic conductance mediated by ion-gated ion channels under different experimental conditions, with potential applications in biotechnology and pharmacology.

  4. Functional interaction of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Na+/K+ ATPase from Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Haibo; Sun, Huahua; Xiao, Youxin; Zhang, Yixi; Wang, Xin; Xu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Zewen; Fang, Jichao; Li, Zhong

    2015-03-06

    Associated proteins are important for the correct functioning of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In the present study, a neonicotinoid-agarose affinity column was used to isolate related proteins from a solubilized membrane preparation from the nervous system of Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen). 1530 peptides were identified and most of them were involved in the membranous structure, molecular interaction and cellular communication. Among these peptides, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase had the highest MASCOT score and were involved in the molecular interaction, which suggested that Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and nAChRs might have strong and stable interactions in insect central nervous system. In the present study, functional interactions between nAChRs and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase were examined by heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. The results showed that the activated nAChRs increased pump currents of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, which did not require current flow through open nAChRs. In turn, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase significantly increased agonist sensitivities of nAChRs in a pump activity-independent manner and reduced the maximum current (Imax) of nAChRs. These findings provide novel insights concerning the functional interactions between insect nAChRs and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase.

  5. Role of acetylcholine and muscarinic receptors in serotonin-induced bronchoconstriction in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Wolfgang; Wiegand, Silke; Akinci, Sibel; Schinkel, Alfred H; Wess, Jürgen; Koepsell, Hermann; Haberberger, Rainer Viktor; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2006-01-01

    For the murine trachea, it has been reported that constriction evoked by serotonin (5-HT) is largely dependent on acetylcholine (ACh) released from the epithelium, owing to the sensitivity of the 5-HT response to epithelium removal, sensitivity to atropine, and insensitivity to tetrodotoxin (Moffatt et al., 2003). Consistent with this assumption, the respiratory epithelium contains ACh, its synthesizing enzyme, and the high-affinity choline transporter CHT1 (Reinheimer et al., 1996; Pfeil et al., 2003; Proskocil et al., 2004). Recently, we demonstrated that ACh can be released from non-neuronal cells by corticosteroid-sensitive polyspecific organic cation transporters (OCTs), which are also expressed by airway epithelial cells (Lips et al., 2005). Hence, we proposed that 5-HT evokes release of ACh from epithelial cells via OCTs and that this epithelial-derived ACh induces bronchoconstriction. We tested this hypothesis in a well-established model of videomorphometric analysis of bronchial diameter in precision-cut murine lung slices utilizing epithelium removal to assess the role of the epithelium, OCT mouse knockout (KO) strains to assess the role of OCT isoforms, and muscarinic receptor M2/M3 double-KO mice to assess the cholinergic component of 5-HT induced bronchoconstriction, as bronchi of this strain are entirely unresponsive to cholinergic stimulation(Struckmann et al., 2003).

  6. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Roskams, Tania [Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, University of Leuven (Belgium); Oben, Jude A., E-mail: j.oben@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  7. Strychnine, but not PMBA, inhibits neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed by rabbit retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renna, J M; Strang, C E; Amthor, F R; Keyser, K T

    2007-01-01

    Strychnine is considered a selective competitive antagonist of glycine gated Cl- channels (Saitoh et al., 1994) and studies have used strychnine at low micromolar concentrations to study the role of glycine in rabbit retina (Linn, 1998; Protti et al., 2005). However, other studies have shown that strychnine, in the concentrations commonly used, is also a potent competitive antagonist of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs; Matsubayashi et al., 1998). We tested the effects of low micromolar concentrations of strychnine and 3-[2'-phosphonomethyl[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl] alanine (PMBA), a specific glycine receptor blocker (Saitoh et al., 1994; Hosie et al., 1999) on the activation of both alpha7 nAChRs on retinal ganglion cells and on ganglion cell responses to a light flash. Extracellular recordings were obtained from ganglion cells in an isolated retina/choroid preparation and 500 microM choline was used as an alpha7 agonist (Alkondon et al., 1997). We recorded from brisk sustained and brisk transient OFF cells, many of which have been previously shown to have alpha7 receptors (Strang et al., 2005). Further, we tested the effect of strychnine, PMBA and alpha-bungarotoxin on the binding of tetramethylrhodamine alpha-bungarotoxin in the inner plexiform layer. Our data indicates that strychnine, at doses as low as 1.0 microM, can inhibit the alpha7 nAChR-mediated response to choline, but PMBA at concentrations as high as 0.4 microM does not. Binding studies show strychnine and alpha-bungarotoxin inhibit binding of labeled alpha-bungarotoxin in the IPL. Thus, the effects of strychnine application may be to inhibit glycine receptors expressed by ganglion cell or to inhibit amacrine cell alpha7 nAChRs, both of which would result in an increase in the ganglion cell responses. Further research will be required to disentangle the effects of strychnine previously believed to be caused by a single mechanism of glycine receptor inhibition.

  8. The vagal nerve stimulates activation of the hepatic progenitor cell compartment via muscarinic acetylcholine receptor type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiman, David; Libbrecht, Louis; Sinelli, Nicoletta; Desmet, Valeer; Denef, Carl; Roskams, Tania

    2002-08-01

    In the rat the hepatic branch of the nervus vagus stimulates proliferation of hepatocytes after partial hepatectomy and growth of bile duct epithelial cells after bile duct ligation. We studied the effect of hepatic vagotomy on the activation of the hepatic progenitor cell compartment in human and rat liver. The number of hepatic progenitor cells and atypical reactive ductular cells in transplanted (denervated) human livers with hepatitis was significantly lower than in innervated matched control livers and the number of oval cells in vagotomized rat livers with galactosamine hepatitis was significantly lower than in livers of sham-operated rats with galactosamine hepatitis. The expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M1-M5 receptor) was studied by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In human liver, immunoreactivity for M3 receptor was observed in hepatic progenitor cells, atypical reactive ductules, intermediate hepatocyte-like cells, and bile duct epithelial cells. mRNA for the M1-M3 and the M5 receptor, but not the M4 receptor, was detected in human liver homogenates. In conclusion, the hepatic vagus branch stimulates activation of the hepatic progenitor cell compartment in diseased liver, most likely through binding of acetylcholine to the M3 receptor expressed on these cells. These findings may be of clinical importance for patients with a transplant liver.

  9. A novel physiological property of snake bradykinin-potentiating peptides-reversion of MK-801 inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Arthur A; Trujillo, Cleber A; Lameu, Claudiana; Konno, Katsuhiro; Oliveira, Vitor; Camargo, Antonio C M; Ulrich, Henning; Hayashi, Mirian A F

    2008-10-01

    The first naturally occurring angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors described are pyroglutamyl proline-rich oligopeptides, found in the venom of the viper Bothrops jararaca, and named as bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs). Biochemical and pharmacological properties of these peptides were essential for the development of Captopril, the first active site-directed inhibitor of ACE, currently used for the treatment of human hypertension. However, a number of data have suggested that the pharmacological activity of BPPs could not only be explained by their inhibitory action on enzymatic activity of somatic ACE. In fact, we showed recently that the strong and long-lasting anti-hypertensive effect of BPP-10c [pheochromocytoma cell line, which following induction to neuronal differentiation expresses most of the nicotinic receptor subtypes. BPP-10c did not induce receptor-mediated ion flux, nor potentiated carbamoylcholine-provoked receptor activity as determined by whole-cell recording. This peptide, however, alleviated MK-801-induced inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activity. Although more data are needed for understanding the mechanism of the BPP-10c effect on nicotinic receptor activity and its relationship with the anti-hypertensive activity, this work reveals possible therapeutic applications for BPP-10c in establishing normal acetylcholine receptor activity.

  10. Telmisartan ameliorates glutamate-induced neurotoxicity: roles of AT(1) receptor blockade and PPARγ activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Pang, Tao; Hafko, Roman; Benicky, Julius; Sanchez-Lemus, Enrique; Saavedra, Juan M

    2014-04-01

    Sartans (Angiotensin II AT(1) Receptor Blockers, ARBs) are powerful neuroprotective agents in vivo and protect against IL-1β neurotoxicity in vitro. The purpose of this research was to determine the extent of sartan neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity, a common cause of neuronal injury and apoptosis. The results show that sartans are neuroprotective, significantly reducing glutamate-induced neuronal injury and apoptosis in cultured rat primary cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). Telmisartan was the most potent sartan studied, with an order of potency telmisartan > candesartan > losartan > valsartan. Mechanisms involved reduction of pro-apoptotic caspase-3 activation, protection of the survival PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway and prevention of glutamate-induced ERK1/2 activation. NMDA receptor stimulation was essential for glutamate-induced cell injury and apoptosis. Participation of AT(1A) receptor was supported by glutamate-induced upregulation of AT(1A) gene expression and AT(1) receptor binding. Conversely, AT(1B) or AT(2) receptors played no role. Glutamate-induced neuronal injury and the neuroprotective effect of telmisartan were decreased, but not abolished, in CGCs obtained from AT(1A) knock-out mice. This indicates that although AT(1) receptors are necessary for glutamate to exert its full neurotoxic potential, part of the neuroprotective effect of telmisartan is independent of AT(1) receptor blockade. PPARγ activation was also involved in the neuroprotective effects of telmisartan, as telmisartan enhanced PPARγ nuclear translocation and the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 partially reversed the neuroprotective effects of telmisartan. The present results substantiate the therapeutic use of sartans, in particular telmisartan, in neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain disorders where glutamate neurotoxicity plays a significant role. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Telmisartan ameliorates glutamate-induced neurotoxicity: roles of AT1 receptor blockade and PPARγ activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Pang, Tao; Hafko, Roman; Benicky, Julius; Sanchez-Lemus, Enrique; Saavedra, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Sartans (Angiotensin II AT1 Receptor Blockers, ARBs) are powerful neuroprotective agents in vivo and protect against IL-1β neurotoxicity in vitro. The purpose of this research was to determine the extent of sartan neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity, a common cause of neuronal injury and apoptosis. The results show that sartans are neuroprotective, significantly reducing glutamate-induced neuronal injury and apoptosis in cultured rat primary cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). Telmisartan was the most potent sartan studied, with an order of potency telmisartan > candesartan > losartan > valsartan. Mechanisms involved reduction of pro-apoptotic caspase-3 activation, protection of the survival PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway, and prevention of glutamate-induced ERK1/2 activation. NMDA receptor stimulation was essential for glutamate-induced cell injury and apoptosis. Participation of AT1A receptor was supported by glutamate-induced upregulation of AT1A gene expression and AT1 receptor binding. Conversely, AT1B or AT2 receptor played no role. Glutamate-induced neuronal injury and the neuroprotective effect of telmisartan were decreased, but not abolished, in CGCs obtained from AT1A knock-out mice. This indicates that although AT1 receptors are necessary for glutamate to exert its full neurotoxic potential, part of the neuroprotective effect of telmisartan is independent of AT1 receptor blockade. PPARγ activation was also involved in the neuroprotective effects of telmisartan, as telmisartan enhanced PPARγ nuclear translocation, and the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 partially reversed the neuroprotective effects of telmisartan. The present results substantiate the therapeutic use of sartans, in particular telmisartan, in neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain disorders where glutamate neurotoxicity plays a significant role. PMID:24316465

  12. Effect of mineralocorticoid receptor blockade on hippocampal-dependent memory in adults with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenstein, Lisa S; Sheridan, Margaret; Garg, Rajesh; Adler, Gail K

    2015-06-01

    The hippocampus is crucial for paired-associate learning. Obesity is associated with increased mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activity in peripheral and possibly central tissues, decreased hippocampal size in humans, and impaired hippocampal learning in rodents. The MR is expressed in hippocampal neurons, and MR blockade improves hippocampal learning in obese animals. The goal of the study was to determine whether MR blockade would modulate paired-associate learning in men and women with obesity. Men and women ages 20-61 years with BMI between 30-45 kg/m(2) were randomly assigned to placebo (n = 11; 7 women) or 50 mg spironolactone daily (n = 12; 7 women) for six weeks. At baseline and post-treatment, subjects underwent a clinical and hormonal evaluation. They also underwent a computerized task that assesses paired-associate learning and has been shown by functional magnetic resonance imaging to activate the hippocampus. In an ANCOVA model that adjusted for baseline paired-associate learning, age, and race, spironolactone treatment was associated with a significant (P = 0.043) improvement in hippocampal memory as compared to placebo treatment. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that blocking MR with chronic, low-dose spironolactone treatment improves paired-associate learning in individuals with obesity, suggesting that MR activation contributes to hippocampal memory modulation in humans. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  13. Topical Mineralocorticoid Receptor Blockade Limits Glucocorticoid-Induced Epidermal Atrophy in Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubec, Eve; Laouénan, Cédric; Deschamps, Lydia; Nguyen, Van Tuan; Scheer-Senyarich, Isabelle; Wackenheim-Jacobs, Anne-Catherine; Steff, Maud; Duhamel, Stéphanie; Tubiana, Sarah; Brahimi, Nesrine; Leclerc-Mercier, Stéphanie; Crickx, Béatrice; Perret, Claudine; Aractingi, Selim; Escoubet, Brigitte; Duval, Xavier; Arnaud, Philippe; Jaisser, Frederic; Mentré, France; Farman, Nicolette

    2015-07-01

    A major deleterious side effect of glucocorticoids is skin atrophy. Glucocorticoids activate the glucocorticoid and the mineralocorticoid (MR) receptor, both present in the epidermis. We hypothesized that glucocorticoid-induced epidermal atrophy may be related to inappropriate occupancy of MR by glucocorticoids. We evaluated whether epidermal atrophy induced by the topical glucocorticoid clobetasol could be limited by coadministration of MR antagonist. In cultured human skin explants, the epidermal atrophy induced by clobetasol was significantly limited by MR antagonism (canrenoate and eplerenone). Blockade of the epithelial sodium channel ENaC by phenamil was also efficient, identifying a role of MR-ENaC cascade in keratinocytes, acting through restoration of clobetasol-induced impairment of keratinocyte proliferation. In the SPIREPI randomized double-blind controlled trial, gels containing clobetasol, the MR antagonist spironolactone, both agents, or placebo were applied on four zones of the forearms of 23 healthy volunteers for 28 days. Primary outcome was histological thickness of the epidermis with clobetasol alone or clobetasol+spironolactone. Spironolactone alone did not affect the epidermal thickness but coapplication of clobetasol and spironolactone significantly limited clobetasol-induced atrophy and was well tolerated. Altogether, these findings identify MR as a factor regulating epidermal homeostasis and suggest that topical MR blockade could limit glucocorticoid-induced epidermal atrophy.

  14. Acetylcholine Attenuates Hypoxia/ Reoxygenation-Induced Mitochondrial and Cytosolic ROS Formation in H9c2 Cells via M2 Acetylcholine Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Miao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anti-infammatory and cardioprotective effect of acetylcholine (ACh has been reported; nevertheless, whether and how ACh exhibits an antioxidant property against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R-induced oxidative stress remains obscure. Methods: In the present study, H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R to mimic I/R injury. We estimated intracellular different sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS by measuring mitochondrial ROS (mtROS, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA copy number, xanthine oxidase (XO and NADPH oxidase (NOX activity and expression of rac 1. Cell injury was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release and cleaved caspase-3 expression. The siRNA transfection was performed to knockdown of M2 acetylcholine receptor (M2 AChR expression. Results: 12-h hypoxia followed by 2-h reoxygenation resulted in an abrupt burst of ROS in H9c2 cells. Administration of ACh reduced the levels of ROS in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to the H/R group, ACh decreased mtROS, recovered mtDNA copy number, diminished XO and NOX activity, rac 1 expression as well as cell injury. Co- treatment with atropine rather than hexamethonium abolished the antioxidant and cardioprotective effect of ACh. Moreover, knockdown of M2 AChR by siRNA showed the similar trends as atropine co-treatment group. Conclusions: ACh inhibits mitochondria-, XO- and NOX-derived ROS production thus protecting H9c2 cells against H/R-induced oxidative stress, and these benefcial effects are mainly mediated by M2 AChR. Our findings suggested that increasing ACh release could be a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment and prevention of I/R injury.

  15. Up-regulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in menthol cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Arthur L; Mukhin, Alexey G; La Charite, Jaime; Ta, Karen; Farahi, Judah; Sugar, Catherine A; Mamoun, Michael S; Vellios, Evan; Archie, Meena; Kozman, Maggie; Phuong, Jonathan; Arlorio, Franca; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    One-third of smokers primarily use menthol cigarettes and usage of these cigarettes leads to elevated serum nicotine levels and more difficulty quitting in standard treatment programmes. Previous brain imaging studies demonstrate that smoking (without regard to cigarette type) leads to up-regulation of β(2)*-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We sought to determine if menthol cigarette usage results in greater nAChR up-regulation than non-menthol cigarette usage. Altogether, 114 participants (22 menthol cigarette smokers, 41 non-menthol cigarette smokers and 51 non-smokers) underwent positron emission tomography scanning using the α(4)β(2)* nAChR radioligand 2-[(18)F]fluoro-A-85380 (2-FA). In comparing menthol to non-menthol cigarette smokers, an overall test of 2-FA total volume of distribution values revealed a significant between-group difference, resulting from menthol smokers having 9-28% higher α(4)β(2)* nAChR densities than non-menthol smokers across regions. In comparing the entire group of smokers to non-smokers, an overall test revealed a significant between-group difference, resulting from smokers having higher α(4)β(2)* nAChR levels in all regions studied (36-42%) other than thalamus (3%). Study results demonstrate that menthol smokers have greater up-regulation of nAChRs than non-menthol smokers. This difference is presumably related to higher nicotine exposure in menthol smokers, although other mechanisms for menthol influencing receptor density are possible. These results provide additional information about the severity of menthol cigarette use and may help explain why these smokers have more trouble quitting in standard treatment programmes.

  16. Nicotine increases GABAergic input on rat dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons through alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Vázquez, F; Chavarría, K; Garduño, J; Hernández-López, S; Mihailescu, S P

    2014-12-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains large populations of serotonergic (5-HT) neurons. This nucleus receives GABAergic inhibitory afferents from many brain areas and from DRN interneurons. Both GABAergic and 5-HT DRN neurons express functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotine increases 5-HT release and 5-HT DRN neuron discharge rate by stimulating postsynaptic nAChRs and by increasing glutamate and norepinephrine release inside DRN. However, the influence of nicotine on the GABAergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons was poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the effect of nicotine on GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) of 5-HT DRN neurons and the subtype of nAChR(s) involved in this response. Experiments were performed in coronal slices obtained from young Wistar rats. GABAergic sIPSCs were recorded from post hoc-identified 5-HT DRN neurons with the whole cell voltage patch-clamp technique. Administration of nicotine (1 μM) increased sIPSC frequency in 72% of identified 5-HT DRN neurons. This effect was not reproduced by the α4β2 nAChR agonist RJR-2403 and was not influenced by TTX (1 μM). It was mimicked by the selective agonist for α7 nAChR, PNU-282987, and exacerbated by the positive allosteric modulator of the same receptor, PNU-120596. The nicotine-induced increase in sIPSC frequency was independent on voltage-gated calcium channels and dependent on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). These results demonstrate that nicotine increases the GABAergic input to most 5-HT DRN neurons, by activating α7 nAChRs and producing CICR in DRN GABAergic terminals.

  17. A robust homogeneous binding assay for α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin HUI; Jie GAO; Xin XIE; Naoki SUTO; Tsuyoshi OGIKU; Ming-Wei WANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To develop a homogeneous high-throughput screening (HTS) assay based on scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology for identification of novel α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) modulators. Methods: Membrane preparation of HEK293 cells expressing α4β2 nAChR, [3H]cytisine and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-coupled microbeads were used to develop an HTS assay based on SPA technology. This method was validated against a conventional filter binding approach and applied to large-scale screening of a library containing 32 000 synthetic compounds. Intracellular calcium measurement was carried out to verify the bioactivities of the hits found by the SPA assay. Results: IC50 values of 2 reference compounds (epibatidine and RJR 2403) determined by SPA and filter binding methods were comparable and consistent with those reported elsewhere. A total of 54 compounds, showing more than 60% competitive inhibition on [3H]cytisine binding to α4β2 nAChR, were identified initially following an HTS campaign. Secondary screening confirmed that 17 compounds with novel chemical structures possessed relatively high binding affinity to α4β2 nAChR (Ki<2 μmol/L). Eight compounds displayed antagonistic effects with >50% inhibition on ABT-594-induced calcium mobilization while none showed any agonist activity. Conclusions: This homogeneous binding assay is a highly efficient,amenable to automation and robust tool to screen potential α4β2 nAChR modulators in an HTS setting. Its application may be expanded to other membrane receptors and ion channels.

  18. A subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors plays a critical role in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeon, Jongrye; Nielsen, Ditte Dencker; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M(1)-M(5) mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M(4) mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M(4) mAChRs are coexpres....... Since enhanced central dopaminergic neurotransmission is a hallmark of several severe disorders of the CNS, including schizophrenia and drug addiction, our findings have substantial clinical relevance....

  19. Lack of CB1 receptors increases noradrenaline release in vas deferens without affecting atrial noradrenaline release or cortical acetylcholine release

    OpenAIRE

    Schlicker, Eberhard; Redmer, Agnes; Werner, André; Kathmann, Markus

    2003-01-01

    We studied whether cannabinoid CB1 receptor gene disruption (to yield CB1−/− mice) affects the electrically evoked tritium overflow from vas deferens and atrial pieces preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline (NA) (‘noradrenaline release') and from cerebral cortex slices preincubated with [3H]-choline (‘acetylcholine release').NA release was higher by 37% in vas deferens from CB1−/− mice than in vas deferens from CB1+/+ mice. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 inhibited, and the CB1 re...

  20. Expression of five acetylcholine receptor subunit genes in Brugia malayi adult worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ben-Wen; Rush, Amy C; Weil, Gary J

    2015-12-01

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are required for body movement in parasitic nematodes and are targets of "classical" anthelmintic drugs such as levamisole and pyrantel and of newer drugs such as tribendimidine and derquantel. While neurotransmission explains the effects of these drugs on nematode movement, their effects on parasite reproduction are unexplained. The levamisole AChR type (L-AChRs) in Caenorhabditis elegans is comprised of five subunits: Cel-UNC-29, Cel-UNC-38, Cel-UNC-63, Cel-LEV-1 and Cel-LEV-8. The genome of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi contains nine AChRs subunits including orthologues of Cel-unc-29, Cel-unc-38, and Cel-unc-63. We performed in situ hybridization with RNA probes to localize the expression of five AChR genes (Bm1_35890-Bma-unc-29, Bm1_20330-Bma-unc-38, Bm1_38195-Bma-unc-63, Bm1_48815-Bma-acr-26 and Bm1_40515-Bma-acr-12) in B. malayi adult worms. Four of these genes had similar expression patterns with signals in body muscle, developing embryos, spermatogonia, uterine wall adjacent to stretched microfilariae, wall of V as deferens, and lateral cord. Three L-AChR subunit genes (Bma-unc-29, Bma-unc-38 and Bma-unc-63) were expressed in body muscle, which is a known target of levamisole. Bma-acr-12 was co-expressed with these levamisole subunit genes in muscle, and this suggests that its protein product may form receptors with other alpha subunits. Bma-acr-26 was expressed in male muscle but not in female muscle. Strong expression signals of these genes in early embryos and gametes in uterus and testis suggest that AChRs may have a role in nervous system development of embryogenesis and spermatogenesis. This would be consistent with embryotoxic effects of drugs that target these receptors in filarial worms. Our data show that the expression of these receptor genes is tightly regulated with regard to localization in adult worms and developmental stage in embryos and gametes. These results may help to explain the broad effects of

  1. Expression of five acetylcholine receptor subunit genes in Brugia malayi adult worms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben-Wen Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs are required for body movement in parasitic nematodes and are targets of “classical” anthelmintic drugs such as levamisole and pyrantel and of newer drugs such as tribendimidine and derquantel. While neurotransmission explains the effects of these drugs on nematode movement, their effects on parasite reproduction are unexplained. The levamisole AChR type (L-AChRs in Caenorhabditis elegans is comprised of five subunits: Cel-UNC-29, Cel-UNC-38, Cel-UNC-63, Cel-LEV-1 and Cel-LEV-8. The genome of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi contains nine AChRs subunits including orthologues of Cel-unc-29, Cel-unc-38, and Cel-unc-63. We performed in situ hybridization with RNA probes to localize the expression of five AChR genes (Bm1_35890-Bma-unc-29, Bm1_20330-Bma-unc-38, Bm1_38195-Bma-unc-63, Bm1_48815-Bma-acr-26 and Bm1_40515-Bma-acr-12 in B. malayi adult worms. Four of these genes had similar expression patterns with signals in body muscle, developing embryos, spermatogonia, uterine wall adjacent to stretched microfilariae, wall of Vas deferens, and lateral cord. Three L-AChR subunit genes (Bma-unc-29, Bma-unc-38 and Bma-unc-63 were expressed in body muscle, which is a known target of levamisole. Bma-acr-12 was co-expressed with these levamisole subunit genes in muscle, and this suggests that its protein product may form receptors with other alpha subunits. Bma-acr-26 was expressed in male muscle but not in female muscle. Strong expression signals of these genes in early embryos and gametes in uterus and testis suggest that AChRs may have a role in nervous system development of embryogenesis and spermatogenesis. This would be consistent with embryotoxic effects of drugs that target these receptors in filarial worms. Our data show that the expression of these receptor genes is tightly regulated with regard to localization in adult worms and developmental stage in embryos and gametes. These results may help to explain the

  2. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1 and M3 subtypes mediate acetylcholine-induced endothelium-independent vasodilatation in rat mesenteric arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangsucharit, Panot; Takatori, Shingo; Zamami, Yoshito; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Pakdeechote, Poungrat; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Takayama, Fusako

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated pharmacological characterizations of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subtypes involving ACh-induced endothelium-independent vasodilatation in rat mesenteric arteries. Changes in perfusion pressure to periarterial nerve stimulation and ACh were measured before and after the perfusion of Krebs solution containing muscarinic receptor antagonists. Distributions of muscarinic AChR subtypes in mesenteric arteries with an intact endothelium were studied using Western blotting. The expression level of M1 and M3 was significantly greater than that of M2. Endothelium removal significantly decreased expression levels of M2 and M3, but not M1. In perfused mesenteric vascular beds with intact endothelium and active tone, exogenous ACh (1, 10, and 100 nmol) produced concentration-dependent and long-lasting vasodilatations. In endothelium-denuded preparations, relaxation to ACh (1 nmol) disappeared, but ACh at 10 and 100 nmol caused long-lasting vasodilatations, which were markedly blocked by the treatment of pirenzepine (M1 antagonist) or 4-DAMP (M1 and M3 antagonist) plus hexamethonium (nicotinic AChR antagonist), but not methoctramine (M2 and M4 antagonist). These results suggest that muscarinic AChR subtypes, mainly M1, distribute throughout the rat mesenteric arteries, and that activation of M1 and/or M3 which may be located on CGRPergic nerves releases CGRP, causing an endothelium-independent vasodilatation. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1 and M3 subtypes mediate acetylcholine-induced endothelium-independent vasodilatation in rat mesenteric arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panot Tangsucharit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated pharmacological characterizations of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR subtypes involving ACh-induced endothelium-independent vasodilatation in rat mesenteric arteries. Changes in perfusion pressure to periarterial nerve stimulation and ACh were measured before and after the perfusion of Krebs solution containing muscarinic receptor antagonists. Distributions of muscarinic AChR subtypes in mesenteric arteries with an intact endothelium were studied using Western blotting. The expression level of M1 and M3 was significantly greater than that of M2. Endothelium removal significantly decreased expression levels of M2 and M3, but not M1. In perfused mesenteric vascular beds with intact endothelium and active tone, exogenous ACh (1, 10, and 100 nmol produced concentration-dependent and long-lasting vasodilatations. In endothelium-denuded preparations, relaxation to ACh (1 nmol disappeared, but ACh at 10 and 100 nmol caused long-lasting vasodilatations, which were markedly blocked by the treatment of pirenzepine (M1 antagonist or 4-DAMP (M1 and M3 antagonist plus hexamethonium (nicotinic AChR antagonist, but not methoctramine (M2 and M4 antagonist. These results suggest that muscarinic AChR subtypes, mainly M1, distribute throughout the rat mesenteric arteries, and that activation of M1 and/or M3 which may be located on CGRPergic nerves releases CGRP, causing an endothelium-independent vasodilatation.

  4. Effect of serotonin receptor blockade on endocrine and cardiovascular responses to head-up tilt in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, S; Secher, N H; Knigge, U

    1993-01-01

    Effects of blockade of serotonin (5-HT) receptors on the integrated cardiovascular and endocrine adaptations during head-up tilt were investigated in normal men. In control experiments 50 degrees head-up tilt increased heart rate (HR), total peripheral resistance (TPR), plasma renin activity (PRA...

  5. Is interleukin-6 receptor blockade the Holy Grail for inflammatory diseases?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Febbraio, M A; Rose-John, S; Pedersen, B K

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been linked to a myriad of diseases associated with inflammation, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn's disease, and several types of cancer. In 2009 the US Food and Drug Administration accepted a complete-response submission for the use of Actemra (tocilizumab), t......), the first humanized IL-6 receptor-inhibiting monoclonal antibody, for the treatment of RA. Although this treatment will certainly help in managing inflammatory disorders such as RA, we suggest that side effects of such blockade may be excess weight gain and hyperlipidemia.......Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been linked to a myriad of diseases associated with inflammation, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn's disease, and several types of cancer. In 2009 the US Food and Drug Administration accepted a complete-response submission for the use of Actemra (tocilizumab...

  6. Influence of Y151 F mutation in loop B on the agonist potency in insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Song; Yi-Xi Zhang; Xiang-Mei Yao; Ze-Wen Liu

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels,which mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission in insect and vertebrate nervous systems.The nAChR agonist-binding site is present at the interface of adjacent subunits and is formed by loops A-C present in α subunits together with loops D-F present in either non-α subunits or homomer-forrning α subunits.Although Y151 in loop B has been identified as important in agonist binding,various residues at the 151-site are found among vertebrate and invertebrate nAChR ot subunits,such as F151.In Xenopus oocytes expressing N1α1 or N1α1~(Y151F) plus rat β2,Y151F mutation was found to significantly change the rate of receptor desensitization and altered the pharmacological properties of acetylcholine,but not imidacloprid,including the decrease of I_(max),the increase of EC_(50)(the concentration causing 50% of the maximum response) and the fast time-constant of decay (τ_f).By comparisons of residue structure,the hydroxyl group in the side chain of Y151 was thought to be important in the interaction between N1α1/β2 nAChRs and acetylcholine,and the phenyl group to be important between N1α1/β2 nAChRs and imidacloprid.

  7. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor turnover in adipose tissue and kidney: irreversible blockade of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors by benextramine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taouis, M.; Berlan, M.; Lafontan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The recovery of post- and extrasynaptic alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-binding sites was studied in vivo in male golden hamsters after treatment with an irreversible alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist benextramine, a tetramine disulfide that possesses a high affinity for alpha 2-binding sites. The kidney alpha 2-adrenergic receptor number was measured with (/sup 3/H)yohimbine, whereas (/sup 3/H)clonidine was used for fat cell and brain membrane alpha 2-binding site identification. Benextramine treatment of fat cell, kidney, and brain membranes reduced or completely suppressed, in an irreversible manner, (/sup 3/H) clonidine and (/sup 3/H)yohimbine binding without modifying adenosine (A1-receptor) and beta-adrenergic receptor sites. This irreversible binding was also found 1 and 2 hr after intraperitoneal administration of benextramine to the hamsters. Although it bound irreversibly to peripheral and central alpha 2-adrenergic receptors on isolated membranes, benextramine was unable to cross the blood-brain barrier of the hamster at the concentrations used (10-20 mg/kg). After the irreversible blockade, alpha 2-binding sites reappeared in kidney and adipose tissue following a monoexponential time course. Recovery of binding sites was more rapid in kidney than in adipose tissue; the half-lives of the receptor were 31 and 46 hr, respectively in the tissues. The rates of receptor production were 1.5 and 1.8 fmol/mg of protein/hr in kidney and adipose tissue. Reappearance of alpha 2-binding sites was associated with a rapid recovery of function (antilipolytic potencies of alpha 2-agonists) in fat cells inasmuch as occupancy of 15% of (/sup 3/H)clonidine-binding sites was sufficient to promote 40% inhibition of lipolysis. Benextramine is a useful tool to estimate turnover of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors under normal and pathological situations.

  8. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade prevents stress-induced modulation of multiple memory systems in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Lars; Tegenthoff, Martin; Höffken, Oliver; Wolf, Oliver T

    2013-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that stress may orchestrate the engagement of multiple memory systems in the brain. In particular, stress is thought to favor dorsal striatum-dependent procedural over hippocampus-dependent declarative memory. However, the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying these modulatory effects of stress remain elusive, especially in humans. Here, we targeted the role of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the stress-induced modulation of dorsal striatal and hippocampal memory systems in the human brain using a combination of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and pharmacologic blockade of the MR. Eighty healthy participants received the MR antagonist spironolactone (300 mg) or a placebo and underwent a stressor or control manipulation before they performed, in the scanner, a classification task that can be supported by the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. Stress after placebo did not affect learning performance but reduced explicit task knowledge and led to a relative increase in the use of more procedural learning strategies. At the neural level, stress promoted striatum-based learning at the expense of hippocampus-based learning. Functional connectivity analyses showed that this shift was associated with altered coupling of the amygdala with the hippocampus and dorsal striatum. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade before stress prevented the stress-induced shift toward dorsal striatal procedural learning, same as the stress-induced alterations of amygdala connectivity with hippocampus and dorsal striatum, but resulted in significantly impaired performance. Our findings indicate that the stress-induced shift from hippocampal to dorsal striatal memory systems is mediated by the amygdala, required to preserve performance after stress, and dependent on the MR. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  9. [Effects of blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors on the development of pentylenetetrazole kindling in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukomskaia, N Ia; Lavrent'eva, V V; Starshinova, L A; Zhabko, E P; Gorbunova, L V; Tikhonova, T B; Gmiro, V E; Magazanik, L G

    2005-11-01

    Effects of mono- and dicationic derivatives of adamantane and phenylcyclohexyl on the petyleneterazole-induced (35 mg/kg i. p.) kindling were studied in the experiments on mice. Monocationic derivative of phenylcyclohexyl IEM-1921, effectively retarded the development of kindling beginning the dose 0.0001 microM/kg. Memantine: derivative of adamantane (derivative of adamatane) produced the same effect with 100-fold increased dose. Dicationic derivative ofphenylcyclohexyl: IEM-1925, is able to block equally the open channels of both NMDA and subtype of Ca-permeable AMPA receptors. Its effect on kindling differed markedly from selective NMDA antagonists (IEM-1921 and memantine) in more complicated dose-dependence. The retardation of kindling IEM-1925 was induced at 0.001 microM/kg. On the contrary, a 10-time lower dose: 0.0001 microM/kg, facilitated the development of kindling. The observed difference in the activity of selective NMDA antagonists and the drugs combining anti-NMDA and anti-AMPA potency indicates that both types of ionotropic glutamate receptors are involved in the mechanism of petyleneterazole-induced kindling. The integral effect of channel blockade evoked by drugs seems to be dependent not only upon the ratio of the receptor types but on the kinetics of drug action, too.

  10. Blockade of P2X7 receptors or pannexin-1 channels similarly attenuates postischemic damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros-Mejorado, Abraham; Gottlieb, Miroslav; Cavaliere, Fabio; Magnus, Tim; Koch-Nolte, Friederich; Scemes, Eliana; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    The role of P2X7 receptors and pannexin-1 channels in ischemic damage remains controversial. Here, we analyzed their contribution to postanoxic depolarization after ischemia in cultured neurons and in brain slices. We observed that pharmacological blockade of P2X7 receptors or pannexin-1 channels delayed the onset of postanoxic currents and reduced their slope, and that simultaneous inhibition did not further enhance the effects of blocking either one. These results were confirmed in acute cortical slices from P2X7 and pannexin-1 knockout mice. Oxygen-glucose deprivation in cortical organotypic cultures caused neuronal death that was reduced with P2X7 and pannexin-1 blockers as well as in organotypic cultures derived from mice lacking P2X7 and pannexin 1. Subsequently, we used transient middle cerebral artery occlusion to monitor the neuroprotective effect of those drugs in vivo. We found that P2X7 and pannexin-1 antagonists, and their ablation in knockout mice, substantially attenuated the motor symptoms and reduced the infarct volume to ~50% of that in vehicle-treated or wild-type animals. These results show that P2X7 receptors and pannexin-1 channels are major mediators of postanoxic depolarization in neurons and of brain damage after ischemia, and that they operate in the same deleterious signaling cascade leading to neuronal and tissue demise.

  11. Secreted Isoform of Human Lynx1 (SLURP-2): Spatial Structure and Pharmacology of Interactions with Different Types of Acetylcholine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, E. N.; Shulepko, M. A.; Shenkarev, Z. O.; Bychkov, M. L.; Paramonov, A. S.; Chugunov, A. O.; Kulbatskii, D. S.; Arvaniti, M.; Dolejsi, Eva; Schaer, T.; Arseniev, A. S.; Efremov, R. G.; Thomsen, M. S.; Dolezal, V.; Bertrand, D.; Dolgikh, D. A.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2016-08-01

    Human-secreted Ly-6/uPAR-related protein-2 (SLURP-2) regulates the growth and differentiation of epithelial cells. Previously, the auto/paracrine activity of SLURP-2 was considered to be mediated via its interaction with the α3β2 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here, we describe the structure and pharmacology of a recombinant analogue of SLURP-2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a ‘three-finger’ fold of SLURP-2 with a conserved β-structural core and three protruding loops. Affinity purification using cortical extracts revealed that SLURP-2 could interact with the α3, α4, α5, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits, revealing its broader pharmacological profile. SLURP-2 inhibits acetylcholine-evoked currents at α4β2 and α3β2-nAChRs (IC50 ~0.17 and >3 μM, respectively) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, at α7-nAChRs, SLURP-2 significantly enhances acetylcholine-evoked currents at concentrations <1 μM but induces inhibition at higher concentrations. SLURP-2 allosterically interacts with human M1 and M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) that are overexpressed in CHO cells. SLURP-2 was found to promote the proliferation of human oral keratinocytes via interactions with α3β2-nAChRs, while it inhibited cell growth via α7-nAChRs. SLURP-2/mAChRs interactions are also probably involved in the control of keratinocyte growth. Computer modeling revealed possible SLURP-2 binding to the ‘classical’ orthosteric agonist/antagonist binding sites at α7 and α3β2-nAChRs.

  12. Non-competitive Inhibition of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors by Ladybird Beetle Alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Ron L; Xing, Hong; Braekman, Jean-Claude; Kem, William R

    2015-10-01

    Ladybird beetles (Family Coccinellidae) secrete an alkaloid rich venom from their leg joints that protects them from predators. Coccinellines, the major venom constituents, are alkaloids composed of three fused piperidine rings that share a common nitrogen atom. Although many coccinellines have been isolated and chemically characterized, their pharmacological properties are essentially unknown. Using radioligand binding and functional assays we investigated the actions of several coccinellines on skeletal muscle and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The alkaloids were shown to displace the specific binding of tritiated piperidyl-N-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)-3,4-piperidine ([(3)H]-TCP), which has been shown to bind deep within the ion channel of the electric fish (Torpedo) muscle nAChR. The stereoisomers precoccinelline and hippodamine (whose nitrogens are predicted to be ionized at physiological pH) and their respective analogs N-methyl-precoccinelline and N-methyl-hippodamine (whose quaternary nitrogens are permanently charged) displayed similar IC50s for inhibition of [(3)H]-TCP binding. However, the corresponding precoccinelline and hippodamine N-oxides, coccinelline and convergine (which have an electronegative oxygen bonded to an electropositive nitrogen) displayed significantly higher binding IC50s. Finally, exochomine, a dimeric coccinelline containing the hippodamine structure, displayed the highest IC50 (lowest affinity) for displacing specific [(3)H]-TCP binding. The presence of a desensitizing concentration (10(-3) M) of carbachol (CCh) had little or no effect on the affinity of the Torpedo nAChR for the three coccinellines tested. High concentrations of the coccinellid alkaloids did not affect binding of [(3)H]-cytisine to Torpedo receptor ACh binding sites. Inhibition of the alpha7 nAChR with pre-equilibrated precoccinelline was insurmountable with respect to ACh concentration. We conclude that the coccinellines bind to one or more

  13. Analogues of neuroactive polyamine wasp toxins that lack inner basic sites exhibit enhanced antagonism toward a muscle-type mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stromgaard, K; Brierley, M J; Andersen, K;

    1999-01-01

    properties (stepwise macroscopic pK(a) values) were determined by (13)C NMR titrations. All analogues are fully protonated at physiological pH. The effects of these compounds on acetylcholine-induced currents in TE671 cells clamped at various holding potentials were determined. All of the analogues...... noncompetitively antagonized the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in a concentration-, time-, and voltage-dependent manner. The amplitudes of acetylcholine-induced currents were compared at their peaks and at the end of a 1 s application in the presence or absence of the analogues. Most of the analogues...

  14. Synthetic. cap alpha. subunit peptide 125-147 of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor induces antibodies to native receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, D.J.; Griesmann, G.E.; Huang, Z.; Lennon, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    A synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 125-147 of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ..cap alpha.. subunit proved to be a major antigenic region of the AChR. Rats inoculated with 50 ..mu..g of peptide (T ..cap alpha.. 125-147) developed T cell immunity and antibodies to native AChR and signs of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. They report the synthesis and preliminary testing of a disulfide-looped peptide comprising residues 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit. Peptide H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 differs from T ..cap alpha.. 125-147 at residues 139 (Glu for Gln) and 143 (Ser for Thr). In immunoprecipitation assays, antibodies to Torpedo AChR bound /sup 125/I-labelled H..cap alpha.. 125-147 antibody bound H..cap alpha.. 125-147, but monoclonal antibodies to an immunodominant region of native AChR bound neither H..cap alpha.. 125-147 nor T ..cap alpha.. 125-147. Rats immunized with H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 produced anti-mammalian muscle AChR antibodies that induced modulation of AChRs from cultured human myotubes. Thus, region 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit is extracellular in muscle, and is both antigenic and immunogenic. It remains to be determined whether or not autoantibodies to this region may in part cause the weakness or myasthenia gravis in man.

  15. Colorimetric microtiter plate receptor-binding assay for the detection of freshwater and marine neurotoxins targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Fernando; Kamp, Lisa; Carpino, Justin; Faltin, Erin; Loftin, Keith A.; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo

    2014-01-01

    Anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a, produced by cyanobacteria, are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Pinnatoxins, spirolides, and gymnodimines, produced by dinoflagellates, are antagonists of nAChRs. In this study we describe the development and validation of a competitive colorimetric, high throughput functional assay based on the mechanism of action of freshwater and marine toxins against nAChRs. Torpedo electrocyte membranes (rich in muscle-type nAChR) were immobilized and stabilized on the surface of 96-well microtiter plates. Biotinylated α-bungarotoxin (the tracer) and streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase (the detector) enabled the detection and quantitation of anatoxin-a in surface waters and cyclic imine toxins in shellfish extracts that were obtained from different locations across the US. The method compares favorably to LC/MS/MS and provides accurate results for anatoxin-a and cyclic imine toxins monitoring. Study of common constituents at the concentrations normally found in drinking and environmental waters, as well as the tolerance to pH, salt, solvents, organic and inorganic compounds did not significantly affect toxin detection. The assay allowed the simultaneous analysis of up to 25 samples within 3.5 h and it is well suited for on-site or laboratory monitoring of low levels of toxins in drinking, surface, and ground water as well as in shellfish extracts.

  16. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 subunits with a C2 cytoplasmic loop yellow fluorescent protein insertion form functional receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teresa A MURRAY; Qiang LIU; Paul WHITEAKER; Jie WU; Ronald J LUKAS

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Several nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits have been engineered as fluorescent protein (FP) fusions and exploited to illuminate features of nAChRs. The aim of this work was to create a FP fusion in the nAChR a.7 subunit without compromising formation of functional receptors.Methods: A gene construct was generated to introduce yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), in frame, into the otherwise unaltered, large, second cytoplamsic loop between the third and fourth transmembrane domains of the mouse nAChR al sub-unit (a7Y). SH-EP1 cells were transfected with mouse nAChR wild type a.7 subunits (a.7) or with a7Y subunits, alone or with the chaperone protein, hRJC-3. Receptor function was assessed using whole-cell current recording. Receptor expression was measured with 125I-labeled a-bungarotoxin (I-Bgt) binding, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.Results: Whole-cell currents revealed that a7Y nAChRs and al nAChRs were functional with comparable EC50 values for the a7 nAChR-selective agonist, choline, and IC50 values for the a.7 nAChR-selective antagonist, methyllycaconitine. I-Bgt binding was detected only after co-expression with hRIC-3. Confocal microscopy revealed that a7Y had primarily intracel-lular rather than surface expression. TIRF microscopy confirmed that little a7Y localized to the plasma membrane, typical of a7 nAChRs.Conclusion: nAChRs composed as homooligomers of a7Y subunits containing cytoplasmic loop YFP have functional, ligand binding, and trafficking characteristics similar to those of a.7 nAChRs. a7Y nAChRs may be used to elucidate properties of a.7 nAChRs and to identify and develop novel probes for these receptors, perhaps in high-throughput fashion.

  17. Association of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit alpha-4 polymorphisms with smoking behaviors in Chinese male smokers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Cheng-jing; YANG Yan-chun; WEI Jin-xue; ZHANG Lan

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been reported that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit a4 gene (CHRNA4) might be associated with smoking behaviors in the previous studies. Up to now, there are few reports on the relationship between CHRNA4 and smoking initiation. In this study, we tried to explore the role of two polymorphisms in CHRNA4 (rs 1044396 and rs 1044397) in smoking initiation and nicotine dependence in Chinese male smokers.Methods Nine hundred and sixty-six Chinese male lifetime nonsmokers and smokers were assessed by the Fagerstr(o)m test for nicotine dependence (FTND), smoking quantity (SQ) and the heaviness of smoking index (HSI). All subjects were divided into four groups based on their tobacco use history and the FTND scores. The polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to find two polymorphisms of CHRNA4 in these subjects.Results The x2 test showed that rs1044396 was significantly associated with smoking initiation (x2=4.65, P=0.031),while both rs1044396 and rs1044397 were significantly associated with nicotine dependence (x2=5.42, P=0.020; x2=758,P=0.005). Furthermore, the T-G (3.9%) haplotype of rs1044396-rs1044397 showed significant association with smoking initiation (x2=6.30, P=0.012) and the C-G haplotype (58.9%) remained positive association with nicotine dependence (x2=8.64, P=0.003) after Bonferroni correction. The C-G haplotype also significantly increased the HSI (P=0.002) and FTND scores (P=0.001) after Bonferroni correction.Conclusion These findings suggest that CHRNA4 may be associated with smoking initiation and the C-G haplotype of rs1044396-rs1044397 might increase the vulnerability to nicotine dependence in Chinese male smokers.

  18. Structural characterization of the main immunogenic region of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Stuart W; Trinh, Vu B; Gudipati, Eswari; Friend, Alexander; Page, Nelson A; Agius, Mark A; Richman, David P; Fairclough, Robert H

    2014-03-01

    To develop antigen-specific immunotherapies for autoimmune diseases, knowledge of the molecular structure of targeted immunological hotspots will guide the production of reagents to inhibit and halt production of antigen specific attack agents. To this end we have identified three noncontiguous segments of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) α-subunit that contribute to the conformationally sensitive immunological hotspot on the AChR termed the main immunogenic region (MIR): α(1-12), α(65-79), and α(110-115). This region is the target of greater than 50% of the anti-AChR Abs in serum from patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) and animals with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG). Many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised in one species against an electric organ AChR cross react with the neuromuscular AChR MIR in several species. Probing the Torpedo AChR α-subunit with mAb 132A, a disease inducing anti-MIR mAb raised against the Torpedo AChR, we have determined that two of the three MIR segments, α(1-12) and α(65-79), form a complex providing the signature components recognized by mAb 132A. These two segments straddle a third, α(110-115), that seems not to contribute specific side chains for 132A recognition, but is necessary for optimum antibody binding. This third segment appears to form a foundation upon which the three-dimensional 132A epitope is anchored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and PAMs as adjunctive treatment in schizophrenia. An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Monica M; Björkholm, Carl; Malmerfelt, Anna; Möller, Annie; Påhlsson, Ninni; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; Feltmann, Kristin; Jardemark, Kent; Schilström, Björn; Svensson, Torgny H

    2016-09-01

    Nicotine has been found to improve cognition and reduce negative symptoms in schizophrenia and a genetic and pathophysiological link between the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and schizophrenia has been demonstrated. Therefore, there has been a large interest in developing drugs affecting the α7 nAChRs for schizophrenia. In the present study we investigated, in rats, the effects of a selective α7 agonist (PNU282987) and a α7 positive allosteric modulator (PAM; NS1738) alone and in combination with the atypical antipsychotic drug risperidone for their utility as adjunct treatment in schizophrenia. Moreover we also investigated their utility as adjunct treatment in depression in combination with the SSRI citalopram. We found that NS1738 and to some extent also PNU282987, potentiated a subeffective dose of risperidone in the conditioned avoidance response test. Both drugs also potentiated the effect of a sub-effective concentration of risperidone on NMDA-induced currents in pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex. Moreover, NS1738 and PNU282987 enhanced recognition memory in the novel object recognition test, when given separately. Both drugs also potentiated accumbal but not prefrontal risperidone-induced dopamine release. Finally, PNU282987 reduced immobility in the forced swim test, indicating an antidepressant-like effect. Taken together, our data support the utility of drugs targeting the α7 nAChRs, perhaps especially α7 PAMs, to potentiate the effect of atypical antipsychotic drugs. Moreover, our data suggest that α7 agonists and PAMs can be used to ameliorate cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia and depression.

  20. Presynaptic α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors enhance hippocampal mossy fiber glutamatergic transmission via PKA activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qing; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed widely in the CNS, and mediate both synaptic and perisynaptic activities of endogenous cholinergic inputs and pharmacological actions of exogenous compounds (e.g., nicotine and choline). Behavioral studies indicate that nicotine improves such cognitive functions as learning and memory. However, the mechanism of nicotine's action on cognitive function remains elusive. We performed patch-clamp recordings from hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons to determine the effect of nicotine on mossy fiber glutamatergic synaptic transmission. We found that nicotine in combination with NS1738, an α7 nAChR-positive allosteric modulator, strongly potentiated the amplitude of evoked EPSCs (eEPSCs), and reduced the EPSC paired-pulse ratio. The action of nicotine and NS1738 was mimicked by PNU-282987 (an α7 nAChR agonist), and was absent in α7 nAChR knock-out mice. These data indicate that activation of α7 nAChRs was both necessary and sufficient to enhance the amplitude of eEPSCs. BAPTA applied postsynaptically failed to block the action of nicotine and NS1738, suggesting again a presynaptic action of the α7 nAChRs. We also observed α7 nAChR-mediated calcium rises at mossy fiber giant terminals, indicating the presence of functional α7 nAChRs at presynaptic terminals. Furthermore, the addition of PNU-282987 enhanced action potential-dependent calcium transient at these terminals. Last, the potentiating effect of PNU-282987 on eEPSCs was abolished by inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA). Our findings indicate that activation of α7 nAChRs at presynaptic sites, via a mechanism involving PKA, plays a critical role in enhancing synaptic efficiency of hippocampal mossy fiber transmission.

  1. Prostate stem cell antigen interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and is affected in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Majbrit M; Arvaniti, Maria; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Michalski, Dominik; Pinborg, Lars H; Härtig, Wolfgang; Thomsen, Morten S

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving impaired cholinergic neurotransmission and dysregulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ly-6/neurotoxin (Lynx) proteins have been shown to modulate cognition and neural plasticity by binding to nAChR subtypes and modulating their function. Hence, changes in nAChR regulatory proteins such as Lynx proteins could underlie the dysregulation of nAChRs in AD. Using Western blotting, we detected bands corresponding to the Lynx proteins prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) and Lypd6 in human cortex indicating that both proteins are present in the human brain. We further showed that PSCA forms stable complexes with the α4 nAChR subunit and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells. In addition, we analyzed protein levels of PSCA and Lypd6 in postmortem tissue of medial frontal gyrus from AD patients and found significantly increased PSCA levels (approximately 70%). In contrast, no changes in Lypd6 levels were detected. In concordance with our findings in AD patients, PSCA levels were increased in the frontal cortex of triple transgenic mice with an AD-like pathology harboring human transgenes that cause both age-dependent β-amyloidosis and tauopathy, whereas Tg2576 mice, which display β-amyloidosis only, had unchanged PSCA levels compared to wild-type animals. These findings identify PSCA as a nAChR-binding protein in the human brain that is affected in AD, suggesting that PSCA-nAChR interactions may be involved in the cognitive dysfunction observed in AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes which selectively couple to phospholipase C: Pharmacological and biochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, M.A.; Fraser, C.M. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (USA))

    1990-12-14

    The pharmacological and biochemical properties of rat m1 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary-K1 (CHO) cells were characterized with ligand binding, affinity labeling and biochemical assays. Both mAChR subtypes display saturable, high affinity binding of (3H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and a rank order of antagonist potency of QNB greater than atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Carbachol displacement of (3H)-QNB binding to the m3 mAChR revealed an approximate 17-fold higher affinity than observed with the m1 mAChR. (3H)-propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PrBCM) labeling of mAChR revealed that m1 and m3 mAChR migrated on SDS-polyacrylamide gels with apparent molecular masses of 80,000 and 94,000 daltons, respectively, consistent with the known differences in their molecular sizes. Both m1 and m3 mAChR elicited dose-dependent increases in the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides; however, the maximal increase in total inositol phosphates elicited with the m1 mAChR was approximately 2-fold greater than that observed in cells expressing similar densities of m3 mAChR. Agonist activation of the m1 mAChR also elicited increases in basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP, whereas the m3 mAChR had no effect on intracellular cAMP levels. These data suggest that although m1 and m3 mAChR display a considerable degree of structural homology, they exhibit distinct pharmacological and biochemical properties.

  3. Signal transduction by M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUO, LIQIANG; LIU, YUQIANG; DING, ZHIBO; SUN, WENDONG; YUAN, MINGZHEN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms used during signal transduction by M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRM3) in prostate cancer. The microarray datasets of GSE3325, including 5 clinically localized primary prostate cancers and 4 benign prostate tissues, were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) in primary prostate cancer tissues compared with benign controls were screened using the Limma package. Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Next, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed. Additionally, microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with DEGs were predicted and miRNA-target DEG analysis was performed using a Web-based Gene Set Analysis Toolkit. Finally, the PPI network and the miRNA-target DEG network were integrated using Cytoscape. In total, 224 DEGs were screened in the prostate cancer tissues, including 113 upregulated and 111 downregulated genes. CHRM3 and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were enriched in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. EGF and v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (Myc) were enriched in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. EGF with the highest degree of connectivity was the hub node in the PPI network, and miR-34b could interact with Myc directly in the miRNA-target DEG network. EGF and Myc may exhibit significant roles in the progression of prostate cancer via regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and the MAPK signaling pathway. CHRM3 may activate these two pathways in prostate cancer progression. Thus, these two key factors and pathways may be crucial mechanisms during signal transduction by CHRM3 in prostate cancer. PMID:26870222

  4. Clinical significance of detection of antibodies to fetal and adult acetylcholine receptors in myasthenia gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Guang Shi; Zhi-Hong Wang; Xiao-Wei Ma; Da-Qi Zhang; Chun-Sheng Yang; Fu-Dong Shi; Li Yang

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the frequency,distribution and clinical significance of the antibodies to the fetal and/or adult acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG).Methods AChR antibodies were detected by cell-based assay in the serum of ocular MG (OMG) (n =90) and generalized MG (GMG) patients (n =110).The fetaltype (2α∶ β∶ γ∶ δ) and adult-type (2α∶ β∶ ε∶ δ) AChR were used as antigens,and their relevance to disease presentation was assessed.Results The overall frequencies of anti-adult and anti-fetal AChR antibodies were similar in all 200 patients examined,with 14 having serum specific to the AChR-γ subunit,and 22 to the AChR-ε subunit.The overall sensitivity when using the fetal and adult AChR antibodies was higher than that when using the fetal AChR antibody only (P =0.015).Compared with OMG patients,the mean age at disease onset and the positive ratio of antibodies to both isoforms of the AChR were significantly higher in patients who subsequently progressed to GMG.Older patients and patients with both anti-fetal and anti-adult AChR antibodies had a greater risk for developing generalized disease [odds ratio (OR),1.03;95% confidence interval (CI),1.01-1.06 and OR,5.09;95% CI,2.23-11.62].Conclusion Using both fetal-and adulttype AChRs as the antigens may be more sensitive than using either subtype.Patients with serum specific to both isoforms are at a greater risk of progressing to GMG.Patients with disease onset at an advanced age appear to have a higher frequency of GMG conversion.

  5. Effect of α₇ nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kevin D; Pfister, James A; Lima, Flavia G; Green, Benedict T; Gardner, Dale R

    2013-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline.

  6. Carrier-mediated release of monoamines induced by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist DMPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szász, Bernadett K; Mayer, Aliz; Zsilla, Gabriella; Lendvai, Balázs; Vizi, E Sylvester; Kiss, János P

    2005-09-01

    We have previously shown that dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) increases the release of noradrenaline (NA) from rat hippocampal slices via two distinct mechanisms: a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated exocytosis and a carrier-mediated release induced by the reversal of NA transporters. Our aim was to investigate whether other monoaminergic systems are also affected by the multiple actions of DMPP. In our experiments DMPP dose-dependently increased the release of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) from rat striatal and hippocampal slices, respectively. The dual effect was observed, however, only in case of DA at a lower DMPP concentration (30 microM), where the response was partly inhibited by mecamylamine, TTX and Ca2+-free medium (nAChR-mediated exocytosis) while the other part of the response was blocked only by the DA uptake inhibitor nomifensine (carrier-mediated release). In contrast, the DMPP-evoked 5-HT release and the DA release induced by high concentration DMPP was not inhibited by nicotinic antagonists, TTX and Ca2+-free medium but only by selective uptake inhibitors. In addition, DMPP dose-dependently inhibited the [3H]DA and [3H]5-HT uptake in striatal and hippocampal synaptosome preparation with an IC50 of 3.18 and 0.49 microM, respectively. Our data show that DMPP interacts with monoamine transporters and induces a substantial carrier-mediated release of DA and 5-HT, therefore caution is needed for the interpretation of data, when this drug is used as a nAChR agonist.

  7. Activation of a7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Prevents Monosodium Iodoacetate-Induced Osteoarthritis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although some evidence suggests that the prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA is lower in smokers compared to nonsmokers, the mechanisms of nicotine-induced protection remain unclear. Stimulation of the a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7-nAChR appears to be a critical mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory potential of cholinergic agonists in immune cells. The inhibition of secreted inflammatory molecules and the subsequent inflammatory processes have been proposed as a novel strategy for the treatment of OA. The objective of the present study was to determine whether nicotine-induced protection in a monosodium iodoacetate (MIA rat model of OA occurs via a7-nAChR-mediated inhibition of chondrocytes. Methods: Both in vivo (MIA and in vitro (MIA; Interleukin-1ß, IL-1ß models of OA were used to investigate the roles and the possible mechanisms whereby a7-nAChRs protect against knee joint degradation. Multiple experimental approaches, including macroscopic, histological analysis, chondrocyte cell cultures, confocal microscopy, and western blotting, were employed to elucidate the mechanisms of a7-nAChR-mediated protection. Results: Systemic administration of nicotine alleviated MIA-induced joint degradation. The protective effects of nicotine were abolished by administration of the a7-nAChR-selective antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA. In primary cultured rat chondrocytes, pretreatment with nicotine suppressed both p38, extracellular regulated kinase (Erk 1/2 and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK phosphorylation and phosphorylated nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB p65 activation induced by MIA- or IL-1ß, and these effects were also reversed by MLA. Conclusion: Taken together, our results suggest that activation a7-nAChRs is an important mechanism underlying the protective effects of nicotine.

  8. Discovery of peptide ligands through docking and virtual screening at nicotinic acetylcholine receptor homology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Abba E; Kuryatov, Alexander; Zebroski, Henry A; Powell, Susan R; Filipenko, Petr; Hussein, Adel K; Gorson, Juliette; Heizmann, Anna; Lyskov, Sergey; Tsien, Richard W; Poget, Sébastien F; Nicke, Annette; Lindstrom, Jon; Rudy, Bernardo; Bonneau, Richard; Holford, Mandë

    2017-09-19

    Venom peptide toxins such as conotoxins play a critical role in the characterization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) structure and function and have potential as nervous system therapeutics as well. However, the lack of solved structures of conotoxins bound to nAChRs and the large size of these peptides are barriers to their computational docking and design. We addressed these challenges in the context of the α4β2 nAChR, a widespread ligand-gated ion channel in the brain and a target for nicotine addiction therapy, and the 19-residue conotoxin α-GID that antagonizes it. We developed a docking algorithm, ToxDock, which used ensemble-docking and extensive conformational sampling to dock α-GID and its analogs to an α4β2 nAChR homology model. Experimental testing demonstrated that a virtual screen with ToxDock correctly identified three bioactive α-GID mutants (α-GID[A10V], α-GID[V13I], and α-GID[V13Y]) and one inactive variant (α-GID[A10Q]). Two mutants, α-GID[A10V] and α-GID[V13Y], had substantially reduced potency at the human α7 nAChR relative to α-GID, a desirable feature for α-GID analogs. The general usefulness of the docking algorithm was highlighted by redocking of peptide toxins to two ion channels and a binding protein in which the peptide toxins successfully reverted back to near-native crystallographic poses after being perturbed. Our results demonstrate that ToxDock can overcome two fundamental challenges of docking large toxin peptides to ion channel homology models, as exemplified by the α-GID:α4β2 nAChR complex, and is extendable to other toxin peptides and ion channels. ToxDock is freely available at rosie.rosettacommons.org/tox_dock.

  9. Pemphigus vulgaris antibodies target the mitochondrial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that protect keratinocytes from apoptolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyavsky, Alex; Chen, Yumay; Wang, Ping H; Grando, Sergei A

    2015-11-01

    The mechanism of detachment and death of keratinocytes in pemphigus vulgaris (PV) involves pro-apoptotic action of constellations of autoantibodies determining disease severity and response to treatment. The presence of antibodies to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and the therapeutic efficacy of cholinomimetics in PV is well-established. Recently, adsorption of anti-mitochondrial antibodies abolished the ability of PVIgGs to cause acantholysis, demonstrating their pathophysiological significance. Since, in addition to cell membrane, nAChRs are also present on the mitochondrial outer membrane, wherein they act to prevent activation of intrinsic (mitochondrial apoptosis), we hypothesized that mitochondrial (mt)-nAChRs might be targeted by PVIgGs. To test this hypothesis, we employed the immunoprecipitation-western blot assay of keratinocyte mitochondrial proteins that visualized the α3, α5, α7, α9, α10, β2 and β4 mt-nAChR subunits precipitated by PV IgGs, suggesting that functions of mt-nAChRs are compromised in PV. To pharmacologically counteract the pro-apoptotic action of anti-mitochondrial antibodies in PV, we exposed naked keratinocyte mitochondria to PVIgGs in the presence of the nicotinic agonist nicotine ± antagonists, and measured cytochrome c (CytC) release. Nicotine abolished PVIgG-dependent CytC release, showing a dose-dependent effect, suggesting that protection of mitochondria can be a novel mechanism of therapeutic action of nicotinic agonists in PV. The obtained results indicated that the mt-nAChRs targeted by anti-mitochondrial antibodies produced by PV patients are coupled to inhibition of CytC release, and that nicotinergic stimulation can abolish PVIgG-dependent activation of intrinsic apoptosis in KCs. Future studies should determine if and how the distinct anti-mt-nAChR antibodies penetrate KCs and correlate with disease severity.

  10. Comparison of acetylcholine receptor-controlled cation flux in membrane vesicles from Torpedo californica and Electrophorus electricus: Chemical kinetic measurements in the millisecond region

    OpenAIRE

    Hess, George P.; Pasquale, Elena B.; Walker, Jeffrey W.; McNamee, Mark G.

    1982-01-01

    In earlier studies with the acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) of Electrophorus electricus the rate and equilibrium constants for a model that relates the ligand binding to ion translocation were determined, and the dependence of these constants on the concentrations of carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine, over a 200- and 5000-fold range, respectively, could be predicted. AcChoR-controlled cation flux has now been measured in Torpedo californica vesicles by using a pulsed-quench-flow technique wi...

  11. Phosphocholine – an agonist of metabotropic but not of ionotropic functions of α9-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, K.; Mathes, V.; Fronius, M.; Althaus, M.; Hecker, A.; Krasteva-Christ, G.; Padberg, W.; Hone, A. J.; McIntosh, J. M.; Zakrzewicz, A.; Grau, V.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that phosphocholine and phosphocholine-modified macromolecules efficiently inhibit ATP-dependent release of interleukin-1β from human and murine monocytes by a mechanism involving nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Interleukin-1β is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine of innate immunity that plays pivotal roles in host defence. Control of interleukin-1β release is vital as excessively high systemic levels cause life threatening inflammatory diseases. In spite of its structural similarity to acetylcholine, there are no other reports on interactions of phosphocholine with nAChR. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphocholine inhibits ion-channel function of ATP receptor P2X7 in monocytic cells via nAChR containing α9 and α10 subunits. In stark contrast to choline, phosphocholine does not evoke ion current responses in Xenopus laevis oocytes, which heterologously express functional homomeric nAChR composed of α9 subunits or heteromeric receptors containing α9 and α10 subunits. Preincubation of these oocytes with phosphocholine, however, attenuated choline-induced ion current changes, suggesting that phosphocholine may act as a silent agonist. We conclude that phophocholine activates immuno-modulatory nAChR expressed by monocytes but does not stimulate canonical ionotropic receptor functions. PMID:27349288

  12. Phosphocholine - an agonist of metabotropic but not of ionotropic functions of α9-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, K; Mathes, V; Fronius, M; Althaus, M; Hecker, A; Krasteva-Christ, G; Padberg, W; Hone, A J; McIntosh, J M; Zakrzewicz, A; Grau, V

    2016-06-28

    We demonstrated previously that phosphocholine and phosphocholine-modified macromolecules efficiently inhibit ATP-dependent release of interleukin-1β from human and murine monocytes by a mechanism involving nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Interleukin-1β is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine of innate immunity that plays pivotal roles in host defence. Control of interleukin-1β release is vital as excessively high systemic levels cause life threatening inflammatory diseases. In spite of its structural similarity to acetylcholine, there are no other reports on interactions of phosphocholine with nAChR. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphocholine inhibits ion-channel function of ATP receptor P2X7 in monocytic cells via nAChR containing α9 and α10 subunits. In stark contrast to choline, phosphocholine does not evoke ion current responses in Xenopus laevis oocytes, which heterologously express functional homomeric nAChR composed of α9 subunits or heteromeric receptors containing α9 and α10 subunits. Preincubation of these oocytes with phosphocholine, however, attenuated choline-induced ion current changes, suggesting that phosphocholine may act as a silent agonist. We conclude that phophocholine activates immuno-modulatory nAChR expressed by monocytes but does not stimulate canonical ionotropic receptor functions.

  13. Effects of dual endothelin receptor blockade on sympathetic activation and arrhythmogenesis during acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolettis, Theofilos M; Baltogiannis, Giannis G; Tsalikakis, Dimitrios G; Tzallas, Alexandros T; Agelaki, Maria G; Fotopoulos, Andreas; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Kyriakides, Zenon S

    2008-02-02

    The effects of dual (ETA and ETB) endothelin receptor blockade on ventricular arrhythmogenesis during acute myocardial infarction are not well defined. We randomly allocated Wistar rats to bosentan (100 mg/kg daily, n=24), a dual endothelin receptor antagonist, or vehicle (n=23). After 7 days of treatment, myocardial infarction was induced by permanent coronary ligation. Ventricular tachyarrhythmias were evaluated for 24 h following ligation, using a miniature telemetry electrocardiogram recorder. Action potential duration was measured from monophasic epicardial recordings and sympathetic activation was assessed by heart rate variability and catecholamine serum level measurements. Compared to controls (1012+/-185 s), bosentan (59+/-24 s) markedly decreased (PDual endothelin-1 receptor blockade decreases ventricular tachyarrhythmias during myocardial infarction without reperfusion, by preventing repolarization inhomogeneity. Diverse treatment effects on sympathetic activation may ameliorate the antiarrhythmic action.

  14. Identification of Propofol Binding Sites in a Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor with a Photoreactive Propofol Analog*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakar, Selwyn S.; Dailey, William P.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Cohen, Jonathan B.

    2013-01-01

    Propofol, a widely used intravenous general anesthetic, acts at anesthetic concentrations as a positive allosteric modulator of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors and at higher concentration as an inhibitor of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here, we characterize propofol binding sites in a muscle-type nAChR by use of a photoreactive analog of propofol, 2-isopropyl-5-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]phenol (AziPm). Based upon radioligand binding assays, AziPm stabilized the Torpedo nAChR in the resting state, whereas propofol stabilized the desensitized state. nAChR-rich membranes were photolabeled with [3H]AziPm, and labeled amino acids were identified by Edman degradation. [3H]AziPm binds at three sites within the nAChR transmembrane domain: (i) an intrasubunit site in the δ subunit helix bundle, photolabeling in the nAChR desensitized state (+agonist) δM2-18′ and two residues in δM1 (δPhe-232 and δCys-236); (ii) in the ion channel, photolabeling in the nAChR resting, closed channel state (−agonist) amino acids in the M2 helices (αM2-6′, βM2-6′ and -13′, and δM2-13′) that line the channel lumen (with photolabeling reduced by >90% in the desensitized state); and (iii) at the γ-α interface, photolabeling αM2-10′. Propofol enhanced [3H]AziPm photolabeling at αM2-10′. Propofol inhibited [3H]AziPm photolabeling within the δ subunit helix bundle at lower concentrations (IC50 = 40 μm) than it inhibited ion channel photolabeling (IC50 = 125 μm). These results identify for the first time a single intrasubunit propofol binding site in the nAChR transmembrane domain and suggest that this is the functionally relevant inhibitory binding site. PMID:23300078

  15. Distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes mediate pre- and postsynaptic effects in rat neocortex

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    Gigout Sylvain

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholinergic transmission has been implicated in learning, memory and cognition. However, the cellular effects induced by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs activation are poorly understood in the neocortex. We investigated the effects of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (CCh and various agonists and antagonists on neuronal activity in rat neocortical slices using intracellular (sharp microelectrode and field potential recordings. Results CCh increased neuronal firing but reduced synaptic transmission. The increase of neuronal firing was antagonized by pirenzepine (M1/M4 mAChRs antagonist but not by AF-DX 116 (M2/M4 mAChRs antagonist. Pirenzepine reversed the depressant effect of CCh on excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP but had marginal effects when applied before CCh. AF-DX 116 antagonized the depression of EPSP when applied before or during CCh. CCh also decreased the paired-pulse inhibition of field potentials and the inhibitory conductances mediated by GABAA and GABAB receptors. The depression of paired-pulse inhibition was antagonized or prevented by AF-DX 116 or atropine but only marginally by pirenzepine. The inhibitory conductances were unaltered by xanomeline (M1/M4 mAChRs agonist, yet the CCh-induced depression was antagonized by AF-DX 116. Linopirdine, a selective M-current blocker, mimicked the effect of CCh on neuronal firing. However, linopirdine had no effect on the amplitude of EPSP or on the paired-pulse inhibition, indicating that M-current is involved in the increase of neuronal excitability but neither in the depression of EPSP nor paired-pulse inhibition. Conclusions These data indicate that the three effects are mediated by different mAChRs, the increase in firing being mediated by M1 mAChR, decrease of inhibition by M2 mAChR and depression of excitatory transmission by M4 mAChR. The depression of EPSP and increase of neuronal firing might enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, whereas the

  16. Trophic factor-induced excitatory synaptogenesis involves postsynaptic modulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodin, Melanie A; Munno, David W; Syed, Naweed I

    2002-01-15

    Neurotrophic factors have well established roles in neuronal development, although their precise involvement in synapse formation and plasticity is yet to be fully determined. Using soma-soma synapses between identified Lymnaea neurons, we have shown recently that trophic factors are required for excitatory but not inhibitory synapse formation. However, neither the precise site (presynaptic versus postsynaptic cell) nor the underlying mechanisms have yet been defined. In the present study, synapse formation between the presynaptic cell visceral dorsal 4 (VD4) and its postsynaptic partner right pedal dorsal 1 (RPeD1) was examined to define the cellular mechanisms mediating trophic factor-induced excitatory synaptogenesis in cell culture. When paired in a soma-soma configuration in the presence of defined media (DM, nonproteinacious), mutually inhibitory synapses were appropriately reconstructed between VD4 and RPeD1. However, when cells were paired in the presence of increasing concentrations of Lymnaea brain-conditioned medium (CM), a biphasic synapse (initial excitatory synaptic component followed by inhibition) developed. The CM-induced excitatory synapse formation required trophic factor-mediated activation of receptor tyrosine kinases in the postsynaptic cell, RPeD1, and a concomitant modulation of existing postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Specifically, when RPeD1 was isolated in DM, exogenously applied ACh induced a hyperpolarizing response that was sensitive to the AChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA). In contrast, a single RPeD1 isolated in CM exhibited a biphasic response to exogenously applied ACh. The initial depolarizing phase of the biphasic response was sensitive to both mecamylamine and hexamethonium chloride, whereas the hyperpolarizing phase was blocked by MLA. In soma-soma-paired neurons, the VD4-induced synaptic responses in RPeD1 were sensitive to the cholinergic antagonists in a concentration range similar to that

  17. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene family of the silkworm, Bombyx mori

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    Zhang Chuan-Xi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs mediate fast synaptic cholinergic transmission in the insect central nervous system. The insect nAChR is the molecular target of a class of insecticides, neonicotinoids. Like mammalian nAChRs, insect nAChRs are considered to be made up of five subunits, coded by homologous genes belonging to the same family. The nAChR subunit genes of Drosophila melanogaster, Apis mellifera and Anopheles gambiae have been cloned previously based on their genome sequences. The silkworm Bombyx mori is a model insect of Lepidoptera, among which are many agricultural pests. Identification and characterization of B. mori nAChR genes could provide valuable basic information for this important family of receptor genes and for the study of the molecular mechanisms of neonicotinoid action and resistance. Results We searched the genome sequence database of B. mori with the fruit fly and honeybee nAChRs by tBlastn and cloned all putative silkworm nAChR cDNAs by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE methods. B. mori appears to have the largest known insect nAChR gene family to date, including nine α-type subunits and three β-type subunits. The silkworm possesses three genes having low identity with others, including one α and two β subunits, α9, β2 and β3. Like the fruit fly and honeybee counterparts, silkworm nAChR gene α6 has RNA-editing sites, and α4, α6 and α8 undergo alternative splicing. In particular, alternative exon 7 of Bmα8 may have arisen from a recent duplication event. Truncated transcripts were found for Bmα4 and Bmα5. Conclusion B. mori possesses a largest known insect nAChR gene family characterized to date, including nine α-type subunits and three β-type subunits. RNA-editing, alternative splicing and truncated transcripts were found in several subunit genes, which might enhance the diversity of the gene family.

  18. Local NMDA receptor blockade attenuates chronic tinnitus and associated brain activity in an animal model.

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    Thomas J Brozoski

    Full Text Available Chronic tinnitus has no broadly effective treatment. Identification of specific markers for tinnitus should facilitate the development of effective therapeutics. Recently it was shown that glutamatergic blockade in the cerebellar paraflocculus, using an antagonist cocktail was successful in reducing chronic tinnitus. The present experiment examined the effect of selective N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA receptor blockade on tinnitus and associated spontaneous brain activity in a rat model. The NMDA antagonist, D(--2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5 (0.5 mM, was continuously infused for 2 weeks directly to the ipsilateral paraflocculus of rats with tinnitus induced months prior by unilateral noise exposure. Treated rats were compared to untreated normal controls without tinnitus, and to untreated positive controls with tinnitus. D-AP5 significantly decreased tinnitus within three days of beginning treatment, and continued to significantly reduce tinnitus throughout the course of treatment and for 23 days thereafter, at which time testing was halted. At the conclusion of psychophysical testing, neural activity was assessed using manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI. In agreement with previous research, untreated animals with chronic tinnitus showed significantly elevated bilateral activity in their paraflocculus and brainstem cochlear nuclei, but not in mid or forebrain structures. In contrast, D-AP5-treated-tinnitus animals showed significantly less bilateral parafloccular and dorsal cochlear nucleus activity, as well as significantly less contralateral ventral cochlear nucleus activity. It was concluded that NMDA-mediated glutamatergic transmission in the paraflocculus appears to be a necessary component of chronic noise-induced tinnitus in a rat model. Additionally, it was confirmed that in this model, elevated spontaneous activity in the cerebellar paraflocculus and auditory brainstem is associated with tinnitus.

  19. Blockade of neuronal dopamine D2 receptor attenuates morphine tolerance in mice spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wen-Ling; Xiong, Feng; Yan, Bing; Cao, Zheng-Yu; Liu, Wen-Tao; Liu, Ji-Hua; Yu, Bo-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Tolerance induced by morphine remains a major unresolved problem and significantly limits its clinical use. Recent evidences have indicated that dopamine D2 receptor (D2DR) is likely to be involved in morphine-induced antinociceptive tolerance. However, its exact effect and molecular mechanism remain unknown. In this study we examined the effect of D2DR on morphine antinociceptive tolerance in mice spinal cord. Chronic morphine treatment significantly increased levels of D2DR in mice spinal dorsal horn. And the immunoreactivity of D2DR was newly expressed in neurons rather than astrocytes or microglia both in vivo and in vitro. Blockade of D2DR with its antagonist (sulpiride and L-741,626, i.t.) attenuated morphine antinociceptive tolerance without affecting basal pain perception. Sulpiride (i.t.) also down-regulated the expression of phosphorylation of NR1, PKC, MAPKs and suppressed the activation of astrocytes and microglia induced by chronic morphine administration. Particularly, D2DR was found to interact with μ opioid receptor (MOR) in neurons, and chronic morphine treatment enhanced the MOR/D2DR interactions. Sulpiride (i.t.) could disrupt the MOR/D2DR interactions and attenuate morphine tolerance, indicating that neuronal D2DR in the spinal cord may be involved in morphine tolerance possibly by interacting with MOR. These results may present new opportunities for the treatment and management of morphine-induced antinociceptive tolerance which often observed in clinic. PMID:28004735

  20. Vasotocin receptor blockade disrupts maternal care of offspring in a viviparous snake, Sistrurus miliarius

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    Craig M. Lind

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Parental care is a complex social behavior that is widespread among vertebrates. The neuroendocrine regulation of parent-offspring social behavior has been well-described in mammals, and to a lesser extent, in birds and fish. However, little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms that mediate the expression of care behaviors in squamate reptiles. In mammalian model species and humans, posterior pituitary hormones of the oxytocin and vasopressin families mediate parental care behaviors. To test the hypothesis that the regulatory role of posterior pituitary neuropeptides is conserved in a viviparous squamate reptile, we pharmacologically blocked the vasotocin receptor in post-parturient pigmy rattlesnakes, Sistrurus miliarius, and monitored the spatial relationship between mothers and offspring relative to controls. Mothers in the control group demonstrated spatial aggregation with offspring, with mothers having greater post-parturient energy stores aggregating more closely with their offspring. Blockade of vasotocin receptors eliminated evidence of spatial aggregation between mothers and offspring and eliminated the relationship between maternal energetic status and spatial aggregation. Our results are the first to implicate posterior pituitary neuropeptides in the regulation of maternal behavior in a squamate reptile and are consistent with the hypothesis that the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying social behaviors are broadly conserved among vertebrates.

  1. Blockade of glucocorticoid receptors improves cutaneous wound healing in stressed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Taís Fontoura; de Castro Pires, Taiza; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2016-02-01

    Stress is an important condition of modern life. The successful wound healing requires the execution of three major overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling, and stress can disturb this process. Chronic stress impairs wound healing through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and the glucocorticoids (GCs) hormones have been shown to delay wound closure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a GC receptor antagonist (RU486) treatment on cutaneous healing in chronically stressed mice. Male mice were submitted to rotational stress, whereas control animals were not subjected to stress. Stressed and control animals were treated with RU486. A full-thickness excisional lesion was generated, and seven days later, lesions were recovered. The RU486 treatment improves wound healing since contraction takes place earlier in RU486-treated in comparison to non-treated mice, and the RU486 treatment also improves the angiogenesis in Stress+RU486 mice when compared to stressed animals. The Stress+RU486 group showed a decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration and in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression; meanwhile, there was an increase in myofibroblasts quantity. In conclusion, blockade of GC receptors with RU486 partially ameliorates stress-impaired wound healing, suggesting that stress inhibits healing through more than one functional pathway. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  2. The effect of opioid receptor blockade on the neural processing of thermal stimuli.

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    Eszter D Schoell

    Full Text Available The endogenous opioid system represents one of the principal systems in the modulation of pain. This has been demonstrated in studies of placebo analgesia and stress-induced analgesia, where anti-nociceptive activity triggered by pain itself or by cognitive states is blocked by opioid antagonists. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of opioid receptor blockade on the physiological processing of painful thermal stimulation in the absence of cognitive manipulation. We therefore measured BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent signal responses and intensity ratings to non-painful and painful thermal stimuli in a double-blind, cross-over design using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. On the behavioral level, we observed an increase in intensity ratings under naloxone due mainly to a difference in the non-painful stimuli. On the neural level, painful thermal stimulation was associated with a negative BOLD signal within the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, and this deactivation was abolished by naloxone.

  3. “Warmingyang and invigoratingqi” acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-peng Huang; Hong Pan; Hong-feng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. “Warmingyang and invigoratingqi” acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inlfammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental au-toimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following “warmingyang and invigoratingqi” acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure pointsShou-sanli (LI10),Zusanli(ST36),Pishu (BL20), and Shenshu (BL23) once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was signiifcantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These ifndings suggest that “warmingyangand invigoratingqi” acu-puncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

  4. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-peng Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10, Zusanli (ST36, Pishu (BL20, and Shenshu (BL23 once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

  5. Acetylcholine receptor (from Electrophorus electricus): a comparison of single-channel current recordings and chemical kinetic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, G P; Kolb, H A; Läuger, P; Schoffeniels, E; Schwarze, W

    1984-09-01

    We report a direct comparison between two types of measurements of the dynamic properties of the acetylcholine receptor: single-channel currents recorded using the patch-clamp technique and chemical kinetic measurements. Electrophorus electricus electroplax cells, and membrane vesicles prepared from these cells, were used. Such a comparison, and single-channel currents recorded from these cells, have not previously been reported. We first give the theoretical basis for the comparison and define the conditions under which the comparisons are elegantly simple. We relate (i) measurements of currents through receptor channels in the cell membranes to measurements of the rates of ion translocation through the receptor channels in vesicles and (ii) measurements of the lifetimes of receptor states (for instance, the lifetime of the active state of the receptor--i.e., the state in which it can form open channels) to rate coefficients obtained in chemical kinetic measurements (for instance, those for the interconversions between different states of the receptor). In eel Ringer's solution we have found the single-channel conductance (gamma) of the receptor in E. electricus electroplax cells to be 53 pS. From this value, a specific reaction rate for ion translocation, J, of 5 X 10(7) M-1 X sec-1 was calculated. When membrane vesicles prepared from the electroplax cells and the same solution compositions were used, chemical kinetic measurements gave a J value of 3 X 10(7) M-1 X sec-1. The agreement between the two measurements is important because (i) they reflect different experimental conditions, which require different assumptions in interpreting the results, and (ii) it indicates that the two techniques can be used to obtain complementary information: the methods have different time resolutions and can be used in different ranges of acetylcholine concentrations.

  6. α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SUBUNIT STOICHIOMETRY AND FUNCTION AT THE SINGLE CHANNEL LEVEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzaferro, Simone; Bermudez, Isabel; Sine, Steven M

    2017-02-17

    Acetylcholine receptors comprising α4 and β2 subunits are the most abundant class of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the brain. They contribute to cognition, reward, mood, and nociception and are implicated in a range of neurological disorders. Previous measurements of whole-cell macroscopic currents showed that α4 and β2 subunits assemble in two predominant pentameric stoichiometries, which differ in their sensitivity to agonists, antagonists, and allosteric modulators. Here we compare agonist-elicited single channel currents from receptors assembled with an excess of either the α4 or β2 subunit, forming receptor populations biased toward one or the other stoichiometry, with currents from receptors composed of five concatemeric subunits in which the subunit stoichiometry is predetermined. Our results associate each subunit stoichiometry with a unique single channel conductance, mean open channel lifetime, and sensitivity to the allosteric potentiator 3-[3-(3-pyridinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS-9283). Receptors with the composition (α4β2)2α4 exhibit high single channel conductance, brief mean open lifetime, and strong potentiation by NS-9283, whereas receptors with the composition (α4β2)2β2 exhibit low single channel conductance and long mean open lifetime and are not potentiated by NS-9283. Thus single channel current measurements reveal bases for the distinct functional and pharmacological properties endowed by different stoichiometries of α4 and β2 subunits and establish pentameric concatemers as a means to delineate interactions between subunits that confer these properties. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. NMR structure and action on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of water-soluble domain of human LYNX1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Mineev, Konstantin S; D'Hoedt, Dieter; Kasheverov, Igor E; Filkin, Sergey Yu; Krivolapova, Alexandra P; Janickova, Helena; Dolezal, Vladimir; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S; Bertrand, Daniel; Tsetlin, Victor I; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2011-03-25

    Discovery of proteins expressed in the central nervous system sharing the three-finger structure with snake α-neurotoxins provoked much interest to their role in brain functions. Prototoxin LYNX1, having homology both to Ly6 proteins and three-finger neurotoxins, is the first identified member of this family membrane-tethered by a GPI anchor, which considerably complicates in vitro studies. We report for the first time the NMR spatial structure for the water-soluble domain of human LYNX1 lacking a GPI anchor (ws-LYNX1) and its concentration-dependent activity on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). At 5-30 μM, ws-LYNX1 competed with (125)I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to the acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) and to Torpedo nAChR. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7 nAChRs to 1 μM ws-LYNX1 enhanced the response to acetylcholine, but no effect was detected on α4β2 and α3β2 nAChRs. Increasing ws-LYNX1 concentration to 10 μM caused a modest inhibition of these three nAChR subtypes. A common feature for ws-LYNX1 and LYNX1 is a decrease of nAChR sensitivity to high concentrations of acetylcholine. NMR and functional analysis both demonstrate that ws-LYNX1 is an appropriate model to shed light on the mechanism of LYNX1 action. Computer modeling, based on ws-LYNX1 NMR structure and AChBP x-ray structure, revealed a possible mode of ws-LYNX1 binding.

  8. NMR Structure and Action on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors of Water-soluble Domain of Human LYNX1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N.; Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Shulepko, Mikhail A.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; D'Hoedt, Dieter; Kasheverov, Igor E.; Filkin, Sergey Yu.; Krivolapova, Alexandra P.; Janickova, Helena; Dolezal, Vladimir; Dolgikh, Dmitry A.; Arseniev, Alexander S.; Bertrand, Daniel; Tsetlin, Victor I.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of proteins expressed in the central nervous system sharing the three-finger structure with snake α-neurotoxins provoked much interest to their role in brain functions. Prototoxin LYNX1, having homology both to Ly6 proteins and three-finger neurotoxins, is the first identified member of this family membrane-tethered by a GPI anchor, which considerably complicates in vitro studies. We report for the first time the NMR spatial structure for the water-soluble domain of human LYNX1 lacking a GPI anchor (ws-LYNX1) and its concentration-dependent activity on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). At 5–30 μm, ws-LYNX1 competed with 125I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to the acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) and to Torpedo nAChR. Exposure of Xenopus oocytes expressing α7 nAChRs to 1 μm ws-LYNX1 enhanced the response to acetylcholine, but no effect was detected on α4β2 and α3β2 nAChRs. Increasing ws-LYNX1 concentration to 10 μm caused a modest inhibition of these three nAChR subtypes. A common feature for ws-LYNX1 and LYNX1 is a decrease of nAChR sensitivity to high concentrations of acetylcholine. NMR and functional analysis both demonstrate that ws-LYNX1 is an appropriate model to shed light on the mechanism of LYNX1 action. Computer modeling, based on ws-LYNX1 NMR structure and AChBP x-ray structure, revealed a possible mode of ws-LYNX1 binding. PMID:21252236

  9. The α4β2 nicotine acetylcholine receptor agonist ispronicline induces c-Fos expression in selective regions of the rat forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Julie; Hansen, Henrik H; Kiss, Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    The dominant nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtype in the brain is the pentameric receptor containing both α4 and β2 subunits (α4β2). Due to the lack of selective agonists it has not been ruled out what neuronal circuits that are stimulated after systemic administration with nicotine. W...

  10. Effect of tissue-specific acetylcholinesterase inhibitor C-547 on α3β4 and αβεδ acetylcholine receptors in COS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindovský, Jiří; Petrov, Konstantin; Krůšek, Jan; Reznik, Vladimir S; Nikolsky, Eugeny E; Vyskočil, František

    2012-08-05

    The C-547 is the most effective muscle and tissue-specific anticholinesterase among alkylammonium derivatives of 6-methyluracil (ADEMS) acting in nanomolar concentrations on locomotor muscles but not on respiratory muscles, smooth muscles and heart and brain acetylcholine esterases (AChE). When applied systematically it could influence peripheral acetylcholine receptors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of C-547 on rat α3β4 (ganglionic type) and αβεδ (muscle type) nicotinic receptors expressed in COS cells. Currents evoked by rapid application of acetylcholine or nicotine were recorded in whole-cell mode by electrophysiological patch-clamp technique 2-4 days after cell transfection by plasmids coding the α3β4 or αβεδ combination of receptor subunits. In cells sensitive to acetylcholine, the application of C-547 evoked no responses. When acetylcholine was applied during an already running application of C-547, acetylcholine responses were only inhibited at concentrations higher than 10(-7)M. This inhibition is not voltage-dependent, but is accompanied by an increased rate of desensitization. Thus in both types of receptors, effective doses are approximately 100 times higher than those inhibiting AChE in leg muscles and similar to those inhibiting respiratory diaphragm muscles and external intercostal muscles. These observations show that C-547 can be considered for symptomatic treatment of myasthenia gravis and other congenital myasthenic syndromes as an inhibitor of AChE in leg muscles at concentrations much lower than those inhibiting muscle and ganglion types of acetylcholine receptors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Central loop of non-conventional toxin WTX from Naja kaouthia is important for interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Kasheverov, Igor E; Chugunov, Anton O; Kulbatskii, Dmitrii S; Myshkin, Mikhail Yu; Utkin, Yuri N; Efremov, Roman G; Tsetlin, Victor I; Arseniev, Alexander S; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Dolgikh, Dmitry A

    2016-09-01

    'Three-finger' toxin WTX from Naja kaouthia interacts with nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and mAChRs). Mutagenesis and competition experiments with (125)I-α-bungarotoxin revealed that Arg31 and Arg32 residues from the WTX loop II are important for binding to Torpedo californica and human α7 nAChRs. Computer modeling suggested that loop II occupies the orthosteric binding site at α7 nAChR. The similar toxin interface was previously described as a major determinant of allosteric interactions with mAChRs.

  12. [Bacterial expression of water-soluble domain of Lynx1, endogenic neuromodulator of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulepko, M A; Liukmanova, E N; Kasheverov, I E; Dolgikh, D A; Tsetlin, V I; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2011-01-01

    Lynx1 expresses in the central nervous system and plays important role in a regulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Successful milligram-quantitive expression of ws-Lynx1 was achieved only in the case of its production in the form of cytoplasm inclusion bodies. Different conditions of ws-Lynx1 refolding for yield optimization were performed. The obtained recombinant protein was characterized by means of mass spectrometry and CD spectroscopy. The binding experiments on the nAChRs from Torpedo californica membranes revealed that ws-Lynxl is biologically active and blocks muscle nAChR with IC50-20-30 microM.

  13. Acetylcholine receptor binding antibody-associated myasthenia gravis and rhabdomyolysis induced by nivolumab in a patient with melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Takushi; Sano, Tasuku; Kamijo, Fuminao; Saito, Nana; Miyake, Tomomi; Kodaira, Minori; Katoh, Nagaaki; Nishie, Kenichi; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Uhara, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    We reported an 81-year-old woman with metastatic melanoma, in whom myasthenia gravis and rhabdomyolysis developed after nivolumab monotherapy. The first symptom of myasthenia gravis was dyspnea. Ultrasonography detected hypokinesis of the bilateral diaphragm suggesting myasthenia gravis, although there was no abnormal finding of the lungs in computed tomography images. Acetylcholine receptor binding antibodies were low-titer positive in the preserved serum before administration of nivolumab, strongly suggesting that the myasthenia gravis was a nivolumab-related immune adverse event. Despite the remarkable clinical benefits of immune checkpoint inhibitors for patients with advanced melanoma, it is important to recognize unexpected immune-related adverse events.

  14. alpha-conotoxin EpI, a novel sulfated peptide from Conus episcopatus that selectively targets neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughnan, M; Bond, T; Atkins, A; Cuevas, J; Adams, D J; Broxton, N M; Livett, B G; Down, J G; Jones, A; Alewood, P F; Lewis, R J

    1998-06-19

    We have isolated and characterized alpha-conotoxin EpI, a novel sulfated peptide from the venom of the molluscivorous snail, Conus episcopatus. The peptide was classified as an alpha-conotoxin based on sequence, disulfide connectivity, and pharmacological target. EpI has homology to sequences of previously described alpha-conotoxins, particularly PnIA, PnIB, and ImI. However, EpI differs from previously reported conotoxins in that it has a sulfotyrosine residue, identified by amino acid analysis and mass spectrometry. Native EpI was shown to coelute with synthetic EpI. The peptide sequence is consistent with most, but not all, recognized criteria for predicting tyrosine sulfation sites in proteins and peptides. The activities of synthetic EpI and its unsulfated analogue [Tyr15]EpI were similar. Both peptides caused competitive inhibition of nicotine action on bovine adrenal chromaffin cells (neuronal nicotinic ACh receptors) but had no effect on the rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm (muscle nicotinic ACh receptors). Both EpI and [Tyr15]EpI partly inhibited acetylcholine-evoked currents in isolated parasympathetic neurons of rat intracardiac ganglia. These results indicate that EpI and [Tyr15]EpI selectively inhibit alpha3beta2 and alpha3 beta4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  15. Kynurenic acid as an antagonist of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain: facts and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Edson X; Schwarcz, Robert

    2013-04-15

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA), a major tryptophan metabolite, is a glutamate receptor antagonist, which is also reported to inhibit α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs). Due to variations in experimental approaches, controversy has arisen regarding the ability of KYNA to directly influence α7nAChR function. Here we summarize current concepts of KYNA neurobiology and review evidence pertaining to the proposed role of KYNA as an endogenous modulator of α7nAChRs and synaptic transmission. As dysfunction of α7nAChRs plays a major role in the pathophysiology of central nervous system disorders, elucidation of KYNA's action on this receptor subtype has significant therapeutic implications.

  16. Chalcones as positive allosteric modulators of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a new target for a privileged structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsera, Beatriz; Mulet, José; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; de la Torre-Martínez, Roberto; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Hernández-Jiménez, José G; Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Borges, Ricardo; Freitas, Andiara E; López, Manuela G; García-López, M Teresa; González-Muñiz, Rosario; Pérez de Vega, María Jesús; Valor, Luis M; Svobodová, Lucie; Sala, Salvador; Sala, Francisco; Criado, Manuel

    2014-10-30

    The α7 acetylcholine nicotine receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel that is involved in cognition disorders, schizophrenia, pain and inflammation among other diseases. Therefore, the development of new agents that target this receptor has great significance. Positive allosteric modulators might be advantageous, since they facilitate receptor responses without directly interacting with the agonist binding site. Here we report the search for and further design of new positive allosteric modulators having the relatively simple chalcone structure. From the natural product isoliquiritigenin as starting point, chalcones substituted with hydroxyl groups at defined locations were identified as optimal and specific promoters of α7 nicotinic function. The most potent compound (2,4,2',5'-tetrahydroxychalcone, 111) was further characterized showing its potential as neuroprotective, analgesic and cognitive enhancer, opening the way for future developments around the chalcone structure.

  17. Blockade of corticosteroid receptors induces anxiolytic-like effects in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, and synergizes with diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rubalcava, Carolina; Paez-Martinez, Nayeli; Oikawa, Julian

    2013-08-01

    Anxiety disorder is a psychiatric condition reported in diabetic patients. It is known that hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis activity is increased in these patients and corticosteroids levels are augmented, whereas the anxiolytic actions of diazepam are reduced. The aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors in anxiety in diabetic mice and whether the blockade of these receptors synergizes with diazepam in the diabetic condition, leading to a reduction of anxiety. Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin (STZ) and anxiety-like levels were evaluated on days 5, 15, and 30 after STZ. Independent groups of control and diabetic mice were treated with diazepam (0.25-2.0 mg/kg), RU-486 (12.5-100 mg/kg), spironolactone (12.5-100 mg/kg), or the combination of suboptimal doses of diazepam and MR or GR antagonists. Results showed that STZ increased anxiety-like behavior 15 days after its administration. The response to diazepam was reduced in diabetic mice, whereas GR and MR blockade induced anxiolytic-like effects in these animals. Coadministration of MR or GR antagonists synergized with diazepam to induce anxiolytic-like effects. The results suggest the participation of corticosteroid receptors in the increased anxiety-like response in diabetic mice and that the blockade of these receptors facilitates the effects of diazepam.

  18. Interleukin-1 Receptor Blockade Rescues Myocarditis-Associated End-Stage Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Giulio; Foppoli, Marco; Cabrini, Luca; Dinarello, Charles A.; Tresoldi, Moreno; Dagna, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Support measures currently represent the mainstay of treatment for fulminant myocarditis, while effective and safe anti-inflammatory therapies remain an unmet clinical need. However, clinical and experimental evidence indicates that inhibition of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1 (IL-1) is effective against both myocardial inflammation and contractile dysfunction. We thus evaluated treatment with the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra in a case of heart failure secondary to fulminant myocarditis. A 65-year-old man with T cell lymphoma developed fulminant myocarditis presenting with severe biventricular failure and cardiogenic shock requiring admittance to the intensive care unit and mechanical circulatory and respiratory support. Specifically, acute heart failure and cardiogenic shock were initially treated with non-invasive ventilation and mechanical circulatory support with an intra-aortic balloon pump. Nevertheless, cardiac function deteriorated further, and there were no signs of improvement. Treatment with anakinra, the recombinant form of the naturally occurring IL-1 receptor antagonist, was started at a standard subcutaneous dose of 100 mg/day. We observed a dramatic clinical improvement within 24 h of initiating anakinra. Prompt, progressive amelioration of cardiac function allowed weaning from mechanical circulatory and respiratory support within 72 h of anakinra administration. Recent studies point at inhibition of IL-1 activity as an attractive treatment option for both myocardial inflammation and contractile dysfunction. Furthermore, IL-1 receptor blockade with anakinra is characterized by an extremely rapid onset of action and remarkable safety and may thus be suitable for the treatment of patients critically ill with myocarditis. PMID:28232838

  19. Optical studies of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the guinea-pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, A L; Nelson, M E; Lindstrom, J; Salzberg, B M

    2005-08-01

    Nicotinic transmission in the enteric nervous system (ENS) is extensive, but the role of individual nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes in the functional connectivity of its plexuses has been elusive. Using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against neuronal alpha3-, alpha4-, alpha3/alpha5-, beta2-, beta4- and alpha7-subunits, combined with radioimmunoassays and immunocytochemistry, we demonstrate that guinea-pig enteric ganglia contain all of these nAChR-subunits with the exception of alpha4, and so, differ from mammalian brain. This information alone, however, is insufficient to establish the functional role of the identified nAChR-subtypes within the enteric networks and, ultimately, their specific contributions to gastrointestinal physiology. We have used voltage-sensitive dyes and a high-speed CCD camera, in conjunction with specific antagonists to various nAChRs, to elucidate some of the distinct contributions of the individual subtypes to the behaviour of enteric networks. In the guinea-pig, the submucous plexus has the extraordinary advantage that it is virtually two-dimensional, permitting optical recording, with single cell resolution, of the electrical activity of all of its neurones. In this plexus, the block of alpha3beta2-, alpha3beta4- and/or alpha7-nAChRs always results in a decrease in the magnitude of the synaptic response. However, the magnitude of the fast excitatory post-synaptic potentials (epsps) evoked by electrical stimulation of a neighbouring ganglion varies from cell to cell, reflecting the differential expression of subunits already observed using mAbs, as well as the strengths of the activated synaptic inputs. At the same time, we observe that submucous neurones have a substantial mecamylamine (Mec)-insensitive (non-nicotinic) component to their fast epsps, which may point to the presence of purinergic or serotonergic fast epsps in this system. In the myenteric plexus, on the other hand, the antagonist-induced changes in the

  20. Megakaryocytes and platelets express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors but nicotine does not affect megakaryopoiesis or platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedel, Angelika; Kaiser, Kerstin; Uhlig, Stefanie; Lorenz, Florian; Sarin, Anip; Starigk, Julian; Hassmann, Dennis; Bieback, Karen; Bugert, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In our previous investigations we have shown that platelets and their precursors express nicotinic α7 acetylcholine receptors (nAChRα7) that are involved in platelet function and in vitro differentiation of the megakaryoblastic cell line MEG-01. In this study, we were interested in the expression analysis of additional nAChR and the effects of nicotine in an ex vivo model using megakaryocytic cells differentiated from cord blood derived CD34(+) cells (CBMK) and an in vivo model using blood samples from smokers. CBMK were differentiated with thrombopoietin (TPO) for up to 17 days. Quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), Western blot analysis and flow cytometry were used to investigate nAChR expression (nAChRα7, nAChRα4, nAChRβ2) and nicotine effects. In blood samples of 15 nonsmokers and 16 smokers platelet parameters (count, mean platelet volume--MPV and platelet distribution width--PDW) were determined as indicators for changes of in vivo megakaryopoiesis. Platelet function was determined by the use of whole blood aggregometry and flow cytometry. The functional role of nAChR was evaluated using specific antagonists in aggregometry. CHRNA7, CHRNA4 and CHRNB2 gene transcripts and the corresponding proteins could be identified in CBMK during all stages of differentiation. Platelets contain nAChRα7 and nAChRβ2 but not nAChRα4. Nicotine had no effect on TPO-induced differentiation of CBMK. There was no significant difference in all platelet parameters of the smokers compared to the nonsmokers. In line with this, cholinergic gene transcripts as well as the encoded proteins were equally expressed in both the study groups. Despite our observation of nAChR expression in megakaryopoiesis and platelets, we were not able to detect effects of nicotine in our ex vivo and in vivo models. Thus, the functional role of the nAChR in these cells remains open.

  1. Expression of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit mRNAs in rat hippocampal GABAergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jong-Hyun; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H

    2008-11-10

    Hippocampal inhibitory interneurons are a diverse population of cells widely scattered in the hippocampus, where they regulate hippocampal circuit activity. The hippocampus receives cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain, and functional studies have suggested the presence of different subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons. Single-cell polymerase chain reaction analysis had confirmed that several nAChR subunit mRNAs are co-expressed with glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), the marker for GABAergic interneurons. In this anatomical study, we systematically investigated the co-expression of GAD67 with different nAChR subunits by using double in situ hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled GAD67 probe and (35)S-labeled probes for nAChR subunits (alpha2, alpha3, alpha4, alpha5, alpha6, alpha7, beta2, beta3, and beta4). The results revealed that most GAD67-positive interneurons expressed beta2, and 67 % also expressed alpha7 mRNA. In contrast, mRNA expression of other subunits was limited; only 13 % of GAD67-positive neurons co-expressed alpha4, and less than 10% expressed transcripts for alpha2, alpha3, alpha5, or beta4. Most GAD67/alpha2 co-expression was located in CA1/CA3 stratum oriens, and GAD67/alpha5 co-expression was predominantly detected in CA1/CA3 stratum radiatum/lacunosum moleculare and the dentate gyrus. Expression of alpha6 and beta3 mRNAs was rarely detected in the hippocampus, and mRNAs were not co-expressed with GAD67. These findings suggest that the majority of nicotinic responses in GABAergic interneurons should be mediated by a homomeric alpha7 or heteromeric alpha7*-containing nAChRs. Other possible combinations such as alpha2beta2*, alpha4beta2*, or alpha5beta2* heteromeric nAChRs could contribute to functional nicotinic response in subsets of GABAergic interneurons but overall would have a minor role.

  2. Durability of the Rituximab Response in Acetylcholine Receptor Autoantibody-Positive Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeson, Kimberly R; Kumar, Aditya; Keung, Benison; DiCapua, Daniel B; Grodinsky, Emily; Patwa, Huned S; Stathopoulos, Panos A; Goldstein, Jonathan M; O'Connor, Kevin C; Nowak, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG), an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission, is treated by an array of immunotherapeutics, many of which are nonspecific. Even with current therapies, a subset of patients has medically refractory MG. The benefits of B-cell-targeted therapy with rituximab have been observed in MG; however, the duration of these benefits after treatment is unclear. To evaluate the durability of response to rituximab in the treatment of acetylcholine receptor autoantibody-positive (AChR+) generalized MG. This retrospective case series study included 16 patients with AChR+ MG referred to an MG clinic from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2015. The patients were treated with rituximab and followed up for 18 to 84 months after treatment. Assessment of long-term clinical response, durability of response and/or relapse rate, AChR autoantibody levels, adverse effects, and inflammatory markers. In the 16 patients (6 men and 10 women; median age, 42 [range, 18-69] years), clinical improvement was observed in parallel with complete withdrawal or reduction of other immunotherapies, with all patients achieving complete stable remission, pharmacologic remission, or minimal manifestations based on the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America postintervention status criteria. Nine patients (56%) had a relapse during a mean follow-up of 36 (range, 24-47) months. Seven patients (44%) remained relapse free with a mean follow-up of 47 (range, 18-81) months since the last rituximab treatment. All values were normalized to a pretreatment anti-AChR antibody level of 100% and the mean levels after each rituximab cycle were calculated. A 33% decrease was seen after cycle 1 of rituximab treatment (100% vs 67%; P = .004); 20% after cycle 2 (compared with cycle 1) (67% vs 47%; P = .008); and 17% after cycle 3 (compared with cycle 2) (47% vs 30%; P = .02). However, the serum cytokine levels measured were found to be unchanged. Rituximab therapy appears to be an

  3. Blockade of cannabinoid CB receptor function protects against in vivo disseminating brain damage following NMDA-induced excitotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H.H.; Ramos, J.A.; Fernández-Ruiz, J.

    2002-01-01

    The ability of cannabinoid CB, receptors to influence glutamatergic excitatory neurotransmission has fueled interest in how these receptors and their endogenous ligands may interact in conditions of excitotoxic insults. The present study characterized the impact of stimulated and inhibited CB...... receptor function on NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. Neonatal (6-day-old) rat pups received a systemic injection of a mixed CB/CB receptor agonist (WIN55,212-2) or their respective antagonists (SR141716A for CB and SR144528 for CB) prior to an unilateral intrastriatal microinjection of NMDA. The NMDA......-induced excitotoxic damage in the ipsilateral forebrain was not influenced by agonist-stimulated CB receptor function. In contrast, blockade of CB, but not CB, receptor activity evoked a robust neuroprotective response by reducing the infarct area and the number of cortical degenerating neurons. These results suggest...

  4. Intersubunit bridge formation governs agonist efficacy at nicotinic acetylcholine alpha4beta2 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Line Aagot Hede; Ahring, Philip Kiær; Jensen, Marianne Lerbech

    2012-01-01

    . Using binding experiments, electrophysiology and X-ray crystallography we have investigated a consecutive series of five prototypical pyridine-containing agonists derived from 1-(pyridin-3-yl)-1,4-diazepane. A correlation between binding affinities at a4ß2 and the acetylcholine binding protein from...

  5. 11C-NS14492 as a novel PET radioligand for imaging cerebral alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: in vivo evaluation and drug occupancy measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Lehel, Szabolcs;

    2011-01-01

    Small-molecule α(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α(7)nAChR) agonists are currently validated for use as treatment for cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia and in Alzheimer disease. A suitable radiolabeled α(7)nAChR PET tracer would be important for in vivo quantification of α(7)nAChR bind......Small-molecule α(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α(7)nAChR) agonists are currently validated for use as treatment for cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia and in Alzheimer disease. A suitable radiolabeled α(7)nAChR PET tracer would be important for in vivo quantification of α(7)n...

  6. Characterization of the retina in the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marci L.

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are involved in visual processing and are expressed by inner retinal neurons in all species studied to date (Keyser et al., 2000; Dmitrieva et al., 2007; Liu et al., 2009), but their distribution in the mouse retina remains unknown. Reductions in alpha7 nicotinic AChRs (nAChRs) are thought to contribute to memory and visual deficits observed in Alzheimer's and schizophrenia (Coyle et al., 1983; Nordberg et al., 1999; Leonard et al., 2006). However, the alpha7 nAChR knockout (KO) mouse has a mild phenotype (Paylor et al., 1998; Fernandes et al., 2006; Young et al., 2007; Origlia et al., 2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the expression of AChRs in wildtype (WT) mouse retina and to assess whether up-regulation of other AChRs in the alpha7 nAChR KO retina may explain the minimal deficits described in the KO mouse. Reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) showed that mRNA transcripts for alpha2-7, alpha 9, alpha10, beta2-4 nAChR subunits and m1-m5 muscarinic AChR (mAChR) subtypes were present in WT murine retina. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of alpha3-5, alpha9, and m1-m5 AChR proteins and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated nAChR and mAChR proteins expressed by subsets of bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells. This is the first reported expression of alpha9 and alpha10 nAChR transcripts and alpha9 nAChR proteins in the retina of any species. Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) showed changes in AChR transcript expression in the alpha7 nAChR KO mouse retina relative to WT. Within whole retina alpha2, alpha9, alpha10, beta4, m1 and m4 AChR transcripts were up-regulated, while alpha5 nAChR transcripts were down-regulated. However, cell populations showed subtle differences; m4 mAChR transcripts were up-regulated in the ganglion cell layer and outer portion of the inner nuclear layer (oINL),while beta4 nAChR transcript up-regulation was limited to the oINL. Surprisingly, alpha2, alpha9, beta4, m2 and m4 transcripts were

  7. The effect of AMPA receptor blockade on spatial information acquisition, consolidation and expression in juvenile rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzakis, Nikolaos; Bosnic, Tim; Ritchie, Thomas; Dixon, Kaylyn; Holahan, Matthew R

    2016-09-01

    Improvement on spatial tasks in rats is observed during a late, postnatal developmental period (post-natal day (PND) 18 - PND 20). The developmental emergence of this spatial function occurs in conjunction with hippocampal connectivity changes and enhanced hippocampal-AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic responses. The current work investigated the effect of AMPAr blockade on the emergence and long-term storage of spatial information in juvenile rats and associated neural activity patterns in the dorsal hippocampus CA1 region. Male, Long Evans rats between the ages of PND 18 and PND 20 were systemically (i.p.) administered the AMPAr antagonist, NBQX, (0, 5 or 10mg/kg) every day prior to hidden platform water maze training (PND 18, 19 and 20), every day immediately post-training or immediately before the probe test (PND 41). NBQX administration prior to training prolonged latencies, pathlength and increased thigmotaxis during the acquisition phase. Administration of NBQX immediately posttraining had no effect on the day-to-day performance. When given a probe test 3weeks later, the saline group across all conditions spent more time in the target quadrant. Rats treated with pretraining 5mg NBQX dose showed a preference for the target quadrant while the posttraining and pretesting 5mg NBQX doses impaired the target quadrant preference. Groups injected with 10mg of NBQX pretraining, posttraining or pretesting did not show a preference for the target quadrant. c-Fos labeling in the CA1 reflected these differences in probe performance in that groups showing greater than chance dwell time in the target quadrant showed more c-Fos labeling in the CA1 region than groups that did not show a target quadrant preference. These findings provide support for the critical role of AMPA receptor-mediated function in the organization and long-term storage of spatial memories acquired during the juvenile period.

  8. Interleukin-7 receptor blockade suppresses adaptive and innate inflammatory responses in experimental colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis Cynthia R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-7 (IL-7 acts primarily on T cells to promote their differentiation, survival, and homeostasis. Under disease conditions, IL-7 mediates inflammation through several mechanisms and cell types. In humans, IL-7 and its receptor (IL-7R are increased in diseases characterized by inflammation such as atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, and inflammatory bowel disease. In mice, overexpression of IL-7 results in chronic colitis, and T-cell adoptive transfer studies suggest that memory T cells expressing high amounts of IL-7R drive colitis and are maintained and expanded with IL-7. The studies presented here were undertaken to better understand the contribution of IL-7R in inflammatory bowel disease in which colitis was induced with a bacterial trigger rather than with adoptive transfer. Methods We examined the contribution of IL-7R on inflammation and disease development in two models of experimental colitis: Helicobacter bilis (Hb-induced colitis in immune-sufficient Mdr1a−/− mice and in T- and B-cell-deficient Rag2−/− mice. We used pharmacological blockade of IL-7R to understand the mechanisms involved in IL-7R-mediated inflammatory bowel disease by analyzing immune cell profiles, circulating and colon proteins, and colon gene expression. Results Treatment of mice with an anti-IL-7R antibody was effective in reducing colitis in Hb-infected Mdr1a−/− mice by reducing T-cell numbers as well as T-cell function. Down regulation of the innate immune response was also detected in Hb-infected Mdr1a−/− mice treated with an anti-IL-7R antibody. In Rag2−/− mice where colitis was triggered by Hb-infection, treatment with an anti-IL-7R antibody controlled innate inflammatory responses by reducing macrophage and dendritic cell numbers and their activity. Conclusions Results from our studies showed that inhibition of IL-7R successfully ameliorated inflammation and disease development

  9. Blockade of muscarinic receptors impairs the retrieval of well-trained memory

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    Shogo eSoma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh is known to play an important role in memory functions, and its deficit has been proposed to cause the cognitive decline associated with advanced age and Alzheimer’s disease (the cholinergic hypothesis. Although many studies have tested the cholinergic hypothesis for recently acquired memory, only a few have investigated the role of ACh in the retrieval process of well-trained cognitive memory, which describes the memory established from repetition and daily routine. To examine this point, we trained rats to perform a two-alternative forced-choice visual detection task. Each trial was started by having the rats pull upward a central-lever, which triggered the presentation of a visual stimulus to the right or left side of the display monitor, and then pulling upward a stimulus-relevant choice-lever located on both sides. Rats learned the task within 10 days, and the task training was continued for a month. Task performance was measured with or without systemic administration of a muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChR antagonist, scopolamine (SCOP, prior to the test. After 30 min of SCOP administration, rats stopped manipulating any lever even though they explored the lever and surrounding environment, suggesting a loss of the task-related associative memory. Three hours later, rats were recovered to complete the trial, but the rats selected the levers irrespective of the visual stimulus, suggesting they remembered a series of lever-manipulations in association with a reward, but not association between the reward and visual stimulation. Furthermore, an m1-AChR, but not nicotinic AChR antagonist caused a similar deficit in the task execution. SCOP neither interfered with locomotor activity nor drinking behavior, while it influenced anxiety. These results suggest that the activation of mAChRs at basal ACh levels is essential for the recall of well-trained cognitive memory.

  10. Sequestration of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor hm1-hm5 subtypes: effect of G protein-coupled receptor kinases GRK2, GRK4, GRK5 and GRK6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, H; Okuno, E; Kameyama, K; Haga, T

    1998-03-01

    Sequestration of porcine muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (m2 receptors) expressed in COS-7 cells is facilitated by coexpression of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 (GRK2). We examined the effect of coexpression of GRK2, GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6 on sequestration of human m1-m5 receptors expressed in COS-7 cells, which was assessed as loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding activity from the cell surface. Sequestration of m4 receptors as well as m2 receptors was facilitated by coexpression of GRK2 and attenuated by coexpression of the dominant negative form of GRK2 (DN-GRK2). Sequestration of m3 and m5 receptors also was facilitated by coexpression of GRK2 but not affected by coexpression of DN-GRK2. On the other hand, proportions of sequestered m1 receptors were not significantly different with coexpression of GRK2 and DN-GRK2. GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6 did not facilitate sequestration of m1-m5 receptors in COS-7 cells, except that the sequestration of m2 receptors tended to be facilitated by coexpression of GRK4 delta, GRK5 and GRK6. However, coexpression of GRK4 delta, GRK5, but not GRK6, in BHK-21 cells facilitated sequestration of m2, but not m3, receptors. These results indicate that the effect of GRK2 to facilitate receptor sequestration is not restricted to m2 receptors but is generalized to other muscarinic receptors except m1 receptors and that other kinases, including GRK4 delta, GRK5 and endogenous kinase(s) in COS-7 cells, also contribute to sequestration of m2 and m4 receptors.

  11. Postsynaptic action of brain-derived neurotrophic factor attenuates alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated responses in hippocampal interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Catarina C; Pinto-Duarte, António; Ribeiro, Joaquim Alexandre; Sebastião, Ana M

    2008-05-21

    Nicotinic mechanisms acting on the hippocampus influence attention, learning, and memory and constitute a significant therapeutic target for many neurodegenerative, neurological, and psychiatric disorders. Here, we report that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (1-100 ng/ml), a member of the neurotrophin gene family, rapidly decreases alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor responses in interneurons of the hippocampal CA1 stratum radiatum. Such effect is dependent on the activation of the TrkB receptor and involves the actin cytoskeleton; noteworthy, it is compromised when the extracellular levels of the endogenous neuromodulator adenosine are reduced with adenosine deaminase (1 U/ml) or when adenosine A(2A) receptors are blocked with SCH 58261 (2-(2-furanyl)-7-(2-phenylethyl)-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine) (100 nm). The intracellular application of U73122 (1-[6[[(17beta)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione) (5 mum), a broad-spectrum inhibitor of phospholipase C, or GF 109203X (bisindolylmaleimide I) (2 mum), a general inhibitor of protein kinase C isoforms, blocks BDNF-induced inhibition of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function. Moreover, in conditions of simultaneous intracellular dialysis of the fast Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA (10 mm) and removal of extracellular Ca(2+) ions, the inhibitory action of BDNF is further prevented. The present findings disclose a novel target for rapid actions of BDNF that might play important roles on synaptic transmission and plasticity in the brain.

  12. Dendritic spine density of prefrontal layer 6 pyramidal neurons in relation to apical dendrite sculpting by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily eKang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Prefrontal layer 6 (L6 pyramidal neurons play an important role in the adult control of attention, facilitated by their strong activation by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These neurons in mouse association cortex are distinctive morphologically when compared to L6 neurons in primary cortical regions. Roughly equal proportions of the prefrontal L6 neurons have apical dendrites that are long (reaching to the pial surface versus short (terminating in the deep layers, as in primary cortical regions. This distinct prefrontal morphological pattern is established in the post-juvenile period and appears dependent on nicotinic receptors. Here, we examine dendritic spine densities in these two subgroups of prefrontal L6 pyramidal neurons under control conditions as well as after perturbation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In control mice, the long neurons have significantly greater apical and basal dendritic spine density compared to the short neurons. Furthermore, manipulations of nicotinic receptors (chrna5 deletion or chronic developmental nicotine exposure have distinct effects on these two subgroups of L6 neurons: apical spine density is significantly reduced in long neurons, and basal spine density is significantly increased in short neurons. These changes appear dependent on the α5 nicotinic subunit encoded by chrna5. Overall, the two subgroups of prefrontal L6 neurons appear positioned to integrate information either across cortex (long neurons or within the deep layers (short neurons, and nicotinic perturbations differently alter spine density within each subgroup. Such changes have ramifications for adult executive function and possibly also for the morphological vulnerability of prefrontal cortex to subsequent stress exposure.

  13. Melatonin modulation of presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors located on short noradrenergic neurons of the rat vas deferens: a pharmacological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, the pineal hormone produced during the dark phase of the light-dark cycle, modulates neuronal acetylcholine receptors located presynaptically on nerve terminals of the rat vas deferens. Recently we showed the presence of high affinity nicotine-binding sites during the light phase, and low and high affinity binding sites during the dark phase. The appearance of the low affinity binding sites was due to the nocturnal melatonin surge and could be mimicked by exposure to melatonin in vitro. The aim of the present research was to identify the receptor subtypes responsible for the functional response during the light and the dark phase. The rank order of potency of agonists was dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP = cytisine > nicotine > carbachol and DMPP = nicotine = cytisine > carbachol, during the light and dark phase, respectively, due to an increase in apparent affinity for nicotine. Mecamylamine similarly blocked the DMPP response during the light and the dark phase, while the response to nicotine was more efficiently blocked during the light phase. In contrast, methyllycaconitine inhibited the nicotine-induced response only at 21:00 h. Since a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs have low affinity for nicotine in binding assays, we suggest that a mixed population composed of a3ß4 - plus a7-bearing nAChR subtypes is present at night. This plasticity in receptor subtypes is probably driven by melatonin since nicotine-induced contraction in organs from animals sacrificed at 15:00 h and incubated with melatonin (100 pg/ml, 4 h is not totally blocked by mecamylamine. Thus melatonin, by acting directly on the short adrenergic neurons that innervate the rat vas deferens, induces the appearance of the low affinity binding site, probably an a7 nAChR subtype.

  14. Acetylcholine receptor: channel-opening kinetics evaluated by rapid chemical kinetic and single-channel current measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udgaonkar, J. B.; Hess, G. P.

    1987-01-01

    A combination of rapid chemical kinetic (quench-flow) and single-channel current measurements was used to evaluate kinetic parameters governing the opening of acetylcholine-receptor channels in the electric organ (electroplax) of Electrophorus electricus. Chemical kinetic measurements made on membrane vesicles, prepared from the E. electricus electroplax, using carbamoylcholine (200 microM-20 mM) at 12 degrees C, pH 7.0, and in the absence of a transmembrane voltage, yielded values for K1 (dissociation constant for receptor activation), phi (channel closing equilibrium constant), J (specific reaction rate for ion flux), and alpha max (maximum inactivation rate constant) of 1 mM, 3.4, 4 x 10(7) M-1 s-1, and 12 s-1, respectively. The single-channel current recordings were made with cells also from the E. electricus electroplax, at the same temperature and pH as the chemical kinetic measurements, using carbamoylcholine (50 microM-2 mM), acetylcholine (500 nM), or suberyldicholine (20 nM). Single-channel current measurements indicated the presence of a single, unique open-channel state of the E. electricus receptor, in concurrence with previous, less extensive measurements. The rate constant for channel closing (kc) obtained from the mean open time of the receptor channel is 1,100 s-1 for carbamoylcholine, 1,200 s-1 for acetylcholine, and 360 s-1 for suberyldicholine at zero membrane potential; and it decreases e-fold for an 80 mV decrease in transmembrane voltage in each case. The decrease in mean open times of the receptor channel that is associated with increasing the carbamoylcholine concentration is interpreted to be due to carbamoylcholine binding to the regulatory (inhibitory) site on the receptor. An analysis of data obtained with carbamoylcholine showed that the closed times within a burst of channel activity fit a two-exponential distribution, with a concentration-independent time constant considered to be the time constant for carbamoylcholine to dissociate

  15. An unusual phospholipase A₂ from puff adder Bitis arietans venom--a novel blocker of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfius, Catherine A; Gorbacheva, Elena V; Starkov, Vladislav G; Osipov, Alexey V; Kasheverov, Igor E; Andreeva, Tatyana V; Astashev, Maxim E; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2011-04-01

    The venoms of snakes from Viperidae family mainly influence the function of various blood components. However, the published data indicate that these venoms contain also neuroactive components, the most studied being neurotoxic phospholipases A₂ (PLA₂s). Earlier we have shown (Gorbacheva et al., 2008) that several Viperidae venoms blocked nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and voltage-gated Ca²+ channels in isolated identified neurons of the fresh-water snail Lymnaea stagnalis. In this paper, we report on isolation from puff adder Bitis arietans venom and characterization of a novel protein bitanarin that reversibly blocks nAChRs. To isolate the protein, the venom of B. arietans was fractionated by gel-filtration, ion-exchange and reversed phase chromatography and fractions obtained were screened for capability to block nAChRs. The isolated protein competed with [¹²⁵I]iodinated α-bungarotoxin for binding to human α7 and Torpedo californica nAChRs, as well as to acetylcholine-binding protein from L. stagnalis, the IC₅₀ being 20 ± 1.5, 4.3 ± 0.2, and 10.6 ± 0.6 μM, respectively. It also blocked reversibly acetylcholine-elicited current in isolated L. stagnalis neurons with IC₅₀ of 11.4 μM. Mass-spectrometry analysis determined the molecular mass of 27.4 kDa and the presence of 28 cysteine residues forming 14 disulphide bonds. Edman degradation of the protein and tryptic fragments showed its similarity to PLA₂s from snake venoms. Indeed, the protein possessed high PLA₂ activity, which was 1.95 mmol/min/μmol. Bitanarin is the first described PLA₂ that contains 14 disulphide bonds and the first nAChR blocker possessing PLA₂ activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. VEGF receptor blockade markedly reduces retinal microglia/macrophage infiltration into laser-induced CNV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Huang

    Full Text Available Although blocking VEGF has a positive effect in wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the effect of blocking its receptors remains unclear. This was an investigation of the effect of VEGF receptor (VEGFR 1 and/or 2 blockade on retinal microglia/macrophage infiltration in laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV, a model of wet AMD. CNV lesions were isolated by laser capture microdissection at 3, 7, and 14 days after laser and analyzed by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining for mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Neutralizing antibodies for VEGFR1 or R2 and the microglia inhibitor minocycline were injected intraperitoneally (IP. Anti-CD11b, CD45 and Iba1 antibodies were used to confirm the cell identity of retinal microglia/macrophage, in the RPE/choroidal flat mounts or retinal cross sections. CD11b(+, CD45(+ or Iba1(+ cells were counted. mRNA of VEGFR1 and its three ligands, PlGF, VEGF-A (VEGF and VEGF-B, were expressed at all stages, but VEGFR2 were detected only in the late stage. PlGF and VEGF proteins were expressed at 3 and 7 days after laser. Anti-VEGFR1 (MF1 delivered IP 3 days after laser inhibited infiltration of leukocyte populations, largely retinal microglia/macrophage to CNV, while anti-VEGFR2 (DC101 had no effect. At 14 days after laser, both MF1 and DC101 antibodies markedly inhibited retinal microglia/macrophage infiltration into CNV. Therefore, VEGFR1 and R2 play differential roles in the pathogenesis of CNV: VEGFR1 plays a dominant role at 3 days after laser; but both receptors play pivotal roles at 14 days after laser. In vivo imaging demonstrated accumulation of GFP-expressing microglia into CNV in both CX3CR1(gfp/gfp and CX3CR1(gfp/+ mice. Minocycline treatment caused a significant increase in lectin(+ cells in the sub-retinal space anterior to CNV and a decrease in dextran-perfused neovessels compared to controls. Targeting the chemoattractant molecules that regulate trafficking of retinal microglia

  17. Improvement of skin wound healing in diabetic mice by kinin B2 receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desposito, Dorinne; Chollet, Catherine; Taveau, Christopher; Descamps, Vincent; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Roussel, Ronan; Bouby, Nadine; Waeckel, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Impaired skin wound healing is a major medical problem in diabetic subjects. Kinins exert a number of vascular and other actions limiting organ damage in ischaemia or diabetes, but their role in skin injury is unknown. We investigated, through pharmacological manipulation of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors (B1R and B2R respectively), the role of kinins in wound healing in non-diabetic and diabetic mice. Using two mouse models of diabetes (streptozotocin-induced and db/db mice) and non-diabetic mice, we assessed the effect of kinin receptor activation or inhibition by subtype-selective pharmacological agonists (B1R and B2R) and antagonist (B2R) on healing of experimental skin wounds. We also studied effects of agonists and antagonist on keratinocytes and fibroblasts in vitro. Levels of Bdkrb1 (encoding B1R) and Bdkrb2 (encoding B2R) mRNAs increased 1-2-fold in healthy and wounded diabetic skin compared with in non-diabetic skin. Diabetes delayed wound healing. The B1R agonist had no effect on wound healing. In contrast, the B2R agonist impaired wound repair in both non-diabetic and diabetic mice, inducing skin disorganization and epidermis thickening. In vitro, B2R activation unbalanced fibroblast/keratinocyte proliferation and increased keratinocyte migration. These effects were abolished by co-administration of B2R antagonist. Interestingly, in the two mouse models of diabetes, the B2R antagonist administered alone normalized wound healing. This effect was associated with the induction of Ccl2 (encoding monocyte chemoattractant protein 1)/Tnf (encoding tumour necrosis factor α) mRNAs. Thus stimulation of kinin B2 receptor impairs skin wound healing in mice. B2R activation occurs in the diabetic skin and delays wound healing. B2R blockade improves skin wound healing in diabetic mice and is a potential therapeutic approach to diabetic ulcers. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  18. ETA receptor blockade with atrasentan prevents hypertension with the multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor ABT-869 in telemetry-instrumented rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfor, Patricia N; Franklin, Pamela A; Segreti, Jason A; Widomski, Deborah L; Davidsen, Steven K; Albert, Daniel H; Cox, Bryan F; Fryer, Ryan M; Gintant, Gary A

    2009-02-01

    ABT-869 is a novel multitargeted inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) with potent antiangiogenic properties that slow tumor progression. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor blockade has been shown to produce hypertension. Atrasentan is a potent and selective endothelin (ETA) receptor antagonist that lowers blood pressure and affects tumor growth. To assess the utility of ETA receptor blockade in controlling hypertension with RTK inhibition, we evaluated the ability of atrasentan to block hypertension with ABT-869 in conscious, telemetry-instrumented rats. Changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were evaluated using mean values and the area under the curve (AUC). Atrasentan (0.5, 1.5, and 5.0 mg kg(-1) d(-1) for 5 days) elicited dose-dependent decreases in MAP-AUC (-16.7 +/- 1.3, -20.94 +/- 3.68, and -30.12 +/- 3.57 mm Hg x day, respectively) compared with vehicle. ABT-869 (1, 3, 10, 30 mg kg(-1) d(-1) for 5 days) increased MAP compared with vehicle (MAP-AUC values of -5.52 +/- 3.75, 12.7 +/- 8.4, 37.5 +/- 4.4, and 63.8 +/- 3.3 mm Hg x day, respectively). Pretreatment with atrasentan (5 mg/kg for 5 days) prevented and abolished the hypertensive effects of ABT-869. Thus, ETA receptor blockade effectively alleviated hypertension with RTK inhibition and may serve a dual therapeutic role by preventing hypertension and slowing tumor progression.

  19. Amelioration strategies fail to prevent tobacco smoke effects on neurodifferentiation: Nicotinic receptor blockade, antioxidants, methyl donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Skavicus, Samantha; Card, Jennifer; Levin, Edward D; Seidler, Frederic J

    2015-07-03

    Tobacco smoke exposure is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. We used neuronotypic PC12 cells to evaluate the mechanisms by which tobacco smoke extract (TSE) affects neurodifferentiation. In undifferentiated cells, TSE impaired DNA synthesis and cell numbers to a much greater extent than nicotine alone; TSE also impaired cell viability to a small extent. In differentiating cells, TSE enhanced cell growth at the expense of cell numbers and promoted emergence of the dopaminergic phenotype. Nicotinic receptor blockade with mecamylamine was ineffective in preventing the adverse effects of TSE and actually enhanced the effect of TSE on the dopamine phenotype. A mixture of antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, N-acetyl-l-cysteine) provided partial protection against cell loss but also promoted loss of the cholinergic phenotype in response to TSE. Notably, the antioxidants themselves altered neurodifferentiation, reducing cell numbers and promoting the cholinergic phenotype at the expense of the dopaminergic phenotype, an effect that was most prominent for N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Treatment with methyl donors (vitamin B12, folic acid, choline) had no protectant effect and actually enhanced the cell loss evoked by TSE; they did have a minor, synergistic interaction with antioxidants protecting against TSE effects on growth. Thus, components of tobacco smoke perturb neurodifferentiation through mechanisms that cannot be attributed to the individual effects of nicotine, oxidative stress or interference with one-carbon metabolism. Consequently, attempted amelioration strategies may be partially effective at best, or, as seen here, can actually aggravate injury by interfering with normal developmental signals and/or by sensitizing cells to TSE effects on neurodifferentiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metformin Attenuates Aβ Pathology Mediated Through Levamisole Sensitive Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in a C. elegans Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Waqar; Ebert, Paul R

    2016-09-05

    The metabolic disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). This suggests that drugs such as metformin that are used to treat T2DM may also be therapeutic toward AD and indicates an interaction between AD and energy metabolism. In this study, we have investigated the effects of metformin and another T2DM drug, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) in C. elegans expressing human Aβ42. We found that Aβ expressed in muscle inhibited levamisole sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and that metformin delayed Aβ-linked paralysis and improved acetylcholine neurotransmission in these animals. Metformin also moderated the effect of neuronal expression of Aβ: decreasing hypersensitivity to serotonin, restoring normal chemotaxis, and improving fecundity. Metformin was unable to overcome the small effect of neuronal Aβ on egg viability. The protective effects of metformin were associated with a decrease in the amount of toxic, oligomeric Aβ. AICAR has a similar protective effect against Aβ toxicity. This work supports the notion that anti-diabetes drugs and metabolic modulators may be effective against AD and that the worm model can be used to identify the specific interactions between Aβ and cellular proteins.

  1. Synthesis, binding, and modeling studies of new cytisine derivatives, as ligands for neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasso, Bruno; Canu Boido, Caterina; Terranova, Emanuela; Gotti, Cecilia; Riganti, Loredana; Clementi, Francesco; Artali, Roberto; Bombieri, Gabriella; Meneghetti, Fiorella; Sparatore, Fabio

    2009-07-23

    The availability of drug affecting neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) may have important therapeutic potential for the treatment of several CNS pathologies. Pursuing our efforts on the systematic structural modification of cytisine and N-arylalkyl and N-aroylalkyl cytisines were synthesized and tested for the displacement of [(3)H]-epibatidine and [(125)I]-alpha-bungarotoxin from the most widespread brain nAChRs subtypes alpha(4)beta(2) and alpha(7), respectively. While the affinity for alpha(7) subtype was rather poor (K(i) from 0.4 to >50 microM), the affinity for alpha(4)beta(2) subtype was very interesting, with nanomolar K(i) values for the best compounds. The N-substituted cytisines were docked into the rat and human alpha(4)beta(2) nAChR models based on the extracellular domain of a molluscan acetylcholine binding protein. The docking results agreed with the binding data, allowing the detection of discrete amino acid residues of the alpha and beta subunits essential for the ligand binding on rat and human nAChRs, providing a novel structural framework for the development of new alpha(4)beta(2) selective ligands.

  2. Activation and Desensitization of Peripheral Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors by Selected, Naturally-Occurring Pyridine Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict T. Green

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Teratogenic alkaloids can cause developmental defects due to the inhibition of fetal movement that results from desensitization of fetal muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. We investigated the ability of two known teratogens, the piperidinyl-pyridine anabasine and its 1,2-dehydropiperidinyl analog anabaseine, to activate and desensitize peripheral nAChRs expressed in TE-671 and SH-SY5Y cells. Activation-concentration response curves for each alkaloid were obtained in the same multi-well plate. To measure rapid desensitization, cells were first exposed to five potentially-desensitizing concentrations of each alkaloid in log10 molar increments from 10 nM to 100 µM and then to a fixed concentration of acetylcholine (ACh, which alone produces near-maximal activation. The fifty percent desensitization concentration (DC50 was calculated from the alkaloid concentration-ACh response curve. Agonist fast desensitization potency was predicted by the agonist potency measured in the initial response. Anabaseine was a more potent desensitizer than anabasine. Relative to anabaseine, nicotine was more potent to autonomic nAChRs, but less potent to the fetal neuromuscular nAChRs. Our experiments have demonstrated that anabaseine is more effective at desensitizing fetal muscle-type nAChRs than anabasine or nicotine and, thus, it is predicted to be more teratogenic.

  3. An experimental study on (131I-CHIBA-1001: a radioligand for α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play a vital role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and depression. However, there is currently no suitable positron emission tomography (PET or Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT radioligands for imaging α7 nAChRs in brain. Here our aim is to radiosynthesize a novel SPECT radioligand (131I-CHIBA-1001 for whole body biodistribution study and in vivo imaging of α7 nAChRs in brain. METHOD: (131I-CHIBA-1001 was radiosynthesized by chloramine-T method. Different conditions of reaction time and temperature were tested to get a better radiolabeling yield. Radiolabeling yield and radiochemical purities of (131I-CHIBA-1001 were analyzed by thin layer chromatography (TLC and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC system. Whole body biodistribution study was performed at different time points post injection of (131I-CHIBA-1001 in KM mice. Monkey subject was used for in vivo SPECT imaging in brain. RESULT: The radiolabeling yield of (131I-CHIBA-1001 reached 96% within 1.5∼2.0 h at 90∼95°C. The radiochemical purity reached more than 99% after HPLC purification. (131I-CHIBA-1001 was highly stable in saline and fresh human serum in room temperature and 37°C separately. The biodistribution data of brain at 15, 30, and 60 min were 11.05±1.04%ID/g, 8.8±0.04%ID/g and 6.28±1.13%ID/g, respectively. In experimental SPECT imaging, the distribution of radioactivity in the brain regions was paralleled with the distribution of α7 nAChRs in the monkey brain. Moreover, in the blocking SPECT imaging study, the selective α7 nAChR agonist SSR180711 blocked the radioactive uptake in the brain successfully. CONCLUSION: The CHIBA-1001 can be successfully radiolabeled with (131I using the chloramine-T method. (131I-CHIBA-1001 can successfully accumulate in the monkey brain and image the α7 acetylcholine receptors. (131I-CHIBA-1001 can be a

  4. Selective potentiation of (α4)3(β2)2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors augments amplitudes of prefrontal acetylcholine- and nicotine-evoked glutamatergic transients in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grupe, Morten; Paolone, Giovanna; Jensen, Anders A; Sandager-Nielsen, Karin; Sarter, Martin; Grunnet, Morten

    2013-11-15

    Prefrontal glutamate release evoked through activation of α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) situated on thalamic glutamatergic afferents mediates cue detection processes and thus contributes to attentional performance. However, little is known about the respective contributions of the high sensitivity and low sensitivity (LS) stoichiometries of the α4β2 nAChR, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2, to these processes. In the present study we employed glutamate-sensitive microelectrodes and the (α4)3(β2)2-selective positive allosteric modulator (PAM) NS9283 to investigate the importance of the LS α4β2 nAChR for glutamate release in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Firstly, the signaling evoked by physiologically relevant ACh concentrations through the (α4)3(β2)2 nAChR in HEK293 cells was potentiated by NS9283, consistent with the classification of NS9283 as a PAM. In urethane-anesthetized rats, intra-prefrontal pressure ejections of NS9283 evoked glutamatergic transients. Importantly, this glutamate release was attenuated by removal of cholinergic projections to the recording area. This finding indicates that the effects of NS9283 depend on endogenous ACh, again consistent with effects of a PAM. We then conducted microdialysis to demonstrate the presence of extracellular ACh in urethane-anesthetized control rats. While detectable, those levels were significantly lower than in awake rats. Finally, the amplitudes of glutamatergic transients evoked by local pressure ejections of a low concentration of nicotine were significantly augmented following systemic administration of NS9283 (3.0mg/kg). In conclusion, our results indicate that a LS α4β2 nAChR PAM such as NS9283 may enhance the cholinergic modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the cortex, thereby perhaps alleviating the attentional impairments common to a range of brain disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural differences in the two agonist binding sites of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor revealed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, K. L.; Corringer, P. J.; Edelstein, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo marmorata carries two nonequivalent agonist binding sites at the αδ and αγ subunit interfaces. These sites have been characterized by time-resolved fluorescence with the partial nicotinic agonist dansyl-C6-choline (Dnscho). When bound to t...

  6. Purification of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein by affinity chromatography using a regioselectively modified and reversibly immobilized alpha-toxin from Naja nigricollis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringler, P; Kessler, P; Menez, A; Brisson, A

    1997-01-01

    A new method of affinity chromatography purification of the detergent-solubilized nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein (nAChR) is presented, based on the reversible coupling of a chemically monomodified alpha-toxin from Naja nigricollis to a resin. The alpha-toxin was monothiolated on the

  7. Structural and functional studies of the modulator NS9283 reveal agonist-like mechanism of action at α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jeppe A; Ahring, Philip K; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen;

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of Cys loop receptor ion channels is a proven drug discovery strategy, but many underlying mechanisms of the mode of action are poorly understood. We report the x-ray structure of the acetylcholine-binding protein from Lymnaea stagnalis with NS9283, a stoichiometry selective positive m...

  8. 11C-NS14492 as a novel PET radioligand for imaging cerebral alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: in vivo evaluation and drug occupancy measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Lehel, Szabolcs

    2011-01-01

    Small-molecule a(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a(7)nAChR) agonists are currently validated for use as treatment for cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia and in Alzheimer disease. A suitable radiolabeled a(7)nAChR PET tracer would be important for in vivo quantification of a(7)n...

  9. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease: The Role of Protein-Protein Interactions in Current and Future Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindskov, Morten Skøtt Thomsen; Andreasen T., Jesper; Arvaniti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been pursued for decades as potential molecular targets to treat cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to their positioning within regions of the brain critical in learning and memory, such as the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus...

  10. Structural differences in the two agonist binding sites of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor revealed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, K. L.; Corringer, P. J.; Edelstein, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo marmorata carries two nonequivalent agonist binding sites at the αδ and αγ subunit interfaces. These sites have been characterized by time-resolved fluorescence with the partial nicotinic agonist dansyl-C6-choline (Dnscho). When bound...

  11. Pre-clinical properties of the alpha 4 beta 2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonists varenicline, cytisine and dianicline translate to clinical efficacy for nicotine dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rollema, H.; Shrikhande, A.; Ward, K. M.; Tingley, F. D.; Coe, J. W.; O'Neill, B. T.; Tseng, E.; Wang, E. Q.; Mather, R. J.; Hurst, R. S.; Williams, K. E.; de Vries, M.; Cremers, T.; Bertrand, S.; Bertrand, D.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Smoking cessation trials with three high-affinity partial agonists of alpha 4 beta 2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have demonstrated differences in their clinical efficacy. This work examines the origin of the differences by taking into account brain exp

  12. Dianicline, a novel α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist, for smoking cessation: a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonstad, Serena; Holme, Ingar; Tønnesen, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Dianicline is a α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist, a class of drugs that includes varenicline and cytisine. Varenicline is efficacious for smoking cessation, while cytisine has not been studied systematically. The efficacy of dianicline has not been previously tested...

  13. Solid-phase synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of analogues of PhTX-12-A potent and selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian R; Andersen, Kim;

    2002-01-01

    Philanthotoxin-12 (PhTX-12) is a novel potent and selective, noncompetitive antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Homologues of PhTX-12 with 7-11 methylene groups between the primary amino group and the aromatic head-group were synthesized using solid-phase methodology. In vitro...

  14. The role of the a7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor on motor coordination in mice treated with methyllcaconitine and anabasine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adverse effects of methyllycaconitine (MLA) have been attributed to competitive antagonism of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Research has indicated a correlation between the LD50 of MLA and the amount of a7 nAChR in various mouse strains, suggesting that mice with more a7 nAChR requi...

  15. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological characterization of novel spirocyclic quinuclidinyl-Delta2 -isoxazoline derivatives as potent and selective agonists of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallanoce, Clelia; Magrone, Pietro; Matera, Carlo;

    2011-01-01

    A set of racemic spirocyclic quinuclidinyl-¿(2) -isoxazoline derivatives was synthesized using a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition-based approach. Target compounds were assayed for binding affinity toward rat neuronal homomeric (a7) and heteromeric (a4ß2) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. ¿(2) -Isoxazol...

  16. Positive allosteric modulators of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor potentiate glutamate release in the prefrontal cortex of freely-moving rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortz, D M; Upton, B A; Mikkelsen, J D

    2016-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) exhibit pro-cognitive effects in animal models of schizophrenia and are targets for the discovery of cognition-enhancing drugs. However, little is known about their in vivo mechanism of action because such st...

  17. Inactivation (desensitization) of the acetylcholine receptor in Electrophorus electricus membrane vesicles by carbamylcholine: comparison between ion flux and alpha-bungarotoxin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, N; Hess, G P; Kim, P S; Noble, R L

    1980-09-30

    The inactivation (desensitization) of the acetylcholine receptor by carbamylcholine, a stable analogue of acetylcholine, has been investigated in eel Ringer's solution, pH 7.0, 0 degrees C, by measurements of (i) ion flux and (ii) the kinetics of the reaction of [125I]-alpha-bungarotoxin with the receptor. The effect of preincubation with carbamylcholine is significantly different in the two types of measurement. In both the receptor-controlled flux of inorganic ions and the toxin-binding kinetics a biphasic process has been observed (Hess, G.P., Lipkowitz, S., Struve, G.E., 1978, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 75:1703; Hess, G.P. et al., 1975, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 64:1018; Bulger, J.E. et al., 1977, Biochemistry 16:684), only the initial fast phase of which is inhibited and the subsequent slow phase persists. However, preincubation with carbamylcholine per se has no effect on the toxin reaction. The results obtained are consistent with the proposal of Katz and Thesleff (Katz, B., Thesleff, S., 1957, J. Physiol. (London) 138:65) that the active form of the receptor is converted to an inactive form in the presence of acetylcholine receptor ligands, and with our previous experiments (Hess et al., 1978) which indicated that one receptor form is responsible for the initial fast phase of both the receptor-controlled ion flux and the toxin binding reaction, and that its conversion to the other form results in the slow phases in these two measurements.

  18. Tryptophan and cystein residues of the acetylcholine receptors of Torpedo species. Relationship to binding of cholinergic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldefrawi, M E; Eldefrawi, A T; Wilson, D B

    1975-09-23

    Several methods were used to analyze for tryptophan in the acetylcholine (ACh) receptors purified from the electric organs of the electric rays, Torpedo californica and Torpedo marmorata. The best value of tryptophan was 2.4 mol %. When excited at 290 nm, both receptors fluoresced with a maximum at 336, but there was no change in the fluorescence emission spectra upon binding of carbamylcholine, d-tubocurarine, ACh, or decamethonium. The free SH content of the Torpedo receptors varied in different preparations, and was highest in that purified from fresh T. californica using deaerated solutions and dialysis under nitrogen, and lowest in that prepared from the aged lyophilized membranes of T. marmorata. The maximum free SH content was 20 nmol/mg of protein or 0.22 mol %, equal to at most 18% of the total cysteic acid residues. Reaction of either 33% or of all the SH residues with p-chloromercuribenzoate reduced maximum ACh binding to the pure receptor prepared from fresh T. californica by only 23%.

  19. A synthetic combinatorial strategy for developing a-conotoxin analogs as potent a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armishaw, Christopher J; Singh, Narender; Medina-Franco, Jose L;

    2010-01-01

    ) nAChR Fluo-4/Ca2+ assay, allowing amino acids that confer antagonistic activity for this receptor to be identified. A second series of individual alpha-conotoxin analogs based on the combinations of defined active amino acid residues from positional scan synthetic combinatorial library screening...... data were synthesized. Several analogs exhibited significantly improved antagonist activity for the alpha(7) nAChR compared with WT-ImI. Binding interactions between the analogs and the alpha(7) nAChR were explored using a homology model of the amino-terminal domain based on a crystal structure...... of an acetylcholine-binding protein. Finally, a third series of refined analogs was synthesized based on modeling studies, which led to several analogs with refined pharmacological properties. Of the 96 individual alpha-conotoxin analogs synthesized, three displayed > or =10-fold increases in antagonist potency...

  20. Toxicity of the synthetic polymeric 3-alkylpyridinium salt (APS3) is due to specific block of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandič, Marjana; Aráoz, Romulo; Molgó, Jordi; Turk, Tom; Sepčić, Kristina; Benoit, Evelyne; Frangež, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The in vivo and in vitro toxic effects of the synthetic polymeric 3-alkylpyridinium salt (APS3), from the Mediterranean marine sponge Reniera sarai, were evaluated on mammals, with emphasis to determine its mode of action. The median lethal doses of APS3 were 7.25 and higher that 20mg/kg in mouse and rat, respectively. Intravenous administration of 7.25 and 20mg/kg APS3 to rat caused a significant fall followed by an increase in mean arterial blood pressure accompanied by tachycardia. In addition, cumulative doses of APS3 (up to 60 mg/kg) inhibited rat nerve-evoked skeletal muscle contraction in vivo, with a median inhibitory dose (ID(50)) of 37.25mg/kg. When administrated locally by intramuscular injection to mouse, APS3 decreased the compound muscle action potential recorded in response to in vivo nerve stimulation, with an ID(50) of 0.5mg/kg. In vitro experiments confirmed the inhibitory effect of APS3 on mouse hemidiaphragm nerve-evoked muscle contraction with a median inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 20.3 μM, without affecting directly elicited muscle contraction. The compound inhibited also miniature endplate potentials and nerve-evoked endplate potentials with an IC(50) of 7.28 μM in mouse hemidiaphragm. Finally, APS3 efficiently blocked acetylcholine-activated membrane inward currents flowing through Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) incorporated to Xenopus oocytes, with an IC(50) of 0.19 μM. In conclusion, our results strongly suggest that APS3 blocks muscle-type nAChRs, and show for the first time that in vivo toxicity of APS3 is likely to occur through an antagonist action of the compound on these receptors.

  1. An mRNA expression analysis of stimulation and blockade of 5-HT7 receptors during memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-García, Georgina; Gonzalez-Espinosa, Claudia; Meneses, Alfredo

    2006-04-25

    Despite the compelling support for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors participation in learning and memory in mammal species, the molecular basis had been largely absent from any discussion of its mechanistic underpinnings. Here, we report that reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that there was a higher level of expression of the investigated 5-HT receptor mRNAs in autoshaping-trained relative to untrained groups. Actually, pharmacological naïve untrained and autoshaping-trained rats showed significant differences, the latter groups expressing, in decreasing order, 5-HT1A memory consolidation, we combined selective 5-HT7 receptors stimulation or blockade in the same animals, and brain areas individually analyzed. 5-HT7 receptors were strongly expressed in all the three brain areas of vehicle-trained rats relative to untrained group. The potential selective 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS 19 enhanced memory consolidation, attenuated mRNA receptors expression, and the facilitatory memory effect was reversed by SB-269970. Finally, pharmacological stimulation of 5-HT7 receptors reversed scopolamine- or dizocilpine-induced amnesia and receptor down-regulation.

  2. The interaction of l-cysteine/H2S pathway and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in mouse corpus cavernosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinoglu, Fatma; Dalkir, Fatma Tugce; Demirbag, Hatice Oruc; Ogulener, Nuran

    2017-08-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible interaction of l-cysteine/H2S pathway and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in the mouse corpus cavernosum (CC). l-cysteine (endogenous H2S substrate; 10(-6)-10(-3) M), sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS; exogenous H2S; 10(-6)-10(-3) M) and acetylcholine (10(-9)-10(-4) M) produced concentration-dependent relaxation in isolated mouse CC tissues. Relaxations to endogenous and exogenous H2S were reduced by non-selective mAChR antagonist atropine (5 × 10(-5) M), selective M1 mAChR antagonist pirenzepine (5 × 10(-5) M) and selective M3 mAChR antagonist 4-DAMP (10(-7) M) but not by selective M2 mAChR antagonist AF-DX 116 (10(-6) M). Also, acetylcholine-induced relaxations were reduced by atropine, pirenzepine, 4-DAMP and AF-DX 116, confirming the selective effects of mAChR antagonists. Furthermore, acetylcholine-induced relaxations were attenuated by cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE) inhibitor d,l-propargylglycine (PAG, 10(-2) M) and cystathionine-β-synthase inhibitor (CBS) aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA, 10(-3) M). l-nitroarginine, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, augmented the inhibitory effects of mAChR antagonists and H2S enzyme inhibitors on acetylcholine-induced relaxations. In addition, the existence and localization of CSE, CBS and 3-MST were demonstrated in mouse CC. Furthermore, tissue acetylcholine release was significantly increased by l-cysteine but not by exogenous H2S. The increase in acetylcholine level was completely inhibited by AOAA and PAG. These results suggest that M1 and M3 mAChRs contributes to relaxant effect mediated by endogenous H2S but at same time l-cysteine triggers acetylcholine release from cavernosal tissue. Also, the role of NO in the interaction of l-cysteine/H2S pathway and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) could not be excluded. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Effects of Calorie Restriction and IGF-1 Receptor Blockade on the Progression of 22Rv1 Prostate Cancer Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette Galet

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Calorie restriction (CR inhibits prostate cancer progression, partially through modulation of the IGF axis. IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R blockade reduces prostate cancer xenograft growth. We hypothesized that combining calorie restriction with IGF-1R blockade would have an additive effect on prostate cancer growth. Severe combined immunodeficient mice were subcutaneously injected with 22Rv1 cells and randomized to: (1 Ad libitum feeding/intraperitoneal saline (Ad-lib; (2 Ad-lib/20 mg/kg twice weekly, intraperitoneal ganitumab [anti-IGF-1R antibody (Ad-lib/Ab]; (3 40% calorie restriction/intraperitoneal saline (CR; (4 CR/ intraperitoneal ganitumab, (CR/Ab. CR and ganitumab treatment were initiated one week after tumor injection. Euthanasia occurred 19 days post treatment. Results showed that CR alone decreased final tumor weight, plasma insulin and IGF-1 levels, and increased apoptosis. Ganitumab therapy alone reduced tumor growth but had no effect on final tumor weight. The combination therapy (CR/Ab further decreased final tumor weight and proliferation, increased apoptosis in comparison to the Ad-lib group, and lowered plasma insulin levels relative to the Ad-lib and Ad-lib/Ab groups. Tumor AKT activation directly correlated with plasma IGF-1 levels. In conclusion, whereas ganitumab therapy modestly affected 22Rv1 tumor growth, combining IGF-1R blockade with calorie restriction resulted in a significant decrease in final tumor weight and improved metabolic profile.

  4. Acetylcholine-induced neuronal differentiation: muscarinic receptor activation regulates EGR-1 and REST expression in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salani, Monica; Anelli, Tonino; Tocco, Gabriella Augusti; Lucarini, Elena; Mozzetta, Chiara; Poiana, Giancarlo; Tata, Ada Maria; Biagioni, Stefano

    2009-02-01

    Neurotransmitters are considered part of the signaling system active in nervous system development and we have previously reported that acetylcholine (ACh) is capable of enhancing neuronal differentiation in cultures of sensory neurons and N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells. To study the mechanism of ACh action, in this study, we demonstrate the ability of choline acetyltransferase-transfected N18TG2 clones (e.g. 2/4 clone) to release ACh. Analysis of muscarinic receptors showed the presence of M1-M4 subtypes and the activation of both IP(3) and cAMP signal transduction pathways. Muscarinic receptor activation increases early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1) levels and treatments with agonists, antagonists, and signal transduction enzyme inhibitors suggest a role for M3 subtype in EGR-1 induction. The role of EGR-1 in the enhancement of differentiation was investigated transfecting in N18TG2 cells a construct for EGR-1. EGR-1 clones show increased neurite extension and a decrease in Repressor Element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) expression: both these features have also been observed for the 2/4 clone. Transfection of this latter with EGR zinc-finger domain, a dominant negative inhibitor of EGR-1 action, increases REST expression, and decreases fiber outgrowth. The data reported suggest that progression of the clone 2/4 in the developmental program is dependent on ACh release and the ensuing activation of muscarinic receptors, which in turn modulate the level of EGR-1 and REST transcription factors.

  5. Effect of cholinergic ligands on the lipids of acetylcholine receptor-rich membrane preparations from Torpedo californica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Carrion, M.; Raftery, M.A.; Thomas, J.K.; Sator, V.

    1976-01-01

    Ion permeation, triggered by ligand-receptor interaction, is associated with the primary events of membrane depolarization at the neuromuscular junction and synaptic connections. To explore the possible sites of ion permeation, the long-lived fluorescent probe pyrene (fluorescence lifetime approximately 400 nsec) has been inserted into the lipid phase of acetylcholine receptor-rich membrane (AcChR-M) preparations from Torpedo californica. The pyrene probe is susceptible to both fluidity and permeability changes in the lipid bilayer. These changes are detected by variations in the rate of decay of the excited singlet state of pyrene after pulsation with a 10-nsec ruby laser flash. Variations of these lifetimes in the membrane preparations alone or in the presence of quenchers show that binding of cholinergic agonists and antagonists, neurotoxins, and local anesthetics to AcChR-M produces varying effects on the properties of the pyrene probe in the lipid phase. It is concluded that binding of cholinergic ligands to the receptor does not significantly alter the fluidity or permeability of the lipids in the bilayer in contact with pyrene. On the other hand, local anesthetics do affect these properties.

  6. Pyridoxal phosphate as a probe of the cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane proteins: Application to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Ramirez, B.; Martinez-Carrion, M. (Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City (USA))

    1989-06-13

    A novel procedure has been developed to specifically label the cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane proteins with the aldehyde pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP). Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (AcChR) vesicles were loaded with ({sup 3}H)pyridoxine 5-phosphate (({sup 3}H)PNP) and pyridoxine-5-phosphate oxidase, followed by intravesicular enzymatic oxidation of ({sup 3}H)PNP at 37{degree}C in the presence of externally added cytochrome c as a scavenger of possible leaking PLP product. The four receptor subunits were labeled whether the reaction was carried out on the internal surface or separately designed to mark the external one. On the other hand, the relative pyridoxylation of the subunits differed in both cases, reflecting differences in accessible lysyl residues in each side of the membrane. Even though there are no large differences in the total lysine content among the subunits and there are two copies of the {alpha}-subunit, internal surface labeling by PLP was greatest for the highest molecular weight ({delta}) subunit, reinforcing the concept that the four receptor subunits are transmembranous and may protrude into the cytoplasmic face in a fashion that is proportional to their subunit molecular weight. Yet, the labeling data do not fit well to any of the models proposed for AcChR subunit folding. The method described can be used for selective labeling of the cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane proteins in sealed membrane vesicles.

  7. Ion Transport in Human Pancreatic Duct Epithelium, Capan-1 Cells, Is Regulated by Secretin, VIP, Acetylcholine, and Purinergic Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to establish a solid model of polarized epithelium for human pancreatic ducts, where electrical parameters could be measured as indicators of ion transport. Further, we aimed to determine functional expression of several receptors, in particular, puriner......OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to establish a solid model of polarized epithelium for human pancreatic ducts, where electrical parameters could be measured as indicators of ion transport. Further, we aimed to determine functional expression of several receptors, in particular......, purinergic receptors, and determine their effects on ion transport. METHODS: Human adenocarcinoma cell line Capan-1 cells were grown on permeable supports and set in Ussing chambers for electrophysiological recordings. Transepithelial voltage (Vte), resistance, and short-circuit currents (Isc) were measured...... in response to agonists. RESULTS: Secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), acetylcholine, forskolin, ionomycin, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP), 3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl ATP, and adenosine induced lumen negative Vte and Isc. These changes were consistent with anion...

  8. α-RgIB: A Novel Antagonist Peptide of Neuronal Acetylcholine Receptor Isolated from Conus regius Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Vianna Braga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conus venoms are rich sources of biologically active peptides that act specifically on ionic channels and metabotropic receptors present at the neuromuscular junction, efficiently paralyzing the prey. Each species of Conus may have 50 to 200 uncharacterized bioactive peptides with pharmacological interest. Conus regius is a vermivorous species that inhabits Northeastern Brazilian tropical waters. In this work, we characterized one peptide with activity on neuronal acetylcholine receptor (nAChR. Crude venom was purified by reverse-phase HPLC and selected fractions were screened and sequenced by mass spectrometry, MALDI-ToF, and ESI-Q-ToF, respectively. A new peptide was identified, bearing two disulfide bridges. The novel 2,701 Da peptide belongs to the cysteine framework I, corresponding to the cysteine pattern CC-C-C. The biological activity of the purified peptide was tested by intracranial injection in mice, and it was observed that high concentrations induced hyperactivity in the animals, whereas lower doses caused breathing difficulty. The activity of this peptide was assayed in patch-clamp experiments, on nAChR-rich cells, in whole-cell configuration. The peptide blocked slow rise-time neuronal receptors, probably α3β4 and/or α3β4α5 subtype. According to the nomenclature, the new peptide was designated as α-RgIB.

  9. Distribution of the a2, a3, and a5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the chick brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrão A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are ionotropic receptors comprised of a and ß subunits. These receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system, and previous studies have revealed specific patterns of localization for some nAChR subunits in the vertebrate brain. In the present study we used immunohistochemical methods and monoclonal antibodies to localize the a2, a3, and a5 nAChR subunits in the chick mesencephalon and diencephalon. We observed a differential distribution of these three subunits in the chick brain, and showed that the somata and neuropil of many central structures contain the a5 nAChR subunit. The a2 and a3 subunits, on the other hand, exhibited a more restricted distribution than a5 and other subunits previously studied, namely a7, a8 and ß2. The patterns of distribution of the different nAChR subunits suggest that neurons in many brain structures may contain several subtypes of nAChRs and that in a few regions one particular subtype may determine the cholinergic nicotinic responses

  10. Anticonvulsants Based on the α-Substituted Amide Group Pharmacophore Bind to and Inhibit Function of Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoshein, Arcadius V

    2016-03-16

    Although the antiepileptic properties of α-substituted lactams, acetamides, and cyclic imides have been known for over 60 years, the mechanism by which they act remains unclear. I report here that these compounds bind to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and inhibit its function. Using transient kinetic measurements with functionally active, nondesensitized receptors, I have discovered that (i) α-substituted lactams and cyclic imides are noncompetitive inhibitors of heteromeric subtypes (such as α4β2 and α3β4) of neuronal nAChRs and (ii) the binding affinity of these compounds toward the nAChR correlates with their potency in preventing maximal electroshock (MES)-induced convulsions in mice. Based on the hypothesis that α-substituted amide group is the essential pharmacophore of these drugs, I found and tested a simple compound, 2-phenylbutyramide. This compound indeed inhibits nAChR and shows good anticonvulsant activity in mice. Molecular docking simulations suggest that α-substituted lactams, acetamides, and cyclic imides bind to the same sites on the extracellular domain of the receptor. These new findings indicate that inhibition of brain nAChRs may play an important role in the action of these antiepileptic drugs, a role that has not been previously recognized.

  11. Decreased binding capacity (Bmax) of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in fibroblasts from boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jessica; Landgren, Magnus; Fernell, Elisabeth; Lewander, Tommy; Venizelos, Nikolaos

    2013-09-01

    Monoaminergic dysregulation is implicated in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and methylphenidate and amphetamines are the most frequently prescribed pharmacological agents for treating ADHD. However, it has recently been proposed that the core symptoms of the disorder might be due to an imbalance between monoaminergic and cholinergic systems. In this study, we used fibroblast cell homogenates from boys with and without ADHD as an extraneural cell model to examine the cholinergic receptor density, that is, muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). We found that the binding capacity (Bmax) of [³H] Quinuclidinyl benzilate (³H-QNB) to mAChRs was decreased by almost 50 % in the children with ADHD (mean = 30.6 fmol/mg protein, SD = 25.6) in comparison with controls [mean = 63.1 fmol/mg protein, SD = 20.5, p ≤ 0.01 (Student's unpaired t test)]. The decreased Bmax indicates a reduced cholinergic receptor density, which might constitute a biomarker for ADHD. However, these preliminary findings need to be replicated in larger ADHD and comparison cohorts.

  12. PET imaging evaluation of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10, a novel radioligand specific to α{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, in nonhuman primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillmer, Ansel T.; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Li, Songye; Lin, Shu-fei; Holden, Daniel; Labaree, David; Ropchan, Jim; Carson, Richard E.; Huang, Yiyun [Yale University, PET Center, 801 Howard Ave, PO Box 208048, New Haven, CT (United States); Scheunemann, Matthias; Teodoro, Rodrigo; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Brust, Peter [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands specific to α{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) afford in vivo imaging of this receptor for neuropathologies such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and substance abuse. This work aims to characterize the kinetic properties of an α{sub 7}-nAChR-specific radioligand, 7-(1,4-diazabicyclo[3.2.2]nonan-4-yl)-2-[{sup 18}F]-fluorodibenzo[b,d]thiophene 5,5-dioxide ([{sup 18}F]DBT-10), in nonhuman primates. [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 was produced via nucleophilic substitution of the nitro-precursor. Four Macaca mulatta subjects were imaged with [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 PET, with measurement of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 parent concentrations and metabolism in arterial plasma. Baseline PET scans were acquired for all subjects. Following one scan, ex vivo analysis of brain tissue was performed to inspect for radiolabeled metabolites in brain. Three blocking scans with 0.69 and 1.24 mg/kg of the α{sub 7}-nAChR-specific ligand ASEM were also acquired to assess dose-dependent blockade of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 binding. Kinetic analysis of PET data was performed using the metabolite-corrected input function to calculate the parent fraction corrected total distribution volume (V{sub T}/f{sub P}). [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 was produced within 90 min at high specific activities of 428 ± 436 GBq/μmol at end of synthesis. Metabolism of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 varied across subjects, stabilizing by 120 min post-injection at parent fractions of 15-55 %. Uptake of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 in brain occurred rapidly, reaching peak standardized uptake values (SUVs) of 2.9-3.7 within 30 min. The plasma-free fraction was 18.8 ± 3.4 %. No evidence for radiolabeled [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 metabolites was found in ex vivo brain tissue samples. Kinetic analysis of PET data was best described by the two-tissue compartment model. Estimated V{sub T}/f{sub P} values were 193-376 ml/cm{sup 3} across regions, with regional rank order of thalamus > frontal cortex > striatum

  13. Pathophysiology of myasthenia gravis with antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor, muscle-specific kinase and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Huijbers, Maartje G; Plomp, Jaap J; Niks, Erik H; Molenaar, Peter C; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar; Gomez, Alejandro M; De Baets, Marc H; Losen, Mario

    2013-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis is caused by antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor, muscle-specific kinase, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4, or possibly yet unidentified antibodies. The mechanisms by which these antibodies interfere with the function of postsynaptic proteins include complement activation, antigenic modulation by crosslinking of the target proteins, competition with ligand binding sites, or steric hindrance which inhibits conformational changes or binding to associated proteins. Screening for auto-antibodies to different postsynaptic targets, and also for low-affinity antibodies, is contributing to a more accurate diagnosis of MG patients. Further studies into the specific pathophysiological pathways of the several MG subforms might help to develop new, more antigen specific, therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel acetylcholine and carbamoylcholine analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Camilla Petrycer; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Christensen, Jeppe K.

    2008-01-01

    A series of carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine analogues were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically at neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Several of the compounds displayed low nanomolar binding affinities to the alpha 4beta 2 nAChR and pronounced selectivity for this ...

  15. Pharmacological characterisation of α6β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors assembled from three different α6/α3 subunit chimeras in tsA201 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Bjørnskov; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Jensen, Anders A.

    2014-01-01

    by their inefficient functional expression in vitro. In the present study we have characterized and compared the pharmacological properties displayed by α6β4 and α6β4β3 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors assembled in tsA201 cells from the classical α6/α3 chimera (C1) and two novel α6/α3 chimeras (C6F223L and C16F223L...... should be made keeping the molecular modifications in the α6 surrogate subunits in mind, this study sheds light on the pharmacological properties of α6β4⁎ nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and demonstrates the applicability of the C6F223L and C16F223L chimeras for studies of these receptors....

  16. Molecular determinants of subtype-selective efficacies of cytisine and the novel compound NS3861 at heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Hald, Helle; Timmermann, Daniel B; Jensen, Marianne L; Dyhring, Tino; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan; Balle, Thomas; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S; Ahring, Philip K

    2013-01-25

    Deciphering which specific agonist-receptor interactions affect efficacy levels is of high importance, because this will ultimately aid in designing selective drugs. The novel compound NS3861 and cytisine are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and both bind with high affinity to heteromeric α3β4 and α4β2 nAChRs. However, initial data revealed that the activation patterns of the two compounds show very distinct maximal efficacy readouts at various heteromeric nAChRs. To investigate the molecular determinants behind these observations, we performed in-depth patch clamp electrophysiological measurements of efficacy levels at heteromeric combinations of α3- and α4-, with β2- and β4-subunits, and various chimeric constructs thereof. Compared with cytisine, which selectively activates receptors containing β4- but not β2-subunits, NS3861 displays the opposite β-subunit preference and a complete lack of activation at α4-containing receptors. The maximal efficacy of NS3861 appeared solely dependent on the nature of the ligand-binding domain, whereas efficacy of cytisine was additionally affected by the nature of the β-subunit transmembrane domain. Molecular docking to nAChR subtype homology models suggests agonist specific interactions to two different residues on the complementary subunits as responsible for the β-subunit preference of both compounds. Furthermore, a principal subunit serine to threonine substitution may explain the lack of NS3861 activation at α4-containing receptors. In conclusion, our results are consistent with a hypothesis where agonist interactions with the principal subunit (α) primarily determine binding affinity, whereas interactions with key amino acids at the complementary subunit (β) affect agonist efficacy.

  17. Molecular Determinants of Subtype-selective Efficacies of Cytisine and the Novel Compound NS3861 at Heteromeric Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Hald, Helle; Timmermann, Daniel B.; Jensen, Marianne L.; Dyhring, Tino; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø.; Peters, Dan; Balle, Thomas; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S.; Ahring, Philip K.

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering which specific agonist-receptor interactions affect efficacy levels is of high importance, because this will ultimately aid in designing selective drugs. The novel compound NS3861 and cytisine are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and both bind with high affinity to heteromeric α3β4 and α4β2 nAChRs. However, initial data revealed that the activation patterns of the two compounds show very distinct maximal efficacy readouts at various heteromeric nAChRs. To investigate the molecular determinants behind these observations, we performed in-depth patch clamp electrophysiological measurements of efficacy levels at heteromeric combinations of α3- and α4-, with β2- and β4-subunits, and various chimeric constructs thereof. Compared with cytisine, which selectively activates receptors containing β4- but not β2-subunits, NS3861 displays the opposite β-subunit preference and a complete lack of activation at α4-containing receptors. The maximal efficacy of NS3861 appeared solely dependent on the nature of the ligand-binding domain, whereas efficacy of cytisine was additionally affected by the nature of the β-subunit transmembrane domain. Molecular docking to nAChR subtype homology models suggests agonist specific interactions to two different residues on the complementary subunits as responsible for the β-subunit preference of both compounds. Furthermore, a principal subunit serine to threonine substitution may explain the lack of NS3861 activation at α4-containing receptors. In conclusion, our results are consistent with a hypothesis where agonist interactions with the principal subunit (α) primarily determine binding affinity, whereas interactions with key amino acids at the complementary subunit (β) affect agonist efficacy. PMID:23229547

  18. Cocaine and phencyclidine inhibition of the acetylcholine receptor: analysis of the mechanisms of action based on measurements of ion flux in the millisecond-to-minute time region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpen, J W; Aoshima, H; Abood, L G; Hess, G P

    1982-01-01

    The effects of cocaine and of phencyclidine and procaine on acetylcholine receptor-controlled ion flux were measured in the millisecond-to-minute time region. Chemical kinetic measurements of ion flux were made in membrane vesicles prepared from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus and in PC-12 cells, a sympathetic neuronal cell line. A quench-flow technique was used to measure ion flux in the millisecond-to-second range in membrane vesicles. Cocaine and phencyclidine both inhibit acetylcholine receptor-controlled ion flux, but by different mechanisms. Both compounds decrease the initial rate of ion flux, an effect observed with the local anesthetic procaine. This inhibition cannot be prevented by saturating concentrations of acetylcholine (1 mM). These results from chemical kinetic experiments are consistent with electrophysiological measurements which indicate that local anesthetics act by interfering with the movement of ions through receptor-formed channels. The chemical kinetic experiments, however, give additional information about the action of phencyclidine. They indicate that phencyclidine also increases the rate of receptor inactivation (desensitization) and changes the equilibrium between active and inactive receptor conformations, effects not observed in the presence of cocaine or procaine. PMID:6953408

  19. Glucose intolerance induced by blockade of central FGF receptors is linked to an acute stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Rojas

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: The effect of acute inhibition of central FGFR signaling to impair glucose tolerance likely involves a stress response associated with pronounced, but transient, sympathoadrenal activation and an associated reduction of insulin secretion. Whether this effect is a true consequence of FGFR blockade or involves an off-target effect of the FGFR inhibitor requires additional study.

  20. Selective blockade of 5-HT7 receptors facilitates attentional set-shifting in stressed and control rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforuk, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical data demonstrate that the selective blockade of 5-HT7 receptors produces antidepressant-like behavioural effects. Although the involvement of 5-HT7 receptors in cognitive processes has been previously suggested, little is known about their role in the prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent processes that may be impaired in stress-related states. According to our previous study, repeated restraint stress induces the long-lasting cognitive impairment in a rat model of PFC-dependent attentional set-shifting task (ASST). Therefore, the first aim of the present experiments was to examine the impact of the selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB-269970, on ASST performance of stressed and control rats. Since the selective blockade of 5-HT7 receptors has been previously demonstrated to enhance the behavioural effects of antidepressants, the second goal was to examine the impact of the joint administration of inactive doses of SB-269970 and escitalopram in the ASST. SB-269970 (0.3 and 1mg/kg) given to stressed rats 30min before testing reversed the restraint-induced impairment of the extra-dimensional (ED) set-shifting ability. Additionally, SB-269970 (1mg/kg) also improved ED performance of the unstressed control group. Moreover, SB-269970, given at an inactive dose, enhanced the pro-cognitive efficacy of escitalopram. In conclusion, these results highlight the possibility that 5-HT7 receptor antagonism may represent a useful pharmacological approach in the treatment of frontal-like cognitive disturbances in stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  1. Trace eyeblink conditioning is impaired in α7 but not in β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knock-out mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L Brown

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are essentially involved in learning and memory. A neurobiologically and behaviorally well-characterized measure of learning and memory, eyeblink classical conditioning, is sensitive to disruptions in acetylcholine neurotransmission. The two most common forms of eyeblink classical conditioning – the delay and trace paradigms - differentially engage forebrain areas densely-populated with nAChRs. The present study used genetically modified mice to investigate the effects of selective nAChR subunit deletion on delay and trace eyeblink classical conditioning. α7 and β2 nAChR subunit knockout (KO mice and their wild-type littermates were trained for 10 daily sessions in a 500 ms delay or 500 ms trace eyeblink conditioning task, matched for the interstimulus interval (ISI between conditioned stimulus (CS and unconditioned stimulus (US onset. Impairments in conditioned responding were found in α7 KO mice trained in trace – but not delay – eyeblink conditioning. Relative to littermate controls, β2 KO mice were unimpaired in the trace task but displayed higher levels of conditioned responding in delay eyeblink conditioning. Elevated conditioned response levels in delay-conditioned β2 KOs corresponded to elevated levels of alpha responding in this group. These findings suggest that α7 nAChRs play a role in normal acquisition of 500 ms trace eyeblink classical conditioning in mice. The prominent distribution of α7 nAChRs in the hippocampus and other forebrain regions may account for these genotype-specific acquisition effects in this hippocampus-dependent trace paradigm.

  2. Acetylcholine muscarinic receptors and response to anti-cholinesterase therapy in patients with Alzheimer's disease

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    Brown, Derek [Department of Psychiatry, Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Chisholm, Jennifer A.; Patterson, Jim; Wyper, David [Department of Clinical Physics, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, G51 4TF (United Kingdom); Owens, Jonathan; Pimlott, Sally [Department of Clinical Physics, Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-01

    An acetylcholine deficit remains the most consistent neurotransmitter abnormality found in Alzheimer's disease and various therapeutic agents have been targeted at this. In this study we investigated the action of Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor that has few side-effects. In particular we set out to investigate whether muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) availability influences the response to this therapy. We used the novel single-photon emission tomography (SPET) tracer (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-quinuclidinyl benzilate (R,R[{sup 123}I]I-QNB), which has high affinity for the M1 subtype of mAChR. Regional cerebral perfusion was also assessed using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. We investigated 20 patients on Donepezil treatment and ten age-matched controls. The results showed a reduction in (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding in the caudal anterior cingulate in patients compared with controls and relatively high binding in the putamen and rostral anterior cingulate, suggesting a relative sparing of mAChR in these regions. The main finding of the study was that mAChR availability as assessed by (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding did not distinguish responders from non-responders. Interestingly, we found that the extent of cognitive improvement showed no positive correlation with (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding in any brain region but was inversely related to binding in the insular cortex. This suggests that, within the advised cognitive performance band for use of Donepezil, response is greater in those patients with evidence of a more marked cholinergic deficit. A larger study should investigate this. (orig.)

  3. Cobra ( Naja spp. ) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor exhibits resistance to Erabu sea snake ( Laticauda semifasciata) short-chain alpha-neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Zoltan; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C; Sorota, Steve

    2004-05-01

    Snake alpha-neutotoxins of Elapidae venoms are grouped into two structural classes, short-chain and long-chain alpha-neutotoxins. While these two classes share many chemical and biological characteristics, there are also distinct dissimilarities between them, including their binding site on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), specificity among species of Chordata, and the associated pharmacological effects. In the present study we test the hypothesis that structural motifs that evolved to confer natural resistance against conspecific long-chain alpha-neurotoxins in Elapidae snakes also interfere with the biological action of short-chain alpha-neurotoxins. We expressed functional nAChRs that contains segments or single residues of the Elapidae nAChR ligand binding domain and tested the effect of short-chain alpha-neurotoxin erabutoxin-a (ETX-a) from the Erabu sea snake Laticauda semifasciata on the acetylcholine-induced currents as measured by two-microelectrode voltage clamp. Our results show that the Elapidae nAChR alpha subunit segment T(154)-L(208) ligand binding domain has an inhibitory effect on the pharmacological action of ETX-a. This effect is primarily attributed to the presence of glycosylation at position N(189). If the glycosylation is removed from the T(154)-L(208) segment, the nAChR will be inhibited, however, to a lesser extent than seen in the mouse. This effect correlates with the variations in alpha-neurotoxin sensitivity of different species and, importantly, reflects the evolutionary conservation of the binding site on the nAChR polypeptide backbone per se. Phylogenetic analysis of alpha-neurotoxin resistance suggests that alpha-neurotoxin-resistant nAChR evolved first, which permitted the evolution of snake venom alpha-neurotoxins. A model describing alpha-neurotoxin resistance in Elapidae snakes is presented.

  4. Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes. Role of third intracellular m2 loop and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, H; Kameyama, K; Haga, T; Honma, T; Lameh, J; Sadée, W

    1998-02-27

    Internalization and down-regulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine m2 receptors (hm2 receptors) and a hm2 receptor mutant lacking a central part of the third intracellular loop (I3-del m2 receptor) were examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells stably expressing these receptors and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). Agonist-induced internalization of up to 80-90% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by measuring loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding sites from the cell surface, and transfer of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites from the plasma membrane into the light-vesicle fractions separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Additionally, translocation of hm2 receptors with endocytic vesicles were visualized by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 60-70% of hm2 receptors was demonstrated by determining the loss of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in the cells. The half-time (t1/2) of internalization and down-regulation in the presence of 10(-4) M carbamylcholine was estimated to be 9.5 min and 2.3 h, respectively. The rates of both internalization and down-regulation of hm2 receptors in the presence of 10(-6) M or lower concentrations of carbamylcholine were markedly increased by coexpression of GRK2. Agonist-induced internalization of I3-del m2 receptors was barely detectable upon incubation of cells for 1 h, but agonist-induced down-regulation of up to 40-50% of I3-del m2 receptors occurred upon incubation with 10(-4) M carbamylcholine for 16 h. However, the rate of down-regulation was lower compared with wild type receptors (t1/2 = 9.9 versus 2.3 h). These results indicate that rapid internalization of hm2 receptors is facilitated by their phosphorylation with GRK2 and does not occur in the absence of the third intracellular loop, but down-regulation of hm2 receptors may occur through both GRK2-facilitating pathway and third intracellular loop-independent pathways.

  5. Brain Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockade Improves Dairy Blood Pressure Variability via Sympathoinhibition in Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kishi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal blood pressure (BP elevation in early morning is known to cause cardiovascular events. Previous studies have suggested that one of the reasons in abnormal dairy BP variability is sympathoexcitation. We have demonstrated that brain angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R causes sympathoexcitation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether central AT1R blockade attenuates the excess BP elevation in rest-to-active phase in hypertensive rats or not. Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP were treated with intracerebroventricular infusion (ICV of AT1R receptor blocker (ARB, oral administration of hydralazine (HYD, or ICV of vehicle (VEH. Telemetric averaged mean BP (MBP was measured at early morning (EM, after morning (AM, and night (NT. At EM, MBP was significantly lower in ARB to a greater extent than in HYD compared to VEH, though MBP at AM was the same in ARB and HYD. At NT, MBP was also significantly lower in ARB than in HYD. These results in MBP were compatible to those in sympathoexcitation and suggest that central AT1R blockade attenuates excess BP elevation in early active phase and continuous BP elevation during rest phase independent of depressor response in hypertensive rats.

  6. Proteoliposome-based selection of a recombinant antibody fragment against the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharni; Nomura, Yayoi; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Hino, Tomoya; Abe, Hitomi; Nakada-Nakura, Yoshiko; Sato, Yumi; Iwanari, Hiroko; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Asada, Hidetsugu; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Murata, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takuya; Hamakubo, Takao; Iwata, So; Nomura, Norimichi

    2014-12-01

    The development of antibodies against human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has achieved limited success, which has mainly been attributed to their low stability in a detergent-solubilized state. We herein describe a method that can generally be applied to the selection of phage display libraries with human GPCRs reconstituted in liposomes. A key feature of this approach is the production of biotinylated proteoliposomes that can be immobilized on the surface of streptavidin-coupled microplates or paramagnetic beads and used as a binding target for antibodies. As an example, we isolated a single chain Fv fragment from an immune phage library that specifically binds to the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor with nanomolar affinity. The selected antibody fragment recognized the GPCR in both detergent-solubilized and membrane-embedded forms, which suggests that it may be a potentially valuable tool for structural and functional studies of the GPCR. The use of proteoliposomes as immunogens and screening bait will facilitate the application of phage display to this difficult class of membrane proteins.

  7. Highly Selective and Sensitive Detection of Acetylcholine Using Receptor-Modified Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shihong; Kim, Byeongju; Song, Hyun Seok; Jin, Hye Jun; Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Sang Hun; Lee, Byung Yang; Park, Tai Hyun; Hong, Seunghun

    2015-03-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a neurotransmitter in a human central nervous system and is related to various neural functions such as memory, learning and muscle contractions. Dysfunctional ACh regulations in a brain can induce several neuropsychiatric diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and myasthenia gravis. In researching such diseases, it is important to measure the concentration of ACh in the extracellular fluid of the brain. Herein, we developed a highly sensitive and selective ACh sensor based on single-walled carbon nanotube-field effect transistors (swCNT-FETs). In our work, M1 mAChR protein, an ACh receptor, was expressed in E.coli and coated on swCNT-FETs with lipid membranes. Here, the binding of ACh onto the receptors could be detected by monitoring the change of electrical currents in the underlying swCNT-FETs, allowing the real-time detection of ACh at a 100 pM concentration. Furthermore, our sensor could selectively detect ACh from other neurotransmitters. This is the first report of the real-time sensing of ACh utilizing specific binding between the ACh and M1 mAChR, and it may lead to breakthroughs in various biomedical applications such as drug screening and disease diagnosis.

  8. Acetylcholine receptor-induced experimental myasthenia gravis: what have we learned from animal models after three decades?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggi, Fulvio; Antozzi, Carlo; Toscani, Chiara; Cordiglieri, Chiara

    2012-02-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease caused by an immunological response against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the neuromuscular junction. Anti-AChR antibodies induce degradation of the receptor, activation of complement cascade and destruction of the post-synaptic membrane, resulting in a functional reduction of AChR availability. The pathophysiological role of autoantibodies (auto-Abs) and T helper lymphocytes has been studied in the experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) models. EAMG models have been employed to investigate the factors involved in the development of MG and to suggest new therapies aimed to preventing or modulating the ongoing disease. EAMG can be induced in susceptible mouse and rat strains, which develop clinical symptoms such as muscular weakness and fatigability, mimicking the human disease. Two major types of EAMG can be induced, passive and active EAMG. Passive transfer MG models, involving the injection of auto-Abs, are helpful for studying the role of complement molecules and their regulatory proteins, which can prevent neuromuscular junction degradation. Active models, induced by immunization, are employed for the analysis of antigen-specific immune responses and their modulation in order to improve disease progression. In this review, we will concentrate on the main pathogenic mechanisms of MG, focusing on recent findings on EAMG experimental models.

  9. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus...... for cocaine addiction....

  10. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S; Dencker, Ditte

    2011-01-01

    of the striatum, suggesting a role for muscarinic M4 receptors in the motor side effects of antipsychotics, and in the alleviation of these side effects by anticholinergics. Here we investigated the potential role of the muscarinic M4 receptor in catalepsy induced by antipsychotics (haloperidol and risperidone...

  11. Investigation of the presence and antinociceptive function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristine B.; Krogh-Jensen, Karen; Pickering, Darryl S;

    2016-01-01

    musculus) using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST). The presence and function of M1 and M4 was investigated in vivo, using the formalin test with the muscarinic receptor agonists xanomeline and VU0152100. Spinal cord tissue from the naked mole-rat was used for receptor saturation binding studies...... with [3H]-N-methylscopolamine. The BLAST test revealed 95 % protein sequence homology showing the naked mole-rat to have the genetic potential to express all five muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. A significant reduction in pain behavior was demonstrated after administration of 8.4 mg...

  12. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus....... More importantly, we tested the hypothesis that muscarinic receptor agonists with varied receptor subtype selectivity can blunt cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects; we hypothesized a critical role for the M(1) and/or M(4) receptor subtypes in this modulation. Mice were trained...... to discriminate cocaine from saline, or to self-administer intravenous cocaine chronically. The nonselective muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and methylscopolamine, the nonselective muscarinic agonists oxotremorine and pilocarpine, the M(1)/M(4)-preferring agonist xanomeline, the putative M(1)-selective agonist...

  13. THE EFFECTS OF ACUTE AND CHRONIC STRESS ON ERYTHROCYTE DYNAMIC IN COMBINATION WITH ß–ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS BLOCKADE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Hritcu

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available : 3 consecutive days propranolol hydrochloride administration (5 mg/kg b.w., subcutaneous injections under acute and chronic stress conditions causes changes of peripheral erythrocyte distribution in rats. The effects of acute stress and its combination with ȕ-adrenergic receptor blockade on erythrocyte dynamic were more pregnant beside the effects of chronic stress and its combination with ȕ-adrenergic receptor blockade, respectively. ȕ-adrenergic mechanisms were shown to be involved in regulation of erythrocyte dynamic in acute and chronic stress response.

  14. CB1 cannabinoid receptor-mediated anandamide signalling reduces the defensive behaviour evoked through GABAA receptor blockade in the dorsomedial division of the ventromedial hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Anjos-Garcia, Tayllon; Ullah, Farhad; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2017-02-01

    The effects of cannabinoids in brain areas expressing cannabinoid receptors, such as hypothalamic nuclei, are not yet well known. Several studies have demonstrated the role of hypothalamic nuclei in the organisation of behavioural responses induced through innate fear and panic attacks. Panic-prone states are experimentally induced in laboratory animals through a reduction in the GABAergic activity. The aim of the present study was to examine panic-like elaborated defensive behaviour evoked by GABAA receptor blockade with bicuculline (BIC) in the dorsomedial division of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHdm). We also aimed to characterise the involvement of endocannabinoids and the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in the modulation of elaborated defence behavioural responses organised with the VMHdm. The guide-cannula was stereotaxicaly implanted in VMHdm and the animals were treated with anandamide (AEA) at different doses, and the effective dose was used after the pre-treatment with the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251, followed by GABAA receptor blockade in VMHdm. The results showed that the intra-hypothalamic administration of AEA at an intermediate dose (5 pmol) attenuated defence responses induced through the intra-VMHdm microinjection of bicuculline (40 ng). This effect, however, was inhibited when applied central microinjection of the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 in the VMHdm. Moreover, AM251 potentiates de non-oriented escape induced by bicuculline, effect blocked by pre-treatment with the TRPV1 channel antagonist 6-I-CPS. These results indicate that AEA modulates the pro-aversive effects of intra-VMHdm-bicuculline treatment, recruiting CB1 cannabinoid receptors and the TRPV1 channel is involved in the AM251-related potentiation of bicuculline effects on non-oriented escape behaviour.

  15. Blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors does not prevent the antipruritic effect of systemic paracetamol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglam, Gulis; Gunduz, Ozgur; Ulugol, Ahmet

    2014-12-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors have been shown to mediate the antinociceptive, but not the hypothermic, action of the worldwide used analgesic, paracetamol. Since itch and pain sensations share many similarities, the purpose of the present study was to investigate whether blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors participates in the antipruritic activity of paracetamol in mice. Scratching behavior was induced by intradermal serotonin injection into the rostral part of the back of the mice. After serotonin administration, scratching of the injected site by the hind paws were videotaped and counted for 30 min. Serotonin-induced scratching behavior was attenuated with high-dose paracetamol (300 mg/kg). The CB1 receptor antagonist, AM-251 (1 mg/kg), and the CB2 receptor antagonist, SR-144528 (1 mg/kg), did not alter the anti-scratching behavioral effect of paracetamol. Our results indicate that, in contrast to its antinociceptive action, but similar to its hypothermic effect, cannabinoid receptors are not involved in the antipruritic activity of paracetamol.

  16. Pharmacological characterisation of strychnine and brucine analogues at glycine and alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Anders A; Gharagozloo, Parviz; Birdsall, Nigel J M; Zlotos, Darius P

    2006-06-06

    Strychnine and brucine from the plant Strychnos nux vomica have been shown to have interesting pharmacological effects on several neurotransmitter receptors, including some members of the superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels. In this study, we have characterised the