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Sample records for acetic acids

  1. furfural and acetic acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigating the effects of two lignocellulose degradation by-products (furfural and acetic acid) on ethanol fermentations by six ethanologenic yeast strains. ... Among the tested yeast strains, 1300 exhibited the highest growth rate, thus can be a promising candidate for mass production of bioethanol. Three important ...

  2. Antibiofilm Properties of Acetic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2014-01-01

    of the infected implant, tissue, or organ and thereby the biofilm. Acetic acid is known for its antimicrobial effect on bacteria in general, but has never been thoroughly tested for its efficacy against bacterial biofilms. In this article, we describe complete eradication of both Gram-positive and Gram......-negative biofilms using acetic acid both as a liquid and as a dry salt. In addition, we present our clinical experience of acetic acid treatment of chronic wounds. In conclusion, we here present the first comprehensive in vitro and in vivo testing of acetic acid against bacterial biofilms....

  3. ACETIC ACID AND A BUFFER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising : a) 0.01-20% wt/wt acetic acid and b) a physiologically tolerable buffer capable of maintaining acetic acid at a pH in the range of 2-7; and use of such a composition as an antimicrobial agent.......The present invention relates to a composition comprising : a) 0.01-20% wt/wt acetic acid and b) a physiologically tolerable buffer capable of maintaining acetic acid at a pH in the range of 2-7; and use of such a composition as an antimicrobial agent....

  4. (VI) oxide in acetic acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oxidation of cyclohexene by chromium (VI) oxide in aqueous and acetic media was studied. The reaction products were analysed using infra red (IR) and gas chromatography coupled with mass (GC/MS) spectroscopy. The major products of the oxidation reaction in acetic acid medium were cyclohexanol, ...

  5. Antibiofilm Properties of Acetic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Nielsen, Anne K.; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Homøe, Preben; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are known to be extremely tolerant toward antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents. These biofilms cause the persistence of chronic infections. Since antibiotics rarely resolve these infections, the only effective treatment of chronic infections is surgical removal of the infected implant, tissue, or organ and thereby the biofilm. Acetic acid is known for its antimicrobial effect on bacteria in general, but has never been thoroughly tested for its efficacy against bacterial biofilms. In this article, we describe complete eradication of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative biofilms using acetic acid both as a liquid and as a dry salt. In addition, we present our clinical experience of acetic acid treatment of chronic wounds. In conclusion, we here present the first comprehensive in vitro and in vivo testing of acetic acid against bacterial biofilms. PMID:26155378

  6. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation of...

  8. Acetic acid extraction from aqueous solutions using fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJmker, H.M.; Gramblicka, M.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; Schuur, Boelo

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for production of acetic acid via bio-based routes is cost-effective concentration and purification of the acetic acid from the aqueous solutions, for which liquid–liquid extraction is a possible method. A main challenge in extraction of acetic acid from dilute aqueous solutions is

  9. Acetobacter pasteurianus metabolic change induced by initial acetic acid to adapt to acetic acid fermentation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Renkuan; Yin, Haisong; Bai, Xiaolei; Chang, Yangang; Xia, Menglei; Wang, Min

    2017-09-01

    Initial acetic acid can improve the ethanol oxidation rate of acetic acid bacteria for acetic acid fermentation. In this work, Acetobacter pasteurianus was cultured in ethanol-free medium, and energy production was found to increase by 150% through glucose consumption induced by initial acetic acid. However, oxidation of ethanol, instead of glucose, became the main energy production pathway when upon culturing ethanol containing medium. Proteome assay was used to analyze the metabolism change induced by initial acetic acid, which provided insight into carbon metabolic and energy regulation of A. pasteurianus to adapt to acetic acid fermentation conditions. Results were further confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. In summary, decreased intracellular ATP as a result of initial acetic acid inhibition improved the energy metabolism to produce more energy and thus adapt to the acetic acid fermentation conditions. A. pasteurianus upregulated the expression of enzymes related to TCA and ethanol oxidation to improve the energy metabolism pathway upon the addition of initial acetic acid. However, enzymes involved in the pentose phosphate pathway, the main pathway of glucose metabolism, were downregulated to induce a change in carbon metabolism. Additionally, the enhancement of alcohol dehydrogenase expression promoted ethanol oxidation and strengthened the acetification rate, thereby producing a strong proton motive force that was necessary for energy production and cell tolerance to acetic acid.

  10. Acetic acid mediated interactions between alumina surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kimiyasu; Yılmaz, Hüseyin; Ijuin, Atsuko; Hotta, Yuji; Watari, Koji

    2012-02-01

    Low-molecular-weight organic acids have been known to modify colloidal stability of alumina-based suspensions. We investigated interaction forces between alumina surfaces mediated by acetic acid which is one of the simplest organic acids. Forces between alumina surfaces were measured using the colloid-probe method of atomic force microscope (AFM). Repulsive forces attributed to steric repulsion due to adsorbed molecules and electrostatic repulsion dominated the interaction. Results of rheological characterization of the alumina slurry containing acetic acid supported the finding.

  11. Acetic acid production from food wastes using yeast and acetic acid bacteria micro-aerobic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; He, Dongwei; Niu, Dongjie; Zhao, Youcai

    2015-05-01

    In this study, yeast and acetic acid bacteria strains were adopted to enhance the ethanol-type fermentation resulting to a volatile fatty acids yield of 30.22 g/L, and improve acetic acid production to 25.88 g/L, with food wastes as substrate. In contrast, only 12.81 g/L acetic acid can be obtained in the absence of strains. The parameters such as pH, oxidation reduction potential and volatile fatty acids were tested and the microbial diversity of different strains and activity of hydrolytic ferment were investigated to reveal the mechanism. The optimum pH and oxidation reduction potential for the acetic acid production were determined to be at 3.0-3.5 and -500 mV, respectively. Yeast can convert organic matters into ethanol, which is used by acetic acid bacteria to convert the organic wastes into acetic acid. The acetic acid thus obtained from food wastes micro-aerobic fermentation liquid could be extracted by distillation to get high-pure acetic acid.

  12. Overview on mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-02-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are a group of gram-negative or gram-variable bacteria which possess an obligate aerobic property with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, meanwhile transform ethanol and sugar to corresponding aldehydes, ketones and organic acids. Since the first genus Acetobacter of AAB was established in 1898, 16 AAB genera have been recorded so far. As the main producer of a world-wide condiment, vinegar, AAB have evolved an elegant adaptive system that enables them to survive and produce a high concentration of acetic acid. Some researches and reviews focused on mechanisms of acid resistance in enteric bacteria and made the mechanisms thoroughly understood, while a few investigations did in AAB. As the related technologies with proteome, transcriptome and genome were rapidly developed and applied to AAB research, some plausible mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in some AAB strains have been published. In this review, the related mechanisms of AAB against acetic acid with acetic acid assimilation, transportation systems, cell morphology and membrane compositions, adaptation response, and fermentation conditions will be described. Finally, a framework for future research for anti-acid AAB will be provided.

  13. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  14. Sphingolipids contribute to acetic acid resistance in Zygosaccharomyces bailii

    OpenAIRE

    Lindahl, Lina; Genheden, Samuel; Eriksson, Leif A.; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lignocellulosic raw material plays a crucial role in the development of sustainable processes for the production of fuels and chemicals. Weak acids such as acetic acid and formic acid are troublesome inhibitors restricting efficient microbial conversion of the biomass to desired products. To improve our understanding of weak acid inhibition and to identify engineering strategies to reduce acetic acid toxicity, the highly acetic?acid?tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii was studied...

  15. Sphingolipids contribute to acetic acid resistance in Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Lina; Genheden, Samuel; Eriksson, Leif A; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Lignocellulosic raw material plays a crucial role in the development of sustainable processes for the production of fuels and chemicals. Weak acids such as acetic acid and formic acid are troublesome inhibitors restricting efficient microbial conversion of the biomass to desired products. To improve our understanding of weak acid inhibition and to identify engineering strategies to reduce acetic acid toxicity, the highly acetic-acid-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii was studied. The impact of acetic acid membrane permeability on acetic acid tolerance in Z. bailii was investigated with particular focus on how the previously demonstrated high sphingolipid content in the plasma membrane influences acetic acid tolerance and membrane permeability. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we concluded that membranes with a high content of sphingolipids are thicker and more dense, increasing the free energy barrier for the permeation of acetic acid through the membrane. Z. bailii cultured with the drug myriocin, known to decrease cellular sphingo-lipid levels, exhibited significant growth inhibition in the presence of acetic acid, while growth in medium without acetic acid was unaffected by the myriocin addition. Furthermore, following an acetic acid pulse, the intracellular pH decreased more in myriocin-treated cells than in control cells. This indicates a higher inflow rate of acetic acid and confirms that the reduction in growth of cells cultured with myriocin in the medium with acetic acid was due to an increase in membrane permeability, thereby demonstrating the importance of a high fraction of sphingolipids in the membrane of Z. bailii to facilitate acetic acid resistance; a property potentially transferable to desired production organisms suffering from weak acid stress. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Sphingolipids contribute to acetic acid resistance in Zygosaccharomyces bailii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Lina; Genheden, Samuel; Eriksson, Leif A.; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lignocellulosic raw material plays a crucial role in the development of sustainable processes for the production of fuels and chemicals. Weak acids such as acetic acid and formic acid are troublesome inhibitors restricting efficient microbial conversion of the biomass to desired products. To improve our understanding of weak acid inhibition and to identify engineering strategies to reduce acetic acid toxicity, the highly acetic‐acid‐tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii was studied. The impact of acetic acid membrane permeability on acetic acid tolerance in Z. bailii was investigated with particular focus on how the previously demonstrated high sphingolipid content in the plasma membrane influences acetic acid tolerance and membrane permeability. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we concluded that membranes with a high content of sphingolipids are thicker and more dense, increasing the free energy barrier for the permeation of acetic acid through the membrane. Z. bailii cultured with the drug myriocin, known to decrease cellular sphingo­lipid levels, exhibited significant growth inhibition in the presence of acetic acid, while growth in medium without acetic acid was unaffected by the myriocin addition. Furthermore, following an acetic acid pulse, the intracellular pH decreased more in myriocin‐treated cells than in control cells. This indicates a higher inflow rate of acetic acid and confirms that the reduction in growth of cells cultured with myriocin in the medium with acetic acid was due to an increase in membrane permeability, thereby demonstrating the importance of a high fraction of sphingolipids in the membrane of Z. bailii to facilitate acetic acid resistance; a property potentially transferable to desired production organisms suffering from weak acid stress. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 744–753. © 2015 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26416641

  17. Genetic dissection of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Peng; Xiao, Yin; Hu, Yun; Sun, Haiye; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Dissection of the hereditary architecture underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for ethanol fermentation. In this work, a genomics approach was used to dissect hereditary variations in acetic acid tolerance between two phenotypically different strains. A total of 160 segregants derived from these two strains were obtained. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the acetic acid tolerance displayed a normal distribution in these segregants, and suggested that the acetic acid tolerant traits were controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Thus, 220 SSR markers covering the whole genome were used to detect QTLs of acetic acid tolerant traits. As a result, three QTLs were located on chromosomes 9, 12, and 16, respectively, which explained 38.8-65.9 % of the range of phenotypic variation. Furthermore, twelve genes of the candidates fell into the three QTL regions by integrating the QTL analysis with candidates of acetic acid tolerant genes. These results provided a novel avenue to obtain more robust strains.

  18. Omics analysis of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Peng; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Gui Yang

    2017-05-01

    Acetic acid is an inhibitor in industrial processes such as wine making and bioethanol production from cellulosic hydrolysate. It causes energy depletion, inhibition of metabolic enzyme activity, growth arrest and ethanol productivity losses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of the yeast responses to acetic acid stress is essential for improving acetic acid tolerance and ethanol production. Although 329 genes associated with acetic acid tolerance have been identified in the Saccharomyces genome and included in the database ( http://www.yeastgenome.org/observable/resistance_to_acetic_acid/overview ), the cellular mechanistic responses to acetic acid remain unclear in this organism. Post-genomic approaches such as transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and chemogenomics are being applied to yeast and are providing insight into the mechanisms and interactions of genes, proteins and other components that together determine complex quantitative phenotypic traits such as acetic acid tolerance. This review focuses on these omics approaches in the response to acetic acid in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, several novel strains with improved acetic acid tolerance have been engineered by modifying key genes, and the application of these strains and recently acquired knowledge to industrial processes is also discussed.

  19. Acetic Acid Bacteria as Symbionts of Insects

    KAUST Repository

    Crotti, Elena

    2016-06-14

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are being increasingly described as associating with different insect species that rely on sugar-based diets. AAB have been found in several insect orders, among them Diptera, Hemiptera, and Hymenoptera, including several vectors of plant, animal, and human diseases. AAB have been shown to associate with the epithelia of different organs of the host, they are able to move within the insect’s body and to be transmitted horizontally and vertically. Here, we review the ecology of AAB and examine their relationships with different insect models including mosquitoes, leafhoppers, and honey bees. We also discuss the potential use of AAB in symbiont-based control strategies, such as “Trojan-horse” agents, to block the transmission of vector-borne diseases.

  20. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  1. Viscometric study of chitosan solutions in acetic acid/sodium acetate and acetic acid/sodium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cristiane N; Teixeira, Viviane G; Delpech, Marcia C; Souza, Josefa Virginia S; Costa, Marcos A S

    2015-11-20

    A viscometric study was carried out at 25°C to assess the physical-chemical behavior in solution and the mean viscometric molar mass (M¯v) of chitosan solutions with different deacetylation degrees, in two solvent mixtures: medium 1-acetic acid 0.3mol/L and sodium acetate 0.2mol/L; and medium 2-acetic acid 0.1mol/L and sodium chloride 0.2mol/L. Different equations were employed, by graphical extrapolation, to calculate the intrinsic viscosities [η] and the viscometric constants, to reveal the solvent's quality: Huggins (H), Kraemer (K) and Schulz-Blaschke (SB). For single-point determination, the equations used were SB, Solomon-Ciuta (SC) and Deb-Chanterjee (DC), resulting in a faster form of analysis. The values of ̄M¯v were calculated by applying the equation of Mark-Houwink-Sakurada. The SB and SC equations were most suitable for single-point determination of [η] and ̄M¯v and the Schulz-Blachke constant (kSB), equal to 0.28, already utilized for various systems, can also be employed to analyze chitosan solutions under the conditions studied. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Biological Function of Acetic Acid-Improvement in Obesity and Glucose Tolerance by Acetic Acid in Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-07-29

    Fatty acids derived from adipose tissue are oxidized by β-oxidation to form ketone bodies as final products under the starving condition. Previously, we found that free acetic acid was formed concomitantly with the production of ketone bodies in isolated rat liver perfusion, and mitochondrial acetyl CoA hydrolase was appeared to be involved with the acetic acid production. It was revealed that acetic acid was formed as a final product of enhanced β-oxidation of fatty acids and utilized as a fuel in extrahepatic tissues under the starving condition. Under the fed condition, β-oxidation is suppressed and acetic acid production is decreased. When acetic acid was taken daily by obesity-linked type 2 diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats under the fed condition, it protected OLETF rats against obesity. Furthermore, acetic acid contributed to protect from the accumulation of lipid in the liver as well as abdominal fat in OLETF rats. Transcripts of lipogenic genes in the liver were decreased, while transcripts of myoglobin and Glut4 genes in abdominal muscles were increased in the acetic acid-administered OLETF rats. It is indicated that exogenously administered acetic acid would have effects on lipid metabolism in both the liver and the skeletal muscles, and have function that works against obesity and obesity-linked type 2 diabetes.

  3. Effects of culture conditions on acetic acid production by bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-11-30

    Nov 30, 2015 ... and 0.6-2.9 % (Ho et al., 2014) respectively for citric, acetic and lactic acids. Consequently, this suggested that such conditions might prevent the production of acetic acid by these isolates during cocoa fermentation assay since Soumahoro et al. (2015) found in previous study incapacity of all tested strains ...

  4. Fermentation of lignocellulosic sugars to acetic acid by Moorella thermoacetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsanipour, Mandana; Suko, Azra Vajzovic; Bura, Renata

    2016-06-01

    A systematic study of bioconversion of lignocellulosic sugars to acetic acid by Moorella thermoacetica (strain ATCC 39073) was conducted. Four different water-soluble fractions (hydrolysates) obtained after steam pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass were selected and fermented to acetic acid in batch fermentations. M. thermoacetica can effectively ferment xylose and glucose in hydrolysates from wheat straw, forest residues, switchgrass, and sugarcane straw to acetic acid. Xylose and glucose were completely utilized, with xylose being consumed first. M. thermoacetica consumed up to 62 % of arabinose, 49 % galactose and 66 % of mannose within 72 h of fermentation in the mixture of lignocellulosic sugars. The highest acetic acid yield was obtained from sugarcane straw hydrolysate, with 71 % of theoretical yield based on total sugars (17 g/L acetic acid from 24 g/L total sugars). The lowest acetic acid yield was observed in forest residues hydrolysate, with 39 % of theoretical yield based on total sugars (18 g/L acetic acid from 49 g/L total sugars). Process derived compounds from steam explosion pretreatment, including 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (0.4 g/L), furfural (0.1 g/L) and total phenolics (3 g/L), did not inhibit microbial growth and acetic acid production yield. This research identified two major factors that adversely affected acetic acid yield in all hydrolysates, especially in forest residues: (i) glucose to xylose ratio and (ii) incomplete consumption of arabinose, galactose and mannose. For efficient bioconversion of lignocellulosic sugars to acetic acid, it is imperative to have an appropriate balance of sugars in a hydrolysate. Hence, the choice of lignocellulosic biomass and steam pretreatment design are fundamental steps for the industrial application of this process.

  5. Measurement of the rates of oxindole-3-acetic acid turnover, and indole-3-acetic acid oxidation in Zea mays seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    Oxindole-3-acetic acid is the principal catabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Zea mays seedlings. In this paper measurements of the turnover of oxindole-3-acetic acid are presented and used to calculate the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation. [3H]Oxindole-3-acetic acid was applied to the endosperm of Zea mays seedlings and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h before the start of the experiment. The subsequent decrease in its specific activity was used to calculate the turnover rate. The average half-life of oxindole-3-acetic acid in the shoots was found to be 30 h while that in the kernels had an average half-life of 35h. Using previously published values of the pool sizes of oxindole-3-acetic acid in shoots and kernels from seedlings of the same age and variety, and grown under the same conditions, the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation was calculated to be 1.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the shoots and 7.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the kernels.

  6. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid and oxindole-3-acetic acid to 2,3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-1H indole-3-acetic acid-7'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside in Zea mays seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Radiolabeled oxindole-3-acetic acid was metabolized by roots, shoots, and caryopses of dark grown Zea mays seedlings to 2,3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-1H indole-3-acetic acid-7'-O-beta-D-glycopyranoside with the simpler name of 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside. This compound was also formed from labeled indole-3-acetic acid supplied to intact seedlings and root segments. The glucoside of 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid was also isolated as an endogenous compound in the caryopses and shoots of 4-day-old seedlings. It accumulates to a level of 4.8 nanomoles per plant in the kernel, more than 10 times the amount of oxindole-3-acetic acid. In the shoot it is present at levels comparable to that of oxindole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetic acid (62 picomoles per shoot). We conclude that 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside is a natural metabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Z. mays seedlings. From the data presented in this paper and in previous work, we propose the following route as the principal catabolic pathway for indole-3-acetic acid in Zea seedlings: Indole-3-acetic acid --> Oxindole-3-acetic acid --> 7-Hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid --> 7-Hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside.

  7. Effect of citric acid and acetic acid on the performance of broilers

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, M. Z.; Khandaker, Z.H; Chowdhury, S D; Islam, K.M.S

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was conducted with commercial broilers to investigate the effects of feeding citric acid, acetic acid and their combination on their performance and to determine the economic competence of using citric acid and acetic acid in broiler rations. A total number of 108 one day old straight run broiler chicks were distributed to four dietary treatments i.e. 0 % citric or acetic acid (A) , 0.5% citric acid (B), 0.5% acetic acid (C) and their combinations 0.5% citric acid and 0.5% aceti...

  8. Correlation of vapor - liquid equilibrium data for acetic acid - isopropanol - water - isopropyl acetate mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Mandagarán

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A correlation procedure for the prediction of vapor - liquid equilibrium of acetic acid - isopropanol - water - isopropyl acetate mixtures has been developed. It is based on the NRTL model for predicting liquid activity coefficients, and on the Hayden-O'Connell second virial coefficients for predicting the vapor phase of systems containing association components. When compared with experimental data the correlation shows a good agreement for binary and ternary data. The correlation also shows good prediction for reactive quaternary data.

  9. Effects of acetic, propionic and butyric acids given intraruminally at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of acetic, propionic and butyric acids given intraruminally at different molar proportions or individually on rumen papillae growth and IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in plasma, liver and rumen tissue in growing sheep nourished by total intragastric infusions.

  10. Alcohols enhance the rate of acetic acid diffusion in S. cerevisiae: biophysical mechanisms and implications for acetic acid tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Lindahl

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbial cell factories with the ability to maintain high productivity in the presence of weak organic acids, such as acetic acid, are required in many industrial processes. For example, fermentation media derived from lignocellulosic biomass are rich in acetic acid and other weak acids. The rate of diffusional entry of acetic acid is one parameter determining the ability of microorganisms to tolerance the acid. The present study demonstrates that the rate of acetic acid diffusion in S. cerevisiae is strongly affected by the alcohols ethanol and n-butanol. Ethanol of 40 g/L and n-butanol of 8 g/L both caused a 65% increase in the rate of acetic acid diffusion, and higher alcohol concentrations caused even greater increases. Molecular dynamics simulations of membrane dynamics in the presence of alcohols demonstrated that the partitioning of alcohols to the head group region of the lipid bilayer causes a considerable increase in the membrane area, together with reduced membrane thickness and lipid order. These changes in physiochemical membrane properties lead to an increased number of water molecules in the membrane interior, providing biophysical mechanisms for the alcohol-induced increase in acetic acid diffusion rate. n-butanol affected S. cerevisiae and the cell membrane properties at lower concentrations than ethanol, due to greater and deeper partitioning in the membrane. This study demonstrates that the rate of acetic acid diffusion can be strongly affected by compounds that partition into the cell membrane, and highlights the need for considering interaction effects between compounds in the design of microbial processes.

  11. Alcohols enhance the rate of acetic acid diffusion inS. cerevisiae: biophysical mechanisms and implications for acetic acid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Lina; Genheden, Samuel; Faria-Oliveira, Fábio; Allard, Stefan; Eriksson, Leif A; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2017-12-01

    Microbial cell factories with the ability to maintain high productivity in the presence of weak organic acids, such as acetic acid, are required in many industrial processes. For example, fermentation media derived from lignocellulosic biomass are rich in acetic acid and other weak acids. The rate of diffusional entry of acetic acid is one parameter determining the ability of microorganisms to tolerance the acid. The present study demonstrates that the rate of acetic acid diffusion in S. cerevisiae is strongly affected by the alcohols ethanol and n-butanol. Ethanol of 40 g/L and n-butanol of 8 g/L both caused a 65% increase in the rate of acetic acid diffusion, and higher alcohol concentrations caused even greater increases. Molecular dynamics simulations of membrane dynamics in the presence of alcohols demonstrated that the partitioning of alcohols to the head group region of the lipid bilayer causes a considerable increase in the membrane area, together with reduced membrane thickness and lipid order. These changes in physiochemical membrane properties lead to an increased number of water molecules in the membrane interior, providing biophysical mechanisms for the alcohol-induced increase in acetic acid diffusion rate. n-butanol affected S. cerevisiae and the cell membrane properties at lower concentrations than ethanol, due to greater and deeper partitioning in the membrane. This study demonstrates that the rate of acetic acid diffusion can be strongly affected by compounds that partition into the cell membrane, and highlights the need for considering interaction effects between compounds in the design of microbial processes.

  12. Tetrazole acetic acid: Tautomers, conformers, and isomerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo-Andrade, C. [Unidad Académica de Física de la Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas (Mexico); Department of Chemistry, University of Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal); Reva, I., E-mail: reva@qui.uc.pt; Fausto, R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-02-14

    Monomers of (tetrazol-5-yl)-acetic acid (TAA) were obtained by sublimation of the crystalline compound and the resulting vapors were isolated in cryogenic nitrogen matrices at 13 K. The conformational and tautomeric composition of TAA in the matrix was characterized by infrared spectroscopy and vibrational calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. TAA may adopt two tautomeric modifications, 1H- and 2H-, depending on the position of the annular hydrogen atom. Two-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of TAA were theoretically calculated at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level, for each tautomer. Four and six symmetry-unique minima were located on these PESs, for 1H- and 2H-TAA, respectively. The energetics of the detected minima was subsequently refined by calculations at the QCISD level. Two 1H- and three 2H-conformers fall within the 0–8 kJ mol{sup −1} energy range and should be appreciably populated at the sublimation temperature (∼330 K). Observation of only one conformer for each tautomer (1ccc and 2pcc) is explained in terms of calculated barriers to conformational rearrangements. All conformers with the cis O=COH moiety are separated by low barriers (less than 10 kJ mol{sup −1}) and collapse to the most stable 1ccc (1H-) and 2pcc (2H-) forms during deposition of the matrix. On the trans O=COH surfaces, the relative energies are very high (between 12 and 27 kJ mol{sup −1}). The trans forms are not thermally populated at the sublimation conditions and were not detected in matrices. One high-energy form in each tautomer, 1cct (1H-) and 2pct (2H-), was found to differ from the most stable form only by rotation of the OH group and separated from other forms by high barriers. This opened a perspective for their stabilization in a matrix. 1cct and 2pct were generated in the matrices selectively by means of narrow-band near-infrared (NIR) irradiations of the samples at 6920 and 6937 cm{sup −1}, where the first OH stretching overtone

  13. Synthesis of imidazol-1-yl-acetic acid hydrochloride: A key intermediate for zoledronic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A convenient and practical synthesis of imidazol-1-yl-acetic acid hydrochloride was achieved via N-alkylation of imidazole using tert-butyl chloroacetate followed by a non-aqueous ester cleavage of the resulting imidazol-1-yl-acetic acid tert-butyl ester in the presence of titanium tetrachloride. The synthesized imidazol-1-yl-acetic acid hydrochloride was then utilized to prepare zoledronic acid.

  14. 21 CFR 862.1390 - 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system... Test Systems § 862.1390 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system. (a) Identification. A 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system is a device intended to measure 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid...

  15. Page 1 Acetylation of Phenols Using Acetic Acid 351 Resorcinol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and 12g of glacial acetic acid, only 15g. of diacetyl resorcinol, boiling at. 278° C., was obtained. Since there was the chance for mono-acetylation also to take place, the alkaline extract from the ethereal Solution containing the reaction products was diluted with water to 200 c.c., acidified with hydrochloric acid and then.

  16. Effects of culture conditions on acetic acid production by bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study investigates the acidification capacity under various culture conditions of high acetic acid producer AAB strains previously isolated from Ivoirian cocoa beans fermentation. Methodology and Results: Effect of culture conditions was studied in agar medium and acid production was monitored by ...

  17. Selenium dioxide catalysed oxidation of acetic acid hydrazide by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Selenium dioxide catalysed acetic acid hydrazide oxidation by bromate was studied in hydrochloric acid medium. The order in oxidant concentration, substrate and catalyst were found to be unity. Increasing hydrogen ion concentration increases the rate of the reaction due to protonation equilibria of the oxidant.

  18. π Hydrogen bonded complexes of Acetic acid and Trifluoroacetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Matrix isolation infrared spectra of O-H···π Hydrogen bonded complexes of Acetic acid and Trifluoroacetic acid with Benzene. PUJARINI BANERJEE, INDRANI BHATTACHARYA and TAPAS CHAKRABORTY. ∗. Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata 700 032, India.

  19. Analysis of some functional properties of acetic acid bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-03-31

    Mar 31, 2014 ... ABSTRACT. Objective: To investigate some functional properties of acetic acid bacteria (AAB), involved in Côte d'Ivoire ... Functional properties such as acid production, thermotolerance, resistance to alcoholic stress carbon metabolism and .... was carried out in HS broth medium containing 0.05 % glucose ...

  20. Acetic acid removal from corn stover hydrolysate using ethyl acetate and the impact on Saccharomyces cerevisiae bioethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh, Mahdieh; Ladisch, Michael R; Engelberth, Abigail S

    2016-07-08

    Acetic acid is introduced into cellulose conversion processes as a consequence of composition of lignocellulose feedstocks, causing significant inhibition of adapted, genetically modified and wild-type S. cerevisiae in bioethanol fermentation. While adaptation or modification of yeast may reduce inhibition, the most effective approach is to remove the acetic acid prior to fermentation. This work addresses liquid-liquid extraction of acetic acid from biomass hydrolysate through a pathway that mitigates acetic acid inhibition while avoiding the negative effects of the extractant, which itself may exhibit inhibition. Candidate solvents were selected using simulation results from Aspen Plus™, based on their ability to extract acetic acid which was confirmed by experimentation. All solvents showed varying degrees of toxicity toward yeast, but the relative volatility of ethyl acetate enabled its use as simple vacuum evaporation could reduce small concentrations of aqueous ethyl acetate to minimally inhibitory levels. The toxicity threshold of ethyl acetate, in the presence of acetic acid, was found to be 10 g L(-1) . The fermentation was enhanced by extracting 90% of the acetic acid using ethyl acetate, followed by vacuum evaporation to remove 88% removal of residual ethyl acetate along with 10% of the broth. NRRL Y-1546 yeast was used to demonstrate a 13% increase in concentration, 14% in ethanol specific production rate, and 11% ethanol yield. This study demonstrated that extraction of acetic acid with ethyl acetate followed by evaporative removal of ethyl acetate from the raffinate phase has potential to significantly enhance ethanol fermentation in a corn stover bioethanol facility. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:929-937, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  1. Study on the Reduction of Acetic Acid from Cabinets for Microfilms

    OpenAIRE

    佐野, 千絵; 古田嶋, 智子; 井上, さやか; 津田, 徹英; 呂, 俊民

    2012-01-01

    Concentration of acetic acid in cabinets, film storage and adjacent room were measured. Two cabinets were filled with acetic acid generated from aged microfilms. Absorbents were placed in one of the cabinets to remove acetic acid. It was confirmed thatconcentration of acetic acid decreased one week after setting the absorbents. Concentration in the other cabinet in which acetic-acid-absorbents were not placed remained high. From this result, it may be said that the absorbents were effective i...

  2. Crystal structure of febuxostat–acetic acid (1/1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound [systematic name: 2-(3-cyano-4-isobutyloxyphenyl-4-methylthiazole-5-carboxylic acid–acetic acid (1/1], C16H16N2O3S·CH3COOH, contains a febuxostat molecule and an acetic acid molecule. In the febuxostat molecule, the thiazole ring is nearly coplanar with the benzene ring [dihedral angle = 3.24 (2°]. In the crystal, the febuxostat and acetic acid molecules are linked by O—H...O, O—H...N hydrogen bonds and weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming supramolecular chains propagating along the b-axis direction. π–π stacking is observed between nearly parallel thiazole and benzene rings of adjacent molecules; the centroid-to-centroid distances are 3.8064 (17 and 3.9296 (17 Å.

  3. Catabolism of indole-3-acetic acid and 4- and 5-chloroindole-3-acetic acid in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Egsgaard, H; Van Onckelen, H

    1995-01-01

    Some strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum have the ability to catabolize indole-3-acetic acid. Indoleacetic acid (IAA), 4-chloro-IAA (4-Cl-IAA), and 5-Cl-IAA were metabolized to different extents by strains 61A24 and 110. Metabolites were isolated and analyzed by high-performance liquid...... chromatography and conventional mass spectrometry (MS) methods, including MS-mass spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, and high-performance liquid chromatography-MS. The identified products indicate a novel metabolic pathway in which IAA is metabolized via dioxindole-3-acetic acid, dioxindole, isatin, and 2......-aminophenyl glyoxylic acid (isatinic acid) to anthranilic acid, which is further metabolized. Degradation of 4-Cl-IAA apparently stops at the 4-Cl-dioxindole step in contrast to 5-Cl-IAA which is metabolized to 5-Cl-anthranilic acid. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Oct...

  4. Indole-3-acetic acid and gibberellic acid production in Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    BİLKAY, Işıl SEYİS; KARAKOÇ, Şafak; AKSÖZ, Nilüfer

    2010-01-01

    The effects of incubation time, temperature, pH, and agitation on indole-3- acetic acid and gibberellic acid production in Aspergillus niger were studied. For indole-3-acetic acid production, 6 days of incubation at 25 °C and pH 6.0 was found to be optimum. Optimum conditions for gibberellic acid production were 12 days of incubation at 30 °C and pH 5.0. Agitation increased both indole-3-acetic acid and gibberellic acid production.

  5. Highly Concentrated Acetic Acid Poisoning: 400 Cases Reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Brusin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caustic substance ingestion is known for causing a wide array of gastrointestinal and systemic complications. In Russia, ingestion of acetic acid is a major problem which annually affects 11.2 per 100,000 individuals. The objective of this study was to report and analyze main complications and outcomes of patients with 70% concentrated acetic acid poisoning. Methods: This was a retrospective study of patients with acetic acid ingestion who were treated at Sverdlovsk Regional Poisoning Treatment Center during 2006 to 2012. GI mucosal injury of each patient was assessed with endoscopy according to Zargar’s scale. Data analysis was performed to analyze the predictors of stricture formation and mortality. Results: A total of 400 patients with median age of 47 yr were included. GI injury grade I was found in 66 cases (16.5%, IIa in 117 (29.3%, IIb in 120 (30%, IIIa in 27 (16.7% and IIIb in 70 (17.5%. 11% of patients developed strictures and overall mortality rate was 21%. Main complications were hemolysis (55%, renal injury (35%, pneumonia (27% and bleeding during the first 3 days (27%. Predictors of mortality were age 60 to 79 years, grade IIIa and IIIb of GI injury, pneumonia, stages “I”, “F” and “L” of kidney damage according to the RIFLE scale and administration of prednisolone. Predictors of stricture formation were ingestion of over 100 mL of acetic acid and grade IIb and IIIa of GI injury. Conclusion: Highly concentrated acetic acid is still frequently ingested in Russia with a high mortality rate. Patients with higher grades of GI injury, pneumonia, renal injury and higher amount of acid ingested should be more carefully monitored as they are more susceptible to develop fatal consequences.          

  6. Condensation of acetol and acetic acid vapor with sprayed liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cellulose-derived fraction of biomass pyrolysis vapor was simulated by evaporating acetol and acetic acid (AA) from flasks on a hot plate. The liquid in the flasks was infused with heated nitrogen. The vapor/nitrogen stream was superheated in a tube oven and condensed by contact with a cloud of ...

  7. Effects of culture conditions on acetic acid production by bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-11-30

    Nov 30, 2015 ... 2001). Therefore, activities of AAB during cocoa fermentation are essential for the production of high-quality cocoa (Quesnel, 1965). On the other hand, cocoa fermentation remains difficult to .... Afoakwa et al., 2013 ; Ardhana and Fleet, 2003; Guehi et al., 2010). On the other hand, acetic acid bacteria.

  8. Gastroprotective Properties of Manganese Chloride on Acetic Acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    3 days after laparotomy of which chronic gastric ulcer was induced using acetic acid. On days 7 and 14, gastric ... that Manganese had dose and treatment duration dependent effect on healing of ulcerated stomach. Ulcer index in Manganese ... laboratory condition of room temperature (23 ±2oC), humidity (55 ± 15%) with ...

  9. Cryotherapy Following Visual Inspection with Acetic Acid and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer can be prevented and mortality/morbidity reduced by early detection and referral. Developing countries are likely to benefit from more cost effective methods of screening and treatment. Visual inspection with acetic acid and Lugol`s iodine (VIA/VILI) offers a see and treat solution thus an ...

  10. Characterization of indole acetic acid endophyte producers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work contributes to the knowledge of the phytobacteria diversity in aquatic plants, particularly in Lemnaceae species; here the majority of the isolates have been characterized as higher indole acetic acid producers, recommended as candidates for their use as biofertilizers. Key words: Plant growth-promoting bacteria, ...

  11. Analysis of some functional properties of acetic acid bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate some functional properties of acetic acid bacteria (AAB), involved in Côte d'Ivoire cocoa fermentation. Methods and results: Six day heap fermentation on banana leaves was conducted at farm level and AAB growth was monitored during this process at 24 h interval by numeration on plate agar.

  12. Effects of acetic, propionic and butyric acids given intraruminally at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-19

    Apr 19, 2010 ... gluconeogenesis (Bergman, 1990). However, the contri- bution of propionate to blood glucose via gluconeogenesis could probably be covered by the glucose infused into the abomasum. Effects of acetic, propionic and butyric acids given individually on rumen papillae size, and IGF-I, IGFBP-. 3, GH and ...

  13. Occurrence and metabolism of 7-hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid in Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewer, P.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    7-Hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid was identified as a catabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in germinating kernels of Zea mays and found to be present in amounts of ca 3.1 nmol/kernel. 7-Hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid was shown to be a biosynthetic intermediate between 2-indolinone-3-acetic acid and 7-hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid-7'-O-glucoside in both kernels and roots of Zea mays. Further metabolism of 7-hydroxy-2-[5-3H]-indolinone-3-acetic acid-7'-O-glucoside occurred to yield tritiated water plus, as yet, uncharacterized products.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of rhodanine-3-acetic acid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krátký, Martin; Vinšová, Jarmila; Stolaříková, Jiřina

    2017-03-15

    Twenty-four 2-(4-oxo-2-thioxothiazolidin-3-yl)acetic acid (rhodanine-3-acetic acid)-based amides, esters and 5-arylalkylidene derivatives were synthesized, characterized and evaluated as potential antimicrobial agents against a panel of bacteria, mycobacteria and fungi. All of the derivatives were active against mycobacteria. N-(4-Chlorophenyl)-2-[5-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-4-oxo-2-thioxothiazolidin-3-yl]acetamide demonstrated the highest activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 8-16μM. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria were the most susceptible to 2-[5-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-4-oxo-2-thioxothiazolidin-3-yl]acetic acids (MIC values ⩾32μM). The highest antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus exhibited 4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl 2-(4-oxo-2-thioxothiazolidin-3-yl)acetate (MIC⩾15.62μM). Several structure-activity relationships were identified. The activity against Gram-negative and fungal pathogens was marginal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Distinct Effects of Sorbic Acid and Acetic Acid on the Electrophysiology and Metabolism of Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, J.W.A.; Teixeira De Mattos, M.J.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; Brul, S.

    2014-01-01

    Sorbic acid and acetic acid are among the weak organic acid preservatives most commonly used to improve the microbiological stability of foods. They have similar pKa values, but sorbic acid is a far more potent preservative. Weak organic acids are most effective at low pH. Under these circumstances,

  16. [Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinder, S.H.

    1993-01-01

    The primary goal of this project is to obtain a better understanding of thermophilic microorganisms which convert acetic acid to CH[sub 4]. The previous funding period represents a departure from earlier research in this laboratory, which was more physiological and ecological. The present work is centered on the biochemistry of the thermophile Methanothrix sp. strain CALS-1. this organism presents a unique opportunity, with its purity and relatively rapid growth, to do comparative biochemical studies with the other major acetotrophic genus Methanosarcina. We previously found that Methanothrix is capable of using acetate at concentrations 100 fold lower than Methanosarcina. This finding suggests that there are significant differences in the pathways of methanogenesis from acetate in the two genera.

  17. Liquid-Liquid equilibria of the water-acetic acid-butyl acetate system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ince E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental liquid-liquid equilibria of the water-acetic acid-butyl acetate system were studied at temperatures of 298.15± 0.20, 303.15± 0.20 and 308.15± 0.20 K. Complete phase diagrams were obtained by determining solubility and tie-line data. The reliability of the experimental tie-line data was ascertained by using the Othmer and Tobias correlation. The UNIFAC group contribution method was used to predict the observed ternary liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE data. It was found that UNIFAC group interaction parameters used for LLE did not provide a good prediction. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated for the immiscibility region.

  18. Protection of historical lead against acetic acid vapour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pecenová Z.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Historical lead artefacts (small figurines, appliques, bull (metal seal can be stored in depository and archives in inconvenient storage conditions. The wooden show-case or paper packagings release volatile organic compound to the air during their degradation. These acids, mainly acetic acid are very corrosive for lead. The thin layer of corrosion products which slows atmospheric corrosion is formed on lead surface in atmospheric condition. In presence of acetic acid vapour the voluminous corrosion products are formed and fall off the surface. These corrosion products do not have any protection ability. The lead could be protected against acid environment by layer of “metal soup” which is formed on surface after immersion in solution of salt of carboxylic acid for 24 hours. The solutions of acids (with vary long of carbon chain and their salts are examined. Longer carbon chain provides better efficiency convers layer. The disadvantages are low solubility of carboxylic acids in water and bad abrasion resistance of formed layer.

  19. Isolation, characterization and optimization of indigenous acetic acid bacteria and evaluation of their preservation methods

    OpenAIRE

    Sharafi, SM; Rasooli, I; Beheshti-Maal, K

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are useful in industrial production of vinegar. The present study aims at isolation and identification of acetic acid bacteria with characterization, optimization, and evaluation of their acetic acid productivity. Materials and Methods Samples from various fruits were screened for presence of acetic acid bacteria on glucose, yeast extract, calcium carbonate (GYC) medium. Carr medium supplemented with bromocresol green was used for distingui...

  20. Aqueous-Phase Acetic Acid Ketonization over Monoclinic Zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Qiuxia [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest; College; Lopez-Ruiz, Juan A. [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest; Cooper, Alan R. [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest; Wang, Jian-guo [College; Albrecht, Karl O. [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest; Mei, Donghai [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest

    2017-12-13

    The effect of aqueous phase on the acetic acid ketonization over monoclinic zirconia has been investigated using first-principles based density functional theory (DFT) calculations. To capture the aqueous phase chemistry over the solid zirconia catalyst surface, the aqueous phase is represented by 111 explicit water molecules with a liquid water density of 0.93 g/cm3 and the monoclinic zirconia is modeled by the most stable surface structure . The dynamic nature of aqueous phase/ interface was studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation, indicating that nearly half of the surface Zr sites are occupied by either adsorbed water molecules or hydroxyl groups at 550 K. DFT calculations show that the adsorption process of acetic acid from the liquid water phase to the surface is nearly thermodynamically neutral with a Gibbs free energy of -2.3 kJ/mol although the adsorption strength of acetic acid on the surface in aqueous phase is much stronger than in vapor phase. Therefore it is expected that the adsorption of acetic acid will dramatically affects aqueous phase ketonization reactivity over the monoclinic zirconia catalyst. Using the same ketonization mechanism via the β-keto acid intermediate, we have compared acetic acid ketonization to acetone in both vapor and aqueous phases. Our DFT calculation results show although the rate-determining step of the β-keto acid formation via the C-C coupling is not pronouncedly affected, the presence of liquid water molecules will dramatically affect dehydrogenation and hydrogenation steps via proton transfer mechanism. This work was financially supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE)’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute. Computing time and advanced catalyst characterization use was granted by a user proposal at the William R. Wiley

  1. Acetic acid pretreatment improves the hardness of cooked potato slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenlin; Shehzad, Hussain; Yan, Shoulei; Li, Jie; Wang, Qingzhang

    2017-08-01

    The effects of acetic acid pretreatment on the texture of cooked potato slices were investigated in this work. Potato slices were pretreated with acetic acid immersion (AAI), distilled water immersion (DWI), or no immersion (NI). Subsequently, the cell wall material of the pretreated samples was isolated and fractioned to evaluate changes in the monosaccharide content and molar mass (MM), and the hardness and microscopic structure of the potato slices in different pretreatments before and after cooking were determined. The results showed that the highest firmness was obtained with more intact structure of the cell wall for cooked potato slices with AAI pretreatment. Furthermore, the MM and sugar ratio demonstrated that the AAI pretreated potato slices contained a higher content of the small molecular polysaccharides of cell walls, especially in the hemicellulose fraction. This work may provide a reference for potato processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional analysis of the acetic acid resistance (aar) gene cluster in Acetobacter aceti strain 1023

    OpenAIRE

    Mullins, Elwood; Kappock, T. Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Vinegar production requires acetic acid bacteria that produce, tolerate, and conserve high levels of acetic acid. When ethanol is depleted, aerobic acetate overoxidation to carbon dioxide ensues. The resulting diauxic growth pattern has two logarithmic growth phases, the first associated with ethanol oxidation and the second associated with acetate overoxidation. The vinegar factory isolate Acetobacter aceti strain 1023 has a long intermediate stationary phase that persists at elevated acetic...

  3. Effects of benzylaminopurine and naphthalene acetic acid on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the pineapple regeneration and shoot growth as affected by 6- benzylaminopurine (BAP) at 2.0 mg/l and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) at 0.2 mg/l in vitro. BAP and NAA at the concentration of 2.0 and 0.2 mg/l were used in this study. BAP at 2.0 mg/l significantly affected the production ...

  4. 75 FR 52269 - Acetic Acid Ethenyl Ester, Polymer With Oxirane; Tolerance Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ...-2010-0429; FRL-8841-2] Acetic Acid Ethenyl Ester, Polymer With Oxirane; Tolerance Exemption AGENCY... from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of acetic acid ethenyl ester, polymer with oxirane... permissible level for residues of acetic acid ethenyl ester, polymer with oxirane on food or feed commodities...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1258 - Acetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acetic acid; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1258 Acetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An... acetic acid when used as a preservative on post-harvest agricultural commodities intended for animal feed...

  6. Cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid and betulinic acid acetate isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... Key words: Betulinic acid, HL 60, cytotoxicity, MTT assay, DNA laddering, Cell cycle PI. INTRODUCTION. Betulinic acid ... Chemical structure of betulinic acid and its derivatives. (Fulda et al., 1999) and leukemia cells ... feature makes betulinic acid unique in comparison to compounds that are currently used ...

  7. Indole-3-acetic acid in plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duca, Daiana; Lorv, Janet; Patten, Cheryl L; Rose, David; Glick, Bernard R

    2014-07-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is an important phytohormone with the capacity to control plant development in both beneficial and deleterious ways. The ability to synthesize IAA is an attribute that many bacteria including both plant growth-promoters and phytopathogens possess. There are three main pathways through which IAA is synthesized; the indole-3-pyruvic acid, indole-3-acetamide and indole-3-acetonitrile pathways. This chapter reviews the factors that effect the production of this phytohormone, the role of IAA in bacterial physiology and in plant-microbe interactions including phytostimulation and phytopathogenesis.

  8. Distinct Effects of Sorbic Acid and Acetic Acid on the Electrophysiology and Metabolism of Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    van Beilen, J. W. A.; Teixeira de Mattos, M. J.; Hellingwerf, K. J.; Brul, S.

    2014-01-01

    Sorbic acid and acetic acid are among the weak organic acid preservatives most commonly used to improve the microbiological stability of foods. They have similar pKa values, but sorbic acid is a far more potent preservative. Weak organic acids are most effective at low pH. Under these circumstances, they are assumed to diffuse across the membrane as neutral undissociated acids. We show here that the level of initial intracellular acidification depends on the concentration of undissociated aci...

  9. Change in the plasmid copy number in acetic acid bacteria in response to growth phase and acetic acid concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, Naoki; Astuti, Wiwik; Ishii, Yuri; Hidese, Ryota; Sakoda, Hisao; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2015-06-01

    Plasmids pGE1 (2.5 kb), pGE2 (7.2 kb), and pGE3 (5.5 kb) were isolated from Gluconacetobacter europaeus KGMA0119, and sequence analyses revealed they harbored 3, 8, and 4 genes, respectively. Plasmid copy numbers (PCNs) were determined by real-time quantitative PCR at different stages of bacterial growth. When KGMA0119 was cultured in medium containing 0.4% ethanol and 0.5% acetic acid, PCN of pGE1 increased from 7 copies/genome in the logarithmic phase to a maximum of 12 copies/genome at the beginning of the stationary phase, before decreasing to 4 copies/genome in the late stationary phase. PCNs for pGE2 and pGE3 were maintained at 1-3 copies/genome during all phases of growth. Under a higher concentration of ethanol (3.2%) the PCN for pGE1 was slightly lower in all the growth stages, and those of pGE2 and pGE3 were unchanged. In the presence of 1.0% acetic acid, PCNs were higher for pGE1 (10 copies/genome) and pGE3 (6 copies/genome) during the logarithmic phase. Numbers for pGE2 did not change, indicating that pGE1 and pGE3 increase their PCNs in response to acetic acid. Plasmids pBE2 and pBE3 were constructed by ligating linearized pGE2 and pGE3 into pBR322. Both plasmids were replicable in Escherichia coli, Acetobacter pasteurianus and G. europaeus, highlighting their suitability as vectors for acetic acid bacteria. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Spectroscopic study of jet-cooled heterodimers of salicylic acid with acetic and trifluoroacetic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmani, F.; Zehnacker-Rentien, A.

    1997-06-01

    The photophysical properties of the intermolecular hydrogen-bonded complexes of salicylic acid with acetic acid and trifluoroacetic acid have been investigated in a supersonic expansion. The fluorescence excitation spectra are characterized by a long harmonic progression upon a low frequency mode and their origin is blue-shifted with respect to that of pure salicylic acid. The emission spectra exhibit a single broad band peaking at 360 and 390 nm respectively for the complex with trifluoroacetic and acetic acids and are not dependent on the excitation wavelength. The results have been rationalized in terms of a single minimum energy curve in both the ground and excited states.

  11. Distinct effects of sorbic acid and acetic acid on the electrophysiology and metabolism of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beilen, J W A; Teixeira de Mattos, M J; Hellingwerf, K J; Brul, S

    2014-10-01

    Sorbic acid and acetic acid are among the weak organic acid preservatives most commonly used to improve the microbiological stability of foods. They have similar pKa values, but sorbic acid is a far more potent preservative. Weak organic acids are most effective at low pH. Under these circumstances, they are assumed to diffuse across the membrane as neutral undissociated acids. We show here that the level of initial intracellular acidification depends on the concentration of undissociated acid and less on the nature of the acid. Recovery of the internal pH depends on the presence of an energy source, but acidification of the cytosol causes a decrease in glucose flux. Furthermore, sorbic acid is a more potent uncoupler of the membrane potential than acetic acid. Together these effects may also slow the rate of ATP synthesis significantly and may thus (partially) explain sorbic acid's effectiveness. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Separation of Acetic Acid from Aqueous Solution using Various Organic Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Zaved Hossain Khan

    2014-01-01

    In the study a model has been developed to separate the acetic acid from aqueous solution by liquid-liquid extraction and find out the proper solvent for this separation. Various solvents such as n-butanol, iso butanol, amyl alcohol and ethyl acetate are used for separation of acetic acid from water. The binodal curves (mutual solubility curves) for acetic acid distributed between water and an organic solvent were obtained by titrating known mixtures of two components (water and solvents) wit...

  13. Acetic Acid Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Induces the Unfolded Protein Response inSaccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazoe, Nozomi; Kimata, Yukio; Izawa, Shingo

    2017-01-01

    Since acetic acid inhibits the growth and fermentation ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae , it is one of the practical hindrances to the efficient production of bioethanol from a lignocellulosic biomass. Although extensive information is available on yeast response to acetic acid stress, the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and unfolded protein response (UPR) has not been addressed. We herein demonstrated that acetic acid causes ER stress and induces the UPR. The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER and activation of Ire1p and Hac1p, an ER-stress sensor and ER stress-responsive transcription factor, respectively, were induced by a treatment with acetic acid stress (>0.2% v/v). Other monocarboxylic acids such as propionic acid and sorbic acid, but not lactic acid, also induced the UPR. Additionally, ire1 Δ and hac1 Δ cells were more sensitive to acetic acid than wild-type cells, indicating that activation of the Ire1p-Hac1p pathway is required for maximum tolerance to acetic acid. Furthermore, the combination of mild acetic acid stress (0.1% acetic acid) and mild ethanol stress (5% ethanol) induced the UPR, whereas neither mild ethanol stress nor mild acetic acid stress individually activated Ire1p, suggesting that ER stress is easily induced in yeast cells during the fermentation process of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. It was possible to avoid the induction of ER stress caused by acetic acid and the combined stress by adjusting extracellular pH.

  14. Acetic Acid Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Induces the Unfolded Protein Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazoe, Nozomi; Kimata, Yukio; Izawa, Shingo

    2017-01-01

    Since acetic acid inhibits the growth and fermentation ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it is one of the practical hindrances to the efficient production of bioethanol from a lignocellulosic biomass. Although extensive information is available on yeast response to acetic acid stress, the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and unfolded protein response (UPR) has not been addressed. We herein demonstrated that acetic acid causes ER stress and induces the UPR. The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER and activation of Ire1p and Hac1p, an ER-stress sensor and ER stress-responsive transcription factor, respectively, were induced by a treatment with acetic acid stress (>0.2% v/v). Other monocarboxylic acids such as propionic acid and sorbic acid, but not lactic acid, also induced the UPR. Additionally, ire1Δ and hac1Δ cells were more sensitive to acetic acid than wild-type cells, indicating that activation of the Ire1p-Hac1p pathway is required for maximum tolerance to acetic acid. Furthermore, the combination of mild acetic acid stress (0.1% acetic acid) and mild ethanol stress (5% ethanol) induced the UPR, whereas neither mild ethanol stress nor mild acetic acid stress individually activated Ire1p, suggesting that ER stress is easily induced in yeast cells during the fermentation process of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. It was possible to avoid the induction of ER stress caused by acetic acid and the combined stress by adjusting extracellular pH. PMID:28702017

  15. Acetic Acid Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Induces the Unfolded Protein Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozomi Kawazoe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since acetic acid inhibits the growth and fermentation ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it is one of the practical hindrances to the efficient production of bioethanol from a lignocellulosic biomass. Although extensive information is available on yeast response to acetic acid stress, the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER and unfolded protein response (UPR has not been addressed. We herein demonstrated that acetic acid causes ER stress and induces the UPR. The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER and activation of Ire1p and Hac1p, an ER-stress sensor and ER stress-responsive transcription factor, respectively, were induced by a treatment with acetic acid stress (>0.2% v/v. Other monocarboxylic acids such as propionic acid and sorbic acid, but not lactic acid, also induced the UPR. Additionally, ire1Δ and hac1Δ cells were more sensitive to acetic acid than wild-type cells, indicating that activation of the Ire1p-Hac1p pathway is required for maximum tolerance to acetic acid. Furthermore, the combination of mild acetic acid stress (0.1% acetic acid and mild ethanol stress (5% ethanol induced the UPR, whereas neither mild ethanol stress nor mild acetic acid stress individually activated Ire1p, suggesting that ER stress is easily induced in yeast cells during the fermentation process of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. It was possible to avoid the induction of ER stress caused by acetic acid and the combined stress by adjusting extracellular pH.

  16. Formation of biologically relevant carboxylic acids during the gamma irradiation of acetic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Irradiation of aqueous solutions of acetic acid with gamma rays produced several carboxylic acids in small yield. Their identification was based on the technique of gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. Some of these acids are Krebs Cycle intermediates. Their simultaneous formation in experiments simulating the primitive conditions on the earth suggests that metabolic pathways may have had their origin in prebiotic chemical processes.

  17. Can Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma be Cured by Percutaneous Acetic Acid Injection Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-T. Fan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the efficacy of ultrasound (US-guided percutaneous acetic acid (in concentrations of 15%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50% injection for small hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs for long-term prognosis, percutaneous acetic acid injection using 15% to 50% acetic acid was performed in 91 patients with one to four HCCs smaller than 3 cm during the past 6.5 years. During the series of treatment sessions for each patient, the same concentration of acetic acid was used. All tumors could be treated successfully with percutaneous acetic acid injection despite the differences in acetic acid concentration used. The number of treatment sessions to treat similar size of tumor was less when the higher concentration of acetic acid was used. No serious complications occurred as a direct sequela to percutaneous acetic acid injection. None of the tumor treated regrew. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year survival rates for 91 patients were 95%, 87%, 80%, 63%, and 49%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year cancer-free survival rates of these patients were 83%, 54%, 50%, 37%, and 29%, respectively. Both liver function and size of tumor affected both survival rate and cancer-free survival rate significantly, but the number of tumors did not. The concentration of acetic acid did not affect the survival rate. Percutaneous acetic acid using 15% to 50% acetic acid will be effective therapy for small HCCs for long-term prognosis.

  18. Effect of acetic acid on citric acid fermentation in an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2014-09-01

    An integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process was proposed to solve the problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid fermentation process. Extraction wastewater was treated by anaerobic digestion and then recycled for the next batch of citric acid fermentation to eliminate wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption. Acetic acid as an intermediate product of methane fermentation was present in anaerobic digestion effluent. In this study, the effect of acetic acid on citric acid fermentation was investigated and results showed that lower concentration of acetic acid could promote Aspergillus niger growth and citric acid production. 5-Cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) staining was used to quantify the activity of A. niger cells, and the results suggested that when acetic acid concentration was above 8 mM at initial pH 4.5, the morphology of A. niger became uneven and the part of the cells' activity was significantly reduced, thereby resulting in deceasing of citric acid production. Effects of acetic acid on citric acid fermentation, as influenced by initial pH and cell number in inocula, were also examined. The result indicated that inhibition by acetic acid increased as initial pH declined and was rarely influenced by cell number in inocula.

  19. Aerobic oxidation of aqueous ethanol using heterogeneous gold catalysts: Efficient routes to acetic acid and ethyl acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Betina; Christiansen, Sofie Egholm; Thomsen, M.L.D.

    2007-01-01

    conditions, yields of 90-95% of acetic acid could be achieved at moderate temperatures and pressures. Based on our findings, a reaction pathway for the catalytic oxidation of ethanol via acetaldehyde to acetic acid is proposed, and the rate-determining step (RDS) in the mechanism is found to be the (possibly......The aerobic oxidation of aqueous ethanol to produce acetic acid and ethyl acetate was studied using heterogeneous gold catalysts. Comparing the performance of Au/MgAl2O4 and Au/TiO2 showed that these two catalysts exhibited similar performance in the reaction. By proper selection of the reaction...... oxygen-assisted) dehydrogenation of ethanol to produce acetaldehyde. It also is concluded that most of the CO2 formed as a byproduct in the reaction results from the absorbed intermediate in the dehydrogenation of ethanol to produce acetaldehyde. By varying the amount of water in the reaction mixture...

  20. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentability of corn stover pretreated by lactic acid and/or acetic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jian; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2009-01-01

    Four different pretreatments with and without addition of low concentration organic acids were carried out on corn stover at 195 °C for 15 min. The highest xylan recovery of 81.08% was obtained after pretreatment without acid catalyst and the lowest of 58.78% after pretreatment with both acetic...... and lactic acid. Glucan recovery was less sensitive to the pretreatment conditions than xylan recovery. The pretreatment with acetic and lactic acid yielded the highest glucan recovery of 95.66%. The glucan recoveries of the other three pretreatments varied between 83.92% and 94.28%. Fermentability tests...... material was obtained following pretreatment at 195 °C for 15 min with acetic acid employed. The estimated total ethanol production was 241.1 kg/ton raw material by assuming fermentation of both C-6 and C-5, and 0.51 g ethanol/g sugar....

  1. Olfactory attraction of Drosophila suzukii by symbiotic acetic acid bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Mazzetto, Fabio

    2016-03-24

    Some species of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play relevant roles in the metabolism and physiology of Drosophila spp. and in some cases convey benefits to their hosts. The pest Drosophila suzukii harbors a set of AAB similar to those of other Drosophila species. Here, we investigate the potential to exploit the ability of AAB to produce volatile substances that attract female D. suzukii. Using a two-way olfactometer bioassay, we investigate the preference of D. suzukii for strains of AAB, and using solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography–mass spectrometry we specifically characterize their volatile profiles to identify attractive and non-attractive components produced by strains from the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, and Komagataeibacter. Flies had a preference for one strain of Komagataeibacter and two strains of Gluconobacter. Analyses of the volatile profiles from the preferred Gluconobacter isolates found that acetic acid is distinctively emitted even after 2 days of bacterial growth, confirming the relevance of this volatile in the profile of this isolate for attracting flies. Analyses of the volatile profile from the preferred Komagataeibacter isolate showed that a different volatile in its profile could be responsible for attracting D. suzukii. Moreover, variation in the concentration of butyric acid derivatives found in some strains may influence the preference of D. suzukii. Our results indicate that Gluconobacter and Komagataeibacter strains isolated from D. suzukii have the potential to provide substances that could be exploited to develop sustainable mass-trapping-based control approaches. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  2. Probiotic and Acetic Acid Effect on Broiler Chickens Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Král

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics and organic acids are widely accepted as an alternative to in-feed antibiotics in poultry production. We carried the experiment with broiler chickens. In experiment we research effect of probiotic and acetic acids on the performance of broiler chickens. A total number of 200 one day old broiler chickens were distributed to two dietary groups. Broiler chickens in control group were fed with standard feed mixture and experimental group 1% vinegar contained 5% acetic acid used in drinking water and probiotics mixed with feed mixture. Body weight, FCR and GIT pH were recorded. The performance showed no statistically significant increase in body weight (P>0.05 in the weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4 of age. The body weight of broiler chickens was significant increase (P0.05 in weeks 5, and 6 of age. In different segments of the GIT was not statistically significant (P>0.05 difference of pH between the control and experimental groups.

  3. Covalent interaction of chloroacetic and acetic acids with cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, H K; Ansari, G A

    1989-01-01

    The covalent interaction of chloroacetic acid with rat liver lipids was studied in vivo. Rats were given a single oral dose (8.75 mg/kg, 50 microCi) of 1-[14C]chloroacetic acid and sacrificed after 24 hours. Lipids extracted from the livers were separated into neutral lipids and phospholipids by solid-phase extraction using sep-pak silica cartridges. The neutral lipid fraction was further fractionated by preparative thin-layer chromatography followed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The fraction corresponding to the retention time of standard cholesteryl chloroacetate gave a pseudomolecular ion peak at m/z 480/482 ratio: (3:1) on ammonia chemical ionization mass spectrometry, and the fragmentation pattern was found to be similar to that of the standard sample. Under similar conditions, acetic acid resulted in the formation of cholesteryl acetate. The effect of such conjugation reactions on the cell membrane and their contribution to toxicity is presently unknown.

  4. Acetic acid bacteria in fermented foods and beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Roos, Jonas; De Vuyst, Luc

    2017-08-29

    Although acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are commonly found in spontaneous or backslopped fermented foods and beverages, rather limited knowledge about their occurrence and functional role in natural food fermentation ecosystems is available. Not only is their cultivation, isolation, and identification difficult, their cells are often present in a viable but not culturable state. Yet, they are promising starter cultures either to better control known food fermentation processes or to produce novel fermented foods and beverages. This review summarizes the most recent findings on the occurrence and functional role of AAB in natural food fermentation processes such as lambic beer, water kefir, kombucha, and cocoa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effective reaction of 2-chloro-3-formylquinoline and acetic acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    formylquinolines in a single step by treating with sodium acetate and acetic acid under microwave irradiation. The structures of the compounds have been established by IR, NMR and mass spectral data. Unexpectedly ...

  6. Cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid and betulinic acid acetate isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BA and BAAC have been shown to induce a time dependant increase in the sub G1 peak indicating apoptotic phenomenon as obtained from the DNA content histogram analysis. Thus, betulinic acid isolated from Malaysia plant showed good potential as an anti-cancer compound with less toxicity to human normal cells.

  7. Cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid and betulinic acid acetate isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... 2Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, Universiti Putra. Malaysia, 43400, Serdang ... analysis. Thus, betulinic acid isolated from Malaysia plant showed good potential as an anti-cancer compound with less toxicity to human normal cells. Key words: ...

  8. Effects of Gibberellic acid and 2,4-Dichlorophenoxy Acetic Acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of Gibberellic acid and 2,4-Dichlorophenoxy Acetic Acid Spray on Vegetative Growth, Fruit Anatomy and Seed Setting of Tomato ( Lycopersicon ... On the other hand, GA3 at lower concentration results in normal fruit and seed development but as its concentration increases it results in the development of more ...

  9. Heterogeneous Reactions of Acetic Acid with Oxide Surfaces: Effects of Mineralogy and Relative Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingjin; Larish, Whitney A; Fang, Yuan; Gankanda, Aruni; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the heterogeneous uptake of gaseous acetic acid on different oxides including γ-Al2O3, SiO2, and CaO under a range of relative humidity conditions. Under dry conditions, the uptake of acetic acid leads to the formation of both acetate and molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on γ-Al2O3 and CaO and only molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on SiO2. More importantly, under the conditions of this study, dimers are the major form for molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on all three particle surfaces investigated, even at low acetic acid pressures under which monomers are the dominant species in the gas phase. We have also determined saturation surface coverages for acetic acid adsorption on these three oxides under dry conditions as well as Langmuir adsorption constants in some cases. Kinetic analysis shows that the reaction rate of acetic acid increases by a factor of 3-5 for γ-Al2O3 when relative humidity increases from 0% to 15%, whereas for SiO2 particles, acetic acid and water are found to compete for surface adsorption sites.

  10. Acetic acid induces pH-independent cellular energy depletion in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sin Mei; Lee, Sui Mae; Dykes, Gary A

    2015-03-01

    Weak organic acids are widely used as preservatives and disinfectants in the food industry. Despite their widespread use, the antimicrobial mode of action of organic acids is still not fully understood. This study investigated the effect of acetic acid on the cell membranes and cellular energy generation of four Salmonella strains. Using a nucleic acid/protein assay, it was established that acetic acid did not cause leakage of intracellular components from the strains. A scanning electron microscopy study further confirmed that membrane disruption was not the antimicrobial mode of action of acetic acid. Some elongated Salmonella cells observed in the micrographs indicated a possibility that acetic acid may inhibit DNA synthesis in the bacterial cells. Using an ATP assay, it was found that at a neutral pH, acetic acid caused cellular energy depletion with an ADP/ATP ratio in the range between 0.48 and 2.63 (pacid molecules. The antimicrobial effect of acetic acid was better under acidic conditions (ADP/ATP ratio of 5.56 ± 1.27; pacid molecules can act together. We concluded that the inhibitory effect of acetic acid is not solely attributable to acidic pH but also to undissociated acid molecules. This finding has implication for the use of acetic acid as an antimicrobial against Salmonella on food products, such as chicken meat, which can buffer its pH.

  11. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Are Protected against Acetic Acid, but Not Hydrochloric Acid, by Hypertonicity▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, B.; Ross, T.

    2009-01-01

    Chapman et al. (B. Chapman, N. Jensen, T Ross, and M. B. Cole, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:5165-5172, 2006) demonstrated that an increased NaCl concentration prolongs survival of Escherichia coli O157 SERL 2 in a broth model simulating the aqueous phase of a food dressing or sauce containing acetic acid. We examined the responses of five other E. coli strains and four Salmonella enterica strains to increasing concentrations of NaCl under conditions of lethal acidity and observed that the average “lag” time prior to inactivation decreases in the presence of hydrochloric acid but not in the presence of acetic acid. For E. coli in the presence of acetic acid, the lag time increased with increasing NaCl concentrations up to 2 to 4% at pH 4.0, up to 4 to 6% at pH 3.8, and up to 4 to 7% (wt/wt of water) NaCl at pH 3.6. Salmonella was inactivated more rapidly by combined acetic acid and NaCl stresses than E. coli, but increasing NaCl concentrations still decreased the lag time prior to inactivation in the presence of acetic acid; at pH 4.0 up to 1 to 4% NaCl was protective, and at pH 3.8 up to 1 to 2% NaCl delayed the onset of inactivation. Sublethal injury kinetics suggest that this complex response is a balance between the lethal effects of acetic acid, against which NaCl is apparently protective, and the lethal effects of the NaCl itself. Compared against 3% NaCl, 10% (wt/wt of water) sucrose with 0.5% NaCl (which has similar osmotic potential) was found to be equally protective against adverse acetic acid conditions. We propose that hypertonicity may directly affect the rate of diffusion of acetic acid into cells and hence cell survival. PMID:19346344

  12. Improvement in HPLC separation of acetic acid and levulinic acid in the profiling of biomass hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Rui; Tu, Maobing; Wu, Yonnie; Adhikari, Sushil

    2011-04-01

    5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural could be separated by the Aminex HPX-87H column chromatography, however, the separation and quantification of acetic acid and levulinic acid in biomass hydrolysate have been difficult with this method. In present study, the HPLC separation of acetic acid and levulinic acid on Aminex HPX-87H column has been investigated by varying column temperature, flow rate, and sulfuric acid content in the mobile phase. The column temperature was found critical in resolving acetic acid and levulinic acid. The resolution for two acids increased dramatically from 0.42 to 1.86 when the column temperature was lowered from 60 to 30 °C. So did the capacity factors for levulinic acid that was increased from 1.20 to 1.44 as the column temperature dropped. The optimum column temperature for the separation was found at 45 °C. Variation in flow rate and sulfuric acid concentration improved not as much as the column temperature did. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Transcript and metabolite alterations increase ganoderic acid content in Ganoderma lucidum using acetic acid as an inducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ang; Li, Xiong-Biao; Miao, Zhi-Gang; Shi, Liang; Jaing, Ai-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2014-12-01

    Acetic acid at 5-8 mM increased ganoderic acid (GA) accumulation in Ganoderma lucidum. After optimization by the response surface methodology, the GA content reached 5.5/100 mg dry weight, an increase of 105% compared with the control. The intermediate metabolites of GA biosynthesis, lanosterol and squalene also increased to 47 and 15.8 μg/g dry weight, respectively, in response to acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly induced transcription levels of sqs, lano, hmgs and cyp51 in the GA biosynthesis pathway. An acetic acid-unregulated acetyl coenzyme A synthase (acs) gene was selected from ten candidate homologous acs genes. The results indicate that acetic acid alters the expression of genes related to acetic acid assimilation and increases GA biosynthesis and the metabolic levels of lanosterol, squalene and GA-a, thereby resulting in GA accumulation.

  14. Recent advances in nitrogen-fixing acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza, Raúl O

    2008-06-30

    Nitrogen is an essential plant nutrient, widely applied as N-fertilizer to improve yield of agriculturally important crops. An interesting alternative to avoid or reduce the use of N-fertilizers could be the exploitation of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB), capable of enhancing growth and yield of many plant species, several of agronomic and ecological significance. PGPB belong to diverse genera, including Azospirillum, Azotobacter, Herbaspirillum, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, and Gluconacetobacter, among others. They are capable of promoting plant growth through different mechanisms including (in some cases), the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), the enzymatic reduction of the atmospheric dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonia, catalyzed by nitrogenase. Aerobic bacteria able to oxidize ethanol to acetic acid in neutral or acid media are candidates of belonging to the family Acetobacteraceae. At present, this family has been divided into ten genera: Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Gluconobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Saccharibacter, Swaminathania, Neoasaia, and Granulibacter. Among them, only three genera include N(2)-fixing species: Gluconacetobacter, Swaminathania and Acetobacter. The first N(2)-fixing acetic acid bacterium (AAB) was described in Brazil. It was found inside tissues of the sugarcane plant, and first named as Acetobacter diazotrophicus, but then renamed as Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus. Later, two new species within the genus Gluconacetobacter, associated to coffee plants, were described in Mexico: G. johannae and G. azotocaptans. A salt-tolerant bacterium named Swaminathania salitolerans was found associated to wild rice plants. Recently, N(2)-fixing Acetobacter peroxydans and Acetobacter nitrogenifigens, associated with rice plants and Kombucha tea, respectively, were described in India. In this paper, recent advances involving nitrogen-fixing AAB are presented. Their natural habitats, physiological and genetic aspects

  15. Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 + 0.7% and 8.8 + 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 + 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 + 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 + 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

  16. Development of Acetic Acid Removal Technology for the UREX+Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Counce; Jack S. Watson

    2009-06-30

    It is imperative that acetic acid is removed from a waste stream in the UREX+process so that nitric acid can be recycled and possible interference with downstreatm steps can be avoidec. Acetic acid arises from acetohydrozamic acid (AHA), and is used to suppress plutonium in the first step of the UREX+process. Later, it is hydrolyzed into hydroxyl amine nitrate and acetic acid. Many common separation technologies were examined, and solvent extraction was determined to be the best choice under process conditions. Solvents already used in the UREX+ process were then tested to determine if they would be sufficient for the removal of acetic acid. The tributyl phosphage (TBP)-dodecane diluent, used in both UREX and NPEX, was determined to be a solvent system that gave sufficient distribution coefficients for acetic acid in addition to a high separation factor from nitric acid.

  17. Acetic acid in aged vinegar affects molecular targets for thrombus disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Li; Yanyan, Zhang; Junfeng, Fan

    2015-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism underlying the action of dietary vinegar on antithrombotic activity, acetic acid, the main acidic component of dietary vinegar, was used to determine antiplatelet and fibrinolytic activity. The results revealed that acetic acid significantly inhibits adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-, collagen-, thrombin-, and arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation. Acetic acid (2.00 mM) reduced AA-induced platelet aggregation to approximately 36.82 ± 1.31%, and vinegar (0.12 mL L(-1)) reduced the platelet aggregation induced by AA to 30.25 ± 1.34%. Further studies revealed that acetic acid exerts its effects by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-1 and the formation of thromboxane-A2. Organic acids including acetic acid, formic acid, lactic acid, citric acid, and malic acid also showed fibrinolytic activity; specifically, the fibrinolytic activity of acetic acid amounted to 1.866 IU urokinase per mL. Acetic acid exerted its fibrinolytic activity by activating plasminogen during fibrin crossing, thus leading to crosslinked fibrin degradation by the activated plasmin. These results suggest that organic acids in dietary vinegar play important roles in the prevention and cure of cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Enhanced biofuel production through coupled acetic acid and xylose consumption by engineered yeast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wei, Na; Quarterman, Josh; Kim, Soo Rin; Cate, Jamie H D; Jin, Yong-Su

    2013-01-01

    .... However, commercial production of cellulosic biofuel has been hampered by inefficient fermentation of xylose and the toxicity of acetic acid, which constitute substantial portions of cellulosic biomass...

  19. L-Lactic acid production from glycerol coupled with acetic acid metabolism by Enterococcus faecalis without carbon loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Nao; Oba, Mana; Iwamoto, Mariko; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Noguchi, Takuya; Bonkohara, Kaori; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ali; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimoda, Mitsuya; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol is a by-product in the biodiesel production process and considered as one of the prospective carbon sources for microbial fermentation including lactic acid fermentation, which has received considerable interest due to its potential application. Enterococcus faecalis isolated in our laboratory produced optically pure L-lactic acid from glycerol in the presence of acetic acid. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis using [1, 2-(13)C2] acetic acid proved that the E. faecalis strain QU 11 was capable of converting acetic acid to ethanol during lactic acid fermentation of glycerol. This indicated that strain QU 11 restored the redox balance by oxidizing excess NADH though acetic acid metabolism, during ethanol production, which resulted in lactic acid production from glycerol. The effects of pH control and substrate concentration on lactic acid fermentation were also investigated. Glycerol and acetic acid concentrations of 30 g/L and 10 g/L, respectively, were expected to be appropriate for lactic acid fermentation of glycerol by strain QU 11 at a pH of 6.5. Furthermore, fed-batch fermentation with 30 g/L glycerol and 10 g/L acetic acid wholly exhibited the best performance including lactic acid production (55.3 g/L), lactic acid yield (0.991 mol-lactic acid/mol-glycerol), total yield [1.08 mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)]/mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)], and total carbon yield [1.06 C-mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)/C-mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)] of lactic acid and ethanol. In summary, the strain QU 11 successfully produced lactic acid from glycerol with acetic acid metabolism, and an efficient fermentation system was established without carbon loss. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Transcriptome analysis of acetic-acid-treated yeast cells identifies a large set of genes whose overexpression or deletion enhances acetic acid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeji; Nasution, Olviyani; Choi, Eunyong; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2015-08-01

    Acetic acid inhibits the metabolic activities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, a better understanding of how S. cerevisiae cells acquire the tolerance to acetic acid is of importance to develop robust yeast strains to be used in industry. To do this, we examined the transcriptional changes that occur at 12 h post-exposure to acetic acid, revealing that 56 and 58 genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively. Functional categorization of them revealed that 22 protein synthesis genes and 14 stress response genes constituted the largest portion of the upregulated and downregulated genes, respectively. To evaluate the association of the regulated genes with acetic acid tolerance, 3 upregulated genes (DBP2, ASC1, and GND1) were selected among 34 non-protein synthesis genes, and 54 viable mutants individually deleted for the downregulated genes were retrieved from the non-essential haploid deletion library. Strains overexpressing ASC1 and GND1 displayed enhanced tolerance to acetic acid, whereas a strain overexpressing DBP2 was sensitive. Fifty of 54 deletion mutants displayed enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Three chosen deletion mutants (hsps82Δ, ato2Δ, and ssa3Δ) were also tolerant to benzoic acid but not propionic and sorbic acids. Moreover, all those five (two overexpressing and three deleted) strains were more efficient in proton efflux and lower in membrane permeability and internal hydrogen peroxide content than controls. Individually or in combination, those physiological changes are likely to contribute at least in part to enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Overall, information of our transcriptional profile was very useful to identify molecular factors associated with acetic acid tolerance.

  1. Inflammatory cells′ role in acetic acid-induced colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H Sanei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Free radicals are the known mechanisms responsible for inducing colitis with two origins: Inflammatory cells and tissues. Only the inflammatory cells can be controlled by corticosteroids. Our aim was to assess the importance of neutrophils as one of the inflammatory cells in inducing colitis and to evaluate the efficacy of corticosteroids in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six mice were divided into six groups of six mice each. Colitis was induced in three groups by exposing them to acetic acid through enema (group 1, ex vivo (group 3, and enema after immune suppression (group 5. Each group had one control group that was exposed to water injection instead of acetic acid. Tissue samples were evaluated and compared based on macroscopic damages and biochemical and pathological results. Results: Considering neutrophilic infiltration, there were significant differences between groups 1, 3, 5, and the control of group 1. Groups 3, 5, and their controls, and group 1 and the control of group 3 had significant differences in terms of goblet depletion. Based on tissue originated H 2 O 2 , we found significant differences between group 1 and its control and group 3, and also between groups 5 and the control of group 3. All the three groups were significantly different from their controls based on Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP and such differences were also seen between group 1 with two other groups. Conclusion: Neutrophils may not be the only cause of oxidation process in colitis, and also makes the effectiveness of corticosteroids in the treatment of this disease doubtful.

  2. Effects of Oxygen Availability on Acetic Acid Tolerance and Intracellular pH in Dekkera bruxellensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capusoni, Claudia; Arioli, Stefania; Zambelli, Paolo; Moktaduzzaman, M.; Mora, Diego

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis, associated with wine and beer production, has recently received attention, because its high ethanol and acid tolerance enables it to compete with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in distilleries that produce fuel ethanol. We investigated how different cultivation conditions affect the acetic acid tolerance of D. bruxellensis. We analyzed the ability of two strains (CBS 98 and CBS 4482) exhibiting different degrees of tolerance to grow in the presence of acetic acid under aerobic and oxygen-limited conditions. We found that the concomitant presence of acetic acid and oxygen had a negative effect on D. bruxellensis growth. In contrast, incubation under oxygen-limited conditions resulted in reproducible growth kinetics that exhibited a shorter adaptive phase and higher growth rates than those with cultivation under aerobic conditions. This positive effect was more pronounced in CBS 98, the more-sensitive strain. Cultivation of CBS 98 cells under oxygen-limited conditions improved their ability to restore their intracellular pH upon acetic acid exposure and to reduce the oxidative damage to intracellular macromolecules caused by the presence of acetic acid. This study reveals an important role of oxidative stress in acetic acid tolerance in D. bruxellensis, indicating that reduced oxygen availability can protect against the damage caused by the presence of acetic acid. This aspect is important for optimizing industrial processes performed in the presence of acetic acid. IMPORTANCE This study reveals an important role of oxidative stress in acetic acid tolerance in D. bruxellensis, indicating that reduced oxygen availability can have a protective role against the damage caused by the presence of acetic acid. This aspect is important for the optimization of industrial processes performed in the presence of acetic acid. PMID:27235432

  3. Effects of Oxygen Availability on Acetic Acid Tolerance and Intracellular pH in Dekkera bruxellensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capusoni, Claudia; Arioli, Stefania; Zambelli, Paolo; Moktaduzzaman, M; Mora, Diego; Compagno, Concetta

    2016-08-01

    The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis, associated with wine and beer production, has recently received attention, because its high ethanol and acid tolerance enables it to compete with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in distilleries that produce fuel ethanol. We investigated how different cultivation conditions affect the acetic acid tolerance of D. bruxellensis We analyzed the ability of two strains (CBS 98 and CBS 4482) exhibiting different degrees of tolerance to grow in the presence of acetic acid under aerobic and oxygen-limited conditions. We found that the concomitant presence of acetic acid and oxygen had a negative effect on D. bruxellensis growth. In contrast, incubation under oxygen-limited conditions resulted in reproducible growth kinetics that exhibited a shorter adaptive phase and higher growth rates than those with cultivation under aerobic conditions. This positive effect was more pronounced in CBS 98, the more-sensitive strain. Cultivation of CBS 98 cells under oxygen-limited conditions improved their ability to restore their intracellular pH upon acetic acid exposure and to reduce the oxidative damage to intracellular macromolecules caused by the presence of acetic acid. This study reveals an important role of oxidative stress in acetic acid tolerance in D. bruxellensis, indicating that reduced oxygen availability can protect against the damage caused by the presence of acetic acid. This aspect is important for optimizing industrial processes performed in the presence of acetic acid. This study reveals an important role of oxidative stress in acetic acid tolerance in D. bruxellensis, indicating that reduced oxygen availability can have a protective role against the damage caused by the presence of acetic acid. This aspect is important for the optimization of industrial processes performed in the presence of acetic acid. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. [Physiological response to acetic acid stress of Acetobacter pasteuranus during vinegar fermentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhengliang; Yang, Hailin; Xia, Xiaole; Wang, Wu; Leng, Yunwei; Yu, Xiaobin; Quan, Wu

    2014-03-04

    The aim of the study is to propose a dynamic acetic acid resistance mechanism through analysis on response of cellular morphology, physiology and metabolism of A. pasteurianus CICIM B7003 during vinegar fermentation. Vinegar fermentation was carried out in a Frings 9 L acetator by strain B7003 and cultures were sampled at different cellular growth phases. Simultaneously, percentage of capsular polysaccharide versus dry cells weight, ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids, transcription of acetic acid resistance genes, activity of alcohol respiratory chain enzymes and ATPase were detected for these samples to assay the responses of bacterial morphology, physiology and metabolism. When acetic acid was existed, no obvious capsular polysaccharide was secreted by cells. As vinegar fermentation proceeding, percentage of capsular polysaccharide versus dry cells weight was reduced from 2.5% to 0.89%. Ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids was increased obviously which can improve membrane fluidity. Also transcription level of acetic acid resistance genes was promoted. Interestingly, activity of alcohol respiratory chain and ATPase was not inhibited but promoted obviously with acetic acid accumulation which could provide enough energy for acetic acid resistance mechanism. On the basis of the results obtained from the experiment, A. pasteurianus CICIM B7003 relies mainly on the cooperation of changes of extracellular capsular polysaccharide and membrane fatty acids, activation of acid resistance genes transcription, enhancement of activity of alcohol respiratory chain and rapid energy production to tolerate acidic environment.

  5. Insights into the mechanism of acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu(111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Minhua; Yao, Rui; Jiang, Haoxi; Li, Guiming [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China); Chen, Yifei, E-mail: yfchen@tju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • The scission of C–OH bond of acetic acid is the rate-determined step in acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu(111). • Acetic acid adsorption and reaction barrier of C–OH scission of acetic acid are factors related to acetic acid conversion. • Acetaldehyde adsorption and reaction barriers of O–H formation of C{sub 2}–oxygenates are factors related to ethanol selectivity. - Abstract: Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to theoretically explain the reaction mechanism of acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu catalyst. The activation barriers of key elementary steps and the adsorption configurations of key intermediates involved in acetic acid hydrogenation on Cu(111) surface were investigated. The results indicated that the direct dissociation of acetic acid to acetyl (CH{sub 3}COOH → CH{sub 3}CO + OH) is the rate-determined step. The activation barrier of acetic acid scission to acetyl and the adsorption energy of acetic acid are two descriptors which could determine the conversion of acetic acid. The descriptors might have effects on the ethanol selectivity including: the adsorption energy of acetaldehyde and the activation barriers for O−H bond formation of C{sub 2}-oxygenates (CH{sub 3}CO + H → CH{sub 3}COH, CH{sub 3}CHO + H → CH{sub 3}CHOH and CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O + H → CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH). These proposed descriptors could be used as references to design new Cu-based catalysts that have excellent catalytic performance.

  6. Deletion of JJJ1 improves acetic acid tolerance and bioethanol fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuechang; Zhang, Lijie; Jin, Xinna; Fang, Yahong; Zhang, Ke; Qi, Lei; Zheng, Daoqiong

    2016-07-01

    To improve tolerance to acetic acid that is present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates and affects bioethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with improved tolerance to acetic acid were obtained through deletion of the JJJ1 gene. The lag phase of the JJJ1 deletion mutant BYΔJJJ1 was ~16 h shorter than that of the parent strain, BY4741, when the fermentation medium contained 4.5 g acetic acid/l. Additionally, the specific ethanol production rate of BYΔJJJ1 was increased (0.057 g/g h) compared to that of the parent strain (0.051 g/g h). Comparative transcription and physiological analyses revealed higher long chain fatty acid, trehalose, and catalase contents might be critical factors responsible for the acetic acid resistance of JJJ1 knockout strains. JJJ1 deletion improves acetic acid tolerance and ethanol fermentation performance of S. cerevisiae.

  7. Modification of wheat starch with succinic acid/acetic anhydride and azelaic acid/acetic anhydride mixtures I. Thermophysical and pasting properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subarić, Drago; Ačkar, Durđica; Babić, Jurislav; Sakač, Nikola; Jozinović, Antun

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of modification with succinic acid/acetic anhydride and azelaic acid/acetic anhydride mixtures on thermophysical and pasting properties of wheat starch. Starch was isolated from two wheat varieties and modified with mixtures of succinic acid and acetic anhydride, and azelaic acid and acetic anhydride in 4, 6 and 8 % (w/w). Thermophysical, pasting properties, swelling power, solubility and amylose content of modified starches were determined. The results showed that modifications with mixtures of afore mentioned dicarboxylic acids with acetic anhydride decreased gelatinisation and pasting temperatures. Gelatinisation enthalpy of Golubica starch increased, while of Srpanjka starch decreased by modifications. Retrogradation after 7 and 14 day-storage at 4 °C decreased after modifications of both starches. Maximum, hot and cold paste viscosity of both starches increased, while stability during shearing at high temperatures decreased. % setback of starches modified with azelaic acid/acetic anhydride mixture decreased. Swelling power and solubility of both starches increased by both modifications.

  8. The Genealogical Tree of Ethanol: Gas-phase Formation of Glycolaldehyde, Acetic Acid, and Formic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouteris, Dimitrios; Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Vazart, Fanny; Puzzarini, Cristina; Barone, Vincenzo; Codella, Claudio; Lefloch, Bertrand

    2018-02-01

    Despite the harsh conditions of the interstellar medium, chemistry thrives in it, especially in star-forming regions where several interstellar complex organic molecules (iCOMs) have been detected. Yet, how these species are synthesized is a mystery. The majority of current models claim that this happens on interstellar grain surfaces. Nevertheless, evidence is mounting that neutral gas-phase chemistry plays an important role. In this paper, we propose a new scheme for the gas-phase synthesis of glycolaldehyde, a species with a prebiotic potential and for which no gas-phase formation route was previously known. In the proposed scheme, the ancestor is ethanol and the glycolaldehyde sister species are acetic acid (another iCOM with unknown gas-phase formation routes) and formic acid. For the reactions of the new scheme with no available data, we have performed electronic structure and kinetics calculations deriving rate coefficients and branching ratios. Furthermore, after a careful review of the chemistry literature, we revised the available chemical networks, adding and correcting several reactions related to glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, and formic acid. The new chemical network has been used in an astrochemical model to predict the abundance of glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, and formic acid. The predicted abundance of glycolaldehyde depends on the ethanol abundance in the gas phase and is in excellent agreement with the measured one in hot corinos and shock sites. Our new model overpredicts the abundance of acetic acid and formic acid by about a factor of 10, which might imply a yet incomplete reaction network.

  9. Genome-wide identification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required for tolerance to acetic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Acetic acid is a byproduct of Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcoholic fermentation. Together with high concentrations of ethanol and other toxic metabolites, acetic acid may contribute to fermentation arrest and reduced ethanol productivity. This weak acid is also a present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, a highly interesting non-feedstock substrate in industrial biotechnology. Therefore, the better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying S. cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for the rational selection of optimal fermentation conditions and the engineering of more robust industrial strains to be used in processes in which yeast is explored as cell factory. Results The yeast genes conferring protection against acetic acid were identified in this study at a genome-wide scale, based on the screening of the EUROSCARF haploid mutant collection for susceptibility phenotypes to this weak acid (concentrations in the range 70-110 mM, at pH 4.5). Approximately 650 determinants of tolerance to acetic acid were identified. Clustering of these acetic acid-resistance genes based on their biological function indicated an enrichment of genes involved in transcription, internal pH homeostasis, carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall assembly, biogenesis of mitochondria, ribosome and vacuole, and in the sensing, signalling and uptake of various nutrients in particular iron, potassium, glucose and amino acids. A correlation between increased resistance to acetic acid and the level of potassium in the growth medium was found. The activation of the Snf1p signalling pathway, involved in yeast response to glucose starvation, is demonstrated to occur in response to acetic acid stress but no evidence was obtained supporting the acetic acid-induced inhibition of glucose uptake. Conclusions Approximately 490 of the 650 determinants of tolerance to acetic acid identified in this work are implicated, for the first time, in tolerance to this weak acid. These are

  10. Genome-wide identification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required for tolerance to acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sá-Correia Isabel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetic acid is a byproduct of Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcoholic fermentation. Together with high concentrations of ethanol and other toxic metabolites, acetic acid may contribute to fermentation arrest and reduced ethanol productivity. This weak acid is also a present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, a highly interesting non-feedstock substrate in industrial biotechnology. Therefore, the better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying S. cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for the rational selection of optimal fermentation conditions and the engineering of more robust industrial strains to be used in processes in which yeast is explored as cell factory. Results The yeast genes conferring protection against acetic acid were identified in this study at a genome-wide scale, based on the screening of the EUROSCARF haploid mutant collection for susceptibility phenotypes to this weak acid (concentrations in the range 70-110 mM, at pH 4.5. Approximately 650 determinants of tolerance to acetic acid were identified. Clustering of these acetic acid-resistance genes based on their biological function indicated an enrichment of genes involved in transcription, internal pH homeostasis, carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall assembly, biogenesis of mitochondria, ribosome and vacuole, and in the sensing, signalling and uptake of various nutrients in particular iron, potassium, glucose and amino acids. A correlation between increased resistance to acetic acid and the level of potassium in the growth medium was found. The activation of the Snf1p signalling pathway, involved in yeast response to glucose starvation, is demonstrated to occur in response to acetic acid stress but no evidence was obtained supporting the acetic acid-induced inhibition of glucose uptake. Conclusions Approximately 490 of the 650 determinants of tolerance to acetic acid identified in this work are implicated, for the first time, in tolerance to

  11. Effect of salt addition on acid resistance response of Escherichia coli O157:H7 against acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Sun-Young

    2017-08-01

    A combination of salt and acid is commonly used in the production of many foods, such as pickles and fermented foods. However, in our previous studies, addition of salt significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of acetic acid against E. coli O157:H7 in laboratory media and pickled cucumbers. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the effect of salt addition on the acid resistance (AR) response of E. coli O157:H7 after treatment with acetic acid. The combined effect of acetic acid and salt showed different results depending on media tested. Organic compounds such as yeast extract and tryptone were required to observe the antagonistic effect of salt and acetic acid in combination. However, use of an rpoS mutant or addition of chloramphenicol resulted in no changes in the antagonistic effect of acetic acid and salt. The addition of glutamate to phosphate buffer significantly increased the survival levels of E. coli O157:H7 after the acetic acid treatment; however, the survival levels were lower than those after the treatment with acetic acid alone. Thus, the addition of salt may increase the AR response of E. coli O157:H7; however, these survival mechanisms were not proven clearly. Therefore, further studies need to be performed to better understand the antagonism of acetic acid salt against E. coli O157:H7. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cervical Pattern on Visual Inspection With Aceto Acetic Acid in A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: One of the commonest alternatives to Pap's smear is direct visualization of the cervix using Acetic acid. The investigators set out to evaluate cervical cancer screening using Visual inspection with Acetic acid in a Faith based organizational setting. Methods: The study was carried out at the premises of the headquarters ...

  13. Sustainable hydrogen from bio-oil - Catalytic steam reforming of acetic acid as a model oxygenate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Seshan, K.; Lefferts, Leon; Aika, Ken-ichi

    2004-01-01

    Steam reforming of acetic acid as a model oxygenate present in bio-oil over Pt/ZrO2 catalysts has been studied. Pt/ZrO2 catalysts are very active, completely converting acetic acid and give hydrogen yield close to thermodynamic equilibrium. The catalyst deactivated by formation of oligomers, which

  14. Efficacy of Acetic Acid againstListeria monocytogenesAttached to Poultry Skin during Refrigerated Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Fandos, Elena; Herrera, Barbara

    2014-09-11

    This work evaluates the effect of acetic acid dipping on the growth of L . monocytogenes on poultry legs stored at 4 °C for eight days. Fresh inoculated chicken legs were dipped into either a 1% or 2% acetic acid solution (v/v) or distilled water (control). Changes in mesophiles, psychrotrophs, Enterobacteriaceae counts and sensorial characteristics (odor, color, texture and overall appearance) were also evaluated. The shelf life of the samples washed with acetic acid was extended by at least two days over the control samples washed with distilled water. L . monocytogenes counts before decontamination were 5.57 log UFC/g, and after treatment with 2% acetic acid (Day 0), L . monocytogenes counts were 4.47 log UFC/g. Legs washed with 2% acetic acid showed a significant ( p acetic acid. This study demonstrates that while acetic acid did reduce populations of L . monocytogenes on meat, it did not completely inactivate the pathogen. The application of acetic acid may be used as an additional hurdle contributing to extend the shelf life of raw poultry and reducing populations of L . monocytogenes .

  15. Cervical cancer risk factors and feasibility of visual inspection with acetic acid screening in Sudan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Rasch, Vibeke; Pukkala, Eero

    2011-01-01

    To assess the risk factors of cervical cancer and the feasibility and acceptability of a visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) screening method in a primary health center in Khartoum, Sudan.......To assess the risk factors of cervical cancer and the feasibility and acceptability of a visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) screening method in a primary health center in Khartoum, Sudan....

  16. Sustainable hydrogen from bio-oil - Steam reforming of acetic acid as a model oxygenate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takanabe, K.; Aika, Ken-ichi; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2004-01-01

    Steam reforming of acetic acid over Pt/ZrO2 catalysts has been investigated. Pt/ZrO2 catalysts are very active, completely converting acetic acid, and give a hydrogen yield close to thermodynamic equilibrium. The catalyst deactivated by formation of oligomers which block the active sites. The

  17. Electron attachment and electron ionization of acetic acid clusters embedded in helium nanodroplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Silva, F. Ferreira; Jaksch, S.; Martins, G.; Dang, H. M.; Dampc, M.; Denifl, S.; Maerk, T. D.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Liu, J.; Yang, S.; Ellis, A. M.; Scheier, P.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of incident electrons on acetic acid clusters is explored for the first time. The acetic acid clusters are formed inside liquid helium nanodroplets and both cationic and anionic products ejected into the gas phase are detected by mass spectrometry. The cation chemistry (induced by

  18. 75 FR 40736 - Acetic Acid; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... acetic acid is not mutagenic at levels less than or equal to 16 micromoles. The Agency has determined... Evaluation of Some Microbials, Antioxidants, Emulsifiers, Stabilizers, Flour-Treatment Agents, Acids and...

  19. Influence of acetic acid on a pap smear of dysplastic lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoellen, Friederike; Bohlmann, Michael K; Brade, Joachim; Rody, Achim; Diedrich, Klaus; Husstedt, Wolf-Diedrich; Hornemann, Amadeus

    2013-03-01

    Cervical cancer prevention is performed by taking Pap smears. The correct execution of the smear is crucial as an inadequate smear might result in underdiagnosis. The second means of cervical cancer prevention is visual inspection of the cervix uteri with acetic acid, while often both methods are combined. We investigated whether the application of acetic acid compromises the Pap smear. A total of 100 patients with dysplasia were prospectively included; Pap smears were obtained before and after the application of acetic acid. We observed an alteration of the result of the Pap smear after acetic acid application in 41%. However, these alterations did not result in a dysplastic case being classed as a normal smear or vice versa. The application of acetic acid to the transformation zone of the cervix uteri may enhance changes of the Pap smear in dysplasia, however, the changes affect subgroups of dysplasia and thus do not change therapeutic management.

  20. Boronic Acid Accelerated Three-Component Reaction for the Synthesis of α-Sulfanyl-Substituted Indole-3-acetic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amrita; Watanabe, Kenji; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Ohshima, Takashi

    2017-11-03

    Boronic acid was used to accelerate a three-component reaction of indoles, thiols, and glyoxylic acids for the synthesis of α-sulfanyl-substituted indole-3-acetic acids. Boronic acid catalysis to activate the α-hydroxy group in α-hydroxycarboxylic acid intermediates and intramolecular assistance by free carboxylic acid were the keys to accelerating the product formation.

  1. The key to acetate: metabolic fluxes of acetic acid bacteria under cocoa pulp fermentation-simulating conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Philipp; Frey, Lasse Jannis; Berger, Antje; Bolten, Christoph Josef; Hansen, Carl Erik; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-08-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role during cocoa fermentation, as their main product, acetate, is a major driver for the development of the desired cocoa flavors. Here, we investigated the specialized metabolism of these bacteria under cocoa pulp fermentation-simulating conditions. A carefully designed combination of parallel 13C isotope labeling experiments allowed the elucidation of intracellular fluxes in the complex environment of cocoa pulp, when lactate and ethanol were included as primary substrates among undefined ingredients. We demonstrate that AAB exhibit a functionally separated metabolism during coconsumption of two-carbon and three-carbon substrates. Acetate is almost exclusively derived from ethanol, while lactate serves for the formation of acetoin and biomass building blocks. Although this is suboptimal for cellular energetics, this allows maximized growth and conversion rates. The functional separation results from a lack of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzymes, typically present in bacteria to interconnect metabolism. In fact, gluconeogenesis is driven by pyruvate phosphate dikinase. Consequently, a balanced ratio of lactate and ethanol is important for the optimum performance of AAB. As lactate and ethanol are individually supplied by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts during the initial phase of cocoa fermentation, respectively, this underlines the importance of a well-balanced microbial consortium for a successful fermentation process. Indeed, AAB performed the best and produced the largest amounts of acetate in mixed culture experiments when lactic acid bacteria and yeasts were both present.

  2. Metabolic regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry D. Cohen

    2009-11-01

    The phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, auxin) is important for many aspects of plant growth, development and responses to the environment yet the routes to is biosynthesis and mechanisms for regulation of IAA levels remain important research questions. A critical issue concerning the biosynthesis if IAA in plants is that redundant pathways for IAA biosynthesis exist in plants. We showed that these redundant pathways and their relative contribution to net IAA production are under both developmental and environmental control. We worked on three fundamental problems related to how plants get their IAA: 1) An in vitro biochemical approach was used to define the tryptophan dependent pathway to IAA using maize endosperm, where relatively large amounts of IAA are produced over a short developmental period. Both a stable isotope dilution and a protein MS approach were used to identify intermediates and enzymes in the reactions. 2) We developed an in vitro system for analysis of tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthesis in maize seedlings and we used a metabolite profiling approach to isolate intermediates in this reaction. 3) Arabidopsis contains a small family of genes that encode potential indolepyruvate decarboxylase enzymes. We cloned these genes and studied plants that are mutant in these genes and that over-express each member in the family in terms of the level and route of IAA biosynthesis. Together, these allowed further development of a comprehensive picture of the pathways and regulatory components that are involved in IAA homeostasis in higher plants.

  3. Design, Synthesis, and Antimycobacterial Activity of Novel Theophylline-7-Acetic Acid Derivatives With Amino Acid Moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakov, Georgi; Valcheva, Violeta; Voynikov, Yulian; Philipova, Irena; Atanasova, Mariyana; Konstantinov, Spiro; Peikov, Plamen; Doytchinova, Irini

    2016-03-01

    The theophylline-7-acetic acid (7-TAA) scaffold is a promising novel lead compound for antimycobacterial activity. Here, we derive a model for antitubercular activity prediction based on 14 7-TAA derivatives with amino acid moieties and their methyl esters. The model is applied to a combinatorial library, consisting of 40 amino acid and methyl ester derivatives of 7-TAA. The best three predicted compounds are synthesized and tested against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. All of them are stable, non-toxic against human cells and show antimycobacterial activity in the nanomolar range being 60 times more active than ethambutol. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Acetalization of 2-Hydroxybenzaldehyde mechanism using halogen acid catalysts based on ab initio methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Muhammad; Roza, Destria; Nasution, Ahmad Kamil

    2017-11-01

    The computational calculation was performed on the acetalization of 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde by using ab initio method. Ab initio method is derived directly from theoretical principles with no inclusion of experimental data and this is an approximate quantum mechanical calculation. The aim of this research was to studies the acetalization of 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde mechanism using halogen acid catalysts. Computational calculation which was applied on the acetalization of 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde using halogen acid catalysts provided possible reaction steps. The first step was formation of a labile hemiacetal because it is essentially tetrahedral intermediates containing a leaving group. The second step was formation of a stable acetal. The results of computational calculation of acetalization of 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde provided possible energy change in the each step of the reaction process. A labile hemiacetal showed higher energy (481.04 kJ/mol) than 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde dimethyl acetal (65.32 kJ/mol) and 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde (0 kJ/mol) due to its instability. In general, acetalization of 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde reaction is a reversible reaction. The effect of Lewis acidity on halogen acid catalysts was also studied in this research. Based on the Mulliken charge on the H atom, it is found that HF has the highest Lewis acidity compared to other halogen acids with order HF> HCl> HBr> HI. As a result, HF was the efficient catalysts for acetalization of 2-Hydroxybenzaldehyde.

  5. Acetic acid bacteria, newly emerging symbionts of insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotti, Elena; Rizzi, Aurora; Chouaia, Bessem; Ricci, Irene; Favia, Guido; Alma, Alberto; Sacchi, Luciano; Bourtzis, Kostas; Mandrioli, Mauro; Cherif, Ameur; Bandi, Claudio; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2010-11-01

    Recent research in microbe-insect symbiosis has shown that acetic acid bacteria (AAB) establish symbiotic relationships with several insects of the orders Diptera, Hymenoptera, Hemiptera, and Homoptera, all relying on sugar-based diets, such as nectars, fruit sugars, or phloem sap. To date, the fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster and Bactrocera oleae, mosquitoes of the genera Anopheles and Aedes, the honey bee Apis mellifera, the leafhopper Scaphoideus titanus, and the mealybug Saccharicoccus sacchari have been found to be associated with the bacterial genera Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Gluconobacter, Asaia, and Saccharibacter and the novel genus Commensalibacter. AAB establish symbiotic associations with the insect midgut, a niche characterized by the availability of diet-derived carbohydrates and oxygen and by an acidic pH, selective factors that support AAB growth. AAB have been shown to actively colonize different insect tissues and organs, such as the epithelia of male and female reproductive organs, the Malpighian tubules, and the salivary glands. This complex topology of the symbiosis indicates that AAB possess the keys for passing through body barriers, allowing them to migrate to different organs of the host. Recently, AAB involvement in the regulation of innate immune system homeostasis of Drosophila has been shown, indicating a functional role in host survival. All of these lines of evidence indicate that AAB can play different roles in insect biology, not being restricted to the feeding habit of the host. The close association of AAB and their insect hosts has been confirmed by the demonstration of multiple modes of transmission between individuals and to their progeny that include vertical and horizontal transmission routes, comprising a venereal one. Taken together, the data indicate that AAB represent novel secondary symbionts of insects.

  6. Phase equilibrium modelling for mixtures with acetic acid using an association equation of state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muro Sunè, Nuria; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; von Solms, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Acetic acid is a very important compound in the chemical industry with applications both as solvent and intermediate in the production of, e.g., polyesters. The design of these processes requires knowledge of the phase equilibria of mixtures containing acetic acid and a wide variety of compounds...... to a wide variety of mixtures containing acetic acid, including gas solubilities, cross-associating systems (with water and alcohols), and polar chemicals like acetone and esters. Vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibria are considered for both binary and ternary mixtures. With the exception of a somewhat...... inferior performance for the water-acetic acid VLE, which does not seem to affect substantially the performance for the multicomponent systems studied, CPA performs satisfactorily in most cases, using a single interaction parameter over extensive temperature ranges. For accurate description of water-acetic...

  7. Cell wall dynamics modulate acetic acid-induced apoptotic cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, António; Duarte, Ana M.; Azevedo, Flávio; Sousa, Maria J.; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Chaves, Susana R.

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid triggers apoptotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, similar to mammalian apoptosis. To uncover novel regulators of this process, we analyzed whether impairing MAPK signaling affected acetic acid-induced apoptosis and found the mating-pheromone response and, especially, the cell wall integrity pathways were the major mediators, especially the latter, which we characterized further. Screening downstream effectors of this pathway, namely targets of the transcription factor Rlm1p, highlighted decreased cell wall remodeling as particularly important for acetic acid resistance. Modulation of cell surface dynamics therefore emerges as a powerful strategy to increase acetic acid resistance, with potential application in industrial fermentations using yeast, and in biomedicine to exploit the higher sensitivity of colorectal carcinoma cells to apoptosis induced by acetate produced by intestinal propionibacteria. PMID:28357256

  8. Catalytic oxidative conversion of cellulosic biomass to formic acid and acetic acid with exceptionally high yields

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2014-09-01

    Direct conversion of raw biomass materials to fine chemicals is of great significance from both economic and ecological perspectives. In this paper, we report that a Keggin-type vanadium-substituted phosphomolybdic acid catalyst, namely H4PVMo11O40, is capable of converting various biomass-derived substrates to formic acid and acetic acid with high selectivity in a water medium and oxygen atmosphere. Under optimized reaction conditions, H4PVMo11O40 gave an exceptionally high yield of formic acid (67.8%) from cellulose, far exceeding the values achieved in previous catalytic systems. Our study demonstrates that heteropoly acids are generally effective catalysts for biomass conversion due to their strong acidities, whereas the composition of metal addenda atoms in the catalysts has crucial influence on the reaction pathway and the product selectivity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Microbial process for the preparation of acetic acid, as well as solvent for its extraction from the fermentation broth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, James L.; Clausen, Edgar C.; Ko, Ching-Whan; Wade, Leslie E.; Wikstrom, Carl V.

    2004-06-22

    A modified water-immiscible solvent useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous streams is a substantially pure mixture of isomers of highly branched di-alkyl amines. Solvent mixtures formed of such a modified solvent with a desired co-solvent, preferably a low boiling hydrocarbon, are useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous gaseous streams. An anaerobic microbial fermentation process for the production of acetic acid employs such solvents, under conditions which limit amide formation by the solvent and thus increase the efficiency of acetic acid recovery. Methods for the direct extraction of acetic acid and the extractive fermentation of acetic acid also employ the modified solvents and increase efficiency of acetic acid production. Such increases in efficiency are also obtained where the energy source for the microbial fermentation contains carbon dioxide and the method includes a carbon dioxide stripping step prior to extraction of acetic acid in solvent.

  10. Tolerance to acetic acid is improved by mutations of the TATA-binding protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jieun; Kwon, Hyeji; Kim, Eunjung; Lee, Young Mi; Ko, Hyeok Jin; Park, Hongjae; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2015-03-01

    Screening a library of overexpressing mutant alleles of the TATA-binding gene SPT15 yielded two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (MRRC 3252 and 3253) with enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. They were also tolerant to propionic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Transcriptome profile analysis identified 58 upregulated genes and 106 downregulated genes in MRRC 3252. Stress- and protein synthesis-related transcription factors were predominantly enriched in the upregulated and downregulated genes respectively. Eight deletion mutants for some of the highly downregulated genes were acetic acid-tolerant. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species was considerably lessened in MRRC 3252 and 3253 upon exposure to acetic acid. Metabolome profile analysis revealed that intracellular concentrations of 5 and 102 metabolites were increased and decreased, respectively, in MRRC 3252, featuring a large increase of urea and a significant decrease of amino acids. The dur1/2Δmutant, in which the urea degradation gene DUR1/2 is deleted, displayed enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. Enhanced tolerance to acetic acid was also observed on the medium containing a low concentration of amino acids. Taken together, this study identified two SPT15 alleles, nine gene deletions and low concentration of amino acids in the medium that confer enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. THE DISTRIBUTION COEFFICIENTS OF ACETIC ACID BETWEEN WATER AND SOLVENT SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet MAHRAMANLIOĞLU

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Distribution coefficients of acetic acid between aqueous phase and solvents (water-C6-C10 alcohols, butyl acetate, ether and benzene were studied. Synergetic effect was obtained for alcohol and ester systems. A slightly positive deviation was obtained for benzene–ester mixtures. The best distribution coefficient was obtained for hexanol-butyl acetate systems. The coefficients of Redlisch-Kister equation were obtained for the deviations.

  12. Comparison of acetic acid and ethanol sclerotherapy for simple renal cysts: clinical experience with 86 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Jun; Shin, Ji Hoon

    2016-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and treatment session numbers of acetic acid to that of ethanol sclerotherapy for the treatment of simple renal cysts. Between February 2004 and June 2013, 86 patients with simple renal cysts underwent percutaneous aspiration and injection of 50 %-acetic-acid (42 cysts) and 95 %-ethanol (44 cysts). The patient demographics, volume reduction rate, number of treatment sessions, and complications were then analyzed. The volume reduction rate was 94.1 ± 7.6 % in the 50 %-acetic acid group and 94.7 ± 11.7 % in the 95 %-ethanol group, and without a statistical difference. The rates of complete remission, partial remission, and no response were 57.1, 42.9 and 0 %, respectively, for the acetic acid group, and 70.5, 25.0, and 4.5 %, respectively, for the ethanol group. No statistical difference was observed between the two groups. Compared to the acetic acid group, the ethanol group had a higher number of treatment sessions, i.e. 1.10 ± 0.30 in the acetic acid group and 1.80 ± 0.79 in the ethanol group. Mild flank pain was a minor complication that occurred in both groups. Acetic acid seems to have equivalent sclerosing effects on simple renal cysts compared with those of ethanol despites of fewer treatment sessions.

  13. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Matuszyk; Piotr Ceranowicz; Zygmunt Warzecha; Jakub Cieszkowski; Dagmara Ceranowicz; Krystyna Gałązka; Joanna Bonior; Jolanta Jaworek; Krzysztof Bartuś; Krzysztof Gil; Rafał Olszanecki; Artur Dembiński

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1? (IL-1?) and tumor nec...

  14. Effect of Acetic Acid on Ruminal pH, Volatile Fatty Acids and Protozooa in the Sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Keçeci, Tufan; Kocabatmaz, Mehmet; KADAK, Ramazan

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the etfect of ruminal infusion of acetic acid on the ruminal pH, volatilefaıty acids (VFA) and protozoa in the sheep. Two fistulated sheep were infused through rumen listula with 500ml water (control) or acetic acid (0.62 gr/kg body weight) before feeding for 4 consecutive days. Samples of rumenconıents were collected from each sheep before and 1 h alter, infusion through the ruminal fistula. Acetic acid infusionhas caused a significant drop in the rumi...

  15. Theophylline-7-acetic acid derivatives with amino acids as anti-tuberculosis agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voynikov, Yulian; Valcheva, Violeta; Momekov, Georgi; Peikov, Plamen; Stavrakov, Georgi

    2014-07-15

    A series of amides were synthesized by condensation of theophylline-7-acetic acid and eight commercially available amino acid methyl ester hydrochlorides. Consecutive hydrolysis of six of the amido-esters resulted in the formation of corresponding amido-acids. The newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The activity varied depending on the amino acid fragments and in seven cases exerted excellent values with MICs 0.46-0.26 μM. Assessment of the cytotoxicity revealed that the compounds were not cytotoxic against the human embryonal kidney cell line HEK-293T. The theophylline-7-acetamides containing amino acid moieties appear to be promising lead compounds for the development of antimycobacterial agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Deprotection of Acetals and Ketals by Silica Sulfuric Acid and Wet SiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhamid Bamoniri

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Neat chlorosulfonic acid reacts with silica gel to give silica sulfuric acid in which sulfuric acid is immobilized on the surface of silica gel via covalent bonds. A combination of silica sulfuric acid and wet SiO2 was used as an effective deacetalizating agent for the conversion of acetals to their corresponding carbonyl derivatives under thermal conditions.

  17. Improved Acetic Acid Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the WHI2 Gene Identified through Inverse Metabolic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingying; Stabryla, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Development of acetic acid-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for economically viable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, but the goal remains a critical challenge due to limited information on effective genetic perturbation targets for improving acetic acid resistance in the yeast. This study employed a genomic-library-based inverse metabolic engineering approach to successfully identify a novel gene target, WHI2 (encoding a cytoplasmatic globular scaffold protein), which elicited improved acetic acid resistance in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of WHI2 significantly improved glucose and/or xylose fermentation under acetic acid stress in engineered yeast. The WHI2-overexpressing strain had 5-times-higher specific ethanol productivity than the control in glucose fermentation with acetic acid. Analysis of the expression of WHI2 gene products (including protein and transcript) determined that acetic acid induced endogenous expression of Whi2 in S. cerevisiae. Meanwhile, the whi2Δ mutant strain had substantially higher susceptibility to acetic acid than the wild type, suggesting the important role of Whi2 in the acetic acid response in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, overexpression of WHI2 and of a cognate phosphatase gene, PSR1, had a synergistic effect in improving acetic acid resistance, suggesting that Whi2 might function in combination with Psr1 to elicit the acetic acid resistance mechanism. These results improve our understanding of the yeast response to acetic acid stress and provide a new strategy to breed acetic acid-resistant yeast strains for renewable biofuel production. PMID:26826231

  18. 40 CFR 721.304 - Acetic acid, [(5-chloro-8-quinolinyl)oxy-], 1-methyl hexyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acetic acid, , 1-methyl hexyl ester... Substances § 721.304 Acetic acid, , 1-methyl hexyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as acetic acid, -, 1-methylhexyl ester (PMN P...

  19. A new laboratory evolution approach to select for constitutive acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identification of causal mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Gonz?lez-Ramos, Daniel; Gorter de Vries, Arthur R.; Grijseels, Sietske S.; van Berkum, Margo C.; Swinnen, Steve; van den Broek, Marcel; Nevoigt, Elke; Daran, Jean-Marc G.; Pronk, Jack T.; van Maris, Antonius J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acetic acid, released during hydrolysis of lignocellulosic feedstocks for second generation bioethanol production, inhibits yeast growth and alcoholic fermentation. Yeast biomass generated in a propagation step that precedes ethanol production should therefore express a high and constitutive level of acetic acid tolerance before introduction into lignocellulosic hydrolysates. However, earlier laboratory evolution strategies for increasing acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cere...

  20. Kinetics of acetic acid synthesis from ethanol over a Cu/SiO2 catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Bodil; Schjødt, Niels Christian; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2011-01-01

    . The dehydrogenation experiments were carried out in a flow through lab scale tubular reactor. Based on 71 data sets a power law kinetic expression has been derived for the description of the dehydrogenation of acetaldehyde to acetic acid. The apparent reaction order was 0.89 with respect to water and 0......The dehydrogenation of ethanol via acetaldehyde for the synthesis of acetic acid over a Cu based catalyst in a new process is reported. Specifically, we have studied a Cu on SiO2 catalyst which has shown very high selectivity to acetic acid via acetaldehyde compared to competing condensation routes...

  1. Investigation of acetic acid-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment on corn stover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jian; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Acetic acid (AA)-catalyzed liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatments on raw corn stover (RCS) were carried out at 195 °C at 15 min with the acetic acid concentrations between 0 and 400 g/kg RCS. After pretreatment, the liquor fractions and water-insoluble solids (WIS) were collected separately...... xylan recovery of 81.82% was observed by the pretreatment with 10 g AA/kg RCS. The toxic test on liquors showed that the inhibition effect happened to Baker's yeast when the acetic acid used in the pretreatment was higher than 100 g/kg RCS. The WIS obtained from the pretreatment with 15 g and 30 g...

  2. Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 2, September 30 to December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, J E; Wise, D L

    1978-03-10

    Preliminary results on the production of acetic acid from marine algae by anaerobic fermentation indicates that the rate is quite fast. First order rate constants of 0.77 day/sup -1/ have been observed. This rate constant gives a half-life of less than one day. In other words, with a properly designed product removal system a five day retention time would yield 98% of theoretical conversion. Determination of the theoretical conversion of marine algae to acetic acid is the subject of much experimentation. The production of one acetic acid molecule (or equivalent in higher organic acids) for each three carbon atoms in the substrate has been achieved; but it is possible that with a mixed culture more than one acetic acid molecule may be produced for each three carbons in the substrate.

  3. Acetic Acid Acts as a Volatile Signal To Stimulate Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Gozzi, Kevin; Yan, Fang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Volatiles are small air-transmittable chemicals with diverse biological activities. In this study, we showed that volatiles produced by the bacterium Bacillus subtilis had a profound effect on biofilm formation of neighboring B. subtilis cells that grew in proximity but were physically separated. We further demonstrated that one such volatile, acetic acid, is particularly potent in stimulating biofilm formation. Multiple lines of genetic evidence based on B. subtilis mutants that are defective in either acetic acid production or transportation suggest that B. subtilis uses acetic acid as a metabolic signal to coordinate the timing of biofilm formation. Lastly, we investigated how B. subtilis cells sense and respond to acetic acid in regulating biofilm formation. We showed the possible involvement of three sets of genes (ywbHG, ysbAB, and yxaKC), all encoding putative holin-antiholin-like proteins, in cells responding to acetic acid and stimulating biofilm formation. All three sets of genes were induced by acetate. A mutant with a triple mutation of those genes showed a severe delay in biofilm formation, whereas a strain overexpressing ywbHG showed early and robust biofilm formation. Results of our studies suggest that B. subtilis and possibly other bacteria use acetic acid as a metabolic signal to regulate biofilm formation as well as a quorum-sensing-like airborne signal to coordinate the timing of biofilm formation by physically separated cells in the community. PMID:26060272

  4. Mechanistic Insights Underlying Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in Vaginal Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Diana V; Salazar, Sara B; Lopes, Maria M; Mira, Nuno P

    2017-01-01

    During colonization of the vaginal tract Candida glabrata cells are challenged with the presence of acetic acid at a low pH, specially when dysbiosis occurs. To avoid exclusion from this niche C. glabrata cells are expected to evolve efficient adaptive responses to cope with this stress; however, these responses remain largely uncharacterized, especially in vaginal strains. In this work a cohort of 18 vaginal strains and 2 laboratory strains (CBS138 and KUE100) were phenotyped for their tolerance against inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid at pH 4. Despite some heterogeneity has been observed among the vaginal strains tested, in general these strains were considerably more tolerant to acetic acid than the laboratory strains. To tackle the mechanistic insights behind this differential level of tolerance observed, a set of vaginal strains differently tolerant to acetic acid (VG281∼VG49 acetic acid the more tolerant vaginal strains exhibited a higher activity of the plasma membrane proton pump CgPma1 and a reduced internal accumulation of the acid, these being two essential features to maximize tolerance. Based on the higher level of resistance exhibited by the vaginal strains against the action of a β-1,3-glucanase, it is hypothesized that the reduced internal accumulation of acetic acid inside these strains may originate from them having a different cell wall structure resulting in a reduced porosity to undissociated acetic acid molecules. Both the vaginal and the two laboratory strains were found to consume acetic acid in the presence of glucose indicating that metabolization of the acid is used by C. glabrata species as a detoxification mechanism. The results gathered in this study advance the current knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the increased competitiveness of C. glabrata in the vaginal tract, a knowledge that can be used to guide more suitable strategies to treat infections caused by this pathogenic yeast.

  5. Indole-3-acetic acid and 2-(indol-3-ylmethyl)indol-3-yl acetic acid in the thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    OpenAIRE

    White, R H

    1987-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 2-(indol-3-ylmethyl)indol-3-yl acetic acid were identified in lipid extracts of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius; they occurred at concentrations of 0.57 and 0.59 mumol/g (dry weight), respectively. The amount of IAA found in these cells is more than a thousand times greater than that found in a typical extract of a plant in which IAA serves as a plant growth hormone. Neither of these compounds was detected in the other archaebacteria that were analyzed; these included...

  6. Kinetics of Oxidation of 3-Benzoylpropionic Acid by N-Chlorobenzamide in Aqueous Acetic Acid Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Mohamed Farook

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of 3-benzoylpropionic acid (KA by N-chlorobenzamide (NCB in aqueous acetic acid medium in the presence of perchloric acid have been investigated. The observed rate of oxidation is first order dependence each in [KA], [NCB] and [H+]. The main product of the oxidation is the corresponding carboxylic acid. The rate decreases with the addition of benzamide, one of the products of the reaction. Variation in ionic strength of the reaction medium has no significant effect on the rate of oxidation. But the rate of the reaction is enhanced by lowering the dielectric constant of the reaction medium. Hypochlorous acidium ion (H2O+Cl, has been postulated as the reactive oxidizing species. A mechanism consistent with observed results have been proposed and the related rate law deduced. The activation parameters have been computed with respect to slow step of the mechanism.

  7. Supported Ionic Liquid Phase (SILP) Catalysis for the Production of Acetic acid by Methanol Carbonylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanning, Christopher William

    The work presented here is focused on the development of a new reaction process. It applies Supported Ionic Liquid Phase (SILP) catalysis to a specific reaction. By reacting methanol and carbon monoxide over a rhodium catalyst, acetic acid can be formed. This reaction is important on a large scale...... industrially, with millions of tonnes of acetic acid being produced annually. Acetic acid is an important precursor for making adhesives, plastics and fabrics. By using the SILP concept we are able to carry out the reaction in a continuous system, allowing a steady production of acetic acid without having...... to stop and re-start the reaction. This sort of continuous flow reaction is a subject of great research effort in recent years as it is more sustainable (and in some cases financially viable) that the current method of carrying out chemical reactions in large size batch reactions The project started right...

  8. the value of 5-hydroxy indole acetic acid measurement in spot urine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    HYDROXY INDOLE ACETIC ACID MEASUREMENT IN SPOT URINE IN DIAGNOSIS OF ACUTE APPENDICITIS. M.T. Oruc, MD, B. Kulah, MD., MD., O. Ozozan, B. Kulah, MD., V. Ozer, B. Kulah, MD. 3rd Sugical Department, Ankara numune ...

  9. Pretreatment and fermentation strategies to overcome the toxicity of acetic acid in hemicellulosic hydrolysates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussatto, Solange I.

    Acetic acid is one of the most important toxic compounds present in hemicellulosic hydrolysates. In order to overcome this problem, several strategies were studied for both biomass pretreatment and fermentation steps. Biomass deacetylation by mild alkaline pretreatment or using high pressure CO2...... were considered interesting strategies to selectively remove acetic acid from biomass structure. In addition, the selective removal of acetic acid from biomass as a first step in the whole biomass conversion chain, contribute for the development and implementation of competitive biorefinery platforms...... where acetic acid can also be integrated as a valuable final product. For the fermentation step, it is well known that hemicellulosic hydrolysates usually need to be detoxified prior use as fermentation medium in order to improve the performance of the microorganism to convert sugars in the product...

  10. THE EFFECTS OF ANIMAL AGE AND ACETIC ACID CONCENTRATION ON PIGSKIN GELATIN CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Pranoto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to study the influence of animal age and concentration of the acetic acid solution on physical and chemical properties of pigskin gelatin. The experiment used Completely Randomized Design (CRD with two factors. The first factor was animal age consisted of 3 levels (5, 7 and 9 months. The second factor was concentration of acetic acid solution consisted of 3 levels (2, 4 and 6 percents. The result showed that animal age had significant effect (P0.05 on the yields, gel strength, viscosity, protein content and pH value. It was concluded that pigskin gelatin from ages of 5, 7 and 9 months and acetic acid concentration of 2, 4 and 6% had similar characteristics to the commercial gelatin, but the optimum production of gelatin was combination of pigskin gelatin from 7 months and of 2% acetic acid.

  11. Comparison of Cultivable Acetic Acid Bacterial Microbiota in Organic and Conventional Apple Cider Vinegar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aleksandra Stornik; Barbara Skok; Janja Trcek

    2016-01-01

      The authors compared the cultivable acetic acid bacterial microbiota in the production of organic and conventional apple cider vinegars from a smoothly running oxidation cycle of a submerged industrial process...

  12. Intensive Therapy of Patients with Acetic Acid Poisoning Complicated by Shock

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Stopnitsky; R. N. Akalaev

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of the elaborated intensive therapy policy for acute acetic acid poisoning complicated by exotoxic shock.Subjects and methods. The results of treatment were analyzed in 72 patients admitted in 2008—2012 with severe acute acetic acid poisoning complicated by exotoxic shock. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1) combination therapy added by an improved intensive therapy complex; 2) conventional therapy. All the patients underwent comprehensive clinica...

  13. KINETIC OF ESTERIFICATION OF ETHYL ALCOHOL BY ACETIC ACID ON A CATALYTIC RESIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol İNCE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The conversion kinetics of diluted acetic acid to ethyl acetate by ethanol esterification in a batch reactor in liquid phase with an acidic polymer catalyst (lewatit series was studied. The intrinsic rate constants have been correlated with the reaction temperature, concentration of catalyst, initial ratios of reactants and initial water concentrations. The kinetic analysis was restricted to the system at hand in which a liquid and vapor phase are at equilibrium.

  14. Growing and laying performance of Japanese quail fed diet supplemented with different concentrations of acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef A. Attia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the effect of acetic acid on growing and laying performance of Japanese Quail (JQ, 180 15-day-old JQ were divided into 4 groups. During the growing (15-42 days of age and laying (43-84 days of age periods, the groups fed the same basal diets supplemented with 0, 1.5, 3 and 6% of acetic acid. Each diet was fed to five replicates of 9 JQ (3 males:6 females during the growing period. During the laying period, 128 birds were housed in 32 cages (4 birds per cage, 1 male and 3 females, 8 replicates per treatment. Birds were housed in wire cages (46L×43W×20H cm in an open room. Acetic acid supplementation at 3% in the diets significantly increased the growth and laying rate and the Haugh unit score. The liver percentage significantly decreased with acetic acid at 6%. Acetic acid at 3% significantly increased hemoglobin concentrations at 6 weeks of age and increased weight of day old chicks hatched. Acetic acid affected the immune system as manifested by an excess of cellular reactions in the intestine as well as lymphoid hyperplasia in the spleen tissue. Degenerative changes in the covering epithelium of the intestinal villi were noted at the 6% concentration of acetic acid. Hepatocyte vacuolation and fatty changes were also observed at this concentration of treatment. In conclusion, 3% acetic acid may be used as a feed supplement for JQ during the growing and laying period to improve the productive performance.

  15. Comparison of Cultivable Acetic Acid Bacterial Microbiota in Organic and Conventional Apple Cider Vinegar

    OpenAIRE

    Štornik, Aleksandra; Skok, Barbara; Trček, Janja

    2016-01-01

    Organic apple cider vinegar is produced from apples that go through very restricted treatment in orchard. During the first stage of the process, the sugars from apples are fermented by yeasts to cider. The produced ethanol is used as a substrate by acetic acid bacteria in a second separated bioprocess. In both, the organic and conventional apple cider vinegars the ethanol oxidation to acetic acid is initiated by native microbiota that survived alcohol fermentation. We compared the cultivable ...

  16. Effects of acetic acid and lactic acid on physicochemical characteristics of native and cross-linked wheat starches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzoobi, Mahsa; Beparva, Paniz

    2014-03-15

    The effects of two common organic acids; lactic and acetic acids (150 mg/kg) on physicochemical properties of native and cross-linked wheat starches were investigated prior and after gelatinization. These acids caused formation of some cracks and spots on the granules. The intrinsic viscosity of both starches decreased in the presence of the acids particularly after gelatinization. Water solubility increased while water absorption reduced after addition of the acids. The acids caused reduction in gelatinization temperature and enthalpy of gelatinization of both starches. The starch gels became softer, less cohesive, elastic and gummy when acids were added. These changes may indicate the degradation of the starch molecules by the acids. Cross-linked wheat starch was more resistant to the acids. However, both starches became more susceptible to the acids after gelatinization. The effect of lactic acid on physicochemical properties of both starches before and after gelatinization was greater than acetic acid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Engineering Escherichia coli to convert acetic acid to β-caryophyllene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianming; Nie, Qingjuan

    2016-05-05

    Under aerobic conditions, acetic acid is the major byproduct produced by E. coli during the fermentation. And acetic acid is detrimental to cell growth as it destroys transmembrane pH gradients. Hence, how to reduce the production of acetic acid and how to utilize it as a feedstock are of intriguing interest. In this study, we provided an evidence to produce β-caryophyllene by the engineered E. coli using acetic acid as the only carbon source. Firstly, to construct the robust acetate-utilizing strain, acetyl-CoA synthases from three different sources were introduced and screened in the E. coli. Secondly, to establish the engineered strains converting acetic acid to β-caryophyllene, acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS), β-caryophyllene synthase (QHS1) and geranyl diphosphate synthase (GPPS2) were co-expressed in the E. coli cells. Thirdly, to further enhance β-caryophyllene production from acetic acid, the heterologous MVA pathway was introduced into the cells. What's more, acetoacetyl-CoA synthase (AACS) was also expressed in the cells to increase the precursor acetoacetyl-CoA and accordingly resulted in the increase of β-caryophyllene. The final genetically modified strain, YJM67, could accumulate the production of biomass and β-caryophyllene up to 12.6 and 1.05 g/L during 72 h, respectively, with a specific productivity of 1.15 mg h(-1) g(-1) dry cells, and the conversion efficiency of acetic acid to β-caryophyllene (gram to gram) reached 2.1%. The yield of β-caryophyllene on acetic acid of this strain also reached approximately 5.6% of the theoretical yield. In the present study, a novel biosynthetic pathway for β-caryophyllene has been investigated by means of conversion of acetic acid to β-caryophyllene using an engineered Escherichia coli. This was the first successful attempt in β-caryophyllene production by E. coli using acetic acid as the only carbon source. Therefore, we have provided a new metabolic engineering tool for β-caryophyllene synthesis.

  18. Insights into the mechanism of acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minhua; Yao, Rui; Jiang, Haoxi; Li, Guiming; Chen, Yifei

    2017-08-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to theoretically explain the reaction mechanism of acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu catalyst. The activation barriers of key elementary steps and the adsorption configurations of key intermediates involved in acetic acid hydrogenation on Cu(111) surface were investigated. The results indicated that the direct dissociation of acetic acid to acetyl (CH3COOH → CH3CO + OH) is the rate-determined step. The activation barrier of acetic acid scission to acetyl and the adsorption energy of acetic acid are two descriptors which could determine the conversion of acetic acid. The descriptors might have effects on the ethanol selectivity including: the adsorption energy of acetaldehyde and the activation barriers for Osbnd H bond formation of C2-oxygenates (CH3CO + H → CH3COH, CH3CHO + H → CH3CHOH and CH3CH2O + H → CH3CH2OH). These proposed descriptors could be used as references to design new Cu-based catalysts that have excellent catalytic performance.

  19. Continuous Ethanol Production with a Membrane Bioreactor at High Acetic Acid Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Päivi Ylitervo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The release of inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid from lignocellulosic raw materials during hydrolysis is one of the main concerns for 2nd generation ethanol production. The undissociated form of acetic acid can enter the cell by diffusion through the plasma membrane and trigger several toxic effects, such as uncoupling and lowered intracellular pH. The effect of acetic acid on the ethanol production was investigated in continuous cultivations by adding medium containing 2.5 to 20.0 g·L−1 acetic acid at pH 5.0, at a dilution rate of 0.5 h−1. The cultivations were performed at both high (~25 g·L−1 and very high (100–200 g·L−1 yeast concentration by retaining the yeast cells inside the reactor by a cross-flow membrane in a membrane bioreactor. The yeast was able to steadily produce ethanol from 25 g·L−1 sucrose, at volumetric rates of 5–6 g·L−1·h−1 at acetic acid concentrations up to 15.0 g·L−1. However, the yeast continued to produce ethanol also at a concentration of 20 g·L−1 acetic acid but at a declining rate. The study thereby demonstrates the great potential of the membrane bioreactor for improving the robustness of the ethanol production based on lignocellulosic raw materials.

  20. Acetic acid modulates spike rate and spike latency to salt in peripheral gustatory neurons of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breza, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Sour and salt taste interactions are not well understood in the peripheral gustatory system. Therefore, we investigated the interaction of acetic acid and NaCl on taste processing by rat chorda tympani neurons. We recorded multi-unit responses from the severed chorda tympani nerve (CT) and single-cell responses from intact narrowly tuned and broadly tuned salt-sensitive neurons in the geniculate ganglion simultaneously with stimulus-evoked summated potentials to signal when the stimulus contacted the lingual epithelium. Artificial saliva served as the rinse and solvent for all stimuli [0.3 M NH4Cl, 0.5 M sucrose, 0.1 M NaCl, 0.01 M citric acid, 0.02 M quinine hydrochloride (QHCl), 0.1 M KCl, 0.003–0.1 M acetic acid, and 0.003–0.1 M acetic acid mixed with 0.1 M NaCl]. We used benzamil to assess NaCl responses mediated by the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). The CT nerve responses to acetic acid/NaCl mixtures were less than those predicted by summing the component responses. Single-unit analyses revealed that acetic acid activated acid-generalist neurons exclusively in a concentration-dependent manner: increasing acid concentration increased response frequency and decreased response latency in a parallel fashion. Acetic acid suppressed NaCl responses in ENaC-dependent NaCl-specialist neurons, whereas acetic acid-NaCl mixtures were additive in acid-generalist neurons. These data suggest that acetic acid attenuates sodium responses in ENaC-expressing-taste cells in contact with NaCl-specialist neurons, whereas acetic acid-NaCl mixtures activate distinct receptor/cellular mechanisms on taste cells in contact with acid-generalist neurons. We speculate that NaCl-specialist neurons are in contact with type I cells, whereas acid-generalist neurons are in contact with type III cells in fungiform taste buds. PMID:22896718

  1. Page 1 286 Salimuzzaman Siddiqui and others acetic acid, yielded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hydrochloride was obtained by adding ethereal hydrochlor to a solution of the base in ethyl acetate and ether as snow-white agg of needles. Recrystallised from a mixture of alcohol, acetone and e melted at 259-60. It is soluble in alcohol and water, difficultly sol1 acetone, insoluble in ether. Found: after drying in air, Cl, 17.2.

  2. Liquid-liquid equilibrium constant for acetic acid in an olive oil-epoxidized olive oil-acetic acid-hydrogen peroxide-water system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Milovan R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The liquid-liquid equilibrium constant for acetic acid in a quinary system olive oil-epoxidized olive oil-acetic acid-hydrogen peroxide-water was experimentally determined for temperatures and component ratios relevant for in situ epoxidation of plant oils. The values has the constant range from 1.52 to 2.73. To predict the equilibrium constant for acetic acid, the experimental data were correlated with UNIQUAC (universal quasi chemical and NRTL (non-random two liquid activity coefficient models. For simplified calculation of the phase equilibrium the insolubility of olive oil and epoxidized olive oil in the water, as well as insolubility of water and hydrogen peroxide in the olive oil and epoxidized olive oil, was assumed. The root mean square deviation (RMSD of the experimental and calculated values of the liquid-liquid equilibrium constant for acetic acid is 0.1910 for the UNIQUAC model and 0.1815 for the NRTL model. For rigorous flash calculation, when the partitioning of all components between the phases was assumed, the RMSD for the NRTL model is 0.1749. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45022

  3. The fraction of cells that resume growth after acetic acid addition is a strain-dependent parameter of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Steve; Fernández-Niño, Miguel; González-Ramos, Daniel; van Maris, Antonius J A; Nevoigt, Elke

    2014-06-01

    High acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a relevant phenotype in industrial biotechnology when using lignocellulosic hydrolysates as feedstock. A screening of 38 S. cerevisiae strains for tolerance to acetic acid revealed considerable differences, particularly with regard to the duration of the latency phase. To understand how this phenotype is quantitatively manifested, four strains exhibiting significant differences were studied in more detail. Our data show that the duration of the latency phase is primarily determined by the fraction of cells within the population that resume growth. Only this fraction contributed to the exponential growth observed after the latency phase, while all other cells persisted in a viable but non-proliferating state. A remarkable variation in the size of the fraction was observed among the tested strains differing by several orders of magnitude. In fact, only 11 out of 10(7)  cells of the industrial bioethanol production strain Ethanol Red resumed growth after exposure to 157 mM acetic acid at pH 4.5, while this fraction was 3.6 × 10(6) (out of 10(7)  cells) in the highly acetic acid tolerant isolate ATCC 96581. These strain-specific differences are genetically determined and represent a valuable starting point to identify genetic targets for future strain improvement. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Polygenic analysis and targeted improvement of the complex trait of high acetic acid tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijnen, Jean-Paul; Randazzo, Paola; Foulquié-Moreno, María R; van den Brink, Joost; Vandecruys, Paul; Stojiljkovic, Marija; Dumortier, Françoise; Zalar, Polona; Boekhout, Teun; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Kokošar, Janez; Štajdohar, Miha; Curk, Tomaž; Petrovič, Uroš; Thevelein, Johan M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acetic acid is one of the major inhibitors in lignocellulose hydrolysates used for the production of second-generation bioethanol. Although several genes have been identified in laboratory yeast strains that are required for tolerance to acetic acid, the genetic basis of the high acetic

  5. Tetra-n-propyl?ammonium acetate?boric acid (1/1)

    OpenAIRE

    Yun-Xia Yang; Qi Li; Seik Weng Ng

    2009-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the ammonium carboxylate–boric acid cocrystal, (C3H7)4N+·CH3CO2−·H3BO3, the boric acid forms two O—H...O hydrogen bonds to the acetate anion. The acetate–boric acid species is hydrogen bonded to another acetate–boric acid species through the third OH unit of the boric acid about a twofold rotation axis.

  6. Pretreatment of corn stover with diluted acetic acid for enhancement of acidogenic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xu; Wang, Lijuan; Lu, Xuebin; Zhang, Shuting

    2014-04-01

    A Box-Behnken design of response surface method was used to optimize acetic acid-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment of corn stover, in respect to acid concentration (0.05-0.25%), treatment time (5-15 min) and reaction temperature (180-210°C). Acidogenic fermentations with different initial pH and hydrolyzates were also measured to evaluate the optimal pretreatment conditions for maximizing acid production. The results showed that pretreatment with 0.25% acetic acid at 191°C for 7.74 min was found to be the most optimal condition for pretreatment of corn stover under which the production of acids can reach the highest level. Acidogenic fermentation with the hydrolyzate of pretreatment at the optimal condition at the initial pH=5 was shown to be butyric acid type fermentation, producing 21.84 g acetic acid, 7.246 g propionic acid, 9.170 butyric acid and 1.035 g isovaleric acid from 100g of corn stover in 900 g of water containing 2.25 g acetic acid. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Performance of dairy cows fed high levels of acetic acid or ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J L P; Amaral, R C; Sá Neto, A; Cabezas-Garcia, E H; Bispo, A W; Zopollatto, M; Cardoso, T L; Spoto, M H F; Santos, F A P; Nussio, L G

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol and acetic acid are common end products from silages. The main objective of this study was to determine whether high concentrations of ethanol or acetic acid in total mixed ration would affect performance in dairy cows. Thirty mid-lactation Holstein cows were grouped in 10 blocks and fed one of the following diets for 7 wk: (1) control (33% Bermuda hay + 67% concentrates), (2) ethanol [control diet + 5% ethanol, dry matter (DM) basis], or (3) acetic acid (control diet + 5% acetic acid, DM basis). Ethanol and acetic acid were diluted in water (1:2) and sprayed onto total mixed rations twice daily before feeding. An equal amount of water was mixed with the control ration. To adapt animals to these treatments, cows were fed only half of the treatment dose during the first week of study. Cows fed ethanol yielded more milk (37.9 kg/d) than those fed the control (35.8 kg/d) or acetic acid (35.3 kg/d) diets, mainly due to the higher DM intake (DMI; 23.7, 22.2, and 21.6 kg/d, respectively). The significant diet × week interaction for DMI, mainly during wk 2 and 3 (when acetic acid reached the full dose), was related to the decrease in DMI observed for the acetic acid treatment. There was a diet × week interaction in excretion of milk energy per DMI during wk 2 and 3, due to cows fed acetic acid sustained milk yield despite lower DMI. Energy efficiency was similar across diets. Blood metabolites (glucose, insulin, nonesterified fatty acids, ethanol, and γ-glutamyl transferase activity) and sensory characteristics of milk were not affected by these treatments. Animal performance suggested similar energy value for the diet containing ethanol compared with other diets. Rumen conversion of ethanol to acetate and a concomitant increase in methane production might be a plausible explanation for the deviation of the predicted energy value based on the heat of combustion. Therefore, the loss of volatile compounds during the drying process in the laboratory should be

  8. Isolation of acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibis, Katharina Gabriela; Gneipel, Armin; König, Helmut

    2016-02-20

    In this study, acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria were isolated from thermophilic and mesophilic biogas plants (BGP) located in Germany. The fermenters were fed with maize silage and cattle or swine manure. Furthermore, pressurized laboratory fermenters digesting maize silage were sampled. Enrichment cultures for the isolation of acid-forming bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with one of the following carbon sources: Na(+)-dl-lactate, succinate, ethanol, glycerol, glucose or a mixture of amino acids. These substrates could be converted by the isolates to acetic, propionic or butyric acid. In total, 49 isolates were obtained, which belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Tenericutes or Thermotogae. According to 16S rRNA gene sequences, most isolates were related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides, Defluviitoga tunisiensis and Dendrosporobacter quercicolus. Acetic, propionic or butyric acid were produced in cultures of isolates affiliated to Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Clostridium aminovalericum, Clostridium cochlearium/Clostridium tetani, C. sporosphaeroides, D. quercicolus, Proteiniborus ethanoligenes, Selenomonas bovis and Tepidanaerobacter sp. Isolates related to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum produced acetic, butyric and lactic acid, and isolates related to D. tunisiensis formed acetic acid. Specific primer sets targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences were designed and used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The isolates were physiologically characterized and their role in BGP discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Membrane fractionation of herring marinade for separation and recovery of fats, proteins, amino acids, salt, acetic acid and water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjerbæk Søtoft, Lene; Lizarazu, Juncal Martin; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz

    2015-01-01

    containing sugars, amino acids and smaller peptides and a NF permeate containing salt and acetic acid ready for reuse. 42% of the spent marinade is recovered to substitute fresh water and chemicals. The Waste water amount is reduced 62.5%. Proteins are concentrated 30 times, while amino acids and smaller...

  10. Transport of acetic acid in Zygosaccharomyces bailii: effects of ethanol and their implications on the resistance of the yeast to acidic environments.

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa,M. J. de; Miranda, L.; Côrte-Real, M; Leão, C.

    1996-01-01

    Cells of Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307 grown in a medium with acetic acid, ethanol, or glycerol as the sole carbon and energy source transported acetic acid by a saturable transport system. This system accepted propionic and formic acids but not lactic, sorbic, and benzoic acids. When the carbon source was glucose or fructose, the cells displayed activity of a mediated transport system specific for acetic acid, apparently not being able to recognize other monocarboxylic acids. In both typ...

  11. Transport of acetic acid in Zygosaccharomyces bailii: effects of ethanol and implications on the resistance of the yeast to acid environments

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Maria João; Leticia M. Estevinho; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Leão, Cecília

    1996-01-01

    Cells of Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307 grown in a medium with acetic acid, ethanol, or glycerol as the sole carbon and energy source transported acetic acid by a saturable transport system. This system accepted propionic and formic acids but not lactic, sorbic, and benzoic acids. When the carbon source was glucose or fructose, the cells displayed activity of a mediated transport system specific for acetic acid, apparently not being able to recognize other monocarboxylic acids....

  12. Physiological responses of insects to microbial fermentation products: Insights from the interactions between Drosophila and acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geonho; Huang, Jia Hsin; McMullen, John G; Newell, Peter D; Douglas, Angela E

    2017-05-15

    Acetic acid is a fermentation product of many microorganisms, including some that inhabit the food and guts of Drosophila. Here, we investigated the effect of dietary acetic acid on oviposition and larval performance of Drosophila. At all concentrations tested (0.34-3.4%), acetic acid promoted egg deposition by mated females in no-choice assays; and females preferred to oviposit on diet with acetic acid relative to acetic acid-free diet. However, acetic acid depressed larval performance, particularly extending the development time of both larvae colonized with the bacterium Acetobacter pomorum and axenic (microbe-free) larvae. The larvae may incur an energetic cost associated with dissipating the high acid load on acetic acid-supplemented diets. This effect was compounded by suppressed population growth of A. pomorum on the 3.4% acetic acid diet, such that the gnotobiotic Drosophila on this diet displayed traits characteristic of axenic Drosophila, specifically reduced developmental rate and elevated lipid content. It is concluded that acetic acid is deleterious to larval Drosophila, and hypothesized that acetic acid may function as a reliable cue for females to oviposit in substrates bearing microbial communities that promote larval nutrition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Steam Reforming of Acetic Acid over Co-Supported Catalysts: Coupling Ketonization for Greater Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Stephen D. [Energy and Environmental; Spies, Kurt A. [Energy and Environmental; Mei, Donghai [Energy and Environmental; Kovarik, Libor [Energy and Environmental; Kutnyakov, Igor [Energy and Environmental; Li, Xiaohong S. [Energy and Environmental; Lebarbier Dagle, Vanessa [Energy and Environmental; Albrecht, Karl O. [Energy and Environmental; Dagle, Robert A. [Energy and Environmental

    2017-09-11

    We report on the markedly improved stability of a novel 2-bed catalytic system, as compared to a conventional 1-bed steam reforming catalyst, for the production of H2 from acetic acid. The 2-bed catalytic system comprises of i) a basic oxide ketonization catalyst for the conversion of acetic acid to acetone, and a ii) Co-based steam reforming catalyst, both catalytic beds placed in sequence within the same unit operation. Steam reforming catalysts are particularly prone to catalytic deactivation when steam reforming acetic acid, used here as a model compound for the aqueous fraction of bio-oil. Catalysts comprising MgAl2O4, ZnO, CeO2, and activated carbon (AC) both with and without Co-addition were evaluated for conversion of acetic acid and acetone, its ketonization product, in the presence of steam. It was found that over the bare oxide support only ketonization activity was observed and coke deposition was minimal. With addition of Co to the oxide support steam reforming activity was facilitated and coke deposition was significantly increased. Acetone steam reforming over the same Co-supported catalysts demonstrated more stable performance and with less coke deposition than with acetic acid feedstock. DFT analysis suggests that over Co surface CHxCOO species are more favorably formed from acetic acid versus acetone. These CHxCOO species are strongly bound to the Co catalyst surface and could explain the higher propensity for coke formation from acetic acid. Based on these findings, in order to enhance stability of the steam reforming catalyst a dual-bed (2-bed) catalyst system was implemented. Comparing the 2-bed and 1-bed (Co-supported catalyst only) systems under otherwise identical reaction conditions the 2-bed demonstrated significantly improved stability and coke deposition was decreased by a factor of 4.

  14. Oral Administration of Lipopolysaccharide of Acetic Acid Bacteria Protects Pollen Allergy in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Satoko; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Nakata, Yoko; Ohmori, Masaki; Kohchi, Chie; Soma, Gen-Ichiro

    2015-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major component of the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria, is known to possess strong immune-regulatory activity. We have found and reported the existence of biologically-active LPS in acetic acid bacteria. The LPS shows Limulus-positive activity and activation of macrophages to produce nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor. In this study, we investigated the anti-allergic effect of an orally-administrated acetic acid bacteria extract containing LPS; the cedar pollinosis model was used. Acetic acid bacteria were isolated from various fruits by Nodai kaihen medium. Then, the anti-allergic effect of acetic acid bacteria extracts was investigated. BALB/c mice were immunized with a mixture of cedar pollen and alum into their peritoneal cavity; they also received additional immunizations of pollen to nasal cavity. After immunizing the mice with pollen into their nasal cavity to trigger an allergic reaction, the frequency of nose scratching was counted for 5 min. The bacteria were cultured and prepared and the water-extract contained about 1-10 mg/ml of Limulus positive substances. The extract of acetic acid bacteria induced higher levels of interleukin (IL)-10 and FOXP3 mRNA expression in macrophages (RAW246.7 cell), as assessed by DNA microarray analysis. Oral administration of the acetic acid bacteria extract demonstrated significantly less scratching numbers than control water group with pollen immunization. These results showed that LPS in acetic acid bacteria has the potential to protect from an allergic reaction, especially from cedar pollinosis. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. Studies on the production of indole-3-acetic acid with auxin-heterotrophic mutants derived from cultured crown gall cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeaki, Atsumi; Department of Biology, College of General Education, University of Tokyo

    1980-01-01

    Mutants in the indole-3-acetic acid metabolism derived from cultured crown gall cells were tested to see whether they could utilize any one of eight indolic compounds in place of indole-3-acetic acid. Two auxin-heterotrophic mutant cell lines could not utilize indolepyruvic acid, but growth recovered when there was a supplement of indole-3-acetic acid. Indoleacetonitril and indoleacetaldoxime inhibited the growth of mutant cell lines and their parental crown gall cells. Cultured crown gall ce...

  16. Effect of acetic acid on rice seeds coated with rice husk ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizandro Ciciliano Tavares

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Flooded rice cultivation promotes anaerobic conditions, favoring the formation of short chain organic acids such as acetic acid, which may be toxic to the crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of acetic acid on rice seeds coated with rice husk ash. The experiment was arranged in a 2 x 5 x 5 factorial randomized design, with two cultivars (IRGA 424 and BRS Querência, five doses of coating material (0, 2, 3,4 e 5 g kg-1 seed and five concentrations of acetic acid (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 mM, with 4 replications, totaling 50 treatments. The variables first count of germination, germination, shoot and root length, dry weight of shoots and roots were recorded. The results showed that coating rice seeds with rice husk ash up to 5 g kg-1 seed does not influence the performance of rice seeds of cultivars IRGA 424 and BRS Querência when exposed to concentrations of 12 mM acetic acid. The presence of acetic acid in the substrates used for seed germination reduced the vigor and viability of seeds of cultivars IRGA 424 and BRS Querência, as well as seedling development, affecting mainly the roots of BRS Querência.

  17. Aversive responses by shore crabs to acetic acid but not to capsaicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, Robert W; Dalton, Natasha; Riddell, Gillian

    2017-07-01

    Nociception is the ability to encode and perceive harmful stimuli and allows for a rapid reflexive withdrawal. In some species, nociception might be accompanied by a pain experience, which is a negative feeling that allows for longer-term changes in behaviour. Different types of stimuli may affect nociceptors, but in crustaceans there is conflicting evidence about the ability to respond to chemical stimuli. This study attempts to resolve this situation by testing behavioural responses of the common shore crab, Carcinus maenas, to two chemical irritants frequently used in vertebrate pain studies (acetic acid and capsaicin). In our first experiment acetic acid, water, capsaicin or mineral oil were applied by brush to the mouth, and in a second experiment treatments were applied to the eyes. Application of acetic acid had a marked effect on behaviour that included vigorous movement of mouth parts, scratching at the mouth with the claws and attempts to escape from the enclosure. Acetic acid also caused holding down of the acid-treated eye in the socket. By contrast, capsaicin had no effect and was no different to the control treatment of mineral oil and water. These results demonstrate responsiveness to acetic acid and thus nociceptive capacity for at least some chemicals. Further, the responses that persist after application were consistent with the idea of pain, however, proof of pain is not possible in any animal. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Acetic acid bacteria: A group of bacteria with versatile biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saichana, Natsaran; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao; Frébort, Ivo; Frebortova, Jitka

    2015-11-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are gram-negative obligate aerobic bacteria assigned to the family Acetobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. They are members of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Swaminathania, Saccharibacter, Neoasaia, Granulibacter, Tanticharoenia, Ameyamaea, Neokomagataea, and Komagataeibacter. Many strains of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter have been known to possess high acetic acid fermentation ability as well as the acetic acid and ethanol resistance, which are considered to be useful features for industrial production of acetic acid and vinegar, the commercial product. On the other hand, Gluconobacter strains have the ability to perform oxidative fermentation of various sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar acids leading to the formation of several valuable products. Thermotolerant strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated in order to serve as the new strains of choice for industrial fermentations, in which the cooling costs for maintaining optimum growth and production temperature in the fermentation vessels could be significantly reduced. Genetic modifications by adaptation and genetic engineering were also applied to improve their properties, such as productivity and heat resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 2, September 30--December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary results on the production of acetic acid from marine algae by anaerobic fermentation indicate that the rate is quite fast. First order rate constants of 0.77 day/sup -1/ were observed. This rate constant gives a half-life of less than one day. In other words, with a properly designed product removal system a five day retention time would yield 98% of theoretical conversion. Determination of the theoretical conversion of marine algae to acetic acid is the subject of much experimentation. The production of one acetic acid molecule (or equivalent in higher organic acids) for each three carbon atoms in the substrate has been achieved; but it is possible that with a mixed culture more than one acetic acid molecule may be produced for each three carbons in the substrate. Work is continuing to improve the yield of acetic acid from marine algae. Marine algae have been found to be rather low in carbon, but the carbon appears to be readily available for fermentation. It, therefore, lends itself to the production of higher value chemicals in relatively expensive equipment, where the rapid conversion rate is particularly cost effective. Fixed packed bed fermenters appear to be desirable for the production of liquid products which are inhibitory to the fermentation from coarse substrates. The inhibitory products may be removed from the fermentation by extraction during recirculation. This technique lends itself to either conventional processing or low capital processing of substrates which require long retention times.

  20. Laboratory Studies of the Tropospheric Loss Processes for Acetic and Peracetic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.

    2002-12-01

    Organic acids are ubiquitous components of tropospheric air and contribute to acid precipitation, particularly in remote regions. These species are present in the troposphere as the result of direct emissions from anthropogenic and biogenic sources, and as the result of photochemical processing of hydrocarbons. Production of organic acids can occur following ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons, while both organic acids and peroxyacids are formed from the reactions of HO2 with acylperoxy radicals. For example, both acetic and peracetic acid are known products of the reaction of HO2 with acetylperoxy radicals. In this paper, data relevant to the gas-phase tropospheric destruction of both acetic and peracetic acid are reported, including studies of their UV absorption spectra and of their rate coefficients for reaction with OH radicals. The data, the first of their kind for peracetic acid, show that the gas-phase lifetime of this species will be on the order of 10 days, with OH reaction occurring more rapidly than photolysis. Data on the rate coefficient for reaction of OH with acetic acid appear to resolve some conflicting data in the previous literature, and show 1) that reaction of OH with the acetic acid dimer is slow compared to the monomer and 2) that the rate coefficient possesses a negative temperature dependence near room temperature.

  1. The fate of acetic acid during glucose co-metabolism by the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most widely represented spoilage yeast species, being able to metabolise acetic acid in the presence of glucose. To clarify whether simultaneous utilisation of the two substrates affects growth efficiency, we examined growth in single- and mixed-substrate cultures with glucose and acetic acid. Our findings indicate that the biomass yield in the first phase of growth is the result of the weighted sum of the respective biomass yields on single-substrate medium, supporting the conclusion that biomass yield on each substrate is not affected by the presence of the other at pH 3.0 and 5.0, at least for the substrate concentrations examined. In vivo(13C-NMR spectroscopy studies showed that the gluconeogenic pathway is not operational and that [2-(13C]acetate is metabolised via the Krebs cycle leading to the production of glutamate labelled on C(2, C(3 and C(4. The incorporation of [U-(14C]acetate in the cellular constituents resulted mainly in the labelling of the protein and lipid pools 51.5% and 31.5%, respectively. Overall, our data establish that glucose is metabolised primarily through the glycolytic pathway, and acetic acid is used as an additional source of acetyl-CoA both for lipid synthesis and the Krebs cycle. This study provides useful clues for the design of new strategies aimed at overcoming yeast spoilage in acidic, sugar-containing food environments. Moreover, the elucidation of the molecular basis underlying the resistance phenotype of Z. bailii to acetic acid will have a potential impact on the improvement of the performance of S. cerevisiae industrial strains often exposed to acetic acid stress conditions, such as in wine and bioethanol production.

  2. Comparative analysis of acetic and citric acid on internal milieu of broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Capcarova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false CS JA X-NONE The aim of the present study was to analyse the effect of two organic acids (acetic and citric acid inclusion on serum parameters and the level of antioxidant status of broiler chickens. Some organic acidifiers reduce the growth of many intestinal bacteria, reduce intestinal colonisation and reduce infectious processes, decrease inflammatory processes at the intestinal mucosa, increase villus height and function of secretion, digestion and absorption of nutrients. Broiler chickens hybrid Ross 308 (n=180 were divided into 3 groups: one control (C and two experimental groups (E1, E2. Experimental animals received acetic and citric acid per os in water in single dose 0.25% for 42 days. After 42 days of feeding blood samples were collected (n=10 in each group. Significant decrease of serum triglycerides in citric acid group when compared with the control group was recorded. Acetic acid administration resulted in increased sodium level. Significant increase of albumin content in both experimental groups and increase of bilirubin content in citric group was recorded. Acids administration had no significant effect on other serum and antioxidant parameters. Acetic and citric acid had no harmful influenced on internal milieu of broiler chickens. The research on the field of organic acid will be worthy of further investigation.

  3. Biochemical effects of ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) on germination, length of stem, area of leaf, fresh weight, level of lipid per oxidation, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, super oxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in the roots of cadmium (Cd) treated maize (Zea mays L) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L) ...

  4. Acetic Acid Detection Threshold in Synthetic Wine Samples of a Portable Electronic Nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Macías Macías

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Wine quality is related to its intrinsic visual, taste, or aroma characteristics and is reflected in the price paid for that wine. One of the most important wine faults is the excessive concentration of acetic acid which can cause a wine to take on vinegar aromas and reduce its varietal character. Thereby it is very important for the wine industry to have methods, like electronic noses, for real-time monitoring the excessive concentration of acetic acid in wines. However, aroma characterization of alcoholic beverages with sensor array electronic noses is a difficult challenge due to the masking effect of ethanol. In this work, in order to detect the presence of acetic acid in synthetic wine samples (aqueous ethanol solution at 10% v/v we use a detection unit which consists of a commercial electronic nose and a HSS32 auto sampler, in combination with a neural network classifier (MLP. To find the characteristic vector representative of the sample that we want to classify, first we select the sensors, and the section of the sensors response curves, where the probability of detecting the presence of acetic acid will be higher, and then we apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA such that each sensor response curve is represented by the coefficients of its first principal components. Results show that the PEN3 electronic nose is able to detect and discriminate wine samples doped with acetic acid in concentrations equal or greater than 2 g/L.

  5. Recovery of arabinan in acetic acid-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment on corn stover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jian; Hedegaard, Mette Christina; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2009-01-01

    Acetic acid-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment was done on corn stover under 195 °C, 15 min with the acetic acid ranging from 5 × 10−3 to 0.2 g g−1 corn stover. After pretreatment, the water-insoluble solids (WISs) and liquors were collected respectively. Arabinan recoveries from both WIS...... and liquors were investigated. The results indicate that there was no detectable arabinan left in the WIS when the acetic acid of 0.1 and 0.2 g g−1 corn stover were used in the pretreatment. The arabinan contents in the other WISs were not more than 10%. However, the arabinan found in the liquors...... was not covering the amount of arabinan released from the raw corn stover. For the arabinan recovery from liquor fractions, the highest of 43.57% was obtained by the pretreatment of acetic acid of 0.01 g g−1 of corn stover and the lowest was only 26.77% when the acetic acid of 0.2 g g−1 corn stover was used...

  6. Formation of formic acid, acetic acid and lactic acid from decomposition of citric acid by coal ash particles at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakui, Hiroyuki; Okitsu, Kenji; Maeda, Yasuaki; Nishimura, Rokuro

    2009-08-30

    It was found for the first time that citric acid was decomposed to formic acid, acetic acid and lactic acid in the presence of coal ash particles at pH 3 at 20 degrees C, while it was not decomposed at more than pH 5. The yield of organic acid at stirring time of 60 min is in the order of formic acid>acetic acid>lactic acid. Since citric acid dissociates to citric anion at more than pH 5, it was suggested that citric anion and negatively charged coal ash particles repelled electrically each other at more than pH 5, resulting in that citric acid could not be adsorbed and not be decomposed on coal ash. Based on the obtained results, the decomposition of citric acid at pH 3 was suggested to be due to catalytic effects of coal ash. Since formic acid and acetic acid can be used as a material of hydrogen fermentation, coal ash could be used as a catalyst to synthesize the important material for hydrogen fermentation from wastewater of citric acid.

  7. Microarray-based transcriptome of Listeria monocytogenes adapted to sublethal concentrations of acetic acid, lactic acid, and hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessema, Girum Tadesse; Møretrø, Trond; Snipen, Lars; Heir, Even; Holck, Askild; Naterstad, Kristine; Axelsson, Lars

    2012-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes , an important foodborne pathogen, commonly encounters organic acids in food-related environments. The transcriptome of L. monocytogenes L502 was analyzed after adaptation to pH 5 in the presence of acetic acid, lactic acid, or hydrochloric acid (HCl) at 25 °C, representing a condition encountered in mildly acidic ready-to-eat food kept at room temperature. The acid-treated cells were compared with a reference culture with a pH of 6.7 at the time of RNA harvesting. The number of genes and magnitude of transcriptional responses were higher for the organic acids than for HCl. Protein coding genes described for low pH stress, energy transport and metabolism, virulence determinates, and acid tolerance response were commonly regulated in the 3 acid-stressed cultures. Interestingly, the transcriptional levels of histidine and cell wall biosynthetic operons were upregulated, indicating possible universal response against low pH stress in L. monocytogenes. The opuCABCD operon, coding proteins for compatible solutes transport, and the transcriptional regulator sigL were significantly induced in the organic acids, strongly suggesting key roles during organic acid stress. The present study revealed the complex transcriptional responses of L. monocytogenes towards food-related acidulants and opens the roadmap for more specific and in-depth future studies.

  8. Model of acetic acid-affected growth and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) production by Cupriavidus necator DSM 545.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marudkla, Jaruwan; Lee, Wen-Chien; Wannawilai, Siwaporn; Chisti, Yusuf; Sirisansaneeyakul, Sarote

    2018-02-20

    Acetic acid, a potential growth inhibitor, commonly occurs in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. The growth of Cupriavidus necator DSM 545 and production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) by this bacterium in a glucose-based medium supplemented with various initial concentrations of acetic acid are reported. The bacterium could use both glucose and acetic acid to grow and produce PHB, but acetic acid inhibited growth once its initial concentration exceeded 0.5 g/L. As acetic acid is an unavoidable contaminant in hydrolysates used as sugar sources in commercial fermentations, a mathematical model was developed to describe its impact on growth and the production of PHB. The model was shown to satisfactorily apply to growth and PHB production data obtained in media made with acetic-acid-containing hydrolysates of Napier grass and oil palm trunk as carbon substrates. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibition of spoilage mould conidia by acetic acid and sorbic acid involves different modes of action, requiring modification of the classical weak-acid theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, Malcolm; Plumridge, Andrew; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhardt; Archer, David B

    2009-11-30

    Fungal spoilage of many foods is prevented by weak-acid preservatives such as sorbic acid or acetic acid. We show that sorbic and acetic acids do not both inhibit cells by lowering of internal pH alone and that the "classical weak-acid theory" must be revised. The "classical weak-acid theory" suggests that all lipophilic acids with identical pK(a) values are equally effective as preservatives, causing inhibition by diffusion of molecular acids into the cell, dissociation, and subsequent acidification of the cytoplasm. Using a number of spoilage fungi from different genera, we have shown that sorbic acid was far more toxic than acetic acid, and no correlation existed between resistance to acetic acid and resistance to sorbic acid. The molar ratio of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) (acetic: sorbic) was 58 for Paecilomyces variotii and 14 for Aspergillus phoenicis. Using flow cytometry on germinating conidia of Aspergillusniger, acetic acid at pH 4.0 caused an immediate decline in the mean cytoplasmic pH (pH(i)) falling from neutrality to approximately pH 4.7 at the MIC (80 mM). Sorbic acid also caused a rapid but far smaller drop in pH(i), at the MIC (4.5 mM); the pH remained above pH 6.3. Over 0-5 mM, a number of other weak acids caused a similar fall in cytoplasmic pH. It was concluded that while acetic acid inhibition of A. niger conidia was due to cytoplasmic acidification, inhibition by sorbic acid was not. A possible membrane-mediated mode of action of sorbic acid is discussed.

  10. 40 CFR 721.10074 - Acetic acid, 2-chloro-, 1-(3,3-dimethylcyclohexyl)ethyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acetic acid, 2-chloro-, 1-(3,3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10074 Acetic acid, 2-chloro-, 1-(3,3-dimethylcyclohexyl)ethyl ester. (a... acetic acid, 2-chloro-, 1-(3,3-dimethylcyclohexyl)ethyl ester (PMN P-05-568; CAS No. 477218-59-0) is...

  11. Acetic acid-catalyzed formation of N-phenylphthalimide from phthalanilic acid: a computational study of the mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-05-28

    In glacial acetic acid, phthalanilic acid and its monosubstituents are known to be converted to the corresponding phthalimides in relatively good yields. In this study, we computationally investigated the experimentally proposed two-step (addition-elimination or cyclization-dehydration) mechanism at the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) level of theory for the unsubstituted phthalanilic acid, with an explicit acetic acid molecule included in the calculations. In the first step, a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate is formed by the nucleophilic attack of the amide nitrogen. The second step is dehydration of the intermediate to give N-phenylphthalimide. In agreement with experimental findings, the second step has been shown to be rate-determining. Most importantly, both of the steps are catalyzed by an acetic acid molecule, which acts both as proton donor and acceptor. The present findings, along with those from our previous studies, suggest that acetic acid and other carboxylic acids (in their undissociated forms) can catalyze intramolecular nucleophilic attacks by amide nitrogens and breakdown of the resulting tetrahedral intermediates, acting simultaneously as proton donor and acceptor. In other words, double proton transfers involving a carboxylic acid molecule can be part of an extensive bond reorganization process from cyclic hydrogen-bonded complexes.

  12. The lifespan-promoting effect of acetic acid and Reishi polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ming-Hong; Chiou, Shyh-Horng; Huang, Chun-Hao; Yang, Wen-Bin; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2009-11-15

    Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism, various natural substances and commercial health-food supplements were screened to evaluate their effects on longevity. Among the substances tested, acetic acid and Reishi polysaccharide fraction 3 (RF3) were shown to increase the expression of the lifespan and longevity-related transcription factor DAF-16 in C. elegans. We have shown that RF3 activates DAF-16 expression via TIR-1 receptor and MAPK pathway whereas acetic acid inhibits the trans-membrane receptor DAF-2 of the insulin/IGF-1 pathway to indirectly activate DAF-16 expression. In addition, a mixture of acetic acid and RF3 possesses a combined effect 30-40% greater than either substance used alone. A proteomic analysis of C. elegans using 2-DE and LC-MS/MS was then carried out, and 15 differentially expressed proteins involved in the lifespan-promoting activity were identified.

  13. Transformation of acetate carbon into carbohydrate and amino acid metabilites during decomposition in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst; Paul, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    Carbon-14-labelled acetate was added to a heavy clay soil of pH 7.6 to study the transformation of acetate carbon into carbohydrate and amino acid metabolites during decomposition. The acetate was totally metabolized after 6 days of incubation at 25°C when 70% of the labelled carbon had been...... evolved as CO2. Maximum incorporation of trace-C into the various organic fractions was observed after 4 days when 19% of residual, labelled carbon in the soil was located in carbohydrates, 29 % in amino acids and 21 % in the insoluble residue of the soil. The curves showing the amounts of labelled carbon...... days of incubation, 2.2% of the labelled carbon originally added to the soil was located in carbohydrate metabolites, 7% in amino acid metabolites and 5% in the insoluble residue. The carbon in these fractions accounted for 77% of the total, residual, labelled carbon in the soil; 12% in carbohydrates...

  14. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eGiannattasio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications.

  15. Butyrate Suppresses The Severity Of Acetic Acid-Induced Ulcerative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short chain fatty acids are increasingly used as food additives due to the health benefits they have. Recently, they have been implicated in protecting patients against intestinal disorders but without a well-known mechanism. We explored the benefits of a major short chain fatty acid, butyrate on experimental ulcerative colitis ...

  16. Dissolution kinetics and mechanism of pandermite in acetic acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-06-07

    Jun 7, 2010 ... reaction temperature. Conversion rate increased up to 3 M, acid concentration then decreased with increasing acid concentration.It was observed that there was no important effect of stirring speed on the dissolution rate. Furthermore, it was observed that the dissolution mechanism was dependent on.

  17. Recovery of acetic acid from an aqueous pyrolysis oil phase by reactive extraction using tri-n-octylamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasrendra, C. B.; Girisuta, B.; van de Bovenkamp, H. H.; Winkelman, J. G. M.; Leijenhorst, E. J.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Windt, M.; Meier, D.; Heeres, H. J.

    2011-01-01

    The application of reactive extraction to isolate organic acids, particularly acetic acid, from the aqueous stream of phase splitted pyrolysis oil using a long chain aliphatic tertiary amine is reported. Acetic acid recovery was optimized by selecting the proper amine and diluent combination and

  18. Anticoccidial effects of acetic acid on performance and pathogenic parameters in broiler chickens challenged with Eimeria tenella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Z. Abbas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the anticoccidial effect of the different concentrations of the acetic acid in the broiler chickens in comparison with the amprolium anticoccidial. A total of 198 chicks were placed 11 per pen with three pens per treatment. The different concentrations (1%, 2% and 3% of acetic acid and amproilum (at the dose rate of 125ppm were given to the experimental groups in drinking water from 10-19th days of age. One group was kept as infected non medicated control and one as non infected non medicated control. All the groups were inoculated orally with 75,000 sporulated oocysts at the 12th day of age except non infected non medicated control. Anticoccidial effect was evaluated on the basis of performance (weight gain, feed conversion ratio and pathogenic (oocyst score, lesion score and mortality %age parameters. Among acetic acid medicated groups, the maximum anticoccidial effect was seen in the group medicated with 3% acetic acid followed by 2% and 1% acetic acid medicated groups. Amprolium and 3% acetic acid were almost equivalent in suppressing the negative performance and pathogenic effects associated with coccidiosis (Eimeria tenella challenge. In summary, acetic acid has the potential to be used as alternative to chemotherapeutic drugs for Eimeria tenella control. Concentration-dependent anticoccidial effect of acetic acid suggests that further studies should be carried out to determine the possible maximum safe levels of acetic acid with least toxic effects to be used as anticoccidial.

  19. Effect of acetic acid in recycling water on ethanol production for cassava in an integrated ethanol-methane fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinchao; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jianhua; Tang, Lei; Mao, Zhonggui

    2016-11-01

    Recently, the integrated ethanol-methane fermentation process has been studied to prevent wastewater pollution. However, when the anaerobic digestion reaction runs poorly, acetic acid will accumulate in the recycling water. In this paper, we studied the effect of low concentration of acetic acid (≤25 mM) on ethanol fermentation at different initial pH values (4.2, 5.2 or 6.2). At an initial pH of 4.2, ethanol yields increased by 3.0% and glycerol yields decreased by 33.6% as the acetic acid concentration was increased from 0 to 25 mM. Raising the concentration of acetic acid to 25 mM increased the buffering capacity of the medium without obvious effects on biomass production in the cassava medium. Acetic acid was metabolized by Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the reason that the final concentration of acetic acid was 38.17% lower than initial concentration at pH 5.2 when 25 mM acetic acid was added. These results confirmed that a low concentration of acetic acid in the process stimulated ethanol fermentation. Thus, reducing the acetic acid concentration to a controlled low level is more advantageous than completely removing it.

  20. A new laboratory evolution approach to select for constitutive acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identification of causal mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ramos, Daniel; Gorter de Vries, Arthur R; Grijseels, Sietske S; van Berkum, Margo C; Swinnen, Steve; van den Broek, Marcel; Nevoigt, Elke; Daran, Jean-Marc G; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid, released during hydrolysis of lignocellulosic feedstocks for second generation bioethanol production, inhibits yeast growth and alcoholic fermentation. Yeast biomass generated in a propagation step that precedes ethanol production should therefore express a high and constitutive level of acetic acid tolerance before introduction into lignocellulosic hydrolysates. However, earlier laboratory evolution strategies for increasing acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, based on prolonged cultivation in the presence of acetic acid, selected for inducible rather than constitutive tolerance to this inhibitor. Preadaptation in the presence of acetic acid was shown to strongly increase the fraction of yeast cells that could initiate growth in the presence of this inhibitor. Serial microaerobic batch cultivation, with alternating transfers to fresh medium with and without acetic acid, yielded evolved S. cerevisiae cultures with constitutive acetic acid tolerance. Single-cell lines isolated from five such evolution experiments after 50-55 transfers were selected for further study. An additional constitutively acetic acid tolerant mutant was selected after UV-mutagenesis. All six mutants showed an increased fraction of growing cells upon a transfer from a non-stressed condition to a medium containing acetic acid. Whole-genome sequencing identified six genes that contained (different) mutations in multiple acetic acid-tolerant mutants. Haploid segregation studies and expression of the mutant alleles in the unevolved ancestor strain identified causal mutations for the acquired acetic acid tolerance in four genes (ASG1, ADH3, SKS1 and GIS4). Effects of the mutations in ASG1, ADH3 and SKS1 on acetic acid tolerance were additive. A novel laboratory evolution strategy based on alternating cultivation cycles in the presence and absence of acetic acid conferred a selective advantage to constitutively acetic acid-tolerant mutants and may be applicable for

  1. Determination of 4-Chloroindole-3-Acetic Acid Methyl Ester in Lathyrus Vicia and Pisum by Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen; Egsgaard, Helge; Larsen, Elfinn

    1980-01-01

    4-Chloroindole-3-acetic acid methyl ester was identified unequivocally in Lathyrus latifolius L., Vicia faba L. and Pisum sativum L. by thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The gas chromatographic system was able to separate underivatized chloroindole-3-acetic acid...... methyl ester isomers. The quantitative determination of 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid methyl ester in immature seeds of these three species was performed by gas chromatography – mass spectrometry using deuterium labelled 4-chloro-indole-3-acetic acid methyl ester as an internal standard. P. sativum...

  2. Oxygen-dependent catabolism of indole-3-acetic acid in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egebo, L A; Nielsen, S V; Jochimsen, B U

    1991-01-01

    Some strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum have the ability to catabolize indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Examination of this catabolism in strain 110 by in vivo experiments has revealed an enzymatic activity catalyzing the degradation of IAA and 5-hydroxy-indole-3-acetic acid. The activity requires...... addition of the substrates for induction and is oxygen dependent. The highest activity is obtained when the concentration of inducer is 0.2 mM. Spectrophotometric data are consistent with the suggestion that the indole ring is broken during degradation of IAA. We hypothesize that the enzyme catalyzes...

  3. Acetic Acid Formation by Selective Aerobic Oxidation of Aqueous Ethanol over Heterogeneous Ruthenium Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbanev, Yury; Kegnæs, Søren; Hanning, Christopher William

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalyst systems comprising ruthenium hydroxide supported on different carrier materials, titania, alumina, ceria, and spinel (MgAl2O4), were applied in selective aerobic oxidation ethanol to form acetic acid, an important bulk chemical and food ingredient. The catalysts were...... of catalysts, oxidant pressure, reaction temperature, and substrate concentration were investigated. Quantitative yield of acetic acid was obtained with 1.2 wt % Ru(OH)x/CeO2 under optimized conditions (150 °C, 10 bar O2, 12 h of reaction time, 0.23 mol % Ru to substrate)....

  4. Cloning of genes responsible for acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti.

    OpenAIRE

    Fukaya, M; Takemura, H.; Okumura, H; Kawamura, Y.; Horinouchi, S; Beppu, T

    1990-01-01

    Five acetic acid-sensitive mutants of Acetobacter aceti subsp. aceti no. 1023 were isolated by mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Three recombinant plasmids that complemented the mutations were isolated from a gene bank of the chromosome DNA of the parental strain constructed in Escherichia coli by using cosmid vector pMVC1. One of these plasmids (pAR1611), carrying about a 30-kilobase-pair (kb) fragment that conferred acetic acid resistance to all five mutants, was furthe...

  5. Acetic acid bacteria and the production and quality of wine vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Albert; Torija, María Jesús; García-Parrilla, María del Carmen; Troncoso, Ana María

    2014-01-01

    The production of vinegar depends on an oxidation process that is mainly performed by acetic acid bacteria. Despite the different methods of vinegar production (more or less designated as either "fast" or "traditional"), the use of pure starter cultures remains far from being a reality. Uncontrolled mixed cultures are normally used, but this review proposes the use of controlled mixed cultures. The acetic acid bacteria species determine the quality of vinegar, although the final quality is a combined result of technological process, wood contact, and aging. This discussion centers on wine vinegar and evaluates the effects of these different processes on its chemical and sensory properties.

  6. Acetic Acid Bacteria and the Production and Quality of Wine Vinegar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Mas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of vinegar depends on an oxidation process that is mainly performed by acetic acid bacteria. Despite the different methods of vinegar production (more or less designated as either “fast” or “traditional”, the use of pure starter cultures remains far from being a reality. Uncontrolled mixed cultures are normally used, but this review proposes the use of controlled mixed cultures. The acetic acid bacteria species determine the quality of vinegar, although the final quality is a combined result of technological process, wood contact, and aging. This discussion centers on wine vinegar and evaluates the effects of these different processes on its chemical and sensory properties.

  7. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid and methylglyoxal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including pyruvate, oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid plays a central role in the aqueous oxidation of methylglyoxal and it is a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radicals, and pyruvic acid and methylglyoxal experimental samples were analyzed using new analytical methods, in order to better understand the formation of SOA from acetic acid and methylglyoxal. Glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids formed from acetic acid and OH radicals. In contrast to the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal, the aqueous OH radical oxidation of acetic acid did not produce succinic acid and oligomers. This suggests that the methylgloxal-derived oligomers do not form through the acid catalyzed esterification pathway proposed previously. Using results from these experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  8. Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 3, January 1, 1978--March 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, J.E.; Wise, D.L.

    1978-06-01

    The program for acetic acid production from marine algae has made significant progress in the current quarter. Some of the significant developments during this period are: (1) conversion of the available reducing equivalents in Chondrus crispus to organic acids has been carried to better than 80% completion; (2) thermophilic fermentations produce higher ratios of acetic acid to total acid than is the case for mesophilic fermentations (80% vs. 50%); (3) a membrane extraction process for removing organic acid products has been developed which has potential for commercial use; (4) a large scale fermentation was shown to convert over 50% of the available carbon in five days; (5) a reducing equivalents balance on the large scale fermentation was closed to with 96% of theoretical.

  9. Sphingolipid biosynthesis upregulation by TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling during yeast adaptive response to acetic acid stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Joana F; Muir, Alexander; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Thorner, Jeremy; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2016-12-01

    Acetic acid-induced inhibition of yeast growth and metabolism limits the productivity of industrial fermentation processes, especially when lignocellulosic hydrolysates are used as feedstock in industrial biotechnology. Tolerance to acetic acid of food spoilage yeasts is also a problem in the preservation of acidic foods and beverages. Thus understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation and tolerance to acetic acid stress is increasingly important in industrial biotechnology and the food industry. Prior genetic screens for Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with increased sensitivity to acetic acid identified loss-of-function mutations in the YPK1 gene, which encodes a protein kinase activated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) complex 2 (TORC2). We show in the present study by several independent criteria that TORC2-Ypk1 signaling is stimulated in response to acetic acid stress. Moreover, we demonstrate that TORC2-mediated Ypk1 phosphorylation and activation is necessary for acetic acid tolerance, and occurs independently of Hrk1, a protein kinase previously implicated in the cellular response to acetic acid. In addition, we show that TORC2-Ypk1-mediated activation of l-serine:palmitoyl-CoA acyltransferase, the enzyme complex that catalyzes the first committed step of sphingolipid biosynthesis, is required for acetic acid tolerance. Furthermore, analysis of the sphingolipid pathway using inhibitors and mutants indicates that it is production of certain complex sphingolipids that contributes to conferring acetic acid tolerance. Consistent with that conclusion, promoting sphingolipid synthesis by adding exogenous long-chain base precursor phytosphingosine to the growth medium enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Thus appropriate modulation of the TORC2-Ypk1-sphingolipid axis in industrial yeast strains may have utility in improving fermentations of acetic acid-containing feedstocks. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the

  10. Sphingolipid biosynthesis upregulation by TOR Complex 2-Ypk1 signaling during yeast adaptive response to acetic acid stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Joana F.; Muir, Alexander; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Thorner, Jeremy; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid-induced inhibition of yeast growth and metabolism limits the productivity of industrial fermentation processes, especially when lignocellulosic hydrolysates are used as feedstock in industrial biotechnology. Tolerance to acetic acid of food spoilage yeasts is also a problem in the preservation of acidic foods and beverages. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation and tolerance to acetic acid stress is increasingly important in industrial biotechnology and the food industry. Prior genetic screens for S. cerevisiae mutants with increased sensitivity to acetic acid identified loss-of-function mutations in the YPK1 gene, which encodes a protein kinase activated by the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) Complex 2 (TORC2). We show here by several independent criteria that TORC2-Ypk1 signaling is stimulated in response to acetic acid stress. Moreover, we demonstrate that TORC2-mediated Ypk1 phosphorylation and activation is necessary for acetic acid tolerance, and occurs independently of Hrk1, a protein kinase previously implicated in the cellular response to acetic acid. In addition, we show that TORC2-Ypk1-mediated activation of L-serine: palmitoyl-CoA acyltransferase, the enzyme complex that catalyzes the first committed step of sphingolipid biosynthesis, is required for acetic acid tolerance. Furthermore, analysis of the sphingolipid pathway using inhibitors and mutants indicates that it is production of certain complex sphingolipids that contributes to conferring acetic acid tolerance. Consistent with that conclusion, promoting sphingolipid synthesis by adding exogenous long-chain base precursor phytosphingosine to the growth medium enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Thus, appropriate modulation of the TORC2-Ypk1-sphingolipid axis in industrial yeast strains may have utility in improving fermentations of acetic acid-containing feedstocks. PMID:27671892

  11. [Effects of sodium chloride, acetic acid and citric acid on the dissolution of aluminum from aluminum cooking utensils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, F; Meshitsuka, S; Funakawa, K; Nose, T

    1990-12-01

    In order to investigate the effects of sodium chloride and organic acids on aluminum elution from cooking utensils made of aluminum, the quantities of aluminum elution were measured in solutions with various concentrations of sodium chloride, acetic acid and citric acid by flameless atomic adsorption spectrophotometry. The increase of the aluminum elution rate from a pudding cup, an aluminum pan and an alumite pan could be clearly distinguished by the coexistence of acetic acid or citric acid and sodium chloride. The elution was low in the presence of sodium chloride at room temperature, but it was distinctly accelerated by heating. Although alumite treatment had the effect of protection against aluminum elution, such elution obviously increased, as shown by the existence of acid and sodium chloride at high temperatures. Aluminum elution rates from surface-untreated cooking utensils made of aluminum were increased by heating by a factor of several thousand.

  12. Culture strategies for lipid production using acetic acid as sole carbon source by Rhodosporidium toruloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Jia-Nan; Lu, Li-Jun; Peng, Kai-Ming; Yang, Gao-Xiang; Liu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Rhodosporidium toruloides AS 2.1389 was tested using different concentrations of acetic acid as a low-cost carbon source for the production of microbial lipids, which are good raw materials for biodiesel production. It grew and had higher lipid contents in media containing 4-20 g/L acetic acid as the sole carbon source, compared with that in glucose-containing media under the same culture conditions. At acetic acid concentrations as high as 20 g/L and the optimal carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (C/N) of 200 in a batch culture, the highest biomass production was 4.35 g/L, with a lipid content of 48.2%. At acetic acid concentrations as low as 4 g/L, a sequencing batch culture (SBC) with a C/N of 100 increased biomass production to 4.21 g/L, with a lipid content of 38.6%. These results provide usable culture strategies for lipid production by R. toruloides AS 2.1389 when using diverse waste-derived volatile fatty acids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Maruta

    Full Text Available Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A, which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin.

  14. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin.

  15. Soil washing of chromium- and cadmium-contaminated sludge using acids and ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid chelating agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitipour, Saeid; Ahmadi, Soheil; Madadian, Edris; Ardestani, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the effect of soil washing in the removal of chromium- and cadmium-contaminated sludge samples collected from Pond 2 of the Tehran Oil Refinery was investigated. These metals are considered as hazardous substances for human health and the environment. The carcinogenicity of chromate dust has been established for a long time. Cadmium is also a potential environmental toxicant. This study was carried out by collecting sludge samples from different locations in Pond 2. Soil washing was conducted to treat the samples. Chemical agents, such as acetic acid, ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid (EDTA) and hydrochloric acid, were used as washing solutions to remove chromium and cadmium from sludge samples. The results of this study indicated that the highest removal efficiencies from the sludge samples were achieved using a 0.3 M HCl solution with 82.69% and 74.47% for chromium and cadmium, respectively. EDTA (0.1 M) in the best condition extracted 66.81% of cadmium and 72.52% of chromium from the sludges. The lowest efficiency values for the samples, however, were achieved using 3 M acetic acid with 41.7% and 46.96% removals for cadmium and chromium, respectively. The analysis of washed sludge indicated that the heavy metals removal decreased in the order of 3 M acetic acid acid appears to offer a greater potential as a washing agent in remediating the sludge samples.

  16. Lipidomic Profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii Reveals Critical Changes in Lipid Composition in Response to Acetic Acid Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riezman, Howard; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555) cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L−1, while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L−1 acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS) showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP)2C 2.2×) and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP)2C 2.7×), when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to generate large

  17. Lipidomic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii reveals critical changes in lipid composition in response to acetic acid stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Lindberg

    Full Text Available When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555 cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L(-1, while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L(-1 acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP2C 2.2× and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP2C 2.7×, when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to

  18. CO2-enhanced extraction of acetic acid from fermented wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyhanitash, Ehsan; Zaalberg, B.; IJmker, H.M.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Schuur, Boelo

    2015-01-01

    The industrial process of recovering fermentation-based volatile fatty acids (VFAs) utilizes H2SO4 to acidify the fermentation broth containing VFA-salts [e.g. Ca(CH3COO)2] to enable formation of molecular VFAs. Molecular VFAs are then recovered by liquid–liquid extraction. However, acidification

  19. Exogenous treatment with indole-3-acetic acid and salicylic acid alleviates cadmium toxicity in wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agami, Ramadan A; Mohamed, Gamal F

    2013-08-01

    The seedlings of wheat were grown in the presence of CdCl2 (500 or 1000 μM Cd), were applied with 500 μM of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or 500 μM salicylic acid (SA) as seed soaking and were sampled at 56 days after sowing. The plants exposed to Cd exhibited a substantial decline in growth, pigment content, relative water content (RWC) activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POX) and leaf structure. However, pretreatment with IAA or SA mitigated the stress generated by Cd and markedly improved the aforesaid parameters. The Cd increased proline content, electrolyte leakage and plant Cd content. However, the IAA or SA treatment attenuated the adverse effects of Cd on these attributes. The results showed that pretreatment with IAA or SA enhanced the antioxidant defense activities in Cd stressed wheat, thus alleviating Cd induced oxidative damage and enhancing Cd tolerance and leaf anatomy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Calibration and intercomparison of acetic acid measurements using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, K.B.; Keene, W.C.; Pszenny, A.A.P.; Mayne, H.R.; Talbot, R.W.; Sive, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Acetic acid is one of the most abundant organic acids in the ambient atmosphere, with maximum mixing ratios reaching into the tens of parts per billion by volume (ppbv) range. The identities and associated magnitudes of the major sources and sinks for acetic acid are poorly characterized, due in part to the limitation in available measurement techniques. This paper demonstrates that Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) can reliably quantify acetic acid vapor in ambient air. Three different PTR-MS configurations were calibrated at low ppbv mixing ratios using permeation tubes, which yielded calibration factors between 7.0 and 10.9 normalized counts per second per ppbv (ncps ppbv−1) at a drift tube field strength of 132 townsend (Td). Detection limits ranged from 0.06 to 0.32 ppbv with dwell times of 5 s. These calibration factors showed negligible humidity dependence. Using the experimentally determined calibration factors, PTR-MS measurements of acetic acid during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) campaign were validated against results obtained using Mist Chambers coupled with Ion Chromatography (MC/IC). An orthogonal least squares linear regression of paired data yielded a slope of 1.14 ± 0.06 (2σ), an intercept of 0.049 ± 20 (2σ) ppbv, and an R2 of 0.78. The median mixing ratio of acetic acid on Appledore Island, ME during the ICARTT campaign was 0.530 ± 0.025 ppbv with a minimum of 0.075 ± 0.004 ppbv, and a maximum of 3.555 ± 0.171 ppbv.

  1. Removal of dicyclohexyl acetic acid from aqueous solution using ultrasound, ozone and their combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pardeep; Headley, John; Peru, Kerry; Bailey, Jon; Dalai, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Naphthenic acids are a complex mixture of organic components, some of which include saturated alkyl-substituted cycloaliphatic carboxylic acids and acyclic aliphatic acids. They are naturally found in hydrocarbon deposits like oil sand, petroleum, bitumen and crude oil. In this study, the oxidation of a relatively high molecular weight naphthenic acid (Dicyclohexyl acetic acid) was investigated using ozonation, ultrasonication and hydrogen peroxide alone and their combinations. Effects on oxidation of dicyclohexyl acetic acid (DAA) were measured for different concentrations of ozone ranging between 0.7 to 3.3 mg L(-1) and pH in the range 6 to 10. Ultrasonication and hydrogen peroxide alone were not effective to oxidize dicyclohexyl acetic acid, but combining ultrasonication with H2O2 had a significant effect on oxidation of dicyclohexyl acetic acid with maximum removal reaching to 84 ± 2.2% with 81 ± 2.1% reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD). Synergistic effects were observed for combining ultrasonication with ozonation and resulted in 100% DAA removal with 98 ± 0.8% reduction in COD within 15 min at 3.3 mg L(-1) ozone concentration and 130 Watts ultrasonication power. The reaction conditions obtained for the maximum oxidation of DAA and COD removal were used for the degradation of naphthenic acids mixture extracted from oil sands process water (OSPW). The percentage oxidation of NAs mixture extracted from OSPW was 89.3 ± 1.1% in ozonation and combined ozonation and ultrasonication, but COD removal observed was 65 ± 1.2% and 78 ± 1.4% for ozonation and combined ozonation and ultrasonication treatments, respectively.

  2. [Concentrations and acidity contributions of acetate and formate in precipitation at 14 stations of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-huan; Xu, Xiao-bin; Yu, Xiao-lan; Tang, Jie

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the concentrations of organic acids in precipitation in China and their contributions to the total acidity of precipitation, samples were taken at 14 stations of regional representativeness in 2007 and analyzed for acetate and formate using ion chromatography. In this paper, data of acetate and formate in precipitation at 14 stations are presented, wet depositions of these organic acids are calculated, and contributions of them to the total free acidity (TFA) of precipitation are estimated. Based on the measurements, the mean concentrations of formate at different stations were in the range of 0.96-3.43 micromol/L, and those of acetate in the range of 0-5.13 micromol/L, close to the levels at remote sites in other countries and at the lower ends of concentration ranges from previous measurements in China. Comparisons indicate that the concentrations of the organic acids at remote sites are lower than those at sites in the vicinity of urban areas. The annual wet depositions of formate and acetate were estimated to be in the ranges of 0.38-4.18 mmol/(m2 x a) and 0.06-5.87 mmol/(m2 x a), respectively, with larger depositions in southern China and smaller depositions in northern China. The relative contributions of the two organic acids to the TFA of precipitation were estimated to be in the range of 0.02%-51.6%, with an overall average of 2.95%. This suggests that although acid rain in China is mainly caused by emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides, organic acids can significantly contribute to the acidification of precipitation in some regions and during some periods, hence need to be included in observational studies of acid rain.

  3. Batch salicylic acid nitration by nitric acid/acetic acid mixture under isothermal, isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, R; Canterino, M; Caprio, V; Di Somma, I; Sanchirico, R

    2006-12-01

    Runaway phenomena and thermal explosions can originate during the nitration of salicylic acid by means of a nitric acid/acetic acid mixture when the thermal control is lost, mainly as a result of the formation and thermal decomposition of picric acid. The prediction of the behaviour of this system is thus of great importance in view of possible industrial applications and the need to avoid the occurrence of unwanted dangerous events. During a previous investigation a model was developed to simulate its behaviour when the starting concentration of the substrate is too low, thus, preventing the precipitation of poor soluble intermediates. In this work this model is extended to deal with more concentrated systems even in case of a solid phase separating during the process. To this purpose the previously assessed dependence of the solubility of 3-nitro and 5-nitrosalicylic acids upon temperature and nitric acid concentration is included in the model. It is assumed that when 3-nitro and 5-nitrosalicylic acids are partially suspended in the reacting medium a kinetic regime of "dissolution with reaction" is established; that is, the redissolution of these species is a fast process compared to the successive nitration to give dinitroderivatives. Good results are obtained in the comparison of the experimental data with those calculated both in isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions when the revised model is used.

  4. Acetic acid as an intervention strategy to decontaminate beef carcasses in mexican commercial slaughterhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Reyes Carranza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Beef can be contaminated during the slaughter process, thus other methods, besides the traditional water washing, must be adopted to preserve meat safety. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of 2% acetic acid interventions on the reduction of indicator bacteria on beef carcasses at a commercial slaughterhouse in Mexico. Reduction was measured by the count of mesophilic aerobic bacteria (TPC, total coliform (TC, and fecal coliform (FC (log CFU/ cm². Among the different interventions tested, treatments combining acetic acid solution sprayed following carcass water washing had greater microbial reduction level. Acetic acid solution sprayed at low pressure and longer time (10-30 psi/ 60 s reached higher TPC, TC, and FC reductions than that obtained under high pressure/ shorter time (1,700 psi/ 15 s; P<0.05. Exposure time significantly affected microbial reduction on carcasses. Acetic acid solution sprayed after carcass washing can be successfully used to control sources of indicator bacteria on beef carcasses under commercial conditions.

  5. Email: tgoodhead@yahoo.co.uk Adsorption of Acetic Acid, Cadmium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    *Email: tgoodhead@yahoo.co.uk. JASEM ISSN 1119-8362. All rights reserved. J. Appl. Sci. Environ. Manage. Sept, 2011. Vol. 15 (3) 467 - 472. Full-text Available Online at www.ajol.info and www.bioline.org.br/ja. Adsorption of Acetic Acid, Cadmium ions, Lead ions and Iodine Using Activated. Carbon from Waste Wood and ...

  6. Stimulatory effect of indole-3-acetic acid and continuous illumination on the growth of Parachlorella kessleri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magierek, Edyta; Krzemińska, Izabela; Tys, Jerzy

    2017-10-01

    The effects of the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid and various conditions of illumination on the growth of Parachlorella kessleri were investigated. Two variants of illumination: continuous and photoperiod 16/8 h (light/dark) and two concentrations of the phytohormone - 10-4 M and 10-5 M of indole-3-acetic acid were used in the experiment. The results of this study show that the addition of the higher concentration of indole-3-acetic acid stimulated the growth of P. kessleri more efficiently than the addition of the lower concentration of indole-3-acetic acid. This dependence can be observed in both variants of illumination. Increased biomass productivity was observed in the photo-period conditions. Both the addition of the phytohormone and the conditions of the illumination had an impact on the number of P. kessleri cells. An increased number of cells was observed under the conditions of continuous illumination. This result has shown that the continuous illumination and the higher concentration of the phytohormone stimulated the growth of P. kessleri more effectively than the shorter duration of light (16/8 h (light/dark)).

  7. Catalyst deactivation during steam reforming of acetic acid over Pt/ZrO2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takanabe, K.; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Aika, Ken-ichi; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2006-01-01

    Steam reforming of acetic acid as a model compound present in bio-oil over Pt/ZrO2 catalysts has been investigated. Pt/ZrO2 yields steam reforming products (i.e., H2, CO, CO2) to the amounts predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium; however, conversion and yields dropped rapidly with time on course.

  8. Effects of salinity and ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid (edta) on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the effects of the combined treatment of salinity and ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) on the germination of tomato seeds in Petri-dishes were compared to sole salinity. The treatments consisted of seven concentrations of sodium chloride (NaCL): 0 (control), 10, 50, 100, 250, 500 and 1000 mM.

  9. The Effect of 2, 4-Dichlorophenoxy Acetic Acid (2, 4-D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiment was designed and conducted to determine the most appropriate concentration of 2, 4-Dichlorophenoxy Acetic Acid suitable for callus induction in sugarcane. Explants were obtained from apical meristems of two sugarcane cultivars (SP726180 and CO-001) and cultured in a modified MS medium supplemented ...

  10. Impact of feed withdrawal and addition of acetic acid in drinking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the impacts of feed withdrawal and addition of acetic acid in drinking water on the pH and microflora of gizzard, cecal and feces in preslaughter broiler chickens. Twenty four (24) individually caged 42 days old male Ross 308 broilers with almost equal weight were randomly divided into six treatments ...

  11. Production of indole-3-acetic acid by the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis strain MMG-9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehboob, A.; Stal, L.J.; Hasnain, S.

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis strain MMG-9 was isolated from a rice field. The ability of this strain to synthesize the bioactive compound indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was demonstrated. IAA was extracted from the culture A. platensis strain MMG-9 and its identity was confirmed

  12. Production of indole-3-acetic acid by the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis strain MMG-9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, M.; Stal, L.J.; Hasnain, S.

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis strain MMG-9 was isolated from a rice field. The ability of this strain to synthesize the bioactive compound indole- 3-acetic acid (IAA) was demonstrated. IAA was extracted from the culture of A. platensis strain MMG-9 and its identity was

  13. The effect of theophylline on acetic acid induced ulcerative colitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi-Pirbaluti, Masoumeh; Motaghi, Ehsan; Najafi, Ali; Hosseini, Mohammad Javad

    2017-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a relapsing inflammatory disorder of the colon. There is a need to explore the new treatments for this disorder. Theophylline, a competitive inhibitor of phosphodiesterase, is shown to have anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of theophylline on ulcerative colitis has not yet been investigated. The present study evaluated the effect of theophylline on acetic acid induced ulcerative colitis in rats. Colitis was induced by instillation of 2ml of acetic acid solution (3%). Colon samples were evaluated grossly and microscopically and assayed for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and proinflammatory cytokine concentrations. Treatment with theophylline at the doses of 20 and 50mg/kg attenuated acetic acid induced ulcerative colitis as shown by improvement in body weight loss, macroscopic score, ulcer area, hematocrit and histopathological score. Theophylline treatment also reduced MPO activity and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1 β) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) concentrations in inflamed colon. Theophylline has a protective effect in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis which might be due to its anti-inflammatory activities. Therefore, theophylline has the potential to be used for successful treatment of ulcerative colitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Critical phenomena in ethylbenzene oxidation in acetic acid solution at high cobalt(II) concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gavrichkov, AA; Zakharov, [No Value

    Critical phenomena in ethylbenzene oxidation in an acetic acid solution at high cobalt(ill) concentrations (from 0.01 to 0.2 mol L-1) were studied at 60-90 degrees C by the gasometric (O-2 absorption), spectrophotometric (Co-III accumulation), and chemiluminescence (relative concentration of radical

  15. Visualization of early events in acetic acid denaturation of HIV-1 protease: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkar, Aditi Narendra; Rout, Manoj Kumar; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2011-01-01

    Protein denaturation plays a crucial role in cellular processes. In this study, denaturation of HIV-1 Protease (PR) was investigated by all-atom MD simulations in explicit solvent. The PR dimer and monomer were simulated separately in 9 M acetic acid (9 M AcOH) solution and water to study the denaturation process of PR in acetic acid environment. Direct visualization of the denaturation dynamics that is readily available from such simulations has been presented. Our simulations in 9 M AcOH reveal that the PR denaturation begins by separation of dimer into intact monomers and it is only after this separation that the monomer units start denaturing. The denaturation of the monomers is flagged off by the loss of crucial interactions between the α-helix at C-terminal and surrounding β-strands. This causes the structure to transit from the equilibrium dynamics to random non-equilibrating dynamics. Residence time calculations indicate that denaturation occurs via direct interaction of the acetic acid molecules with certain regions of the protein in 9 M AcOH. All these observations have helped to decipher a picture of the early events in acetic acid denaturation of PR and have illustrated that the α-helix and the β-sheet at the C-terminus of a native and functional PR dimer should maintain both the stability and the function of the enzyme and thus present newer targets for blocking PR function.

  16. Impact of feed withdrawal and addition of acetic acid in drinking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ALI GILANI

    2012-11-02

    Nov 2, 2012 ... This study investigated the impacts of feed withdrawal and addition of acetic acid in drinking water on the pH and microflora of gizzard, cecal and feces in preslaughter broiler chickens. Twenty four (24) individually caged 42 days old male Ross 308 broilers with almost equal weight were randomly divided.

  17. Sustainable hydrogen from bio-oil - Catalytic steam reforming of acetic acid as a model oxygenate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Aika, Ken-ichi; Seshan, K.; Lefferts, Leon

    Studies were conducted with acetic acid (HAc) as model oxygenate for the design of active and stable catalysts for steam reforming of bio-oil. Pt/ZrO2 catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation technique. The Pt/ZrO2 catalysts showed high activities at initial time on stream, but lost its activity

  18. Biorefining of wheat straw using an acetic and formic acid based organosolv fractionation process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snelders, J.; Dornez, E.; Benjelloun-Mlayah, B.; Huijgen, W.J.J.; Wild, de P.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Gerritsma, J.; Courtin, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the potential of acetic and formic acid organosolv fractionation of wheat straw as basis of an integral biorefinery concept, detailed knowledge on yield, composition and purity of the obtained streams is needed. Therefore, the process was performed, all fractions extensively characterized

  19. Kinetic model for the esterification of oleic acid catalyzed by zinc acetate in subcritical methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chengcai; Deng, Tiansheng [State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 165, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030001 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Qi, Yongqin; Hou, Xianglin; Qin, Zhangfeng [State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 165, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030001 (China)

    2010-03-15

    The esterification of oleic acid in subcritical methanol catalyzed by zinc acetate was investigated in a batch-type autoclave. The effect of reaction conditions such as temperature, pressure, reaction time and molar ratio of oleic acid to methanol on the esterification was examined. The oleic acid conversion reached 95.0% under 220 C and 6.0 MPa with the molar ratio of methanol to oleic acid being 4 and 1.0 wt% zinc acetate as catalyst. A kinetic model for the esterification was established. By fitting the kinetic model with the experimental results, the reaction order n = 2.2 and activation energy E{sub a} = 32.62 KJ/mol were obtained. (author)

  20. Chloroindolyl-3-acetic Acid and its Methyl Ester Incorporation of 36Cl in Immature Seeds of Pea and Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1974-01-01

    compounds besides Cl−. One compound, present in pea and probably in barley, cochromatographed with a mixture of 4- and 6-chloroindolyl-3-acetic acid methyl esters. Another, detected in pea, but probably not in barley, cochromatographed with a mixture of 4-and 6-chloroindolyl-3-acetic acids....

  1. Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulation using an optimized potential model: pure acetic acid and a mixture of it with ethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minhua; Chen, Lihang; Yang, Huaming; Sha, Xijiang; Ma, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulation with configurational bias was employed to study the vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) for pure acetic acid and for a mixture of acetic acid and ethylene. An improved united-atom force field for acetic acid based on a Lennard-Jones functional form was proposed. The Lennard-Jones well depth and size parameters for the carboxyl oxygen and hydroxyl oxygen were determined by fitting the interaction energies of acetic acid dimers to the Lennard-Jones potential function. Four different acetic acid dimers and the proportions of them were considered when the force field was optimized. It was found that the new optimized force field provides a reasonable description of the vapor-liquid phase equilibrium for pure acetic acid and for the mixture of acetic acid and ethylene. Accurate values were obtained for the saturated liquid density of the pure compound (average deviation: 0.84 %) and for the critical points. The new optimized force field demonstrated greater accuracy and reliability in calculations of the solubility of the mixture of acetic acid and ethylene as compared with the results obtained with the original TraPPE-UA force field.

  2. Acidic Chitinase-Chitin Complex Is Dissociated in a Competitive Manner by Acetic Acid: Purification of Natural Enzyme for Supplementation Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Tabata

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acidic chitinase (Chia has been implicated in asthma, allergic inflammations, and food processing. We have purified Chia enzymes with striking acid stability and protease resistance from chicken and pig stomach tissues using a chitin column and 8 M urea (urea-Chia. Here, we report that acetic acid is a suitable agent for native Chia purification from the stomach tissues using a chitin column (acetic acid-Chia. Chia protein can be eluted from a chitin column using 0.1 M acetic acid (pH 2.8, but not by using Gly-HCl (pH 2.5 or sodium acetate (pH 4.0 or 5.5. The melting temperatures of Chia are not affected substantially in the elution buffers, as assessed by differential scanning fluorimetry. Interestingly, acetic acid appears to be more effective for Chia-chitin dissociation than do other organic acids with similar structures. We propose a novel concept of this dissociation based on competitive interaction between chitin and acetic acid rather than on acid denaturation. Acetic acid-Chia also showed similar chitinolytic activity to urea-Chia, indicating that Chia is extremely stable against acid, proteases, and denaturing agents. Both acetic acid- and urea-Chia seem to have good potential for supplementation or compensatory purposes in agriculture or even biomedicine.

  3. Acidic Chitinase-Chitin Complex Is Dissociated in a Competitive Manner by Acetic Acid: Purification of Natural Enzyme for Supplementation Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Eri; Kashimura, Akinori; Wakita, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Imamura, Yasutada; Shimizu, Hideaki; Matoska, Vaclav; Bauer, Peter O; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2018-01-25

    Acidic chitinase (Chia) has been implicated in asthma, allergic inflammations, and food processing. We have purified Chia enzymes with striking acid stability and protease resistance from chicken and pig stomach tissues using a chitin column and 8 M urea (urea-Chia). Here, we report that acetic acid is a suitable agent for native Chia purification from the stomach tissues using a chitin column (acetic acid-Chia). Chia protein can be eluted from a chitin column using 0.1 M acetic acid (pH 2.8), but not by using Gly-HCl (pH 2.5) or sodium acetate (pH 4.0 or 5.5). The melting temperatures of Chia are not affected substantially in the elution buffers, as assessed by differential scanning fluorimetry. Interestingly, acetic acid appears to be more effective for Chia-chitin dissociation than do other organic acids with similar structures. We propose a novel concept of this dissociation based on competitive interaction between chitin and acetic acid rather than on acid denaturation. Acetic acid-Chia also showed similar chitinolytic activity to urea-Chia, indicating that Chia is extremely stable against acid, proteases, and denaturing agents. Both acetic acid- and urea-Chia seem to have good potential for supplementation or compensatory purposes in agriculture or even biomedicine.

  4. Mild oxidation of methane to methanol or acetic acid on supported isolated rhodium catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Junjun; Li, Mengwei; Allard, Lawrence F.; Lee, Sungsik; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    2017-11-01

    An efficient and direct method of catalytic conversion of methane to liquid methanol and other oxygenates would be of considerable practical value. However, it remains an unsolved problem in catalysis, as typically it involves expensive or corrosive oxidants or reaction media that are not amenable to commercialization. Although methane can be directly converted to methanol using molecular oxygen under mild conditions in the gas phase, the process is either stoichiometric (and therefore requires a water extraction step) or is too slow and low-yielding to be practical. Methane could, in principle, also be transformed through direct oxidative carbonylation to acetic acid, which is commercially obtained through methane steam reforming, methanol synthesis, and subsequent methanol carbonylation on homogeneous catalysts. However, an effective catalyst for the direct carbonylation of methane to acetic acid, which might enable the economical small-scale utilization of natural gas that is currently flared or stranded, has not yet been reported. Here we show that mononuclear rhodium species, anchored on a zeolite or titanium dioxide support suspended in aqueous solution, catalyse the direct conversion of methane to methanol and acetic acid, using oxygen and carbon monoxide under mild conditions. We find that the two products form through independent pathways, which allows us to tune the conversion: three-hour-long batch-reactor tests conducted at 150 degrees Celsius, using either the zeolite-supported or the titanium-dioxide-supported catalyst, yield around 22,000 micromoles of acetic acid per gram of catalyst, or around 230 micromoles of methanol per gram of catalyst, respectively, with selectivities of 60–100 per cent. We anticipate that these unusually high activities, despite still being too low for commercial application, may guide the development of optimized catalysts and practical processes for the direct conversion of methane to methanol, acetic acid and other

  5. Mild oxidation of methane to methanol or acetic acid on supported isolated rhodium catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Junjun; Li, Mengwei; Allard, Lawrence F; Lee, Sungsik; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    2017-11-29

    An efficient and direct method of catalytic conversion of methane to liquid methanol and other oxygenates would be of considerable practical value. However, it remains an unsolved problem in catalysis, as typically it involves expensive or corrosive oxidants or reaction media that are not amenable to commercialization. Although methane can be directly converted to methanol using molecular oxygen under mild conditions in the gas phase, the process is either stoichiometric (and therefore requires a water extraction step) or is too slow and low-yielding to be practical. Methane could, in principle, also be transformed through direct oxidative carbonylation to acetic acid, which is commercially obtained through methane steam reforming, methanol synthesis, and subsequent methanol carbonylation on homogeneous catalysts. However, an effective catalyst for the direct carbonylation of methane to acetic acid, which might enable the economical small-scale utilization of natural gas that is currently flared or stranded, has not yet been reported. Here we show that mononuclear rhodium species, anchored on a zeolite or titanium dioxide support suspended in aqueous solution, catalyse the direct conversion of methane to methanol and acetic acid, using oxygen and carbon monoxide under mild conditions. We find that the two products form through independent pathways, which allows us to tune the conversion: three-hour-long batch-reactor tests conducted at 150 degrees Celsius, using either the zeolite-supported or the titanium-dioxide-supported catalyst, yield around 22,000 micromoles of acetic acid per gram of catalyst, or around 230 micromoles of methanol per gram of catalyst, respectively, with selectivities of 60-100 per cent. We anticipate that these unusually high activities, despite still being too low for commercial application, may guide the development of optimized catalysts and practical processes for the direct conversion of methane to methanol, acetic acid and other useful

  6. Kinetic and safety assessment for salicylic acid nitration by nitric acid/acetic acid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, R; Caprio, V; Di Somma, I; Sanchirico, R

    2006-06-30

    The nitration process of salicylic acid for the production of the important intermediate 5-nitrosalicylic acid is studied from thermokinetic and safety points of view. Investigations carried out by considering, as process deviations, the loss of the thermal control point out the possibility of runaway phenomena due to the occurrence of polynitration reactions. Isothermal experiments are carried out in various conditions to assess the involved reaction network and reaction kinetics.

  7. A Specialized Citric Acid Cycle Requiring Succinyl-Coenzyme A (CoA):Acetate CoA-Transferase (AarC) Confers Acetic Acid Resistance on the Acidophile Acetobacter aceti▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Elwood A.; Francois, Julie A.; Kappock, T. Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Microbes tailor macromolecules and metabolism to overcome specific environmental challenges. Acetic acid bacteria perform the aerobic oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid and are generally resistant to high levels of these two membrane-permeable poisons. The citric acid cycle (CAC) is linked to acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti by several observations, among them the oxidation of acetate to CO2 by highly resistant acetic acid bacteria and the previously unexplained role of A. aceti citrate synthase (AarA) in acetic acid resistance at a low pH. Here we assign specific biochemical roles to the other components of the A. aceti strain 1023 aarABC region. AarC is succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase, which replaces succinyl-CoA synthetase in a variant CAC. This new bypass appears to reduce metabolic demand for free CoA, reliance upon nucleotide pools, and the likely effect of variable cytoplasmic pH upon CAC flux. The putative aarB gene is reassigned to SixA, a known activator of CAC flux. Carbon overflow pathways are triggered in many bacteria during metabolic limitation, which typically leads to the production and diffusive loss of acetate. Since acetate overflow is not feasible for A. aceti, a CO2 loss strategy that allows acetic acid removal without substrate-level (de)phosphorylation may instead be employed. All three aar genes, therefore, support flux through a complete but unorthodox CAC that is needed to lower cytoplasmic acetate levels. PMID:18502856

  8. A specialized citric acid cycle requiring succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) confers acetic acid resistance on the acidophile Acetobacter aceti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Elwood A; Francois, Julie A; Kappock, T Joseph

    2008-07-01

    Microbes tailor macromolecules and metabolism to overcome specific environmental challenges. Acetic acid bacteria perform the aerobic oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid and are generally resistant to high levels of these two membrane-permeable poisons. The citric acid cycle (CAC) is linked to acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti by several observations, among them the oxidation of acetate to CO2 by highly resistant acetic acid bacteria and the previously unexplained role of A. aceti citrate synthase (AarA) in acetic acid resistance at a low pH. Here we assign specific biochemical roles to the other components of the A. aceti strain 1023 aarABC region. AarC is succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase, which replaces succinyl-CoA synthetase in a variant CAC. This new bypass appears to reduce metabolic demand for free CoA, reliance upon nucleotide pools, and the likely effect of variable cytoplasmic pH upon CAC flux. The putative aarB gene is reassigned to SixA, a known activator of CAC flux. Carbon overflow pathways are triggered in many bacteria during metabolic limitation, which typically leads to the production and diffusive loss of acetate. Since acetate overflow is not feasible for A. aceti, a CO(2) loss strategy that allows acetic acid removal without substrate-level (de)phosphorylation may instead be employed. All three aar genes, therefore, support flux through a complete but unorthodox CAC that is needed to lower cytoplasmic acetate levels.

  9. [Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles]. Progress report, May 15, 1989--May 14, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinder, S.H.

    1993-06-01

    The primary goal of this project is to obtain a better understanding of thermophilic microorganisms which convert acetic acid to CH{sub 4}. The previous funding period represents a departure from earlier research in this laboratory, which was more physiological and ecological. The present work is centered on the biochemistry of the thermophile Methanothrix sp. strain CALS-1. this organism presents a unique opportunity, with its purity and relatively rapid growth, to do comparative biochemical studies with the other major acetotrophic genus Methanosarcina. We previously found that Methanothrix is capable of using acetate at concentrations 100 fold lower than Methanosarcina. This finding suggests that there are significant differences in the pathways of methanogenesis from acetate in the two genera.

  10. Successful management of 70% acetic acid ingestion on the intensive care unit: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Andrew; Baker, Andrew; Smith, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    Acetic acid is an organic acid available in concentrations from 2 to 80%. Whilst lower concentrations of 2-6% are more commonly used as the table top condiment, vinegar, much stronger solutions are regularly used in Eastern Europe as food preservatives and cleaning solutions. Oral ingestion of greater than 12% has been reported to cause haemolysis, renal failure, shock and death. Most reported cases of deliberate or accidental poisoning are from Russia and Eastern Europe in the 1980s, with very little currently in western publications. We present the case of a female patient who attempted suicide by drinking 250 ml of 70% acetic acid. Her widespread gastrointestinal injuries were managed conservatively, and despite suffering extensive upper airway and renal complications, she was successfully decannulated and discharged home after a prolonged intensive care and hospital stay.

  11. Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 1, July 1--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, J.E.; Augenstein, D.C.; Wise, D.L.

    1977-10-14

    Progress is reported in research designed to develop an economically competitive process for producing acetic acid from biomass for the purpose of sparing petroleum for other uses, to evaluate marine algae as a potential source of biomass, and to document the feasibility of running fermentations in fixed packed bed fermenters. It was demonstrated that marine algae can be fermented to acetic acid. Initial rates of up to 168 meq/1 day were observed. These rates are substantially in excess of the 47 meq/1 day used in the economic projections. Also, when using marine algae as a substrate, acid levels were generated equivalent to the highest reported with other substrates. It was also demonstrated that a 4-foot fixed packet bed fermenter may be operated with marine algae as a substrate at 20 percent solids or 200 meq/1.

  12. THE EFFECT OF ACETIC ACID ON PROPERTIES OF COCONUT SHELL FILLED LOW DENSITY POLYETHYLENE COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.H. Tengku Faisal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural lignocellulosics have an outstanding potential as reinforcement in thermoplastics. Coconut shell is one of natural lignocellulosic material. In this study, coconut shell (CS was use as filler in low density polyethylene (LDPE composites. The effect of surface treatment of coconut shell (CS with acetic acid (acetylation on mechanical properties, thermal properties and morphology were studied. The acetylation treatment has improved the tensile strength, elongation at break and Young's modulus of LDPE/CS composites. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA results show that the acetylated composites has better thermal stability compared to untreated composites at 600 °C. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis showed that the esterification treatment increases the crystallinity of LDPE/CS composites. It was found that coconut shell acts as a nucleation agent in the presence of acrylic acid. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM study of the tensile fracture surface of acetylated composites indicates that the presence of acetic acid increased the interfacial interaction.

  13. Genomic Expression Program Involving the Haa1p-Regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Response to Acetic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jorg D.; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The alterations occurring in yeast genomic expression during early response to acetic acid and the involvement of the transcription factor Haa1p in this transcriptional reprogramming are described in this study. Haa1p was found to regulate, directly or indirectly, the transcription of approximately 80% of the acetic acid-activated genes, suggesting that Haa1p is the main player in the control of yeast response to this weak acid. The genes identified in this work as being activated in response to acetic acid in a Haa1p-dependent manner include protein kinases, multidrug resistance transporters, proteins involved in lipid metabolism, in nucleic acid processing, and proteins of unknown function. Among these genes, the expression of SAP30 and HRK1 provided the strongest protective effect toward acetic acid. SAP30 encode a subunit of a histone deacetylase complex and HRK1 encode a protein kinase belonging to a family of protein kinases dedicated to the regulation of plasma membrane transporters activity. The deletion of the HRK1 gene was found to lead to the increase of the accumulation of labeled acetic acid into acid-stressed yeast cells, suggesting that the role of both HAA1 and HRK1 in providing protection against acetic acid is, at least partially, related with their involvement in the reduction of intracellular acetate concentration. PMID:20955010

  14. Co-production of functional xylooligosaccharides and fermentable sugars from corncob with effective acetic acid prehydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Xu, Yong; Yu, Shiyuan

    2017-06-01

    A novel and green approach for the coproduction of xylooligosaccharides (XOS), in terms of a series of oligosaccharide components from xylobiose to xylohexose, and fermentable sugars was developed using the prehydrolysis of acetic acid that was fully recyclable and environmentally friendly, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. Compared to hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid, acetic acid hydrolysis provided the highest XOS yield of 45.91% and the highest enzymatic hydrolysis yield. More than 91% conversion of cellulose was achieved in a batch-hydrolysis using only a cellulase loading of 20FPU/g cellulose and even a high solid loading of 20% without any special strategies. The acetic acid pretreated corncob should be washed adequately before saccharification to achieve complete hydrolysis. Consequently, a mass balance analysis showed that 139.8g XOS, 328.1g glucose, 25.1g cellobiose, and 147.8g xylose were produced from 1000g oven dried raw corncob. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Formic and acetic acid over the central Amazon region, Brazil. I - Dry season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, M. O.; Andreae, T. W.; Talbot, R. W.; Harriss, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    The concentrations of formic and acetic acids in the gas phase, atmospheric aerosol, and rainwater samples collected in Amazonia at ground level and in the atmosphere during the Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment in July/August 1985 were analyzed by ion exchange chromatography. The diurnal behavior of both acids at ground level and their vertical distribution in the forest canopy point to the existence of vegetative sources as well as to production by chemical reactions in the atmosphere. The concentrations of formic and acetic acids in the gas phase were about 2 orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding concentrations in the atmospheric aerosol. In rainwater, the total formate and acetate represented about one half of the anion equivalents, in contrast to less than 10 percent of the soluble anionic equivalents contributed by these acids in the atmospheric aerosol. The observed levels of these ions in rainwater are considered to be the result of a combination of chemical reactions in hydrometeors and the scavenging of the gaseous acids by cloud droplets.

  16. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Matuszyk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis.

  17. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis.

  18. Use of acetic and citric acids to control Salmonella Typhimurium in tahini (sesame paste).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Olaimat, Amin N; Osaili, Tareq M; Shaker, Reyad R; Zein Elabedeen, Noor; Jaradat, Ziad W; Abushelaibi, Aisha; Holley, Richard A

    2014-09-01

    Since tahini and its products have been linked to Salmonella illness outbreaks and product recalls in recent years, this study assessed the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to survive or grow in commercial tahini and when hydrated (10% w/v in water), treated with 0.1%-0.5% acetic or citric acids, and stored at 37, 21 and 10 °C for 28 d. S. Typhimurium survived in commercial tahini up to 28 d but was reduced in numbers from 1.7 to 3.3 log10 CFU/ml. However, in the moist or hydrated tahini, significant growth of S. Typhimurium occurred at the tested temperatures. Acetic and citric acids at ≤0.5% reduced S. Typhimurium by 2.7-4.8 log10 CFU/ml and 2.5-3.8 log10 CFU/ml, respectively, in commercial tahini at 28 d. In hydrated tahini the organic acids were more effective. S. Typhimurium cells were not detected in the presence of 0.5% acetic acid after 7 d or with 0.5% citric acid after 21 d at the tested temperatures. The ability of S. Typhimurium to grow or survive in commercial tahini and products containing hydrated tahini may contribute to salmonellosis outbreaks; however, use of acetic and citric acids in ready-to-eat foods prepared from tahini can significantly minimize the risk associated with this pathogen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis and Antiradical/Antioxidant Activities of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Its Related Propionic, Acetic, and Benzoic Acid Analoguesc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Touaibia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE is a bioactive component isolated from propolis. A series of CAPE analogues was synthesized and their antiradical/antioxidant effects analyzed. The effect of the presence of the double bond and of the conjugated system on the antioxidant effect is evaluated with the analogues obtained from 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl propanoic acid. Those obtained from 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid allow the evaluation of the effect of the presence of two carbons between the carbonyl and aromatic system.

  20. Synthesis and antiradical/antioxidant activities of caffeic acid phenethyl ester and its related propionic, acetic, and benzoic acid analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Luc M; Paré, Aurélie F; Jean-François, Jacques; Hébert, Martin J G; Surette, Marc E; Touaibia, Mohamed

    2012-12-10

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a bioactive component isolated from propolis. A series of CAPE analogues was synthesized and their antiradical/antioxidant effects analyzed. The effect of the presence of the double bond and of the conjugated system on the antioxidant effect is evaluated with the analogues obtained from 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propanoic acid. Those obtained from 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) acetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid allow the evaluation of the effect of the presence of two carbons between the carbonyl and aromatic system.

  1. A solvent extraction approach to recover acetic acid from mixed waste acids produced during semiconductor wafer process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Ju-Yup; Kim, Jun-Young; Kim, Hyun-Sang; Lee, Hyang-Sook; Mohapatra, Debasish; Ahn, Jae-Woo; Ahn, Jong-Gwan; Bae, Wookeun

    2009-03-15

    Recovery of acetic acid (HAc) from the waste etching solution discharged from silicon wafer manufacturing process has been attempted by using solvent extraction process. For this purpose 2-ethylhexyl alcohol (EHA) was used as organic solvent. In the pre-treatment stage >99% silicon and hydrofluoric acid was removed from the solution by precipitation. The synthesized product, Na(2)SiF(6) having 98.2% purity was considered of commercial grade having good market value. The waste solution containing 279 g/L acetic acid, 513 g/L nitric acid, 0.9 g/L hydrofluoric acid and 0.030 g/L silicon was used for solvent extraction study. From the batch test results equilibrium conditions for HAc recovery were optimized and found to be 4 stages of extraction at an organic:aqueous (O:A) ratio of 3, 4 stages of scrubbing and 4 stages of stripping at an O:A ratio of 1. Deionized water (DW) was used as stripping agent to elute HAc from organic phase. In the whole batch process 96.3% acetic acid recovery was achieved. Continuous operations were successfully conducted for 100 h using a mixer-settler to examine the feasibility of the extraction system for its possible commercial application. Finally, a complete process flowsheet with material balance for the separation and recovery of HAc has been proposed.

  2. Iron dissolution of dust source materials during simulated acidic processing: the effect of sulfuric, acetic, and oxalic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2013-09-17

    Atmospheric organic acids potentially display different capacities in iron (Fe) mobilization from atmospheric dust compared with inorganic acids, but few measurements have been made on this comparison. We report here a laboratory investigation of Fe mobilization of coal fly ash, a representative Fe-containing anthropogenic aerosol, and Arizona test dust, a reference source material for mineral dust, in pH 2 sulfuric acid, acetic acid, and oxalic acid, respectively. The effects of pH and solar radiation on Fe dissolution have also been explored. The relative capacities of these three acids in Fe dissolution are in the order of oxalic acid > sulfuric acid > acetic acid. Oxalate forms mononuclear bidentate ligand with surface Fe and promotes Fe dissolution to the greatest extent. Photolysis of Fe-oxalate complexes further enhances Fe dissolution with the concomitant degradation of oxalate. These results suggest that ligand-promoted dissolution of Fe may play a more significant role in mobilizing Fe from atmospheric dust compared with proton-assisted processing. The role of atmospheric organic acids should be taken into account in global-biogeochemical modeling to better access dissolved atmospheric Fe deposition flux at the ocean surface.

  3. Search for genes responsible for the remarkably high acetic acid tolerance of a Zygosaccharomyces bailii-derived interspecies hybrid strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Margarida; Roque, Filipa de Canaveira; Guerreiro, Joana Fernandes; Mira, Nuno Pereira; Queiroz, Lise; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2015-12-16

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is considered the most problematic acidic food spoilage yeast species due to its exceptional capacity to tolerate high concentrations of weak acids used as fungistatic preservatives at low pH. However, the mechanisms underlying its intrinsic remarkable tolerance to weak acids remain poorly understood. The identification of genes and mechanisms involved in Z. bailii acetic acid tolerance was on the focus of this study. For this, a genomic library from the highly acetic acid tolerant hybrid strain ISA1307, derived from Z. bailii and a closely related species and isolated from a sparkling wine production plant, was screened for acetic acid tolerance genes. This screen was based on the transformation of an acetic acid susceptible Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant deleted for the gene encoding the acetic acid resistance determinant transcription factor Haa1. The expression of 31 different DNA inserts from ISA1307 strain genome was found to significantly increase the host cell tolerance to acetic acid. The in silico analysis of these inserts was facilitated by the recently available genome sequence of this strain. In total, 65 complete or truncated ORFs were identified as putative determinants of acetic acid tolerance and an S. cerevisiae gene homologous to most of them was found. These include genes involved in cellular transport and transport routes, protein fate, protein synthesis, amino acid metabolism and transcription. The role of strong candidates in Z. bailii and S. cerevisiae acetic acid tolerance was confirmed based on homologous and heterologous expression analyses. ISA1307 genes homologous to S. cerevisiae genes GYP8, WSC4, PMT1, KTR7, RKR1, TIF3, ILV3 and MSN4 are proposed as strong candidate determinants of acetic acid tolerance. The ORF ZBAI_02295 that contains a functional domain associated to the uncharacterised integral membrane proteins of unknown function of the DUP family is also suggested as a relevant tolerance determinant

  4. Influence of levan-producing acetic acid bacteria on buckwheat-sourdough breads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ua-Arak, Tharalinee; Jakob, Frank; Vogel, Rudi F

    2017-08-01

    Buckwheat sourdoughs supplemented with molasses as natural sucrose source were fermented with levan-producing Gluconobacter (G.) albidus TMW 2.1191 and Kozakia (K.) baliensis NBRC 16680. Cell growth, concomitant levan and low-molecular-weight metabolite production were monitored. Sourdough breads were prepared with different sourdoughs from both strains (24, 30 and 48 h fermentation, respectively) and analyzed with respect to bread volume, crumb hardness and sensory characteristics. During fermentation, levan, acetic and gluconic acids were increasingly produced, while spontaneously co-growing lactic acid bacteria additionally formed acetic and lactic acids. Sourdoughs from both strains obtained upon 24 h of fermentation significantly improved the bread sensory and quality, including higher specific volume as well as lower crumb hardness. Buckwheat doughs containing isolated levan, with similar molecular size and mass compared to in situ produced levan in the sourdough at 48 h, verified the positive effect of levan on bread quality. However, the positive effects of levan were masked to a certain extent by the impact from the natural acidification during fermentations. While levan-producing acetic acid bacteria are a promising alternative for the development of clean-label gluten-free breads without the need of additives, an appropriate balance between acidification and levan production (amount and structure) must be reached. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancing the Acylation Activity of Acetic Acid by Formation of an Intermediate Aromatic Ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Nhung N; Wang, Bin; Sooknoi, Tawan; Crossley, Steven P; Resasco, Daniel E

    2017-07-10

    Acylation is an effective C-C bond-forming reaction to condense acetic acid and lignin-derived aromatic compounds into acetophenones, valuable precursors to fuels and chemicals. However, acetic acid is intrinsically an ineffective acylating agent. Here, we report that its acylation activity can be greatly enhanced by forming intermediate aromatic esters directly derived from acetic acid and phenolic compounds. Additionally, the acylation reaction was studied in the liquid phase over acid zeolites and was found to happen in two steps: 1) formation of an acylium ion and 2) C-C bond formation between the acylium ion and the aromatic substrate. Each of these steps may be rate-limiting, depending on the type of acylating agent and the aromatic substrate. Oxygen-containing substituents, such as -OH and -OCH3 , can activate aromatic substrates for step 2, with -OH> -OCH3 , whereas alkyl substituent -R cannot. At the same time, aromatic esters can rearrange to acetophenones by both an intramolecular pathway and, preferentially, an intermolecular one. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Cellulose acetate layer effect toward aluminium corrosion rate in hydrochloric acid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andarany, K. S.; Sagir, A.; Ahmad, A.; Deni, S. K.; Gunawan, W.

    2017-09-01

    Corrosion occurs due to the oxidation and reduction reactions between the material and its environment. The oxidation reaction defined as reactions that produce electrons and reduction is between two elements that bind the electrons. Corrosion cannot be inevitable in life both within the industry and household. Corrosion cannot eliminate but can be control. According to the voltaic table, Aluminum is a metal that easily corroded. This study attempts to characterize the type of corrosion by using a strong acid media (HCl). Experiment using a strong acid (HCl), at a low concentration that occurs is pitting corrosion, whereas at high concentrations that occurs is corrosion erosion. One of prevention method is by using a coating method. An efforts are made to slow the rate of corrosion is by coating the metal with “cellulose acetate” (CA). cellulose acetate consisted of cellulose powder dissolved in 99% acetic acid, and then applied to the aluminum metal. Soaking experiments using hydrochloric acid, cellulose acetate is able to slow down the corrosion rate of 47 479%.

  7. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Matuszyk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa.

  8. Novel wine yeast with mutations in YAP1 that produce less acetic acid during fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordente, Antonio G; Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Pretorius, Isak S; Curtin, Christopher D

    2013-02-01

    Acetic acid, a byproduct formed during yeast alcoholic fermentation, is the main component of volatile acidity (VA). When present in high concentrations in wine, acetic acid imparts an undesirable 'vinegary' character that results in a significant reduction in quality and sales. Previously, it has been shown that saké yeast strains resistant to the antifungal cerulenin produce significantly lower levels of VA. In this study, we used a classical mutagenesis method to isolate a series of cerulenin-resistant strains, derived from a commercial diploid wine yeast. Four of the selected strains showed a consistent low-VA production phenotype after small-scale fermentation of different white and red grape musts. Specific mutations in YAP1, a gene encoding a transcription factor required for oxidative stress tolerance, were found in three of the four low-VA strains. When integrated into the genome of a haploid wine strain, the mutated YAP1 alleles partially reproduced the low-VA production phenotype of the diploid cerulenin-resistant strains, suggesting that YAP1 might play a role in (regulating) acetic acid production during fermentation. This study offers prospects for the development of low-VA wine yeast starter strains that could assist winemakers in their effort to consistently produce wine to definable quality specifications. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of Bacillus subtilis and acetic acid on Cobb500 intestinal microflora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Král

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial modes of probiotic action include regulation of intestinal microbial homeostasis, stabilization of the gastrointestinal barrier function expression of bacteriocins and interference with the ability of pathogens to colonize and infect the mucosa. Organic acids as feed additives have been used to reduce or eliminate pathogenic bacteria and fungal contamination, control microbial growth and reduction of microbial metabolites. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Bacillus subtilis, acetic acid and their combination on the intestinal microflora of broiler chickens (Cobb 500. The experiment was carried out on 4 groups each contains 100 chicks as follows: control (without addition, treatment 1 (acetic acid, treatment 2 (Bacillus subtilis and treatment 3 (acetic acid + Bacillus subtilis. Six samples from each group were selected as a sample (mixed sex. The highest average number of log CFU.g-1 Lactobacillus sp. was in the treatment 3 – 7.11 log CFU.g-1 and the lowest was in the control group – 6.85. The highest average number of log CFU.g-1 Enterococcus sp. was in the treatment 2 – 7.17 log CFU.g-1 and the lowest was in the control group – 5.65. In both observing additions of Bacillus subtilis and acetic acid increase the number of log CFU.g-1 Lactobacillus sp. and Enterococcus sp. compared with control group. The lower average number of log CFU.g-1 coliform bacteria was in the treatment 2 – 5.9 log CFU.g-1 and the higher was in control group – 6.98. The additional supplement decreased the number of log CFU.g-1 coliform bacteria in the treatment groups compared with the control.

  10. Cloning of genes responsible for acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, M; Takemura, H; Okumura, H; Kawamura, Y; Horinouchi, S; Beppu, T

    1990-04-01

    Five acetic acid-sensitive mutants of Acetobacter aceti subsp. aceti no. 1023 were isolated by mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Three recombinant plasmids that complemented the mutations were isolated from a gene bank of the chromosome DNA of the parental strain constructed in Escherichia coli by using cosmid vector pMVC1. One of these plasmids (pAR1611), carrying about a 30-kilobase-pair (kb) fragment that conferred acetic acid resistance to all five mutants, was further analyzed. Subcloning experiments indicated that a 8.3-kb fragment was sufficient to complement all five mutations. To identify the mutation loci and genes involved in acetic acid resistance, insertional inactivation was performed by insertion of the kanamycin resistance gene derived from E. coli plasmid pACYC177 into the cloned 8.3-kb fragment and successive integration into the chromosome of the parental strain. The results suggested that three genes, designated aarA, aarB, and aarC, were responsible for expression of acetic acid resistance. Gene products of these genes were detected by means of overproduction in E. coli by use of the lac promoter. The amino acid sequence of the aarA gene product deduced from the nucleotide sequence was significantly similar to those of the citrate synthases (CSs) of E. coli and other bacteria. The A. aceti mutants defective in the aarA gene were found to lack CS activity, which was restored by introduction of a plasmid containing the aarA gene. A mutation in the CS gene of E. coli was also complemented by the aarA gene. These results indicate that aarA is the CS gene.

  11. Dynamics of three organic acids (malic, acetic and succinic acid) in sunflower exposed to cadmium and lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhixin; Li, Xiaodong; Sun, Lina; Sun, Tieheng

    2013-01-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) has been considered as a good candidate for bioaccumulation of heavy metals. In the present study, sunflower was used to enrich the cadmium and lead in sand culture during 90 days. Biomass, Cd and Pb uptake, three organic acids and pH in cultures were investigated. Results showed that the existence of Cd and Pb showed different interactions on the organic acids exudation. In single Cd treatments, malic and acetic acids in Cd10 showed an incremental tendency with time. In the mixed treatments of Cd and Pb, malic acids increased when 10 and 40 mg x L(-1) Cd were added into Pb50, but acetic acids in Pb50 were inhibited by Cd addition. The Cd10 supplied in Pb10 stimulated the secretion of malic and succinic acids. Moreover, the Cd or Pb uptake in sunflower showed various correlations with pH and some organic acids, which might be due to the fact that the Cd and Pb interfere with the organic acids secretion in rhizosphere of sunflower, and the changes of organic acids altered the form and bioavailability of Cd and Pb in cultures conversely.

  12. Removal of 17β-estradiol in a Biological Active Carbon Reactor with Acetic Acid and Humic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongtian; Stenstrom, Michael K; Li, Xu

    2017-09-01

      The objective of this study is to characterize the removal of 17β-estradiol (E2) and the microbial community of a biologically active carbon (BAC) reactor under acetic acid or humic acid as the primary carbon source. Influent E2 concentration was maintained at 20 μg/L. Higher than 99% removal of E2 was achieved by the BAC reactor. The concentration of E2 increased from below detection limit (reactor influent. Meanwhile, effluent estrone concentration increased from 50 ± 15 to 55 ± 15 ng/L after the switch of primary carbon source in the reactor influent. 17β-estradiol degrading bacteria were isolated. Microbial community structures under different nutrient conditions were revealed by high throughput sequencing. The presence of readily biodegradable carbon source such as acetic acid benefited E2 removal in the BAC reactor.

  13. Main and interaction effects of acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on growth and ethanol productivity of yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmqvist, E.; Grage, H.; Meinander, N.Q.; Hahn-Haegerdal, B. [Univ. of Lund (Sweden)

    1999-04-05

    The influence of the factors acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on the ethanol yield (Y{sub EtOH}) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, bakers` yeast, S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581, and Candida shehatae NJ 23 was investigated using a 2{sup 3}-full factorial design with 3 centerpoints. The results indicated that acetic acid inhibited the fermentation by C. shehatae NJ 23 markedly more than by bakers` yeast, whereas no significant difference in tolerance towards the compounds was detected between the S. cerevisiae strains. Furfural and the lignin derived compound p-hydroxybenzoic acid did not affect any of the yeasts at the cell mass concentration used. The results indicated that the linear model was not adequate to describe the experimental data. Based on the results from the 2{sup 3}-full factorial experiment, an extended experiment was designed based on a central composite design to investigate the influence of the factors on the specific growth rate ({mu}), biomass yield (Y{sub x}), volumetric ethanol productivity (Q{sub EtOH}), and Y{sub EtOH}. Bakers` yeast was chosen in the extended experiment due to its better tolerance towards acetic acid, which makes it a more interesting organism for use in industrial fermentations of lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

  14. Theoretical study of the hydration of atmospheric nucleation precursors with acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu-Peng; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Jiang, Shuai; Xu, Kang-Ming; Wen, Hui; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Huang, Wei

    2014-09-11

    While atmosphere is known to contain a significant fraction of organic substance and the effect of acetic acid to stabilize hydrated sulfuric acids is found to be close that of ammonia, the details about the hydration of (CH3COOH)(H2SO4)2 are poorly understood, especially for the larger clusters with more water molecules. We have investigated structural characteristics and thermodynamics of the hydrates using density functional theory (DFT) at PW91PW91/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level. The phenomena of the structural evolution may exist during the early stage of the clusters formation, and we tentatively proposed a calculation path for the Gibbs free energies of the clusters formation via the structural evolution. The results in this study supply a picture of the first deprotonation of sulfuric acids for a system consisting of two sulfuric acid molecules, an acetic acid molecule, and up to three waters at 0 and 298.15 K, respectively. We also replace one of the sulfuric acids with a bisulfate anion in (CH3COOH)(H2SO4)2 to explore the difference of acid dissociation between two series of clusters and interaction of performance in clusters growth between ion-mediated nucleation and organics-enhanced nucleation.

  15. Effect of manganese ions on ethanol fermentation by xylose isomerase expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae under acetic acid stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ja Kyong; Um, Youngsoon; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2016-12-01

    The efficient fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the presence of inhibitors is highly desirable for bioethanol production. Among the inhibitors, acetic acid released during the pretreatment of lignocellulose negatively affects the fermentation performance of biofuel producing organisms. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of acetic acid on glucose and xylose fermentation by a high performance engineered strain of xylose utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SXA-R2P-E, harboring a xylose isomerase based pathway. The presence of acetic acid severely decreased the xylose fermentation performance of this strain. However, the acetic acid stress was alleviated by metal ion supplementation resulting in a 52% increased ethanol production rate under 2g/L of acetic acid stress. This study shows the inhibitory effect of acetic acid on an engineered isomerase-based xylose utilizing strain and suggests a simple but effective method to improve the co-fermentation performance under acetic acid stress for efficient bioethanol production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Photofragmentation of gas-phase acetic acid and acetamide clusters in the vacuum ultraviolet region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berholts, Marta; Myllynen, Hanna; Kooser, Kuno; Itälä, Eero; Granroth, Sari; Levola, Helena; Laksman, Joakim; Oghbaiee, Shabnam; Oostenrijk, Bart; Nõmmiste, Ergo; Kukk, Edwin

    2017-11-01

    Photofragmentation of gas-phase acetamide and acetic acid clusters produced by a supersonic expansion source has been studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometry and the partial ion yield (PIY) technique combined with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. Appearance energies of the clusters and their fragments were experimentally determined from the PIY measurements. The effect of clusterization conditions on the formation and fragmentation of acetic acid clusters was investigated. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations were performed on both samples' dimers to find their neutral and ionized geometries as well as proton transfer energy barriers leading to the optimal geometries. In the case of the acetamide dimer, the reaction resulting in the production of ammoniated acetamide was probed, and the geometry of the obtained ion was calculated.

  17. Highly dispersed supported ruthenium oxide as an aerobic catalyst for acetic acid synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anders Bo; Gorbanev, Yury; Cavalca, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    for the selective aerobic oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid. The RuOx was deposited onto different oxide supports using a new gas-phase reaction, which in all cases resulted in homogeneous nanoparticulate films. The RuOx particle size ranged from 0.3 to 1.5nm. The catalytic activity was evaluated on TiO2, Mg6Al2......(CO3)(OH)16·4(H2O), MgAl2O4, Na2Ti6O13 nanotubes, ZnO, γ-Al2O3, WO3, CeO2, and Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 supports. The CeO2 supported RuOx had the highest activity, and selectivity toward acetic acid, of all the materials when normalized with respect to Ru-loading. This high activity was independent of the surface...

  18. Impact of Acetic Acid on the Survival of L. plantarum upon Microencapsulation by Coaxial Electrospraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura G. Gómez-Mascaraque

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, coaxial electrospraying was used for the first time to microencapsulate probiotic bacteria, specifically Lactobacillus plantarum, within edible protein particles with the aim of improving their resistance to in vitro digestion. The developed structures, based on an inner core of whey protein concentrate and an outer layer of gelatin, were obtained in the presence of acetic acid in the outer solution as a requirement for the electrospraying of gelatin. Despite the limited contact of the inner suspension and outer solution during electrospraying, the combination of the high voltage used during electrospraying with the presence of acetic acid was found to have a severe impact on the lactobacilli, not only decreasing initial viability but also negatively affecting the survival of the bacteria during storage and their resistance to different stress conditions, including simulated in vitro digestion.

  19. Steam reforming of biomass based oxygenates - Mechanism of acetic acid activation on supported platinum catalysts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matas Güell, B.; Babych, Igor V.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2008-01-01

    The activation of acetic acid during steam reforming reactions over Pt-based catalysts has been probed by decomposing CH3COOD over Pt/C. The product mixture contained CO2, CH4 and its D-analogs (CH4−xDx, 0⩽x⩽4), H2, HD and D2. CO2, CH3D and D2 are typically primary desorption products whereas the

  20. Mentha longifolia protects against acetic-acid induced colitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Hussam A S; Abdallah, Hossam M; Ali, Soad S

    2016-08-22

    Mentha longifolia L (Wild Mint or Habak) (ML) is used in traditional medicine in treatment of many gastrointestinal disorders. This study aimed to evaluate potential protecting effect of ML and its major constituent, eucalyptol, against acetic acid-induced colitis in rats, a model of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Rats were divided into ten groups (n=8) given orally for three days (mg/kg/day) the following: normal control, acetic acid-induced colitis (un-treated, positive control), vehicle (DMSO), sulfasalazine (500), ML extract (100, 500, 1000), and eucalyptol (100, 200, 400). After 24h-fasting, two ML of acetic acid (3%) was administered intrarectally. On the fifth day, serum and colonic biochemical markers, and histopathological changes were evaluated. Colitis significantly increased colonic myeloperoxidase activity and malonaldehyde level, and serum tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and malonaldehyde levels while significantly decreased colonic and serum glutathione levels. All treatments (except ML 100, ML 1000, and eucalyptol 100) significantly reversed these changes where eucalyptol (400) showed the highest activity in a dose-dependent manner. The colitis-induced histopathological changes were mild in sulfasalazine and eucalyptol 400 groups, moderate in ML 500 and eucalyptol 200 groups, and severe in ML 100, ML 1000, and eucalyptol 100 groups nearly similar to colitis-untreated rats. ML (in moderate doses) and eucalyptol (dose-dependently) exerted protective effects against acetic acid-induced colitis in rats possibly through antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties suggesting a potential benefit in treatments of IBD. To our knowledge this is the first report addressing this point. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of acetic acid concentration of fermented liquid feed on growth performance of piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canibe, Nuria; Pedersen, Anni Øyan; Jensen, Bent Borg

    2010-01-01

    Feeding fermented liquid feed (FLF) to pigs has proven to benefit gastrointestinal health of the animals. However, growth performance data of piglets and growing pigs fed FLF are variable and often a lower feed intake compared to feeding non-FLF or dry feed has been observed. Accumulation...... feed intake on dry matter basis when feeding liquid feed to pigs. In conclusion, concentrations of acetic acid, at the levels normally measured in FLF, are not expected to affect markedly growth performance of piglets...

  2. The Enhancement of Catharanthine Content in Catharanthus roseus Callus Culture Treated with Naphtalene Acetic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DINGSE PANDIANGAN

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The research aim was to examine the enhancement of catharanthine content in Catharanthus roseus callus culture added with different concentration of Naphtalene Acetic Acid (NAA. NAA treatment produced callus that formed hairy roots. Fresh and dry weight of callus increased as the increasing of NAA concentration. The catharanthine content of C. roseus callus culture was increased by adding NAA as well. The highest catharanthine content was found in 2.5 ppm NAA added callus.

  3. Study of alkaline-earth element complexes in anhydrous acetic acid; Etude de complexes des elements alcalino-terreux dans l'acide acetique anhydre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, N. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Institut National des Sciences et Technique Nucleaires, Saclay (France)

    1968-10-01

    We have studied the complexes of alkaline-earth elements in anhydrous acetic acid. Using glass-electrode potentiometry we have studied the titration of alkaline earth acetates with perchloric acid which is the strongest acid in anhydrous acetic acid. These titrations have shown that the basic strength of these acetates increases as follows: Mg < Ca < Si < Ba. The interpretation of the titration curves has made it possible to determine a certain number of reaction constants. A study has also been made of the dissociation, of alkaline earth perchlorates formed during these titrations, since the determination of the reaction constants involves their dissociation constants. During this work it has been possible to show that barium has a particular behaviour, giving a mixed compound (a lower acetate complex) not only in the presence of perchloric acid but also in the presence of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids. These are respectively: the mixed acetate-perchlorate complex of barium: Ba(OAc) (ClO{sub 4}); the mixed acetate-acid sulfate complex of barium: Ba (OAc)(HSO{sub 4}); the mixed acetate-chloride of barium: Ba (OAc)(Cl). (author) [French] Nous nous sommes interesses a l'etude de complexes des elements alcalino-terreux dans l'acide acetique anhydre. Par potentiometrie avec une electrode de verre, nous avons etudie les titrages des acetates alcalino-terreux par l'acide perchlorique, qui est l'acide le plus fort dans l'acide acetique anhydre. Ces titrages ont montre que la force basique de ces acetates croit selon: Mg < Ca < Sr < Ba. L'interpretation des courbes de titrages a permis la determination d'un certain nombre de constantes de reactions. D'autre part, nous avons etudie la dissociation des perchlorates alcalino-terreux formes au cours de ces titrages car leurs constantes de dissociation interviennent dans la determination des constantes de reactions. Au cours de ce travail, nous avons pu mettre en evidence le

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of the auxin-binding protein 1 in complex with indole-3-acetic acid and naphthalen-1-acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandits, Melanie; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-10-01

    Auxin-binding protein 1 (ABP1) is suggested to be an auxin receptor which plays an important role in several processes in green plants. Maize ABP1 was simulated with the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and the synthetic analog naphthalen-1-acetic acid (NAA), to elucidate the role of the KDEL sequence and the helix at the C-terminus. The KDEL sequence weakens the intermolecular interactions between the monomers but stabilizes the C-terminal helix. Conformational changes at the C-terminus occur within the KDEL sequence and are influenced by the binding of the simulated ligands. This observation helps to explain experimental findings on ABP1 interactions with antibodies that are modulated by the presence of auxin, and supports the hypothesis that ABP1 acts as an auxin receptor. Stable hydrogen bonds between the monomers are formed between Glu40 and Glu62, Arg10 and Thr97, Lys39, and Glu62 in all simulations. The amino acids Ile22, Leu25, Trp44, Pro55, Ile130, and Phe149 are located in the binding pocket and are involved in hydrophobic interactions with the ring system of the ligand. Trp151 is stably involved in a face to end interaction with the ligand. The calculated free energy of binding using the linear interaction energy approach showed a higher binding affinity for NAA as compared to IAA. Our simulations confirm the asymmetric behavior of the two monomers, the stronger interaction of NAA than IAA and offers insight into the possible mechanism of ABP1 as an auxin receptor. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Regulation of ethylene-related gene expression by indole-3-acetic acid and 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid in relation to pea fruit and seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghege, Charitha P A; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Waduthanthri, Kosala D; Reinecke, Dennis M

    2017-07-10

    In pea, the auxins 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid (4-Cl-IAA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) occur naturally; however, only 4-Cl-IAA stimulates pericarp growth and gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis, and inhibits the ethylene response in deseeded ovaries (pericarps), mimicking the presence of seeds. Expression of ovary ethylene biosynthesis genes was regulated similarly in most cases by the presence of 4-Cl-IAA or seeds. PsACS1 [which encodes an enzyme that synthesizes 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC)] transcript abundance was high in pericarp tissue adjacent to developing seeds following pollination. ACC accumulation in 4-Cl-IAA-treated deseeded pericarps was driven by high PsASC1 expression (1800-fold). 4-Cl-IAA, but not IAA, also suppressed the pericarp transcript levels of PsACS4. 4-Cl-IAA increased PsACO1 and decreased PsACO2 and PsACO3 expression (enzymes that convert ACC to ethylene) but did not change ACO enzyme activity. Increased ethylene was countered by a 4-Cl-IAA-specific decrease in ethylene responsiveness potentially via modulation of pericarp ethylene receptor and signaling gene expression. This pattern did not occur in IAA-treated pericarps. Overall, the effect of 4-Cl-IAA and IAA on ethylene biosynthesis gene expression generally explains the ethylene evolution patterns, and their effects on GA biosynthesis and ethylene signaling gene expression explain the tissue response patterns in young pea ovaries. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  6. The influence of surface oxygen and hydroxyl groups on the dehydrogenation of ethylene, acetic acid and hydrogenated vinyl acetate on pure Pd(1 0 0): A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yanping [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China); Dong, Xiuqin [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Yu, Yingzhe, E-mail: yzhyu@tju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Minhua, E-mail: mhzhangtj@163.com [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • All dehydrogenation reactions in vinyl acetate synthesis on Pd(1 0 0) were studied. • The energy barriers of the transition state of the three reactions were calculated. • The influence of surface Os and OHs on all dehydrogenation actions was discussed. - Abstract: On the basis of a Langmuir–Hinshelwood-type mechanism, the dehydrogenation of ethylene, acetic acid and hydrogenated vinyl acetate (VAH) on pure Pd(1 0 0) with surface oxygen atoms (Os) and hydroxyl groups (OHs) was studied with density functional theory (DFT) method. Our calculation results show that both Os and OHs can consistently reduce the activation energies of dehydrogenation of ethylene, acetic acid and VAH to some degree with only one exception that OHs somehow increase the activation energy of VAH. Based on Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanism, the three dehydrogenation reactions in presence of surface Os and OHs are almost consistently favored, compared with the corresponding processes on clean Pd(1 0 0) surfaces, and thus a Langmuir–Hinshelwood-type mechanism may not be excluded beforehand when investigating the microscopic performance of the oxygen-assisted vinyl acetate synthesis on Pd(1 0 0) catalysts.

  7. Pb(II) and Zn(II) adsorption onto Na- and Ca-montmorillonites in acetic acid/acetate medium: experimental approach and geochemical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayaza, Mariem; Le Forestier, Lydie; Muller, Fabrice; Tournassat, Christophe; Beny, Jean-Michel

    2011-09-01

    Smectites are usually used as a clay barrier at the bottom of subsurface waste landfills due to their low permeability and their capacity to retain pollutants. The Na- and Ca-saturated SWy2 montmorillonites were interacted with initial Zn(NO(3))(2) or Pb(NO(3))(2) concentrations ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-2)M with a solid/liquid ratio of 10 g L(-1) and using acetic acid/acetate as buffer at pH 5 in order to reproduce a biodegradable leachate of a young landfill. These experiments revealed that Zn and Pb sorption onto Na-SWy2 is higher than that onto Ca-SWy2 in the whole range of concentrations. Metal retention into both montmorillonites increases with the decrease in acetic acid/acetate concentration. The two-site protolysis model with no electrostatic term (2SPNE model) was used to model these experiments. As the experimental data of Zn sorption were well fitted, this model was validated and has been improved by taking into account the metal-acetate complexation in solution. In order to validate the model for Pb sorption, new selectivity coefficients have been determined, namely logK(c)(PbNa)=0.5 for Na-montmorillonite and logK(c)(PbCa)=0.3 for Ca-montmorillonite. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Density functional theory study of acetic acid steam reforming on Ni(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yan-Xiong; Du, Zhen-Yi; Guo, Yun-Peng; Feng, Jie; Li, Wen-Ying

    2017-04-01

    Catalytic steam reforming of bio-oil is a promising process to convert biomass into hydrogen. To shed light on this process, acetic acid is selected as the model compound of the oxygenates in bio-oil, and density functional theory is applied to investigate the mechanism of acetic acid steam reforming on the Ni(111) surface. The most favorable pathway of this process on the Ni(111) surface is suggested as CH3COOH* → CH3COO* → CH3CO* → CH2CO* → CH2* + CO* → CH* → CHOH* → CHO* → CO*, followed by the water gas shift reaction to produce CO2 and H2. CH* species are identified as the major carbon deposition precursor, and the water gas shift reaction is the rate-determining step during the whole acetic acid steam reforming process, as CO* + OH* → cis-COOH* is kinetically restricted with the highest barrier of 1.85 eV. Furthermore, the formation pathways and initial dissociation of important intermediates acetone and acetaldehyde are also investigated.

  9. The effect of sodium valproate on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Ali; Motaghi, Ehsan; Hosseini, Mohammad Javad; Ghasemi-Pirbaluti, Masoumeh

    2017-02-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic recurrent disease with incomplete treatment options. The current article evaluated the effect of sodium valproate on acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats. Rats were randomly distributed into six groups including Sham group, colitis control group, sodium valproate treatment groups (50, 100 and 300 mg/kg, i.p.) and dexamethasone-treatment group. Dexamethasone was used as a reference drug. Colitis was induced by intracolonic instillation of 2 mL of 3% acetic acid solution. The efficacy of sodium valproate was evaluated by macroscopical and histopathological scoring systems, hematocrit measurement as well as biochemical analysis including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines assessment. Sodium valproate, particularly with doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg significantly improved weight loss, and macroscopic damage, reduced ulcer area, colon weight, microscopic colitis index and elevated hematocrit level. Biochemical experiments showed elevated levels of colonic MPO activity, interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in colitis control group. Treatment with sodium valproate at the doses of 100 and 300 mg/Kg) decreased the MPO activity and colonic concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. The results provide evidence that sodium valproate has a protective effect in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis which might be due to its anti-inflammatory activities, and it may be useful in patients with ulcerative colitis.

  10. Effect of Concentrated Apple Extract on Experimental Colitis Induced by Acetic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastrelo, Maurício Mercaldi; Dias Ribeiro, Carla Caroline; Duarte, Joselmo Willamys; Bioago Gollücke, Andréa Pitelli; Artigiani-Neto, Ricardo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Miszputen, Sender Jankiel; Fujiyama Oshima, Celina Tizuko; Ribeiro Paiotti, Ana Paula

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) play a crucial role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) exacerbating the chronic inflammatory process. Endogenous and diet antioxidants can neutralize these compounds. The apple is widely consumed, with several antioxidant activity compounds. The present study evaluated the effects of concentrated apple extract (CAE) in acetic acid induced colitis. 29 Wistar male rats were randomized into 5 groups. G1-Sham/saline solution, G2-CAE/control, G3-acetic acid/control, G4-curative- CAE treatment and G5-preventive-CAE treatment. Eight days later, the animals were euthanized and the colonic segment resected for macroscopic and histological analysis. Gene expression was evaluated for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), catalase and copper and zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) by quantitative real time PCR, while protein expression was assessed for iNOS, COX-2 and 8-hydroxy-20-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) via immunohistochemistry. The groups G3, G4 and G5 had weight loss, while G5 had weight increase at the end of the experiment. The treatment with CAE reduced the macroscopic and microscopic injury, decreased iNOS mRNA expression and increased CuZnSOD mRNA expression in animals with induced acetic acid-colitis. The findings of the present study suggest that CAE treatment exerts an antioxidant role by downregulating iNOS and upregulating CuZnSOD.

  11. Radioprotective and Apoptotic Properties of a Combination of α-Tocopherol Acetate and Ascorbic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, I N; Bespalov, V G; Baranenko, D A

    2016-06-01

    We studied radioprotective and apoptotic properties of a combination of α-tocopherol acetate and ascorbic acid. α-Tocopherol acetate (10 mg/kg body weight) or ascorbic acid (20 mg/kg) or combination of these agents in the same doses was orally administered to male rats at various terms before and after single whole-body exposure to γ-irradiation in the doses of 2 and 8 Gy. Irradiation increased the frequency of chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells and plasma level of low-molecular-weight DNA. Vitamin combination administered before or after irradiation significantly reduced the frequency of chromosome aberrations by 2-2.5 times. Administration of this combination 10 min before irradiation 1.5-fold increased the content of low-molecular-weight DNA in blood plasma in comparison with the control animals exposed to radiation. The combination of α-tocopherol acetate and ascorbic acid produced radioprotective effects and enhanced apoptosis in irradiated cells.

  12. Preparation and characterization of physicochemical properties of glacial acetic acid modified Gadung (Diocorea hispida Dennst) flours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumoro, Andri Cahyo; Amalia, Rizka; Budiyati, Catarina Sri; Retnowati, Diah Susetyo; Ratnawati, Ratnawati

    2015-10-01

    In addition to the presence of antinutrients, the inferior physicochemical properties of flours has caused gadung (Dioscorea hispida dennst) becomes one of the underutilized tubers in the world. Acetylation is one of the starch modification methods to alter the physicochemical properties of starch, namely swelling power and solubility. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of reaction time, glacial acetic acid/flour mass ratio and pH on gadung flour acetylation at ambient temperature. The acetylation was carried out by reacting gadung flour slurry of 20 % consistency with glacial acetic acid under alkaline condition. The results show that in general degree of substitution and swelling power increased with the increase of reaction time, while the solubility was not affected by reaction time after 10 min acetylation. Acetylation led to significant changes in morphology and structure of gadung flour starch granules. Overall, all the acetylated gadung flours obtained in this work were having higher swelling power and solubility than the native flour. Acetylation of gadung flour using glacial acetic acid with 1:3 mass ratio and pH 8.0 at ambient temperature for 30 min resulted gadung flours with swelling power and solubility similar to that of Korean wheat flour.

  13. A new medium containing mupirocin, acetic acid, and norfloxacin for the selective cultivation of bifidobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlková, Eva; Salmonová, Hana; Bunešová, Věra; Geigerová, Martina; Rada, Vojtěch; Musilová, Šárka

    2015-08-01

    Various culture media have been proposed for the isolation and selective enumeration of bifidobacteria. Mupirocin is widely used as a selective factor along with glacial acetic acid. TOS (transgalactosylated oligosaccharides) medium supplemented with mupirocin is recommended by the International Dairy Federation for the detection of bifidobacteria in fermented milk products. Mupirocin media with acetic acid are also reliable for intestinal samples in which bifidobacteria predominate. However, for complex samples containing more diverse microbiota, the selectivity of mupirocin media is limited. Resistance to mupirocin has been demonstrated by many anaerobic bacteria, especially clostridia. The objective was to identify an antibiotic that inhibits the growth of clostridia and allows the growth of bifidobacteria, and to use the identified substance to develop a selective cultivation medium for bifidobacteria. The susceptibility of bifidobacteria and clostridia to 12 antibiotics was tested on agar using the disk diffusion method. Only norfloxacin inhibited the growth of clostridia and did not affect the growth of bifidobacteria. Using both pure cultures and faecal samples from infants, adults, calves, lambs, and piglets, the optimal concentration of norfloxacin in solid cultivation media was determined to be 200 mg/L. Our results showed that solid medium containing norfloxacin (200 mg/L) in combination with mupirocin (100 mg/L) and glacial acetic acid (1 mL/L) is suitable for the enumeration and isolation of bifidobacteria from faecal samples of different origins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Interaction of acetic acid and phenylacetaldehyde as attractants for trapping pest species of moths (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolt, Peter J; Tóth, Miklós; Meagher, Robert L; Szarukán, István

    2013-02-01

    Phenylacetaldehyde is a flower volatile and attractant for many nectar-seeking moths. Acetic acid is a microbial fermentation product that is present in insect sweet baits. It is weakly attractive to some moths and other insects, but can be additive or synergistic with other compounds to make more powerful insect lures. Acetic acid and phenylacetaldehyde presented together in traps made a stronger lure than either chemical alone for moths of the alfalfa looper Autographa californica (Speyer) and the armyworm Spodoptera albula (Walker). However, this combination of chemicals reduced captures of the cabbage looper moth Trichoplusia ni (Hübner), the silver Y moth Autographa gamma (L.), MacDunnoughia confusa (Stephens) and the soybean looper moth Chrysodeixis includens (Walker) by comparison with phenylacetaldehyde alone. These results indicate both positive and negative interactions of acetic acid, a sugar fermentation odor cue, and phenylacetaldehyde, a floral scent cue, in eliciting orientation responses of moths. This research provides a new two-component lure for the alfalfa looper A. californica and for the armyworm S. albula for potential use in pest management. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Unimolecular decomposition of formic and acetic acids: A shock tube/laser absorption study

    KAUST Repository

    Elwardany, A.

    2014-07-16

    The thermal decomposition of formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH), two carboxylic acids which play an important role in oxygenate combustion chemistry, were investigated behind reflected shock waves using laser absorption. The rate constants of the primary decomposition pathways of these acids:(HCOOH → CO + H2 O (R 1); HCOOH → CO2 + H2 (R 2); CH3 COOH → CH4 + CO2 (R 3); CH3 COOH → CH2 CO + H2 O (R 4)) were measured using simultaneous infrared laser absorption of CO, CO2 and H2O at wavelengths of 4.56, 4.18 and 2.93 microns, respectively. Reaction test conditions covered temperatures from 1230 to 1821 K and pressures from 1.0 to 6.5 atm for dilute mixtures of acids (0.25-0.6%) in argon. The rate constants of dehydration (R1) and decarboxylation (R2) reactions of formic acid were calculated by fitting exponential functions to the measured CO, CO2 and H2O time-history profiles. These two decomposition channels were found to be in the fall-off region and have a branching ratio, k1/k2, of approximately 20 over the range of pressures studied here. The best-fit Arrhenius expressions of the first-order rates of R1 and R2 were found to be:(k1 (1 atm) = 1.03 × 1011 exp (- 25651 / T) s- 1 (± 37 %); k1 (6.5 atm) = 9.12 × 1012 exp (- 30275 / T) s- 1 (± 32 %); k2 (1 atm) = 1.79 × 108 exp (- 21133 / T) s- 1 (± 41 %); k2 (6.5 atm) = 2.73 × 108 exp (- 20074 / T) s- 1 (± 37 %)). The rate constants for acetic acid decomposition were obtained by fitting simulated profiles, using an acetic acid pyrolysis mechanism, to the measured species time-histories. The branching ratio, k4/k3, was found to be approximately 2. The decarboxylation and dehydration reactions of acetic acid appear to be in the falloff region over the tested pressure range:(k3 (1 atm) = 3.18 × 1011 exp (- 28679 / T) s- 1 (± 30 %); k3 (6 atm) = 3.51 × 1012 exp (- 31330 / T) s- 1 (± 26 %); k4 (1 atm) = 7.9 × 1011 exp (- 29056 / T) s- 1 (± 34 %); k4 (6 atm) = 6.34 × 1012 exp (- 31330 / T) s

  16. Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 4, April 1-June 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, J. E.; Wise, D. L.

    1978-08-28

    To date fermentations of marine algal species run at a controlled pH of 5.5 to 6.0 have exhibited essentially complete conversion to organic acids in as little as 16 days. (By complete conversion is meant conversion of each hexose unit to three acetic acid molecules or higher organic acids on a reducing equivalent basis.) As a result of these rapid rates and high conversions economic calculations have shown that processing costs are sufficiently low to encourage commercial development of this process. In the course of this work a diffusion membrane extraction system has been developed for removing organic acids from the fermentation broth. In addition, a fixed packed bed fermenter with a capacity of approximately 300 liters has been constructed and operated for a six month period. Another significant result is that fermentation at thermophilic temperatures (55/sup 0/C) gives higher ratios of acetic acid to total acid product than at mesophilic temperatures (37/sup 0/C). Manuscripts of two technical presentations based on this work are attached.

  17. 2,2,3-trimethylbutane and differently-branched hydrocarbons through hydrogenation of trialkyl acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueren, H.

    1944-02-15

    This report described a method of producing Triptan (2,2,3-trimethylbutane). The starting material was diisopropyl ketone (Isobutyron). It was transformed into dimethylisopropyl acetic acid by first chlorinating the starting material and then treating it with a water-free alkali (sodium hydroxide) in a benzene solution containing a small amount of sodium metal to tie up any remaining water. The acid crystallized out as a sodium salt and then was redissolved with dilute hydrochloric acid. The dimethylisopropyl acetic acid had the same carbon skeleton as Triptan. Studies were underway on finding the best catalyst to accomplish the hydrogenation of the acid group to give Triptan. The best catalyst tried so far was catalyst 6718, a non-splitting catalyst containing nickel sulfide and tungsten sulfide in the ratio 1:1. That catalyst gave yields of 40% Triptan, 40% unchanged acid, 10% higher-boiling-point compounds, and 10% lower-boiling-point liquids and gases. It was supposed that a catalyst with nickel:tungsten ratio of 2:1 instead of 1:1 would have even better effects. Other catalysts were also being investigated. The starting material isobutyron was obtained as a byproduct of butyl alcohol production. The chlorination of Isobutyron was done by introducing chlorine gas into the material while the material was being held at 0/sup 0/ to 5/sup 0/C. Care had to be taken to stop the chlorination at the right time so that only the monochlorinated product was obtained.

  18. Vinegar Production from Jabuticaba (Myrciaria jaboticaba Fruit Using Immobilized Acetic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Suela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell immobilization comprises the retention of metabolically active cells inside a polymeric matrix. In this study, the production of jabuticaba (Myrciaria jaboticaba vinegar using immobilized Acetobacter aceti and Gluconobacter oxydans cells is proposed as a new method to prevent losses of jabuticaba fruit surplus. The pulp of jabuticaba was processed and Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCMA 0200 was used to ferment the must for jabuticaba wine production. Sugars, alcohols (ethanol and glycerol and organic acids were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Volatile compounds were determined by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. The ethanol content of the produced jabuticaba wine was approx. 74.8 g/L (9.5 % by volume after 168 h of fermentation. Acetic acid fermentation for vinegar production was performed using a mixed culture of immobilized A. aceti CCT 0190 and G. oxydans CCMA 0350 cells. The acetic acid yield was 74.4 % and productivity was 0.29 g/(L·h. The vinegar had particularly high concentrations of citric (6.67 g/L, malic (7.02 g/L and succinic (5.60 g/L acids. These organic acids give a suitable taste and flavour to the vinegar. Seventeen compounds (aldehydes, higher alcohols, terpene, acetate, diether, furans, acids, ketones and ethyl esters were identified in the jabuticaba vinegar. In conclusion, vinegar was successfully produced from jabuticaba fruits using yeast and immobilized mixed cultures of A. aceti and G. oxydans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to use mixed culture of immobilized cells for the production of jabuticaba vinegar.

  19. The CgHaa1-Regulon Mediates Response and Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Ruben T; Cunha, Diana V; Wang, Can; Pereira, Leonel; Silva, Sónia; Salazar, Sara B; Schröder, Markus S; Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Aoyama, Toshihiro; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Azeredo, Joana; Butler, Geraldine; Mira, Nuno Pereira

    2017-01-05

    To thrive in the acidic vaginal tract, Candida glabrata has to cope with high concentrations of acetic acid. The mechanisms underlying C. glabrata tolerance to acetic acid at low pH remain largely uncharacterized. In this work, the essential role of the CgHaa1 transcription factor (encoded by ORF CAGL0L09339g) in the response and tolerance of C. glabrata to acetic acid is demonstrated. Transcriptomic analysis showed that CgHaa1 regulates, directly or indirectly, the expression of about 75% of the genes activated under acetic acid stress. CgHaa1-activated targets are involved in multiple physiological functions including membrane transport, metabolism of carbohydrates and amino acids, regulation of the activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, and adhesion. Under acetic acid stress, CgHaa1 increased the activity and the expression of the CgPma1 proton pump and contributed to increased colonization of vaginal epithelial cells by C. glabrata CgHAA1, and two identified CgHaa1-activated targets, CgTPO3 and CgHSP30, are herein demonstrated to be determinants of C. glabrata tolerance to acetic acid. The protective effect of CgTpo3 and of CgHaa1 was linked to a role of these proteins in reducing the accumulation of acetic acid inside C. glabrata cells. In response to acetic acid stress, marked differences were found in the regulons controlled by CgHaa1 and by its S. cerevisiae ScHaa1 ortholog, demonstrating a clear divergent evolution of the two regulatory networks. The results gathered in this study significantly advance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the success of C. glabrata as a vaginal colonizer. Copyright © 2017 Bernardo et al.

  20. New insights into the mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter pasteurianus using iTRAQ-dependent quantitative proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kai; Zang, Ning; Zhang, Junmei; Zhang, Hong; Li, Yudong; Liu, Ye; Feng, Wei; Liang, Xinle

    2016-12-05

    Acetobacter pasteurianus is the main starter in rice vinegar manufacturing due to its remarkable abilities to resist and produce acetic acid. Although several mechanisms of acetic acid resistance have been proposed and only a few effector proteins have been identified, a comprehensive depiction of the biological processes involved in acetic acid resistance is needed. In this study, iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis was adopted to investigate the whole proteome of different acidic titers (3.6, 7.1 and 9.3%, w/v) of Acetobacter pasteurianus Ab3 during the vinegar fermentation process. Consequently, 1386 proteins, including 318 differentially expressed proteins (pacetic acid stress, where >150 proteins were differentially expressed. Specifically, proteins involved in amino acid metabolic processes and fatty acid biosynthesis were differentially expressed, which may contribute to the acetic acid resistance of Acetobacter. Transcription factors, two component systems and toxin-antitoxin systems were implicated in the modulatory network at multiple levels. In addition, the identification of proteins involved in redox homeostasis, protein metabolism, and the cell envelope suggested that the whole cellular system is mobilized in response to acid stress. These findings provide a differential proteomic profile of acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter pasteurianus and have potential application to highly acidic rice vinegar manufacturing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of Cultivable Acetic Acid Bacterial Microbiota in Organic and Conventional Apple Cider Vinegar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Štornik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic apple cider vinegar is produced from apples that go through very restricted treatment in orchard. During the first stage of the process, the sugars from apples are fermented by yeasts to cider. The produced ethanol is used as a substrate by acetic acid bacteria in a second separated bioprocess. In both, the organic and conventional apple cider vinegars the ethanol oxidation to acetic acid is initiated by native microbiota that survived alcohol fermentation. We compared the cultivable acetic acid bacterial microbiota in the production of organic and conventional apple cider vinegars from a smoothly running oxidation cycle of a submerged industrial process. In this way we isolated and characterized 96 bacteria from organic and 72 bacteria from conventional apple cider vinegar. Using the restriction analysis of the PCR-amplifi ed 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS regions, we identified four different HaeIII and five different HpaII restriction profiles for bacterial isolates from organic apple cider vinegar. Each type of restriction profile was further analyzed by sequence analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS regions, resulting in identification of the following species: Acetobacter pasteurianus (71.90 %, Acetobacter ghanensis (12.50 %, Komagataeibacter oboediens (9.35 % and Komagataeibacter saccharivorans (6.25 %. Using the same analytical approach in conventional apple cider vinegar, we identified only two different HaeIII and two different HpaII restriction profiles of the 16S‒23S rRNA gene ITS regions, which belong to the species Acetobacter pasteurianus (66.70 % and Komagataeibacter oboediens (33.30 %. Yeasts that are able to resist 30 g/L of acetic acid were isolated from the acetic acid production phase and further identified by sequence analysis of the ITS1-5.8S rDNA‒ITS2 region as Candida ethanolica, Pichia membranifaciens and Saccharomycodes ludwigii. This study has shown for the first time that the bacterial microbiota for the

  2. Comparison of Cultivable Acetic Acid Bacterial Microbiota in Organic and Conventional Apple Cider Vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štornik, Aleksandra; Skok, Barbara; Trček, Janja

    2016-03-01

    Organic apple cider vinegar is produced from apples that go through very restricted treatment in orchard. During the first stage of the process, the sugars from apples are fermented by yeasts to cider. The produced ethanol is used as a substrate by acetic acid bacteria in a second separated bioprocess. In both, the organic and conventional apple cider vinegars the ethanol oxidation to acetic acid is initiated by native microbiota that survived alcohol fermentation. We compared the cultivable acetic acid bacterial microbiota in the production of organic and conventional apple cider vinegars from a smoothly running oxidation cycle of a submerged industrial process. In this way we isolated and characterized 96 bacteria from organic and 72 bacteria from conventional apple cider vinegar. Using the restriction analysis of the PCR-amplified 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS regions, we identified four different HaeIII and five different HpaII restriction profiles for bacterial isolates from organic apple cider vinegar. Each type of restriction profile was further analyzed by sequence analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS regions, resulting in identification of the following species: Acetobacter pasteurianus (71.90%), Acetobacter ghanensis (12.50%), Komagataeibacter oboediens (9.35%) and Komagataeibacter saccharivorans (6.25%). Using the same analytical approach in conventional apple cider vinegar, we identified only two different HaeIII and two different HpaII restriction profiles of the 16S‒23S rRNA gene ITS regions, which belong to the species Acetobacter pasteurianus (66.70%) and Komagataeibacter oboediens (33.30%). Yeasts that are able to resist 30 g/L of acetic acid were isolated from the acetic acid production phase and further identified by sequence analysis of the ITS1-5.8S rDNA‒ITS2 region as Candida ethanolica, Pichia membranifaciens and Saccharomycodes ludwigii. This study has shown for the first time that the bacterial microbiota for the industrial production of

  3. Synthesis and biological activities of 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid and its esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, M

    2000-04-01

    4-Chloroindole-3-acetic acid (4-Cl-IAA) and its esters were synthesized from 2-chloro-6-nitrotoluene as the starting material. The biological activities of 4-CI-IAA and its esters were determined by four bioassays. Except for the tert-butyl ester, 4-Cl-IAA and its esters had stronger elongation activity toward Avena coleoptiles than had indole-3-acetic acid. The biological activities of the methyl, ethyl and allyl esters were as strong as the activity of the free acid. All the esters, except for the tert-butyl, inhibited Chinese cabbage hypocotyl growth more than the free acid did, and all the esters induced severe swelling and formation of numerous lateral roots in black gram seedlings even at a low concentration. Furthermore, adventitious root formation was strongly promoted in Serissa japonica cuttings by all the esters. The root formation-promoting activities of the ethyl and allyl esters were about three times the value for indole-3-butyric acid which is used to promote and accelerate root formation in plant cuttings.

  4. Enhancement of extracellular lipid production by oleaginous yeast through preculture and sequencing batch culture strategy with acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiang-Feng; Shen, Yi; Luo, Hui-Juan; Liu, Jia-Nan; Liu, Jia

    2018-01-01

    Oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus curvatus MUCL 29819, an acid-tolerant lipid producer, was tested to spill lipids extracellularly using different concentrations of acetic acid as carbon source. Extracellular lipids were released when the yeast was cultured with acetic acid exceeding 20g/L. The highest production of lipid (5.01g/L) was obtained when the yeast was cultured with 40g/L acetic acid. When the yeast was cultivated with moderate concentration (20g/L) of acetic acid, lipid production was further increased by 49.6% through preculture with 40g/L acetic acid as stimulant. When applying high concentration (40g/L) of acetic acid as carbon source in sequencing batch cultivation, extracellular lipids accounted up to 50.5% in the last cycle and the extracellular lipids reached 5.43g/L through the whole process. This study provides an effective strategy to enhance extracellular lipid production and facilitate the recovery of microbial lipids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of 2-phenlethanol and acetic acid lures to monitor Obliquebanded leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) under mating disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted to compare the relative attraction of the benzenoid plant volatiles 2-phenylethanol, phenylacetaldehyde, and phenylacetonitrile in combination with acetic acid as lures for male and female adults of the obliquebanded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris), in apple, Mal...

  6. The effect of curcumin (active substance of turmeric) on the acetic acid-induced visceral nociception in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajik, Hossein; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Hamzeh-Gooshchi, Nasrin

    2008-01-15

    In the present study, the effect of chronic oral administration of curcumin in the presence or absence of morphine and noloxone was investigated on the visceral nociception induced by acetic acid in rats. Intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid (1 mL, 2%) produced contractions in the abdominal musculature (writhes). The latency time to the beginning of the first writhe was measured and the total number of writhes in the 1 h after acetic acid injection was counted. The latency time to the beginning of the first writhe was significantly (p weight). The same results were obtained after subcutaneous injection of morphine (1 mg kg(-1) b.wt.). Naloxone at the dose of 1 mg kg(-1) body weight had no effect on pain intensity. Curcumin significantly (p acetic acid-induced visceral nociception of rats, curcumin may produce an antinociceptive effect and the endogenous analgesic opioid system is involved in the curcumin-induced antinociception.

  7. Ethanol and acetic acid production from carbon monoxide in a Clostridium strain in batch and continuous gas-fed bioreactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abubackar, Haris Nalakath; Veiga, María C; Kennes, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different sources of nitrogen as well as their concentrations on the bioconversion of carbon monoxide to metabolic products such as acetic acid and ethanol by Clostridium autoethanogenum was studied...

  8. Profile of preoperative fecal organic acids closely predicts the incidence of postoperative infectious complications after major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection: Importance of fecal acetic acid plus butyric acid minus lactic acid gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Mizuno, Takashi; Sugawara, Gen; Asahara, Takashi; Nomoto, Koji; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Ebata, Tomoki; Nagino, Masato

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the association between preoperative fecal organic acid concentrations and the incidence of postoperative infectious complications in patients undergoing major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection for biliary malignancies. The fecal samples of 44 patients were collected before undergoing hepatectomy with bile duct resection for biliary malignancies. The concentrations of fecal organic acids, including acetic acid, butyric acid, and lactic acid, and representative fecal bacteria were measured. The perioperative clinical characteristics and the concentrations of fecal organic acids were compared between patients with and without postoperative infectious complications. Among 44 patients, 13 (30%) developed postoperative infectious complications. Patient age and intraoperative bleeding were significantly greater in patients with postoperative infectious complications compared with those without postoperative infectious complications. The concentrations of fecal acetic acid and butyric acid were significantly less, whereas the concentration of fecal lactic acid tended to be greater in the patients with postoperative infectious complications. The calculated gap between the concentrations of fecal acetic acid plus butyric acid minus lactic acid gap was less in the patients with postoperative infectious complications (median 43.5 vs 76.1 μmol/g of feces, P = .011). Multivariate analysis revealed that an acetic acid plus butyric acid minus lactic acid gap acid profile (especially low acetic acid, low butyric acid, and high lactic acid) had a clinically important impact on the incidence of postoperative infectious complications in patients undergoing major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Polygenic analysis and targeted improvement of the complex trait of high acetic acid tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijnen, Jean-Paul; Randazzo, Paola; Foulquié-Moreno, María R; van den Brink, Joost; Vandecruys, Paul; Stojiljkovic, Marija; Dumortier, Françoise; Zalar, Polona; Boekhout, Teun; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Kokošar, Janez; Štajdohar, Miha; Curk, Tomaž; Petrovič, Uroš; Thevelein, Johan M

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid is one of the major inhibitors in lignocellulose hydrolysates used for the production of second-generation bioethanol. Although several genes have been identified in laboratory yeast strains that are required for tolerance to acetic acid, the genetic basis of the high acetic acid tolerance naturally present in some Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains is unknown. Identification of its polygenic basis may allow improvement of acetic acid tolerance in yeast strains used for second-generation bioethanol production by precise genome editing, minimizing the risk of negatively affecting other industrially important properties of the yeast. Haploid segregants of a strain with unusually high acetic acid tolerance and a reference industrial strain were used as superior and inferior parent strain, respectively. After crossing of the parent strains, QTL mapping using the SNP variant frequency determined by pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis revealed two major QTLs. All F1 segregants were then submitted to multiple rounds of random inbreeding and the superior F7 segregants were submitted to the same analysis, further refined by sequencing of individual segregants and bioinformatics analysis taking into account the relative acetic acid tolerance of the segregants. This resulted in disappearance in the QTL mapping with the F7 segregants of a major F1 QTL, in which we identified HAA1, a known regulator of high acetic acid tolerance, as a true causative allele. Novel genes determining high acetic acid tolerance, GLO1, DOT5, CUP2, and a previously identified component, VMA7, were identified as causative alleles in the second major F1 QTL and in three newly appearing F7 QTLs, respectively. The superior HAA1 allele contained a unique single point mutation that significantly improved acetic acid tolerance under industrially relevant conditions when inserted into an industrial yeast strain for second-generation bioethanol production. This work reveals the polygenic

  10. Hydration of AN Acid Anhydride: the Water Complex of Acetic Sulfuric Anhydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, CJ; Huff, Anna; Mackenzie, Becca; Leopold, Ken

    2017-06-01

    The water complex of acetic sulfuric anhydride (ASA, CH_{3}COOSO_{2}OH) has been observed by pulsed nozzle Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. ASA is formed in situ in the supersonic jet via the reaction of SO_{3} and acetic acid and subsequently forms a complex with water during the expansion. Spectra of the parent and fully deuterated form, as well as those of the species derived from CH_{3}^{13}COOH, have been observed. The fitted internal rotation barrier of the methyl group is 219.599(21), \\wn indicating the complexation with water lowers the internal rotation barrier of the methyl group by 9% relative to that of free ASA. The observed species is one of several isomers identified theoretically in which the water inserts into the intramolecular hydrogen bond of the ASA. Aspects of the intermolecular potential energy surface are discussed.

  11. Acetic acid inhibits nutrient uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: auxotrophy confounds the use of yeast deletion libraries for strain improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; Bierma, Jan; Smith, Mark R; Poliner, Eric; Wolfe, Carole; Hadduck, Alex N; Zara, Severino; Jirikovic, Mallori; van Zee, Kari; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2013-08-01

    Acetic acid inhibition of yeast fermentation has a negative impact in several industrial processes. As an initial step in the construction of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with increased tolerance for acetic acid, mutations conferring resistance were identified by screening a library of deletion mutants in a multiply auxotrophic genetic background. Of the 23 identified mutations, 11 were then introduced into a prototrophic laboratory strain for further evaluation. Because none of the 11 mutations was found to increase resistance in the prototrophic strain, potential interference by the auxotrophic mutations themselves was investigated. Mutants carrying single auxotrophic mutations were constructed and found to be more sensitive to growth inhibition by acetic acid than an otherwise isogenic prototrophic strain. At a concentration of 80 mM acetic acid at pH 4.8, the initial uptake of uracil, leucine, lysine, histidine, tryptophan, phosphate, and glucose was lower in the prototrophic strain than in a non-acetic acid-treated control. These findings are consistent with two mechanisms by which nutrient uptake may be inhibited. Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were severely decreased upon acetic acid treatment, which likely slowed ATP-dependent proton symport, the major form of transport in yeast for nutrients other than glucose. In addition, the expression of genes encoding some nutrient transporters was repressed by acetic acid, including HXT1 and HXT3 that encode glucose transporters that operate by facilitated diffusion. These results illustrate how commonly used genetic markers in yeast deletion libraries complicate the effort to isolate strains with increased acetic acid resistance.

  12. Improved Acetic Acid Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the WHI2 Gene Identified through Inverse Metabolic Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yingying; Stabryla, Lisa; Wei, Na

    2016-01-01

    Development of acetic acid-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for economically viable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, but the goal remains a critical challenge due to limited information on effective genetic perturbation targets for improving acetic acid resistance in the yeast. This study employed a genomic-library-based inverse metabolic engineering approach to successfully identify a novel gene target, WHI2 (encoding a cytoplasmatic globular scaffold prote...

  13. Survival mechanism of Escherichia coli O157:H7 against combined treatment with acetic acid and sodium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Young; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    The combination of salt and acid is commonly used in the production of many foods, including pickles and fermented foods. However, in our previous studies, the addition of salt significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of acetic acid on Escherichia coli O157:H7 in laboratory media and pickled cucumbers. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the mechanism by which salt confers resistance against acetic acid in E. coli O157:H7. The addition of high concentrations (up to 9% or 15% [w/v]) of salt increased the resistance of E. coli O157:H7 to acetic acid treatment. Combined treatment with acetic acid and salt showed varying results among different bacterial strains (an antagonistic effect for E. coli O157:H7 and Shigella and a synergistic effect for Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus). The addition of salt increased the cytoplasmic pH of E. coli O157:H7, but decreased the cytoplasmic pH of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus on treatment with acetic acid. Therefore, the addition of salt increases the acid resistance of E. coli O157:H7 possibly by increasing its acid resistance response and consequently preventing the acidification of its cytoplasm by organic acids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Adaptive Response and Tolerance to Acetic Acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii: A Physiological Genomics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Palma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid is an important microbial growth inhibitor in the food industry; it is used as a preservative in foods and beverages and is produced during normal yeast metabolism in biotechnological processes. Acetic acid is also a major inhibitory compound present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates affecting the use of this promising carbon source for sustainable bioprocesses. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae response and adaptation to acetic acid have been studied for years, only recently they have been examined in more detail in Zygosaccharomyces bailii. However, due to its remarkable tolerance to acetic acid and other weak acids this yeast species is a major threat in the spoilage of acidic foods and beverages and considered as an interesting alternative cell factory in Biotechnology. This review paper emphasizes genome-wide strategies that are providing global insights into the molecular targets, signaling pathways and mechanisms behind S. cerevisiae and Z. bailii tolerance to acetic acid, and extends this information to other weak acids whenever relevant. Such comprehensive perspective and the knowledge gathered in these two yeast species allowed the identification of candidate molecular targets, either for the design of effective strategies to overcome yeast spoilage in acidic foods and beverages, or for the rational genome engineering to construct more robust industrial strains. Examples of successful applications are provided.

  15. Auxin (Indole-3-acetic acid), Gibberellic acid (GA3), Abscisic Acid (ABA) and Cytokinin (Zeatin) Production by Some Species of Mosses and Lichens

    OpenAIRE

    ERGÜN, Nuray

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the levels of endogenous free, bound and total auxin (Indole-3-acetic acid, IAA), gibberellic acid (GA3), abscisic acid (ABA) and cytokinin (zeatin) were examined in some species of mosses and lichens. For determination of the levels of these plant growth regulators, spectrophotometry was used. Our findings show that the mosses and lichens used in this study produce the plant growth regulators IAA, GA3, ABA and zeatin.

  16. Involvement of Yeast HSP90 Isoforms in Response to Stress and Cell Death Induced by Acetic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Alexandra; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Fernandes, Ângela; Carreto, Laura; Rodrigues, Fernando; Holcik, Martin; Santos, Manuel A. S.; Ludovico, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Acetic acid-induced apoptosis in yeast is accompanied by an impairment of the general protein synthesis machinery, yet paradoxically also by the up-regulation of the two isoforms of the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) chaperone family, Hsc82p and Hsp82p. Herein, we show that impairment of cap-dependent translation initiation induced by acetic acid is caused by the phosphorylation and inactivation of eIF2α by Gcn2p kinase. A microarray analysis of polysome-associated mRNAs engaged in translation in acetic acid challenged cells further revealed that HSP90 mRNAs are over-represented in this polysome fraction suggesting preferential translation of HSP90 upon acetic acid treatment. The relevance of HSP90 isoform translation during programmed cell death (PCD) was unveiled using genetic and pharmacological abrogation of HSP90, which suggests opposing roles for HSP90 isoforms in cell survival and death. Hsc82p appears to promote survival and its deletion leads to necrotic cell death, while Hsp82p is a pro-death molecule involved in acetic acid-induced apoptosis. Therefore, HSP90 isoforms have distinct roles in the control of cell fate during PCD and their selective translation regulates cellular response to acetic acid stress. PMID:23967187

  17. Chromoendoscopy with indigo carmine dye added to acetic acid in the diagnosis of gastric neoplasia: a prospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yuzo; Eto, Reiko; Kasanuki, Junji; Kondo, Fukuo; Kato, Kazuki; Arai, Makoto; Suzuki, Takuto; Kobayashi, Michiko; Matsumura, Tomoaki; Bekku, Dan; Ito, Kenichi; Nakamoto, Shingo; Tanaka, Takeshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2008-10-01

    Conventional endoscopy and chromoendoscopy with indigo carmine dye are usually performed for recognizing adequate tumor-negative lateral margins for successful endoscopic resection of gastric neoplasia. However, chromoendoscopy with indigo carmine dye added to acetic acid has not been used for this purpose. Our purpose was to compare the diagnostic performance of chromoendoscopy with indigo carmine dye added to acetic acid with that of conventional endoscopy and chromoendoscopy with indigo carmine dye or acetic acid alone. Prospective study. Social Insurance Funabashi Central Hospital. Forty-seven consecutive patients (53 lesions) with early gastric cancer and gastric adenomas who underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) from April 2006 to July 2007 were studied. All the lesions were examined by the endoscopic modalities before ESD, and the resected specimens were analyzed histopathologically. Two endoscopists independently evaluated the diagnostic performance of each image in terms of recognition of tumor borders with reference to macroscopic and histopathologic findings of resected specimens. We also conducted a substudy to assess interobserver variability. There was good interobserver agreement between the 2 endoscopists in this study (kappa index = 0.764). The diagnostic performance of chromoendoscopy with indigo carmine dye added to acetic acid was significantly greater than that of any of the other modalities (vs each: P indigo carmine dye added to acetic acid was better compared with conventional endoscopy and chromoendoscopy by using only indigo carmine dye or acetic acid. The applicability of this method for gastric neoplasia merits further investigation.

  18. Acetic acid recovery from fast pyrolysis oil. An exploratory study on liquid-liquid reactive extraction using aliphatic tertiary amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfud, F. H.; van Geel, F. P.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Heeres, H. J.

    2008-01-01

    Flash pyrolysis oil or Bio-oil (BO), obtained by flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, is very acidic in nature. The major component responsible for this acidity is acetic acid, present in levels up to 2-10 wt%. Here, we report an exploratory study on BO upgrading by reactive extraction of

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of mutual azo prodrug of 5-aminosalicylic acid linked to 2-phenylbenzoxazole-2-yl-5-acetic acid in ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilani JA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Jamal A Jilani,1 Maha Shomaf,2 Karem H Alzoubi3 1Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 2Department of Pathology, Jordan University, Amman, Jordan; 3Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan Abstract: In this study, the syntheses of 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid, (an analogue of a known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug [NSAID] and 5-[4-(benzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acidphenylazo]-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (a novel mutual azo prodrug of 5-aminosalicylic acid [5-ASA] are reported. The structures of the synthesized compounds were confirmed using infrared (IR, hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR, and mass spectrometry (MS spectroscopy. Incubation of the azo compound with rat cecal contents demonstrated the susceptibility of the prepared azo prodrug to bacterial azoreductase enzyme. The azo compound and the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid were evaluated for inflammatory bowel diseases, in trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNB-induced colitis in rats. The synthesized diazo compound and the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid were found to be as effective as 5-aminosalicylic acid for ulcerative colitis. The results of this work suggest that the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid may represent a new lead for treatment of ulcerative colitis. Keywords: benzoxazole acetic acid, azo prodrug, colon drug delivery

  20. 40 CFR 721.2076 - D-Glucuronic acid, polymer with 6-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium magnesium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium magnesium potassium sodium salt. 721.2076 Section 721...-Glucuronic acid, polymer with 6-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium magnesium potassium sodium... identified as D-Glucuronic acid, polymer with 6-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium magnesium...

  1. Regulation of indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis by branched-chain amino acids in Enterobacter cloacae UW5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Cassandra V; Harris, Danielle M M; Patten, Cheryl L

    2015-09-01

    The soil bacterium Enterobacter cloacae UW5 produces the rhizosphere signaling molecule indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) via the indolepyruvate pathway. Expression of indolepyruvate decarboxylase, a key pathway enzyme encoded by ipdC, is upregulated by the transcription factor TyrR in response to aromatic amino acids. Some members of the TyrR regulon may also be controlled by branched-chain amino acids and here we show that expression from the ipdC promoter and production of IAA are downregulated by valine, leucine and isoleucine. Regulation of the IAA synthesis pathway by both aromatic and branched-chain amino acids suggests a broader role for this pathway in bacterial physiology, beyond plant interactions. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Impact of gluconic fermentation of strawberry using acetic acid bacteria on amino acids and biogenic amines profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez, J L; Sainz, F; Callejón, R M; Troncoso, A M; Torija, M J; García-Parrilla, M C

    2015-07-01

    This paper studies the amino acid profile of beverages obtained through the fermentation of strawberry purée by a surface culture using three strains belonging to different acetic acid bacteria species (one of Gluconobacter japonicus, one of Gluconobacter oxydans and one of Acetobacter malorum). An HPLC-UV method involving diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate (DEEMM) was adapted and validated. From the entire set of 21 amino acids, multiple linear regressions showed that glutamine, alanine, arginine, tryptophan, GABA and proline were significantly related to the fermentation process. Furthermore, linear discriminant analysis classified 100% of the samples correctly in accordance with the microorganism involved. G. japonicus consumed glucose most quickly and achieved the greatest decrease in amino acid concentration. None of the 8 biogenic amines were detected in the final products, which could serve as a safety guarantee for these strawberry gluconic fermentation beverages, in this regard. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Aromatic Aldehydes by Imidazolium Dichromate in Aqueous Acetic Acid Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sheik Mansoor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of benzaldehyde (BA and para-substituted benzaldehydes by imidazolium dichromate (IDC has been studied in aqueous acetic acid medium in the presence of perchloric acid. The reaction is first order each in [IDC], [Substrate] and [H+]. The reaction rates have been determined at different temperatures and the activation parameters calculated. Electron withdrawing substituents are found to increase the reaction and electron releasing substituents are found to retard the rate of the reaction and the rate data obey the Hammett relationship. The products of the oxidation are the corresponding acids. The rate decreases with the increase in the water content of the medium. A suitable mechanism is proposed.

  4. The complexity of Orion: an ALMA view. II. gGg'-ethylene glycol and acetic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, C.; Pagani, L.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Bergin, E. A.; Carvajal, M.; Kleiner, I.; Melnick, G.; Snell, R.

    2017-07-01

    We report the first detection and high angular resolution (1.8″× 1.1″) imaging of acetic acid (CH3COOH) and gGg'-ethylene glycol (gGg'(CH2OH)2) toward the Orion Kleinmann-Low (Orion-KL) nebula. The observations were carried out at 1.3 mm with ALMA during Cycle 2. A notable result is that the spatial distribution of the acetic acid and ethylene glycol emission differs from that of the other O-bearing molecules within Orion-KL. While the typical emission of O-bearing species harbors a morphology associated with a V-shape linking the hot core region to the compact ridge (with an extension toward the BN object), the emission of acetic acid and ethylene glycol mainly peaks at about 2'' southwest from the hot core region (near sources I and n). We find that the measured CH3COOH:aGg'(CH2OH)2 and CH3COOH:gGg'(CH2OH)2 ratios differ from those measured toward the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422 by more than one order of magnitude. Our best hypothesis to explain these findings is that CH3COOH, aGg'(CH2OH)2, and gGg'(CH2OH)2 are formed on the icy surface of grains and are then released into the gas-phase via co-desorption with water, by way of a bullet of matter ejected during the explosive event that occurred in the heart of the nebula about 500-700 yr ago.

  5. The role of methanogens in acetic acid production under different salinity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Keke; Guo, Chenghong; Maspolim, Yogananda; Zhou, Yan; Ng, Wun Jern

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a fed-batch acidogenic reactor was operated at a 3 d hydraulic retention time (HRT) and fed with alkaline pre-treated sludge to investigate salinity effects on methanogens' abundance, activities and their consumption of produced acetic acid (HAc) and total volatile fatty acids (VFAs). The salinity concentration was increased step-wise by adding sodium chloride. At 3‰ (parts per thousand) salinity, the average produced volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentration was 2410.16 ± 637.62 mg COD L(-1) and 2.70 ± 0.36 L methane was produced daily in the acidogenic reactor. Further batch tests indicated methanogens showed a HAc degradation rate of 3.81 mg COD g(-1) VSS h(-1) at initial HAc concentration of 1150 mg COD L(-1), and showed tolerance up to 16‰ salinity (3.76 g Na(+) L(-1)) as indicated by a constant HAc degradation rate. The microbiological study indicated this can be related to the predominance of acetate-utilizing Methanosarcinaceae and Methanomicrobiales in the reactor. However, with salinity increased to 20‰ and 40‰, increases in VFAs and HAc production and decreases in methane production, methanogens population, acidogenic bacteria population and acidification extent were observed. This study demonstrated presence of acetate-utilizing methanogens in an acidogenic reactor and their high tolerance to salinity, as well as their negative impacts on net VFAs production. The results would suggest the presence of methanogens in the acidogenic reactor should not be ignored and the recovery of methane from the acidogenic reactor needs to be considered to avoid carbon loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Protective effect of sanguinarine against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Fan, Ting; Li, Weifeng; Huang, Huimin; Zhang, Yanmin; Xing, Wei

    2013-03-15

    The quaternary ammonium salt, sanguinarine (SANG), is of great practical and research interest because of its pronounced, widespread physiological effects, which promote anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory responses in experimental animals. Although SANG is originally shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties and it has been used to treat various inflammatory diseases, its effects on ulcerative colitis have not been previously explored. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of SANG on acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in mice. Experimental animals received SANG (1, 5 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.) and sulfasalazine (500 mg/kg, p.o.) for seven consecutive days after induction of colitis by intra-rectal acetic acid (5% v/v) administration. The colonic mucosal injury was assessed by clinical, macroscopic, biochemical and histopathological examinations. SANG treatment significantly decreased mortality rate, body weight loss, disease activity index (DAI), wet colon weight, macroscopic and histological score when compared to acetic acid-induced controls. In addition, administration of SANG effectively inhibited p65 NF-κB protein expression and MPO activity accumulation. The levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in the serum and colon tissue of mice with experimental colitis were decreased by SANG in a concentration-dependent manner in response to p65 NF-κB. The possible mechanism of protection on experimental colitis was that SANG could be through attenuating early steps of inflammation as well as decreasing the expression of NF-κB and subsequent pro-inflammatory cytokines production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Carbon dioxide capture from reforming gases using acetic acid-mixed chemical absorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmanian, Amin; Zaini, Muhammad Abbas ahmad; Abdullah, Tuan Amran Tuan [Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    2015-07-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a major problem in the production of natural gas as it may contribute to the operational problems such as foaming, corrosion, high solution viscosity, and fouling, thereby decreasing the plant life. The presence of acid gas in natural gas reforming may also result in the increase of transported gas volume and the decrease of heating value. Absorption using aqueous solutions of alkanolamines has been a preferred approach in current industry for CO{sub 2} removal. Concentration of ammonia and DEA affects the CO{sub 2} removal; increasing the absorbents concentration increases the CO{sub 2} removal. On molar basis, DEA shows a greater CO{sub 2} absorption than ammonia. Acetic acid-mixed absorbents display a lower CO{sub 2} removal than the nonmixed ones. Decrease in solubility due to the decrease in solution pH has resulted in a lower CO{sub 2} absorption by acetic acid-mixed absorbents. Liquid flow rate offers only small influence on the absorption of CO{sub 2}, while decreasing the gas flow rate increases the CO{sub 2} removal. On the operational point of view, blend of ammonia and DEA absorbent would be beneficial for CO{sub 2} removal from reforming gases as it could partly solve the problems associated with regeneration and corrosion.

  8. Effect of acetic acid on corrosion behavior of AISI 201, 304 and 430 stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vashishtha, Himanshu; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Sharma, Sumitra [Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), Nagpur (India). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    2017-05-15

    Austenitic stainless steels are often used to handle organic acids such as acetic acid (CH{sub 3}COOH), which are extensively used in food contact applications and chemical industries for manufacturing medicines, nutrition and various chemical amalgams. In the present investigation an attempt has been made to compare the corrosion behavior of Cr-Ni (AISI type 304), Cr-Mn-Ni (type 201) and Cr (type 430) stainless steel for economical replacement of higher cost Cr-Ni grade. Immersion testing was performed at room temperature and boiling temperature in acetic acid. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was carried out to evaluate metal ion concentration in the immersion solution. The surface morphology of pit formation was characterized using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of elemental leaching on electrical conductivity of the immersion solution was evaluated and correlated with pH measurements. A new mechanism has been proposed for the pit formation due to manganese sulfide inclusions. The replacement compatibility was further confirmed with anodic polarization testing and a successful replacement was established for room temperature applications.

  9. Ultrastructure of sheep primordial follicles cultured in the presence of indol acetic acid, EGF, and FSH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade, Evelyn Rabelo; Hyttel, Poul; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda Da Cruz

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ultrastructural characteristics of primordial follicles after culturing of sheep ovarian cortical slices in the presence of indol acetic acid (IAA), Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), and FSH. To evaluate ultrastructure of primordial follicles cultured...... in MEM (control) or in MEM containing IAA, EGF, and FSH, fragments of cultured tissue were processes for transmission electron microscopy. Except in the control, primordial follicles cultured in supplemented media for 6¿d were ultrastructurally normal. They had oocyte with intact nucleus......, the presence of IAA, EGF, and FSH helped to maintain ultrastructural integrity of sheep primordial follicles cultured in vitro....

  10. Hydroxylamine hydrochloride-acetic acid-soluble and -insoluble fractions of pelagic sediment: Readsorption revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, D.Z.; Wandless, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    The extraction of the rare earth elements (REE) from deep-ocean pelagic sediment, using hydroxylamine hydrochloride-acetic acid, leads to the separation of approximately 70% of the bulk REE content into the soluble fraction and 30% into the insoluble fraction. The REE pattern of the soluble fraction, i.e., the content of REE normalized to average shale on an element-by-element basis and plotted against atomic number, resembles the pattern for seawater, whereas the pattern, as well as the absolute concentrations, in the insoluble fraction resembles the North American shale composite. These results preclude significant readsorption of the REE by the insoluble phases during the leaching procedure.

  11. Application of molecular techniques for identification and ennumeration of acetic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    González Benito, Angel

    2005-01-01

    Application of molecular techniques for identification and enumeration of acetic acid bacteria:Los principales objetivos de la tesis son el desarrollo de técnicas de biología molecular rápidas y fiables para caracterizar bacterias acéticas.Las bacterias acéticas son las principales responsables del picado de los vinos y de la producción de vinagre. Sin embargo, existe un desconocimiento importante sobre su comportamiento y evolución. Las técnicas de enumeración y de identificación basadas en ...

  12. Ternary liquid-liquid equilibria measurement for epoxidized soybean oil + acetic acid + water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shuang-Fei; Wang, Li-Sheng; Yan, Guo-Qing; Li, Yi; Feng, Yun-Xia; Linghu, Rong-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE) data were measured for ternary system epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) + acetic acid + water at 313.15, 323.15 and 333.15 K, respectively. The consistency of the measured LLE data was tested, using Othmer-Tobias correlation and root-mean-square deviation (sigma) in mass fraction of water in the lower phase and average value of the absolute difference (AAD) between experimental mass fraction of epoxidized soybean oil in the upper phase and that calculated using Othmer-Tobias correlation.

  13. Comparative Genomics of Acetobacterpasteurianus Ab3, an Acetic Acid Producing Strain Isolated from Chinese Traditional Rice Vinegar Meiguichu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Xia

    Full Text Available Acetobacter pasteurianus, an acetic acid resistant bacterium belonging to alpha-proteobacteria, has been widely used to produce vinegar in the food industry. To understand the mechanism of its high tolerance to acetic acid and robust ability of oxidizing ethanol to acetic acid (> 12%, w/v, we described the 3.1 Mb complete genome sequence (including 0.28 M plasmid sequence with a G+C content of 52.4% of A. pasteurianus Ab3, which was isolated from the traditional Chinese rice vinegar (Meiguichu fermentation process. Automatic annotation of the complete genome revealed 2,786 protein-coding genes and 73 RNA genes. The comparative genome analysis among A. pasteurianus strains revealed that A. pasteurianus Ab3 possesses many unique genes potentially involved in acetic acid resistance mechanisms. In particular, two-component systems or toxin-antitoxin systems may be the signal pathway and modulatory network in A. pasteurianus to cope with acid stress. In addition, the large numbers of unique transport systems may also be related to its acid resistance capacity and cell fitness. Our results provide new clues to understanding the underlying mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter species and guiding industrial strain breeding for vinegar fermentation processes.

  14. Esterification of Benzyl Alcohol with Acetic Acid over Mesoporous H-ZSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desy Tri Kusumaningtyas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the performance of mesoporous ZSM-5 has been studied on the esterification of acetic acid (AA with benzyl alcohol (BA. The mesoporous ZSM-5 catalyst has been synthesized with the variation of aging time i.e. 6, 12, and 24 hours at the same temperature, 70 °C. The cation exchange of Na-ZSM-5 to H-ZSM-5 was performed before the catalytic activity test. The acidity type and amount of solids were determined by FT-IR spectroscopy using pyridine as a probe molecule. The characterization by pyridine adsorption showed that at a higher mesoporous surface area, the number of Lewis acid was increased. The highest mesoporous surface area, Lewis, and Brönsted acid sites were obtained by sample which has the lowest crystallinity, i.e. 255.78 m2/g, 0.2732 mmol/g, and 0.20612 mmol/g, respectively. Influence of mesoporous volume was studied on the catalytic activity of the mesoporous ZSM-5 in the esterification reaction. Conversion of acetic acid in the esterification reaction for samples of    HZ-6, HZ-12, and HZ-24 were obtained by titration methods, i.e. 39.59, 36.39, and 32.90 %, respectively. Hence, the reaction temperature of 393 K, molar ratio 1:4 (AA:BA and catalyst loading 5 % were selected as an optimum reaction parameters. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 21st November 2016; Revised: 1st February 2017; Accepted: 18th February 2017 How to Cite: Kusumaningtyas, D.T., Prasetyoko, D., Suprapto, Triwahyono, S., Jalil, A.A., Rosidah, A. (2017. Esterification of Benzyl Alcohol with Acetic Acid over Mesoporous H-ZSM-5. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (2: 243-250 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.2.806.243-250 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.2.806.243-250

  15. Techno-economic Analysis for the Thermochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol via Acetic Acid Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Jones, Susanne B.

    2009-04-01

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications. As a widely available biomass form, lignocellulosic biomass can have a major impact on domestic transportation fuel supplies and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). This study performs a techno-economic analysis of the thermo chemical conversion of biomass to ethanol, through methanol and acetic acid, followed by hydrogenation of acetic acid to ethanol. The conversion of syngas to methanol and methanol to acetic acid are well-proven technologies with high conversions and yields. This study was undertaken to determine if this highly selective route to ethanol could provide an already established economically attractive route to ethanol. The feedstock was assumed to be wood chips at 2000 metric ton/day (dry basis). Two types of gasification technologies were evaluated: an indirectly-heated gasifier and a directly-heated oxygen-blown gasifier. Process models were developed and a cost analysis was performed. The carbon monoxide used for acetic acid synthesis from methanol and the hydrogen used for hydrogenation were assumed to be purchased and not derived from the gasifier. Analysis results show that ethanol selling prices are estimated to be $2.79/gallon and $2.81/gallon for the indirectly-heated gasifier and the directly-heated gasifier systems, respectively (1stQ 2008$, 10% ROI). These costs are above the ethanol market price for during the same time period ($1.50 - $2.50/gal). The co-production of acetic acid greatly improves the process economics as shown in the figure below. Here, 20% of the acetic acid is diverted from ethanol production and assumed to be sold as a co-product at the prevailing market prices ($0.40 - $0.60/lb acetic acid), resulting in competitive ethanol production costs.

  16. Evaluation of fermentation kinetics of acid-treated corn cob hydrolysate for xylose fermentation in the presence of acetic acid by Pichia stipitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashid, Mohan; Ghosalkar, Anand

    2017-08-01

    The efficient utilization of lignocellulosic biomass for ethanol production depends on the fermentability of the biomass hydrolysate obtained after pretreatment. In this work we evaluated the kinetics of ethanol production from xylose using Pichia stipitis in acid-treated corn cob hydrolysate. Acetic acid is one of the main inhibitors in corn cob hydrolysate that negatively impacts kinetics of xylose fermentation by P. stipitis. Unstructured kinetic model has been formulated that describes cell mass growth and ethanol production as a function of xylose, oxygen, ethanol, and acetic acid concentration. Kinetic parameters were estimated under different operating conditions affecting xylose fermentation. This is the first report on kinetics of xylose fermentation by P. stipitis which includes inhibition of acetic acid on growth and product formation. In the presence of acetic acid in the hydrolysate, the model accurately predicted reduction in maximum specific growth rate (from 0.23 to 0.15 h -1 ) and increase in ethanol yield per unit biomass (from 3 to 6.2 gg -1 ), which was also observed during experimental trials. Presence of acetic acid in the fermentation led to significant reduction in the cell growth rate, reduction in xylose consumption and ethanol production rate. The developed model accurately described physiological state of P. stipitis during corn cob hydrolysate fermentation. Proposed model can be used to predict the influence of xylose, ethanol, oxygen, and acetic acid concentration on cell growth and ethanol productivity in industrial fermentation.

  17. High temperature stimulates acetic acid accumulation and enhances the growth inhibition and ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under fermenting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ji-Min; Yang, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Sae-Um; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    2014-07-01

    Cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to high temperatures of up to 42 °C during ethanol fermentation at a high glucose concentration (i.e., 100 g/L) were investigated. Increased temperature correlated with stimulated glucose uptake to produce not only the thermal protectant glycerol but also ethanol and acetic acid. Carbon flux into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle correlated positively with cultivation temperature. These results indicate that the increased demand for energy (in the form of ATP), most likely caused by multiple stressors, including heat, acetic acid, and ethanol, was matched by both the fermentation and respiration pathways. Notably, acetic acid production was substantially stimulated compared to that of other metabolites during growth at increased temperature. The acetic acid produced in addition to ethanol seemed to subsequently result in adverse effects, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. This, in turn, appeared to cause the specific growth rate, and glucose uptake rate reduced leading to a decrease of the specific ethanol production rate far before glucose depletion. These results suggest that adverse effects from heat, acetic acid, ethanol, and oxidative stressors are synergistic, resulting in a decrease of the specific growth rate and ethanol production rate and, hence, are major determinants of cell stability and ethanol fermentation performance of S. cerevisiae at high temperatures. The results are discussed in the context of possible applications.

  18. Electrospun fibers of acid-labile biodegradable polymers with acetal groups as potential drug carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wenguo; Qi, Mingbo; Li, Xiaohong; Huang, Shaozhou; Zhou, Shaobing; Weng, Jie

    2008-09-01

    The local delivery and controllable release profiles make electrospun ultrafine fibers as potential implantable drug carriers and functional coatings of medical devices. Till date there is no literature report on drug delivery from acid-labile electrospun fibers, whose degradation and drug release behaviors respond to the local pathological pH environment. Acid-labile groups have been incorporated into nonbiodegradable backbones as crosslinkers or linkers of the side chains. A novel strategy was developed in this study to synthesize acid-labile polymers by introducing acetal groups into biodegradable backbone of poly(dl-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol). In vitro release study showed that the total amount of drug released from acid-labile polymeric fibers was accelerated on account of pH-induced structural and morphological changes of fibrous mats and the degradation of matrix polymers, and the burst release was significant higher for polymers with higher contents of acid-labile segments. During the investigational period, almost no molecular weight reduction and mass loss was detected in neutral buffer solutions, but the degradation was enhanced in acid buffers with a two-stage degradation profile. Surface erosion mechanism was initially detected for fibrous mats with distinct fiber morphologies, and bulk degradation was determined during the following incubation for polymeric films resulting from the morphological changes.

  19. Acetic acid upregulates the expression of genes for fatty acid oxidation enzymes in liver to suppress body fat accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tomoo; Kishi, Mikiya; Fushimi, Takashi; Kaga, Takayuki

    2009-07-08

    We investigated the effect of acetic acid (AcOH) on the prevention of obesity in high-fat-fed mice. The mice were intragastrically administrated with water or 0.3 or 1.5% AcOH for 6 weeks. AcOH administration inhibited the accumulation of body fat and hepatic lipids without changing food consumption or skeletal muscle weight. Significant increases were observed in the expressions of genes for peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and for fatty-acid-oxidation- and thermogenesis-related proteins: acetyl-CoA oxidase (ACO), carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1), and uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2), in the liver of the AcOH-treatment groups. PPARalpha, ACO, CPT-1, and UCP-2 gene expressions were increased in vitro by acetate addition to HepG2 cells. However, the effects were not observed in cells depleted of alpha2 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) by siRNA. In conclusion, AcOH suppresses accumulation of body fat and liver lipids by upregulation of genes for PPARalpha and fatty-acid-oxidation-related proteins by alpha2 AMPK mediation in the liver.

  20. Temperature dependence of the dielectric permittivity of acetic acid, propionic acid and their methyl esters: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riniker, Sereina; Horta, Bruno A C; Thijssen, Bram; Gupta, Saumya; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2012-04-10

    For most liquids, the static relative dielectric permittivity is a decreasing function of temperature, because enhanced thermal motion reduces the ability of the molecular dipoles to orient under the effect of an external electric field. Monocarboxylic fatty acids ranging from acetic to octanoic acid represent an exception to this general rule. Close to room temperature, their dielectric permittivity increases slightly with increasing temperature. Herein, the causes for this anomaly are investigated based on molecular dynamics simulations of acetic and propionic acids at different temperatures in the interval 283-363 K, using the GROMOS 53A6(OXY) force field. The corresponding methyl esters are also considered for comparison. The dielectric permittivity is calculated using either the box-dipole fluctuation (BDF) or the external electric field (EEF) methods. The normal and anomalous temperature dependences of the permittivity for the esters and acids, respectively, are reproduced. Furthermore, in the EEF approach, the response of the acids to an applied field of increasing strength is found to present two successive linear regimes before reaching saturation. The low-field permittivity ε, comparable to that obtained using the BDF approach, increases with increasing temperature. The higher-field permittivity ε' is slightly larger, and decreases with increasing temperature. Further analyses of the simulations in terms of radial distribution functions, hydrogen-bonded structures, and diffusion properties suggest that increasing the temperature or the applied field strength both promote a relative population shift from cyclic (mainly dimeric) to extended (chain-like) hydrogen-bonded structures. The lower effective dipole moment associated with the former structures compared to the latter ones provides an explanation for the peculiar dielectric properties of the two acids compared to their methyl esters. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Reaction of Elemol with Acetic acid –Perchloric acid: Characterization of a novel oxide and (+)-β-cyperone

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S.; Govenkar, M.B.; Paknikar, S.K.

    2. Purification of elemol. Higher boiling fraction of Java Citronella oil (supplied by Nishant Aromas, Mumbai) was subjected to CC (SiO2; petroleum ether/AcOEt, gradient elution). Fraction eluted with petrol: ethyl acetate (95:5) furnished elemol...%, 0.7 ml) was added dropwise and the mixture left at room temperature (25-27oC) for 72 hrs with stirring. The dark brown solution was diluted with water, extracted with ether, the ether layer washed free from acid, and dried. Removal of the solvent...

  2. Alcohol dehydrogenase of acetic acid bacteria: structure, mode of action, and applications in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2010-05-01

    Pyrroquinoline quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (PQQ-ADH) of acetic acid bacteria is a membrane-bound enzyme involved in the acetic acid fermentation by oxidizing ethanol to acetaldehyde coupling with reduction of membranous ubiquinone (Q), which is, in turn, re-oxidized by ubiquinol oxidase, reducing oxygen to water. PQQ-ADHs seem to have co-evolved with the organisms fitting to their own habitats. The enzyme consists of three subunits and has a pyrroloquinoline quinone, 4 heme c moieties, and a tightly bound Q as the electron transfer mediators. Biochemical, genetic, and electrochemical studies have revealed the unique properties of PQQ-ADH since it was purified in 1978. The enzyme is unique to have ubiquinol oxidation activity in addition to Q reduction. This mini-review focuses on the molecular properties of PQQ-ADH, such as the roles of the subunits and the cofactors, particularly in intramolecular electron transport of the enzyme from ethanol to Q. Also, we summarize biotechnological applications of PQQ-ADH as to enantiospecific oxidations for production of the valuable chemicals and bioelectrocatalysis for sensors and fuel cells using indirect and direct electron transfer technologies and discuss unsolved issues and future prospects related to this elaborate enzyme.

  3. Insight into carbon formation from acetic acid decomposition over Pd(100) via density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingzhe; Sun, Xuanyu; Zhang, Minhua

    2017-10-01

    The mechanism of carbon deposition in acetic acid/palladium system is of great research significance in the catalytic field. In order to illustrate the plausible carbon formation routes, a systematic survey on the stepwise decomposition from adsorbed acetic acid to atomic carbon on Pd(100) was conducted via density functional theory calculations. A complex reaction network including Osbnd H bond scission reaction and various Csbnd H and Csbnd C bond scission reactions was built and the relevant structural and energetic properties were calculated. The results show that Osbnd H bond breaking is very possible for CH3COOH, that Csbnd C bond breaking is always more favorable than Csbnd H bond breaking for CHxCOO (x = 1-3), and the dehydrogenation of CHx (x = 1-3) is more likely to proceed than most of other reactions. The most possible pathway for the formation of carbon monomer was proposed based on the analysis of the reaction network and it features the decarbonation of CH3COO to CH3 as the rate-limiting step.

  4. Methane reacts with heteropolyacids chemisorbed on silica to produce acetic acid under soft conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Miao

    2013-01-16

    Selective functionalization of methane at moderate temperature is of crucial economic, environmental, and scientific importance. Here, we report that methane reacts with heteropolyacids (HPAs) chemisorbed on silica to produce acetic acid under soft conditions. Specially, when chemisorbed on silica, H 4SiW12O40, H3PW12O 40, H4SiMo12O40, and H 3PMo12O40 activate the primary C-H bond of methane at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. With these systems, acetic acid is produced directly from methane, in a single step, in the absence of Pd and without adding CO. Extensive surface characterization by solid-state NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggests that C-H activation of methane is triggered by the protons in the HPA-silica interface with concerted reduction of the Keggin cage, leading to water formation and hydration of the interface. This is the simplest and mildest way reported to date to functionalize methane. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  5. Protective Effect of Ocimum basilicum Essential Oil Against Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Amir; Roohi, Parnia; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Ghannadi, Ali Reza; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Ocimum basilicum L has been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in Iran. This study investigates the ameliorative effect of Ocimum basilicum essential oil on an acetic acid-induced colitis model in rats. Ocimum basilicum essential oil with 2 doses (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly ameliorated wet weight/length ratio of colonic tissue compared to the control group. Higher doses of essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly reduced ulcer severity, ulcer area, and ulcer index. On the other hand, histological examination revealed the diminution of total colitis index as a marker for inflammatory cell infiltration in the colonic segments of rats treated with Ocimum basilicum essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). The increased level of myeloperoxidase was significantly decreased after the treatment with the essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). These results suggest that Ocimum basilicum exhibits protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Protective effect of Dillenia indica L. on acetic acid induced colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somani, S J; Badgujar, L B; Sutariya, B K; Saraf, M N

    2014-09-01

    The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an idiopathic, immune mediated and chronic inflammation of the intestine. The study aimed to elucidate the ameliorative effect of methanolic extract of Dillenia indica (DIME), hexane fraction (HFDI) and chloroform fraction (CFDI) of Dillenia indica in acetic acid induced experimental colitis in mice. Macroscopic score, colon weight, colonic catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha), and histological changes were recorded after the treatment regimen of 7 days. Intra-rectal instillation of acetic acid caused enhanced macroscopic score, colon weight, colonic MPO, MDA, and TNF-alpha level. It caused significant decreased level of CAT, SOD and GSH. DIME (800 mg/kg), HFDI (200 mg/kg) and CFDI (200 mg/kg) treatment exhibited significant effect in lowering macroscopic score, colon weight, MPO, MDA, TNF-alpha levels and elevation of CAT, GSH and SOD levels. The results suggest that D. indica has ameliorating effects on experimental colitis by inhibiting the proinflammatory mediators like TNF-alpha production.

  7. Intermediates in the reaction of substrate-free cytochrome P450cam with peroxy acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schünemann, V; Jung, C; Trautwein, A X; Mandon, D; Weiss, R

    2000-08-18

    Freeze-quenched intermediates of substrate-free cytochrome 57Fe-P450(cam) in reaction with peroxy acetic acid as oxidizing agent have been characterized by EPR and Mossbauer spectroscopy. After 8 ms of reaction time the reaction mixture consists of approximately 90% of ferric low-spin iron with g-factors and hyperfine parameters of the starting material; the remaining approximately 10% are identified as a free radical (S' = 1/2) by its EPR and as an iron(IV) (S= 1) species by its Mossbauer signature. After 5 min of reaction time the intermediates have disappeared and the Mossbauer and EPR-spectra exhibit 100% of the starting material. We note that the spin-Hamiltonian analysis of the spectra of the 8 ms reactant clearly reveals that the two paramagnetic species, e.g. the ferryl (iron(IV)) species and the radical, are not exchanged coupled. This led to the conclusion that under the conditions used, peroxy acetic acid oxidized a tyrosine residue (probably Tyr-96) into a tyrosine radical (Tyr*-96), and the iron(III) center of substrate-free P450(cam) to iron(IV).

  8. The effect of homogenization pressure and stages on the amounts of Lactic and Acetic acids of probiotic yoghurt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Massoud

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the use of probiotic products especially yogurt, due to having wonderful and health properties, has become popular in the world. In this study, the effect of homogenization pressure (100, 150 and 200 bars and stage (single and two on the amount of lactic and acetic acids was investigated. Yoghurts were manufactured from low-fat milk treated using high pressure homogenization at 100,150 and 200 bar and at 60°C. The amount of lactic and acetic acids was determined after the days 1, 7, 14 and 21 of storage at 4ºC. The experiments were set up using a completely randomized design. With the increase of pressure and stage of homogenization, the amount of both acids was increased (p<0.01. The greatest amount of lactic and acetic acids during the storage period was observed in the sample homogenized at a pressure of 200 bars and two stages.

  9. Developmental toxicity of mixtures: the water disinfection by-products dichloro-, dibromo- and bromochloro acetic acid in rat embryo culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chlorination of drinking water results in production of numerous disinfection by-products (DBPs). One of the important classes of DBPs is the haloacetic acids. We have previously shown that the haloacetic acids (HAs), dichloro (DCA), dibromo (DBA) and bromochloro (BCA) acetic...

  10. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-12-22

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains.

  11. Quantifying Effect of Lactic, Acetic, and Propionic Acids on Growth of Molds Isolated from Spoiled Bakery Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnas, Stéphane; Gauvry, Emilie; Onno, Bernard; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2015-09-01

    The combined effect of undissociated lactic acid (0 to 180 mmol/liter), acetic acid (0 to 60 mmol/liter), and propionic acid (0 to 12 mmol/liter) on growth of the molds Aspergillus niger, Penicillium corylophilum, and Eurotium repens was quantified at pH 3.8 and 25°C on malt extract agar acid medium. The impact of these acids on lag time for growth (λ) was quantified through a gamma model based on the MIC. The impact of these acids on radial growth rate (μ) was analyzed statistically through polynomial regression. Concerning λ, propionic acid exhibited a stronger inhibitory effect (MIC of 8 to 20 mmol/liter depending on the mold species) than did acetic acid (MIC of 23 to 72 mmol/liter). The lactic acid effect was null on E. repens and inhibitory on A. niger and P. corylophilum. These results were validated using independent sets of data for the three acids at pH 3.8 but for only acetic and propionic acids at pH 4.5. Concerning μ, the effect of acetic and propionic acids was slightly inhibitory for A. niger and P. corylophilum but was not significant for E. repens. In contrast, lactic acid promoted radial growth of all three molds. The gamma terms developed here for these acids will be incorporated in a predictive model for temperature, water activity, and acid. More generally, results for μ and λ will be used to identify and evaluate solutions for controlling bakery product spoilage.

  12. Absence of Rtt109p, a fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase, results in improved acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhao, Xinqing; Zhang, Mingming; Bai, Fengwu

    2016-03-01

    RTT109 is a histone acetyltransferase for the acetylation of histone H3. It is still not clear whether RTT109 plays a role in regulation of gene expression under environmental stresses. In this study, the involvement of RTT109 in acetic acid stress tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. It was revealed that the absence of RTT109 enhanced resistance to 5.5 g L(-1) acetic acid, which was indicated by improved growth of RTT109Δ mutant compared with that of the wild-type BY4741 strain. Meanwhile, the lag phase was shortened for 48 h and glucose consumption completed 36 h in advance for RTT109Δ mutant compared to the wild-type strain, with ethanol production rate increased from 0.39 to 0.60 g L(-1) h(-1). Significantly, elevated transcription levels of HSP12, CTT1 and GSH1, as well as increased activities of antioxidant enzymes were observed in RTT109Δ under acetic acid stress. Improved flocculation of RTT109Δ compared to that of the control strain BY4741 under the acetic acid stress was also observed. These results suggest that the absence of RTT109 not only activates transcription of stress responsive genes, but also improves resistance to oxidative stress, which ultimately contributes to improved acetic acid tolerance in S. cerevisiae. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Acetic acid recovery from a hybrid biological-hydrothermal treatment process of sewage sludge - a pilot plant study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J; Dare, P; Estcourt, G; Gapes, D; Lei, R; McDonald, B; Wijaya, N

    2015-01-01

    A two-stage process consisting of anaerobic fermentation followed by sub-critical wet oxidation was used to generate acetic acid from sewage sludge at pilot scale. Volatile fatty acids, dominated by propionic acid, were produced over 4-6 days in the 2,000 L fermentation reactor, which also achieved 31% solids reduction. Approximately 96% of the carbon was retained in solution over the fermentation stage. Using a 200 L wet oxidation reactor operating in batch mode, the second stage achieved 98% volatile suspended solids (VSS) destruction and 67% total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD) destruction. Acetic acid produced in this stage was recalcitrant to further degradation and was retained in solution. The gross yield from VSS was 16% for acetic acid and 21% for volatile fatty acids across the process, higher than reported yields for wet oxidation alone. The pilot plant results showed that 72% of the incoming phosphorus was retained in the solids, 94% of the nitrogen became concentrated in solution and 41% of the carbon was converted to a soluble state, in a more degradable form. Acetic acid produced from the process has the potential to be used to offset ethanol requirements in biological nutrient removal plants.

  14. Hydrogen production from steam reforming of acetic acid over Cu-Zn supported calcium aluminate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Pravakar; Patel, Madhumita; Pant, Kamal K

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen can be produced by catalytic steam reforming (CSR) of biomass-derived oil. Typically bio oil contains 12-14% acetic acid; therefore, this acid was chosen as model compound for reforming of biooil with the help of a Cu-Zn/Ca-Al catalyst for high yield of H(2) with low CH(4) and CO content. Calcium aluminate support was prepared by solid-solid reaction at 1350°C. X-ray diffraction indicates 12CaO·7Al(2)O(3) as major, CaA(l4)O(7) and Ca(5)A(l6)O(14) as minor phases. Cu and Zn were loaded onto the support by wet-impregnation at 10 and 1wt.%, respectively. The catalysts were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy TEM and the surface area for both support and Cu-Zn were 10.5 and 5.8m(2)/g, respectively. CSR was carried out in a tubular fixed bed reactor (I.D.=19mm) at temperatures between 600 and 800°C with 3-g loadings and (H(2)O/acetic acid) wt. ratio of 9:1. Significantly high (80%) yield of hydrogen was obtained over Cu-Zn/Ca-Al catalyst, as incorporation of Zn enhanced the H(2) yield by reducing deactivation of the catalyst. The coke formation on the support (Ca-12/Al-7) surface was negligible due to the presence of excess oxygen in the 12CaO·7Al(2)O(3) phase. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Staining of proteins in gels with Coomassie G-250 without organic solvent and acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Ann-Marie; Besir, H Uuml Seyin

    2009-08-14

    In classical protein staining protocols using Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB), solutions with high contents of toxic and flammable organic solvents (Methanol, Ethanol or 2-Propanol) and acetic acid are used for fixation, staining and destaining of proteins in a gel after SDS-PAGE. To speed up the procedure, heating the staining solution in the microwave oven for a short time is frequently used. This usually results in evaporation of toxic or hazardous Methanol, Ethanol or 2-Propanol and a strong smell of acetic acid in the lab which should be avoided due to safety considerations. In a protocol originally published in two patent applications by E.M. Wondrak (US2001046709 (A1), US6319720 (B1)), an alternative composition of the staining solution is described in which no organic solvent or acid is used. The CBB is dissolved in bidistilled water (60-80 mg of CBB G-250 per liter) and 35 mM HCl is added as the only other compound in the staining solution. The CBB staining of the gel is done after SDS-PAGE and thorough washing of the gel in bidistilled water. By heating the gel during the washing and staining steps, the process can be finished faster and no toxic or hazardous compounds are evaporating. The staining of proteins occurs already within 1 minute after heating the gel in staining solution and is fully developed after 15-30 min with a slightly blue background that is destained completely by prolonged washing of the stained gel in bidistilled water, without affecting the stained protein bands.

  16. Intravenous supplementation of acetate, glucose or essential amino acids to an energy and protein deficient diet in lactating dairy goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safayi, S.; Nielsen, M. O.

    2013-01-01

    , isoenergetic solutions of essential amino acids (EM), sodium acetate (ACE) and glucose (GLU) with saline (SAL) as control. There was a 3-d rest period between treatments. Milk production was recorded during the last 48h of the infusion. Arterio-venous concentration differences (AVD) across each udder half......In the present experiment we aimed to study, if milk synthesis is more sensitive toward deficiency in supply of amino acids in early (EL) versus late lactation (LL), and if energy yielding substrates in the form of acetate (but not glucose) can contribute to sustain milk (protein) synthesis, when......, but not GLU, could compensate for insufficient EM supply in EL, but this was not the case in LL This suggests that acetate (or beta-hydroxybutyrate) can improve mammary amino acid utilization for protein synthesis in EL by generation of ATP from oxidation, potentially pointing to a scope for differential...

  17. Growth inhibitory effect of grape phenolics against wine spoilage yeasts and acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorkova, E; Zakova, T; Landa, P; Novakova, J; Vadlejch, J; Kokoska, L

    2013-02-15

    This paper investigates the in vitro antimicrobial potential of 15 grape phenolic compounds of various chemical classes (phenolic acids, stilbenes and flavonoids) using the broth microdilution method against yeasts and acetic acid bacteria frequently occurring in deteriorated wine. Pterostilbene (MICs=32-128 μg/mL), resveratrol (MICs=256-512 μg/mL) and luteolin (MICs=256-512 μg/mL) are among six active compounds that possessed the strongest inhibitory effects against all microorganisms tested. In the case of phenolic acids, myricetin, p-coumaric and ferulic acids exhibited selective antimicrobial activity (MICs=256-512 μg/mL), depending upon yeasts and bacteria tested. In comparison with potassium metabisulphite, all microorganisms tested were more susceptible to the phenolics. The results revealed the antibacterial and antiyeast effects against wine spoilage microorganisms of several highly potent phenolics naturally occurring in grapes. These findings also provide arguments for further investigation of stilbenes as prospective compounds reducing the need for the use of sulphites in winemaking. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Native lignin structure of Miscanthus x giganteus and its changes during acetic and formic acid fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, Juan José; Li, Jiebing; Ek, Monica; Ligero, Pablo; de Vega, Alberto

    2009-07-22

    Milled wood lignin (MWL) and acetic and formic acid lignin (AL and FL) from Miscanthus x giganteus bark were produced, respectively, before and after organosolv fractionations under optimal conditions, in terms of organic and hydrochloric acid concentrations, liquid/wood ratio, and reaction time. In order to study the M. x giganteus native lignin structure and its modifications during the fractionation process, the lignins were studied by two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence (2D-(HSQC)), (13)C- and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) both before and after thioacidolysis, and elemental analysis. In addition, chemical composition analysis was performed on ash, Klason lignin, and carbohydrate content. The analyses demonstrated that M. x giganteus native lignin (MWL) is highly acylated at the C(gamma) of the lignin side chain (46%), possibly with p-coumarate and/or acetate groups. This is newsworthy since several earlier studies showed that acylation at the gamma-carbon commonly occurs in C(3) and CAM grasses, whereas M. x giganteus is a C(4) grass. Furthermore, M. x giganteus showed a low S/G ratio (0.7) and a predominance of beta-O-4' linkages (up to 93% of all linkages). AL and FL lose part of these linkages during organosolv fractionation (up to 21 and 32%, respectively). The p-coumarate groups resist fractionation processes and are still present in high quantities in AL and FL. During the fractionation process, lignin is acetylated (acetic acid process) and condensed, with the G units condensing more than S units. M. x giganteus MWL contains a high content of carbohydrates (22.8%), suggesting that it is a lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC). AL and FL showed low carbohydrate contents because of the breaking down of the LCC structures. AL and FL have high molecular weights and low polydispersities, and are high in phenolic content, qualities that make these

  19. Suppressing glucose uptake and acetic acid production increases membrane protein overexpression in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsson Gen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The production of integral membrane spanning proteins (IMP's constitutes a bottleneck in pharmaceutical development. It was long considered that the state-of-the-art was to produce the proteins as inclusion bodies using a powerful induction system. However, the quality of the protein was compromised and the production of a soluble protein that is incorporated into the membrane from which it is extracted is now considered to be a better method. Earlier research has indicated that a slower rate of protein synthesis might overcome the tendency to form inclusion bodies. We here suggest the use of a set of E. coli mutants characterized by a slower rate of growth and protein synthesis as a tool for increasing the amount of soluble protein in high- throughput protein production processes. Results A set of five IMP's was chosen which were expressed in three mutants and the corresponding WT cell (control. The mutations led to three different substrate uptake rates, two of which were considerably slower than that of the wild type. Using the mutants, we were able to express three out of the five membrane proteins. Most successful was the mutant growing at 50% of the wild type growth rate. A further effect of a low growth rate is a low acetic acid formation, and we believe that this is a possible reason for the better production. This hypothesis was further supported by expression from the BL21(DE3 strain, using the same plasmid. This strain grows at a high growth rate but nevertheless yields only small amounts of acetic acid. This strain was also able to express three out of the five IMP's, although at lower quantities. Conclusions The use of mutants that reduce the specific substrate uptake rate seems to be a versatile tool for overcoming some of the difficulties in the production of integral membrane spanning proteins. A set of strains with mutations in the glucose uptake system and with a lower acetic acid formation were able to

  20. Calcifying Tendonitis of the Shoulder: Risk Factors and Effectiveness of Acetic Acid Iontophoresis and Ultrasound

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    Fernández Cuadros

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To clinically characterize calcifying tendonitis of the shoulder (CT through a prospective quasi-experimental before-and-after study, which provides a level of demonstrable evidence to support the decision-making and demonstrate the effectiveness of acetic acid iontophoresis and ultrasound in the treatment of CT. Methods Prospective, quasi-experimental before-after intervention study was conducted on 44 patients who referred to the rehabilitation department, Santísima Trinidad’s General Foundation hospital, Salamanca, from June 2014 to April 2016. Outcome measures: 1 Pain: measured by visual analogical scale (VAS; 2 calcification size: in millimetres, both measured radiologically at the beginning/end of treatment; 3 Intervention: Iontophoresis with 5% acetic acid at 4.7 mA × 10 minutes and continuous ultrasound 1 W/cm2 /1 MHz × 5 minutes over calcification. Results Mean age of the subjects was 54.2 years (n = 44, 65.9% female (n = 29, (95% with supraspinatus tendon (n = 38 and 5% with subscapularis (n = 2; 55% had complication in left shoulder (n = 22, 45% in right shoulder (n = 18 and 4.5% bilateral (n = 2. Regarding the occupation, 59.1% had (n = 26 administrative positions and 40.9% manual jobs (n = 18. On personal history: 34.09% were smoker (n = 15, 4.5% had diabetes (n = 2 and calcium intake secondary to osteoporosis was recorded for 2.27% (n = 1 of the subjects. Regarding radiological type: 68.18% formative (n = 30, 38.72% resorptive (n = 14 were observed. Average number of sessions was 19 and 9.01% (n = 4 of the subjects had treatment complications as intolerance/erythema/burn. Average initial pain was 7.7 points (VAS scale, significantly decreased (P = 0.0000 post treatment to 2.2. Initial average size of calcification was 10 mm and significantly decreased (P = 0.0000 post treatment to 3 mm. With respect to the change of calcification: success/cure rate was 56.8% (n = 25, improvement rate was 25% (n = 11; failure rate

  1. Effects of Pfaffia glomerata (Spreng pedersen aqueous extract on healing acetic acid-induced ulcers

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    Cristina Setim Freitas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to evaluate the acute toxicity and the effect of the aqueous extract of the roots from Pfaffia glomerata (Spreng Pedersen (Amaranthaceae (AEP on the prevention of acetic acid-induced ulcer and on the healing process of previously induced ulcers. The acute toxicity was evaluated in Swiss mice after oral administration of a single dose and the chronic gastric ulcer was induced with local application of acetic acid. The results showed that the LD50 of the extract was 684.6 mg.kg-1 for the intraperitoneal administration and higher than 10 mg.kg-1by the oral route. The administration of the AEP did not prevent ulcers formation. However, the AEP increased of the healing process of previously induced ulcers. The results suggest that AEP chronically administered promote an increase of tissue healing, after the damage induced by acetic acid and the extract seemed to be destituted of toxic effects in the mice by the oral route.Pfaffia glomerata (Spreng Pedersen (Amaranthaceae, uma planta conhecida popularmente como "Ginseng Brasileiro" e "paratudo", é utilizada para tratar distúrbios gástricos e como cicatrizante. Em estudos anteriores, foi demonstrado que o extrato aquoso bruto da P. glomerata (AEP protegeu a mucosa gástrica contra úlceras induzidas por etanol e estresse e reduziu a secreção ácida gástrica basal e estimulada em ratos com ligadura de piloro. Além disso, a secreção gástrica de animais tratados com AEP apresentou níveis de nitrato e nitrito aumentados. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar se o AEP previne o desenvolvimento de úlceras induzidas por ácido acético e o efeito desse extrato no processo de cicatrização em úlceras previamente formadas. A administração do AEP em diferentes doses produziu efeitos tóxicos baixos e não preveniu a formação de úlceras, porém aumentou o processo de cicatrização em úlceras já existentes, como evidenciado no estudo histopatológico. Em

  2. Rice straw incorporated just before soil flooding increases acetic acid formation and decreases available nitrogen

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    Ronaldir Knoblauch

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Incorporation of rice straw into the soil just before flooding for water-seeded rice can immobilize mineral nitrogen (N and lead to the production of acetic acid harmful to the rice seedlings, which negatively affects grain yield. This study aimed to evaluate the formation of organic acids and variation in pH and to quantify the mineral N concentration in the soil as a function of different times of incorporation of rice straw or of ashes from burning the straw before flooding. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse using an Inceptisol (Typic Haplaquept soil. The treatments were as follows: control (no straw or ash; incorporation of ashes from previous straw burning; rice straw incorporated to drained soil 60 days before flooding; straw incorporated 30 days before flooding; straw incorporated 15 days before flooding and straw incorporated on the day of flooding. Experimental units were plastic buckets with 6.0 kg of soil. The buckets remained flooded throughout the trial period without rice plants. Soil samples were collected every seven days, beginning one day before flooding until the 13th week of flooding for determination of mineral N- ammonium (NH4+ and nitrate (NO3-. Soil solution pH and concentration of organic acids (acetic, propionic and butyric were determined. All NO3- there was before flooding was lost in approximately two weeks of flooding, in all treatments. There was sigmoidal behavior for NH4+ formation in all treatments, i.e., ammonium ion concentration began to rise shortly after soil flooding, slightly decreased and then went up again. On the 91st day of flooding, the NH4+ concentrations in soil was 56 mg kg-1 in the control treatment, 72 mg kg-1 for the 60-day treatment, 73 mg kg-1 for the 30-day treatment and 53 mg kg-1 for the ash incorporation treatment. These ammonium concentrations correspond to 84, 108, 110 and 80 kg ha-1 of N-NH4+, respectively. When the straw was incorporated on the day of flooding or 15 days

  3. UREMIC TOXIN GUANIDINE ACETIC ACID INHIBITS THE OXIDATIVE METABOLISM OF NEUTROPHILS IN DOGS

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    Priscila Preve Pereira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Among the uremic toxins proven to affect the neutrophil function in humans with chronic kidney disease (CKD, guanidine compounds stand out. To achieve a clearer understanding of the mechanisms that affect the immunity of uremic patients, the hypothesis that guanidine acetic acid (GAA contributes to the inhibition of oxidative metabolism and an increase in neutrophil apoptosis in healthy dogs was investigated in vitro. To this end, neutrophils isolated from ten healthy dogs were incubated in pure RPMI 1640 (control and enriched with 5 mg/L of GAA. Capillary flow cytometry was used to quantify superoxide production in neutrophils with the probe (hydroethidine, in the presence and absence of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, in order to assess oxidative metabolism. Apoptotic indices were quantified using the Annexin V-PE system, with and without the inductive effect of camptothecin. Neutrophils isolated and incubated in a GAA-enriched medium produced smaller amounts of superoxide (p<0.001 when activated with PMA, however, this inhibition of oxidative metabolism occurred without significantly altering their viability or rate of apoptosis. Thus, the results show guanidine compounds contribute to immunosuppression in dogs with CKD.

  4. Influence of Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Gibberellic Acid on Phenylpropanoid Accumulation in Common Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) Sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang Ha; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Park, Yun Ji; Morgan, Abubaker M A; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Park, Sang Un

    2017-02-28

    We investigated the effects of natural plant hormones, indole-3-acetic (IAA) acid and gibberellic acid (GA), on the growth parameters and production of flavonoids and other phenolic compounds in common buckwheat sprouts. A total of 17 phenolic compounds were identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Among these, seven compounds (4-hydroxybenzoic acid, catechin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, epicatechin, rutin, and quercetin) were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after treating the common buckwheat sprouts with different concentrations of the hormones IAA and GA. At a concentration of 0.5 mg/L, both IAA and GA exhibited the highest levels of growth parameters (shoot length, root length, and fresh weight). The HPLC analysis showed that the treatment of sprouts with IAA at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mg/L produced higher or comparable levels of the total phenolic compounds than the control sprout and enhanced the production of rutin. Similarly, the supplementation with 0.1 and 0.5 mg/L GA increased the content of rutin in buckwheat sprouts. Our results suggested that the treatment with optimal concentrations of IAA and GA enhanced the growth parameters and accumulation of flavonoids and other phenolic compounds in buckwheat sprouts.

  5. Influence of Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Gibberellic Acid on Phenylpropanoid Accumulation in Common Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench Sprouts

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    Chang Ha Park

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of natural plant hormones, indole-3-acetic (IAA acid and gibberellic acid (GA, on the growth parameters and production of flavonoids and other phenolic compounds in common buckwheat sprouts. A total of 17 phenolic compounds were identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS analysis. Among these, seven compounds (4-hydroxybenzoic acid, catechin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, epicatechin, rutin, and quercetin were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC after treating the common buckwheat sprouts with different concentrations of the hormones IAA and GA. At a concentration of 0.5 mg/L, both IAA and GA exhibited the highest levels of growth parameters (shoot length, root length, and fresh weight. The HPLC analysis showed that the treatment of sprouts with IAA at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mg/L produced higher or comparable levels of the total phenolic compounds than the control sprout and enhanced the production of rutin. Similarly, the supplementation with 0.1 and 0.5 mg/L GA increased the content of rutin in buckwheat sprouts. Our results suggested that the treatment with optimal concentrations of IAA and GA enhanced the growth parameters and accumulation of flavonoids and other phenolic compounds in buckwheat sprouts.

  6. Translocation of radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol from kernel to shoot of Zea mays L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisnell, J. R.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Either 5-[3H]indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or 5-[3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was applied to the endosperm of kernels of dark-grown Zea mays seedlings. The distribution of total radioactivity, radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid, and radiolabeled ester conjugated indole-3-acetic acid, in the shoots was then determined. Differences were found in the distribution and chemical form of the radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid in the shoot depending upon whether 5-[3H]indole-3-acetic acid or 5-[3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was applied to the endosperm. We demonstrated that indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol applied to the endosperm provides both free and ester conjugated indole-3-acetic acid to the mesocotyl and coleoptile. Free indole-3-acetic acid applied to the endosperm supplies some of the indole-3-acetic acid in the mesocotyl but essentially no indole-3-acetic acid to the coleoptile or primary leaves. It is concluded that free IAA from the endosperm is not a source of IAA for the coleoptile. Neither radioactive indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol nor IAA accumulates in the tip of the coleoptile or the mesocotyl node and thus these studies do not explain how the coleoptile tip controls the amount of IAA in the shoot.

  7. Translocation of radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol from kernel to shoot of Zea mays L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisnell, J.R.; Bandurski, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Either 5-(/sup 3/H)indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or 5-(/sup 3/H)indole-3-acetyl-myoinositol was applied to the endosperm of kernels of dark-grown Zea mays seedlings. The distribution of total radioactivity, radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid, and radiolabeled ester conjugated indole-3-acetic acid, in the shoots was then determined. Differences were found in the distribution and chemical form of the radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid in the shoot depending upon whether 5-(/sup 3/H)indole-3-acetic acid or 5-(/sup 3/H)indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was applied to the endosperm. We demonstrated that indole-3-acetyle-myo-inositol applied to the endosperm provides both free and ester conjugated indole-3-acetic acid to the mesocotyl and coleoptile. Free indole-3-acetic acid applied to the endosperm supplies some of the indole-3-acetic acid in the mesocotyl but essentially no indole-3-acetic acid to the coleoptile or primary leaves. It is concluded that free IAA from the endosperm is not a source of IAA for the coleoptile. Neither radioactive indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol nor IAA accumulates in the tip of the coleoptile or the mesocotyl node and thus these studies do not explain how the coleoptile tip controls the amount of IAA in the shoot.

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Esters of Indole-3-Acetic Acid from the Liquid Endosperm of the Horse Chestnut (Aesculus species) 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, Wojciech; Schulze, Aga; Bandurski, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    Esters of indole-3-acetic acid were extracted and purified from the liquid endosperm of immature fruits of various species of the horse chestnut (Aesculus parviflora, A. baumanni, A.pavia rubra, and A. pavia humulis). The liquid endosperm contained, at least 12 chromatographically distinct esters. One of these compounds was purified and characterized as an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and myo-inositol. A second compound was found to be an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and the disaccharide rutinose (glucosyl-rhamnose). A third compound was partially characterized as an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and a desoxyaminohexose. PMID:11539676

  9. Isolation of a Strain of Clostridium thermoaceticum Capable of Growth and Acetic Acid Production at pH 4.5

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Robert D.; Keller, Frederick A.

    1982-01-01

    Using a series of pH controlled batch fermentations operated in a fed-batch mode and adaptation and selection techniques where pH and acetic acid provided the selective pressures, we isolated a culture of Clostridium thermoaceticum that can grow and produce acetic acid at pH 4.5. At pH 4.5 the fastest mass doubling time was 36 h, and the highest acetic acid concentration reached was 4.5 g/liter. Generally, as the pH was decreased from 6.0 and the initial acetic acid concentration increased, t...

  10. Anticoccidial effects of acetic acid on performance and pathogenic parameters in broiler chickens challenged with Eimeria tenella

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas,Rao Z; Munawar,Shokat H; Zahid Manzoor; Zafar Iqbal; Khan,Muhammad N.; Muhammad K. Saleemi; Zia,Muhammad A; Arfan Yousaf

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the anticoccidial effect of the different concentrations of the acetic acid in the broiler chickens in comparison with the amprolium anticoccidial. A total of 198 chicks were placed 11 per pen with three pens per treatment. The different concentrations (1%, 2% and 3%) of acetic acid and amproilum (at the dose rate of 125ppm) were given to the experimental groups in drinking water from 10-19th days of age. One group was kept as infected non me...

  11. Isotopic composition of Murchison organic compounds: Intramolecular carbon isotope fractionation of acetic acid. Simulation studies of cosmochemical organic syntheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Cronin, J. R.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, in our laboratories, samples of Murchison acetic acid were decarboxylated successfully and the carbon isotopic composition was measured for the methane released by this procedure. These analyses showed significant differences in C-13/C-12 ratios for the methyl and carboxyl carbons of the acetic acid molecule, strongly suggesting that more than one carbon source may be involved in the synthesis of the Murchison organic compounds. On the basis of this finding, laboratory model systems simulating cosmochemical synthesis are being studied, especially those processes capable of involving two or more starting carbon sources.

  12. Structural identifiability of a model for the acetic acid fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Hornero, Jorge E; Santos-Dueñas, Inés M; Garci A-Garci A, Isidoro

    2008-12-01

    Modelling has proved an essential tool for addressing research into biotechnological processes, particularly with a view to their optimization and control. Parameter estimation via optimization approaches is among the major steps in the development of biotechnology models. In fact, one of the first tasks in the development process is to determine whether the parameters concerned can be unambiguously determined and provide meaningful physical conclusions as a result. The analysis process is known as 'identifiability' and presents two different aspects: structural or theoretical identifiability and practical identifiability. While structural identifiability is concerned with model structure alone, practical identifiability takes into account both the quantity and quality of experimental data. In this work, we discuss the theoretical identifiability of a new model for the acetic acid fermentation process and review existing methods for this purpose.

  13. 2-{2-[(E-(2-Benzoylhydrazin-1-ylidenemethyl]phenoxy}acetic acid

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    Hoong-Kun Fun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C16H14N2O4, the dihedral angle between the aromatic rings is 12.45 (6°. The central C(=O—N—N=C bridge is roughly planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.0346 Å and makes dihedral angles of 13.01 (7 and 0.56 (7° with the attached phenyl and benzene rings, respectively. The acetic acid unit (r.m.s. deviation = 0.0066 Å is twisted from its attached benzene ring [dihedral angle = 19.48 (6°]. In the crystal, molecules are linked by O—H...(O,N, N—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen bonds into sheets lying parallel to the bc plane. A weak aromatic π–π stacking interaction is also observed [centroid–centroid distance = 3.7330 (7 Å].

  14. 2-[(1R*,4R*-1,4-Dihydroxycyclohexyl]acetic acid

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    Mohammad Arfan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C8H14O4, is an isolation product of the aerial parts of Senecio desfontanei. The acetic acid group is oriented at a dihedral angle of 48.03 (9° with respect to the basal plane of the cyclohexane-1,4-diol chair. An intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond generates an S(6 ring with an envelope conformation. In the crystal, molecules are linked by O—H...O hydrogen bonds, resulting in R33(20 ring motifs and C(2 O—H...O—H...O—H... chains. Overall, a three-dimensional polymeric network arises. A C—H...O contact is also present.

  15. Oxime ligation in acetic acid: efficient synthesis of aminooxy-peptide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelushkin, Pavel S; Leko, Maria V; Dorosh, Marina Yu; Burov, Sergey V

    2017-01-01

    Oxime ligation is a powerful tool in various bioconjugation strategies. Nevertheless, high reaction rates and quantitative yields are typically reported for aldehyde-derived compounds. In contrary, keto groups react much slower, with quantitative yields achieved at 5 h for low-molecular weight compounds and more than 15 h for polymers or dendrimers. In this communication, we report that oxime ligation proceeds rapidly with quantitative (>95%) conversion within 1.5-2 h in pure acetic acid. The practical utility of suggested technique is illustrated by the synthesis of peptide-steroid and peptide-polymer conjugates of model aminooxy-peptides. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Acetic acid bacterial lipids improve cognitive function in dementia model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Hiroyuki; Tachimoto, Hideki; Kishi, Mikiya; Kaga, Takayuki; Tanaka, Yasukazu

    2010-04-14

    Acetic acid bacteria, fermentative microorganisms of traditional foods, have unique alkali-stable lipids (ASL), such as dihydroceramide which is a precursor of sphingolipids. Sphingolipids are important components of the brain tissue. We examined the effect of oral administration of ASL in a rat model of dementia (7-week-old, male) with a basal forebrain lesion. In a water maze test, the dementia model rats demonstrated poor spatial orientation. The administration of ASL (165 or 1650 mg/kg of body weight per day, for 14 days) produced a significant improvement in learning ability in the dementia model rats. In vitro experiments showed ASL had the ability to promote neurite outgrowth in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Among the ASL components, dihydroceramide has the most potent effect on the differentiation of PC12 cells. It is highly possible that oral administration of dihydroceramide-containing ASL reverses the decline in cognitive function in dementia.

  17. Ultrastructure of Sheep Primordial Follicles Cultured in the Presence of Indol Acetic Acid, EGF, and FSH

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    Evelyn Rabelo Andrade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the ultrastructural characteristics of primordial follicles after culturing of sheep ovarian cortical slices in the presence of indol acetic acid (IAA, Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF, and FSH. To evaluate ultrastructure of primordial follicles cultured in MEM (control or in MEM containing IAA, EGF, and FSH, fragments of cultured tissue were processes for transmission electron microscopy. Except in the control, primordial follicles cultured in supplemented media for 6 d were ultrastructurally normal. They had oocyte with intact nucleus and the cytoplasm contained heterogeneous-sized lipid droplets and numerous round or elongated mitochondria with intact parallel cristae were observed. Rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER was rarely found. The granulosa cells cytoplasm contained a great number of mitochondria and abundant RER. In conclusion, the presence of IAA, EGF, and FSH helped to maintain ultrastructural integrity of sheep primordial follicles cultured in vitro.

  18. Cloning of a novel gene from Penicillium oxalicum I1 which in Escherichia coli enhances the secretion of acetic acid

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    Xue, L.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the subject. Organic acids play an important role in the conversion of insoluble ions into soluble ones in soil. Heterologous overexpression of a single gene in a cell is the optimal strategy for increasing the secretion of organic acids solubilizing phosphate. Objectives. In this study, we constructed a primary cDNA library of Penicillium oxalicum I1, and screened clones that can solubilize P in tricalcium phosphate (TCP medium. We aimed to obtain the gene expressed in Escherichia coli, which can enhance organic acid secretion. Method. A primary cDNA library of Penicillium oxalicum I1 was constructed using the switching mechanism at the 5'-end of RNA transcription. The organic acid secretion ability of E. coli DH5α™ with overexpressed P. oxalicum I1gene was tested in TCP medium where glucose is the sole carbon source. Afterwards, pyruvic acid, citric acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, and malic acid were used as sole carbon source substitutes for glucose in the TCP medium to test the organic acid secretion ability of the transformed E. coli DH5α™. Results. A total of 106 clones showed halos in TCP medium, among which clone I-2 displayed clear halo. The full-length cDNA of clone I-2 was 1,151 bp, with a complete open reading frame of 702 bp, which encoded a hypothetical protein of 233 amino acids. The cDNA sequence showed 68% identity and 73% query cover with other fungal gene sequences of which the function remains unknown. Escherichia coli containing the cloned gene secreted up to 567 mg·l-1 acetic acid within 48 h. The use of glucose, pyruvic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, and malic acid improved the acetic acid secretion of the E. coli DH5α™ clone I-2. By contrast, the use of citric acid, succinic acid, and fumaric acid did not improve the acetic acid secretion of clone I-2 compared to a control E. coli DH5α™ strain bearing only the cloning vector without any insert. Conclusions. We obtained a

  19. Vacuum electrolysis reactor technique for quantitation of 13-carbon isotope enrichment at the C1-position of formic acid and acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Michael; Kuo, John; Tan, C T

    2004-09-15

    A specialized vacuum electrolysis reactor was designed, constructed, and utilized for 13-carbon isotope analysis of formic acid-13C and acetic acid-13C, each highly enriched at the C1-position. This reusable reactor was equipped with two platinum wire electrodes, miniature stir bar, and sidearm reaction chamber. The associated technique developed for 13-carbon isotope analysis is based upon electrolytic generation of carbon dioxide into the preevacuated reactor followed by gas inlet mass spectrometry. It proved practical to degas and electrolyze 95% formic acid (without added electrolyte) due to adequate ionic conductivity. Formic acid-13C (nominally 99 at. % 13C) was measured by electrolytic CO2 generation to be 98.9 at. % 13C. To analyze various 13C-isotopic permutations of acetic acid, lithium and acid were separately added to reactor compartments, vacuum degassed, and stirred to produce an acidic solution. Thus, acetic acid-1-13C that was nominally 99 at. % 13C1 was determined by vacuum electrolysis to be 98.9 at. % 13C1. Further, acetic acid-2-13C that was isotope depleted at the C1-position (and known to be 99 at. % 13C at C2) gave 0.8 at. % 13C by mass spectrometry.

  20. Indole-3-acetic acid production by newly isolated red yeast Rhodosporidium paludigenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutaratat, Pumin; Amsri, Weerawan; Srisuk, Nantana; Arunrattiyakorn, Panarat; Limtong, Savitree

    2015-01-01

    Indole 3-acetic acid (IAA) is the principal hormone which regulates various developmental and physiological processes in plants. IAA production is considered as a key trait for supporting plant growth. Hence, in this study, production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) by a basidiomycetous red yeast Rhodosporidium paludigenum DMKU-RP301 (AB920314) was investigated and improved by the optimization of the culture medium and culture conditions using one factor at a time (OFAT) and response surface methodology (RSM). The study considered the effects of incubation time, carbon and nitrogen sources, growth factor, tryptophan, temperature, shaking speed, NaCl and pH, on the production of IAA. The results showed that all the factors studied, except NaCl, affected IAA production by R. paludigenum DMKU-RP301. Maximum IAA production of 1,623.9 mg/l was obtained as a result of the studies using RSM. The optimal medium and growth conditions observed in this study resulted in an increase of IAA production by a factor of up to 5.0 compared to the unoptimized condition, i.e. when yeast extract peptone dextrose (YPD) broth supplemented with 0.1% l-tryptophan was used as the production medium. The production of IAA was then scaled up in a 2-l stirred tank fermenter, and the maximum IAA of 1,627.1 mg/l was obtained. This experiment indicated that the obtained optimal medium and condition (pH and temperature) from shaking flask production can be used for the production of IAA in a larger size production. In addition, the present research is the first to report on the optimization of IAA production by the yeast Rhodosporidium.

  1. Identification of methylenecyclopropyl acetic acid in serum of European horses with atypical myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votion, D-M; van Galen, G; Sweetman, L; Boemer, F; de Tullio, P; Dopagne, C; Lefère, L; Mouithys-Mickalad, A; Patarin, F; Rouxhet, S; van Loon, G; Serteyn, D; Sponseller, B T; Valberg, S J

    2014-03-01

    It is hypothesised that European atypical myopathy (AM) has a similar basis as seasonal pasture myopathy in North America, which is now known to be caused by ingestion of hypoglycin A contained in seeds from the tree Acer negundo. Serum from horses with seasonal pasture myopathy contained the conjugated toxic metabolite of hypoglycin A, methylenecyclopropyl acetic acid (MCPA). Retrospective study on archived samples. 1) To determine whether MCPA-carnitine was present in serum of European horses confirmed to have AM; 2) to determine whether Acer negundo or related Acer species were present on AM pastures in Europe. Concentrations of MCPA-carnitine were analysed in banked serum samples of 17 AM horses from Europe and 3 diseased controls (tetanus, neoplasia and exertional rhabdomyolysis) using tandem mass spectrometry. Atypical myopathy was diagnosed by characteristic serum acylcarnitine profiles. Pastures of 12 AM farms were visited by experienced botanists and plant species were documented. Methylenecyclopropyl acetic acid-carnitine at high concentrations (20.39 ± 17.24 nmol/l; range 0.95-57.63 nmol/l; reference: <0.01 nmol/l) was identified in serum of AM but not disease controls (0.00 ± 0.00 nmol/l). Acer pseudoplatanus but not Acer negundo was present on all AM farms. Atypical myopathy in Europe, like seasonal pasture myopathy in North America, is highly associated with the toxic metabolite of hypoglycin A, MCPA-carnitine. This finding coupled with the presence of a tree of which seeds are known to also contain hypoglycin A indicates that ingestion of Acer pseudoplatanus is the probable cause of AM. This finding has major implications for the prevention of AM. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  2. Variability of Acid-Base Status in Acetate-Free Biofiltration 84% versus Bicarbonate Dialysis

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    Harzallah Kais

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of hemodialysis (HD treatment is to achieve the highest level of efficacy in the presence of maximal clinical tolerance. With an aim to offer good hemodynamic stability, as observed during the acetate-free biofiltration 14% (AFB 14% to patients who are intolerant to bicarbonate dialysis (BD and with less cost, we have developed since June 1994, a new HD technique, namely AFB 84%. This study was carried out to analyze acid-base variations during the AFB 84% in comparison to BD in hemodynamically stable patients on regular HD. This was a prospective randomized crossover study carried out on 12 patients (6 males and 6 females for a total of 144 HD sessions (72 BD and 72 AFB 84%. Patients with decompensated cardiomyopathy, respiratory diseases or uncontrolled hypertension were not included in the trial. All the patients were treated with BD or AFB 84%; the latter is characterized by the absence of acetate in the dialysate and a complete correction of buffer balance by post-dilutional infusion of bicarbonate-based replacement solution. The comparison of pre-dialysis arterial acid-base and blood-gas parameters revealed no significant differences of pH, HCO 3 - and paCO 2 levels between the two techniques. Analysis of post-dialysis parameters showed that, among patients dialyzed with BD, there was over correction of metabolic acidosis with a tendency towards metabolic alkalosis. In contrast, in patients dialyzed with AFB 84%, we observed a significant improvement in pH and HCO 3 - levels but the increase in paCO2 level was not significant. A comparison of these parameters between the two techniques showed statistically significant difference in pH, HCO3 - and paCO2 levels, but not for paO2 level. AFB 84% can offer some important advantages with the complete absence of acetate from the substitution fluids, and permits a better correction of metabolic acidosis than BD, without causing alkalosis.

  3. Bacterial dynamics and metabolite changes in solid-state acetic acid fermentation of Shanxi aged vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Li, Pan; Liu, Xiong; Luo, Lixin; Lin, Weifeng

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state acetic acid fermentation (AAF), a natural or semi-controlled fermentation process driven by reproducible microbial communities, is an important technique to produce traditional Chinese cereal vinegars. Highly complex microbial communities and metabolites are involved in traditional Chinese solid-state AAF, but the association between microbiota and metabolites during this process are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed amplicon 16S rRNA gene sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and metabolite analysis to trace the bacterial dynamics and metabolite changes under AAF process. A succession of bacterial assemblages was observed during the AAF process. Lactobacillales dominated all the stages. However, Acetobacter species in Rhodospirillales were considerably accelerated during AAF until the end of fermentation. Quantitative PCR results indicated that the biomass of total bacteria showed a "system microbe self-domestication" process in the first 3 days, and then peaked at the seventh day before gradually decreasing until the end of AAF. Moreover, a total of 88 metabolites, including 8 organic acids, 16 free amino acids, and 66 aroma compounds were detected during AAF. Principal component analysis and cluster analyses revealed the high correlation between the dynamics of bacterial community and metabolites.

  4. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohgi Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA, which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism.

  5. Efficacy of Trichloro-Acetic Acid Peel Alone Versus Combined Topical Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate for Epidermal Melasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaza, Fatima; Bangash, Abdur Rahim; Khushdil, Arshad; Noor, Sahibzada Mahmood

    2016-07-01

    To compare the efficacy in terms of reduction in melasma area and severity index (MASI) score by more than 10 of a combination of 20% trichloro-acetic acid peel plus 5% topical magnesium ascorbyl phosphate versus 20% trichloroacetic acid peel alone in the treatment of epidermal melasma. Randomized controlled trial. Department of Dermatology, Lady Reading Hospital (LRH), Peshawar, from May 2012 to May 2013. Patients aged 18 - 65 years, with Fitzpatrick skin type III-V were divided into two equal groups having 74 patients each. Detailed history was taken and Wood's lamp examination done to rule out mixed and dermal melasma. Melasma area and severity index (MASI) score was calculated for every patient. Priming was done for all patients with tretinoin cream applied once daily at night for 2 weeks, and to use a broad spectrum sun block cream before sun exposure. Patients in group Awere subjected to combined treatment, i.e. trichloro-acetic acid peel 20% (weekly) plus magnesium ascorbyl phosphate cream (applied once daily), while patients in group B were subjected to trichloro-acetic acid peel 20% (weekly) alone. Treatment was continued for 6 weeks. After completion of treatment, MASI score was recalculated. Proportion of patients with significant MASI score reduction was compared using chi-square test with significance at p peel and topical magnesium ascorbyl phosphate cream was significantly more effective than trichloro-acetic acid peel alone in treatment of melasma.

  6. Effectiveness of Alkaline Pretreatment and Acetic Acid Hydrolysis on the Characteristics of Collagen from Fish Skin of Snakehead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulandari Wulandari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fish skin is one of marine byproducts potential for alternative source of collagen. This studyinvestigated the effectiveness of alkaline and acetic acid pretreatment on the characteristics ofcollagen from skin snakehead fish. The concentrations of alkaline pretreatment were 0.05; 0.1; 0.15and 0.2 M for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 hours, acetic acid concentrations were 0.05 M, 0.1 M, 0.15 M and0.2 M for 1 and 2 hours. The experimental design used for alkaline and acetic acid pretreatmentwas factorial completely randomized design. The result showed that the concentration of alkaline0.05 M for 6 hours have significant effect on the elimination of non-collagen protein (p<0.05,whereas for the optimum acetic acid at a concentration 0.1 M for 2 hours significantly differenton solubility and swelling. Extraction yields of collagen was 16%, with characteristics of whiteness66.67%, protein content 96.21%, viscosity 10 cP, Tmax 159.9oC and glass transition temperature78.55oC. The dominant amino acid composition were glycine (27.11%, proline (13.87% andalanine (12.58%. Functional groups collagen from skin snakehead fish has β-sheet structurewhich is a characteristic of collagen.

  7. Improvement of yeast tolerance to acetic acid through Haa1 transcription factor engineering: towards the underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Steve; Henriques, Sílvia F; Shrestha, Ranjan; Ho, Ping-Wei; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Nevoigt, Elke

    2017-01-09

    Besides being a major regulator of the response to acetic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Haa1 is an important determinant of the tolerance to this acid. The engineering of Haa1 either by overexpression or mutagenesis has therefore been considered to be a promising avenue towards the construction of more robust strains with improved acetic acid tolerance. By applying the concept of global transcription machinery engineering to the regulon-specific transcription factor Haa1, a mutant allele containing two point mutations could be selected that resulted in a significantly higher acetic acid tolerance as compared to the wild-type allele. The level of improvement obtained was comparable to the level obtained by overexpression of HAA1, which was achieved by introduction of a second copy of the native HAA1 gene. Dissection of the contribution of the two point mutations to the phenotype showed that the major improvement was caused by an amino acid exchange at position 135 (serine to phenylalanine). In order to further study the mechanisms underlying the tolerance phenotype, Haa1 translocation and transcriptional activation of Haa1 target genes was compared between Haa1 mutant, overproduction and wild-type strains. While the rapid Haa1 translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus in response to acetic acid was not affected in the Haa1 S135F mutant strain, the levels of transcriptional activation of four selected Haa1-target genes by acetic acid were significantly higher in cells of the mutant strain as compared to cells of the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the time-course of transcriptional activation in response to acetic acid was comparable for the mutant and wild-type strain whereas the maximum mRNA levels obtained correlate with each strain's tolerance level. Our data confirms that engineering of the regulon-specific transcription factor Haa1 allows the improvement of acetic acid tolerance in S. cerevisiae. It was also shown that the

  8. Anaerobic conversion of lactic acid to acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol by Lactobacillus buchneri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, SJWHO; Krooneman, J; Gottschal, JC; Spoelstra, SF; Faber, F; Driehuis, F

    The degradation of lactic acid under anoxic conditions was studied in several strains of Lactobacillus buchneri and in close relatives such as Lactobacillus parabuchneri, Lactobacillus kefir, and Lactobacillus hilgardii. Of these lactobacilli, L. buchneri and L. parabuchneri were able to degrade

  9. Anaerobic conversion of lactic acid to acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol by Lactobacillus buchneri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.; Krooneman, J.; Gottschal, J.C.; Spoelstra, S.F.; Faber, F.; Driehuis, F.

    2001-01-01

    The degradation of lactic acid under anoxic conditions was studied in several strains of Lactobacillus buchneri and in close relatives such as Lactobacillus parabuchneri, Lactobacillus kefir, and Lactobacillus hilgardii. Of these lactobacilli, L. buchneri and L. parabuchneri were able to degrade

  10. Gluconacetobacter medellinensis sp. nov., cellulose- and non-cellulose-producing acetic acid bacteria isolated from vinegar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Cristina; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Trcek, Janja; Zuluaga, Robin; De Vos, Paul; Caro, Gloria; Aguirre, Ricardo; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Gañán, Piedad

    2013-03-01

    The phylogenetic position of a cellulose-producing acetic acid bacterium, strain ID13488, isolated from commercially available Colombian homemade fruit vinegar, was investigated. Analyses using nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequences, nearly complete 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences, as well as concatenated partial sequences of the housekeeping genes dnaK, groEL and rpoB, allocated the micro-organism to the genus Gluconacetobacter, and more precisely to the Gluconacetobacter xylinus group. Moreover, the data suggested that the micro-organism belongs to a novel species in this genus, together with LMG 1693(T), a non-cellulose-producing strain isolated from vinegar by Kondo and previously classified as a strain of Gluconacetobacter xylinus. DNA-DNA hybridizations confirmed this finding, revealing a DNA-DNA relatedness value of 81 % between strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T), and values <70 % between strain LMG 1693(T) and the type strains of the closest phylogenetic neighbours. Additionally, the classification of strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T) into a single novel species was supported by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and (GTG)5-PCR DNA fingerprinting data, as well as by phenotypic data. Strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T) could be differentiated from closely related species of the genus Gluconacetobacter by their ability to produce 2- and 5-keto-d-gluconic acid from d-glucose, their ability to produce acid from sucrose, but not from 1-propanol, and their ability to grow on 3 % ethanol in the absence of acetic acid and on ethanol, d-ribose, d-xylose, sucrose, sorbitol, d-mannitol and d-gluconate as carbon sources. The DNA G+C content of strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T) was 58.0 and 60.7 mol%, respectively. The major ubiquinone of LMG 1693(T) was Q-10. Taken together these data indicate that strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T) represent a novel species of the genus Gluconacetobacter for which the name Gluconacetobacter

  11. THE STUDY OF HENNA LEAVES EXTRACT AS GREEN CORROSION INHIBITOR FOR MILD STEEL IN ACETIC ACID.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. G. Chaudhari

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitive action of henna leaves extract on mild steel in acetic acid solution have been investigated by weight-loss, A C impedence and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The study indicates that as acid concentration increases corrosion rate increases. The corrosion inhibition efficiency increases with increase in concentration of extract. The result obtained revealed that henna leaves extract act as efficient inhibitor. The adsorption of the henna leaves extract obeyed Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous, exothermic process accompanied by an increase in entropy. Cathodic and anodic polarization curves show that henna leaves extract is a mixed-type inhibitor. Normal 0 false false false EN-IN X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}   ABSTRACT:    The inhibitive action of henna leaves extract on mild steel in acetic acid solution have been investigated by weight-loss, A C impedence and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The study indicates that as acid concentration increases corrosion rate increases. The corrosion inhibition efficiency increases with increase in concentration of extract. The result obtained revealed that henna leaves extract act as efficient inhibitor. The adsorption of the henna leaves

  12. Immunolocalization of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid and abscisic acid in the shoot internodes of Fargesia yunnanensis bamboo during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuguang Wang; Yongpeng Ma; Chengbin Wan; Chungyun Hse; Todd F. Shupe; Yujun Wang; Changming. Wang

    2016-01-01

    The Bambusoideae subfamily includes the fastest-growing plants worldwide, as a consequence of fast internode elongation. However, few studies have evaluated the temporal and spatial distribution of endogenous hormones during internode elongation. In this paper, endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA) were detected in different developmental...

  13. An atom-economic approach to carboxylic acids via Pd-catalyzed direct addition of formic acid to olefins with acetic anhydride as a co-catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Ren, Wenlong; Shi, Yian

    2015-08-21

    An effective Pd-catalyzed hydrocarboxylation of olefins using formic acid with acetic anhydride as a co-catalyst is described. A variety of carboxylic acids are obtained in good yields with high regioselectivities under mild reaction conditions without the use of toxic CO gas.

  14. In vitro Evaluation of the Efficacy of 2% Carbonic Acid and 2% Acetic Acid on Retrieval of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and their Effect on Microhardness of Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sathish; Kamble, Aradhana B; Gupta, Pooja; Satpute, Archana; Chaudhari, Salil; Ladhe, Pushpak

    2016-07-01

    In this in vitro study, the efficacy of 2% carbonic acid and 2% acetic acid on the surface, microhardness of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and dentin after 1 day of setting and 21 days of setting of MTA is measured. Tooth molds were made using 60 single-rooted premolars by slicing them to 4 mm in the mid-root region. White MTA (Angelus) was mixed and packed in the molds. Three experimental groups were formed and exposed to 2% carbonic acid, 2% acetic acid, and saline for 10 minutes on 1 and 21 days of setting respectively. Vickers hardness test of white MTA and dentin was done before and after exposure. Data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc tests. The results show that 2% acetic acid was significantly effective in reducing the microhardness of white MTA compared to 2% carbonic acid and saline on exposure for 10 minutes. The results of the present study indicate that 2% acetic acid has maximum efficacy in reducing the surface microhardness of partial and completely set MTA, followed by 2% carbonic acid. The following study will help find an adjunct for retrieval of MTA, which was found difficult with the existing methods.

  15. Determination of critical conditions for the esterification of acetic acid with ethanol in the presence of carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Platt

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the calculation of critical coordinates for the esterification of acetic acid with ethanol in compressed carbon dioxide. Determination of the critical pressure for this system is useful, since the conversion of this reaction increases with pressure in the two-phase region, reaching a maximum at the critical point. We used a calculation framework based on a coordinate transformation for molar fractions, producing a new compositional domain. For a system with five components (acetic acid + ethanol + ethyl acetate + water + carbon dioxide and one equilibrium reaction, the compositional domain is entirely described by three independent transformed coordinates. The results obtained were compared with experimental observations presented in the literature. The results illustrate the capability of the framework used to determine critical coordinates for reactive systems, and thus its usefulness as a tool for pressure tuning for this esterification reaction in compressed carbon dioxide.

  16. Influence of phenolic acids on indole acetic acid production and on the type III secretion system gene transcription in food-associated Pseudomonas fluorescens KM05.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myszka, Kamila; Schmidt, Marcin T; Olejnik-Schmidt, Agnieszka K; Leja, Katarzyna; Czaczyk, Katarzyna

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of these investigations was to evaluate the reduction capability of phenolic acids (ferulic, chlorogenic, gallic, and p-coumaric acids) on indole acetic acid synthesis by food-associated Pseudomonas fluorescens KM05. Specific genetic primer for the type III secretion system (TTSS) in P. fluorescens KM05 was designed and the influence of phenolic acids on its expression was investigated. In the work the ferulic and chlorogenic acids at the concentration of 0.02 and 0.04 μg/ml affected on bacterial growth pattern and the signal molecules production. The phenolic acids, that were appreciable effective against P. fluorescens KM05 indole acetic acid production, significantly suppressed TTSS gene. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mass Transfer and Chemical Reaction Approach of the Kinetics of the Acetylation of Gadung Flour using Glacial Acetic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andri Cahyo Kumoro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylation is one of the common methods of modifying starch properties by introducing acetil (CH3CO groups to starch molecules at low temperatures. While most acetylation is conducted using starch as anhidroglucose source and acetic anhydride or vinyl acetate as nucleophilic agents, this work employ reactants, namely flour and glacial acetic acid. The purpose of this work are to study the effect of pH reaction and GAA/GF mass ratio on the rate of acetylation reaction and to determine its rate constants. The acetylation of gadung flour with glacial acetic acid in the presence of sodium hydroxide as a homogenous catalyst was studied at ambient temperature with pH ranging from 8-10 and different mass ratio of acetic acid : gadung flour (1:3; 1:4; and 1:5. It was found that increasing pH, lead to increase the degree of substitution, while increasing GAA/GF mass ratio caused such decreases in the degree of substitution, due to the hydrolysis of the acetylated starch. The desired starch acetylation reaction is accompanied by undesirable hydrolysis reaction of the acetylated starch after 40-50 minutes reaction time. Investigation of kinetics of the reaction observed that the value of mass transfer rate constant (Kcs is smaller than the surface reaction rate constant (k. Thus, it can be concluded that rate controlling step is mass transfer.  © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 7th August 2014; Revised: 8th September 2014; Accepted: 14th September 2014How to Cite: Kumoro, A.C., Amelia, R. (2015. Mass Transfer and Chemical Reaction Approach of the Kinetics of the Acetylation of Gadung Flour using Glacial Acetic Acid. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (1: 30-37. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7181.30-37Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7181.30-37

  18. 16S rRNA in situ Hybridization Followed by Flow Cytometry for Rapid Identification of Acetic Acid Bacteria Involved in Submerged Industrial Vinegar Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Lipoglavšek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid bacteria are involved in many biotechnological processes such as vitamin C, gluconic acid, miglitol or acetic acid production, and others. For a technologist trying to control the industrial process, the ability to follow the microbiological development of the process is thus of importance. During the past few years hybridization in a combination with flow cytometry has often been used for this purpose. Since vinegar is a liquid, it is an ideal matrix for flow cytometry analysis. In this work we have constructed a specific probe for highly acetic acid-resistant species of the acetic acid bacteria and a protocol for in situ hybridization, which in combination with flow cytometry enables direct monitoring of bacteria producing vinegar with >10 % of acetic acid. The approach was successfully applied for monitoring microbiota during industrial vinegar production.

  19. Preferential Stereocomplex Crystallization in Enantiomeric Blends of Cellulose Acetate-g-Poly(lactic acid)s with Comblike Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jianna; Han, Lili; Shan, Guorong; Bao, Yongzhong; Pan, Pengju

    2015-10-01

    Although stereocomplex (sc) crystallization is highly effective for improving the thermal resistance of poly(lactic acid) (PLA), it is much less predominant than homocrystallization in high-molecular-weight (HMW) poly(l-lactic acid)/ poly(d-lactic acid) (PLLA/PDLA) racemic blends. In this contribution, the sc crystallization of HMW PLLA/PDLA racemic blends was facilitated by using comblike PLAs with cellulose acetate as the backbone. Competing crystallization kinetics, polymorphic crystalline structure, and structural transition of comblike PLLA/PDLA blends with a wide range of MWs were investigated and compared with the corresponding linear/comblike and linear blends. The HMW comblike blend is preferentially crystallized in sc polymorphs and exhibits a faster crystallization rate than does the corresponding linear blend. The sc crystallites are predominantly formed in nonisothermal cold crystallization and isothermal crystallization at temperatures above 120 °C for the comblike blends. Except for the facilitated sc formation in primary crystallization, synchrotron radiation WAXD analysis indicates that the presence of a comblike component also facilitates the transition or recrystallization from homocrystallite (hc) to sc crystallite upon heating. Preferential sc formation of comblike blends is probably attributable to the favorable interdigitation between enantiomeric branches and the increased mobility of polymer segments. After crystallization under the same temperature, the comblike blends, which mainly contain sc crystallites, show smaller long periods and thinner crystalline lamellae than do the corresponding PLLA with homocrystalline structures.

  20. Enhanced Catalyst Activity of WO3 Using Polypyrrole as Support for Acidic Esterification of Glycerol with Acetic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Beigom Ghoreishi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of polypyrrole supported WO3 were fabricated and characterized by FT-IR, XRD, XPS, BET, TGA, and FESEM-EDX. The activity of the catalysts was tested in glycerol esterification with acetic acid, and it found that WO3-Ppy-20 (nanocomposite with 20% WO3 loaded showed the maximum catalyst activity with 98% and selectivity of 70% to triacetin at 110°C with a reaction duration of 10 h and also recorded the highest selectivity (75% for acetylation of glycerol to monoacetin with about 59% conversion only. The highest acidity of WO3-Ppy-20 is also confirmed using TPD-NH3 analysis. The activity and selectivity to triacetin of the catalyst were enhanced by increasing WO3 loading amount, resulting in 82% conversion for WO3-Ppy-5 with about 32 and 50% selectivity to monoacetin and diacetin and about 18% selectivity to triacetin; in case of WO3-Ppy-20, these amounts were changed to 5, 25, and 70% selectivity to monoacetin, diacetin, and triacetin, respectively with the conversion of 98%. TPD-NH3 analysis found that polypyrrole supported WO3 increases the catalyst acidity of WO3. BET and FESEM analyses revealed that WO3 particles were well dispersed with the smallest average size in nanocomposite compared to pure WO3, which could contribute to the high activity of WO3-Ppy catalyst for esterification of glycerol.

  1. Biofilm-associated indole acetic acid producing bacteria and their impact in the proliferation of biofilm mats in solar salterns

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kerkar, S.; Raiker, L.; Tiwari, A.; Mayilraj, S.; Dastager, S.

    viz. Nerul and Curca to find a possible reason for the rapid proliferation of these solar biofilms. Out of the 125 bacteria isolated from these biofilms, 16 produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Rapid in-situ assay with Salkowski reagent and HPLC...

  2. Production of acetic acid by hydrothermal two-step process of vegetable wastes for use as a road deicer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, F; Watanabe, Y; Kishita, A; Enomoto, H [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kishida, H [Environmental Systems Headquarters, Environmental Research and Development Center Hitachi Zosen Corporation, Kyoto 625-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: fmjin@mail.tongji.edu.cn

    2008-07-15

    This study aimed to produce acetic acid from vegetable wastes by a new hydrothermal two-step process. A continuous flow reaction system with a maximum treatment capacity of 2 kg/h of dry biomass developed by us was used. Five kinds of vegetables of carrots, white radish, chinese cabbage, cabbage and potato were selected as the representation of vegetable wastes. First, batch experiments with the selected vegetables were performed under the condition of 300 deg. C, 1 min for the first step, and 300 deg. C, 1 min and 70% oxygen supply for the second step, which is the optimum condition for producing acetic acid in the case of using starch as test material. The highest yields of acetic acid from five vegetables were almost the same as those obtained from starch. Subsequently, similar the highest yield of acetic acid and experimental conditions from vegetables were also obtained successfully using the continuous flow reaction system. These results should be useful for developing an industrial scale process.

  3. Formic and Acetic Acids in Degradation Products of Plant Volatiles Elicit Olfactory and Behavioral Responses from an Insect Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Justin; Robbins, Paul S; Alessandro, Rocco T; Stelinski, Lukasz L; Lapointe, Stephen L

    2016-05-01

    Volatile phytochemicals play a role in orientation by phytophagous insects. We studied antennal and behavioral responses of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, vector of the citrus greening disease pathogen. Little or no response to citrus leaf volatiles was detected by electroantennography. Glass cartridges prepared with β-ocimene or citral produced no response initially but became stimulatory after several days. Both compounds degraded completely in air to a number of smaller molecules. Two peaks elicited large antennal responses and were identified as acetic and formic acids. Probing by D. citri of a wax substrate containing odorants was significantly increased by a blend of formic and acetic acids compared with either compound separately or blends containing β-ocimene and/or citral. Response surface modeling based on a 4-component mixture design and a 2-component mixture-amount design predicted an optimal probing response on wax substrate containing a blend of formic and acetic acids. Our study suggests that formic and acetic acids play a role in host selection by D. citri and perhaps by phytophagous insects in general even when parent compounds from which they are derived are not active. These results have implications for the investigation of arthropod olfaction and may lead to elaboration of attract-and-kill formulations to reduce nontarget effects of chemical control in agriculture. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of US Government 2016.

  4. Trapping female Pandemis limitata (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) moths with mixtures of acetic acid, benzenoid apple leaf volatiles, and sex pheromones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandemis limitata (Robinson) is one of several leaf-feeding caterpillar pests of commercial tree-fruit crops in British Columbia. Recent discovery that European Pandemis spp. are attracted to lures containing acetic acid (AA) and caterpillar-induced benzenoid apple leaf volatiles, 2-phenylethanol a...

  5. Ru decorated carbon nanotubes - a promising catalyst for reforming bio-based acetic acid in the aqueous phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vlieger, Dennis; Lefferts, Leonardus; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic reforming of biomass derived waste streams in the aqueous phase is a promising process for the production of sustainable hydrogen. Acetic acid will be a major component (up to 20 wt%) in many anticipated gasification feed streams (e.g. the aqueous fraction of pyrolysis oil). Conventional

  6. Protective effect of Agave americana Linn. leaf extract in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannasaheb, Basheerahmed A A; Kulkarni, Preeti V; Sangreskopp, Mashood Ahmed; Savant, Chetan; Mohan, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Natural plants always provide core compounds for new drug development. In the present life and food style, inflammatory bowel disease has become common and needs a lead compound for its drug development. To evaluate the effect of Agave americana Linn. leaf extract in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats based on its traditional anti-inflammatory use. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with A. americana leaf extract in the dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. daily for 7 days. On 8(th) day, 2 ml of 4% v/v acetic acid in saline was instilled into rats' rectum. Prednisolone was used as standard drug and it was administered on the day of acetic acid instillation and continued for 3 days. Extract treatment was continued till 11(th) day. Body weight, ulcer score, colonic muscle contraction, antioxidant activity and histopathology were studied. Statistical analysis was performed using Parametric one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's posttest. A. americana have retained total body weight significantly (P weight/length ratio. Extract have shown a significant decrease (P acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

  7. Synthesis of the [beta]-D-glucosyl ester of [carbonyl-[sup 13]C]-indole-3-acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakas, A.; Magnus, V. (Rudjer Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia)); Horvat, S.; Sandberg, G. (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1993-10-01

    An efficient, operationally simple synthetic approach to 1-O-([carbonyl-[sup 13]C]-indole-3'-ylacetyl)-[beta]-D-glucopyranose is described. The synthesis was carried out by fusing a fully benzylated 1-O-glucosylpseudourea intermediate with [carbonyl-[sup 13]C]-indole-3-acetic acid, followed by hydrogenolytic removal of the protective groups. (Author).

  8. Protective effect of Agave americana Linn. leaf extract in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannasaheb, Basheerahmed A.A.; Kulkarni, Preeti V.; Sangreskopp, Mashood Ahmed; Savant, Chetan; Mohan, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Natural plants always provide core compounds for new drug development. In the present life and food style, inflammatory bowel disease has become common and needs a lead compound for its drug development. Aim: To evaluate the effect of Agave americana Linn. leaf extract in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats based on its traditional anti-inflammatory use. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were pretreated with A. americana leaf extract in the dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. daily for 7 days. On 8th day, 2 ml of 4% v/v acetic acid in saline was instilled into rats’ rectum. Prednisolone was used as standard drug and it was administered on the day of acetic acid instillation and continued for 3 days. Extract treatment was continued till 11th day. Body weight, ulcer score, colonic muscle contraction, antioxidant activity and histopathology were studied. Statistical analysis was performed using Parametric one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's posttest. Results: A. americana have retained total body weight significantly (P < 0.01) and decreased colon weight/length ratio. Extract have shown a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in ulcer scores, myeloperoxidase, lipid peroxidase activity. Further, extract have shown significant improvement in colonic muscle contraction, histopathology of colon etc., which is comparable with standard drug. Conclusion: A. americana possess protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. PMID:26730148

  9. 2-Aryl(pyrrolidin-4-yl)acetic acids are potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Budhu, Richard; Huo, Pei; Lynch, Christopher L; Hale, Jeffrey J; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2006-07-01

    A series of 2-aryl(pyrrolidin-4-yl)acetic acids were synthesized and their biological activities were evaluated as agonists of S1P receptors. These analogs were able to induce lowering of lymphocyte counts in the peripheral blood of mice and were found to have good overall pharmacokinetic properties in rat.

  10. Zinc, magnesium, and calcium ion supplementation confers tolerance to acetic acid stress in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizing xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ku Syahidah Ku; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential substrate for ethanol production. However, pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials produces inhibitory compounds such as acetic acid, which negatively affect ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Supplementation of the medium with three metal ions (Zn(2+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) ) increased the tolerance of S. cerevisiae toward acetic acid compared to the absence of the ions. Ethanol production from xylose was most improved (by 34%) when the medium was supplemented with 2 mM Ca(2+) , followed by supplementation with 3.5 mM Mg(2+) (29% improvement), and 180 μM Zn(2+) (26% improvement). Higher ethanol production was linked to high cell viability in the presence of metal ions. Comparative transcriptomics between the supplemented cultures and the control suggested that improved cell viability resulted from the induction of genes controlling the cell wall and membrane. Only one gene, FIT2, was found to be up-regulated in common between the three metal ions. Also up-regulation of HXT1 and TKL1 might enhance xylose consumption in the presence of acetic acid. Thus, the addition of ionic nutrients is a simple and cost-effective method to improve the acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Improvement of acetic acid tolerance and fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by disruption of the FPS1 aquaglyceroporin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Guo; Liu, Xiu-Ying; He, Xiu-Ping; Guo, Xue-Na; Lu, Ying; Zhang, Bo-Run

    2011-02-01

    The FPS1 gene coding for the Fps1p aquaglyceroporin protein of an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was disrupted by inserting CUP1 gene. Wild-type strain, CE25, could only grow on YPD medium containing less than 0.45% (v/v) acetic acid, while recombinant strain T12 with FPS1 disruption could grow on YPD medium with 0.6% (v/v) acetic acid. Under 0.4% (v/v) acetic acid stress (pH 4.26), ethanol production and cell growth rates of T12 were 1.7 ± 0.1 and 0.061 ± 0.003 g/l h, while those of CE25 were 1.2 ± 0.1 and 0.048 ± 0.003 g/l h, respectively. FPS1 gene disruption in an industrial ethanologenic yeast thus increases cell growth and ethanol yield under acetic acid stress, which suggests the potential utility of FPS1 gene disruption for bioethanol production from renewable resources such as lignocelluloses.

  12. Production of acetic acid by hydrothermal two-step process of vegetable wastes for use as a road deicer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, F.; Watanabe, Y.; Kishita, A.; Enomoto, H.; Kishida, H.

    2008-07-01

    This study aimed to produce acetic acid from vegetable wastes by a new hydrothermal two-step process. A continuous flow reaction system with a maximum treatment capacity of 2 kg/h of dry biomass developed by us was used. Five kinds of vegetables of carrots, white radish, chinese cabbage, cabbage and potato were selected as the representation of vegetable wastes. First, batch experiments with the selected vegetables were performed under the condition of 300°C, 1 min for the first step, and 300°C, 1 min and 70% oxygen supply for the second step, which is the optimum condition for producing acetic acid in the case of using starch as test material. The highest yields of acetic acid from five vegetables were almost the same as those obtained from starch. Subsequently, similar the highest yield of acetic acid and experimental conditions from vegetables were also obtained successfully using the continuous flow reaction system. These results should be useful for developing an industrial scale process.

  13. ETHANOL, ACETIC ACID, AND WATER ADSORPTION FROM BINARY AND TERNARY LIQUID MIXTURES ON HIGH-SILICA ZEOLITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsorption isotherms were measured for ethanol, acetic acid, and water adsorbed on high-silica ZSM-5 zeolite powder from binary and ternary liquid mixtures at room temperature. Ethanol and water adsorption on two high-silica ZSM-5 zeolites with different aluminum contents and a h...

  14. Gas-Phase Thermal Tautomerization of Imidazole-Acetic Acid: Theoretical and Computational Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadullah G. Aziz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The gas-phase thermal tautomerization reaction between imidazole-4-acetic (I and imidazole-5-acetic (II acids was monitored using the traditional hybrid functional (B3LYP and the long-range corrected functionals (CAM-B3LYP and ωB97XD with 6-311++G** and aug-cc-pvdz basis sets. The roles of the long-range and dispersion corrections on their geometrical parameters, thermodynamic functions, kinetics, dipole moments, Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital–Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO–LUMO energy gaps and total hyperpolarizability were investigated. All tested levels of theory predicted the preference of I over II by 0.750–0.877 kcal/mol. The origin of predilection of I is assigned to the H-bonding interaction (nN8→σ*O14–H15. This interaction stabilized I by 15.07 kcal/mol. The gas-phase interconversion between the two tautomers assumed a 1,2-proton shift mechanism, with two transition states (TS, TS1 and TS2, having energy barriers of 47.67–49.92 and 49.55–52.69 kcal/mol, respectively, and an sp3-type intermediate. A water-assisted 1,3-proton shift route brought the barrier height down to less than 20 kcal/mol in gas-phase and less than 12 kcal/mol in solution. The relatively high values of total hyperpolarizability of I compared to II were interpreted and discussed.

  15. GROWTH, YIELD AND POSTHARVEST QUALITY OF WAX APPLE AS AFFECTED BY NAPHTHALENE ACETIC ACID APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD MONERUZZAMAN KHANDAKER

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Results of this study represent the first report of the effect of Naphthalene Acetic Acid (NAA on the pre and post harvest quality of wax apple fruit. The wax apple trees were spray treated with 0, 5, 10 and 20 mg L-1 NAA under field conditions during 2008 to 2011. The experiments were carried out in Completely Randomized Design (CRD with six replications. Leaf chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthetic yield, net photosynthetic rate, drymatter content of leaves and total soluble solids and K+content of wax apple fruits were significantly increased after treatments with 10 mg L-1. Polygalacturonase activity significantly decreased with NAA treatments. The application of 5 mg L-1 NAA increased 27% more bud and reduced 42% less fruit drop compared to the control. In addition, higher protein and phosphate synthase activity of leaves, fruit set, fruit growth, larger fruit size and yield were recorded in NAA treated plants. In storage, treated fruits exhibited higher TSS and firmness and less weight loss, browning, titratable acidity, respiration and ethylene production than the control. It is concluded that spraying with 5 and 10 mg L-1 NAA once a week under field conditions produced better fruit growth and yield of the wax apple and maintained better fruit quality in postharvest storage.

  16. Efficacy of 1% acetic acid in the treatment of chronic wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa: prospective randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, V L

    2016-12-01

    Chronic wounds are those wounds that are persistent and do not respond to any sort of treatment. The concept of using topical antiseptics on open wounds is to prevent and treat infections. They also help to shorten the time taken to heal the wounds. The use of topical agents on wounds to prevent infection is a minimal ability to develop resistance to the microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen with innate resistance to many antibiotics. In places that are economically backward, these problems get compounded by the inability of patients to afford newer expensive drugs. Topically applied dilute acetic acid, which is cheap and easily available, has been found to be effective in such chronic wounds. In the present study, an attempt has been made to use 1% acetic acid as the sole antimicrobial agent for the treatment of pseudomonal wound infections. A control limb was used in which the wounds were treated with normal saline. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of acetic acid in low concentration of 1% in chronic wounds infected with P. aeruginosa. This was a prospective study conducted over a period of 6 months. All patients with chronic wounds infected with P. aeruginosa. Wounds due to massive burns, suspected malignancy, immunocompromised individuals and individuals with sepsis. A total of 32 patients enrolled in the study. Subjects were randomised equally to the 1% acetic acid group and saline dressing group. None of the patients received any systemic antibiotics during the study period and received twice daily dressings. The endpoint of the treatment was wounds free of P. aeruginosa. The duration of treatment required to eliminate the Pseudomonas from the wounds in the acetic acid group was on an average 7 days less than that required by the saline group. P value was acetic acid group irrespective of the sensitivity of the organism to antibiotics, Pseudomonas organisms were eliminated within the same time period - 4·5

  17. Steam reforming of acetic acid as a biomass derived oxygenate: Bifunctional pathway for hydrogen formation over Pt/ZrO2 catalysts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takanabe, K.; Aika, Ken-ichi; Inazu, Koji; Baba, Toshihide; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2006-01-01

    Mechanistic studies on steam reforming of acetic acid over Pt/ZrO2 catalysts were performed as extension of our previous work [K. Takanabe, K. Aika, K. Seshan, L. Lefferts, J. Catal. 227 (2004) 101]. An overall picture of the bifunctional mechanism is established for steam reforming of acetic acid,

  18. Single and combined effects of acetic acid, furfural, and sugars on the growth of the pentose-fermenting yeastMeyerozyma guilliermondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Michelle Dos Santos Cordeiro; Bastos, Reinaldo Gaspar; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina

    2018-02-01

    The tolerance of the pentose-fermenting yeast Meyerozyma guilliermondii to the inhibitors released after the biomass hydrolysis, such as acetic acid and furfural, was surveyed. We first verified the effects of acetic acid and cell concentrations and initial pH on the growth of a M. guilliermondii strain in a semi-synthetic medium containing acetic acid as the sole carbon source. Second, the single and combined effects of furfural, acetic acid, and sugars (xylose, arabinose, and glucose) on the sugar uptake, cell growth, and ethanol production were also analysed. Growth inhibition occurred in concentrations higher than 10.5 g l -1 acetic acid and initial pH 3.5. The maximum specific growth rate (µ) was 0.023 h -1 and the saturation constant (ks) was 0.75 g l -1 acetic acid. Initial cell concentration also influenced µ. Acetic acid (initial concentration 5 g l -1 ) was co-consumed with sugars even in the presence of 20 mg l -1 furfural without inhibition to the yeast growth. The yeast grew and fermented sugars in a sugar-based medium with acetic acid and furfural in concentrations much higher than those usually found in hemicellulosic hydrolysates.

  19. Root-uptake of {sup 14}C derived from acetic acid and {sup 14}C transfer to rice edible parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiyama, Shinichi [Office of Biospheric Assessment for Waste Disposal, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: ogiyama@nirs.go.jp; Suzuki, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-5522 (Japan); Inubushi, Kazuyuki [Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, 648 Matsudo, Matsudo-shi 271-8510 (Japan); Takeda, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shigeo [Office of Biospheric Assessment for Waste Disposal, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Three types of culture experiments using paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.) were performed to examine root-uptake of {sup 14}C in the form of acetic acid: double pot experiment (hydroponics), wet culture experiment (submerged sand medium), and chamber experiment (hydroponics and submerged sand medium). The {sup 14}C radioactivity in the plant, mediums, and atmospheric carbon dioxide ({sup 14}CO{sub 2}) in the chamber were determined, and the distribution of {sup 14}C in the plant was visualized using autoradiography. In the double pot experiment, the shoot of the plant and the lower root which was soaked in the culture solution had {sup 14}C radioactivity, but the upper root which did not have contact with the solution had none. There were also {sup 14}C radioactivity in the grains and roots in the wet culture experiment. Results of the chamber experiment showed that {sup 14}CO{sub 2} gas was released from the culture solution in both types of cultures. Results indicated that the {sup 14}C-acetic acid absorbed by rice plant through its root would be very small. Most of the {sup 14}C-acetic acid was transformed into gaseous forms either in the culture solution or rhizosphere. A relatively longer time would be needed to assimilate {sup 14}C derived from acetic acid to grain parts after it was once absorbed by the shoot through the root. Availability of {sup 14}C for the plant in sand culture was considered to be decreased compared with that for the plant in the hydroponics experiment. It was suggested that rice plant absorbed and assimilated {sup 14}C through the plant roots not because of uptake of {sup 14}C-acetic acid but because of uptake of {sup 14}C in gaseous forms such as {sup 14}CO{sub 2}.

  20. L-arginine augments the antioxidant effect of garlic against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harisa, Gamal Eldin I; Abo-Salem, Osama M; El-Sayed, El-Sayed M; Taha, Ehab I; El-Halawany, Nermin

    2009-10-01

    Garlic contains many sulfhydryl compounds that act as antioxidants. However, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in inflammation is controversial. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possible protective effect of garlic against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats, as well as the probable modulatory effect of L-arginine (NO precursor) on garlic activity. Intra-rectal inoculation of rats with 4% acetic acid for 3 consecutive days caused a significant increase in the colon weight and marked decrease in the colon length. In addition, acetic acid induced a significant increase in serum levels of nitrate as well as colonic tissue content of malondialdehyde (MDA). Moreover, colonic tissue contents of glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were markedly reduced. On the other hand, pre-treatment of rats with garlic (0.25 g/kgbwt, orally) for 4 consecutive weeks and 3 days during induction of colitis significantly reduced the increase in the colon weight induced by acetic acid and ameliorated alterations in oxidant and antioxidant parameters. Interestingly, oral co-administration of garlic (0.25 g/kgbwt) and L-arginine (625 mg/kgbwt) for the same period of garlic administration mitigated the changes in both colon weight and length induced by acetic acid and increased garlic effect on colon tissue contents of MDA and GSH. In conclusion, L-arginine can augment the protective effect of garlic against ulcerative colitis; an effect that might be mainly attributed to its NO donating property resulting in enhancement of garlic antioxidant effect. Further studies will be needed to determine which one of the active ingredients of garlic has the main antioxidant effect to be used with L-arginine.

  1. Cartilage and bone malformations in the head of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos following exposure to disulfiram and acetic acid hydrazide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Ruben, E-mail: Ruben.Strecker@cos.uni-heidelberg.de [Aquatic Ecology and Toxicology Section, Center for Organismal Studies, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 230, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Weigt, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.weigt@merckgroup.com [Institute of Toxicology, Merck KGaA, 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Braunbeck, Thomas, E-mail: braunbeck@uni-hd.de [Aquatic Ecology and Toxicology Section, Center for Organismal Studies, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 230, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    In order to investigate teratogenic effects, especially on cartilage and bone formation, zebrafish embryos were exposed for 144 h to the dithiocarbamate pesticide disulfiram (20–320 μg/L) and acetic acid hydrazide (0.375–12 g/L), a degradation product of isoniazid. After fixation and full-mount staining, disulfiram could be shown to induce strong cartilage malformations after exposure to ≥ 80 μg/L, whereas acetic acid hydrazide caused cartilage alterations only from 1.5 g/L. Undulating notochords occurred after exposure to disulfiram even at the lowest test concentration of 20 μg/L, whereas at the two lowest concentrations of acetic acid hydrazide (0.375 and 0.75 g/L) mainly fractures of the notochord were observed. Concentrations of acetic acid hydrazide ≥ 1.5 g/L resulted in undulated notochords similar to disulfiram. Cartilages and ossifications of the cranium, including the cleithrum, were individually analyzed assessing the severity of malformation and the degree of ossification in a semi-quantitative approach. Cartilages of the neurocranium such as the ethmoid plate proved to be more stable than cartilages of the pharyngeal skeleton such as Meckel's cartilage. Hence, ossification proved significantly more susceptible than cartilage. The alterations induced in the notochord as well as in the cranium might well be of ecological relevance, since notochord malformation is likely to result in impaired swimming and cranial malformation might compromise regular food uptake. - Highlights: ► Disulfiram and acetic acid hydrazide as notochord, cartilage and bone teratogens ► Zebrafish embryos to model effects on single cartilages and bones in the head ► LC50 calculation and head length measurements after six days post-fertilization ► Lethality, head length and teratogenic effects are dose-dependent. ► Cartilages of the neurocranium are the most stable elements in the head.

  2. Improvement of sensitivity of electrolyte cathode discharge atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES) for mercury using acetic acid medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, R

    2012-05-15

    A method has been developed to improve the sensitivity of the electrolyte cathode discharge atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES) for mercury determination. Effects of various low molecular weight organic solvents at different volume percentages as well as at different acid molarities on the mercury signal were investigated using ELCAD-AES. The addition of few percent of organic solvent, acetic acid produced significant enhancement in mercury signal. Acetic acid of 5% (v/v) with the 0.2M acidity has been found to give 500% enhancement for mercury signal in flow injection mode. Under the optimized parameters the repeatability, expressed as the percentage relative standard deviation of spectral peak area for mercury with 5% acetic acid was found to be 10% for acid blank solution and 5% for 20 ng/mL mercury standard based on multiple measurements with a multiple sample loading in flow injection mode. Limit of detection of this method was determined to be 2 ng/mL for inorganic mercury. The proposed method has been validated by determining mercury in certified reference materials, Tuna fish (IAEA-350) and Aquatic plant (BCR-060). Accuracy of the method for the mercury determination in the reference materials has been found to be between 3.5% and 5.9%. This study enhances the utility of ELCAD-AES for various types of biological and environmental materials to quantify total mercury at very low levels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ecosystem-Scale Compensation Point Analysis of Formic and Acetic Acid in the Central Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanez-Serrano, A. M.; Jardine, K. J.; Arneth, A.; Abrell, L.; Jardine, A. B.; Artaxo, P.; Gomes, E.; Kesselmeier, J.; Saleska, S. R.; Huxman, T. E.

    2011-12-01

    Organic acids, central to terrestrial carbon metabolism and atmospheric photochemistry, are ubiquitous in the troposphere in the gas, particle, and aqueous phases. As the dominant organic acids in the atmosphere, formic acid (FA, HCOOH) and acetic acid (AA, CH3COOH) control precipitation acidity in remote regions and may represent a critical link between the terrestrial carbon and water cycles by acting as key intermediates in plant carbon and energy metabolism and aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. However, our understanding of the exchange of these acids between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere is limited by a lack of field observations, the existence of biogenic and anthropogenic primary and secondary sources whose relative importance is unclear, and the fact that vegetation can act as both a source and a sink. Here, we present results from the tropical rainforest mescosom at Biosphere 2 which isolates primary vegetation sources. Strong light and temperature dependent emissions of FA and AA were simultaneously observed from individual branches and mesocosm ambient air with a strong enrichment in FA (FA/AA = 1.4 +/- 0.3, R2 of 0.89 +/- 0.10). We also present long-term observations of vertical concentration gradients of FA and AA within and above a primary rainforest canopy in central Amazonia during the 2010 dry and 2011 wet seasons. We observed a seasonal switch from net ecosystem-scale deposition during the dry season to net emissions during the wet season. This switch was associated with reduced ambient concentrations in the wet season (FA secondary production of FA and AA from biogenic precursors like isoprene are the largest atmospheric source. Our observations provide the first ecosystem-scale evidence of bidirectional FA and AA exchange between a forest canopy and the atmosphere controlled by ambient concentrations and ecosystem scale compensation points (estimated to be 1.3 ppbv: FA, and 2.1 ppbv: AA). These results suggest the need for a

  4. Development of an acetic acid tolerant Spathaspora passalidarum strain through evolutionary engineering with resistance to inhibitors compounds of autohydrolysate of Eucalyptus globulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales, Paulina; Gentina, Juan Carlos; Aroca, German

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionary engineering strategy based on mutagenesis by UV irradiation and subsequent selectionby continuous cultivation at increasing concentrations of acetic acid in synthetic medium with glucoseand xylose mixtures was used to develop an evolved strain of the yeast Spathaspora passalidarum...... withimproved resistance to acetic acid. After 380 generations, the yeast was able to produce 5.8 g/L ethanolin the presence of 3.5 g/L acetic acid in synthetic medium with mixture of 15 g L−1glucose and 15 g L−1xylose. To demonstrate the improved resistance to acetic acid of the evolved strain compared...... to the nativestrain, growth kinetics and bioethanol production of both strains in batch cultures under microaerobiccondition were performed. The evolved strain reached an ethanol volumetric productivity of 0.23 g/L hand ethanol yield of 0.48 g/g in the presence of 4.5 g/L acetic acid. These results were 7-fold and 2...

  5. Cervical cancer risk factors and feasibility of visual inspection with acetic acid screening in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed Ibrahim1, Vibeke Rasch2, Eero Pukkala3, Arja R Aro11Unit for Health Promotion Research, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; 3Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki, FinlandObjectives: To assess the risk factors of cervical cancer and the feasibility and acceptability of a visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA screening method in a primary health center in Khartoum, Sudan.Methods: A cross-sectional prospective pilot study of 100 asymptomatic women living in Khartoum State in Sudan was carried out from December 2008 to January 2009. The study was performed at the screening center in Khartoum. Six nurses and two physicians were trained by a gynecologic oncologist. The patients underwent a complete gynecological examination and filled in a questionnaire on risk factors and feasibility and acceptability. They were screened for cervical cancer by application of 3%–5% VIA. Women with a positive test were referred for colposcopy and treatment.Results: Sixteen percent of screened women were tested positive. Statistically significant associations were observed between being positive with VIA test and the following variables: uterine cervix laceration (odds ratio [OR] 18.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.64–74.8, assisted vaginal delivery (OR 13.2; 95% CI: 2.95–54.9, parity (OR 5.78; 95% CI: 1.41–23.7, female genital mutilation (OR 4.78; 95% CI: 1.13–20.1, and episiotomy (OR 5.25; 95% CI: 1.15–23.8. All these associations remained statistically significant after adjusting for age, educational level, employment, and potential confounding factors such as smoking, number of sexual partners, and use of contraceptive method. Furthermore, the VIA screening method was found to be feasible and acceptable to participants.Conclusion: This pilot study showed that women who have uterine

  6. Validation of a multi-analyte HPLC-DAD method for determination of uric acid, creatinine, homovanillic acid, niacinamide, hippuric acid, indole-3-acetic acid and 2-methylhippuric acid in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remane, Daniela; Grunwald, Soeren; Hoeke, Henrike; Mueller, Andrea; Roeder, Stefan; von Bergen, Martin; Wissenbach, Dirk K

    2015-08-15

    During the last decades exposure sciences and epidemiological studies attracts more attention to unravel the mechanisms for the development of chronic diseases. According to this an existing HPLC-DAD method for determination of creatinine in urine samples was expended for seven analytes and validated. Creatinine, uric acid, homovanillic acid, niacinamide, hippuric acid, indole-3-acetic acid, and 2-methylhippuric acid were separated by gradient elution (formate buffer/methanol) using an Eclipse Plus C18 Rapid Resolution column (4.6mm×100mm). No interfering signals were detected in mobile phase. After injection of blank urine samples signals for the endogenous compounds but no interferences were detected. All analytes were linear in the selected calibration range and a non weighted calibration model was chosen. Bias, intra-day and inter-day precision for all analytes were below 20% for quality control (QC) low and below 10% for QC medium and high. The limits of quantification in mobile phase were in line with reported reference values but had to be adjusted in urine for homovanillic acid (45mg/L), niacinamide 58.5(mg/L), and indole-3-acetic acid (63mg/L). Comparison of creatinine data obtained by the existing method with those of the developed method showing differences from -120mg/L to +110mg/L with a mean of differences of 29.0mg/L for 50 authentic urine samples. Analyzing 50 authentic urine samples, uric acid, creatinine, hippuric acid, and 2-methylhippuric acid were detected in (nearly) all samples. However, homovanillic acid was detected in 40%, niacinamide in 4% and indole-3-acetic acid was never detected within the selected samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Indole-3-butyric acid induces lateral root formation via peroxisome-derived indole-3-acetic acid and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicht, Markus; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Burbach, Christian; Volkmann, Dieter; Baluska, Frantisek

    2013-10-01

    Controlled plant growth requires regulation through a variety of signaling molecules, including steroids, peptides, radicals of oxygen and nitrogen, as well as the 'classical' phytohormone groups. Auxin is critical for the control of plant growth and also orchestrates many developmental processes, such as the formation of new roots. It modulates root architecture both slowly, through actions at the transcriptional level and, more rapidly, by mechanisms targeting primarily plasma membrane sensory systems and intracellular signaling pathways. The latter reactions use several second messengers, including Ca(2+) , nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we investigated the different roles of two auxins, the major auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and another endogenous auxin indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), in the lateral root formation process of Arabidopsis and maize. This was mainly analyzed by different types of fluorescence microscopy and inhibitors of NO production. This study revealed that peroxisomal IBA to IAA conversion is followed by peroxisomal NO, which is important for IBA-induced lateral root formation. We conclude that peroxisomal NO emerges as a new player in auxin-induced root organogenesis. In particular, the spatially and temporally coordinated release of NO and IAA from peroxisomes is behind the strong promotion of lateral root formation via IBA. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. PEP3 overexpression shortens lag phase but does not alter growth rate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to acetic acid stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Bradford, C. Samuel; Cooley, Ben; Yoshinaga, Allen S.; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Abeliovich, Hagai; Penner, Michael H.; Bakalinsky, Alan T.

    2017-01-01

    In fungi, two recognized mechanisms contribute to pH homeostasis: the plasma membrane proton-pumping ATPase that exports excess protons and the vacuolar proton-pumping ATPase (V-ATPase) that mediates vacuolar proton uptake. Here, we report that overexpression of PEP3 which encodes a component of the HOPS and CORVET complexes involved in vacuolar biogenesis, shortened lag phase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to acetic acid stress. By confocal microscopy, PEP3-overexpressing cells stained with the vacuolar membrane-specific dye, FM4-64 had more fragmented vacuoles than the wild-type control. The stained overexpression mutant was also found to exhibit about 3.6-fold more FM4-64 fluorescence than the wild-type control as determined by flow cytometry. While the vacuolar pH of the wild-type strain grown in the presence of 80 mM acetic acid was significantly higher than in the absence of added acid, no significant difference was observed in vacuolar pH of the overexpression strain grown either in the presence or absence of 80 mM acetic acid. Based on an indirect growth assay, the PEP3-overexpression strain exhibited higher V-ATPase activity. We hypothesize that PEP3 overexpression provides protection from acid stress by increasing vacuolar surface area and V-ATPase activity and, hence, proton-sequestering capacity. PMID:26051671

  9. PEP3 overexpression shortens lag phase but does not alter growth rate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to acetic acid stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Bradford, C Samuel; Cooley, Ben; Yoshinaga, Allen S; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Abeliovich, Hagai; Penner, Michael H; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2015-10-01

    In fungi, two recognized mechanisms contribute to pH homeostasis: the plasma membrane proton-pumping ATPase that exports excess protons and the vacuolar proton-pumping ATPase (V-ATPase) that mediates vacuolar proton uptake. Here, we report that overexpression of PEP3 which encodes a component of the HOPS and CORVET complexes involved in vacuolar biogenesis, shortened lag phase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to acetic acid stress. By confocal microscopy, PEP3-overexpressing cells stained with the vacuolar membrane-specific dye, FM4-64 had more fragmented vacuoles than the wild-type control. The stained overexpression mutant was also found to exhibit about 3.6-fold more FM4-64 fluorescence than the wild-type control as determined by flow cytometry. While the vacuolar pH of the wild-type strain grown in the presence of 80 mM acetic acid was significantly higher than in the absence of added acid, no significant difference was observed in vacuolar pH of the overexpression strain grown either in the presence or absence of 80 mM acetic acid. Based on an indirect growth assay, the PEP3-overexpression strain exhibited higher V-ATPase activity. We hypothesize that PEP3 overexpression provides protection from acid stress by increasing vacuolar surface area and V-ATPase activity and, hence, proton-sequestering capacity.

  10. Mitochondrial proteomics of the acetic acid - induced programmed cell death response in a highly tolerant Zygosaccharomyces bailii - derived hybrid strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Joana F.; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Soares, Renata; Coelho, Ana V.; Leão, Cecília; Ludovico, Paula; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Very high concentrations of acetic acid at low pH induce programmed cell death (PCD) in both the experimental model Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Zygosaccharomyces bailii, the latter being considered the most problematic acidic food spoilage yeast due to its remarkable intrinsic resistance to this food preservative. However, while the mechanisms underlying S. cerevisiae PCD induced by acetic acid have been previously examined, the corresponding molecular players remain largely unknown in Z. bailii. Also, the reason why acetic acid concentrations known to be necrotic for S. cerevisiae induce PCD with an apoptotic phenotype in Z. bailii remains to be elucidated. In this study, a 2-DE-based expression mitochondrial proteomic analysis was explored to obtain new insights into the mechanisms involved in PCD in the Z. bailii derived hybrid strain ISA1307. This allowed the quantitative assessment of expression of protein species derived from each of the parental strains, with special emphasis on the processes taking place in the mitochondria known to play a key role in acetic acid - induced PCD. A marked decrease in the content of proteins involved in mitochondrial metabolism, in particular, in respiratory metabolism (Cor1, Rip1, Lpd1, Lat1 and Pdb1), with a concomitant increase in the abundance of proteins involved in fermentation (Pdc1, Ald4, Dld3) was registered. Other differentially expressed identified proteins also suggest the involvement of the oxidative stress response, protein translation, amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, among other processes, in the PCD response. Overall, the results strengthen the emerging concept of the importance of metabolic regulation of yeast PCD. PMID:28357336

  11. Cellulose production and cellulose synthase gene detection in acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Maria José; Torija, Maria Jesús; Mas, Albert; Mateo, Estibaliz

    2015-02-01

    The ability of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) to produce cellulose has gained much industrial interest due to the physical and chemical characteristics of bacterial cellulose. The production of cellulose occurs in the presence of oxygen and in a glucose-containing medium, but it can also occur during vinegar elaboration by the traditional method. The vinegar biofilm produced by AAB on the air-liquid interface is primarily composed of cellulose and maintains the cells in close contact with oxygen. In this study, we screened for the ability of AAB to produce cellulose using different carbon sources in the presence or absence of ethanol. The presence of cellulose in biofilms was confirmed using the fluorochrome Calcofluor by microscopy. Moreover, the process of biofilm formation was monitored under epifluorescence microscopy using the Live/Dead BacLight Kit. A total of 77 AAB strains belonging to 35 species of Acetobacter, Komagataeibacter, Gluconacetobacter, and Gluconobacter were analysed, and 30 strains were able to produce a cellulose biofilm in at least one condition. This cellulose production was correlated with the PCR amplification of the bcsA gene that encodes cellulose synthase. A total of eight degenerated primers were designed, resulting in one primer pair that was able to detect the presence of this gene in 27 AAB strains, 26 of which formed cellulose.

  12. The use of bacterial indol-3-acetic acid (IAA for reduce of chemical fertilizers doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Snežana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard technology of seed processing uses mainly chemical products. Recent researches showed that toxic materials from chemical fertilizers can be harmful to humans, animals and the environment. Currently the attention of researches is shifting away from chemical fertlizers and toward alternative that consumers perceive to be natural, Plant Growth Promoting bacteria (PGP. PGP bacteria could be a way to reduce chemical fertilizer doses. This was the reason to test the ability of Bacillus megaterium, Azotobacter chroococcum to produce hormone auxin (IAA. Bacterial strains were identified by PCR amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA was detected and quantified by MRM experiment. This study conducted that maize seed inoculation with IAA from species mentioned above showed positive effects. They had statistically significantly higher root and steam height compared to control seedlings. Bacterial strains tested in this study may be recommended as PGP (Plant Growth Promoting bacteria, due to their positive effects and eventually can be used to reduce chemical fertilizers doses.

  13. Standardization of DNA extraction from methanol acetic acid fixed cytogenetic cells of cattle and buffalo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotikalapudi, Rosaiah; Patel, Rajesh K; Katragadda, Sanghamitra

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study is to standardize the simple method for extracting DNA from cells fixed in fixative (3:1 ratio of methanol and acetic acid glacial) mostly used for chromosomal studies in cattle and buffaloes. These fixed cells were stored for more than 6 months at refrigerated temperature. The fixed cells were washed 2-3 times by the ice cold 1x Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS) with pH 7.4, so that effect of fixative may be eliminated. The genomic DNA was extracted by adding cell lysis and nucleus lysis buffers. The quality and quantity of DNA were estimated. The readings of nano drop and agarose gel electrophoresis indicate good quality DNA isolated with a rapid and simple protocol routinely using in our laboratory. The method enables us to study the DNA of a cattle and buffaloes after completing cytogenetic investigation or in cases where DNA samples are otherwise not available. This protocol may be useful for molecular analysis of DNA from fixed cells palettes.

  14. Temperature-Sensitive Plant Cells with Shunted Indole-3-Acetic Acid Conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetiker, J. H.; Aeschbacher, G.

    1997-01-01

    Cells of henbane (Hyoscyamus muticus L.) grow indefinitely in culture without exogenous auxin. Cells of its temperature-sensitive variant XIIB2 grow like the wild type at 26[deg]C but die rapidly at 33[deg]C unless auxin is added to the medium. Despite this temperature-sensitive auxin auxotrophy, XIIB2 produces wild-type amounts of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). IAA is the predominant auxin and is important for plant growth and development. Since the IAA production of the variant is functional, we investigated whether the synthesis or degradation of IAA metabolites, possibly active auxins themselves, is altered. The IAA metabolites were IAA-aspartate (IAAsp) and IAA-glucose. The wild type converted IAA mainly to IAAsp, whereas the variant produced mainly IAA-glucose. Exogenous auxin corrected the shunted IAA metabolism of the variant. The half-life of labeled IAAsp in the variant was reduced 21-fold, but in the presence of exogenous auxin it was not different from the wild type. The temperature sensitivity of XIIB2 was also corrected by supplying IAAsp. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that henbane rapidly metabolizes IAAsp to compounds not identical to IAA. The data show that the variant XIIB2 is a useful tool to study the function of IAA conjugates to challenge the popular hypothesis that IAA conjugates are merely slow-release storage forms of IAA. PMID:12223777

  15. New polylactic acid/ cellulose acetate-based antimicrobial interactive single dose nanofibrous wound dressing mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Salma F; Madkour, Tarek M; Moghannem, Saad; El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M

    2017-12-01

    New single dose interactive extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking nanofibrous wound dressings based on polylactic acid (PLA) and cellulose acetate (CA) were developed, characterized and investigated for wound treatment. The antimicrobial agent, thymoquinone (TQ) was selected and incorporated into the scaffolds for preventing common clinical infections, and to accelerate the rate of wound closure and re-epithelialization. The newly fabricated TQ-loaded PLA/CA wound dressings offered many advantages such as mimicking the ECM via the 3D nanofibrous structure, and promoted the cell proliferation due to the hydrophilicity and bioactivity of CA. The wound dressings also prevented the bacterial infection in the early stages due to presence of TQ, and maintained the minimum possible bacterial load in the wound area through the sustained release of the drug for 9days. In vivo assessment demonstrated that TQ-loaded PLA: CA (7:3) scaffolds significantly promoted the wound healing process by increasing re-epithelialization and controlling the formation of granulation tissue. The obtained results suggest that the developed TQ-loaded PLA/CA nanofibrous mats could be ideal for wound dressing applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Protein acetylation affects acetate metabolism, motility and acid stress response in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño-Cerezo, Sara; Bernal, Vicente; Post, Harm; Fuhrer, Tobias; Cappadona, Salvatore; Sánchez-Díaz, Nerea C; Sauer, Uwe; Heck, Albert J R; Altelaar, A F Maarten; Cánovas, Manuel

    2014-11-27

    Although protein acetylation is widely observed, it has been associated with few specific regulatory functions making it poorly understood. To interrogate its functionality, we analyzed the acetylome in Escherichia coli knockout mutants of cobB, the only known sirtuin-like deacetylase, and patZ, the best-known protein acetyltransferase. For four growth conditions, more than 2,000 unique acetylated peptides, belonging to 809 proteins, were identified and differentially quantified. Nearly 65% of these proteins are related to metabolism. The global activity of CobB contributes to the deacetylation of a large number of substrates and has a major impact on physiology. Apart from the regulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase, we found that CobB-controlled acetylation of isocitrate lyase contributes to the fine-tuning of the glyoxylate shunt. Acetylation of the transcription factor RcsB prevents DNA binding, activating flagella biosynthesis and motility, and increases acid stress susceptibility. Surprisingly, deletion of patZ increased acetylation in acetate cultures, which suggests that it regulates the levels of acetylating agents. The results presented offer new insights into functional roles of protein acetylation in metabolic fitness and global cell regulation. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  17. Process control, energy recovery and cost savings in acetic acid wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaiopoulou, E., E-mail: vaiop@env.duth.gr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, Vas. Sofias 12, 67 100 Xanthi (Greece); Melidis, P., E-mail: pmelidis@env.duth.gr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, Vas. Sofias 12, 67 100 Xanthi (Greece); Aivasidis, A., E-mail: aavazid@env.duth.gr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, Vas. Sofias 12, 67 100 Xanthi (Greece)

    2011-02-28

    An anaerobic fixed bed loop (AFBL) reactor was applied for treatment of acetic acid (HAc) wastewater. Two pH process control concepts were investigated; auxostatic and chemostatic control. In the auxostatic pH control, feed pump is interrupted when pH falls below a certain pH value in the bioreactor, which results in reactor operation at maximum load. Chemostatic control assures alkaline conditions by setting a certain pH value in the influent, preventing initial reactor acidification. The AFBL reactor treated HAc wastewater at low hydraulic residence time (HRT) (10-12 h), performed at high space time loads (40-45 kg COD/m{sup 3} d) and high space time yield (30-35 kg COD/m{sup 3} d) to achieve high COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) removal (80%). Material and cost savings were accomplished by utilizing the microbial potential for wastewater neutralization during anaerobic treatment along with application of favourable pH-auxostatic control. NaOH requirement for neutralization was reduced by 75% and HRT was increased up to 20 h. Energy was recovered by applying costless CO{sub 2} contained in the biogas for neutralization of alkaline wastewater. Biogas was enriched in methane by 4 times. This actually brings in more energy profits, since biogas extra heating for CO{sub 2} content during biogas combustion is minimized and usage of other acidifying agents is omitted.

  18. Healing acceleration of acetic acid-induced colitis by marigold (Calendula officinalis) in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanideh, Nader; Jamshidzadeh, Akram; Sepehrimanesh, Masood; Hosseinzadeh, Masood; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid; Najibi, Asma; Raam, Mozhdeh; Daneshi, Sajad; Asadi-Yousefabad, Seyedeh-Leili

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a type of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with unknown etiology. Several therapeutic strategies such as consumption of medicinal plants have been used for its treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate healing effects of Calendula officinalis hydroalcoholic extract in experimentally induced UC in rat. Ninety-six rats, weighing 200 ± 20 g, were randomly divided into eight equal groups. UC induced by 3% acetic acid and oral doses of C. officinalis extract, 1500 and 3000 mg/kg, and enema (gel 10% and 20%) were given. Two groups as positive controls were given asacol (enema) and oral mesalamine. Negative control groups were given normal saline and base gel. On days 3 and 7, intestinal histopathology and weight changes, plus oxidative stress indices including malondialdehyde (MDA) level and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assayed. A significant increase in the body weight of rats was seen in the group given C. officinalis extract 3000 mg/kg orally, oral mesalamine, and 20% intracolonic gel form of marigold extract compared with negative control and base gel groups during the experimental period. Acute inflammation and granular atrophy after UC induction were resolved completely completely by both 20% intracolonic gel and 3000 mg/kg orally. An increase in MPO activity and a decrease in MDA level in response to oral and intracolonic gel form of C. officinalis were observed 3 and and 7 days after treatment (P officinalis can be offered as are potential therapeutic agents for UC induced in rats.

  19. Separation of macromolecular proteins and removal of humic acid by cellulose acetate modified UF membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagaraj, P; Nagendran, A; Rana, D; Matsuura, T

    2016-08-01

    Surface modifying macromolecules (SMMs) were synthesized with various polyurethane pre polymers end-capped with different groups and blended into the casting solution of cellulose acetate (CA) to prepare surface modified ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for water filtration applications. The surface modification of the CA membranes was confirmed by the FTIR and static contact angle (SCA) measurements. The membranes so prepared had the typical characteristics of UF membranes as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Membrane properties were studied in terms of membrane compaction, percentage water content (%WC), pure water flux (PWF), membrane hydraulic resistance (Rm), molecular weight cut-off (MWCO), average pore size and porosity. The result showed that PWF, %WC, MWCO and pore size increased whereas the Rm decreased by the addition of SMMs. The significant effect of SMMs on the fouling by humic acid (HA) was also observed. It was found that the cSMM-3 membrane, in which SMM was synthesized with diethylene glycol (DEG) and hydroxyl benzene sulfonate (HBS) was blended, had the highest flux recovery ratio FRR (84.6%), as well as the lowest irreversible fouling (15.4%), confirming their improved antifouling properties. Thus, the SMM modified CA membranes had proven, to play an important role in the water treatment by UF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Seed and 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid regulation of gibberellin metabolism in pea pericarp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huizen, R; Ozga, J A; Reinecke, D M; Twitchin, B; Mander, L N

    1995-12-01

    In this study, we investigated seed and auxin regulation of gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis in pea (Pisum sativum L.) pericarp tissue in situ, specifically the conversion of [14C]GA19 to [14C]GA20. [14C]GA19 metabolism was monitored in pericarp with seeds, deseeded pericarp, and deseeded pericarp treated with 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid (4-CI-IAA). Pericarp with seeds and deseeded pericarp treated with 4-CI-IAA continued to convert [14C]GA19 to [14C]GA20 throughout the incubation period (2-24 h). However, seed removal resulted in minimal or no accumulation of [14C]GA20 in pericarp tissue. [14C]GA29 was also identified as a product of [14C]GA19 metabolism in pea pericarp. The ratio of [14C]GA29 to [14C]GA20 was significantly higher in deseeded pericarp (with or without exogenous 4-CI-IAA) than in pericarp with seeds. Therefore, conversion of [14C]GA20 to [14C]GA29 may also be seed regulated in pea fruit. These data support the hypothesis that the conversion of GA19 to GA20 in pea pericarp is seed regulated and that the auxin 4-CI-IAA can substitute for the seeds in the stimulation of pericarp growth and the conversion of GA19 to GA20.

  1. Comparison of Pap smear, visual inspection with acetic acid, and digital cervicography as cervical screening strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakarami, Nahid; Farzaneh, Farah; Aslani, Fatemeh; Alizadeh, Kamyab

    2011-11-01

    To compare the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV), and accuracy of Pap smear, visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) and digital cervicography (DC). This is a cross-sectional study on 100 women in the age group of 20-60 years, sequentially using the Pap test, the VIA, and the DC for screening. All women underwent colposcopic biopsy as the gold standard in comparing the methods. Of the total of 100 women with the mean age 36.0 years, 17 cases were recognized positive for abnormal cervical cell by gold standard. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of the Pap test, the VIA, and the DC were 23.5, 100, 100, 86.5, and 87%; 62.5, 98.8, 90.9, 93.2, and 92.9%; and 46.7, 97.6, 77.8, 91, and 89.8%, respectively, for cervical neoplasia. The Pap test had low sensitivity but high specificity, whereas VIA had a high sensitivity in addition to being easy and low-cost. Adjuvant methods of screening such as VIA can be a valuable alternative to the Pap test for cervical cancer screening in low-resource settings.

  2. Comparison of Visual Inspection with Acetic Acid and the Pap Smear for Cervical Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Parul; Srivastava, Pritika; Srivastava, Anand

    2017-11-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) in the early detection of cervical cancer and compare it with the Pap smear. This was a cross-sectional study conducted over a period of 3 months. A total of 316 patients who attended the Gynecology Outpatient Department of Era's Lucknow Medical College and Hospital, fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and gave their informed consent were included. VIA was found positive in 38 patients (12.6%). Pap smear was positive in 31 patients (10.3%). Twenty-eight patients had a positive VIA and a positive Pap smear, 3 had a negative VIA and a positive Pap smear, 10 had a positive VIA and a negative Pap smear, and 34 had a negative VIA and a negative Pap smear. The sensitivity of VIA and the Pap smear was found to be nearly equal, 93.3 and 93.8%, respectively. The Pap smear was found to be more specific than VIA, i.e., 72.9 versus 60%. In terms of test accuracy, the Pap smear was found to have greater test accuracy, i.e., 77.3 versus 66.7% for VIA. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Modulation of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis in bacteroids within Medicago sativa nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, C; Senatore, B; Arbucci, S; Pieraccini, G; Defez, R

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the dose-response effects of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on Medicago plant growth and dry weight production, we increased the synthesis of IAA in both free-living and symbiosis-stage rhizobial bacteroids during Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. For this purpose, site-directed mutagenesis was applied to modify an 85-bp promoter sequence, driving the expression of iaaM and tms2 genes for IAA biosynthesis. A positive correlation was found between the higher expression of IAA biosynthetic genes in free-living bacteria and the increased production of IAA under both free-living and symbiotic conditions. Plants nodulated by RD65 and RD66 strains, synthetizing the highest IAA concentration, showed a significant (up to 73%) increase in the shoot fresh weight and upregulation of nitrogenase gene, nifH, compared to plants nodulated by the wild-type strain. When these plants were analyzed by confocal microscopy, using an anti-IAA antibody, the strongest signal was observed in bacteroids of Medicago sativa RD66 (Ms-RD66) plants, even when they were located in the senescent nodule zone. We show here a simple system to modulate endogenous IAA biosynthesis in bacteria nodulating legumes suitable to investigate which is the maximum level of IAA biosynthesis, resulting in the maximal increase of plant growth. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Effects of glucose, ethanol and acetic acid on regulation of ADH2 gene from Lachancea fermentati

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norhayati Yaacob

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Not all yeast alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2 are repressed by glucose, as reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia stipitis ADH2 is regulated by oxygen instead of glucose, whereas Kluyveromyces marxianus ADH2 is regulated by neither glucose nor ethanol. For this reason, ADH2 regulation of yeasts may be species dependent, leading to a different type of expression and fermentation efficiency. Lachancea fermentati is a highly efficient ethanol producer, fast-growing cells and adapted to fermentation-related stresses such as ethanol and organic acid, but the metabolic information regarding the regulation of glucose and ethanol production is still lacking. Methods. Our investigation started with the stimulation of ADH2 activity from S. cerevisiae and L. fermentati by glucose and ethanol induction in a glucose-repressed medium. The study also embarked on the retrospective analysis of ADH2 genomic and protein level through direct sequencing and sites identification. Based on the sequence generated, we demonstrated ADH2 gene expression highlighting the conserved NAD(P-binding domain in the context of glucose fermentation and ethanol production. Results. An increase of ADH2 activity was observed in starved L. fermentati (LfeADH2 and S. cerevisiae (SceADH2 in response to 2% (w/v glucose induction. These suggest that in the presence of glucose, ADH2 activity was activated instead of being repressed. An induction of 0.5% (v/v ethanol also increased LfeADH2 activity, promoting ethanol resistance, whereas accumulating acetic acid at a later stage of fermentation stimulated ADH2 activity and enhanced glucose consumption rates. The lack in upper stream activating sequence (UAS and TATA elements hindered the possibility of Adr1 binding to LfeADH2. Transcription factors such as SP1 and RAP1 observed in LfeADH2 sequence have been implicated in the regulation of many genes including ADH2. In glucose fermentation, L. fermentati exhibited a bell

  5. Biofilm formation and indole-3-acetic acid production by two rhizospheric unicellular cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mehboob; Stal, Lucas J; Hasnain, Shahida

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms that live in the rhizosphere play a pivotal role in the functioning and maintenance of soil ecosystems. The study of rhizospheric cyanobacteria has been hampered by the difficulty to culture and maintain them in the laboratory. The present work investigated the production of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and the potential of biofilm formation on the rhizoplane of pea plants by two cyanobacterial strains, isolated from rice rhizosphere. The unicellular cyanobacteria Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 that were isolated from a rice rhizosphere, were investigated. Production of IAA by Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 was measured under experimental conditions (pH and light). The bioactivity of the cyanobacterial auxin was demonstrated through the alteration of the rooting pattern of Pisum sativum seedlings. The increase in the concentration of L-tryptophan and the time that this amino acid was present in the medium resulted in a significant enhancement of the synthesis of IAA (r > 0.900 at p = 0.01). There was also a significant correlation between the concentration of IAA in the supernatant of the cyanobacteria cultures and the root length and number of the pea seedlings. Observations made by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed the presence of cyanobacteria on the surface of the roots and also provided evidence for the penetration of the cyanobacteria in the endorhizosphere. We show that the synthesis of IAA by Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 occurs under different environmental conditions and that the auxin is important for the development of the seedling roots and for establishing an intimate symbiosis between cyanobacteria and host plants.

  6. Kinetic basis for the conjugation of auxin by a GH3 family indole-acetic acid-amido synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingfeng; Westfall, Corey S; Hicks, Leslie M; Wang, Shiping; Jez, Joseph M

    2010-09-24

    The GH3 family of acyl-acid-amido synthetases catalyze the ATP-dependent formation of amino acid conjugates to modulate levels of active plant hormones, including auxins and jasmonates. Initial biochemical studies of various GH3s show that these enzymes group into three families based on sequence relationships and acyl-acid substrate preference (I, jasmonate-conjugating; II, auxin- and salicylic acid-conjugating; III, benzoate-conjugating); however, little is known about the kinetic and chemical mechanisms of these enzymes. Here we use GH3-8 from Oryza sativa (rice; OsGH3-8), which functions as an indole-acetic acid (IAA)-amido synthetase, for detailed mechanistic studies. Steady-state kinetic analysis shows that the OsGH3-8 requires either Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) for maximal activity and is specific for aspartate but accepts asparagine as a substrate with a 45-fold decrease in catalytic efficiency and accepts other auxin analogs, including phenyl-acetic acid, indole butyric acid, and naphthalene-acetic acid, as acyl-acid substrates with 1.4-9-fold reductions in k(cat)/K(m) relative to IAA. Initial velocity and product inhibition studies indicate that the enzyme uses a Bi Uni Uni Bi Ping Pong reaction sequence. In the first half-reaction, ATP binds first followed by IAA. Next, formation of an adenylated IAA intermediate results in release of pyrophosphate. The second half-reaction begins with binding of aspartate, which reacts with the adenylated intermediate to release IAA-Asp and AMP. Formation of a catalytically competent adenylated-IAA reaction intermediate was confirmed by mass spectrometry. These mechanistic studies provide insight on the reaction catalyzed by the GH3 family of enzymes to modulate plant hormone action.

  7. Exchange of atmospheric formic and acetic acids with trees and crop plants under controlled chamber and purified air conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselmeier, J.; Bode, K.; Gerlach, C.; Jork, E.-M.

    We investigated the exchange of formic and acetic acids between the atmosphere and various tree species such as beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.), ash ( Fraxinus excelsior L.), spruce ( Picea abies L.) Karst, holm oak ( Quercus ilex L.), and birch ( Betula pendula L.). and some crop-plant species such as corn ( Zea mays, var. Banjo), pea ( Pisum sativum, var. Solara), barley ( Hordeum vulgare, var. Igri) and oat (Avena sativa, var. Wiesel). All experiments were done with dynamic enclosures flushed with purified oxidant-free air, containing only low or controlled amounts of the two acids. Significant and light-triggered emission of both acids from all tree species was observed. For one tree species (ash) a seasonal large increase in fall due to early leaf decomposition was found. The standard emission factors (30°C and PAR=1000 μmol m 2 s -1) given as (nmol m -2 min -1) for acetic and formic acids, respectively, were 8.1 and 29.7 (ash, autumn), 1.0 and 3.3 (ash, summer), 0.9 and 1.4 (beech), 0.7 and 1.45 (spruce), 1.9 and 2.4 (Holm oak) and 1.7 and 6.7 (birch). Rough estimation of global annual emissions range between 20 and 130 Gmol formic acid and 10 and 33 Gmol acetic acid. These numbers reflect a 15-30% contribution by forest emissions to the continental organic acid budget. As compared to the global total NMHC emissions low molecular weight organic acids are of minor importance. In contrast to the trees, none of the crop-plant species investigated showed an emission, but always a clear deposition of both acids. Both emission from trees as well as uptake by the agricultural plants could be related to transpiration rates and leaf conductances.

  8. Temperature dependent emission of formic and acetic acid from paper, and its consequences for the air quality in archives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild Smedemark, Signe; Ryhl-Svendsen, Morten; Vinther Hansen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    ) the reaction rate is therefore, among other things, depending on temperature. Some of the emission products from paper, e.g., acetic and formic acid, are problematic from a conservation point of view, because they will re-react with the paper and other archival materials and cause further deterioration......Paper records affect the indoor environment in archives, because the paper may give off acid compounds to the air. These emission products origins from the decay of cellulose and lignin in the paper. As the off-gassing origins from chemical processes within the material (e.g., acid hydrolysis...

  9. Recycling acetic acid from polarizing film of waste liquid crystal display panels by sub/supercritical water treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruixue; Chen, Ya; Xu, Zhenming

    2015-05-19

    Waste liquid crystal display (LCD) panels mainly contain inorganic materials (glass substrate) and organic materials (polarizing film and liquid crystal). The organic materials should be removed first since containing polarizing film and liquid crystal is to the disadvantage of the indium recycling process. In the present study, an efficient and environmentally friendly process to obtain acetic acid from waste LCD panels by sub/supercritical water treatments is investigated. Furthermore, a well-founded reaction mechanism is proposed. Several highlights of this study are summarized as follows: (i) 99.77% of organic matters are removed, which means the present technology is quite efficient to recycle the organic matters; (ii) a yield of 78.23% acetic acid, a quite important fossil energy based chemical product is obtained, which can reduce the consumption of fossil energy for producing acetic acid; (iii) supercritical water acts as an ideal solvent, a requisite reactant as well as an efficient acid-base catalyst, and this is quite significant in accordance with the "Principles of Green Chemistry". In a word, the organic matters of waste LCD panels are recycled without environmental pollution. Meanwhile, this study provides new opportunities for alternating fossil-based chemical products for sustainable development, converting "waste" into "fossil-based chemicals".

  10. Evaluation of nitric and acetic acid resistance of cement mortars containing high-volume black rice husk ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatveera, B; Lertwattanaruk, P

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents the performance of cement mortar containing black rice husk ash (BRHA) under nitric and acetic acid attacks. The BRHA, collected from an electrical generating power plant that uses rice husk as fuel, was ground using a grinding machine. The compressive strength loss, weight loss, and expansion of mortars under nitric and acetic acid attack were investigated. The test results of BRHA properties in accordance with the ASTM C 618 standard found that the optimal grinding time was 4 h as this achieved a Blaine fineness of 5370 cm(2)/g. For parametric study, BRHA were used as a Portland cement Type 1 replacement at the levels of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50% by weight of binder. The water-to-binder ratios were 0.55, 0.60, and 0.65. From test results, when the percentage replacements of BRHA in cement increased, it was observed that the strength loss and weight loss of mortars containing BRHA under acetic acid attack were higher than those of the mortars against nitric acid attack. It was found that, of the various BHRA mortars, the strength loss and weight loss due to nitric and acetic acid attacks were the lowest in the mortar with 10% BRHA replacement. For 10%, 20% and 30% BRHA replacements, the rate of expansion of the BRHA mortar decreased when compared with the control mortar. For the mortars with other percentage replacements of BRHA, the rate of expansion increased. Furthermore, the effective water-to-binder ratios of control and BRHA mortars were the primary factor for determining the durability of mortar mixed with BRHA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesizing Pt nanoparticles in the presence of methylamine: Impact of acetic acid treatment in the electrocatalytic activity of formic acid oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, M. D. Johan; Aziz, A. Abdul

    2017-05-01

    Surfactant removal from the surface of platinum nanoparticles prepared by solution based method is a prerequisite process to accomplish a high catalytic activity for electrochemical reactions. Here, we report a possible approach of combining acid acetic with thermal treatment for improving catalytic performance of formic acid oxidation. This strategy involves conversion of amine to amide in acetic acid followed by surfactant removal via subsequent thermal treatment at 85 °C. This combined activation technique produced monodisperse nanoparticle with the size of 3 to 5 nm with enhanced formic acid oxidation activity, particularly in perchloric acid solution. Pt treated in 1 h of acetic acid and heat treatment of 9 h shows high electrochemical surface area value (27.6 m2/g) compares to Pt without activation (16.6 m2/g). The treated samples also exhibit high current stability of 0.3 mA/cm2 compares to the as-prepared mA/cm2). Shorter duration of acid wash and longer duration of heating process result in high electrocatalytic activity. This work demonstrates a possible technique in improving catalytic activity of platinum nanoparticles synthesized using methylamine as surfactant.

  12. Oxidation of fatty acid may be enhanced by a combination of pomegranate fruit phytochemicals and acetic acid in HepG2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Ok, Elly; Kim, You Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Sook

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether the combination of phytochemicals and acetic acid in the form of fruit vinegar provides an additive effect on changes of mRNA levels related to fatty acid oxidation in human hepatocyte (HepG2). Among the seven fruit vinegars (Rubuscoreanus, Opuntia, blueberry, cherry, red ginseng, mulberry, and pomegranate) studied, treatment of HepG2 with pomegranate vinegar (PV) at concentrations containing 1 mM acetic acid showed the highest in vitro potentiating effect on the mRNA expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, carnitinepalmitoyl transferase-1, and acyl-CoA oxidase compared to the control group (P punicalagin B, ellagic acid, and two unidentified compounds) responsible for altered gene expression in HepG2 cells treated with PV as compared with the others. Further investigations are warranted to determine if drinking PV beverages may help to maintain a healthy body weight in overweight subjects. PMID:23766874

  13. Oxidation of fatty acid may be enhanced by a combination of pomegranate fruit phytochemicals and acetic acid in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Ok, Elly; Kim, You Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Sook; Kwon, Oran

    2013-06-01

    We investigated whether the combination of phytochemicals and acetic acid in the form of fruit vinegar provides an additive effect on changes of mRNA levels related to fatty acid oxidation in human hepatocyte (HepG2). Among the seven fruit vinegars (Rubuscoreanus, Opuntia, blueberry, cherry, red ginseng, mulberry, and pomegranate) studied, treatment of HepG2 with pomegranate vinegar (PV) at concentrations containing 1 mM acetic acid showed the highest in vitro potentiating effect on the mRNA expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, carnitinepalmitoyl transferase-1, and acyl-CoA oxidase compared to the control group (P acid, and two unidentified compounds) responsible for altered gene expression in HepG2 cells treated with PV as compared with the others. Further investigations are warranted to determine if drinking PV beverages may help to maintain a healthy body weight in overweight subjects.

  14. Effects of acetic acid and its assimilation in fed-batch cultures of recombinant Escherichia coli containing human-like collagen cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenjiao; Fan, Daidi; Shang, Longan; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Zhu, Xiaoli; Yu, Yuanyuan

    2010-03-01

    The primary processing problem in recombinant Escherichia coli fermentation is the production of acetic acid, which can inhibit both cell growth and recombinant protein production. The ability of E. coli to assimilate acetate permits it to solve this problem in a rather creative manner. In this study, the effects of acetic acid assimilation through a glucose starvation period at different cell growth phases were investigated in fed-batch cultures of recombinant E. coli. Experimental results showed that the human-like collagen (HLC) production could be improved by introducing glucose starvation at the end of batch culture and pre-induction phase, while the glucose starvation at the induction phase resulted in a poor HLC productivity. The acetic acid assimilation was observed during all the glucose starvation periods. In addition, a systematic study for evaluating the effects of acetic acid was carried out by adding acetate into culture media at different cell growth phases and then employing a glucose starvation after several hours. It was found that obvious acetate inhibition on cell growth occurred in the batch culture phases while its inhibitory effect on HLC expression occurred only in the post-induction phase. The longer the elevated acetic acid concentration maintained, the stronger the inhibitory effects were. These results are of significance for optimizing and scaling-up fermentation processes. Copyright 2009 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Acetic acid as a decontamination method for sink drains in a nosocomial outbreak of metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stjärne Aspelund, A; Sjöström, K; Olsson Liljequist, B; Mörgelin, M; Melander, E; Påhlman, L I

    2016-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa may colonize water systems via biofilm formation. In hospital environments, contaminated sinks have been associated with nosocomial transmission. Here we describe a prolonged outbreak of a metallo-β-lactamase-producing P. aeruginosa (Pae-MBL) associated with sink drains, and propose a previously unreported decontamination method with acetic acid. To describe a nosocomial outbreak of Pae-MBL associated with hospital sink drains and to evaluate acetic acid as a decontamination method. The outbreak was investigated by searching the microbiology database, microbiological sampling and strain typing. Antibacterial and antibiofilm properties of acetic acid were evaluated in vitro. Pae-MBL-positive sinks were treated with 24% acetic acid once weekly and monitored with repeated cultures. Fourteen patients with positive cultures for Pae-MBL were identified from 2008 to 2014. The patients had been admitted to three wards, where screening discovered Pae-MBL in 12 sink drains located in the patient bathrooms. Typing of clinical and sink drain isolates revealed identical or closely related strains. Pae-MBL biofilm was highly sensitive to acetic acid with a minimum biofilm eradication concentration of 0.75% (range: 0.19-1.5). Weekly treatment of colonized sink drains with acetic acid resulted in negative cultures and terminated transmission. Acetic acid is highly effective against Pae-MBL biofilms, and may be used as a simple method to decontaminate sink drains and to prevent nosocomial transmission. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Naphthalene Acetic Acid and Carbaryl on Fruit Thinning in ‘Kinnow’ Mandarin Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnar Safaei-Nejad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Several fruit trees including some cultivars of citrus tend to develop irregular bearing. Fruit thinning has been used for hundreds of years to manipulate blooming and crop load to improve the alternate bearing process. Frequently, combination sprays of two or more chemical thinners are used in various fruit trees and the thinning responses were additive and more effective than individual compounds. In this study, we investigated the effects of Naphthalene acetic acid and carbaryl alone and in combination in thinning of ‘Kinnow’ mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco trees. Some characteristics such as fruit weight, diameter and volume, total soluble solid (TSS, titrable acidity (TA, TSS/TA, vitamin C and peel thickness were measured prior to harvest for 2010 and 2011 as a complete randomized block design with 13 treatments and four replications. Results showed that the application of NAA and carbaryl alone in June drop stage of fruit growth increased fruit thinning percentage, TSS of fruit juice, fruit weight, volume, diameter and length. These chemical thinners improved fruit size significantly by increasing the leaf/fruit ratio. Combination sprays could not effectively thin fruits than individual chemicals and thus had no effect on fruit size. Fruit characteristics such as TA, ascorbic acid, TSS/TA ratio and peel thickness were not affected by our treatments.  Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso

  17. Isolation of a high malic and low acetic acid-producing sake yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain screened from respiratory inhibitor 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, Shingo; Kiyoshi, Keiji; Oba, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Kenichi; Kadokura, Toshimori; Nakazato, Atsumi; Nakayama, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    We isolated 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-resistant sake yeast strains by UV mutagenesis. Among the DNP-resistant mutants, we focused on strains exhibiting high malic acid and low acetic acid production. The improved organic acid composition is unlikely to be under the control of enzyme activities related to malic and acetic acid synthesis pathways. Instead, low mitochondrial activity was observed in DNP-resistant mutants, indicating that the excess pyruvic acid generated during glycolysis is not metabolized in the mitochondria but converted to malic acid in the cytosol. In addition, the NADH/NAD(+) ratio of the DNP-resistant strains was higher than that of the parental strain K901. These results suggest that the increased NADH/NAD(+) ratio together with the low mitochondrial activity alter the organic acid composition because malic acid synthesis requires NADH, while acetic acid uses NAD(+). Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid analysis of formic acid, acetic acid, and furfural in pretreated wheat straw hydrolysates and ethanol in a bioethanol fermentation using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) offers advantages as a rapid analytical technique for the quantification of three biomass degradation products (acetic acid, formic acid and furfural) within pretreated wheat straw hydrolysates and the analysis of ethanol during fermentation. The data we obtained using APCI-MS correlated significantly with high-performance liquid chromatography analysis whilst offering the analyst minimal sample preparation and faster sample throughput. PMID:21896164

  19. Preparation and Adsorption Property of Imido-acetic Acid Type Chelating Nano-fibers by Electro-spinning Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiali; Lu, Lansi; Zhang, Zhu; Liao, Minhui; He, Huirong; Li, Lingxing; Chen, Jida; Chen, Shijin

    2017-12-01

    A novel nano-fibrous adsorbent from imino-acetic acid (IDA) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) mixture solution was prepared by electro-spinning technique. The nano-fibrous adsorbents with imino-acetic acid functional groups were characterized and demonstrated by fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of the adsorbents to remove heavy metals such as lead (Pb) and copper (Cu) ions from the aqueous solution was studied. The maximum adsorption percentage (SP) of the metal ions can reach 93.08% for Cu (II) and 96.69% for Pb(II), respectively. Furthermore, it shows that the adsorption procedure of the adsorbents is spontaneous and endothermic, and adsorption rate fits well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Most importantly, the reusability of the nanofibers for removal of metal ions was also demonstrated to be used at least five times.

  20. Effect of Cooling Rates on Shape and Crystal Size Distributions of Mefenamic Acid Polymorph in Ethyl Acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudalip, S. K. Abdul; Adam, F.; Parveen, J.; Abu Bakar, M. R.; Amran, N.; Sulaiman, S. Z.; Che Man, R.; Arshad, Z. I. Mohd; Shaarani, S. Md.

    2017-06-01

    This study investigate the effect of cooling rates on mefenamic acid crystallisation in ethyl acetate. The cooling rate was varied from 0.2 to 5 °C/min. The in-line conductivity system and turbidity system were employed to detect the onset of the crystallization process. The crystals produced were analysed using optical microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was found that the crystals produced at different cooling rates were needle-like and exhibit polymorphic form type I. However, the aspect ratio and crystal size distributions were varied with the increased of cooling rate. A high crystals aspect ratio and narrower CSD (100-900 μm) was obtained at cooling rate of 0.5 °C/min. Thus, can be suggested as the most suitable cooling rate for crystallization of mefenamic acid in ethyl acetate.

  1. A study of the effect of salicylic acetic acid on a lymphocyte cell model of cellular activation and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Enrique Aranda; de la Haba-Rodríguez, Juan; Macho, Antonio; Lucena, Concha; Gómez, Auxiliadora; Calzado, Marco; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2006-01-18

    Salicylic acetic acid (SAA) is a drug that has formed part of the treatment of many diseases for many years. Its anti-inflammatory activity is well known, but recently its possible role in the interference in the oncogenesis mechanisms has become apparent. With the aim of supporting these yet preliminary observations, we studied the effect of salicylic acetic acid on a cellular activation and proliferation model. We used lymphocytes obtained from peripheral blood, which were later exposed to cellular activation and proliferation stimulus by the SEB antigen. Lymphocyte activation was determined by direct immunoflourescence through expression of the receptor IL-2 (CD25) alpha chain and proliferation through the incorporation of tritiated thymidine to the DNA in synthesis together with the determination of the cellular cycle by flow cytometry. We found that both processes, activation and proliferation, are inhibited by increasing doses of SAA.

  2. Ecosystem-scale compensation points of formic and acetic acid in the central Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jardine

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic acids, central to terrestrial carbon metabolism and atmospheric photochemistry, are ubiquitous in the troposphere in the gas, particle, and aqueous phases. As the dominant organic acids in the atmosphere, formic acid (FA, HCOOH and acetic acid (AA, CH3COOH control precipitation acidity in remote regions and may represent a critical link between the terrestrial carbon and water cycles by acting as key intermediates in plant carbon and energy metabolism and aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. However, our understanding of the exchange of these acids between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere is limited by a lack of field observations, the existence of biogenic and anthropogenic primary and secondary sources whose relative importance is unclear, and the fact that vegetation can act as both a source and a sink. Here, we first present data obtained from the tropical rainforest mesocosm at Biosphere 2 which isolates primary vegetation sources. Strong light and temperature dependent emissions enriched in FA relative to AA were simultaneously observed from individual branches (FA/AA = 3.0 ± 0.7 and mesocosm ambient air (FA/AA = 1.4 ± 0.3. We also present long-term observations of vertical concentration gradients of FA and AA within and above a primary rainforest canopy in the central Amazon during the 2010 dry and 2011 wet seasons. We observed a seasonal switch from net ecosystem-scale deposition during the dry season to net emissions during the wet season. This switch was associated with reduced ambient concentrations in the wet season (FA < 1.3 nmol mol−1, AA < 2.0 nmol mol−1 relative to the dry season (FA up to 3.3 nmol mol−1, AA up to 6.0 nmol mol−1, and a simultaneous increase in the FA/AA ambient concentration ratios from 0.3–0.8 in the dry season to 1.0–2.1 in the wet season. These observations are consistent with a switch between a biomass burning dominated

  3. Simultaneous extraction and HPLC determination of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid in pea plant by using ionic liquid-modified silica as sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhian, Leila; Bina, Sedigheh

    2016-01-15

    In this study, ionic liquid-modified silica was used as sorbent for simultaneous extraction and preconcentration of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid in pea plants. The effect of some parameters such as pH and ionic strength of sample solution, amount of sorbent, flow rate of aqueous sample solution and eluent solution, concentration of eluent solution, and temperature were studied for each hormone solution. Percent extraction of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid was strongly affected by pH of aqueous sample solution. Ionic strength of aqueous phase and temperature showed no serious effects on extraction efficiency of studied plant hormones. Obtained breakthrough volume was 200mL for each of studied hormones. Preconcentration factor for spectroscopic and chromatographic determination of studied hormones was 100 and 4.0×10(3) respectively. Each solid sorbent phase was reusable for almost 10 times of extraction/stripping procedure. Relative standard deviations of extraction/stripping processes of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid were 2.79% and 3.66% respectively. The calculated limit of detections for IBA and IAA were 9.1×10(-2)mgL(-1) and 1.6×10(-1)mgL(-1) respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Stability of the acetic acid-induced bladder irritation model in alpha chloralose-anesthetized female cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Aura Kullmann

    Full Text Available Time- and vehicle-related variability of bladder and urethral rhabdosphincter (URS activity as well as cardiorespiratory and blood chemistry values were examined in the acetic acid-induced bladder irritation model in α-chloralose-anesthetized female cats. Additionally, bladder and urethra were evaluated histologically using Mason trichrome and toluidine blue staining. Urodynamic, cardiovascular and respiratory parameters were collected during intravesical saline infusion followed by acetic acid (0.5% to irritate the bladder. One hour after starting acetic acid infusion, a protocol consisting of a cystometrogram, continuous infusion-induced rhythmic voiding contractions, and a 5 min "quiet period" (bladder emptied without infusion was precisely repeated every 30 minutes. Administration of vehicle (saline i.v. occurred 15 minutes after starting each of the first 7 cystometrograms and duloxetine (1mg/kg i.v. after the 8(th. Acetic acid infusion into the bladder increased URS-EMG activity, bladder contraction frequency, and decreased contraction amplitude and capacity, compared to saline. Bladder activity and URS activity stabilized within 1 and 2 hours, respectively. Duloxetine administration significantly decreased bladder contraction frequency and increased URS-EMG activity to levels similar to previous reports. Cardiorespiratory parameters and blood gas levels remained consistent throughout the experiment. The epithelium of the bladder and urethra were greatly damaged and edema and infiltration of neutrophils in the lamina propria of urethra were observed. These data provide an ample evaluation of the health of the animals, stability of voiding function and appropriateness of the model for testing drugs designed to evaluate lower urinary tract as well as cardiovascular and respiratory systems function.

  5. An effective O-demethylation of some C19-diterpenoid alkaloids with HBr-glacial acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chun-Lan; Ji, Hong; Xie, Guang-Bo; Chen, Dong-Lin; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2008-01-01

    The aconitine-type alkaloids talatisamine (1), 8,14-diacetyltalatisamine (11), and compound 3, the lycoctonine-type alkaloid deltaline (5), and the 7,17-seco C(19)-diterpenoid alkaloids 7 and 9 were treated with HBr-glacial acetic acid to give useful O-demethylated derivatives 2, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 respectively in good to high yields (49-90%).

  6. Protective Effect of the Methanolic Extract of Malva parviflora L. leaves on Acetic Acid-induced Ulcerative Colitis in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Aisha Dugani; Bushra Dakhil; Soad Treesh

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a general term describing chronic, idiopathic relapsing, inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology. Previous studies have indicated that Malva parviflora leaf extract possesses anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiulcerogenic activity. activity. This work aimed to investigatee the anti-inflammatory effect of the methanolic (MEMP) and aqueous (AEMP) extracts of M. parviflora leaves on acetic acid-induced co...

  7. Study on Esterification Reaction of Starch Isolated From Cassava (Manihot Esculenta) with Acetic Acid and Isopropyl Myristate Using Ultrasonicator

    OpenAIRE

    Amini, Helda Wika; Masruri MASRURI; Ulfa, Siti Mariyah

    2017-01-01

    Cassava starch is a polysaccharide consists of amylose and amylopectin. This research was purposed to modify the starch isolated from local cassava (Manihot esculenta). Modification was undertaken to study the esterification reaction of cassava starch with acetic acid and with isopropyl myristate. Moreover, morphology observation was also conducted both for original starch and its modification yields. It was found that cassava‘s starch was isolated in 16.4% yield as a white powder. Esterifica...

  8. Acetic and Acrylic Acid Molecular Imprinted Model Silicone Hydrogel Materials for Ciprofloxacin-HCl Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Alex; Sheardown, Heather; Jones, Lyndon

    2012-01-01

    Contact lenses, as an alternative drug delivery vehicle for the eye compared to eye drops, are desirable due to potential advantages in dosing regimen, bioavailability and patient tolerance/compliance. The challenge has been to engineer and develop these materials to sustain drug delivery to the eye for a long period of time. In this study, model silicone hydrogel materials were created using a molecular imprinting strategy to deliver the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Acetic and acrylic acid were used as the functional monomers, to interact with the ciprofloxacin template to efficiently create recognition cavities within the final polymerized material. Synthesized materials were loaded with 9.06 mM, 0.10 mM and 0.025 mM solutions of ciprofloxacin, and the release of ciprofloxacin into an artificial tear solution was monitored over time. The materials were shown to release for periods varying from 3 to 14 days, dependent on the loading solution, functional monomer concentration and functional monomer:template ratio, with materials with greater monomer:template ratio (8:1 and 16:1 imprinted) tending to release for longer periods of time. Materials with a lower monomer:template ratio (4:1 imprinted) tended to release comparatively greater amounts of ciprofloxacin into solution, but the release was somewhat shorter. The total amount of drug released from the imprinted materials was sufficient to reach levels relevant to inhibit the growth of common ocular isolates of bacteria. This work is one of the first to demonstrate the feasibility of molecular imprinting in model silicone hydrogel-type materials. PMID:28817033

  9. The Analgesic Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Tanacetum Parthenium in Acetic Acid Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Asgari

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different Tanacetum species have been widely used in traditional medicine as a remedy for the pain and inflammation since ancient times. Because of the few studies conducted on the mechanism of Tanacetum parthenium (TP, this study has been conducted to determine the effects of TP on pain relief and its action mechanism. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 100 male mice (25-35 g were randomly grouped into receivers of distilled water, morphine (0.5 mg/kg, ibuprofen (100 mg/kg, different doses of the extract including 10, 20, 30 and 40 mg/kg of the extract. In order to study the pain relief effect of this herb, two groups were also received naloxon (0.5 mg/kg and naloxon together with the 40 mg/kg of the extract. Animals were injected with 0.9% acetic acid for visceral pain induction. 15 minutes after each injection antinociceptive effects were recorded by counting the number of writhes for 30 minutes. Achieved data were analyzed by SPSS statistical software, Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn post hoc test.Results: 40 mg/kg of the extract of TP caused a significant reduction in the pain response. Group receiving a dose of 40 mg/kg extract had higher antinociceptive effects than the group receiving ibuprofen (p<0.001 but it didn't have any significant difference with the group receiving morphine. Group receiving naloxone had a statistical significant difference with the group receiving 40 mg/kg extract with naloxone and the group receiving 40 mg/kg extract (p<0.001.Conclusion: Antinociceptive activity of TP extract is due to the activation of opioid system, however further studies are needed to be conducted for finding out the suitable position or the role of the antispasmodic effect of TP.

  10. Dietary supplementation with tributyrin alleviates intestinal injury in piglets challenged with intrarectal administration of acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yongqing; Wang, Lei; Yi, Dan; Ding, Binying; Chen, Xing; Wang, Qingjing; Zhu, Huiling; Liu, Yulan; Yin, Yulong; Gong, Joshua; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-05-28

    Tributyrin (TBU) is a good dietary source of butyrate and has beneficial effects on the maintenance of normal intestinal morphology. The present study tested the hypothesis that dietary TBU supplementation could alleviate intestinal injury in the acetic acid (ACA)-induced porcine model of colitis. A total of eighteen piglets (25 d old) were randomly allocated to one of three treatment groups (control, ACA and TBU). The control and ACA groups were fed a basal diet and the TBU group was fed the basal diet supplemented with 0·1 % TBU. On day 15 of the trial, under anaesthesia, a soft catheter was inserted into the rectum of piglets (20-25 cm from the anus), followed by administration of either saline (control group) or ACA (10 ml of 10 % ACA solution for ACA and TBU groups). On day 22 of the trial, after venous blood samples were collected, piglets were killed to obtain mid-ileum and mid-colon mucosae. Compared with the control group, the ACA group exhibited an increase (Pinsulin concentrations and glutathione peroxidase activity, ileal villus height:crypt depth ratios and goblet cell numbers in the colon. These adverse effects of ACA were attenuated by TBU supplementation. Moreover, TBU prevented the ACA-induced increase in caspase-3 levels while enhancing claudin-1 protein and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA expression in the colonic mucosa. Collectively, these results indicate that dietary supplementation with 0·1 % TBU alleviates ACA-induced intestinal injury possibly by inhibiting apoptosis, promoting tight-junction formation and activating EGFR signalling.

  11. Interactions of indole acetic acid with EGF and FSH in the culture of ovine preantral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Evelyn Rabelo; Marcondes Seneda, Marcelo; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo; de Oliveira, João Ademir; Frederico Rodrigues Loureiro Bracarense, Ana Paula; Figueiredo, José Ricardo; Toniolli, Ricardo

    2005-09-15

    The mechanisms that regulate the gradual exit of ovarian follicles from the non-growing, primordial pool are very poorly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of adding indole acetic acid (IAA), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) to the media for in vitro culture of ovine ovarian fragments and determine their effects on growth activation and viability of preantral follicles. The ovarian cortex was divided into small fragments; one fragment was immediately fixed in Bouin (control). The other fragments were cultured for 2 or 6 days in culture plates with: minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS), pyruvate, glutamine, hypoxantine, bovine serum albumine and antibiotics (MEM+); MEM+ plus IAA (40 ng/mL); MEM+ plus EGF (100 ng/mL); MEM+ plus FSH (100 ng/mL); MEM+ plus IAA+EGF; MEM+ plus IAA+FSH; MEM+ plus EGF+FSH; or MEM+ plus IAA+EGF+FSH. After 2 or 6 days of culture in each treatment, the pieces of ovarian cortex were fixed in Bouin for histological examination. Follicles were classified as primordial or developing (primary and secondary) follicles. Compared to the control, in all media tested, the percentages of primordial follicles were reduced (P<0.05) and the percentages of developing follicles were increased (P<0.05) after 2 or 6 days of culture. Furthermore, culture of ovarian cortex for 6 days reduced the percentages of healthy, viable follicles when compared with the control (P<0.05), except for cultures supplemented with IAA+EGF and EGF+FSH. In conclusion, the addition of IAA and EGF or EGF and FSH to the culture media were the most effective treatments to sustain the health and viability of activated ovine primordial follicles during in vitro culture.

  12. The movement of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid in root segments of Pisum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, H; Wilkins, M B

    1975-01-01

    The movement of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) through subapical segments of the primary roots of Pisum seedlings has been investigated using [1-(14)C]2,4-D.Donation of [1-(14)C]2,4-D to the apical or basal ends of Pisum root segments at 25°C in darkness revealed a preferential movement of the compound towards the root apex i.e. an acropetal polarisation. Thus the movement of [1-(14)C]2,4-D into receiver blocks applied to the apical ends of the segments is greater than that into receiver blocks applied to the basal ends of the segments The low level of basipetal transport appears to be associated with a restriction of the movement of [1-(14)C]2,4-D to the half of the segment nearest the donor block.Acropetal transport of 2,4-D is faster than basipetal transport in root segments maintained at 15° and 35° C but is slower than basipetal transport if the segments are maintained at 25°C. Maximum velocitees are 0.71 and 0.83 mm h(-1) for acropetal and basipetal transport respectively.Evidence from experiments carried out (a) in an anaerobic environment in the presence or absence of sodium fluoride and (b) over a range of temperatures from 1-35°C, indicates that the movement of [1-(14)C]2,4-D is dependent on the metabolic activity of the Pisum root segments.Release of (14)CO2 during transport of [1-(14)C]2,4-D is small and supports chromatographic evidence that negligible degradation of the 2,4-D molecules takes place during transport through the root segments.

  13. Visual inspection after acetic acid (VIA is highly heterogeneous in primary cervical screening in Amazonian Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribel Almonte

    Full Text Available Conventional cytology (Pap and visual inspection after the application of acetic acid (VIA are currently used in primary screening in Peru. Studies suggest that the quality of VIA is highly variable. Over 36 000 women were screened with Pap and VIA in the TATI (Tamizaje y Tratamiento Inmediato de Lesiones Cervico-uterinas project conducted in Amazonian Peru. Within a nested study to compare several screening techniques (C-TATI, a total of 5435 women were additionally screened with liquid-based cytology (LBC and high-risk human papillomavirus testing (HR-HPV. We investigate the variation of positivity rates of VIA, Pap, LBC and HR-HPV in C-TATI and of VIA in the full TATI intervention.At the screening visit, midwives collected three cervical samples for Pap, LBC and HC2 before performing VIA. The dispersion factor "D" (D = Pearson chi-square value/degrees-of-freedom was used to measure the variability of tests results. Within C-TATI, the variability of positivity rates of VIA, Pap, LBC and HR-HPV was also graphically assessed with box- and scatter plots by midwife and month of screening. Funnel plots and smoothed scatter plots were used to correlate the variation of VIA by the number of examinations performed by each midwife over the full TATI intervention.Consistently over TATI, VIA results were highly variable, independently of the examiner, the time when the test was performed and the number of tests the examiner performed (D>6, p-values25, p-values0.05 for HR-HPV. No evidence for correlation between the number of VIAs done per midwife and the variability of VIA results was observed.The lack of over-dispersion for HR-HPV detection suggests that the variable VIA results do not reflect true variation in underlying disease, but a lack of consistency in human judgement.

  14. Nanoparticles and Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid on Growth Inhibition of Standard Strain of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Haghighi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: In recent years, the incidence of opportunistic fungi has shown a marked increase. Infection caused by common pathogenic fungi is a significant health problem in immune compromised hosts. The present study evaluated antifungal activity of Titanum dioxide nanoparticles and Ethylene Diamine Tetra-acetic Acid against Candida albicans as self-cleaning agent by standard micro dilution test. Materials & Methods: The present study was conducted at the Medical University of Tarbiyat Modares in 2009. TiO2 nanoparticles were obtained through the hydrolysis of TiCl4 (Titanium tetrachloride. Size and type of these nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-Ray-Diffraction (XRD. Afterwards, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimal Fungicide Concentration (MFC test for TiO2 and EDTA were performed. Results: Concentration of synthesised TiO2 was 7.03 mg/ml and 5.63 5.63 ×1020 particles/ml. Evaluation of morphology and diameter of the TiO2 nanoparticles with SEM showed that nanoparticles were spherical with diameter between 40-65 nm. MIC50 of 2.2, 1.24 and 0.125 µg/ml respectively. MIC90 and MFC of TiO2, EDTA and fluconazole were 3.51, 2.48 , 0.5 µg/ml and 4.06, 3.1 ,1 µg/ml respectively. Conclusion: In the present study, using of synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles with chemical method showed a suitable activity against Candida in comparison with Fluconazole. Thus it might represent a good candidates in elimination of Candida in medical from medical devices. Key Words:

  15. Characterization of growth and exopolysaccharide production of selected acetic acid bacteria in buckwheat sourdoughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ua-Arak, Tharalinee; Jakob, Frank; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-12-19

    Sourdough technology is a promising approach to improve the quality of gluten-free (GF) breads. It offers replacement of currently used structure-forming commercial hydrocolloids by in situ produced exopolysaccharides (EPS). Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) can produce EPS of extremely high molecular weight, which are promising candidates for structure formation in breads. In this work, an alternative aerobic GF cereal fermentation by the levan producing AAB strains Gluconobacter albidus TMW 2.1191, Kozakia baliensis NBRC 16680 and Neoasaia chiangmaiensis NBRC 101099 was established in buckwheat doughs containing molasses as a natural source of sucrose. All three strains reached up to 10(9)CFU/g dough at 48h and produced 16-20g/kg flour of fructans. The efficiency of EPS production was strain dependent and was additionally affected by initial molasses concentrations, inoculum sizes and dough yields, which influenced the respective bacterial growth and levan forming capabilities. G. albidus was the most competitive strain to grow in the buckwheat doughs, accordingly, the levan produced by this strain was further examined for its molecular mass and size determination. The structural analysis of levans from G. albidus in buckwheat doughs at 24 and 48h revealed the changes in particle sizes during fermentation. The ability of AAB strains to grow well and to produce high amounts of levan in situ in buckwheat-molasses doughs has opened a new possibility of using AAB doughs as a natural ingredient for quality improvement of GF baked products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Oleanolic acid acetate inhibits atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Kyeong; Oh, Hyun-Mee; Lee, Soyoung; Park, Jin-Woo; Khang, Dongwoo; Lee, Seung Woong; Lee, Woo Song; Rho, Mun-Chual; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2013-05-15

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) are common allergic and inflammatory skin diseases caused by a combination of eczema, scratching, pruritus, and cutaneous sensitization with allergens. This paper examines whether oleanolic acid acetate (OAA) modulates AD and ACD symptoms by using an existing AD model based on the repeated local exposure of mite extract (Dermatophagoides farinae extract, DFE) and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene to the ears of BALB/c mice. In addition, the paper uses a 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-sensitized local lymph node assay (LLNA) for the ACD model. The oral administration of OAA over a four-week period attenuated AD symptoms in terms of decreased skin lesions, epidermal thickness, the infiltration of immune cells (CD4⁺ cells, eosinophils, and mast cells), and serum IgE, IgG2a, and histamine levels. The gene expression of Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th22 cytokines was reduced by OAA in the lymph node and ear tissue, and the LLNA verified that OAA suppressed ACD. The oral administration of OAA over a three-day period attenuated ACD symptoms in terms of ear thickness, lymphocyte proliferation, and serum IgG2a levels. The gene expression of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines was reduced by OAA in the thymus and ear tissue. Finally, to define the underlying mechanism, this paper uses a TNF-α/IFN-γ-activated human keratinocyte (HaCaT) model. OAA inhibited the expression of cytokines and chemokines through the downregulation of NF-κB and MAPKs in HaCaT cells. Taken together, the results indicate that OAA inhibited AD and ACD symptoms, suggesting that OAA may be effective in treating allergic skin disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Visual inspection after acetic acid (VIA) is highly heterogeneous in primary cervical screening in Amazonian Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonte, Maribel; Ferreccio, Catterina; Luciani, Silvana; Gonzales, Miguel; Delgado, Jose M; Santos, Carlos; Alvarez, Manuel; Cuzick, Jack; Sasieni, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Conventional cytology (Pap) and visual inspection after the application of acetic acid (VIA) are currently used in primary screening in Peru. Studies suggest that the quality of VIA is highly variable. Over 36 000 women were screened with Pap and VIA in the TATI (Tamizaje y Tratamiento Inmediato de Lesiones Cervico-uterinas) project conducted in Amazonian Peru. Within a nested study to compare several screening techniques (C-TATI), a total of 5435 women were additionally screened with liquid-based cytology (LBC) and high-risk human papillomavirus testing (HR-HPV). We investigate the variation of positivity rates of VIA, Pap, LBC and HR-HPV in C-TATI and of VIA in the full TATI intervention. At the screening visit, midwives collected three cervical samples for Pap, LBC and HC2 before performing VIA. The dispersion factor "D" (D = Pearson chi-square value/degrees-of-freedom) was used to measure the variability of tests results. Within C-TATI, the variability of positivity rates of VIA, Pap, LBC and HR-HPV was also graphically assessed with box- and scatter plots by midwife and month of screening. Funnel plots and smoothed scatter plots were used to correlate the variation of VIA by the number of examinations performed by each midwife over the full TATI intervention. Consistently over TATI, VIA results were highly variable, independently of the examiner, the time when the test was performed and the number of tests the examiner performed (D>6, p-values25, p-values0.05 for HR-HPV). No evidence for correlation between the number of VIAs done per midwife and the variability of VIA results was observed. The lack of over-dispersion for HR-HPV detection suggests that the variable VIA results do not reflect true variation in underlying disease, but a lack of consistency in human judgement.

  18. Global effect of indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis on multiple virulence factors of Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shihui; Zhang, Qiu; Guo, Jianhua; Charkowski, Amy O; Glick, Bernard R; Ibekwe, A Mark; Cooksey, Donald A; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2007-02-01

    Production of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is widespread among plant-associated microorganisms. The non-gall-forming phytopathogen Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937 (strain Ech3937) possesses iaaM (ASAP16562) and iaaH (ASAP16563) gene homologues. In this work, the null knockout iaaM mutant strain Ech138 was constructed. The IAA production by Ech138 was reduced in M9 minimal medium supplemented with l-tryptophan. Compared with wild-type Ech3937, Ech138 exhibited reduced ability to produce local maceration, but its multiplication in Saintpaulia ionantha was unaffected. The pectate lyase production of Ech138 was diminished. Compared with wild-type Ech3937, the expression levels of an oligogalacturonate lyase gene, ogl, and three endopectate lyase genes, pelD, pelI, and pelL, were reduced in Ech138 as determined by a green fluorescent protein-based fluorescence-activated cell sorting promoter activity assay. In addition, the transcription of type III secretion system (T3SS) genes, dspE (a putative T3SS effector) and hrpN (T3SS harpin), was found to be diminished in the iaaM mutant Ech138. Compared with Ech3937, reduced expression of hrpL (a T3SS alternative sigma factor) and gacA but increased expression of rsmA in Ech138 was also observed, suggesting that the regulation of T3SS and pectate lyase genes by IAA biosynthesis might be partially due to the posttranscriptional regulation of the Gac-Rsm regulatory pathway.

  19. Surfactant toxicity in a case of (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) acetic acid herbicide intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, I; Lee, J W; Kim, J S; Gil, H W; Song, H Y; Hong, S Y

    2015-08-01

    Self-poisoning with (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) acetic acid (MCPA) is a common reason for presentation to hospitals, especially in some Asian countries. We encountered a case of a 76-year-old woman who experienced unconsciousness, shock and respiratory failure after ingesting 100 mL MCPA herbicide. We determined whether the surfactant in the formulation was the chemical responsible for the toxic symptom in this patient. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell viability and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) cytotoxicity assays were performed on human brain neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. The expressions of 84 genes in 9 categories that are implicated in cellular damage pathways were quantified using an RT(2) Profiler™ PCR array on a human neuronal cell line challenged with polyoxyethylene tridecyl ether (PTE). Pesticide intoxication institute in university hospital. Extracorporeal elimination with intravenous lipid emulsion. Cell viability and gene expression. In the MTT assay, MCPA only minimally decreased cell viability even at concentrations as high as 1 mM. Cells treated with 1-methoxy-2-propanol, dimethylamine and polypropylene glycol exhibited minimal decreases in viability, whilst the viability of cells challenged with PTE decreased dramatically; only 15.5% of cells survived after exposure to 1 µM PTE. Similarly, the results of the LDH cytotoxicity assay showed that MCPA had very low cytotoxicity, whilst cells treated with PTE showed incomparably higher LDH levels (p < 0.0001). PTE up-regulated the expressions of genes implicated in various cell damage pathways, particularly genes involved in the inflammatory pathway. The surfactant PTE was likely the chemical responsible for the toxic symptom in our patient. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Stable chlorine isotope analysis of chlorinated acetic acids using gas chromatography/quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miska, Milena E; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Holmstrand, Henry

    2015-12-30

    The environmental occurrence of chlorinated acetic acids (CAAs) has been extensively studied, but the sources and transport are still not yet fully understood. A promising approach for source apportionment and process studies is the isotopic characterization of target compounds. We present the first on-line stable chlorine isotope analysis of CAAs by use of gas chromatography/quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/qMS). Following approved procedures for concentration analysis, CAAs extracted into MTBE were methylated to GC-amenable methyl esters (mCAAs). These mCAAs were then analyzed by GC/qMS for their stable chlorine isotope composition using a sample/standard-bracketing approach (CAA standards in the range δ(37) Cl -6.3 to -0.2 ‰, Standard Mean Ocean Chloride). Cross-calibration of the herein presented method with off-line reference methods (thermal ionization and continuous-flow GC isotope ratio mass spectrometry; TI-MS and CF-GC/IRMS, respectively) shows good agreement between the methods (regression slope for GC/qMS vs reference method data sets: 0.92 ± 0.29). Sample amounts as small as 10 pmol Cl can herewith be analyzed with a precision of 0.1 to 0.4 ‰. This method should be useful for environmental studies of CAAs at ambient concentrations in precipitations (<0.06 to 100 nmol L(-1) ), surface waters (<0.2 to 5 nmol L(-1) ) and soil (<0.6 to 2000 nmol kg(-1) dry soil) where conventional off-line methods cannot be applied. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Oral Grapeseed Oil and Sesame Oil in Experimental Acetic Acid-Induced Ulcerative Colitis in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseinzadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Ulcerative colitis (UC is a multi-factorial disease with unknown etiology and has many clinical manifestations. Objectives The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of sesame oil (SO and grapeseed oil (GSO on acetic acid-induced UC in rats. Materials and Methods Eighty male rats were divided into eight groups as health control (HC1, received normal saline; HC2, received SO; HC3, received GSO; negative control (NC, UC and normal saline; positive control (PC, UC and mesalamine; SO, UC and SO; GSO, UC and GSO, and SO + GSO. The daily weight changes, serum levels of oxidative stress markers and lipid profile plus colon macroscopic and microscopic histological changes were measured at the end of the seventh day. Results Significant differences were detected between HC1 and PC on the 3rd (P = 0.002, 4th (0.013 and 6th days (0.014 and between HC1 and NC on the 4th day (0.027 in weight of rats. Use of GSO alone or in combination with SO decreased the extent of the changes both in macroscopic and microscopic indices and also at the inflammation level. The most significant decrease in the MDA level and the most obvious increase in the TAC belonged to the GSO group in comparison to the NC group. The lowest cholesterol (51.43 ± 5.62 mg/dL and HDL levels (29.29 ± 6.24 mg/dL were detected in response to SO consumption in comparison to NC group (P = 0.030 and P = 0.257, respectively. Conclusions GSO in combination with SO may be considered as the treatment of choice for UC based on antioxidant and histopathological evaluations.

  2. Acetic and Acrylic Acid Molecular Imprinted Model Silicone Hydrogel Materials for Ciprofloxacin-HCl Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndon Jones

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact lenses, as an alternative drug delivery vehicle for the eye compared to eye drops, are desirable due to potential advantages in dosing regimen, bioavailability and patient tolerance/compliance. The challenge has been to engineer and develop these materials to sustain drug delivery to the eye for a long period of time. In this study, model silicone hydrogel materials were created using a molecular imprinting strategy to deliver the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Acetic and acrylic acid were used as the functional monomers, to interact with the ciprofloxacin template to efficiently create recognition cavities within the final polymerized material. Synthesized materials were loaded with 9.06 mM, 0.10 mM and 0.025 mM solutions of ciprofloxacin, and the release of ciprofloxacin into an artificial tear solution was monitored over time. The materials were shown to release for periods varying from 3 to 14 days, dependent on the loading solution, functional monomer concentration and functional monomer:template ratio, with materials with greater monomer:template ratio (8:1 and 16:1 imprinted tending to release for longer periods of time. Materials with a lower monomer:template ratio (4:1 imprinted tended to release comparatively greater amounts of ciprofloxacin into solution, but the release was somewhat shorter. The total amount of drug released from the imprinted materials was sufficient to reach levels relevant to inhibit the growth of common ocular isolates of bacteria. This work is one of the first to demonstrate the feasibility of molecular imprinting in model silicone hydrogel-type materials.

  3. Effects of furfural and acetic acid on growth and lipid production from glucose and xylose by Rhodotorula glutinis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guochang; French, William Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Alley, Earl; Paraschivescu, Maria [Dave C. Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, P.O. Box 9595, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Microbial conversion of lignocellulosic sugars to triacylglycerols (a biodiesel or renewable diesel feedstock) was investigated using the oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis (ATCC 15125). In the shake flask experiments, R. glutinis was first grown in a nitrogen-rich medium utilizing an artificial acid hydrolysate of lignocellulosic biomass switchgrass as the sole carbon and energy source. Once the culture had reached the stationary phase, the cells were harvested and transferred to a fresh nitrogen-free media containing artificial acid hydrolysate sugars for lipid accumulation. Analysis of the data collected showed that the yeast were able to grow in the medium containing artificial acid hydrolysate sugars as the carbon and energy source. The net specific Growth rate(s) indicated that the presence of acetic acid and furfural in the artificial acid hydrolysate inhibited the growth of R. glutinis on glucose, but not the growth on xylose. The lipid accumulated in the cells, determined by gravimetrical method, increased from initial 4.3%-39.0% of dry cell mass weight. The major fatty acids of the accumulated lipids were palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and {gamma}-linoleic acid. These results indicate that it is feasible to convert the sugars in acid hydrolysate of lignocellulosic biomass to triacylglycerols using R. glutinis. (author)

  4. A gaseous acetic acid treatment to disinfect fenugreek seeds and black pepper inoculated with pathogenic and spoilage bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nei, Daisuke; Enomoto, Katsuyoshi; Nakamura, Nobutaka

    2015-08-01

    Contamination of spices by pathogenic and/or spoilage bacteria can be deleterious to consumer's health and cause deterioration of foods, and inactivation of such bacteria is necessary for the food industry. The present study examined the effect of gaseous acetic acid treatment in reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Enteritidis and Bacillus subtilis populations inoculated on fenugreek seeds and black pepper. Treatment with gaseous acetic acid at 0.3 mmol/L, 0.6 mmol/L and 4.7 mmol/L for 1-3 h significantly reduced the populations of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis on black pepper and fenugreek seeds at 55 °C (p pathogens than the treatment at 0.3 mmol/L. An approximately 5.0 log reduction was obtained after 3 h of treatment with 4.7 mmol/L acetic acid. No significant reductions in the population of B. subtilis spores inoculated on fenugreek seeds and black pepper were obtained after the gas treatments at 0.3 mmol/L or 0.6 mmol/L (p > 0.05). However, the gas treatment at 4.7 mmol/L significantly reduced B. subtilis spores (p < 0.05), and 4.0 log CFU/g and 3.5 log CFU/g reductions on fenugreek seeds and black pepper, respectively, were obtained after 3 h of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrodes Modification Based on Metal-Free Phthalocyanine: Example of Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Acetic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amadou L. Ndiaye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroanalytical properties of tetra-tert-butyl phthalocyanine (PcH2-tBu modified electrodes are studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV. The modified electrodes are obtained by CV deposition techniques on gold (Au and glassy carbon (C screen-printed electrodes (SPEs and used for the electrochemical detection of acetic acid (AA. Based on the CV experiments, the electrodeposition mechanism is detailed. The modified PcH2-tBu electrodes reveal one oxidation and one reduction peak within the potential window of the working electrodes. In the presence of the analyte (acetic acid, the modified electrodes show sensitivity in the range of 10 mM to 400 mM. For the PcH2-tBu modified Au electrode, a limit of detection (LOD of 5.89 mM (based on the +0.06 V peak was obtained while for the PcH2-tBu modified C electrode a LOD of 17.76 mM (based on the +0.07 V peak was achieved. A signal decay of 17%, based on 20 experiments, is obtained when gold is used as working electrode. If carbon is used as working electrode a value of 7% is attained. A signal decay is observed after more than 50 cycles of experiments and is more pronounced when higher concentrations of acetic acid are used. A mechanism of sensing is proposed at the end.

  6. Quinazolinone-based rhodanine-3-acetic acids as potent aldose reductase inhibitors: Synthesis, functional evaluation and molecular modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Sherihan; Metwally, Kamel; El-Shanawani, Abdalla A; Abdel-Aziz, Lobna M; El-Rashedy, Ahmed A; Soliman, Mahmoud E S; Quattrini, Luca; Coviello, Vito; la Motta, Concettina

    2017-10-15

    A series of quinazolinone-based rhodanine-3-acetic acids was synthesized and tested for in vitro aldose reductase inhibitory activity. All the target compounds displayed nanomolar activity against the target enzyme. Compounds 3a, 3b, and 3e exhibited almost 3-fold higher activity as compared to the only marketed reference drug epalrestat. Structure-activity relationship studies indicated that bulky substituents at the 3-phenyl ring of the quinazolinone moiety are generally not tolerated in the active site of the enzyme. Insertion of a methoxy group on the central benzylidene ring was found to have a variable effect on ALR-2 activity depending on the nature of peripheral quinazolinone ring substituents. Removal of the acetic acid moiety led to inactive or weakly active target compounds. Docking and molecular dynamic simulations of the most active rhodanine-3-acetic acid derivatives were also carried out, to provide the basis for further structure-guided design of novel inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of human-selective analogues of the vascular-disrupting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijono, S M; Guo, K; Henare, K; Palmer, B D; Wang, L-C S; Albelda, S M; Ching, L-M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Species selectivity of DMXAA (5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid, Vadimezan) for murine cells over human cells could explain in part the recent disappointing phase III trials clinical results when preclinical studies were so promising. To identify analogues with greater human clinical potential, we compared the activity of xanthenone-4-acetic acid (XAA) analogues in murine or human cellular models. Methods: Analogues with a methyl group systematically substituted at different positions of the XAA backbone were evaluated for cytokine induction in cultured murine or human leukocytes; and for anti-vascular effects on endothelial cells on matrigel. In vivo antitumour activity and cytokine production by stromal or cancer cells was measured in human A375 and HCT116 xenografts. Results: Mono-methyl XAA analogues with substitutions at the seventh and eighth positions were the most active in stimulating human leukocytes to produce IL-6 and IL-8; and for inhibition of tube formation by ECV304 human endothelial-like cells, while 5- and 6-substituted analogues were the most active in murine cell systems. Conclusion: Xanthenone-4-acetic acid analogues exhibit extreme species selectivity. Analogues that are the most active in human systems are inactive in murine models, highlighting the need for the use of appropriate in vivo animal models in selecting clinical candidates for this class of compounds. PMID:23481185

  8. Selective liquid chromatographic separation of yttrium from heavier rare earth elements using acetic acid as a novel eluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kifle, Dejene; Wibetoe, Grethe

    2013-09-13

    One of the major difficulties in the rare earth elements separation is purification of yttrium from heavy rare earth elements. Thus, an HPLC method using acetic acid as novel eluent was explored for selective separation of yttrium form the heavy rare earth elements. When acetic acid is used as a mobile phase yttrium eluted with the lighter lanthanides. This is contrary to its relative position amongst heavier lanthanides when eluents commonly used for separation of rare earth elements were employed. The shift in elution position of yttrium with acetic acid as eluent may reflect a relatively lower stability constant of the yttrium-AcOH complex (in the same order as for the lighter lanthanides) compared to the corresponding AcOH complexes with heavy lanthanides, enabling selective separation of yttrium from the latter. The method was successfully used for selective separation of yttrium in mixed rare earth sample containing about 80% of yttrium and about 20% of heavy rare earth oxides. Thus, the use of AcOH as eluent is an effective approach for separating and determining the trace amounts of heavy rare earth elements in large amounts of yttrium matrix. Separation was performed on C18 column by running appropriate elution programs. The effluent from the column was monitored with diode array detector at absorbance wavelength of 658nm after post column derivatization with Arsenazo III. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Estrogen treatment of acetic acid burns to the vagina, cervix, and perineum: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Jessica A; Kuykendall, Lauren V; Troy, Jared S; Smith, David J

    2014-01-01

    In colposcopic evaluation of the cervix, acetic acid of 3 to 5% is commonly used for identification of preneoplastic and neoplastic cells. Acetic acid is a known caustic substance and has the potential to cause irritation and chemical burns when there is sufficient concentration or duration of contact. The authors present a unique