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Sample records for acetic acid allyl

  1. Tsuji-Trost N-allylation with allylic acetates using cellulose-Pd catalyst

    Allylic amines are synthesized using heterogeneous cellulose-Pd catalyst via N-allylation of amines; aliphatic and benzyl amines undergo facile reaction with substituted and unsubstituted allyl acetates in high yields.

  2. Memory effects in palladium-catalyzed allylic Alkylations of 2-cyclohexen-1-yl acetate

    Svensen, Nina; Fristrup, Peter; Tanner, David Ackland;

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the enantiospecificity of the allylic alkylation of enantioenriched 2-cyclohexen-1-yl acetate with the enolate ion of dimethyl malonate catalyzed by unsymmetrical palladium catalysts. The precatalysts employed were (eta(3)-allyl)PdLCl, where L is a m...

  3. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of allylic halides and acetates with indium organometallics.

    Rodríguez, David; Pérez Sestelo, José; Sarandeses, Luis A

    2004-11-12

    The palladium(0)-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of allylic halides and acetates with indium organometallics is reported. In this synthetic transformation, triorganoindium compounds and tetraorganoindates (aryl, alkenyl, and methyl) react with cinnamyl and geranyl halides and acetates to afford the S(N)2 product regioselectively and in good yield. The reaction proceeds with net inversion of the stereochemical configuration.

  4. Atmospheric oxidation of vinyl and allyl acetate: product distribution and mechanisms of the OH-initiated degradation in the presence and absence of NO(x).

    Blanco, María B; Bejan, Iustinian; Barnes, Ian; Wiesen, Peter; Teruel, Mariano A

    2012-08-21

    The products formed from the reactions of OH radicals with vinyl acetate and allyl acetate have been studied in a 1080 L quartz-glass chamber in the presence and absence of NO(x) using in situ FTIR spectroscopy to monitor the reactant decay and product formation. The yields of the primary products formed in the reaction of OH with vinyl acetate were: formic acetic anhydride (84 ± 11)%; acetic acid (18 ± 3)% and formaldehyde (99 ± 15)% in the presence of NO(x) and formic acetic anhydride (28 ± 5)%; acetic acid (87 ± 12)% and formaldehyde (52 ± 8)% in the absence of NO(x). For the reaction of OH with allyl acetate the yields of the identified products were: acetoxyacetaldehyde (96 ± 15)% and formaldehyde (90 ± 12)% in the presence of NO(x) and acetoxyacetaldehyde (26 ± 4)% and formaldehyde (12 ± 3)% in the absence of NO(x). The present results indicate that in the absence of NO(x) the main fate of the 1,2-hydroxyalkoxy radicals formed after addition of OH to the double bond in the compounds is, in the case of vinyl acetate, an α-ester rearrangement to produce acetic acid and CH(2)(OH)CO(•) radicals and in the case of allyl acetate reaction of the radical with O(2) to form acetic acid 3-hydroxy-2-oxo-propyl ester (CH(3)C(O)OCH(2)C(O)CH(2)OH). In contrast, in the presence of NO(x) the main reaction pathway for the 1,2-hydroxyalkoxy radicals is decomposition. The results are compared with the available literature data and implications for the atmospheric chemistry of vinyl and allyl acetate are assessed.

  5. Decarboxylative-coupling of allyl acetate catalyzed by group 10 organometallics, [(phen)M(CH3)]+.

    Woolley, Matthew; Ariafard, Alireza; Khairallah, George N; Kwan, Kim Hong-Yin; Donnelly, Paul S; White, Jonathan M; Canty, Allan J; Yates, Brian F; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2014-12-19

    Gas-phase carbon-carbon bond forming reactions, catalyzed by group 10 metal acetate cations [(phen)M(O2CCH3)](+) (where M = Ni, Pd or Pt) formed via electrospray ionization of metal acetate complexes [(phen)M(O2CCH3)2], were examined using an ion trap mass spectrometer and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In step 1 of the catalytic cycle, collision induced dissociation (CID) of [(phen)M(O2CCH3)](+) yields the organometallic complex, [(phen)M(CH3)](+), via decarboxylation. [(phen)M(CH3)](+) reacts with allyl acetate via three competing reactions, with reactivity orders (% reaction efficiencies) established via kinetic modeling. In step 2a, allylic alkylation occurs to give 1-butene and reform metal acetate, [(phen)M(O2CCH3)](+), with Ni (36%) > Pd (28%) > Pt (2%). Adduct formation, [(phen)M(C6H11O2)](+), occurs with Pt (24%) > Pd (21%) > Ni(11%). The major losses upon CID on the adduct, [(phen)M(C6H11O2)](+), are 1-butene for M = Ni and Pd and methane for Pt. Loss of methane only occurs for Pt (10%) to give [(phen)Pt(C5H7O2)](+). The sequences of steps 1 and 2a close a catalytic cycle for decarboxylative carbon-carbon bond coupling. DFT calculations suggest that carbon-carbon bond formation occurs via alkene insertion as the initial step for all three metals, without involving higher oxidation states for the metal centers.

  6. Antibiofilm Properties of Acetic Acid

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Østrup;

    2014-01-01

    of the infected implant, tissue, or organ and thereby the biofilm. Acetic acid is known for its antimicrobial effect on bacteria in general, but has never been thoroughly tested for its efficacy against bacterial biofilms. In this article, we describe complete eradication of both Gram-positive and Gram......-negative biofilms using acetic acid both as a liquid and as a dry salt. In addition, we present our clinical experience of acetic acid treatment of chronic wounds. In conclusion, we here present the first comprehensive in vitro and in vivo testing of acetic acid against bacterial biofilms....

  7. ACETIC ACID AND A BUFFER

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising : a) 0.01-20% wt/wt acetic acid and b) a physiologically tolerable buffer capable of maintaining acetic acid at a pH in the range of 2-7; and use of such a composition as an antimicrobial agent.......The present invention relates to a composition comprising : a) 0.01-20% wt/wt acetic acid and b) a physiologically tolerable buffer capable of maintaining acetic acid at a pH in the range of 2-7; and use of such a composition as an antimicrobial agent....

  8. Silver-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Allylation of Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids in Aqueous Solution.

    Cui, Lei; Chen, He; Liu, Chao; Li, Chaozhong

    2016-05-06

    Direct decarboxylative radical allylation of aliphatic carboxylic acids is described. With K2S2O8 as the oxidant and AgNO3 as the catalyst, the reactions of aliphatic carboxylic acids with allyl sulfones in aqueous CH3CN solution gave the corresponding alkenes in satisfactory yields under mild conditions. This site-specific allylation method is applicable to all primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl acids and exhibits wide functional group compatibility.

  9. Analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid in Acetobacter: molecular mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria are used for industrial vinegar production because of their remarkable ability to oxidize ethanol and high resistance to acetic acid. Although several molecular machineries responsible for acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria have been reported, the entire mechanism that confers acetic acid resistance has not been completely understood. One of the promising methods to elucidate the entire mechanism is global analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Recently, two proteins whose production was greatly enhanced by acetic acid in Acetobacter aceti were identified to be aconitase and a putative ABC-transporter, respectively; furthermore, overexpression or disruption of the genes encoding these proteins affected acetic acid resistance in A. aceti, indicating that these proteins are involved in acetic acid resistance. Overexpression of each gene increased acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter, which resulted in an improvement in the productivity of acetic acid fermentation. Taken together, the results of the proteomic analysis and those of previous studies indicate that acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria is conferred by several mechanisms. These findings also provide a clue to breed a strain having high resistance to acetic acid for vinegar fermentation.

  10. 21 CFR 582.1005 - Acetic acid.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acetic acid. 582.1005 Section 582.1005 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1005 Acetic acid. (a) Product. Acetic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  11. Extractive fermentation of acetic acid

    Busche, R.M. [Bio En-Gene-Er Associates, Inc., Wilmington, DE (United States)

    1991-12-31

    In this technoeconomic evaluation of the manufacture of acetic acid by fermentation, the use of the bacterium: Acetobacter suboxydans from the old vinegar process was compared with expected performance of the newer Clostridium thermoaceticum bacterium. Both systems were projected to operate as immobilized cells in a continuous, fluidized bed bioreactor, using solvent extraction to recover the product. Acetobacter metabolizes ethanol aerobically to produce acid at 100 g/L in a low pH medium. This ensures that the product is in the form of a concentrated extractable free acid, rather than as an unextractable salt. Unfortunately, yields from glucose by way of the ethanol fermentation are poor, but near the biological limits of the organisms involved. Conversely, C. thermoaceticum is a thermophilic anaerobe that operates at high fermentation rates on glucose at neutral pH to produce acetate salts directly in substantially quantitative yields. However, it is severely inhibited by product, which restricts concentration to a dilute 20 g/L. An improved Acetobacter system operating with recycled cells at 50 g/L appears capable of producing acid at $0.38/lb, as compared with a $0.29/lb price for synthetic acid. However, this system has only a limited margin for process improvement. The present Clostridium system cannot compete, since the required selling price would be $0.42/lb. However, if the organism could be adapted to tolerate higher product concentrations at acid pH, selling price could be reduced to $0.22/lb, or about 80% of the price of synthetic acid.

  12. Chiral Phosphoric Acid Catalyzed Enantioselective Allylation of Aldehydes with Allyltrichlorosilane%Chiral Phosphoric Acid Catalyzed Enantioselective Allylation of Aldehydes with Allyltrichlorosilane

    程柯; 范甜甜; 孙健

    2011-01-01

    Easily accessible chiral phosphoric acid lb has been applied as efficient organocatalyst for the asymmetric al- lylation of aldehydes with allyltrichlorosilane. In the presence of 20 mol% of lb, the allylation of a broad range of aldehydes proceeded smoothly to give the corresponding homoallylic alcohol with up to 87% ee and 97% yield.

  13. 21 CFR 184.1005 - Acetic acid.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acetic acid. 184.1005 Section 184.1005 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1005 Acetic acid. (a) Acetic acid (C2H4O2, CAS Reg. No. 64-19-7) is known as ethanoic acid. It occurs naturally in plant and animal tissues. It is produced by fermentation...

  14. Acetic acid extraction from aqueous solutions using fatty acids

    IJmker, H.M.; Gramblicka, M.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Ham, van der A.G.J.; Schuur, B.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for production of acetic acid via bio-based routes is cost-effective concentration and purification of the acetic acid from the aqueous solutions, for which liquid–liquid extraction is a possible method. A main challenge in extraction of acetic acid from dilute aqueous solutions is

  15. Direct Oxidation of Ethene to Acetic Acid

    2001-01-01

    Direct oxidation of ethene to acetic acid over Pd-SiW12/SiO2 catalysts prepared by several methods was studied. A better method for reducing palladium composition of the catalysts was found. Acetic acid was obtained with selectivity of 82.7% and once-through space time yield (STY) of 257.4 g/h×L.

  16. Cooperative catalysis by palladium and a chiral phosphoric acid: enantioselective amination of racemic allylic alcohols.

    Banerjee, Debasis; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2014-11-24

    Cooperative catalysis by [Pd(dba)2] and the chiral phosphoric acid BA1 in combination with the phosphoramidite ligand L8 enabled the efficient enantioselective amination of racemic allylic alcohols with a variety of functionalized amines. This catalytic protocol is highly regio- and stereoselective (up to e.r. 96:4) and furnishes valuable chiral amines in almost quantitative yield.

  17. Preservation of acidified cucumbers with a natural preservative combination of fumaric acid and allyl isothiocyanate that target lactic acid bacteria and yeasts.

    Pérez-Díaz, I M; McFeeters, R F

    2010-05-01

    Without the addition of preservative compounds cucumbers acidified with 150 mM acetic acid with pH adjusted to 3.5 typically undergo fermentation by lactic acid bacteria. Fumaric acid (20 mM) inhibited growth of Lactobacillus plantarum and the lactic acid bacteria present on fresh cucumbers, but spoilage then occurred due to growth of fermentative yeasts, which produced ethanol in the cucumbers. Allyl isothiocyanate (2 mM) prevented growth of Zygosaccharomyces globiformis, which has been responsible for commercial pickle spoilage, as well as the yeasts that were present on fresh cucumbers. However, allyl isothiocyanate did not prevent growth of Lactobacillus plantarum. When these compounds were added in combination to acidified cucumbers, the cucumbers were successfully preserved as indicated by the fact that neither yeasts or lactic acid bacteria increased in numbers nor were lactic acid or ethanol produced by microorganisms when cucumbers were stored at 30 degrees C for at least 2 mo. This combination of 2 naturally occurring preservative compounds may serve as an alternative approach to the use of sodium benzoate or sodium metabisulfite for preservation of acidified vegetables without a thermal process.

  18. Remarkable rate acceleration of SmI3-mediated iodination of acetates of Baylis-Hillman adducts in ionic liquid: facile synthesis of (Z)-allyl iodides

    2006-01-01

    Stereoselective transformation of Baylis-Hillman acetates 1 into corresponding (Z)-allyl iodides 2 has been achieved by treatment of 1 with samarium triiodide in THF. Remarkable rate acceleration of samarium triiodide-mediated iodination of 1 was found when ionic liquid 1-n-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrafluroborate ([bmim]BF4) was used as reaction media in stead of THF. This novel approach proceeds readily at 50 ℃ within a few minutes to afford (Z)-allyl iodides 2 in excellent yields. A mechanism involving stereoselective iodination of the acetates of Baylis-Hillman adducts by samarium triiodide is described, in which a six-membered ring transition state played a key role in the stereoselective formation of 2.

  19. Synthesis of allyl esters of fatty acids and their ovicidal effect on Cydia pomonella (L.).

    Escribà, Marc; Barbut, Montserrat; Eras, Jordi; Canela, Ramon; Avilla, Jesús; Balcells, Mercè

    2009-06-10

    Eight allyl esters of fatty acids were synthesized in moderate to high yields with a novel two-step procedure using glycerol as a starting material. The two-step methodology avoids the use of allyl alcohol. The first step consisted of heating at 80 degrees C for 48 h a 2:1:5 mmol mixture of glycerol, a fatty acid, and chlorotrimethylsilane in a solvent-free medium. The crude compound was then dissolved in butanone and heated at 115 degrees C in the presence of NaI. A tandem Finkelstein rearrangement-elimination reaction occurs, producing the corresponding allyl ester. The activity of these esters against Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) eggs was tested in the laboratory by topical application of one 0.1 microL drop. All of the compounds showed a concentration-mortality response and caused 100% mortality at the highest concentration tested (10 mg/mL). There was an inverse relationship between the alkyl chain length and the ovicidal activity of the allyl ester; the LC(50) and the LC(90) of the two compounds that have the longer alkyl chains were significantly higher than those of the rest of the compounds. The ovicidal and IGR activities of this kind of compound appear to be unprecedented.

  20. Acetic acid fermentation of acetobacter pasteurianus: relationship between acetic acid resistance and pellicle polysaccharide formation.

    Kanchanarach, Watchara; Theeragool, Gunjana; Inoue, Taketo; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Adachi, Osao; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2010-01-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus strains IFO3283, SKU1108, and MSU10 were grown under acetic acid fermentation conditions, and their growth behavior was examined together with their capacity for acetic acid resistance and pellicle formation. In the fermentation process, the cells became aggregated and covered by amorphous materials in the late-log and stationary phases, but dispersed again in the second growth phase (due to overoxidation). The morphological change in the cells was accompanied by changes in sugar contents, which might be related to pellicle polysaccharide formation. To determine the relationship between pellicle formation and acetic acid resistance, a pellicle-forming R strain and a non-forming S strain were isolated, and their fermentation ability and acetic acid diffusion activity were compared. The results suggest that pellicle formation is directly related to acetic acid resistance ability, and thus is important to acetic acid fermentation in these A. pasteurianus strains.

  1. Acetic acid production from food wastes using yeast and acetic acid bacteria micro-aerobic fermentation.

    Li, Yang; He, Dongwei; Niu, Dongjie; Zhao, Youcai

    2015-05-01

    In this study, yeast and acetic acid bacteria strains were adopted to enhance the ethanol-type fermentation resulting to a volatile fatty acids yield of 30.22 g/L, and improve acetic acid production to 25.88 g/L, with food wastes as substrate. In contrast, only 12.81 g/L acetic acid can be obtained in the absence of strains. The parameters such as pH, oxidation reduction potential and volatile fatty acids were tested and the microbial diversity of different strains and activity of hydrolytic ferment were investigated to reveal the mechanism. The optimum pH and oxidation reduction potential for the acetic acid production were determined to be at 3.0-3.5 and -500 mV, respectively. Yeast can convert organic matters into ethanol, which is used by acetic acid bacteria to convert the organic wastes into acetic acid. The acetic acid thus obtained from food wastes micro-aerobic fermentation liquid could be extracted by distillation to get high-pure acetic acid.

  2. On the regiochemistry of nucleophilic attack on 2-halo pi-allyl complexes. 4. The effect of silver acetate and nucleophile concentrations in competitive nucleophilic attack with malonate and phenoxide nucleophiles.

    Organ, Michael G; Arvanitis, Elena A; Hynes, Stephen J

    2003-05-16

    2,3-Dibromo-1-propene or its allyl carbonate analogue are ionized under Pd catalysis to generate the 2-bromo Pd-pi-allyl complex (triphenylphosphine ligand), which alkylates with malonate nucleophile at the terminal position. The presence of acetate ion in the reaction mixture results in some malonate attack being redirected to the central carbon. The acetate ion can come from the ionization of 1-acetoxy-2-bromo-2-propene or by the addition of silver acetate to the reaction mixture. The addition of phenoxide ion to the reaction also causes the same regiochemical phenomena, although harder anions such as methoxide exert no such effect.

  3. Hydrogen production by fermentation using acetic acid and lactic acid.

    Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Nishimura, Yasuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Microbial hydrogen production from sho-chu post-distillation slurry solution (slurry solution) containing large amounts of organic acids was investigated. The highest hydrogen producer, Clostridium diolis JPCC H-3, was isolated from natural environment and produced hydrogen at 6.03+/-0.15 ml from 5 ml slurry solution in 30 h. Interestingly, the concentration of acetic acid and lactic acid in the slurry solution decreased during hydrogen production. The substrates for hydrogen production by C. diolis JPCC H-3, in particular organic acids, were investigated in an artificial medium. No hydrogen was produced from acetic acid, propionic acid, succinic acid, or citric acid on their own. Hydrogen and butyric acid were produced from a mixture of acetic acid and lactic acid, showing that C. diolis. JPCC H-3 could produce hydrogen from acetic acid and lactic acid. Furthermore, calculation of the Gibbs free energy strongly suggests that this reaction would proceed. In this paper, we describe for the first time microbial hydrogen production from acetic acid and lactic acid by fermentation.

  4. Substituent Effects on Regioselectivity of the Diels-Alder Reactions: Reactions of 10-Allyl-1,8-dichloroanthracene with 2-Chloroacrylonitrile, 1-Cyanovinyl Acetate and Phenyl Vinyl Sulfone

    Mujeeb A. Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diels-Alder reaction of 10-allyl-1,8-dichloroanthracene (3 with 2-chloroacrylonitrile (4 and 1-cyanovinyl acetate (5 gives exclusively the ortho isomer while its reaction with phenyl vinyl sulfone (10 yields a mixture of two isomeric adducts with priority to ortho isomer. The reactions proceeded under microwave condition in xylene. Configurations of these isomers have been assigned with the help of NMR spectra. The results indicated that the steric effect is dominating toward the isomer regioselectivity in the Diels-Alder reaction of the present compounds.

  5. Overview on mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-02-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are a group of gram-negative or gram-variable bacteria which possess an obligate aerobic property with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, meanwhile transform ethanol and sugar to corresponding aldehydes, ketones and organic acids. Since the first genus Acetobacter of AAB was established in 1898, 16 AAB genera have been recorded so far. As the main producer of a world-wide condiment, vinegar, AAB have evolved an elegant adaptive system that enables them to survive and produce a high concentration of acetic acid. Some researches and reviews focused on mechanisms of acid resistance in enteric bacteria and made the mechanisms thoroughly understood, while a few investigations did in AAB. As the related technologies with proteome, transcriptome and genome were rapidly developed and applied to AAB research, some plausible mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in some AAB strains have been published. In this review, the related mechanisms of AAB against acetic acid with acetic acid assimilation, transportation systems, cell morphology and membrane compositions, adaptation response, and fermentation conditions will be described. Finally, a framework for future research for anti-acid AAB will be provided.

  6. Kinetics of wet oxidation of formic acid and acetic acid

    Shende, R.V.; Mahajani, V.V. [Univ. of Mumbai (India). Dept. of Chemical Technology

    1997-11-01

    Oxidation of lower molecular weight carboxylic acids such as formic, acetic, glyoxalic, and oxalic acids is often the rate-controlling step during wet oxidation (WO) of an aqueous waste stream exhibiting very high chemical oxygen demand (COD). The kinetics of WO of formic acid was studied in the absence and presence of a cupric sulfate as catalyst in the temperature range 150--240 C and oxygen partial pressure range 0.345--1.380 MPa. Wet oxidation of acetic acid was carried out in the presence of cupric sulfate in the temperature range 215--235 C. Homogeneous copper sulfate was found to be a very good catalyst for oxidation of formic acid and acetic acid.

  7. Rotational study of the bimolecule acetic acid-fluoroacetic acid

    Feng, Gang; Gou, Qian; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther

    2017-01-01

    The rotational spectrum of the acetic acid-fluoroacetic acid bimolecule was measured by using a pulsed jet Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. One conformer, in which fluoroacetic acid is in trans form, has been observed. The rotational transitions are split into two component lines, due to the internal rotation of the methyl group of acetic acid. From these splittings, the corresponding V3 barrier has been determined. The dissociation energy of this complex has been estimated to 66 kJ/mol. An increase of the distance between the two monomers upon the OH → OD substitution (Ubbelohde effect) has been observed.

  8. Kinetics of Ethyl Acetate Synthesis Catalyzed by Acidic Resins

    Antunes, Bruno M.; Cardoso, Simao P.; Silva, Carlos M.; Portugal, Ines

    2011-01-01

    A low-cost experiment to carry out the second-order reversible reaction of acetic acid esterification with ethanol to produce ethyl acetate is presented to illustrate concepts of kinetics and reactor modeling. The reaction is performed in a batch reactor, and the acetic acid concentration is measured by acid-base titration versus time. The…

  9. Adaptation and tolerance of bacteria against acetic acid.

    Trček, Janja; Mira, Nuno Pereira; Jarboe, Laura R

    2015-08-01

    Acetic acid is a weak organic acid exerting a toxic effect to most microorganisms at concentrations as low as 0.5 wt%. This toxic effect results mostly from acetic acid dissociation inside microbial cells, causing a decrease of intracellular pH and metabolic disturbance by the anion, among other deleterious effects. These microbial inhibition mechanisms enable acetic acid to be used as a preservative, although its usefulness is limited by the emergence of highly tolerant spoilage strains. Several biotechnological processes are also inhibited by the accumulation of acetic acid in the growth medium including production of bioethanol from lignocellulosics, wine making, and microbe-based production of acetic acid itself. To design better preservation strategies based on acetic acid and to improve the robustness of industrial biotechnological processes limited by this acid's toxicity, it is essential to deepen the understanding of the underlying toxicity mechanisms. In this sense, adaptive responses that improve tolerance to acetic acid have been well studied in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strains highly tolerant to acetic acid, either isolated from natural environments or specifically engineered for this effect, represent a unique reservoir of information that could increase our understanding of acetic acid tolerance and contribute to the design of additional tolerance mechanisms. In this article, the mechanisms underlying the acetic acid tolerance exhibited by several bacterial strains are reviewed, with emphasis on the knowledge gathered in acetic acid bacteria and E. coli. A comparison of how these bacterial adaptive responses to acetic acid stress fit to those described in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also performed. A systematic comparison of the similarities and dissimilarities of the ways by which different microbial systems surpass the deleterious effects of acetic acid toxicity has not been performed so far, although such exchange

  10. Sphingolipids contribute to acetic acid resistance in Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Lindahl, Lina; Genheden, Samuel; Eriksson, Leif A; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Lignocellulosic raw material plays a crucial role in the development of sustainable processes for the production of fuels and chemicals. Weak acids such as acetic acid and formic acid are troublesome inhibitors restricting efficient microbial conversion of the biomass to desired products. To improve our understanding of weak acid inhibition and to identify engineering strategies to reduce acetic acid toxicity, the highly acetic-acid-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii was studied. The impact of acetic acid membrane permeability on acetic acid tolerance in Z. bailii was investigated with particular focus on how the previously demonstrated high sphingolipid content in the plasma membrane influences acetic acid tolerance and membrane permeability. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we concluded that membranes with a high content of sphingolipids are thicker and more dense, increasing the free energy barrier for the permeation of acetic acid through the membrane. Z. bailii cultured with the drug myriocin, known to decrease cellular sphingo-lipid levels, exhibited significant growth inhibition in the presence of acetic acid, while growth in medium without acetic acid was unaffected by the myriocin addition. Furthermore, following an acetic acid pulse, the intracellular pH decreased more in myriocin-treated cells than in control cells. This indicates a higher inflow rate of acetic acid and confirms that the reduction in growth of cells cultured with myriocin in the medium with acetic acid was due to an increase in membrane permeability, thereby demonstrating the importance of a high fraction of sphingolipids in the membrane of Z. bailii to facilitate acetic acid resistance; a property potentially transferable to desired production organisms suffering from weak acid stress.

  11. Interception and characterization of catalyst species in rhodium bis(diazaphospholane)-catalyzed hydroformylation of octene, vinyl acetate, allyl cyanide, and 1-phenyl-1,3-butadiene.

    Nelsen, Eleanor R; Brezny, Anna C; Landis, Clark R

    2015-11-11

    In the absence of H2, reaction of [Rh(H) (CO)2(BDP)] [BDP = bis(diazaphospholane)] with hydroformylation substrates vinyl acetate, allyl cyanide, 1-octene, and trans-1-phenyl-1,3-butadiene at low temperatures and pressures with passive mixing enables detailed NMR spectroscopic characterization of rhodium acyl and, in some cases, alkyl complexes of these substrates. For trans-1-phenyl-1,3-butadiene, the stable alkyl complex is an η(3)-allyl complex. Five-coordinate acyl dicarbonyl complexes appear to be thermodynamically preferred over the four-coordinate acyl monocarbonyls at low temperatures and one atmosphere of CO. Under noncatalytic (i.e., no H2 present) reaction conditions, NMR spectroscopy reveals the kinetic and thermodynamic selectivity of linear and branched acyl dicarbonyl formation. Over the range of substrates investigated, the kinetic regioselectivity observed at low temperatures under noncatalytic conditions roughly predicts the regioselectivity observed for catalytic transformations at higher temperatures and pressures. Thus, kinetic distributions of off-cycle acyl dicarbonyls constitute reasonable models for catalytic selectivity. The Wisconsin high-pressure NMR reactor (WiHP-NMRR) enables single-turnover experiments with active mixing; such experiments constitute a powerful strategy for elucidating the inherent selectivity of acyl formation and acyl hydrogenolysis in hydroformylation reactions.

  12. Resonance energies of the allyl cation and allyl anion: contribution by resonance and inductive effects toward the acidity and hydride abstraction enthalpy of propene.

    Barbour, Josiah B; Karty, Joel M

    2004-02-06

    Density functional theory was employed to calculate the acidities and hydride abstraction enthalpies of propene (3) and propane (4), along with their vinylogues (5 and 6, respectively). The same reaction enthalpies were calculated for the propene vinylogues in which the terminal vinyl group was rotated perpendicular to the rest of the conjugated system (7). The contribution by resonance and inductive effects toward the acidity and hydride abstraction enthalpy of each vinylogue of 5 (n = 1-3) was computed and extrapolated to n = 0 (the parent propene system). The resonance energies of the allyl cation and anion were determined to be about 20-22 and 17-18 kcal/mol, respectively. Comparisons are made to resonance energies calculated using other methodologies.

  13. CATALYTIC ENANTIOSELECTIVE ALLYLIC OXIDATION

    Rispens, Minze T.; Zondervan, Charon; Feringa, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    Several chiral Cu(II)-complexes of cyclic amino acids catalyse the enantioselective allylic oxidation of cyclohexene to cyclohexenyl esters. Cyclohexenyl propionate was obtained in 86% yield with e.e.'s up to 61%.

  14. Low-temperature Electrodeposition of Aluminium from Lewis Acidic 1-Allyl-3-methylimidazolium Chloroaluminate Ionic Liquids

    郑勇; 张锁江; 吕兴梅; 王倩; 左勇; 刘恋

    2012-01-01

    Lewis acidic 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloroaluminate ionic liquids were used as promising electrolytes in the low-temperature electrodeposition of aluminium. Systematic studies on deposition process have been performed by cYClic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The surface morphology and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of deposits prepared at different experimental conditions were also investigated. It was shown that the nucleation density and growth rate of crystallites had a great effect on the structure of aluminium deposited. The crys- tallographic orientation of deposits was mainly influenced by temperature and current density. Smooth, dense and well adherent aluminium coatings were obtained on copper substrates at 10-25 mA.cm^-2 and 313.2-353.2 K. More- over, the current efficiency of deposition and purity of aluminium have been significantly improved, demonstrating that the ionic liquids tested have a prospectful potential in electroplating and electrorefining of aluminium.

  15. Tested Demonstrations: Buffer Capacity of Various Acetic Acid-Sodium Acetate Systems: A Lecture Experiment.

    Donahue, Craig J.; Panek, Mary G.

    1985-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a lecture experiment which uses indicators to illustrate the concept of differing buffer capacities by titrating acetic acid/sodium acetate buffers with 1.0 molar hydrochloric acid and 1.0 molar sodium hydroxide. A table with data used to plot the titration curve is included. (JN)

  16. Genetic dissection of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Geng, Peng; Xiao, Yin; Hu, Yun; Sun, Haiye; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Dissection of the hereditary architecture underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for ethanol fermentation. In this work, a genomics approach was used to dissect hereditary variations in acetic acid tolerance between two phenotypically different strains. A total of 160 segregants derived from these two strains were obtained. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the acetic acid tolerance displayed a normal distribution in these segregants, and suggested that the acetic acid tolerant traits were controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Thus, 220 SSR markers covering the whole genome were used to detect QTLs of acetic acid tolerant traits. As a result, three QTLs were located on chromosomes 9, 12, and 16, respectively, which explained 38.8-65.9 % of the range of phenotypic variation. Furthermore, twelve genes of the candidates fell into the three QTL regions by integrating the QTL analysis with candidates of acetic acid tolerant genes. These results provided a novel avenue to obtain more robust strains.

  17. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  18. Epoxidation of olefins and allylic alcohols with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by heteropoly acids in the presence of cetylpyridinium chloride

    Okabayashi, Takuji; Yamawaki, Kazumasa; Nishihara, Hideki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ura, Toshikazu; Ishii, Yasutaka; Ogawa, Masaya

    1987-11-01

    The epoxidation of olefins and allylic alcohols with aqueous hydrogen peroxide could be achieved in good yield when 12-tungustophosphoric acid(WPA) was used with two phase condition using chloroform as the solvent. From the epoxidation result by 12-molybdophosphoric acid(MPA) and WPA catalysts, epoxidation activity of WPA catalyst was found to be remarkably higher than that of MPA. The rate of epoxidation by heteropoly acids catalyst depended markedly upon the activity of the reaction medium. Epoxidation of allylic alcohols with hydrogen peroxide proceeded under mild conditions, resulting good yield of epoxi-alcohols. Epoxidation of olefins by WPA/cetylpyridium chloride was confirmed to be promoted selectively with cheap and pure hydrogen peroxide, resulting good yield. (3 figs, 2 tabs, 18 refs)

  19. Inhibitory effect of ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production

    Wang, Bo; Wan, Wei; Wang, Jianlong [Laboratory of Environmental Technology, INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2008-12-15

    The inhibitory effect of added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production by mixed cultures was investigated in batch tests using glucose as substrate. The experimental results showed that, at 35 C and initial pH 7.0, during the fermentative hydrogen production, the substrate degradation efficiency, hydrogen production potential, hydrogen yield and hydrogen production rate all trended to decrease with increasing added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid concentration from 0 to 300 mmol/L. The inhibitory effect of added ethanol on fermentative hydrogen production was smaller than those of added acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid. The modified Han-Levenspiel model could describe the inhibitory effects of added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production rate in this study successfully. The modified Logistic model could describe the progress of cumulative hydrogen production. (author)

  20. Methane-to-acetic acid synthesis matriculates at Penn State

    Rotman, D.

    1994-04-20

    Direct conversion of methane to commercially valuable chemicals remains one of the grails of industrial chemistry. But scientists at Pennsylvania State University (University Park) appear to have made a significant step forward, reporting the direct catalytic conversion of methane into acetic acid under relatively mild conditions. Commercial acetic production involves a three-step process, including steam reforming of methane to synthesis gas (syngas) and the carbonylation of methanol of acetic acid.

  1. Isobaric Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium of Binary Systems: p-Xylene + (Acetic Acid, Methyl Acetate and n-Propyl Acetate)and Methyl Acetate + n-Propyl Acetate in an Acetic Acid Dehydration Process

    HUANG Xiuhui; ZHONG Weimin; PENG Changjun; QIAN Feng

    2013-01-01

    The vapor-liquid equilibrium data of four binary systems(acetic acid + p-xylene,methyl acetate + n-propyl acetate,n-propyl acetate + p-xylene and methyl acetate + p-xylene)are measured at 101.33 kPa with Ellis equilibrium still,and then both the NRTL and UNIQUAC models are used in combination with the HOC model for correlating and estimating the vapor-liquid equilibrium of these four binary systems.The estimated binary VLE results using correlated parameters agree well with the measured data except the methyl acetate + p-xylene system which easily causes bumping and liquid rushing out of the sampling tap due to their dramatically different boiling points.The correlation results by NRTL and UNIQUAC models have little difference on the average absolute deviations of temperature and composition of vapor phase,and the results by NRTL model are slightly better than those by UNIQUAC model except for the methyl acetate + n-propyl acetate system,for which the latter gives more accurate correlations.

  2. Biological Function of Acetic Acid-Improvement in Obesity and Glucose Tolerance by Acetic Acid in Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-07-29

    Fatty acids derived from adipose tissue are oxidized by β-oxidation to form ketone bodies as final products under the starving condition. Previously, we found that free acetic acid was formed concomitantly with the production of ketone bodies in isolated rat liver perfusion, and mitochondrial acetyl CoA hydrolase was appeared to be involved with the acetic acid production. It was revealed that acetic acid was formed as a final product of enhanced β-oxidation of fatty acids and utilized as a fuel in extrahepatic tissues under the starving condition. Under the fed condition, β-oxidation is suppressed and acetic acid production is decreased. When acetic acid was taken daily by obesity-linked type 2 diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats under the fed condition, it protected OLETF rats against obesity. Furthermore, acetic acid contributed to protect from the accumulation of lipid in the liver as well as abdominal fat in OLETF rats. Transcripts of lipogenic genes in the liver were decreased, while transcripts of myoglobin and Glut4 genes in abdominal muscles were increased in the acetic acid-administered OLETF rats. It is indicated that exogenously administered acetic acid would have effects on lipid metabolism in both the liver and the skeletal muscles, and have function that works against obesity and obesity-linked type 2 diabetes.

  3. Trehalose accumulation enhances tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to acetic acid.

    Yoshiyama, Yoko; Tanaka, Koichi; Yoshiyama, Kohei; Hibi, Makoto; Ogawa, Jun; Shima, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Trehalose confers protection against various environmental stresses on yeast cells. In this study, trehalase gene deletion mutants that accumulate trehalose at high levels showed significant stress tolerance to acetic acid. The enhancement of trehalose accumulation can thus be considered a target in the breeding of acetic acid-tolerant yeast strains.

  4. Fermentation of lignocellulosic sugars to acetic acid by Moorella thermoacetica.

    Ehsanipour, Mandana; Suko, Azra Vajzovic; Bura, Renata

    2016-06-01

    A systematic study of bioconversion of lignocellulosic sugars to acetic acid by Moorella thermoacetica (strain ATCC 39073) was conducted. Four different water-soluble fractions (hydrolysates) obtained after steam pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass were selected and fermented to acetic acid in batch fermentations. M. thermoacetica can effectively ferment xylose and glucose in hydrolysates from wheat straw, forest residues, switchgrass, and sugarcane straw to acetic acid. Xylose and glucose were completely utilized, with xylose being consumed first. M. thermoacetica consumed up to 62 % of arabinose, 49 % galactose and 66 % of mannose within 72 h of fermentation in the mixture of lignocellulosic sugars. The highest acetic acid yield was obtained from sugarcane straw hydrolysate, with 71 % of theoretical yield based on total sugars (17 g/L acetic acid from 24 g/L total sugars). The lowest acetic acid yield was observed in forest residues hydrolysate, with 39 % of theoretical yield based on total sugars (18 g/L acetic acid from 49 g/L total sugars). Process derived compounds from steam explosion pretreatment, including 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (0.4 g/L), furfural (0.1 g/L) and total phenolics (3 g/L), did not inhibit microbial growth and acetic acid production yield. This research identified two major factors that adversely affected acetic acid yield in all hydrolysates, especially in forest residues: (i) glucose to xylose ratio and (ii) incomplete consumption of arabinose, galactose and mannose. For efficient bioconversion of lignocellulosic sugars to acetic acid, it is imperative to have an appropriate balance of sugars in a hydrolysate. Hence, the choice of lignocellulosic biomass and steam pretreatment design are fundamental steps for the industrial application of this process.

  5. Measurement of the rates of oxindole-3-acetic acid turnover, and indole-3-acetic acid oxidation in Zea mays seedlings

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    Oxindole-3-acetic acid is the principal catabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Zea mays seedlings. In this paper measurements of the turnover of oxindole-3-acetic acid are presented and used to calculate the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation. [3H]Oxindole-3-acetic acid was applied to the endosperm of Zea mays seedlings and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h before the start of the experiment. The subsequent decrease in its specific activity was used to calculate the turnover rate. The average half-life of oxindole-3-acetic acid in the shoots was found to be 30 h while that in the kernels had an average half-life of 35h. Using previously published values of the pool sizes of oxindole-3-acetic acid in shoots and kernels from seedlings of the same age and variety, and grown under the same conditions, the rate of indole-3-acetic acid oxidation was calculated to be 1.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the shoots and 7.1 pmol plant-1 h-1 in the kernels.

  6. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid and oxindole-3-acetic acid to 2,3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-1H indole-3-acetic acid-7'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside in Zea mays seedlings

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Radiolabeled oxindole-3-acetic acid was metabolized by roots, shoots, and caryopses of dark grown Zea mays seedlings to 2,3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-1H indole-3-acetic acid-7'-O-beta-D-glycopyranoside with the simpler name of 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside. This compound was also formed from labeled indole-3-acetic acid supplied to intact seedlings and root segments. The glucoside of 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid was also isolated as an endogenous compound in the caryopses and shoots of 4-day-old seedlings. It accumulates to a level of 4.8 nanomoles per plant in the kernel, more than 10 times the amount of oxindole-3-acetic acid. In the shoot it is present at levels comparable to that of oxindole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetic acid (62 picomoles per shoot). We conclude that 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside is a natural metabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Z. mays seedlings. From the data presented in this paper and in previous work, we propose the following route as the principal catabolic pathway for indole-3-acetic acid in Zea seedlings: Indole-3-acetic acid --> Oxindole-3-acetic acid --> 7-Hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid --> 7-Hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside.

  7. Solubilities of Isophthalic Acid in Acetic Acid + Water Solvent Mixtures

    CHENG Youwei; HUO Lei; LI Xi

    2013-01-01

    The solubilities of isophthalic acid (1) in binary acetic acid (2) + water (3) solvent mixtures were determined in a pressurized vessel.The temperature range was from 373.2 to 473.2K and the range of the mole fraction of acetic acid in the solvent mixtures was from x2 =0 to 1.A new method to measure the solubility was developed,which solved the problem of sampling at high temperature.The experimental results indicated that within the temperature range studied,the solubilities of isophthalic acid in all mixtures showed an increasing trend with increasing temperature.The experimental solubilities were correlated by the Buchowski equation,and the calculate results showed good agreement with the experimental solubilities.Furthermore,the mixed solvent systems were found to exhibit a maximum solubility effect on the solubility,which may be attributed to the intermolecular association between the solute and the solvent mixture.The maximum solubility effect was well modeled by the modified Wilson equation.

  8. Probiotic and Acetic Acid Effect on Broiler Chickens Performance

    Martin Král; Mária Angelovičová; Ľubica Mrázová; Jana Tkáčová; Martin Kliment

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics and organic acids are widely accepted as an alternative to in-feed antibiotics in poultry production. We carried the experiment with broiler chickens. In experiment we research effect of probiotic and acetic acids on the performance of broiler chickens. A total number of 200 one day old broiler chickens were distributed to two dietary groups. Broiler chickens in control group were fed with standard feed mixture and experimental group 1% vinegar contained 5% acetic acid used in drin...

  9. Simultaneous production of acetic and gluconic acids by a thermotolerant Acetobacter strain during acetous fermentation in a bioreactor

    Majid MOUNIR; Shafiei, Rasoul; Zarmehrkhorshid, Raziyeh; Hamouda, Allal; Ismaili Alaoui, Mustapha; Thonart, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The activity of bacterial strains significantly influences the quality and the taste of vinegar. Previous studies of acetic acid bacteria have primarily focused on the ability of bacterial strains to produce high amounts of acetic acid. However, few studies have examined the production of gluconic acid during acetous fermentation at high temperatures. The production of vinegar at high temperatures by two strains of acetic acid bacteria isolated from apple and cactus fruits, namely AF01 and CV...

  10. Acetic acid assisted cobalt methanesulfonate catalysed chemoselective diacetylation of aldehydes

    Min Wang; Zhi Guo Song; Hong Gong; Heng Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Cobalt methanesulfonate in combination with acetic acid catalysed the chemoselective diacetylation of aldehyde with acetic anhydride at room temperature under solvent free conditions. After reaction, cobalt methanesulfonate can be easily recovered and mused many times. The reaction was mild and efficient with good to high yields.

  11. Disproportionation Kinetics of Hypoiodous Acid As Catalyzed and Suppressed by Acetic Acid-Acetate Buffer.

    Urbansky, Edward T.; Cooper, Brian T.; Margerum, Dale W.

    1997-03-26

    The kinetics of the disproportionation of hypoiodous acid to give iodine and iodate ion (5HOI right harpoon over left harpoon 2I(2) + IO(3)(-) + H(+) + 2H(2)O) are investigated in aqueous acetic acid-sodium acetate buffer. The rate of iodine formation is followed photometrically at -log [H(+)] = 3.50, 4.00, 4.50, and 5.00, &mgr; = 0.50 M (NaClO(4)), and 25.0 degrees C. Both catalytic and inhibitory buffer effects are observed. The first process is proposed to be a disproportionation of iodine(I) to give HOIO and I(-); the iodide then reacts with HOI to give I(2). The reactive species (acetato-O)iodine(I), CH(3)CO(2)I, is postulated to increase the rate by assisting in the formation of I(2)O, a steady-state species that hydrolyzes to give HOIO and I(2). Inhibition is postulated to result from the formation of the stable ion bis(acetato-O)iodate(I), (CH(3)CO(2))(2)I(-), as buffer concentration is increased. This species is observed spectrophotometrically with a UV absorption shoulder (lambda = 266 nm; epsilon = 530 M(-)(1) cm(-)(1)). The second process is proposed to be a disproportionation of HOIO to give IO(3)(-) and I(2). Above 1 M total buffer, the reaction becomes reversible with less than 90% I(2) formation. Rate and equilibrium constants are resolved and reported for the proposed mechanism.

  12. Correlation of vapor - liquid equilibrium data for acetic acid - isopropanol - water - isopropyl acetate mixtures

    B. A. Mandagarán

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A correlation procedure for the prediction of vapor - liquid equilibrium of acetic acid - isopropanol - water - isopropyl acetate mixtures has been developed. It is based on the NRTL model for predicting liquid activity coefficients, and on the Hayden-O'Connell second virial coefficients for predicting the vapor phase of systems containing association components. When compared with experimental data the correlation shows a good agreement for binary and ternary data. The correlation also shows good prediction for reactive quaternary data.

  13. A NOVEL COPOLYMER-BOUND CIS- DICARBONYLRHODIUM COMPLEX FOR THE CARBONYLATION OF METHANOL TO ACETIC ACID AND ACETIC ANHYDRIDE

    YUAN Guoqing; CHEN Yuying; CHEN Rongyao

    1989-01-01

    A series of porous microspheres of linear and ethylene diacrylate (M ') cross-linked copolymers of 2 - vinylpyridine (V) and methyl acrylate (M) reacted with tetracarbonyldichlorodirhodium to form a series of cis-dicarbonylrhodium chelate complex (MVRh and MVM 'Rh). They are thermally stable yet very reactive in the carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid, and of methanol - acetic acid mixture to acetic acid and acetic anhydride with a selectivity of 100% under relatively mild and anhydrous conditions.

  14. Genetic organization of Acetobacter for acetic acid fermentation.

    Beppu, T

    Plasmid vectors for the acetic acid-producing strains of Acetobacter and Gluconobacter were constructed from their cryptic plasmids and the efficient transformation conditions were established. The systems allowed to reveal the genetic background of the strains used in the acetic acid fermentation. Genes encoding indispensable components in the acetic acid fermentation, such as alcohol dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and terminal oxidase, were cloned and characterized. Spontaneous mutations at high frequencies in the acetic acid bacteria to cause the deficiency in ethanol oxidation were analyzed. A new insertion sequence element, IS1380, was identified as a major factor of the genetic instability, which causes insertional inactivation of the gene encoding cytochrome c, an essential component of the functional alcohol dehydrogenase complex. Several genes including the citrate synthase gene of A. aceti were identified to confer acetic acid resistance, and the histidinolphosphate aminotransferase gene was cloned as a multicopy suppressor of an ethanol sensitive mutant. Improvement of the acetic acid productivity of an A. aceti strain was achieved through amplification of the aldehyde dehydrogenase gene with a multicopy vector. In addition, spheroplast fusion of the Acetobacter strains was developed and applied to improve their properties.

  15. Proteome analysis of Acetobacter pasteurianus during acetic acid fermentation.

    Andrés-Barrao, Cristina; Saad, Maged M; Chappuis, Marie-Louise; Boffa, Mauro; Perret, Xavier; Ortega Pérez, Ruben; Barja, François

    2012-03-16

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are Gram-negative, strictly aerobic microorganisms that show a unique resistance to ethanol (EtOH) and acetic acid (AcH). Members of the Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter genera are capable of transforming EtOH into AcH via the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes and are used for the industrial production of vinegar. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain how AAB resist high concentrations of AcH, such as the assimilation of acetate through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, the export of acetate by various transporters and modifications of the outer membrane. However, except for a few acetate-specific proteins, little is known about the global proteome responses to AcH. In this study, we used 2D-DIGE to compare the proteome of Acetobacter pasteurianus LMG 1262(T) when growing in glucose or ethanol and in the presence of acetic acid. Interesting protein spots were selected using the ANOVA p-value of 0.05 as threshold and 1.5-fold as the minimal level of differential expression, and a total of 53 proteins were successfully identified. Additionally, the size of AAB was reduced by approximately 30% in length as a consequence of the acidity. A modification in the membrane polysaccharides was also revealed by PATAg specific staining.

  16. Acetic acid removal from corn stover hydrolysate using ethyl acetate and the impact on Saccharomyces cerevisiae bioethanol fermentation.

    Aghazadeh, Mahdieh; Ladisch, Michael R; Engelberth, Abigail S

    2016-07-08

    Acetic acid is introduced into cellulose conversion processes as a consequence of composition of lignocellulose feedstocks, causing significant inhibition of adapted, genetically modified and wild-type S. cerevisiae in bioethanol fermentation. While adaptation or modification of yeast may reduce inhibition, the most effective approach is to remove the acetic acid prior to fermentation. This work addresses liquid-liquid extraction of acetic acid from biomass hydrolysate through a pathway that mitigates acetic acid inhibition while avoiding the negative effects of the extractant, which itself may exhibit inhibition. Candidate solvents were selected using simulation results from Aspen Plus™, based on their ability to extract acetic acid which was confirmed by experimentation. All solvents showed varying degrees of toxicity toward yeast, but the relative volatility of ethyl acetate enabled its use as simple vacuum evaporation could reduce small concentrations of aqueous ethyl acetate to minimally inhibitory levels. The toxicity threshold of ethyl acetate, in the presence of acetic acid, was found to be 10 g L(-1) . The fermentation was enhanced by extracting 90% of the acetic acid using ethyl acetate, followed by vacuum evaporation to remove 88% removal of residual ethyl acetate along with 10% of the broth. NRRL Y-1546 yeast was used to demonstrate a 13% increase in concentration, 14% in ethanol specific production rate, and 11% ethanol yield. This study demonstrated that extraction of acetic acid with ethyl acetate followed by evaporative removal of ethyl acetate from the raffinate phase has potential to significantly enhance ethanol fermentation in a corn stover bioethanol facility. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:929-937, 2016.

  17. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Phenyl Acetic Acid and Dl-Mandelic Acid by Permanganate in Acid Medium

    B.Syama Sundar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinetics of oxidation of phenyl acetic acid and DL- Mandelic acid by potassium permanganate in aqueous acetic acid and perchloric acid mixture reveals that the kinetic orders are first order in oxidant, first order in H+ and zero order in substrate for phenyl acetic acid. DL-Mandelic acid exhibits first order in oxidant and zero order in substrate. The results are rationalised by a mechanism involving intermediate formation of mandelic acid in case of Phenyl acetic acid and ester formation with Mn (VII in case of DL-Mandelic acid. The following order of reactivity is observed: DL-Mandelic acid > Phenyl acetic acid. The high reactivity of DL-Mandelic acid over phenyl acetic acid may be due to different mechanisms operating with the two substrates and benzaldehyde is the final product in both the cases.

  18. Synthetic Studies on Tricyclic Diterpenoids: Direct Allylic Amination Reaction of Isopimaric Acid Derivatives.

    Timoshenko, Mariya A; Kharitonov, Yurii V; Shakirov, Makhmut M; Bagryanskaya, Irina Yu; Shults, Elvira E

    2016-02-01

    A selective synthesis of 7- or 14-nitrogen containing tricyclic diterpenoids was completed according to a strategy in which the key step was the catalyzed direct allylic amination of methyl 14α-hydroxy-15,16-dihydroisopimarate with a wide variety of nitrogenated nucleophiles. It was revealed that the selectivity of the reaction depends on the nature of nucleophile. The catalyzed reaction of the mentioned diterpenoid allylic alcohol with 3-nitroaniline, 3-(trifluoromethyl)aniline, and 4-(trifluoromethyl)aniline yield the subsequent 7α-, 7β- and 14αnitrogen-containing diterpenoids. The reaction with 2-nitroaniline, 4-nitro-2-chloroaniline, 4-methoxy-2-nitroaniline, phenylsulfamide, or tert-butyl carbamate proceeds with the formation of 7α-nitrogen-substituted diterpenoids as the main products.

  19. Crystal structure of febuxostat–acetic acid (1/1

    Min Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound [systematic name: 2-(3-cyano-4-isobutyloxyphenyl-4-methylthiazole-5-carboxylic acid–acetic acid (1/1], C16H16N2O3S·CH3COOH, contains a febuxostat molecule and an acetic acid molecule. In the febuxostat molecule, the thiazole ring is nearly coplanar with the benzene ring [dihedral angle = 3.24 (2°]. In the crystal, the febuxostat and acetic acid molecules are linked by O—H...O, O—H...N hydrogen bonds and weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming supramolecular chains propagating along the b-axis direction. π–π stacking is observed between nearly parallel thiazole and benzene rings of adjacent molecules; the centroid-to-centroid distances are 3.8064 (17 and 3.9296 (17 Å.

  20. Catalysis of the Carbonylation of Alcohols to Carboxylic Acids Including Acetic Acid Synthesis from Methanol.

    Forster, Denis; DeKleva, Thomas W.

    1986-01-01

    Monsanto's highly successful synthesis of acetic acid from methanol and carbon monoxide illustrates use of new starting materials to replace pretroleum-derived ethylene. Outlines the fundamental aspects of the acetic acid process and suggests ways of extending the synthesis to higher carboxylic acids. (JN)

  1. Catalytic Esterification of Methyl Alcohol with Acetic Acid

    2001-01-01

    Esterification of methyl alcohol with acetic acid catalysed by Amberlyst-15 (cation-exchange resin) was carried out in a batch reactor in the temperature ranging between 318-338 K, at atmospheric pressure. The reaction rate increased with increase in catalyst concentration and reaction temperature, but decreased with an increase in water concentration. Stirrer speed had virtually no effect on the rate under the experimental conditions. The rate data were correlated with a second-order kinetic model based on homogeneous reaction. The apparent activation energy was found to be 22.9kJ.mo1-1 for the formation of methyl acetate. The methyl acetate production was carried out aa batch and continuous in a packed bed restive distillation column with high purity methyl acetate produced.

  2. Improvement of productivity in acetic acid fermentation with Clostridium thermoaceticum

    Shah, M.M.; Cheryan, M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Production of acetic acid by a mutant strain of Clostridium thermoaceticum was compared in three types of membrane cell-recycle bioreactors. A modified fed-batch bioreactor (where the product is partially removed at the end of fermentation, but the cells are retained), and a two-stage CSTR (with product being removed continuously and the cells being recycled from the second to the first stage) resulted in better performance than a one-stage CSTR or batch fermenter. The difference in performance was greater at higher acetate concentration. With 45 g/L of glucose in the feed, productivity was 0.75-1.12 g/L-h and acetic acid concentrations were 34-38 g/L. This is more than double the batch system. The nutrient supply rate also appeared to have a strong influence on productivity of the microorganism.

  3. Intramolecular carbon isotope distribution of acetic acid in vinegar.

    Hattori, Ryota; Yamada, Keita; Kikuchi, Makiko; Hirano, Satoshi; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2011-09-14

    Compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of acetic acid is useful for origin discrimination and quality control of vinegar. Intramolecular carbon isotope distributions, which are each carbon isotope ratios of the methyl and carboxyl carbons in the acetic acid molecule, may be required to obtain more detailed information to discriminate such origin. In this study, improved gas chromatography-pyrolysis-gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-Py-GC-C-IRMS) combined with headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) was used to measure the intramolecular carbon isotope distributions of acetic acid in 14 Japanese vinegars. The results demonstrated that the methyl carbons of acetic acid molecules in vinegars produced from plants were mostly isotopically depleted in (13)C relative to the carboxyl carbon. Moreover, isotopic differences (δ(13)C(carboxyl) - δ(13)C(methyl)) had a wide range from -0.3 to 18.2‰, and these values differed among botanical origins, C3, C4, and CAM plants.

  4. First Acetic Acid Survey with CARMA in Hot Molecular Cores

    Shiao, Y -S Jerry; Remijan, Anthony J; Snyder, Lewis E; Friedel, Douglas N

    2010-01-01

    Acetic acid (CH$_3$COOH) has been detected mainly in hot molecular cores where the distribution between oxygen (O) and nitrogen (N) containing molecular species is co-spatial within the telescope beam. Previous work has presumed that similar cores with co-spatial O and N species may be an indicator for detecting acetic acid. However, does this presumption hold as higher spatial resolution observations become available of large O and N-containing molecules? As the number of detected acetic acid sources is still low, more observations are needed to support this postulate. In this paper, we report the first acetic acid survey conducted with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) at 3 mm wavelengths towards G19.61-0.23, G29.96-0.02 and IRAS 16293-2422. We have successfully detected CH$_3$COOH via two transitions toward G19.61-0.23 and tentatively confirmed the detection toward IRAS 16293-2422 A. The determined column density of CH$_3$COOH is 2.0(1.0)$\\times 10^{16}$ cm$^{-2}$ and the...

  5. Fries Rearrangement of Phenyl Acetate over Solid Acid Catalyst

    2002-01-01

    A silica-supported zirconium based solid acid (ZS) has been used as catalyst for the Fries rearrangement of phenyl acetate (PA). The catalyst showed a higher PA conversion activity and a much higher selectivity for o-hydroxyacetophenone (o-HAP) than for strongly acidic zeolite catalysts. The supported catalyst was characterized by XRD, IR, XPS, pyridine-TPD and the surface area measurements. The catalytic properties were influenced significantly by pretreatment temperature.

  6. Fries Rearrangement of Phenyl Acetate over Solid Acid Catalyst

    CanXiongGUO; YanLIU; 等

    2002-01-01

    A silica-supported zirconium based solid acid (ZS) has been used as catalyst for the Fries rearrangement of phenyl acetate (PA). The catalyst showed a higher PA conversion activity and a much higher selectivity for o-hydroxyacetophenone (o-HAP) than for strongly acidic zeolite catalysts. The supported catalyst was characterized by XRD,IR,XPS,pyridine-TPD and the surface area measurements. The catalytic properties were influenced significantly by pretreatment temperature.

  7. Catabolism of indole-3-acetic acid and 4- and 5-chloroindole-3-acetic acid in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    Jensen, J B; Egsgaard, H; Van Onckelen, H

    1995-01-01

    chromatography and conventional mass spectrometry (MS) methods, including MS-mass spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, and high-performance liquid chromatography-MS. The identified products indicate a novel metabolic pathway in which IAA is metabolized via dioxindole-3-acetic acid, dioxindole, isatin, and 2......-aminophenyl glyoxylic acid (isatinic acid) to anthranilic acid, which is further metabolized. Degradation of 4-Cl-IAA apparently stops at the 4-Cl-dioxindole step in contrast to 5-Cl-IAA which is metabolized to 5-Cl-anthranilic acid. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Oct...

  8. Occurrence and metabolism of 7-hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid in Zea mays

    Lewer, P.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    7-Hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid was identified as a catabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in germinating kernels of Zea mays and found to be present in amounts of ca 3.1 nmol/kernel. 7-Hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid was shown to be a biosynthetic intermediate between 2-indolinone-3-acetic acid and 7-hydroxy-2-indolinone-3-acetic acid-7'-O-glucoside in both kernels and roots of Zea mays. Further metabolism of 7-hydroxy-2-[5-3H]-indolinone-3-acetic acid-7'-O-glucoside occurred to yield tritiated water plus, as yet, uncharacterized products.

  9. Simultaneous production of acetic and gluconic acids by a thermotolerant Acetobacter strain during acetous fermentation in a bioreactor.

    Mounir, Majid; Shafiei, Rasoul; Zarmehrkhorshid, Raziyeh; Hamouda, Allal; Ismaili Alaoui, Mustapha; Thonart, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The activity of bacterial strains significantly influences the quality and the taste of vinegar. Previous studies of acetic acid bacteria have primarily focused on the ability of bacterial strains to produce high amounts of acetic acid. However, few studies have examined the production of gluconic acid during acetous fermentation at high temperatures. The production of vinegar at high temperatures by two strains of acetic acid bacteria isolated from apple and cactus fruits, namely AF01 and CV01, respectively, was evaluated in this study. The simultaneous production of gluconic and acetic acids was also examined in this study. Biochemical and molecular identification based on a 16s rDNA sequence analysis confirmed that these strains can be classified as Acetobacter pasteurianus. To assess the ability of the isolated strains to grow and produce acetic acid and gluconic acid at high temperatures, a semi-continuous fermentation was performed in a 20-L bioreactor. The two strains abundantly grew at a high temperature (41°C). At the end of the fermentation, the AF01 and CV01 strains yielded acetic acid concentrations of 7.64% (w/v) and 10.08% (w/v), respectively. Interestingly, CV01 was able to simultaneously produce acetic and gluconic acids during acetic fermentation, whereas AF01 mainly produced acetic acid. In addition, CV01 was less sensitive to ethanol depletion during semi-continuous fermentation. Finally, the enzymatic study showed that the two strains exhibited high ADH and ALDH enzyme activity at 38°C compared with the mesophilic reference strain LMG 1632, which was significantly susceptible to thermal inactivation.

  10. A continuous acetic acid system for polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of gliadins and other prolamines.

    Clements, R L

    1988-02-01

    A polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system buffered by acetic acid alone was developed for electrophoresis of prolamines. When applied to gliadin electrophoresis, the acetic acid system produces more bands than does a conventional aluminum lactate-lactic acid system (using 12% acrylamide gels). The acetic acid system is relatively simple, requiring a single buffer component that is universally available in high purity.

  11. Liquid-Liquid equilibria of the water-acetic acid-butyl acetate system

    E. Ince

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental liquid-liquid equilibria of the water-acetic acid-butyl acetate system were studied at temperatures of 298.15± 0.20, 303.15± 0.20 and 308.15± 0.20 K. Complete phase diagrams were obtained by determining solubility and tie-line data. The reliability of the experimental tie-line data was ascertained by using the Othmer and Tobias correlation. The UNIFAC group contribution method was used to predict the observed ternary liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE data. It was found that UNIFAC group interaction parameters used for LLE did not provide a good prediction. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated for the immiscibility region.

  12. [Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles: Progress report

    Zinder, S.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to provide an understanding of thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms capable of breaking down acetic acid, the precursor of two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors. Recent results include: (1) the isolation of Methanothrix strain CALLS-1, which grows much more rapidly than mesophilic strains; (2) the demonstration that thermophilic cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix show minimum thresholds for acetate utilization of 1--2.5 mM and 10--20{mu}m respectively, in agreement with ecological data indicating that Methanothrix is favored by low acetate concentration; (3) the demonstration of high levels of thermostable acetyl-coA synthetase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strains CALS-1; (4) the demonstration of methanogenesis from acetate and ATP in cell free extracts of strain CALS-1. (5) the demonstration that methanogenesis from acetate required 2 ATP/methane, and, in contrast to Methanosarcina, was independent of hydrogen and other electron donors; (6) the finding that entropy effects must be considered when predicting the level of hydrogen in thermophilic syntrophic cultures. (7) the isolation and characterization of the Desulfotomaculum thermoacetoxidans. Current research is centered on factors which allow thermophilic Methanothrix to compete with Methanosarcina.

  13. (Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles: Progress report)

    Zinder, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide an understanding of thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms capable of breaking down acetic acid, the precursor of two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors. Recent results include: (1) the isolation of Methanothrix strain CALLS-1, which grows much more rapidly than mesophilic strains; (2) the demonstration that thermophilic cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix show minimum thresholds for acetate utilization of 1--2.5 mM and 10--20{mu}m respectively, in agreement with ecological data indicating that Methanothrix is favored by low acetate concentration; (3) the demonstration of high levels of thermostable acetyl-coA synthetase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strains CALS-1; (4) the demonstration of methanogenesis from acetate and ATP in cell free extracts of strain CALS-1. (5) the demonstration that methanogenesis from acetate required 2 ATP/methane, and, in contrast to Methanosarcina, was independent of hydrogen and other electron donors; (6) the finding that entropy effects must be considered when predicting the level of hydrogen in thermophilic syntrophic cultures. (7) the isolation and characterization of the Desulfotomaculum thermoacetoxidans. Current research is centered on factors which allow thermophilic Methanothrix to compete with Methanosarcina.

  14. Evaporation kinetics of acetic acid-water solutions

    Duffey, K.; Wong, N.; Saykally, R.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The transport of water molecules across vapor-liquid interfaces in the atmosphere is a crucial step in the formation and evolution of cloud droplets. Despite decades of study, the effects of solutes on the mechanism and rate of evaporation and condensation remain poorly characterized. The present work aims to determine the effect of atmospherically-relevant solutes on the evaporation rate of water. In our experiments, we create a train of micron-sized droplets and measure their temperature via Raman thermometry as they undergo evaporation without condensation. Analysis of the cooling rate yields the evaporation coefficient (γ). Previous work has shown that inorganic salts have little effect on γ, with surface-adsorbing anions causing a slight reduction in the coefficient from that measured for pure water. Organic acids are ubiquitous in aqueous aerosol and have been shown to disrupt the surface structure of water. Here we describe measurements of the evaporation rate of acetic acid solutions, showing that acetic acid reduces γ to a larger extent than inorganic ions, and that γ decreases with increasing acetic acid concentration.

  15. Preservation of acidified cucumbers with a natural preservative combination of fumaric acid and allyl isothiocyanate that target lactic acid bacteria and yeasts

    Without the addition of preservative compounds cucumbers acidified with 150 mM acetic acid with pH adjusted to 3.5 typically undergo fermentation by lactic acid bacteria. Fumaric acid (20 mM) inhibited growth of Lactobacillus plantarum and the lactic acid bacteria present on fresh cucumbers, but sp...

  16. Acetic Acid Production by an Electrodialysis Fermentation Method with a Computerized Control System

    Nomura, Yoshiyuki; Iwahara, Masayoshi; Hongo, Motoyoshi

    1988-01-01

    In acetic acid fermentation by Acetobacter aceti, the acetic acid produced inhibits the production of acetic acid by this microorganism. To alleviate this inhibitory effect, we developed an electrodialysis fermentation method such that acetic acid is continuously removed from the broth. The fermentation unit has a computerized system for the control of the pH and the concentration of ethanol in the fermentation broth. The electrodialysis fermentation system resulted in improved cell growth an...

  17. Acetic acid enhances endurance capacity of exercise-trained mice by increasing skeletal muscle oxidative properties.

    Pan, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Jun Ho; Kim, Hyung Min; Lee, Eui Seop; Shin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Seongpil; Shin, Minkyeong; Kim, Sang Ho; Lee, Jin Hyup; Kim, Young Jun

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid has been shown to promote glycogen replenishment in skeletal muscle during exercise training. In this study, we investigated the effects of acetic acid on endurance capacity and muscle oxidative metabolism in the exercise training using in vivo mice model. In exercised mice, acetic acid induced a significant increase in endurance capacity accompanying a reduction in visceral adipose depots. Serum levels of non-esterified fatty acid and urea nitrogen were significantly lower in acetic acid-fed mice in the exercised mice. Importantly, in the mice, acetic acid significantly increased the muscle expression of key enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation and glycolytic-to-oxidative fiber-type transformation. Taken together, these findings suggest that acetic acid improves endurance exercise capacity by promoting muscle oxidative properties, in part through the AMPK-mediated fatty acid oxidation and provide an important basis for the application of acetic acid as a major component of novel ergogenic aids.

  18. Microwave Irradiation Promoted Synthesis of Aryloxy Acetic Acids

    LIN Min; ZHOU Jin-mei; XIA Hai-ping; YANG Rui-feng; LIN Chen

    2004-01-01

    Several aryloxy acetic acids were synthesized under microwave irradiation. The factors, which affect the reaction, were investigated and optimized. It was revealed that the best yields(92.7%-97.4%) were obtained when the molar ratio of the reactants was n(ArOH) : n(NaOH): n(ClCH2CO2H) =1: 2.5: 1.2 with microwave irradiation power of 640 W for 65-85 s.

  19. Kinetics of xylose dehydration into furfural in acetic acid

    Zhou Chen; Weijiang Zhang; Jiao Xu; Pingli Li

    2015-01-01

    In this paper kinetics of xylose dehydration into furfural using acetic acid as catalyst was studied comprehensively and systematical y. The reaction order of both furfural and xylose dehydration was determined and the reaction activation energy was obtalned by nonlinear regression. The effect of acetic acid concentration was also investi-gated. Reaction rate constants were galned. Reaction rate constant of xylose dehydration is k1 ¼ 4:189 . 1010 ½A.0:1676 exp −108:6.1000RT . ., reaction rate constant of furfural degradation is k2 ¼ 1:271 . 104½A.0:1375 exp−63:413.1000RT . and reaction rate constant of condensation reaction is k3 ¼ 3:4051 . 1010½A.0:1676 exp−104:99.1000RT .. Based on this, the kinetics equation of xylose dehydration into furfural in acetic acid was set up according to theory of Dunlop and Furfural generating rate equation is dd½F.t ¼ k1½X.0e−k1t−k2½F.−k3½X.0e−k1t½F.. © 2015 The Chemical Industry and Engineering Society of China, and Chemical Industry Press. Al rights reserved.

  20. 40 CFR 180.1258 - Acetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acetic acid; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1258 Acetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An... acetic acid when used as a preservative on post-harvest agricultural commodities intended for animal...

  1. 75 FR 52269 - Acetic Acid Ethenyl Ester, Polymer With Oxirane; Tolerance Exemption

    2010-08-25

    ...-2010-0429; FRL-8841-2] Acetic Acid Ethenyl Ester, Polymer With Oxirane; Tolerance Exemption AGENCY... from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of acetic acid ethenyl ester, polymer with oxirane... permissible level for residues of acetic acid ethenyl ester, polymer with oxirane on food or feed...

  2. 21 CFR 175.350 - Vinyl acetate/crotonic acid copolymer.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Vinyl acetate/crotonic acid copolymer. 175.350... COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.350 Vinyl acetate/crotonic acid copolymer. A copolymer of vinyl acetate and crotonic acid may be safely used as a coating or as a component of a...

  3. Aerobic oxidation of aqueous ethanol using heterogeneous gold catalysts: Efficient routes to acetic acid and ethyl acetate

    Jørgensen, Betina; Christiansen, Sofie Egholm; Thomsen, M.L.D.

    2007-01-01

    The aerobic oxidation of aqueous ethanol to produce acetic acid and ethyl acetate was studied using heterogeneous gold catalysts. Comparing the performance of Au/MgAl2O4 and Au/TiO2 showed that these two catalysts exhibited similar performance in the reaction. By proper selection of the reaction...

  4. Acetic Acid bacteria: physiology and carbon sources oxidation.

    Mamlouk, Dhouha; Gullo, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are obligately aerobic bacteria within the family Acetobacteraceae, widespread in sugary, acidic and alcoholic niches. They are known for their ability to partially oxidise a variety of carbohydrates and to release the corresponding metabolites (aldehydes, ketones and organic acids) into the media. Since a long time they are used to perform specific oxidation reactions through processes called "oxidative fermentations", especially in vinegar production. In the last decades physiology of AAB have been widely studied because of their role in food production, where they act as beneficial or spoiling organisms, and in biotechnological industry, where their oxidation machinery is exploited to produce a number of compounds such as l-ascorbic acid, dihydroxyacetone, gluconic acid and cellulose. The present review aims to provide an overview of AAB physiology focusing carbon sources oxidation and main products of their metabolism.

  5. Change in the plasmid copy number in acetic acid bacteria in response to growth phase and acetic acid concentration.

    Akasaka, Naoki; Astuti, Wiwik; Ishii, Yuri; Hidese, Ryota; Sakoda, Hisao; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2015-06-01

    Plasmids pGE1 (2.5 kb), pGE2 (7.2 kb), and pGE3 (5.5 kb) were isolated from Gluconacetobacter europaeus KGMA0119, and sequence analyses revealed they harbored 3, 8, and 4 genes, respectively. Plasmid copy numbers (PCNs) were determined by real-time quantitative PCR at different stages of bacterial growth. When KGMA0119 was cultured in medium containing 0.4% ethanol and 0.5% acetic acid, PCN of pGE1 increased from 7 copies/genome in the logarithmic phase to a maximum of 12 copies/genome at the beginning of the stationary phase, before decreasing to 4 copies/genome in the late stationary phase. PCNs for pGE2 and pGE3 were maintained at 1-3 copies/genome during all phases of growth. Under a higher concentration of ethanol (3.2%) the PCN for pGE1 was slightly lower in all the growth stages, and those of pGE2 and pGE3 were unchanged. In the presence of 1.0% acetic acid, PCNs were higher for pGE1 (10 copies/genome) and pGE3 (6 copies/genome) during the logarithmic phase. Numbers for pGE2 did not change, indicating that pGE1 and pGE3 increase their PCNs in response to acetic acid. Plasmids pBE2 and pBE3 were constructed by ligating linearized pGE2 and pGE3 into pBR322. Both plasmids were replicable in Escherichia coli, Acetobacter pasteurianus and G. europaeus, highlighting their suitability as vectors for acetic acid bacteria.

  6. The effect of oral sodium acetate administration on plasma acetate concentration and acid-base state in horses

    Lindinger Michael I

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Sodium acetate (NaAcetate has received some attention as an alkalinizing agent and possible alternative energy source for the horse, however the effects of oral administration remain largely unknown. The present study used the physicochemical approach to characterize the changes in acid-base status occurring after oral NaAcetate/acetic acid (NAA administration in horses. Methods Jugular venous blood was sampled from 9 exercise-conditioned horses on 2 separate occasions, at rest and for 24 h following a competition exercise test (CET designed to simulate the speed and endurance test of 3-day event. Immediately after the CETs horses were allowed water ad libitum and either: 1 8 L of a hypertonic NaAcetate/acetic acid solution via nasogastric tube followed by a typical hay/grain meal (NAA trial; or 2 a hay/grain meal alone (Control trial. Results Oral NAA resulted in a profound plasma alkalosis marked by decreased plasma [H+] and increased plasma [TCO2] and [HCO3-] compared to Control. The primary contributor to the plasma alkalosis was an increased [SID], as a result of increased plasma [Na+] and decreased plasma [Cl-]. An increased [Atot], due to increased [PP] and a sustained increase in plasma [acetate], contributed a minor acidifying effect. Conclusion It is concluded that oral NaAcetate could be used as both an alkalinizing agent and an alternative energy source in the horse.

  7. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance.

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a wild-type control strain, suggesting that Acs2-mediated consumption of acetic acid during fermentation contributes to acetic acid detoxification.

  8. KINETIC STUDY OF CARBONYLATION OF METHANOL TO ACETIC ACID AND ACETIC ANHYDRIDE OVER A NOVEL COPOLYMER- BOUND CIS- DICARBONYLRHODIUM COMPLEX

    CHEN Yuying; YUAN Guoqing; CHEN Rongyao

    1989-01-01

    The kinetic study of carbonylation of methanol-acetic acid mixture to acetic acid and acetic anhydride over a cis-dicarbonylrhodium complex (MVM' Rh)coordinated with the ethylene diacrylate (M')crosslinked copolymer of methyl acrylate (M) and 2 - vinylpyridine (V) shows that the rate of reaction is zero order with respect to both reactants methanol and carbon monoxide, but first order in the concentrations of promoter methyl iodide and rhodium in the complex . Polar solvents can accelerate the reaction .Activation parameters were calculated from the experimental results, being comparable to that of the homogeneous system . A mechanism similar to that of soluble rhodium catalyst was proposed .

  9. Acetic acid bacteria spoilage of bottled red wine -- a review.

    Bartowsky, Eveline J; Henschke, Paul A

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are ubiquitous organisms that are well adapted to sugar and ethanol rich environments. This family of Gram-positive bacteria are well known for their ability to produce acetic acid, the main constituent in vinegar. The oxidation of ethanol through acetaldehyde to acetic acid is well understood and characterised. AAB form part of the complex natural microbial flora of grapes and wine, however their presence is less desirable than the lactic acid bacteria and yeast. Even though AAB were described by Pasteur in the 1850s, wine associated AAB are still difficult to cultivate on artificial laboratory media and until more recently, their taxonomy has not been well characterised. Wine is at most risk of spoilage during production and the presence of these strictly aerobic bacteria in grape must and during wine maturation can be controlled by eliminating, or at least limiting oxygen, an essential growth factor. However, a new risk, spoilage of wine by AAB after packaging, has only recently been reported. As wine is not always sterile filtered prior to bottling, especially red wine, it often has a small resident bacterial population (bacteria. This spoilage is evident as a distinct deposit of bacterial biofilm in the neck of the bottle at the interface of the wine and the headspace of air, and is accompanied with vinegar, sherry, bruised apple, nutty, and solvent like off-aromas, depending on the degree of spoilage. This review focuses on the wine associated AAB species, the aroma and flavour changes in wine due to AAB metabolism, discusses the importance of oxygen ingress into the bottle and presents a hypothesis for the mechanism of spoilage of bottled red wine.

  10. A formal [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement route to quaternary alpha-vinyl amino acids: use of allylic N-PMP trifluoroacetimidates.

    Berkowitz, David B; Wu, Bin; Li, Huijie

    2006-03-01

    Pd(II)-mediated rearrangement of allylic N-PMP (p-methoxyphenyl) trifluoroacetimidates provides the first formal sigmatropic route to quaternary, alpha-vinylic amino acids, potential suicide substrates for PLP enzymes. The amino acid side chains enter via transition-metal-mediated C-C bond constructions, including (i) Cu(I)-mediated conjugate addition (Ala); (ii) Pd(0)/AsPh3-mediated Stille coupling (allyl-Gly, Phe, DOPA, m-Tyr); and (iii) Pd(0)/Pt-Bu3-mediated Negishi coupling (Leu). In the synthesis of the DOPA decarboxylase inactivator, alpha-vinyl-m-tyrosine, the new N-PMP trifluoroacetimidate rearranges much more efficiently than the corresponding trichloroacetimidate.

  11. Formation of biologically relevant carboxylic acids during the gamma irradiation of acetic acid

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Irradiation of aqueous solutions of acetic acid with gamma rays produced several carboxylic acids in small yield. Their identification was based on the technique of gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. Some of these acids are Krebs Cycle intermediates. Their simultaneous formation in experiments simulating the primitive conditions on the earth suggests that metabolic pathways may have had their origin in prebiotic chemical processes.

  12. Effect of acetic acid on citric acid fermentation in an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process.

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2014-09-01

    An integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process was proposed to solve the problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid fermentation process. Extraction wastewater was treated by anaerobic digestion and then recycled for the next batch of citric acid fermentation to eliminate wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption. Acetic acid as an intermediate product of methane fermentation was present in anaerobic digestion effluent. In this study, the effect of acetic acid on citric acid fermentation was investigated and results showed that lower concentration of acetic acid could promote Aspergillus niger growth and citric acid production. 5-Cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) staining was used to quantify the activity of A. niger cells, and the results suggested that when acetic acid concentration was above 8 mM at initial pH 4.5, the morphology of A. niger became uneven and the part of the cells' activity was significantly reduced, thereby resulting in deceasing of citric acid production. Effects of acetic acid on citric acid fermentation, as influenced by initial pH and cell number in inocula, were also examined. The result indicated that inhibition by acetic acid increased as initial pH declined and was rarely influenced by cell number in inocula.

  13. Kinetics of esterification of methanol and acetic acid with mineral homogeneous acid catalyst

    Mallaiah Mekala; Venkat Reddy Goli

    2015-01-01

    In this work, esterification of acetic acid and methanol to synthesize methyl acetate in a batch stirred reactor is studied in the temperature range of 305.15–333.15 K. Sulfuric acid is used as the homogeneous catalyst with concentrations ranging from 0.0633 mol·L−1 to 0.3268 mol·L−1. The feed molar ratio of acetic acid to methanol is varied from 1:1 to 1:4. The influences of temperature, catalyst concentration and reactant concentration on the reaction rate are investigated. A second order kinetic rate equation is used to correlate the experimental data. The forward and backward reaction rate constants and activation energies are determined from the Arrhenius plot. The developed kinetic model is compared with the models in literature. The developed kinetic equation is useful for the simulation of reactive distillation column for the synthesis of methyl acetate.

  14. EFFECT OF GOSSYPOL ACETIC ACID ON CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS AND ANEUPLOIDIES IN OOCYTES AND ZYGOTES OF MICE

    WANGRen-Li; ZHANGZhong-Shu

    1989-01-01

    It was reported that gossypol acetic acid could effectively inhibit th~ implantation in ratA. This finding indicated that gossypol acet/c acid might also be used as a female contraceptive. The Present study further investigated the genetic effect of gossypol acetic

  15. Conversion regular patterns of acetic acid,propionic acid and butyric acid in UASB reactor

    LIU Min; REN Nan-qi; CHEN Ying; ZHU Wen-fang; DING Jie

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of continuous tests and batch tests, conversion regular patterns of acetate, propionate and butyrate in activated sludge at different heights of the UASB reactor were conducted. Results indicated that the conversion capacity of the microbial is decided by the substrate characteristic when sole VFA is used as the only substrate. But when mixed substrates are used,the conversion regulations would have changed accordingly. Relationships of different substrates vary according to their locations. In the whole reactor, propionate's conversion is restrained by acetate and butyrate of high concentration. On the top and at the bottom of the reactor, conversion of acetate, but butyrate, is restrained by propionate. And in the midst, acetate's conversion is accelerated by propionate while that of butyrate is restrained. It is proved, based on the analysis of specific conversion rate, that the space distribution of the microbe is the main factor that affects substrates' conversion. The ethanol-type fermentation of the acidogenic-phase is the optimal acid-type fermentation for the two-phase anaerobic process.

  16. Liquid phase ozonation of cyclohexanol using acetic acid as solvent

    Encinar, J.M.; Beltran, F.J. (Departamento de Ingeneria Quimica y Energetica. Facultad de Ciencias. Badajoz (Spain)); Frades, J.M. (Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica. E.U.P. Almaden (Spain))

    1994-01-01

    The liquid phase oxidation of cyclohexanol in an acetic acid medium using a mixture of oxygen and ozone has been studied in a laboratory semi batch reactor. The influence of temperature, ozone partial pressure, initial concentration of cyclohexanol on its conversion and yield and distribution of products has been observed. Under the experimental conditions investigated formation of peroxydic compounds and mono basic acids was not relevant; the major products obtained were cyclohexanone and adipic and glutaric acids although analytical chromatograms revealed the presence of other products unidentified. Formation of these products is qualitatively explained by means of a chain-radical mechanism. Finally, it is proposed an empirical kinetic equation which relates the variables mentioned above with the reaction rates. This equation reproduces the experimental results with deviations less than 10%. (Author) 21 refs.

  17. Probiotic and Acetic Acid Effect on Broiler Chickens Performance

    Martin Král

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics and organic acids are widely accepted as an alternative to in-feed antibiotics in poultry production. We carried the experiment with broiler chickens. In experiment we research effect of probiotic and acetic acids on the performance of broiler chickens. A total number of 200 one day old broiler chickens were distributed to two dietary groups. Broiler chickens in control group were fed with standard feed mixture and experimental group 1% vinegar contained 5% acetic acid used in drinking water and probiotics mixed with feed mixture. Body weight, FCR and GIT pH were recorded. The performance showed no statistically significant increase in body weight (P>0.05 in the weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4 of age. The body weight of broiler chickens was significant increase (P0.05 in weeks 5, and 6 of age. In different segments of the GIT was not statistically significant (P>0.05 difference of pH between the control and experimental groups.

  18. Olfactory attraction of Drosophila suzukii by symbiotic acetic acid bacteria

    Mazzetto, Fabio

    2016-03-24

    Some species of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play relevant roles in the metabolism and physiology of Drosophila spp. and in some cases convey benefits to their hosts. The pest Drosophila suzukii harbors a set of AAB similar to those of other Drosophila species. Here, we investigate the potential to exploit the ability of AAB to produce volatile substances that attract female D. suzukii. Using a two-way olfactometer bioassay, we investigate the preference of D. suzukii for strains of AAB, and using solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography–mass spectrometry we specifically characterize their volatile profiles to identify attractive and non-attractive components produced by strains from the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, and Komagataeibacter. Flies had a preference for one strain of Komagataeibacter and two strains of Gluconobacter. Analyses of the volatile profiles from the preferred Gluconobacter isolates found that acetic acid is distinctively emitted even after 2 days of bacterial growth, confirming the relevance of this volatile in the profile of this isolate for attracting flies. Analyses of the volatile profile from the preferred Komagataeibacter isolate showed that a different volatile in its profile could be responsible for attracting D. suzukii. Moreover, variation in the concentration of butyric acid derivatives found in some strains may influence the preference of D. suzukii. Our results indicate that Gluconobacter and Komagataeibacter strains isolated from D. suzukii have the potential to provide substances that could be exploited to develop sustainable mass-trapping-based control approaches. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  19. Free acetate production by rat hepatocytes during peroxisomal fatty acid and dicarboxylic acid oxidation.

    Leighton, F; Bergseth, S; Rørtveit, T; Christiansen, E N; Bremer, J

    1989-06-25

    The fate of the acetyl-CoA units released during peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation was studied in isolated hepatocytes from normal and peroxisome-proliferated rats. Ketogenesis and hydrogen peroxide generation were employed as indicators of mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation, respectively. Butyric and hexanoic acids were employed as mitochondrial substrates, 1, omega-dicarboxylic acids as predominantly peroxisomal substrates, and lauric acid as a substrate for both mitochondria and peroxisomes. Ketogenesis from dicarboxylic acids was either absent or very low in normal and peroxisome-proliferated hepatocytes, but free acetate release was detected at rates that could account for all the acetyl-CoA produced in peroxisomes by dicarboxylic and also by monocarboxylic acids. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation also led to free acetate generation but at low rates relative to ketogenesis. The origin of the acetate released was confirmed employing [1-14C]dodecanedioic acid. Thus, the activity of peroxisomes might contribute significantly to the free acetate generation known to occur during fatty acid oxidation in rats and possibly also in humans.

  20. Quantitative Structure of an Acetate Dye Molecule Analogue at the TiO2–Acetic Acid Interface

    2016-01-01

    The positions of atoms in and around acetate molecules at the rutile TiO2(110) interface with 0.1 M acetic acid have been determined with a precision of ±0.05 Å. Acetate is used as a surrogate for the carboxylate groups typically employed to anchor monocarboxylate dye molecules to TiO2 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). Structural analysis reveals small domains of ordered (2 × 1) acetate molecules, with substrate atoms closer to their bulk terminated positions compared to the clean UHV surface. Acetate is found in a bidentate bridge position, binding through both oxygen atoms to two 5-fold titanium atoms such that the molecular plane is along the [001] azimuth. Density functional theory calculations provide adsorption geometries in excellent agreement with experiment. The availability of these structural data will improve the accuracy of charge transport models for DSSC. PMID:27110318

  1. Quantitative Structure of an Acetate Dye Molecule Analogue at the TiO2-Acetic Acid Interface.

    Hussain, Hadeel; Torrelles, Xavier; Cabailh, Gregory; Rajput, Parasmani; Lindsay, Robert; Bikondoa, Oier; Tillotson, Marcus; Grau-Crespo, Ricardo; Zegenhagen, Jörg; Thornton, Geoff

    2016-04-14

    The positions of atoms in and around acetate molecules at the rutile TiO2(110) interface with 0.1 M acetic acid have been determined with a precision of ±0.05 Å. Acetate is used as a surrogate for the carboxylate groups typically employed to anchor monocarboxylate dye molecules to TiO2 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). Structural analysis reveals small domains of ordered (2 × 1) acetate molecules, with substrate atoms closer to their bulk terminated positions compared to the clean UHV surface. Acetate is found in a bidentate bridge position, binding through both oxygen atoms to two 5-fold titanium atoms such that the molecular plane is along the [001] azimuth. Density functional theory calculations provide adsorption geometries in excellent agreement with experiment. The availability of these structural data will improve the accuracy of charge transport models for DSSC.

  2. Structure formation of soil dispersions in the presence of polyelectrolytes on the basis of allyl alcohol and acryl acid derivatives

    Amankait Asanov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Some changes of structural composition and surface properties of soil dispersions in the presence of polyelectrolytes, based on allyl alcohol and acryl acid derivatives, have been studied. The results show, that the changes in the structure of soil dispersions composition are connected with the added concentration and pH value, that depend on mole ratio and nature of functional groups, as well as on the nature of counterions and concomitant electrolytes, changing with the conditions of polymer analogous conversion and neutralization reaction. Experimental data show, that the change in the conformational state and the length of the macromolecule has a significant impact on the structure-forming effect and the amount of polyelectrolyte, needed to achieve the same degree of structure-forming effect of soil dispersions. The causes for the revealed reasons are shown on the basis of the results of the experiment. Along with this, it was found that particular changes of structural composition and surface properties of the soil dispersions depend on the type and concentration of the added polyelectrolyte.

  3. Improvement of acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a zinc-finger-based artificial transcription factor and identification of novel genes involved in acetic acid tolerance.

    Ma, Cui; Wei, Xiaowen; Sun, Cuihuan; Zhang, Fei; Xu, Jianren; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2015-03-01

    Acetic acid is present in cellulosic hydrolysate as a potent inhibitor, and the superior acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ensures good cell viability and efficient ethanol production when cellulosic raw materials are used as substrates. In this study, a mutant strain of S. cerevisiae ATCC4126 (Sc4126-M01) with improved acetic acid tolerance was obtained through screening strains transformed with an artificial zinc finger protein transcription factor (ZFP-TF) library. Further analysis indicated that improved acetic acid tolerance was associated with improved catalase (CAT) activity. The ZFP coding sequence associated with the improved phenotype was identified, and real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that three of the possible genes involved in the enhanced acetic acid tolerance regulated by this ZFP-TF, namely YFL040W, QDR3, and IKS1, showed decreased transcription levels in Sc4126-M01 in the presence of acetic acid, compared to those in the control strain. Sc4126-M01 mutants having QDR3 and IKS1 deletion (ΔQDR3 and ΔIKS1) exhibited higher acetic acid tolerance than the wild-type strain under acetic acid treatment. Glucose consumption rate and ethanol productivity in the presence of 5 g/L acetic acid were improved in the ΔQDR3 mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Our studies demonstrated that the synthetic ZFP-TF library can be used to improve acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae and that the employment of an artificial transcription factor can facilitate the exploration of novel functional genes involved in stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae.

  4. Thin film of Poly(acrylic acid-co-allyl acrylate as a Sacrificial Protective Layer for Hydrophilic Self Cleaning Glass

    Jānis Lejnieks

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Poly(acrylic acid-co-allyl acrylate statistical copolymers were synthesized in a controlled manner in two steps: first tert.butyl acrylate and allyl acrylate were polymerized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP and afterwords the tert.butyl protective groups were removed via hydrolysis. Samples of self cleaning glass (SCG were coated with thin films of poly(acrylic acid-co-allyl acrylate and cross-linked afterwards by UV irradiation (in the presence of a photoinitiator and an accelerator. Solution cast thin films were transparent and homogeneous before and after UV cross-linking. The irradiated samples were found to be hydrophilic (Θ < 20° and water insoluble. The coating prevented the spontaneous hydrophobization of the SCG by residual silicon exhaled from the sealing material. The TiO2 photocatalyst that covers the glass surface was found to strip the protective coating. The rate of the photooxidation process was measured by IR spectroscopy. The real field performance of the protective coating was also tested.

  5. Unusal pattern of product inhibition: batch acetic acid fermentation

    Bar, R.; Gainer, J.L.; Kirwan, D.J.

    1987-04-20

    The limited tolerance of microorganisms to their metabolic products results in inhibited growth and product formation. The relationship between the specific growth rate, micro, and the concentration of an inhibitory product has been described by a number of mathematical models. In most cases, micro was found to be inversely proportional to the product concentration and invariably the rate of substrate utilization followed the same pattern. In this communication, the authors report a rather unusual case in which the formation rate of a product, acetic acid, increased with a decreasing growth rate of the microorganism, Acetobacter aceti. Apparently, a similar behavior was mentioned in a review report with respect to Clostridium thermocellum in a batch culture but was not published in the freely circulating literature. The fermentation of ethanol to acetic acid, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/OH + O/sub 2/ = CH/sub 3/COOH + H/sub 2/O is clearly one of the oldest known fermentations. Because of its association with the commercial production of vinegar it has been a subject of extensive but rather technically oriented studies. Suprisingly, the uncommon uncoupling between the inhibited microbial growth and the product formation appears to have been unnoticed. 13 references.

  6. Required catalytic properties for alkane production from carboxylic acids: Hydrodeoxygenation of acetic acid

    Zhong; He; Xianqin; Wang

    2013-01-01

    The supported Pt catalysts(1 wt%)were prepared by the incipient impregnation method and analyzed using synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction,BET surface area,oxygen adsorption,CO pulse chemisorption,temperature-programmed desorption(TPD)of acetic acid,H2-TPD,NH3-TPD,O2-TPD,and H2-TPR.The reactivity of Pt-based catalysts was studied using a fixed bed reactor at 300 C and 4 MPa for hydrodeoxygenation of acetic acid,where Pt/TiO2 was very selective for ethane production.TPD experiments revealed that several conditions must be satisfied to achieve this high selectivity to ethane from acetic acid,such as Pt sites,moderate acidity,and medium metal-oxygen bond strength in the oxide support.This work provides insights in developing novel catalytic materials for hydrocarbon productions from various organics including bio-fuels.

  7. Selenium dioxide catalysed oxidation of acetic acid hydrazide by bromate in aqueous hydrochloric acid medium

    R S Yalgudre; G S Gokavi

    2012-07-01

    Selenium dioxide catalysed acetic acid hydrazide oxidation by bromate was studied in hydrochloric acid medium. The order in oxidant concentration, substrate and catalyst were found to be unity. Increasing hydrogen ion concentration increases the rate of the reaction due to protonation equilibria of the oxidant. The mechanism of the reaction involves prior complex formation between the catalyst and substrate, hydrazide, followed by its oxidation by diprotonated bromate in a slow step. Acetic acid was found to be the oxidation product. Other kinetic data like effect of solvent polarity and ionic strength on the reaction support the proposed mechanism.

  8. Ionic liquid mediated esterification of alcohol with acetic acid

    Beilei ZHOU; Yanxiong FANG; Hao GU; Saidan ZHANG; Baohua HUANG; Kun ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Highly efficient esterification of alcohols with acetic acid by using a Bransted acidic ionic liquid, i.e., 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidonium hydrogen sulfate ([Hnmp]HSo4), as catalyst has been realized. The turnover numbers (TON) were able to reach up to 11000 and turnover frequency (TOF) was 846. The catalytic system is suitable for the esterification of long chain aliphatic alcohols, benzyl alcohol and cyclohexanol with good yields of esters. The procedure of separating the product and catalyst is simple, and the catalyst could be reused. [Hnmp]HSO4 had much weaker corrosiveness than H2SO4. The corrosive rate of H2SO4 was 400 times more than that of [Hnmp]HSO4 to stainless steel.

  9. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentability of corn stover pretreated by lactic acid and/or acetic acid

    Xu, Jian; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2009-01-01

    Four different pretreatments with and without addition of low concentration organic acids were carried out on corn stover at 195 °C for 15 min. The highest xylan recovery of 81.08% was obtained after pretreatment without acid catalyst and the lowest of 58.78% after pretreatment with both acetic...

  10. Heterogeneous Reactions of Acetic Acid with Oxide Surfaces: Effects of Mineralogy and Relative Humidity.

    Tang, Mingjin; Larish, Whitney A; Fang, Yuan; Gankanda, Aruni; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the heterogeneous uptake of gaseous acetic acid on different oxides including γ-Al2O3, SiO2, and CaO under a range of relative humidity conditions. Under dry conditions, the uptake of acetic acid leads to the formation of both acetate and molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on γ-Al2O3 and CaO and only molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on SiO2. More importantly, under the conditions of this study, dimers are the major form for molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on all three particle surfaces investigated, even at low acetic acid pressures under which monomers are the dominant species in the gas phase. We have also determined saturation surface coverages for acetic acid adsorption on these three oxides under dry conditions as well as Langmuir adsorption constants in some cases. Kinetic analysis shows that the reaction rate of acetic acid increases by a factor of 3-5 for γ-Al2O3 when relative humidity increases from 0% to 15%, whereas for SiO2 particles, acetic acid and water are found to compete for surface adsorption sites.

  11. Acetic acid induces pH-independent cellular energy depletion in Salmonella enterica.

    Tan, Sin Mei; Lee, Sui Mae; Dykes, Gary A

    2015-03-01

    Weak organic acids are widely used as preservatives and disinfectants in the food industry. Despite their widespread use, the antimicrobial mode of action of organic acids is still not fully understood. This study investigated the effect of acetic acid on the cell membranes and cellular energy generation of four Salmonella strains. Using a nucleic acid/protein assay, it was established that acetic acid did not cause leakage of intracellular components from the strains. A scanning electron microscopy study further confirmed that membrane disruption was not the antimicrobial mode of action of acetic acid. Some elongated Salmonella cells observed in the micrographs indicated a possibility that acetic acid may inhibit DNA synthesis in the bacterial cells. Using an ATP assay, it was found that at a neutral pH, acetic acid caused cellular energy depletion with an ADP/ATP ratio in the range between 0.48 and 2.63 (pacid molecules. The antimicrobial effect of acetic acid was better under acidic conditions (ADP/ATP ratio of 5.56 ± 1.27; pacid molecules can act together. We concluded that the inhibitory effect of acetic acid is not solely attributable to acidic pH but also to undissociated acid molecules. This finding has implication for the use of acetic acid as an antimicrobial against Salmonella on food products, such as chicken meat, which can buffer its pH.

  12. Benzylidene Acetal Protecting Group as Carboxylic Acid Surrogate: Synthesis of Functionalized Uronic Acids and Sugar Amino Acids.

    Banerjee, Amit; Senthilkumar, Soundararasu; Baskaran, Sundarababu

    2016-01-18

    Direct oxidation of the 4,6-O-benzylidene acetal protecting group to C-6 carboxylic acid has been developed that provides an easy access to a wide range of biologically important and synthetically challenging uronic acid and sugar amino acid derivatives in good yields. The RuCl3 -NaIO4 -mediated oxidative cleavage method eliminates protection and deprotection steps and the reaction takes place under mild conditions. The dual role of the benzylidene acetal, as a protecting group and source of carboxylic acid, was exploited in the efficient synthesis of six-carbon sialic acid analogues and disaccharides bearing uronic acids, including glycosaminoglycan analogues.

  13. Recent advances in nitrogen-fixing acetic acid bacteria.

    Pedraza, Raúl O

    2008-06-30

    Nitrogen is an essential plant nutrient, widely applied as N-fertilizer to improve yield of agriculturally important crops. An interesting alternative to avoid or reduce the use of N-fertilizers could be the exploitation of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB), capable of enhancing growth and yield of many plant species, several of agronomic and ecological significance. PGPB belong to diverse genera, including Azospirillum, Azotobacter, Herbaspirillum, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, and Gluconacetobacter, among others. They are capable of promoting plant growth through different mechanisms including (in some cases), the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF), the enzymatic reduction of the atmospheric dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonia, catalyzed by nitrogenase. Aerobic bacteria able to oxidize ethanol to acetic acid in neutral or acid media are candidates of belonging to the family Acetobacteraceae. At present, this family has been divided into ten genera: Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Gluconobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Saccharibacter, Swaminathania, Neoasaia, and Granulibacter. Among them, only three genera include N(2)-fixing species: Gluconacetobacter, Swaminathania and Acetobacter. The first N(2)-fixing acetic acid bacterium (AAB) was described in Brazil. It was found inside tissues of the sugarcane plant, and first named as Acetobacter diazotrophicus, but then renamed as Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus. Later, two new species within the genus Gluconacetobacter, associated to coffee plants, were described in Mexico: G. johannae and G. azotocaptans. A salt-tolerant bacterium named Swaminathania salitolerans was found associated to wild rice plants. Recently, N(2)-fixing Acetobacter peroxydans and Acetobacter nitrogenifigens, associated with rice plants and Kombucha tea, respectively, were described in India. In this paper, recent advances involving nitrogen-fixing AAB are presented. Their natural habitats, physiological and genetic aspects

  14. Clostridium lentocellum SG6--a potential organism for fermentation of cellulose to acetic acid.

    Ravinder, T; Swamy, M V; Seenayya, G; Reddy, G

    2001-12-01

    A cellulolytic, acetic acid producing anaerobic bacterial isolate, Gram negative, rod-shaped, motile, terminal oval shaped endospore forming bacterium identified as Clostridium lentocellum SG6 based on physiological and biochemical characteristics. It produced acetic acid as a major end product from cellulose fermentation at 37 degrees C and pH 7.2. Acetic acid production was 0.67 g/g cellulose substrate utilized in cellulose mineral salt (CMS) medium. Yeast extract (0.4%) was the best nitrogen source among the various nitrogenous nutrients tested in production medium containing 0.8% cellulose as substrate. No additional vitamins or trace elemental solution were required for acetic acid fermentation. This is the highest acetic acid fermentation yield in monoculture fermentation for direct conversion of cellulose to acetic acid.

  15. Study on fluorescence spectra of molecular association of acetic acid-water

    Caiqin Han; Ying Liu; Yang Yang; Xiaowu Ni; Jian Lu; Xiaosen Luo

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra of acetic acid-water solution excited by ultraviolet (UV) light are studied, and the relationship between fluorescence spectra and molecular association of acetic acid is discussed. The results indicate that when the exciting light wavelength is longer than 246 nm, there are two fluorescence peaks located at 305 and 334 nm, respectively. By measuring the excitation spectra, the optimal wavelengths of the two fluorescence peaks are obtained, which are 258 and 284 nm, respectively. Fluorescence spectra of acetic acid-water solution change with concentrations, which is primarily attributed to changes of molecular association of acetic acid in aqueous solution. Through theoretical analysis, three variations of molecular association have been obtained in acetic acid-water solution, which are the hydrated monomers, the linear dimers, and the water separated dimers. This research can provide references to studies of molecular association of acetic acid-water, especially studies of hydrogen bonds.

  16. Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures

    Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 + 0.7% and 8.8 + 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 + 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 + 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 + 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

  17. Improvement in HPLC separation of acetic acid and levulinic acid in the profiling of biomass hydrolysate.

    Xie, Rui; Tu, Maobing; Wu, Yonnie; Adhikari, Sushil

    2011-04-01

    5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural could be separated by the Aminex HPX-87H column chromatography, however, the separation and quantification of acetic acid and levulinic acid in biomass hydrolysate have been difficult with this method. In present study, the HPLC separation of acetic acid and levulinic acid on Aminex HPX-87H column has been investigated by varying column temperature, flow rate, and sulfuric acid content in the mobile phase. The column temperature was found critical in resolving acetic acid and levulinic acid. The resolution for two acids increased dramatically from 0.42 to 1.86 when the column temperature was lowered from 60 to 30 °C. So did the capacity factors for levulinic acid that was increased from 1.20 to 1.44 as the column temperature dropped. The optimum column temperature for the separation was found at 45 °C. Variation in flow rate and sulfuric acid concentration improved not as much as the column temperature did.

  18. Transcript and metabolite alterations increase ganoderic acid content in Ganoderma lucidum using acetic acid as an inducer.

    Ren, Ang; Li, Xiong-Biao; Miao, Zhi-Gang; Shi, Liang; Jaing, Ai-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2014-12-01

    Acetic acid at 5-8 mM increased ganoderic acid (GA) accumulation in Ganoderma lucidum. After optimization by the response surface methodology, the GA content reached 5.5/100 mg dry weight, an increase of 105% compared with the control. The intermediate metabolites of GA biosynthesis, lanosterol and squalene also increased to 47 and 15.8 μg/g dry weight, respectively, in response to acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly induced transcription levels of sqs, lano, hmgs and cyp51 in the GA biosynthesis pathway. An acetic acid-unregulated acetyl coenzyme A synthase (acs) gene was selected from ten candidate homologous acs genes. The results indicate that acetic acid alters the expression of genes related to acetic acid assimilation and increases GA biosynthesis and the metabolic levels of lanosterol, squalene and GA-a, thereby resulting in GA accumulation.

  19. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H.; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a ...

  20. Development of Acetic Acid Removal Technology for the UREX+Process

    Robert M. Counce; Jack S. Watson

    2009-06-30

    It is imperative that acetic acid is removed from a waste stream in the UREX+process so that nitric acid can be recycled and possible interference with downstreatm steps can be avoidec. Acetic acid arises from acetohydrozamic acid (AHA), and is used to suppress plutonium in the first step of the UREX+process. Later, it is hydrolyzed into hydroxyl amine nitrate and acetic acid. Many common separation technologies were examined, and solvent extraction was determined to be the best choice under process conditions. Solvents already used in the UREX+ process were then tested to determine if they would be sufficient for the removal of acetic acid. The tributyl phosphage (TBP)-dodecane diluent, used in both UREX and NPEX, was determined to be a solvent system that gave sufficient distribution coefficients for acetic acid in addition to a high separation factor from nitric acid.

  1. Acetic acid in aged vinegar affects molecular targets for thrombus disease management.

    Jing, Li; Yanyan, Zhang; Junfeng, Fan

    2015-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism underlying the action of dietary vinegar on antithrombotic activity, acetic acid, the main acidic component of dietary vinegar, was used to determine antiplatelet and fibrinolytic activity. The results revealed that acetic acid significantly inhibits adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-, collagen-, thrombin-, and arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation. Acetic acid (2.00 mM) reduced AA-induced platelet aggregation to approximately 36.82 ± 1.31%, and vinegar (0.12 mL L(-1)) reduced the platelet aggregation induced by AA to 30.25 ± 1.34%. Further studies revealed that acetic acid exerts its effects by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-1 and the formation of thromboxane-A2. Organic acids including acetic acid, formic acid, lactic acid, citric acid, and malic acid also showed fibrinolytic activity; specifically, the fibrinolytic activity of acetic acid amounted to 1.866 IU urokinase per mL. Acetic acid exerted its fibrinolytic activity by activating plasminogen during fibrin crossing, thus leading to crosslinked fibrin degradation by the activated plasmin. These results suggest that organic acids in dietary vinegar play important roles in the prevention and cure of cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of acetic acid and ethanoic acid (based)-maleimide

    Poad, Siti Nashwa Mohd; Hassan, Nurul Izzaty; Hassan, Nur Hasyareeda

    2016-11-01

    A new route to the synthesis of maleimide is described. 2-(2,5-dioxo-2,5-dihydro-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)acetic acid maleimide (1) and 2-(4-(2,5-Dioxo-2,5-dihydro- 1H-pyrrol-1-yl)phenyl)ethanoic acid maleimide (2) have been synthesized by the reaction of maleic anhydride with glycine and 4-aminophenyl acetic aicd. Maleimide (1) was synthesized by conventional technique while maleimide (2) was synthesized by microwave method. The compounds were characterized using FT-Infrared (FT-IR), 1H and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopies and Mass Spectrometry.

  3. Leaching of spent lead acid battery paste components by sodium citrate and acetic acid.

    Zhu, Xinfeng; He, Xiong; Yang, Jiakuan; Gao, Linxia; Liu, Jianwen; Yang, Danni; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Qin; Kumar, R Vasant

    2013-04-15

    A sustainable method, with minimal pollution and low energy cost in comparison with the conventional smelting methods, is proposed for treating components of spent lead-acid battery pastes in aqueous organic acid(s). In this study, PbO, PbO2, and PbSO4, the three major components in a spent lead paste, were individually reacted with a mixture of aqueous sodium citrate and acetic acid solution. Pure lead citrate precursor of Pb3(C6H5O7)2 · 3H2O is the only product crystallized in each leaching experiment. Conditions were optimized for individual lead compounds which were then used as the basis for leaching real industrial spent paste. In this work, efficient leaching process is achieved and raw material cost is reduced by using aqueous sodium citrate and acetic acid, instead of aqueous sodium citrate and citric acid as reported in a pioneering hydrometallurgical method earlier. Acetic acid is not only cheaper than citric acid but is also more effective in aiding dissolution of the lead compounds thus speeding up the leaching process in comparison with citric acid. Lead citrate is readily crystallized from the aqueous solution due to its low solubility and can be combusted to directly produce leady oxide as a precursor for making new battery pastes.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of acetic-acid-treated yeast cells identifies a large set of genes whose overexpression or deletion enhances acetic acid tolerance.

    Lee, Yeji; Nasution, Olviyani; Choi, Eunyong; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2015-08-01

    Acetic acid inhibits the metabolic activities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, a better understanding of how S. cerevisiae cells acquire the tolerance to acetic acid is of importance to develop robust yeast strains to be used in industry. To do this, we examined the transcriptional changes that occur at 12 h post-exposure to acetic acid, revealing that 56 and 58 genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively. Functional categorization of them revealed that 22 protein synthesis genes and 14 stress response genes constituted the largest portion of the upregulated and downregulated genes, respectively. To evaluate the association of the regulated genes with acetic acid tolerance, 3 upregulated genes (DBP2, ASC1, and GND1) were selected among 34 non-protein synthesis genes, and 54 viable mutants individually deleted for the downregulated genes were retrieved from the non-essential haploid deletion library. Strains overexpressing ASC1 and GND1 displayed enhanced tolerance to acetic acid, whereas a strain overexpressing DBP2 was sensitive. Fifty of 54 deletion mutants displayed enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Three chosen deletion mutants (hsps82Δ, ato2Δ, and ssa3Δ) were also tolerant to benzoic acid but not propionic and sorbic acids. Moreover, all those five (two overexpressing and three deleted) strains were more efficient in proton efflux and lower in membrane permeability and internal hydrogen peroxide content than controls. Individually or in combination, those physiological changes are likely to contribute at least in part to enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Overall, information of our transcriptional profile was very useful to identify molecular factors associated with acetic acid tolerance.

  5. L-Lactic acid production from glycerol coupled with acetic acid metabolism by Enterococcus faecalis without carbon loss.

    Murakami, Nao; Oba, Mana; Iwamoto, Mariko; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Noguchi, Takuya; Bonkohara, Kaori; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ali; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimoda, Mitsuya; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol is a by-product in the biodiesel production process and considered as one of the prospective carbon sources for microbial fermentation including lactic acid fermentation, which has received considerable interest due to its potential application. Enterococcus faecalis isolated in our laboratory produced optically pure L-lactic acid from glycerol in the presence of acetic acid. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis using [1, 2-(13)C2] acetic acid proved that the E. faecalis strain QU 11 was capable of converting acetic acid to ethanol during lactic acid fermentation of glycerol. This indicated that strain QU 11 restored the redox balance by oxidizing excess NADH though acetic acid metabolism, during ethanol production, which resulted in lactic acid production from glycerol. The effects of pH control and substrate concentration on lactic acid fermentation were also investigated. Glycerol and acetic acid concentrations of 30 g/L and 10 g/L, respectively, were expected to be appropriate for lactic acid fermentation of glycerol by strain QU 11 at a pH of 6.5. Furthermore, fed-batch fermentation with 30 g/L glycerol and 10 g/L acetic acid wholly exhibited the best performance including lactic acid production (55.3 g/L), lactic acid yield (0.991 mol-lactic acid/mol-glycerol), total yield [1.08 mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)]/mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)], and total carbon yield [1.06 C-mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)/C-mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)] of lactic acid and ethanol. In summary, the strain QU 11 successfully produced lactic acid from glycerol with acetic acid metabolism, and an efficient fermentation system was established without carbon loss.

  6. Separation of Acetic Acid from Aqueous Solution using Various Organic Solvents

    Md. Zaved Hossain Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 In the study a model has been developed to separate the acetic acid from aqueous solution by liquid-liquid extraction and find out the proper solvent for this separation. Various solvents such as n-butanol, iso butanol, amyl alcohol and ethyl acetate are used for separation of acetic acid from water. The binodal curves (mutual solubility curves for acetic acid distributed between water and an organic solvent were obtained by titrating known mixtures of two components (water and solvents with the third component acetic acid to the point of first appearance of permanent turbidity. In order to determine the tie-lines, the absorbance of the coexisting phases, obtained by the separation of ternary mixtures within the binodal curve are needed to be determined. The absorbance of each point had been determined by a UV spectrophotometer. Distribution diagrams are obtained by plotting weight percent of acetic acid in solvent phase against the weight percent of acetic acid in water phase. Selectivity diagrams are also obtained by plotting (wt. % of acetic acid / (percent of acetic acid + percent of water in solvent phase against the same quantity in the diluent phase. The separation factor is determined numerically from the tie-line data.

  7. Isolation, characterization and optimization of indigenous acetic acid bacteria and evaluation of their preservation methods

    K Beheshti-Maal

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Acetic acid bacteria (AAB are useful in industrial production of vinegar. The present study aims at isolation and identification of acetic acid bacteria with characterization, optimization, and evaluation of their acetic acid productivity."nMaterials and Methods: Samples from various fruits were screened for presence of acetic acid bacteria on glucose, yeast extract, calcium carbonate (GYC medium. Carr medium supplemented with bromocresol green was used for distinguishing Acetobacter from Gluconobacter. The isolates were cultured in basal medium to find the highest acetic acid producer. Biochemical tests followed by 16S rRNA and restriction analyses were employed for identification of the isolate and phylogenic tree was constructed. Bacterial growth and acid production conditions were optimized based on optimal inoculum size, pH, temperature, agitation, aeration and medium composition."nResults: Thirty-seven acetic acid bacteria from acetobacter and gluconobacter members were isolated. Acetic acid productivity yielded 4 isolates that produced higher amounts of acid. The highest producer of acid (10.03% was selected for identification. The sequencing and restriction analyses of 16S rRNA revealed a divergent strain of Acetobacter pasteurianus (Gene bank accession number # GU059865. The optimum condition for acid production was a medium composed of 2% glucose, 2% yeast extract, 3% ethanol and 3% acid acetic at inoculum size of 4% at 3L/Min aeration level in the production medium. The isolate was best preserved in GYC medium at 12oC for more than a month. Longer preservation was possible at -70oC."nConclusion: The results are suggestive of isolation of an indigenous acetic acid bacteria. Pilot plan is suggested to study applicability of the isolated strain in acetic acid production.

  8. Phenyl Acetate Preparation from Phenol and Acetic Acid: Reassessment of a Common Textbook Misconception.

    Hocking, M. B.

    1980-01-01

    Reassesses a common textbook misconception that "...phenols cannot be esterified directly." Results of experiments are discussed and data tables provided of an effective method for the direct preparation of phenyl acetate. (CS)

  9. Enhanced expression of aconitase raises acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti.

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2004-06-15

    Acetobacter spp. are used for industrial vinegar production because of their high ability to oxidize ethanol to acetic acid and high resistance to acetic acid. Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of a soluble fraction of Acetobacter aceti revealed the presence of several proteins whose production was enhanced, to various extents, in response to acetic acid in the medium. A protein with an apparent molecular mass of 100 kDa was significantly enhanced in amount by acetic acid and identified to be aconitase by NH2-terminal amino acid sequencing and subsequent gene cloning. Amplification of the aconitase gene by use of a multicopy plasmid in A. aceti enhanced the enzymatic activity and acetic acid resistance. These results showed that aconitase is concerned with acetic acid resistance. Enhancement of the aconitase activity turned out to be practically useful for acetic acid fermentation, because the A. aceti transformant harboring multiple copies of the aconitase gene produced a higher concentration of acetic acid with a reduced growth lag-time.

  10. [Advances in functional genomics studies underlying acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Zhao, Xinqing; Zhang, Mingming; Xu, Guihong; Xu, Jianren; Bai, Fengwu

    2014-03-01

    Industrial microorganisms are subject to various stress conditions, including products and substrates inhibitions. Therefore, improvement of stress tolerance is of great importance for industrial microbial production. Acetic acid is one of the major inhibitors in the cellulosic hydrolysates, which affects seriously on cell growth and metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptive response and tolerance of acetic acid of S. cerevisiae benefit breeding of robust strains of industrial yeast for more efficient production. In recent years, more insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying acetic acid tolerance have been revealed through analysis of global gene expression and metabolomics analysis, as well as phenomics analysis by single gene deletion libraries. Novel genes related to response to acetic acid and improvement of acetic acid tolerance have been identified, and novel strains with improved acetic acid tolerance were constructed by modifying key genes. Metal ions including potassium and zinc play important roles in acetic acid tolerance in S. cerevisiae, and the effect of zinc was first discovered in our previous studies on flocculating yeast. Genes involved in cell wall remodeling, membrane transport, energy metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis and transport, as well as global transcription regulation were discussed. Exploration and modification of the molecular mechanisms of yeast acetic acid tolerance will be done further on levels such as post-translational modifications and synthetic biology and engineering; and the knowledge obtained will pave the way for breeding robust strains for more efficient bioconversion of cellulosic materials to produce biofuels and bio-based chemicals.

  11. Atmospheric geochemistry of formic and acetic acids at a mid-latitude temperate site

    Talbot, R. W.; Beecher, K. M.; Harriss, R. C.; Cofer, R. W., III

    1988-01-01

    Tropospheric concentrations of formic and acetic acids in the gas, the aerosol, and the rainwater phases were determined in samples collected 1-2 m above ground level at an open field site in eastern Virginia. These acids were found to occur principally (98 percent or above) in the gas phase, with a marked annual seasonality, averaging 1890 ppt for formate and 1310 ppt for acetate during the growing season, as compared to 695 ppt and 700 ppt, respectively, over the nongrowing season. The data support the hypothesis that biogenic emissions from vegatation are important sources of atmospheric formic and acetic acid during the local growing season. The same time trends were observed for precipitation, although with less defined seasonality. The relative increase of the acetic acid/formic acid ratio during the nongrowing season points to the dominance of anthropogenic inputs of acetic acid from motor vehicles and biomass combustion in the wintertime.

  12. Progress in Acetic Acid Industry%醋酸工业现状及发展

    李好管; 闫慧芳

    2001-01-01

    醋酸是用途最广泛的有机酸之一。分析了醋酸的生产和消费趋势;综述了醋酸工艺的进展;介绍了具有工业化前景或学术价值的醋酸合成新工艺的研究开发概况。对我国醋酸工业发展提出了建议。%Acetic acid is one of the organic acids which have many uses.This paper analyzed the production and consumption of acetic acid,summarized the progress of acetic acid technology,introduced the research and development of acetic acid new process.Some suggestions on China's acetic acid industry were also put forward.

  13. Modification of wheat starch with succinic acid/acetic anhydride and azelaic acid/acetic anhydride mixtures I. Thermophysical and pasting properties.

    Subarić, Drago; Ačkar, Durđica; Babić, Jurislav; Sakač, Nikola; Jozinović, Antun

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of modification with succinic acid/acetic anhydride and azelaic acid/acetic anhydride mixtures on thermophysical and pasting properties of wheat starch. Starch was isolated from two wheat varieties and modified with mixtures of succinic acid and acetic anhydride, and azelaic acid and acetic anhydride in 4, 6 and 8 % (w/w). Thermophysical, pasting properties, swelling power, solubility and amylose content of modified starches were determined. The results showed that modifications with mixtures of afore mentioned dicarboxylic acids with acetic anhydride decreased gelatinisation and pasting temperatures. Gelatinisation enthalpy of Golubica starch increased, while of Srpanjka starch decreased by modifications. Retrogradation after 7 and 14 day-storage at 4 °C decreased after modifications of both starches. Maximum, hot and cold paste viscosity of both starches increased, while stability during shearing at high temperatures decreased. % setback of starches modified with azelaic acid/acetic anhydride mixture decreased. Swelling power and solubility of both starches increased by both modifications.

  14. Electron attachment and electron ionization of acetic acid clusters embedded in helium nanodroplets

    da Silva, F. Ferreira; Jaksch, S.; Martins, G.; Dang, H. M.; Dampc, M.; Denifl, S.; Maerk, T. D.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Liu, J.; Yang, S.; Ellis, A. M.; Scheier, P.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of incident electrons on acetic acid clusters is explored for the first time. The acetic acid clusters are formed inside liquid helium nanodroplets and both cationic and anionic products ejected into the gas phase are detected by mass spectrometry. The cation chemistry (induced by electro

  15. 21 CFR 862.1390 - 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system. 862.1390 Section 862.1390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Test Systems § 862.1390 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system. (a) Identification. A...

  16. Investigation of acetic acid-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment on corn stover

    Xu, Jian; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Acetic acid (AA)-catalyzed liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatments on raw corn stover (RCS) were carried out at 195 °C at 15 min with the acetic acid concentrations between 0 and 400 g/kg RCS. After pretreatment, the liquor fractions and water-insoluble solids (WIS) were collected separately...

  17. Cervical cancer risk factors and feasibility of visual inspection with acetic acid screening in Sudan

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Rasch, Vibeke; Pukkala, Eero;

    2011-01-01

    To assess the risk factors of cervical cancer and the feasibility and acceptability of a visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) screening method in a primary health center in Khartoum, Sudan.......To assess the risk factors of cervical cancer and the feasibility and acceptability of a visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) screening method in a primary health center in Khartoum, Sudan....

  18. Efficacy of Acetic Acid against Listeria monocytogenes Attached to Poultry Skin during Refrigerated Storage.

    Gonzalez-Fandos, Elena; Herrera, Barbara

    2014-09-11

    This work evaluates the effect of acetic acid dipping on the growth of L. monocytogenes on poultry legs stored at 4 °C for eight days. Fresh inoculated chicken legs were dipped into either a 1% or 2% acetic acid solution (v/v) or distilled water (control). Changes in mesophiles, psychrotrophs, Enterobacteriaceae counts and sensorial characteristics (odor, color, texture and overall appearance) were also evaluated. The shelf life of the samples washed with acetic acid was extended by at least two days over the control samples washed with distilled water. L. monocytogenes counts before decontamination were 5.57 log UFC/g, and after treatment with 2% acetic acid (Day 0), L. monocytogenes counts were 4.47 log UFC/g. Legs washed with 2% acetic acid showed a significant (p acetic acid. This study demonstrates that while acetic acid did reduce populations of L. monocytogenes on meat, it did not completely inactivate the pathogen. The application of acetic acid may be used as an additional hurdle contributing to extend the shelf life of raw poultry and reducing populations of L. monocytogenes.

  19. A Binary Host Plant Volatile Lure Combined With Acetic Acid to Monitor Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Knight, A L; Basoalto, E; Katalin, J; El-Sayed, A M

    2015-10-01

    Field studies were conducted in the United States, Hungary, and New Zealand to evaluate the effectiveness of septa lures loaded with ethyl (E,Z)-2,4-decadienoate (pear ester) and (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (nonatriene) alone and in combination with an acetic acid co-lure for both sexes of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.). Additional studies were conducted to evaluate these host plant volatiles and acetic acid in combination with the sex pheromone, (E,E)-8,10-dodecadien-1-ol (codlemone). Traps baited with pear ester/nonatriene + acetic acid placed within orchards treated either with codlemone dispensers or left untreated caught significantly more males, females, and total moths than similar traps baited with pear ester + acetic acid in some assays. Similarly, traps baited with codlemone/pear ester/nonatriene + acetic acid caught significantly greater numbers of moths than traps with codlemone/pear ester + acetic acid lures in some assays in orchards treated with combinational dispensers (dispensers loaded with codlemone/pear ester). These data suggest that monitoring of codling moth can be marginally improved in orchards under variable management plans using a binary host plant volatile lure in combination with codlemone and acetic acid. These results are likely to be most significant in orchards treated with combinational dispensers. Significant increases in the catch of female codling moths in traps with the binary host plant volatile blend plus acetic acid should be useful in developing more effective mass trapping strategies.

  20. Microbiological preservation of cucumbers for bulk storage by the use of acetic acid and food preservatives

    Microbial growth did not occur when cucumbers were preserved without a thermal process by storage in solutions containing acetic acid, sodium benzoate, and calcium chloride to maintain tissue firmness. The concentrations of acetic acid and sodium benzoate required to assure preservation were low en...

  1. Fabrication of First Chinese Made Reactor for Oxosvnthesis of Acetic Acid in Xi'an

    2008-01-01

    @@ The first set of Chinese made reactor for oxo-synthesis of acetic acid has been fabricated by the Xi'an Nuclear Equipment Company,Ltd.This reactor has been transported to the site of equipment installation at the acetic acid production project owned by Shandong Yimeng Company,Ltd.,which has shattered the long-time precedent of relying upon imported equipment.

  2. Palladacyclic imidazoline-naphthalene complexes: synthesis and catalytic performance in Pd(II)-catalyzed enantioselective reactions of allylic trichloroacetimidates.

    Cannon, Jeffrey S; Frederich, James H; Overman, Larry E

    2012-02-17

    A new family of air- and moisture-stable enantiopure C,N-palladacycles (PIN-acac complexes) were prepared in good overall yield in three steps from 2-iodo-1-naphthoic acid and enantiopure β-amino alcohols. Three of these PIN complexes were characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis. As anticipated, the naphthalene and imidazoline rings of PIN-acac complexes 18a and 18b were canted significantly from planarity and projected the imidazoline substituents R(1) and R(2) on opposite faces of the palladium square plane. Fifteen PIN complexes were evaluated as catalysts for the rearrangement of prochiral (E)-allylic trichloroacetimidate 19 (eq 2) and the S(N)2' allylic substitution of acetic acid with prochiral (Z)-allylic trichloroacetimidate 23. Although these complexes were kinetically poor catalysts for the Overman rearrangement, they were good catalysts for the allylic substitution reaction, providing branched allylic esters in high yield. However, enantioselectivities were low to moderate and significantly less than that realized with palladacyclic complexes of the COP family. Computational studies support an anti-acetoxypalladation/syn-deoxypalladation mechanism analogous to that observed with COP catalysts. The computational study further suggests that optimizing steric influence in the vicinity of the carbon ligand of a chiral C,N-palladacycle, rather than near the nitrogen heterocycle, is the direction to pursue in future development of improved enantioselective catalysts of this motif.

  3. Acetate/acetyl-CoA metabolism associated with cancer fatty acid synthesis: overview and application.

    Yoshii, Yukie; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-28

    Understanding cancer-specific metabolism is important for identifying novel targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Induced acetate/acetyl CoA metabolism is a notable feature that is related to fatty acid synthesis supporting tumor growth. In this review, we focused on the recent findings related to cancer acetate/acetyl CoA metabolism. We also introduce [1-¹¹C]acetate positron emission tomography (PET), which is a useful tool to visualize up-regulation of acetate/acetyl CoA metabolism in cancer, and discuss the utility of [1-¹¹C]acetate PET in cancer diagnosis and its application to personalized medicine.

  4. The key to acetate: metabolic fluxes of acetic acid bacteria under cocoa pulp fermentation-simulating conditions.

    Adler, Philipp; Frey, Lasse Jannis; Berger, Antje; Bolten, Christoph Josef; Hansen, Carl Erik; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-08-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role during cocoa fermentation, as their main product, acetate, is a major driver for the development of the desired cocoa flavors. Here, we investigated the specialized metabolism of these bacteria under cocoa pulp fermentation-simulating conditions. A carefully designed combination of parallel 13C isotope labeling experiments allowed the elucidation of intracellular fluxes in the complex environment of cocoa pulp, when lactate and ethanol were included as primary substrates among undefined ingredients. We demonstrate that AAB exhibit a functionally separated metabolism during coconsumption of two-carbon and three-carbon substrates. Acetate is almost exclusively derived from ethanol, while lactate serves for the formation of acetoin and biomass building blocks. Although this is suboptimal for cellular energetics, this allows maximized growth and conversion rates. The functional separation results from a lack of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzymes, typically present in bacteria to interconnect metabolism. In fact, gluconeogenesis is driven by pyruvate phosphate dikinase. Consequently, a balanced ratio of lactate and ethanol is important for the optimum performance of AAB. As lactate and ethanol are individually supplied by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts during the initial phase of cocoa fermentation, respectively, this underlines the importance of a well-balanced microbial consortium for a successful fermentation process. Indeed, AAB performed the best and produced the largest amounts of acetate in mixed culture experiments when lactic acid bacteria and yeasts were both present.

  5. Recovery of Dilute Acetic Acid by Catalytic Distillation Using NKC-9 as Catalyst

    ZHANG Zhigang; LI Xiaofeng; XU Shimin; LI Xingang

    2006-01-01

    The reaction kinetics of dilute acetic acid with methanol using NKC-9 as catalyst was studied at temperatures of 308 K, 318 K, 323 K, 328 K. The kinetic model based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate model was derived and the activation energy was 6.13 x 104 kJ/kmol. The experiment of recovery of dilute acetic acid was conducted in a packed bed catalytic distillation column. The optimal process parameters and operational conditions determined to make up to 85.9% conversion of acetic acid are as follows:the height of catalyst bed is 1 100 mm, reflux ratio is 4: 1, and the ratio of methanol to acetic acid is 2: 1. The method can be used as a guide in industrial scale recovery of 15%-30% dilute acetic acid.

  6. Reducing ulcerogenic potential of biphenyl acetic acid: Design and development of chimeric derivatives with amino acids

    Suneela Dhaneshwar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to minimize the ulcerogenic potential and associated gastro-intestinal toxicity of bioprecursor fenbufen and its active metabolite biphenyl acetic acid, carrier-linked chimeric derivatives of the latter were designed and synthesized using amino acids as the promoities. DCC coupling method was used for the synthesis of these amides. The chimeras were characterized by IR and 1H NMR. Pharmacological investigations were carried out in animal models for analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-arthritic and ulcerogenic activities. The chimeras exhibited high gastro-sparing effect; quick onset and longer duration of analgesia; enhanced/prolonged anti-inflammatory activity and better anti-arthritic effect than fenbufen or biphenyl acetic acid. These derivatives could be useful as a chronotherapy for rheumatoid arthritis due to their prolonged analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects.

  7. Effects of pH and acetic acid on homoacetic fermentation of lactate by Clostridium formicoaceticum.

    Tang, I C; Okos, M R; Yang, S T

    1989-10-20

    Clostridium formicoaceticum homofermentatively converts lactate to acetate at 37 degrees C and pH 6.6-9.6. However, this fermentation is strongly inhibited by acetic acid at acidic pH. The specific growth rate of this organism decreased from a maximum at pH 7.6 to zero at pH 6.6. This inhibition effect was found to be attributed to both H(+) and undissociated acetic acid. At pH values below 7.6, the H(+) inhibited the fermentation following non-competitive inhibition kinetics. The acetic acid inhibition was found to be stronger at a lower medium pH. At pH 6.45-6.8, cell growth was found to be primarily limited by a maximum undissociated acetic acid concentration of 0.358 g/L (6mM). This indicates that the undissociated acid, not the dissociated acid, is the major acid inhibitor. At pH 7.6 or higher, this organism could tolerate acetate concentrations of higher than 0.8M, but salt (Na(+)) became a strong inhibitor at concentrations of higher than 0.4M. Acetic acid inhibition also can be represented by noncompetitive inhibition kinetics. A mathematical model for this homoacetic fermentation was also developed. This model can be used to simulate batch fermentation at any pH between 6.9 and 7.6.

  8. Metabolic regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid

    Jerry D. Cohen

    2009-11-01

    The phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, auxin) is important for many aspects of plant growth, development and responses to the environment yet the routes to is biosynthesis and mechanisms for regulation of IAA levels remain important research questions. A critical issue concerning the biosynthesis if IAA in plants is that redundant pathways for IAA biosynthesis exist in plants. We showed that these redundant pathways and their relative contribution to net IAA production are under both developmental and environmental control. We worked on three fundamental problems related to how plants get their IAA: 1) An in vitro biochemical approach was used to define the tryptophan dependent pathway to IAA using maize endosperm, where relatively large amounts of IAA are produced over a short developmental period. Both a stable isotope dilution and a protein MS approach were used to identify intermediates and enzymes in the reactions. 2) We developed an in vitro system for analysis of tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthesis in maize seedlings and we used a metabolite profiling approach to isolate intermediates in this reaction. 3) Arabidopsis contains a small family of genes that encode potential indolepyruvate decarboxylase enzymes. We cloned these genes and studied plants that are mutant in these genes and that over-express each member in the family in terms of the level and route of IAA biosynthesis. Together, these allowed further development of a comprehensive picture of the pathways and regulatory components that are involved in IAA homeostasis in higher plants.

  9. Evaluation of the morphological changes of gastric mucosa induced by a low concentration of acetic acid using a rat model.

    Nakao, Ken-ichiro; Ro, Ayako; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    Oral ingestion of concentrated acetic acid causes corrosive injury of the gastrointestinal tract. To assess the effects of a low concentration of acetic acid on gastric mucosa, we examined the gastric mucosal changes in rats at 1 and 3 days after the injection of 5% or 25% acetic acid into the gastric lumen. The area of the gastric ulcerative lesions in the 25% acetic acid group was significantly larger than that in the 5% acetic acid group. The lesion area was reduced significantly at 3 days after injection in the 5% acetic acid group, whereas no significant difference in lesion area was observed at 1 and 3 days in the 25% acetic acid group. Histologically, corrosive necrosis was limited to the mucosal layer in the 5% acetic acid group, whereas necrosis extended throughout the gastric wall in the 25% acetic acid group. At 3 days post-injection, the 25% acetic acid group showed widespread persistent inflammation, whereas the 5% acetic acid group showed widespread appearance of fibroblasts indicative of a healing process. These results indicate that a low concentration of acetic acid damages the gastric mucosa and that the degree of mucosal damage depends on the concentration of acetic acid.

  10. Experimental Measurements and Correlations Isobaric Vapor-Liquid Equilibria for Water + Acetic Acid + Sec-butyl Acetate at 101.3 kPa

    LI Ling; HE Yong; WU Yanxiang; ZOU Wenhu

    2013-01-01

    Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibrium(VLE) data for acetic acid + sec-butyl acetate and water + acetic acid + sec-butyl acetate systems were determined at 101.3 kPa using a modified Rose type.The nonideality of the vapor phase caused by the association of the acetic acid was corrected by the chemical theory and Hayden-O'Connell method.Thermodynamic consistency was tested for the binary VLE data.The experimental data were correlated successfully with the Non-Random Two Liquids (NRTL) model.The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) of the ternary system was 0.0038.The saturation vapor pressure of sec-butyl acetate at 329 to 385 K was measured by means of two connected equilibrium cells.The vapor pressures of water and sec-butyl acetate were correlated with the Antoine equation.The binary interaction parameters and the ternary VLE data were obtained from this work.

  11. Effect of acetic acid on rice seeds coated with rice husk ash

    Lizandro Ciciliano Tavares; André Pich Brunes; Daniel Andrei Robe da Fonseca; Gizele Ingrid Gadotti; Lilian Madruga de Tunes; Géri Eduardo Meneghello; Antonio Carlos Souza Albuquerque Barros

    2013-01-01

    Flooded rice cultivation promotes anaerobic conditions, favoring the formation of short chain organic acids such as acetic acid, which may be toxic to the crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of acetic acid on rice seeds coated with rice husk ash. The experiment was arranged in a 2 x 5 x 5 factorial randomized design, with two cultivars (IRGA 424 and BRS Querência), five doses of coating material (0, 2, 3,4 e 5 g kg-1 seed) and five concentrations of acetic acid (0, 3,...

  12. Effect of roxatidine acetate on daytime and night-time peptone-stimulated gastric acid secretion.

    Hagenmüller, F

    1988-01-01

    A double-blind, randomised, crossover study in 12 healthy volunteers was performed to assess the effects of roxatidine acetate 75 mg or placebo administered at 8 am and 9 pm on peptone-stimulated hydrochloric acid secretion. In comparison to placebo, roxatidine acetate produced an average reduction of daytime hydrochloric acid output of 86% and 32%, respectively, for the 4- to 6-hour and 10- to 12-hour post-drug administration phases. In addition, roxatidine acetate produced reductions in nocturnal hydrochloric acid output of 75 to 92% with an associated rise in intragastric pH of around 2 units compared to placebo. No side effects or clinically significant alterations in haematological or biochemical values were reported following roxatidine acetate administration. These results suggest that roxatidine acetate is a potent and effective inhibitor of day and night-time intragastric acid secretion.

  13. Cell wall dynamics modulate acetic acid-induced apoptotic cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    António Rego

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid triggers apoptotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, similar to mammalian apoptosis. To uncover novel regulators of this process, we analyzed whether impairing MAPK signaling affected acetic acid-induced apoptosis and found the mating-pheromone response and, especially, the cell wall integrity pathways were the major mediators, especially the latter, which we characterized further. Screening downstream effectors of this pathway, namely targets of the transcription factor Rlm1p, highlighted decreased cell wall remodeling as particularly important for acetic acid resistance. Modulation of cell surface dynamics therefore emerges as a powerful strategy to increase acetic acid resistance, with potential application in industrial fermentations using yeast, and in biomedicine to exploit the higher sensitivity of colorectal carcinoma cells to apoptosis induced by acetate produced by intestinal propionibacteria.

  14. Scaleable production and separation of fermentation-derived acetic acid. Final CRADA report.

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-08

    Half of U.S. acetic acid production is used in manufacturing vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) and is economical only in very large production plants. Nearly 80% of the VAM is produced by methanol carbonylation, which requires high temperatures and exotic construction materials and is energy intensive. Fermentation-derived acetic acid production allows for small-scale production at low temperatures, significantly reducing the energy requirement of the process. The goal of the project is to develop a scaleable production and separation process for fermentation-derived acetic acid. Synthesis gas (syngas) will be fermented to acetic acid, and the fermentation broth will be continuously neutralized with ammonia. The acetic acid product will be recovered from the ammonium acid broth using vapor-based membrane separation technology. The process is summarized in Figure 1. The two technical challenges to success are selecting and developing (1) microbial strains that efficiently ferment syngas to acetic acid in high salt environments and (2) membranes that efficiently separate ammonia from the acetic acid/water mixture and are stable at high enough temperature to facilitate high thermal cracking of the ammonium acetate salt. Fermentation - Microbial strains were procured from a variety of public culture collections (Table 1). Strains were incubated and grown in the presence of the ammonium acetate product and the fastest growing cultures were selected and incubated at higher product concentrations. An example of the performance of a selected culture is shown in Figure 2. Separations - Several membranes were considered. Testing was performed on a new product line produced by Sulzer Chemtech (Germany). These are tubular ceramic membranes with weak acid functionality (see Figure 3). The following results were observed: (1) The membranes were relatively fragile in a laboratory setting; (2) Thermally stable {at} 130 C in hot organic acids; (3) Acetic acid rejection > 99%; and (4

  15. Absorption cross section for the 5νOH stretch of acetic acid and peracetic acid

    Begashaw, I. G.; Collingwood, M.; Bililign, S.

    2009-12-01

    We report measurements of the absorption cross sections for the vibrational O-H stretch (5νOH) overtone transitions in glacial acetic acid and peracetic acid. The photochemistry that results from overtone excitation has been shown to lead to OH radical production in molecules containing O-H (HNO3, H2O2). In addition the overtone excitation has been observed to result in light initiated chemical reaction. A Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument comprising of an Nd:YAG pumped dye laser and 620nm high reflectivity mirrors (R=99.995%) was used to measure the cross sections. The dye laser wavelength was calibrated using water vapor spectrum and the HITRAN 2008 database. The instrument’s minimum detectable absorption is αmin =4.5 *10-9cm-1 Hz-1/2 at 2σ noise level near the peak of the absorption feature. This measurement is the first for acetic acid at this excitation level. Preliminary results for acetic acid show the peak occurs near 615nm. Procedures for separating the monomer and dimer contribution will be presented. We would like to acknowledge support from NSF award #0803016 and NOAA-EPP award #NA06OAR4810187.

  16. Beneficial Effect of Acetic Acid on the Xylose Utilization and Bacterial Cellulose Production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Chao; Guo, Hai-Jun; Xiong, Lian; Luo, Jun; Wang, Bo; Chen, Xue-Fang; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Xin-De

    2014-09-01

    In this work, acetic acid was found as one promising substrate to improve xylose utilization by Gluconacetobacter xylinus CH001. Also, with the help of adding acetic acid into medium, the bacterial cellulose (BC) production by G. xylinus was increased significantly. In the medium containing 3 g l(-1) acetic acid, the optimal xylose concentration for BC production was 20 g l(-1). In the medium containing 20 g l(-1) xylose, the xylose utilization and BC production by G. xylinus were stimulated by acetic acid within certain concentration. The highest BC yield (1.35 ± 0.06 g l(-1)) was obtained in the medium containing 20 g l(-1) xylose and 3 g l(-1) acetic acid after 14 days. This value was 6.17-fold higher than the yield (0.21 ± 0.01 g l(-1)) in the medium only containing 20 g l(-1) xylose. The results analyzed by FE-SEM, FTIR, and XRD showed that acetic acid affected little on the microscopic morphology and physicochemical characteristics of BC. Base on the phenomenon observed, lignocellulosic acid hydrolysates (xylose and acetic acid are main carbon sources present in it) could be considered as one potential substrate for BC production.

  17. Catalytic oxidative conversion of cellulosic biomass to formic acid and acetic acid with exceptionally high yields

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2014-09-01

    Direct conversion of raw biomass materials to fine chemicals is of great significance from both economic and ecological perspectives. In this paper, we report that a Keggin-type vanadium-substituted phosphomolybdic acid catalyst, namely H4PVMo11O40, is capable of converting various biomass-derived substrates to formic acid and acetic acid with high selectivity in a water medium and oxygen atmosphere. Under optimized reaction conditions, H4PVMo11O40 gave an exceptionally high yield of formic acid (67.8%) from cellulose, far exceeding the values achieved in previous catalytic systems. Our study demonstrates that heteropoly acids are generally effective catalysts for biomass conversion due to their strong acidities, whereas the composition of metal addenda atoms in the catalysts has crucial influence on the reaction pathway and the product selectivity. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Tolerance to acetic acid is improved by mutations of the TATA-binding protein gene.

    An, Jieun; Kwon, Hyeji; Kim, Eunjung; Lee, Young Mi; Ko, Hyeok Jin; Park, Hongjae; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2015-03-01

    Screening a library of overexpressing mutant alleles of the TATA-binding gene SPT15 yielded two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (MRRC 3252 and 3253) with enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. They were also tolerant to propionic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Transcriptome profile analysis identified 58 upregulated genes and 106 downregulated genes in MRRC 3252. Stress- and protein synthesis-related transcription factors were predominantly enriched in the upregulated and downregulated genes respectively. Eight deletion mutants for some of the highly downregulated genes were acetic acid-tolerant. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species was considerably lessened in MRRC 3252 and 3253 upon exposure to acetic acid. Metabolome profile analysis revealed that intracellular concentrations of 5 and 102 metabolites were increased and decreased, respectively, in MRRC 3252, featuring a large increase of urea and a significant decrease of amino acids. The dur1/2Δmutant, in which the urea degradation gene DUR1/2 is deleted, displayed enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. Enhanced tolerance to acetic acid was also observed on the medium containing a low concentration of amino acids. Taken together, this study identified two SPT15 alleles, nine gene deletions and low concentration of amino acids in the medium that confer enhanced tolerance to acetic acid.

  19. Oxidation of acetate through reactions of the citric acid cycle by Geobacter sulfurreducens in pure culture and in syntrophic coculture

    2000-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA oxidized acetate to CO2 via citric acid cycle reactions during growth with acetate plus fumarate in pure culture, and with acetate plus nitrate in coculture with Wolinella succinogenes. Acetate was activated by succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase and also via acetate kinase plus phosphotransacetylase. Citrate was formed by citrate synthase. Soluble isocitrate and malate dehydrogenases reduced NADP+ and NAD+, respectively. Oxidation of 2-oxoglutarate was me...

  20. Acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar: phenotypic traits relevant for starter cultures selection.

    Gullo, Maria; Giudici, Paolo

    2008-06-30

    This review focuses on acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar process. Although several studies are available on acetic acid bacteria ecology, metabolism and nutritional requirements, their activity as well as their technological traits in homemade vinegars as traditional balsamic vinegar is not well known. The basic technology to oxidise cooked grape must to produce traditional balsamic vinegar is performed by the so called "seed-vinegar" that is a microbiologically undefined starter culture obtained from spontaneous acetification of previous raw material. Selected starter cultures are the main technological improvement in order to innovate traditional balsamic vinegar production but until now they are rarely applied. To develop acetic acid bacteria starter cultures, selection criteria have to take in account composition of raw material, acetic acid bacteria metabolic activities, applied technology and desired characteristics of the final product. For traditional balsamic vinegar, significative phenotypical traits of acetic acid bacteria have been highlighted. Basic traits are: ethanol preferred and efficient oxidation, fast rate of acetic acid production, tolerance to high concentration of acetic acid, no overoxidation and low pH resistance. Specific traits are tolerance to high sugar concentration and to a wide temperature range. Gluconacetobacter europaeus and Acetobacter malorum strains can be evaluated to develop selected starter cultures since they show one or more suitable characters.

  1. Acetic Acid Production by an Electrodialysis Fermentation Method with a Computerized Control System.

    Nomura, Yoshiyuki; Iwahara, Masayoshi; Hongo, Motoyoshi

    1988-01-01

    In acetic acid fermentation by Acetobacter aceti, the acetic acid produced inhibits the production of acetic acid by this microorganism. To alleviate this inhibitory effect, we developed an electrodialysis fermentation method such that acetic acid is continuously removed from the broth. The fermentation unit has a computerized system for the control of the pH and the concentration of ethanol in the fermentation broth. The electrodialysis fermentation system resulted in improved cell growth and higher productivity over an extended period; the productivity exceeded that from non-pH-controlled fermentation. During electrodialysis fermentation in our system, 97.6 g of acetic acid was produced from 86.0 g of ethanol; the amount of acetic acid was about 2.4 times greater than that produced by non-pH-controlled fermentation (40.1 g of acetic acid produced from 33.8 g of ethanol). Maximum productivity of electrodialysis fermentation in our system was 2.13 g/h, a rate which was 1.35 times higher than that of non-pH-controlled fermentation (1.58 g/h).

  2. Point mutation of H3/H4 histones affects acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Liu, Xiangyong; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-10-10

    The molecular mechanism of acetic acid tolerance in yeast remains unclear despite of its importance for efficient cellulosic ethanol production. In this study, we examined the effects of histone H3/H4 point mutations on yeast acetic acid tolerance by comprehensively screening a histone H3/H4 mutant library. A total of 24 histone H3/H4 mutants (six acetic acid resistant and 18 sensitive) were identified. Compared to the wild-type strain, the histone acetic acid-resistant mutants exhibited improved ethanol fermentation performance under acetic acid stress. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed that changes in the gene expression in the acetic acid-resistant mutants H3 K37A and H4 K16Q were mainly related to energy production, antioxidative stress. Our results provide novel insights into yeast acetic acid tolerance on the basis of histone, and suggest a novel approach to improve ethanol production by altering the histone H3/H4 sequences.

  3. KRAFT MILL BIOREFINERY TO PRODUCE ACETIC ACID AND ETHANOL: TECHNICAL ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

    Haibo Mao; Joseph M. Genco; Adriaan van Heiningen; Hemant Pendse

    2010-01-01

    The “near neutral hemicellulose extraction process” involves extraction of hemicellulose using green liquor prior to kraft pulping. Ancillary unit operations include hydrolysis of the extracted carbohydrates using sulfuric acid, removal of extracted lignin, liquid-liquid extraction of acetic acid, liming followed by separation of gypsum, fermentation of C5 and C6 sugars, and upgrading the acetic acid and ethanol products by distillation. The process described here is a variant of the “near n...

  4. Theophylline-7-acetic acid derivatives with amino acids as anti-tuberculosis agents.

    Voynikov, Yulian; Valcheva, Violeta; Momekov, Georgi; Peikov, Plamen; Stavrakov, Georgi

    2014-07-15

    A series of amides were synthesized by condensation of theophylline-7-acetic acid and eight commercially available amino acid methyl ester hydrochlorides. Consecutive hydrolysis of six of the amido-esters resulted in the formation of corresponding amido-acids. The newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The activity varied depending on the amino acid fragments and in seven cases exerted excellent values with MICs 0.46-0.26 μM. Assessment of the cytotoxicity revealed that the compounds were not cytotoxic against the human embryonal kidney cell line HEK-293T. The theophylline-7-acetamides containing amino acid moieties appear to be promising lead compounds for the development of antimycobacterial agents.

  5. Kinetics of Oxidation of Some Amino Acids by N-Chlorosaccharin in Aqueous Acetic Acid Medium

    N. A. Mohamed Farook

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of some amino acids namely, glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, arginine, and histidine, (AA by N-chlorosaccharin (NCSA in aqueous acetic acid medium in the presence of perchloric acid have been investigated. The observed rate of oxidation is first order in [AA], [NCSA] and of inverse fractional order in [H+]. The main product of the oxidation is the corresponding aldehyde. The ionic strength on the reaction rate has no significant effect. The effect of changing the dielectric constant of the medium on the rate indicates the reaction to be of dipole-dipole type. Hypochlorous acid has been postulated as the reactive oxidizing species. The reaction constants involved in the mechanism are derived. The activation parameters are computed with respect to slow step of the mechanism.

  6. Kinetics of acetic acid synthesis from ethanol over a Cu/SiO2 catalyst

    Voss, Bodil; Schjødt, Niels Christian; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk;

    2011-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of ethanol via acetaldehyde for the synthesis of acetic acid over a Cu based catalyst in a new process is reported. Specifically, we have studied a Cu on SiO2 catalyst which has shown very high selectivity to acetic acid via acetaldehyde compared to competing condensation routes....... The dehydrogenation experiments were carried out in a flow through lab scale tubular reactor. Based on 71 data sets a power law kinetic expression has been derived for the description of the dehydrogenation of acetaldehyde to acetic acid. The apparent reaction order was 0.89 with respect to water and 0...

  7. Improvement on stability of square planar rhodium (Ⅰ) complexes for carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid

    蒋华; 潘平来; 袁国卿; 陈新滋

    1999-01-01

    A series of square planar cis-dicarbonyl polymer coordinated rhodium complexes with uncoordinated donors near the central rhodium atoms for carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid are reported. Data of IR, XPS and thermal analysis show that these complexes are very stable. The intramolecular substitution reaction is proposed for their high stability. These complexes show excellent catalytic activity, selectivity and less erosion to the equipment for the methanol carbonylation to acetic acid. The distillation process may be used instead of flash vaporization in the manufacture of acetic acid, which reduces the investment on the equipment.

  8. Improved Acetic Acid Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Overexpression of the WHI2 Gene Identified through Inverse Metabolic Engineering.

    Chen, Yingying; Stabryla, Lisa; Wei, Na

    2016-01-29

    Development of acetic acid-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for economically viable production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass, but the goal remains a critical challenge due to limited information on effective genetic perturbation targets for improving acetic acid resistance in the yeast. This study employed a genomic-library-based inverse metabolic engineering approach to successfully identify a novel gene target, WHI2 (encoding a cytoplasmatic globular scaffold protein), which elicited improved acetic acid resistance in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of WHI2 significantly improved glucose and/or xylose fermentation under acetic acid stress in engineered yeast. The WHI2-overexpressing strain had 5-times-higher specific ethanol productivity than the control in glucose fermentation with acetic acid. Analysis of the expression of WHI2 gene products (including protein and transcript) determined that acetic acid induced endogenous expression of Whi2 in S. cerevisiae. Meanwhile, the whi2Δ mutant strain had substantially higher susceptibility to acetic acid than the wild type, suggesting the important role of Whi2 in the acetic acid response in S. cerevisiae. Additionally, overexpression of WHI2 and of a cognate phosphatase gene, PSR1, had a synergistic effect in improving acetic acid resistance, suggesting that Whi2 might function in combination with Psr1 to elicit the acetic acid resistance mechanism. These results improve our understanding of the yeast response to acetic acid stress and provide a new strategy to breed acetic acid-resistant yeast strains for renewable biofuel production.

  9. 40 CFR 721.304 - Acetic acid, [(5-chloro-8-quinolinyl)oxy-], 1-methyl hexyl ester.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acetic acid, , 1-methyl hexyl ester... Substances § 721.304 Acetic acid, , 1-methyl hexyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as acetic acid, -, 1-methylhexyl ester (PMN...

  10. Electrochemical evaluation of the inhibitory effects of acetic acid on Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Yuan Zhenhong; Zhao Jinsheng; Yan Yongjie; Yang Zhengyu

    2006-01-01

    A mediated electrochemical method was proposed for toxic evaluation of acetic acid on S. cerevisiae AS.380, and menadione/ferricyanide was chosen as the mediator system. The variance in electrochemical response in the absence and presence of increasing concentrations of acetic acid were used to indicate the inhibitory effects of weak acid on the yeast. The inhibitory effects of acetic acid on glucose consumption during menadione mediated reduction of ferricyanide were also measured for comparison purpose. The relative limiting current and the glucose consumption were reduced by 64.5 % and 61%, respectively, in the presence of 4g/L acetic acid at pH 4.0. The results showed that the electrochemical method can provide us with an appropriate and convenient tool for cytotoxic evaluation.

  11. 1-Methylpyrrolidine-2-acetic Acid is not a Precursor of Tropane Alkaloids.

    Huang, M N; Abraham, T W; Kim, S H; Leete, E

    1996-02-01

    1-Methylpyrrolidine-2-acetic acid and related compounds were studied as precursors in the biosynthesis of the tropane alkaloids in Erythroxylum coca and Datura innoxia. (R,S)-[1',2-(13)C2,2-(14)C,(15)N]-1-methylpyrrolidine-2- acid, (R,S)-[1',2'-(13)C2,1'-(14)C]-1-methylpyrrolidine-2-acetic acid, (R,S) [1',2'-(13)C2,1-(14)C]-1-methylpyrrolidine-2-acetate, and (R,S)-+2'-(14)C] methylpyrrolidine-2-acetic acid N-acetylcysteamine thioester were synthesized an intact plants by leaf-planting or hydroponic-feeding. Specific incorporation of compounds into ( - )-hyoscyamine, ( - )-scopolamine, ( - )-cocaine and the biosynthetically related cuscohygrine were very low. These results indicate that 1-methylpyrrolidine acid is not an efficient precursor of tropane alkaloids.

  12. Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 2, September 30 to December 31, 1977

    Sanderson, J E; Wise, D L

    1978-03-10

    Preliminary results on the production of acetic acid from marine algae by anaerobic fermentation indicates that the rate is quite fast. First order rate constants of 0.77 day/sup -1/ have been observed. This rate constant gives a half-life of less than one day. In other words, with a properly designed product removal system a five day retention time would yield 98% of theoretical conversion. Determination of the theoretical conversion of marine algae to acetic acid is the subject of much experimentation. The production of one acetic acid molecule (or equivalent in higher organic acids) for each three carbon atoms in the substrate has been achieved; but it is possible that with a mixed culture more than one acetic acid molecule may be produced for each three carbons in the substrate.

  13. Kinetics of Oxidation of 3-Benzoylpropionic Acid by N-Chlorobenzamide in Aqueous Acetic Acid Medium

    N. A. Mohamed Farook

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of 3-benzoylpropionic acid (KA by N-chlorobenzamide (NCB in aqueous acetic acid medium in the presence of perchloric acid have been investigated. The observed rate of oxidation is first order dependence each in [KA], [NCB] and [H+]. The main product of the oxidation is the corresponding carboxylic acid. The rate decreases with the addition of benzamide, one of the products of the reaction. Variation in ionic strength of the reaction medium has no significant effect on the rate of oxidation. But the rate of the reaction is enhanced by lowering the dielectric constant of the reaction medium. Hypochlorous acidium ion (H2O+Cl, has been postulated as the reactive oxidizing species. A mechanism consistent with observed results have been proposed and the related rate law deduced. The activation parameters have been computed with respect to slow step of the mechanism.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide resistance of Acetobacter pasteurianus NBRC3283 and its relationship to acetic acid fermentation.

    Okamoto-Kainuma, Akiko; Ehata, Yasunori; Ikeda, Manami; Osono, Takemasa; Ishikawa, Morio; Kaga, Takayuki; Koizumi, Yukimichi

    2008-10-01

    The bacterium Acetobacter pasteurianus can ferment acetic acid, a process that proceeds at the risk of oxidative stress. To understand the stress response, we investigated catalase and OxyR in A. pasteurianus NBRC3283. This strain expresses only a KatE homolog as catalase, which is monofunctional and growth dependent. Disruption of the oxyR gene increased KatE activity, but both the katE and oxyR mutant strains showed greater sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide as compared to the parental strain. These mutant strains showed growth similar to the parental strain in the ethanol oxidizing phase, but their growth was delayed when cultured in the presence of acetic acid and of glycerol and during the acetic acid peroxidation phase. The results suggest that A. pasteurianus cells show different oxidative stress responses between the metabolism via the membrane oxidizing pathway and that via the general aerobic pathway during acetic acid fermentation.

  15. Impact of acetic acid concentration of fermented liquid feed on growth performance of piglets

    Canibe, Nuria; Pedersen, Anni Øyan; Jensen, Bent Borg

    2010-01-01

    of microbial metabolites, namely acetic acid, possibly in combination with low feed pH, has been suggested to be determinant in reducing feed intake by impairing palatability. However, this hypothesis has never been investigated. A study was carried out to determine the impact of increasing levels of acetic...... acid in FLF on feed intake of weaners. Three experimental FLF diets were prepared to contain varying levels of acetic acid (30, 60, and 120 mM). Twenty piglets per treatment, weaned at 4 weeks of age and housed individually, were fed the experimental diets during six weeks starting at weaning. Feed...... intake and body weight were registered weekly. The results showed that high acetic acid concentration in FLF, accompanied by a slight lower pH level, tended to decrease feed intake without affecting body weight gain. This discrepancy could partly be explained by the difficulty in measuring accurately...

  16. Synthesis of 2-(Benzodioxol-2-yl)acetic Acids as PPARδ Agonists

    Jian Lei KANG; Zhi Bing ZHENG; Dan QIN; Li Li WANG; Song LI

    2006-01-01

    A new series of compounds, 2-(benzodioxol-2-yl)acetic acids, have been synthesized. Their structures were confirmed by MS and 1H-NMR. The preliminary pharmacological screening showed that these compounds exhibited potent human PPARδ agonist activities.

  17. Oxidative aromatization of Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines by aqueous hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for the oxidative aromatization of Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines to the corresponding pyridines is achieved by using hydrogen peroxide as green oxidant and acetic acid as catalyst in aqueous solution.

  18. Growing and laying performance of Japanese quail fed diet supplemented with different concentrations of acetic acid

    Youssef A. Attia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the effect of acetic acid on growing and laying performance of Japanese Quail (JQ, 180 15-day-old JQ were divided into 4 groups. During the growing (15-42 days of age and laying (43-84 days of age periods, the groups fed the same basal diets supplemented with 0, 1.5, 3 and 6% of acetic acid. Each diet was fed to five replicates of 9 JQ (3 males:6 females during the growing period. During the laying period, 128 birds were housed in 32 cages (4 birds per cage, 1 male and 3 females, 8 replicates per treatment. Birds were housed in wire cages (46L×43W×20H cm in an open room. Acetic acid supplementation at 3% in the diets significantly increased the growth and laying rate and the Haugh unit score. The liver percentage significantly decreased with acetic acid at 6%. Acetic acid at 3% significantly increased hemoglobin concentrations at 6 weeks of age and increased weight of day old chicks hatched. Acetic acid affected the immune system as manifested by an excess of cellular reactions in the intestine as well as lymphoid hyperplasia in the spleen tissue. Degenerative changes in the covering epithelium of the intestinal villi were noted at the 6% concentration of acetic acid. Hepatocyte vacuolation and fatty changes were also observed at this concentration of treatment. In conclusion, 3% acetic acid may be used as a feed supplement for JQ during the growing and laying period to improve the productive performance.

  19. The Fate of Acetic Acid during Glucose Co-Metabolism by the Spoilage Yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii

    Fernando Rodrigues; Maria João Sousa; Paula Ludovico; Helena Santos; Manuela Côrte-Real; Cecília Leão

    2012-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most widely represented spoilage yeast species, being able to metabolise acetic acid in the presence of glucose. To clarify whether simultaneous utilisation of the two substrates affects growth efficiency, we examined growth in single- and mixed-substrate cultures with glucose and acetic acid. Our findings indicate that the biomass yield in the first phase of growth is the result of the weighted sum of the respective biomass yields on single-substrate me...

  20. Comparison of Cultivable Acetic Acid Bacterial Microbiota in Organic and Conventional Apple Cider Vinegar

    2016-01-01

    Organic apple cider vinegar is produced from apples that go through very restricted treatment in orchard. During the first stage of the process, the sugars from apples are fermented by yeasts to cider. The produced ethanol is used as a substrate by acetic acid bacteria in a second separated bioprocess. In both, the organic and conventional apple cider vinegars the ethanol oxidation to acetic acid is initiated by native microbiota that survived alcohol fermentation. We compared the cultivable ...

  1. KINETIC OF ESTERIFICATION OF ETHYL ALCOHOL BY ACETIC ACID ON A CATALYTIC RESIN

    Erol İNCE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The conversion kinetics of diluted acetic acid to ethyl acetate by ethanol esterification in a batch reactor in liquid phase with an acidic polymer catalyst (lewatit series was studied. The intrinsic rate constants have been correlated with the reaction temperature, concentration of catalyst, initial ratios of reactants and initial water concentrations. The kinetic analysis was restricted to the system at hand in which a liquid and vapor phase are at equilibrium.

  2. SINOPEC,BP TO LAUNCH ACETIC ACID JOINT VENTURE IN NANJING

    2005-01-01

    @@ Sinopec Corp and BP signed a 50%-50% joint venture contract on March 15 to build a world-class 500,000-ton acetic acid plant in Nanjing, the capital of East China's Jiangsu Province. The joint venture, which is expected to be on stream in the second half of 2007,will adopt BP's world leading CativaR technology to make this project become a acetic acid production base with great competitiveness.

  3. Effects of acetic acid and lactic acid on physicochemical characteristics of native and cross-linked wheat starches.

    Majzoobi, Mahsa; Beparva, Paniz

    2014-03-15

    The effects of two common organic acids; lactic and acetic acids (150 mg/kg) on physicochemical properties of native and cross-linked wheat starches were investigated prior and after gelatinization. These acids caused formation of some cracks and spots on the granules. The intrinsic viscosity of both starches decreased in the presence of the acids particularly after gelatinization. Water solubility increased while water absorption reduced after addition of the acids. The acids caused reduction in gelatinization temperature and enthalpy of gelatinization of both starches. The starch gels became softer, less cohesive, elastic and gummy when acids were added. These changes may indicate the degradation of the starch molecules by the acids. Cross-linked wheat starch was more resistant to the acids. However, both starches became more susceptible to the acids after gelatinization. The effect of lactic acid on physicochemical properties of both starches before and after gelatinization was greater than acetic acid.

  4. Comparison of D-gluconic acid production in selected strains of acetic acid bacteria.

    Sainz, F; Navarro, D; Mateo, E; Torija, M J; Mas, A

    2016-04-01

    The oxidative metabolism of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) can be exploited for the production of several compounds, including D-gluconic acid. The production of D-gluconic acid in fermented beverages could be useful for the development of new products without glucose. In the present study, we analyzed nineteen strains belonging to eight different species of AAB to select those that could produce D-gluconic acid from D-glucose without consuming D-fructose. We tested their performance in three different media and analyzed the changes in the levels of D-glucose, D-fructose, D-gluconic acid and the derived gluconates. D-Glucose and D-fructose consumption and D-gluconic acid production were heavily dependent on the strain and the media. The most suitable strains for our purpose were Gluconobacter japonicus CECT 8443 and Gluconobacter oxydans Po5. The strawberry isolate Acetobacter malorum (CECT 7749) also produced D-gluconic acid; however, it further oxidized D-gluconic acid to keto-D-gluconates.

  5. Effect of manganese ions on ethanol fermentation by xylose isomerase expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae under acetic acid stress.

    Ko, Ja Kyong; Um, Youngsoon; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2016-12-01

    The efficient fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the presence of inhibitors is highly desirable for bioethanol production. Among the inhibitors, acetic acid released during the pretreatment of lignocellulose negatively affects the fermentation performance of biofuel producing organisms. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of acetic acid on glucose and xylose fermentation by a high performance engineered strain of xylose utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SXA-R2P-E, harboring a xylose isomerase based pathway. The presence of acetic acid severely decreased the xylose fermentation performance of this strain. However, the acetic acid stress was alleviated by metal ion supplementation resulting in a 52% increased ethanol production rate under 2g/L of acetic acid stress. This study shows the inhibitory effect of acetic acid on an engineered isomerase-based xylose utilizing strain and suggests a simple but effective method to improve the co-fermentation performance under acetic acid stress for efficient bioethanol production.

  6. [Advances in the progress of anti-bacterial biofilms properties of acetic acid].

    Gao, Xinxin; Jin, Zhenghua; Chen, Xinxin; Yu, Jia'ao

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial biofilms are considered to be the hindrance in the treatment of chronic wound, because of their tolerance toward antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents. They also have strong ability to escape from the host immune attack. Acetic acid, as a kind of organic weak acid, can disturb the biofilms by freely diffusing through the bacterial biofilms and bacterial cell membrane structure. Then the acid dissociates to release the hydrogen ions, leading to the disorder of the acid-base imbalance, change of protein conformation, and the degradation of the DNA within the membranes. This paper reviews the literature on the characteristics and treatment strategies of the bacterial biofilms and the acetic acid intervention on them, so as to demonstrate the roles acetic acid may play in the treatment of chronic wound, and thus provide a convincing treatment strategy for this kind of disease.

  7. The fraction of cells that resume growth after acetic acid addition is a strain-dependent parameter of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Swinnen, Steve; Fernández-Niño, Miguel; González-Ramos, Daniel; van Maris, Antonius J A; Nevoigt, Elke

    2014-06-01

    High acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a relevant phenotype in industrial biotechnology when using lignocellulosic hydrolysates as feedstock. A screening of 38 S. cerevisiae strains for tolerance to acetic acid revealed considerable differences, particularly with regard to the duration of the latency phase. To understand how this phenotype is quantitatively manifested, four strains exhibiting significant differences were studied in more detail. Our data show that the duration of the latency phase is primarily determined by the fraction of cells within the population that resume growth. Only this fraction contributed to the exponential growth observed after the latency phase, while all other cells persisted in a viable but non-proliferating state. A remarkable variation in the size of the fraction was observed among the tested strains differing by several orders of magnitude. In fact, only 11 out of 10(7)  cells of the industrial bioethanol production strain Ethanol Red resumed growth after exposure to 157 mM acetic acid at pH 4.5, while this fraction was 3.6 × 10(6) (out of 10(7)  cells) in the highly acetic acid tolerant isolate ATCC 96581. These strain-specific differences are genetically determined and represent a valuable starting point to identify genetic targets for future strain improvement.

  8. Effects of the use of acetic acid as the conservant in lucerne ensiling

    Đorđević Nenad

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of acetic acid as the chemical conservant in three doses (4, 6 8 g/kg green mass on the intensity of fermentation and proteolysis in lucerne silage was investigated. On the basis of chemical analysis, it was found that with the increase of conservant dose the pH value decreased aminogenesis and nitrogen solubility was limited. In silages treated the absolute and relative domination of acetic acid was found in total acid content. The increase of free and bonded acetic acid was discovered with the increase of conservant dose. Free butyric acid was not detected, while bonded butyric acid was present in negligible concentration, without effect on silage quality. Compared to control silage (III quality class according to DLG and Zelter method, a significant increase of acetic acid in silages resulted in the decline of their quality, and they were ranked as not useful (V quality class according to DLG method, or on the margin of usefulness (IV quality class according to Zelter method. In spite of some foreign references, domestic experiences show that acetic acid is not an effective conservant and it is not recommended for that use for lucerne that is not simple to ensile.

  9. Acetate accumulation enhances mixed culture fermentation of biomass to lactic acid.

    Khor, Way Cern; Roume, Hugo; Coma, Marta; Vervaeren, Han; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-10-01

    Lactic acid is a high-in-demand chemical, which can be produced through fermentation of lignocellulosic feedstock. However, fermentation of complex substrate produces a mixture of products at efficiencies too low to justify a production process. We hypothesized that the background acetic acid concentration plays a critical role in lactic acid yield; therefore, its retention via selective extraction of lactic acid or its addition would improve overall lactic acid production and eliminate net production of acetic acid. To test this hypothesis, we added 10 g/L of acetate to fermentation broth to investigate its effect on products composition and concentration and bacterial community evolution using several substrate-inoculum combinations. With rumen fluid inoculum, lactate concentrations increased by 80 ± 12 % (cornstarch, p 69 % lactic acid bacteria (LAB), predominantly Lactobacillaceae. Higher acetate concentration promoted a more diverse LAB population, especially on non-inoculated bottles. In subsequent tests, acetate was added in a semi-continuous percolation system with grass as substrate. These tests confirmed our findings producing lactate at concentrations 26 ± 5 % (p lactic acid production from waste biomass to levels more attractive for application.

  10. Citric acid cycle in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum grown autotrophically, heterotrophically, and mixotrophically with acetate.

    Hu, Yajing; Holden, James F

    2006-06-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum uses the citric acid cycle in the oxidative and reductive directions for heterotrophic and autotrophic growth, respectively, but the control of carbon flow is poorly understood. P. islandicum was grown at 95 degrees C autotrophically, heterotrophically, and mixotrophically with acetate, H2, and small amounts of yeast extract and with thiosulfate as the terminal electron acceptor. The autotrophic growth rates and maximum concentrations of cells were significantly lower than those in other media. The growth rates on H2 and 0.001% yeast extract with and without 0.05% acetate were the same, but the maximum concentration of cells was fourfold higher with acetate. There was no growth with acetate if 0.001% yeast extract was not present, and addition of H2 to acetate-containing medium greatly increased the growth rates and maximum concentrations of cells. P. islandicum cultures assimilated 14C-labeled acetate in the presence of H2 and yeast extract with an efficiency of 55%. The activities of 11 of 19 enzymes involved in the central metabolism of P. islandicum were regulated under the three different growth conditions. Pyruvate synthase and acetate:coenzyme A (CoA) ligase (ADP-forming) activities were detected only in heterotrophically grown cultures. Citrate synthase activity decreased in autotrophic and acetate-containing cultures compared to the activity in heterotrophic cultures. Acetylated citrate lyase, acetate:CoA ligase (AMP forming), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities increased in autotrophic and acetate-containing cultures. Citrate lyase activity was higher than ATP citrate synthase activity in autotrophic cultures. These data suggest that citrate lyase and AMP-forming acetate:CoA ligase, but not ATP citrate synthase, work opposite citrate synthase to control the direction of carbon flow in the citric acid cycle.

  11. Polygenic analysis and targeted improvement of the complex trait of high acetic acid tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Meijnen, Jean-Paul; Randazzo, Paola; Foulquié-Moreno, María R; van den Brink, Joost; Vandecruys, Paul; Stojiljkovic, Marija; Dumortier, Françoise; Zalar, Polona; Boekhout, Teun; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Kokošar, Janez; Štajdohar, Miha; Curk, Tomaž; Petrovič, Uroš; Thevelein, Johan M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acetic acid is one of the major inhibitors in lignocellulose hydrolysates used for the production of second-generation bioethanol. Although several genes have been identified in laboratory yeast strains that are required for tolerance to acetic acid, the genetic basis of the high acetic

  12. Zinc Acetate Immobilized on Mesoporous Materials by Acetate Ionic Liquids as Catalysts for Vinyl Acetate Synthesis

    Hang Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquid containing active ingredient Zn(CH3COO2 was loaded in mesoporous silica gel to form supported ionic liquids catalyst (SILC which was used to synthesize vinyl acetate monomer (VAM. SILC was characterized by 1HNMR, FT-IR, TGA, BET, and N2 adsorption/desorption and the acetylene method was used to evaluate SILC catalytic activity and stability in fixed reactor. The result shows that 1-allyl-3-acetic ether imidazole acetate ionic liquid is successfully fixed within mesoporous channel of silica gel. The average thickness of ionic liquid catalyst layer is about 1.05 nm. When the catalytic temperature is 195°C, the acetic acid (HAc conversion is 10.9% with 1.1 g vinyl acetate yield and 98% vinyl acetate (VAc selectivity. The HAc conversion is increased by rise of catalytic temperature and molar ratio of C2H2 : HAc and decreased by mass space velocity (WHSV. The catalyst activity is not significantly reduced within 7 days and VAc selectivity has a slight decrease.

  13. Batch and continuous culture-based selection strategies for acetic acid tolerance in xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Wright, Jeremiah; Bellissimi, Eleonora; de Hulster, Erik; Wagner, Andreas; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2011-05-01

    Acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is crucial for the production of bioethanol and other bulk chemicals from lignocellulosic plant-biomass hydrolysates, especially at a low pH. This study explores two evolutionary engineering strategies for the improvement of acetic acid tolerance of the xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae RWB218, whose anaerobic growth on xylose at pH 4 is inhibited at acetic acid concentrations >1 g L(-1) : (1) sequential anaerobic, batch cultivation (pH 4) at increasing acetic acid concentrations and (2) prolonged anaerobic continuous cultivation without pH control, in which acidification by ammonium assimilation generates selective pressure for acetic acid tolerance. After c. 400 generations, the sequential-batch and continuous selection cultures grew on xylose at pH≤4 with 6 and 5 g L(-1) acetic acid, respectively. In the continuous cultures, the specific xylose-consumption rate had increased by 75% to 1.7 g xylose g(-1) biomass h(-1) . After storage of samples from both selection experiments at -80 °C and cultivation without acetic acid, they failed to grow on xylose at pH 4 in the presence of 5 g L(-1) acetic acid. Characterization in chemostat cultures with linear acetic acid gradients demonstrated an acetate-inducible acetic acid tolerance in samples from the continuous selection protocol.

  14. Pretreatment of corn stover with diluted acetic acid for enhancement of acidogenic fermentation.

    Zhao, Xu; Wang, Lijuan; Lu, Xuebin; Zhang, Shuting

    2014-04-01

    A Box-Behnken design of response surface method was used to optimize acetic acid-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment of corn stover, in respect to acid concentration (0.05-0.25%), treatment time (5-15 min) and reaction temperature (180-210°C). Acidogenic fermentations with different initial pH and hydrolyzates were also measured to evaluate the optimal pretreatment conditions for maximizing acid production. The results showed that pretreatment with 0.25% acetic acid at 191°C for 7.74 min was found to be the most optimal condition for pretreatment of corn stover under which the production of acids can reach the highest level. Acidogenic fermentation with the hydrolyzate of pretreatment at the optimal condition at the initial pH=5 was shown to be butyric acid type fermentation, producing 21.84 g acetic acid, 7.246 g propionic acid, 9.170 butyric acid and 1.035 g isovaleric acid from 100g of corn stover in 900 g of water containing 2.25 g acetic acid.

  15. Conformational equilibria and large-amplitude motions in dimers of carboxylic acids: rotational spectrum of acetic acid-difluoroacetic acid.

    Gou, Qian; Feng, Gang; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther

    2014-10-01

    We report the rotational spectra of two conformers of the acetic acid-difluoroacetic acid adduct (CH3COOH-CHF2COOH) and supply information on its internal dynamics. The two conformers differ from each other, depending on the trans or gauche orientation of the terminal -CHF2 group. Both conformers display splittings of the rotational transitions, due to the internal rotation of the methyl group of acetic acid. The corresponding barriers are determined to be V3(trans)=99.8(3) and V3(gauche)=90.5(9) cm(-1) (where V3 is the methyl rotation barrier height). The gauche form displays a further doubling of the rotational transitions, due to the tunneling motion of the -CHF2 group between its two equivalent conformations. The corresponding B2 barrier is estimated to be 108(2) cm(-1). The increase in the distance between the two monomers upon OH→OD deuteration (the Ubbelohde effect) is determined.

  16. Thermal decarboxylation of acetic acid: Implications for origin of natural gas

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Carothers, W.W.; Rosenbauer, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on the thermal decarboxylation of solutions of acetic acid at 200??C and 300??C were carried out in hydrothermal equipment allowing for on-line sampling of both the gas and liquid phases for chemical and stable-carbon-isotope analyses. The solutions had ambient pH values between 2.5 and 7.1; pH values and the concentrations of the various acetate species at the conditions of the experiments were computed using a chemical model. Results show that the concentrations of acetic acid, and not total acetate in solution, control the reaction rates which follow a first order equation based on decreasing concentrations of acetic acid with time. The decarboxylation rates at 200??C (1.81 ?? 10-8 per second) and 300??C (8.17 ?? 10-8 per second) and the extrapolated rates at lower temperatures are relatively high. The activation energy of decarboxylation is only 8.1 kcal/mole. These high decarboxylation rates, together with the distribution of short-chained aliphatic acid anions in formation waters, support the hypothesis that acid anions are precursors for an important portion of natural gas. Results of the ??13C values of CO2, CH4, and total acetate show a reasonably constant fractionation factor of about 20 permil between CO2 and CH4 at 300??C. The ??13C values of CO2 and CH4 are initially low and become higher as decarboxylation increases. ?? 1983.

  17. Performance of dairy cows fed high levels of acetic acid or ethanol.

    Daniel, J L P; Amaral, R C; Sá Neto, A; Cabezas-Garcia, E H; Bispo, A W; Zopollatto, M; Cardoso, T L; Spoto, M H F; Santos, F A P; Nussio, L G

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol and acetic acid are common end products from silages. The main objective of this study was to determine whether high concentrations of ethanol or acetic acid in total mixed ration would affect performance in dairy cows. Thirty mid-lactation Holstein cows were grouped in 10 blocks and fed one of the following diets for 7 wk: (1) control (33% Bermuda hay + 67% concentrates), (2) ethanol [control diet + 5% ethanol, dry matter (DM) basis], or (3) acetic acid (control diet + 5% acetic acid, DM basis). Ethanol and acetic acid were diluted in water (1:2) and sprayed onto total mixed rations twice daily before feeding. An equal amount of water was mixed with the control ration. To adapt animals to these treatments, cows were fed only half of the treatment dose during the first week of study. Cows fed ethanol yielded more milk (37.9 kg/d) than those fed the control (35.8 kg/d) or acetic acid (35.3 kg/d) diets, mainly due to the higher DM intake (DMI; 23.7, 22.2, and 21.6 kg/d, respectively). The significant diet × week interaction for DMI, mainly during wk 2 and 3 (when acetic acid reached the full dose), was related to the decrease in DMI observed for the acetic acid treatment. There was a diet × week interaction in excretion of milk energy per DMI during wk 2 and 3, due to cows fed acetic acid sustained milk yield despite lower DMI. Energy efficiency was similar across diets. Blood metabolites (glucose, insulin, nonesterified fatty acids, ethanol, and γ-glutamyl transferase activity) and sensory characteristics of milk were not affected by these treatments. Animal performance suggested similar energy value for the diet containing ethanol compared with other diets. Rumen conversion of ethanol to acetate and a concomitant increase in methane production might be a plausible explanation for the deviation of the predicted energy value based on the heat of combustion. Therefore, the loss of volatile compounds during the drying process in the laboratory should be

  18. Isolation of acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria from biogas plants.

    Cibis, Katharina Gabriela; Gneipel, Armin; König, Helmut

    2016-02-20

    In this study, acetic, propionic and butyric acid-forming bacteria were isolated from thermophilic and mesophilic biogas plants (BGP) located in Germany. The fermenters were fed with maize silage and cattle or swine manure. Furthermore, pressurized laboratory fermenters digesting maize silage were sampled. Enrichment cultures for the isolation of acid-forming bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with one of the following carbon sources: Na(+)-dl-lactate, succinate, ethanol, glycerol, glucose or a mixture of amino acids. These substrates could be converted by the isolates to acetic, propionic or butyric acid. In total, 49 isolates were obtained, which belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Tenericutes or Thermotogae. According to 16S rRNA gene sequences, most isolates were related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides, Defluviitoga tunisiensis and Dendrosporobacter quercicolus. Acetic, propionic or butyric acid were produced in cultures of isolates affiliated to Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Clostridium aminovalericum, Clostridium cochlearium/Clostridium tetani, C. sporosphaeroides, D. quercicolus, Proteiniborus ethanoligenes, Selenomonas bovis and Tepidanaerobacter sp. Isolates related to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum produced acetic, butyric and lactic acid, and isolates related to D. tunisiensis formed acetic acid. Specific primer sets targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences were designed and used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The isolates were physiologically characterized and their role in BGP discussed.

  19. Microbiological preservation of cucumbers for bulk storage using acetic acid and food preservatives.

    Pérez-Díaz, I M; McFeeters, R F

    2008-08-01

    Microbial growth did not occur when cucumbers were preserved without a thermal process by storage in solutions containing acetic acid, sodium benzoate, and calcium chloride to maintain tissue firmness. The concentrations of acetic acid and sodium benzoate required to ensure preservation were low enough so that stored cucumbers could be converted to the finished product without the need to wash out and discard excess acid or preservative. Since no thermal process was required, this method of preservation would be applicable for storing cucumbers in bulk containers. Acid tolerant pathogens died off in less than 24 h with the pH, acetic acid, and sodium benzoate concentrations required to assure the microbial stability of cucumbers stored at 30 degrees C. Potassium sorbate as a preservative in this application was not effective. Yeast growth was observed when sulfite was used as a preservative.

  20. Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 2, September 30--December 31, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary results on the production of acetic acid from marine algae by anaerobic fermentation indicate that the rate is quite fast. First order rate constants of 0.77 day/sup -1/ were observed. This rate constant gives a half-life of less than one day. In other words, with a properly designed product removal system a five day retention time would yield 98% of theoretical conversion. Determination of the theoretical conversion of marine algae to acetic acid is the subject of much experimentation. The production of one acetic acid molecule (or equivalent in higher organic acids) for each three carbon atoms in the substrate has been achieved; but it is possible that with a mixed culture more than one acetic acid molecule may be produced for each three carbons in the substrate. Work is continuing to improve the yield of acetic acid from marine algae. Marine algae have been found to be rather low in carbon, but the carbon appears to be readily available for fermentation. It, therefore, lends itself to the production of higher value chemicals in relatively expensive equipment, where the rapid conversion rate is particularly cost effective. Fixed packed bed fermenters appear to be desirable for the production of liquid products which are inhibitory to the fermentation from coarse substrates. The inhibitory products may be removed from the fermentation by extraction during recirculation. This technique lends itself to either conventional processing or low capital processing of substrates which require long retention times.

  1. Acetic acid bacteria: A group of bacteria with versatile biotechnological applications.

    Saichana, Natsaran; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao; Frébort, Ivo; Frebortova, Jitka

    2015-11-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are gram-negative obligate aerobic bacteria assigned to the family Acetobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. They are members of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Swaminathania, Saccharibacter, Neoasaia, Granulibacter, Tanticharoenia, Ameyamaea, Neokomagataea, and Komagataeibacter. Many strains of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter have been known to possess high acetic acid fermentation ability as well as the acetic acid and ethanol resistance, which are considered to be useful features for industrial production of acetic acid and vinegar, the commercial product. On the other hand, Gluconobacter strains have the ability to perform oxidative fermentation of various sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar acids leading to the formation of several valuable products. Thermotolerant strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated in order to serve as the new strains of choice for industrial fermentations, in which the cooling costs for maintaining optimum growth and production temperature in the fermentation vessels could be significantly reduced. Genetic modifications by adaptation and genetic engineering were also applied to improve their properties, such as productivity and heat resistance.

  2. Effect of acetic acid on rice seeds coated with rice husk ash

    Lizandro Ciciliano Tavares

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Flooded rice cultivation promotes anaerobic conditions, favoring the formation of short chain organic acids such as acetic acid, which may be toxic to the crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of acetic acid on rice seeds coated with rice husk ash. The experiment was arranged in a 2 x 5 x 5 factorial randomized design, with two cultivars (IRGA 424 and BRS Querência, five doses of coating material (0, 2, 3,4 e 5 g kg-1 seed and five concentrations of acetic acid (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 mM, with 4 replications, totaling 50 treatments. The variables first count of germination, germination, shoot and root length, dry weight of shoots and roots were recorded. The results showed that coating rice seeds with rice husk ash up to 5 g kg-1 seed does not influence the performance of rice seeds of cultivars IRGA 424 and BRS Querência when exposed to concentrations of 12 mM acetic acid. The presence of acetic acid in the substrates used for seed germination reduced the vigor and viability of seeds of cultivars IRGA 424 and BRS Querência, as well as seedling development, affecting mainly the roots of BRS Querência.

  3. Laboratory Studies of the Tropospheric Loss Processes for Acetic and Peracetic Acid

    Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.

    2002-12-01

    Organic acids are ubiquitous components of tropospheric air and contribute to acid precipitation, particularly in remote regions. These species are present in the troposphere as the result of direct emissions from anthropogenic and biogenic sources, and as the result of photochemical processing of hydrocarbons. Production of organic acids can occur following ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons, while both organic acids and peroxyacids are formed from the reactions of HO2 with acylperoxy radicals. For example, both acetic and peracetic acid are known products of the reaction of HO2 with acetylperoxy radicals. In this paper, data relevant to the gas-phase tropospheric destruction of both acetic and peracetic acid are reported, including studies of their UV absorption spectra and of their rate coefficients for reaction with OH radicals. The data, the first of their kind for peracetic acid, show that the gas-phase lifetime of this species will be on the order of 10 days, with OH reaction occurring more rapidly than photolysis. Data on the rate coefficient for reaction of OH with acetic acid appear to resolve some conflicting data in the previous literature, and show 1) that reaction of OH with the acetic acid dimer is slow compared to the monomer and 2) that the rate coefficient possesses a negative temperature dependence near room temperature.

  4. Direct catalytic asymmetric addition of allyl cyanide to ketones via soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base/hard Lewis base catalysis.

    Yazaki, Ryo; Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2010-04-21

    We report that a hard Lewis base substantially affects the reaction efficiency of direct catalytic asymmetric gamma-addition of allyl cyanide (1a) to ketones promoted by a soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base catalyst. Mechanistic studies have revealed that Cu/(R,R)-Ph-BPE and Li(OC(6)H(4)-p-OMe) serve as a soft Lewis acid and a hard Brønsted base, respectively, allowing for deprotonative activation of 1a as the rate-determining step. A ternary catalytic system comprising a soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base and an additional hard Lewis base, in which the basicity of the hard Brønsted base Li(OC(6)H(4)-p-OMe) was enhanced by phosphine oxide (the hard Lewis base) through a hard-hard interaction, outperformed the previously developed binary soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base catalytic system, leading to higher yields and enantioselectivities while using one-tenth the catalyst loading and one-fifth the amount of 1a. This second-generation catalyst allows efficient access to highly enantioenriched tertiary alcohols under nearly ideal atom-economical conditions (0.5-1 mol % catalyst loading and a substrate molar ratio of 1:2).

  5. Large prebiotic molecules in space: photo-physics of acetic acid and its isomers

    Puletti, Fabrizio; Mulas, Giacomo; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of large molecules have been positively identified in space. Many of these molecules are of biological interest and thus provide insight into prebiotic organic chemistry in the protoplanetary nebula. Among these molecules, acetic acid is of particular importance due to its structural proximity to glycine, the simplest amino acid. We compute electronic and vibrational properties of acetic acid and its isomers, methyl formate and glycolaldehyde, using density functional theory. From computed photo-absorption cross-sections, we obtain the corresponding photo-absorption rates for solar radiation at 1 AU and find them in good agreement with previous estimates. We also discuss glycolaldehyde diffuse emission in Sgr B2(N), as opposite to emissions from methyl formate and acetic acid that appear to be concentrate in the compact region Sgr B2(N-LMH).

  6. The fate of acetic acid during glucose co-metabolism by the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Fernando Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most widely represented spoilage yeast species, being able to metabolise acetic acid in the presence of glucose. To clarify whether simultaneous utilisation of the two substrates affects growth efficiency, we examined growth in single- and mixed-substrate cultures with glucose and acetic acid. Our findings indicate that the biomass yield in the first phase of growth is the result of the weighted sum of the respective biomass yields on single-substrate medium, supporting the conclusion that biomass yield on each substrate is not affected by the presence of the other at pH 3.0 and 5.0, at least for the substrate concentrations examined. In vivo(13C-NMR spectroscopy studies showed that the gluconeogenic pathway is not operational and that [2-(13C]acetate is metabolised via the Krebs cycle leading to the production of glutamate labelled on C(2, C(3 and C(4. The incorporation of [U-(14C]acetate in the cellular constituents resulted mainly in the labelling of the protein and lipid pools 51.5% and 31.5%, respectively. Overall, our data establish that glucose is metabolised primarily through the glycolytic pathway, and acetic acid is used as an additional source of acetyl-CoA both for lipid synthesis and the Krebs cycle. This study provides useful clues for the design of new strategies aimed at overcoming yeast spoilage in acidic, sugar-containing food environments. Moreover, the elucidation of the molecular basis underlying the resistance phenotype of Z. bailii to acetic acid will have a potential impact on the improvement of the performance of S. cerevisiae industrial strains often exposed to acetic acid stress conditions, such as in wine and bioethanol production.

  7. The role of glass composition in the behaviour of glass acetic acid and glass lactic acid cements.

    Shahid, Saroash; Billington, R W; Pearson, G J

    2008-02-01

    Cements have recently been described, made from glass ionomer glass reacted with acetic and lactic acid instead of polymeric carboxylic acid. From their behaviour a theory relating to a possible secondary setting mechanism of glass ionomer has been adduced. However, only one glass (G338) was used throughout. In this study a much simpler glass ionomer glass (MP4) was compared with G338. This produced very different results. With acetic acid G338 formed cement which became resistant to water over a period of hours, as previously reported, MP4 formed cement which was never stable to water. With lactic acid G338 behaved similarly to G338 with acetic acid, again as reported, but MP4 produced a cement which was completely resistant to water at early exposure and unusually became slightly less resistant if exposure was delayed for 6 h or more. These findings indicate that the theories relating to secondary setting in glass ionomer maturation may need revision.

  8. Structurally defined allyl compounds of main group metals: coordination and reactivity.

    Lichtenberg, Crispin; Okuda, Jun

    2013-05-10

    Organometallic allyl compounds are important as allylation reagents in organic synthesis, as polymerization catalysts, and as volatile metal precursors in material science. Whereas the allyl chemistry of synthetically relevant transition metals such as palladium and of the lanthanoids is well-established, that of main group metals has been lagging behind. Recent progress on allyl complexes of Groups 1, 2, and 12-16 now provides a more complete picture. This is based on a fundamental understanding of metal-allyl bonding interactions in solution and in the solid state. Furthermore, reactivity trends have been rationalized and new types of allyl-specific reactivity patterns have been uncovered. Key features include 1) the exploitation of the different types of metal-allyl bonding (highly ionic to predominantly covalent), 2) the use of synergistic effects in heterobimetallic compounds, and 3) the adjustment of Lewis acidity by variation of the charge of allyl compounds.

  9. Candida zemplinina can reduce acetic acid produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in sweet wine fermentations.

    Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Dolci, Paola; Giacosa, Simone; Torchio, Fabrizio; Tofalo, Rosanna; Torriani, Sandra; Suzzi, Giovanna; Rolle, Luca; Cocolin, Luca

    2012-03-01

    In this study we investigated the possibility of using Candida zemplinina, as a partner of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in mixed fermentations of must with a high sugar content, in order to reduce its acetic acid production. Thirty-five C. zemplinina strains, which were isolated from different geographic regions, were molecularly characterized, and their fermentation performances were determined. Five genetically different strains were selected for mixed fermentations with S. cerevisiae. Two types of inoculation were carried out: coinoculation and sequential inoculation. A balance between the two species was generally observed for the first 6 days, after which the levels of C. zemplinina started to decrease. Relevant differences were observed concerning the consumption of sugars, the ethanol and glycerol content, and acetic acid production, depending on which strain was used and which type of inoculation was performed. Sequential inoculation led to the reduction of about half of the acetic acid content compared to the pure S. cerevisiae fermentation, but the ethanol and glycerol amounts were also low. A coinoculation with selected combinations of S. cerevisiae and C. zemplinina resulted in a decrease of ~0.3 g of acetic acid/liter, while maintaining high ethanol and glycerol levels. This study demonstrates that mixed S. cerevisiae and C. zemplinina fermentation could be applied in sweet wine fermentation to reduce the production of acetic acid, connected to the S. cerevisiae osmotic stress response.

  10. Acetic Acid Detection Threshold in Synthetic Wine Samples of a Portable Electronic Nose

    Miguel Macías Macías

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Wine quality is related to its intrinsic visual, taste, or aroma characteristics and is reflected in the price paid for that wine. One of the most important wine faults is the excessive concentration of acetic acid which can cause a wine to take on vinegar aromas and reduce its varietal character. Thereby it is very important for the wine industry to have methods, like electronic noses, for real-time monitoring the excessive concentration of acetic acid in wines. However, aroma characterization of alcoholic beverages with sensor array electronic noses is a difficult challenge due to the masking effect of ethanol. In this work, in order to detect the presence of acetic acid in synthetic wine samples (aqueous ethanol solution at 10% v/v we use a detection unit which consists of a commercial electronic nose and a HSS32 auto sampler, in combination with a neural network classifier (MLP. To find the characteristic vector representative of the sample that we want to classify, first we select the sensors, and the section of the sensors response curves, where the probability of detecting the presence of acetic acid will be higher, and then we apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA such that each sensor response curve is represented by the coefficients of its first principal components. Results show that the PEN3 electronic nose is able to detect and discriminate wine samples doped with acetic acid in concentrations equal or greater than 2 g/L.

  11. The Antibacterial Activity of Acetic Acid against Biofilm-Producing Pathogens of Relevance to Burns Patients.

    Fenella D Halstead

    Full Text Available Localised infections, and burn wound sepsis are key concerns in the treatment of burns patients, and prevention of colonisation largely relies on biocides. Acetic acid has been shown to have good antibacterial activity against various planktonic organisms, however data is limited on efficacy, and few studies have been performed on biofilms.We sought to investigate the antibacterial activity of acetic acid against important burn wound colonising organisms growing planktonically and as biofilms.Laboratory experiments were performed to test the ability of acetic acid to inhibit growth of pathogens, inhibit the formation of biofilms, and eradicate pre-formed biofilms.Twenty-nine isolates of common wound-infecting pathogens were tested. Acetic acid was antibacterial against planktonic growth, with an minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.16-0.31% for all isolates, and was also able to prevent formation of biofilms (at 0.31%. Eradication of mature biofilms was observed for all isolates after three hours of exposure.This study provides evidence that acetic acid can inhibit growth of key burn wound pathogens when used at very dilute concentrations. Owing to current concerns of the reducing efficacy of systemic antibiotics, this novel biocide application offers great promise as a cheap and effective measure to treat infections in burns patients.

  12. Coproduction of acetic acid and electricity by application of microbial fuel cell technology to vinegar fermentation.

    Tanino, Takanori; Nara, Youhei; Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Ohshima, Takayuki

    2013-08-01

    The coproduction of a useful material and electricity via a novel application of microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology to oxidative fermentation was investigated. We focused on vinegar production, i.e., acetic acid fermentation, as an initial and model useful material that can be produced by oxidative fermentation in combination with MFC technology. The coproduction of acetic acid and electricity by applying MFC technology was successfully demonstrated by the simultaneous progress of acetic acid fermentation and electricity generation through a series of repeated batch fermentations. Although the production rate of acetic acid was very small, it increased with the number of repeated batch fermentations that were conducted. We obtained nearly identical (73.1%) or larger (89.9%) acetic acid yields than that typically achieved by aerated fermentation (75.8%). The open-cycle voltages measured before and after fermentation increased with the total fermentation time and reached a maximum value of 0.521 V prior to the third batch fermentation. The maximum current and power densities measured in this study (19.1 μA/cm² and 2.47 μW/cm², respectively) were obtained after the second batch fermentation.

  13. Recovery of arabinan in acetic acid-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment on corn stover

    Xu, Jian; Hedegaard, Mette Christina; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2009-01-01

    Acetic acid-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment was done on corn stover under 195 °C, 15 min with the acetic acid ranging from 5 × 10−3 to 0.2 g g−1 corn stover. After pretreatment, the water-insoluble solids (WISs) and liquors were collected respectively. Arabinan recoveries from both WIS...... and liquors were investigated. The results indicate that there was no detectable arabinan left in the WIS when the acetic acid of 0.1 and 0.2 g g−1 corn stover were used in the pretreatment. The arabinan contents in the other WISs were not more than 10%. However, the arabinan found in the liquors...... was not covering the amount of arabinan released from the raw corn stover. For the arabinan recovery from liquor fractions, the highest of 43.57% was obtained by the pretreatment of acetic acid of 0.01 g g−1 of corn stover and the lowest was only 26.77% when the acetic acid of 0.2 g g−1 corn stover was used...

  14. Mechanistic Insights Underlying Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in Vaginal Candida glabrata Clinical Isolates

    Cunha, Diana V.; Salazar, Sara B.; Lopes, Maria M.; Mira, Nuno P.

    2017-01-01

    During colonization of the vaginal tract Candida glabrata cells are challenged with the presence of acetic acid at a low pH, specially when dysbiosis occurs. To avoid exclusion from this niche C. glabrata cells are expected to evolve efficient adaptive responses to cope with this stress; however, these responses remain largely uncharacterized, especially in vaginal strains. In this work a cohort of 18 vaginal strains and 2 laboratory strains (CBS138 and KUE100) were phenotyped for their tolerance against inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid at pH 4. Despite some heterogeneity has been observed among the vaginal strains tested, in general these strains were considerably more tolerant to acetic acid than the laboratory strains. To tackle the mechanistic insights behind this differential level of tolerance observed, a set of vaginal strains differently tolerant to acetic acid (VG281∼VG49 < VG99 < VG216) and the highly susceptible laboratory strain KUE100 were selected for further studies. When suddenly challenged with acetic acid the more tolerant vaginal strains exhibited a higher activity of the plasma membrane proton pump CgPma1 and a reduced internal accumulation of the acid, these being two essential features to maximize tolerance. Based on the higher level of resistance exhibited by the vaginal strains against the action of a β-1,3-glucanase, it is hypothesized that the reduced internal accumulation of acetic acid inside these strains may originate from them having a different cell wall structure resulting in a reduced porosity to undissociated acetic acid molecules. Both the vaginal and the two laboratory strains were found to consume acetic acid in the presence of glucose indicating that metabolization of the acid is used by C. glabrata species as a detoxification mechanism. The results gathered in this study advance the current knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the increased competitiveness of C. glabrata in the vaginal tract, a knowledge that can

  15. Use of pooled sodium acetate acetic acid formalin-preserved fecal specimens for the detection of intestinal parasites.

    Gaafar, Maha R

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at comparing detection of intestinal parasites from single unpreserved stool sample vs. sodium acetate acetic acid formalin (SAF)-preserved pooled samples, and stained with chlorazol black dye in routine practice. Unpreserved samples were collected from 120 patients and represented as Group I. Other three SAF-preserved samples were collected from the same patients over a 6-day period and represented as Groups IIa, IIb, and IIc. The latter groups were equally subdivided into two subgroups. The first subgroup of each of the three samples was examined individually, whereas the second subgroup of each were pooled and examined as a single specimen. All groups were examined by the routine diagnostic techniques; however, in group II when the diagnosis was uncertain, the chlorazol black dye staining procedure was carried out. Results demonstrated that out of 74 patients who continued the study, 12 cases (16%) were positive in group I, compared with 29 (39%) in the subgroups examined individually, and 27 (36%) in the pooled subgroups. Therefore, pooling of preserved fecal samples is an efficient and economical procedure for the detection of parasites. Furthermore, the chlorazol black dye was simple and effective in detecting the nuclear details of different parasites.

  16. Influence of Acetic Acid on Dynamic Behavior of Hydrolazation and Film Forming of Organosilane

    YANG Lixia; ZHANG Wenguang; GU Tao; FENG Jun

    2009-01-01

    The influence of acetic acid on dynamic behavior of hydrolazation and film forming of an expoxy-silane compound(γ-GPS)was investigated by conductivity meter,IR and AFM.The experimental results show that there is an optimal pH value(pH=4-5)for hydrolysis of silane solution,and with the prolongation of hydrolytic time,the promotion of acetic acid on the hydrolyza-tion of silane solution become more obvious.During the adsorption and film forming process,acetic acid could promote the formation of Si-O-Fe bond,which activates hydroxyl group of silanol unit and facilitates this hydroxyl group to react with adjacent silanol unit forming linear condensation polymers.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    Sergio eGiannattasio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications.

  18. Effect of acetic acid on physical properties of pregelatinized wheat and corn starch gels.

    Majzoobi, Mahsa; Kaveh, Zahra; Farahnaky, Asgar

    2016-04-01

    Pregelatinized starches are physically modified starches with ability to absorb water and increase viscosity at ambient temperature. The main purpose of this study was to determine how different concentrations of acetic acid (0, 500, 1000, 10,000 mg/kg) can affect functional properties of pregelatinized wheat and corn starches (PGWS and PGCS, respectively) produced by a twin drum drier. With increasing acetic acid following changes occurred for both samples; cold water solubility (at 25 °C) increased, water absorption and apparent cold water viscosity (at 25 °C) reduced, the smooth surface of the starch particles converted to an uneven surface as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, cohesiveness, consistency and turbidity of the starch gels reduced while their syneresis increased. It was found that in presence of acetic acid, PGWS resulted in higher water absorption and apparent cold water viscosity and produced more cohesive and turbid gels with less syneresis compared to PGCS.

  19. The lifespan-promoting effect of acetic acid and Reishi polysaccharide.

    Chuang, Ming-Hong; Chiou, Shyh-Horng; Huang, Chun-Hao; Yang, Wen-Bin; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2009-11-15

    Using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism, various natural substances and commercial health-food supplements were screened to evaluate their effects on longevity. Among the substances tested, acetic acid and Reishi polysaccharide fraction 3 (RF3) were shown to increase the expression of the lifespan and longevity-related transcription factor DAF-16 in C. elegans. We have shown that RF3 activates DAF-16 expression via TIR-1 receptor and MAPK pathway whereas acetic acid inhibits the trans-membrane receptor DAF-2 of the insulin/IGF-1 pathway to indirectly activate DAF-16 expression. In addition, a mixture of acetic acid and RF3 possesses a combined effect 30-40% greater than either substance used alone. A proteomic analysis of C. elegans using 2-DE and LC-MS/MS was then carried out, and 15 differentially expressed proteins involved in the lifespan-promoting activity were identified.

  20. Transformation of acetate carbon into carbohydrate and amino acid metabilites during decomposition in soil

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst; Paul, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    Carbon-14-labelled acetate was added to a heavy clay soil of pH 7.6 to study the transformation of acetate carbon into carbohydrate and amino acid metabolites during decomposition. The acetate was totally metabolized after 6 days of incubation at 25°C when 70% of the labelled carbon had been...... evolved as CO2. Maximum incorporation of trace-C into the various organic fractions was observed after 4 days when 19% of residual, labelled carbon in the soil was located in carbohydrates, 29 % in amino acids and 21 % in the insoluble residue of the soil. The curves showing the amounts of labelled carbon...... located in carbohydrates and amino acid metabolites show a curvilinear form during the first 30 days of incubation, indicating a variety of chemical compounds decaying at different rates. After this time, the decay curves became straight lines indicating a greater homogeneity of the metabolites. After 200...

  1. Acetic acid-catalyzed formation of N-phenylphthalimide from phthalanilic acid: a computational study of the mechanism.

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-05-28

    In glacial acetic acid, phthalanilic acid and its monosubstituents are known to be converted to the corresponding phthalimides in relatively good yields. In this study, we computationally investigated the experimentally proposed two-step (addition-elimination or cyclization-dehydration) mechanism at the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) level of theory for the unsubstituted phthalanilic acid, with an explicit acetic acid molecule included in the calculations. In the first step, a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate is formed by the nucleophilic attack of the amide nitrogen. The second step is dehydration of the intermediate to give N-phenylphthalimide. In agreement with experimental findings, the second step has been shown to be rate-determining. Most importantly, both of the steps are catalyzed by an acetic acid molecule, which acts both as proton donor and acceptor. The present findings, along with those from our previous studies, suggest that acetic acid and other carboxylic acids (in their undissociated forms) can catalyze intramolecular nucleophilic attacks by amide nitrogens and breakdown of the resulting tetrahedral intermediates, acting simultaneously as proton donor and acceptor. In other words, double proton transfers involving a carboxylic acid molecule can be part of an extensive bond reorganization process from cyclic hydrogen-bonded complexes.

  2. Changes in Growth, Auxin- and Ribonucleic Acid Metabolism in Wheat Coleoptile Sections Following Pulse Treatment with Indole-3-Acetic Acid

    Truelsen, T.A.; Galston, A.W.

    1966-01-01

    Growth reactions of wbeat coleoptile sections following a brief pretreament in indole-3-acetic acid (LAA) were studied. The growth versus concentration curves 24 hours after the treatment showed a minimum value surrounded by bigber values. The minimum was never at concentrations lower than 10-5M l...... was mirroretl in effects of IAA on hte net synthesis of ribonucleic acid....

  3. Recovery of acetic acid from an aqueous pyrolysis oil phase by reactive extraction using tri-n-octylamine

    Rasrendra, C. B.; Girisuta, B.; van de Bovenkamp, H. H.; Winkelman, J. G. M.; Leijenhorst, E. J.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Windt, M.; Meier, D.; Heeres, H. J.

    2011-01-01

    The application of reactive extraction to isolate organic acids, particularly acetic acid, from the aqueous stream of phase splitted pyrolysis oil using a long chain aliphatic tertiary amine is reported. Acetic acid recovery was optimized by selecting the proper amine and diluent combination and adj

  4. [Comparative genomics and evolutionary analysis of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria].

    Kai, Xia; Xinle, Liang; Yudong, Li

    2015-12-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) is a widespread adaptive immunity system that exists in most archaea and many bacteria against foreign DNA, such as phages, viruses and plasmids. In general, CRISPR system consists of direct repeat, leader, spacer and CRISPR-associated sequences. Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role in industrial fermentation of vinegar and bioelectrochemistry. To investigate the polymorphism and evolution pattern of CRISPR loci in acetic acid bacteria, bioinformatic analyses were performed on 48 species from three main genera (Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter and Gluconobacter) with whole genome sequences available from the NCBI database. The results showed that the CRISPR system existed in 32 species of the 48 strains studied. Most of the CRISPR-Cas system in AAB belonged to type I CRISPR-Cas system (subtype E and C), but type II CRISPR-Cas system which contain cas9 gene was only found in the genus Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The repeat sequences of some CRISPR were highly conserved among species from different genera, and the leader sequences of some CRISPR possessed conservative motif, which was associated with regulated promoters. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of cas1 demonstrated that they were suitable for classification of species. The conservation of cas1 genes was associated with that of repeat sequences among different strains, suggesting they were subjected to similar functional constraints. Moreover, the number of spacer was positively correlated with the number of prophages and insertion sequences, indicating the acetic acid bacteria were continually invaded by new foreign DNA. The comparative analysis of CRISR loci in acetic acid bacteria provided the basis for investigating the molecular mechanism of different acetic acid tolerance and genome stability in acetic acid bacteria.

  5. Effect of acetic acid on optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of cervical epithelium.

    Gallwas, Julia; Stanchi, Anna; Dannecker, Christian; Ditsch, Nina; Mueller, Susanna; Mortensen, Uwe; Stepp, Herbert

    2014-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used as an adjunct to colposcopy in the identification of precancerous and cancerous cervical lesions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acetic acid on OCT imaging. OCT images were taken from unsuspicious and suspicious areas of fresh conization specimens immediately after resection and 3 and 10 min after application of 6 % acetic acid. A corresponding histology was obtained from all sites. The images taken 3 and 10 min after application of acetic acid were compared to the initial images with respect to changes in brightness, contrast, and scanning depth employing a standard nonparametric test of differences of proportions. Further, mean intensity backscattering curves were calculated from all OCT images in the histological groups CIN3, inflammation, or normal epithelium. Mean difference profiles within each of these groups were determined, reflecting the mean differences between the condition before application of acetic acid and the exposure times 3 and 10 min, respectively. According to the null hypothesis, the difference profiles do not differ from profiles fluctuating around zero in a stationary way, which implies that the profiles do not differ significantly from each other. The null hypothesis was tested employing the KPSS test. The visual analysis of 137 OCT images from 46 sites of 10 conization specimens revealed a statistically significant increase in brightness for all three groups and a statistically significant decrease in contrast for normal epithelium after 10 min. Further, an increase in scanning depth was noted for normal epithelium after 10 min and for CIN3 after 3 min. The analysis of mean intensity profiles showed an increased backscattering intensity after application of acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly affects the quality of OCT images. Overall brightness and scanning depth increase with the opposite effect regarding the image contrast. Whether the observed changes

  6. Inhibition of microbial xylitol production by acetic acid and its relation with fermentative parameters.

    Morita, T A; Silva, S S

    2000-01-01

    Precipitated sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate containing acetic acid was fermented by Candida guilliermondii FTI20037 under different operational conditions (pH 4.0 and 7.0, three aeration rates). At pH 7.0 and kLa of 10 (0.75 vvm) and 22.5/h (3.0 vvm) the acetic acid had not been consumed until the end of the fermentations, whereas at the same pH and kLa of 35/h (4.5 vvm) the acid was rapidly consumed and acetic acid inhibition was not important. On the other hand, fermentations at an initial pH of 4.0 and kLa of 22.5 and 35/h required less time for the acid uptake than fermentations at kLa of 10/h. The acetic acid assimilation by the yeast indicates the ability of this strain to ferment in partially detoxified medium, making possible the utilization of the sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate in this bio-process. The effects on xylitol yield and production are reported.

  7. Production of oils from acetic acid by the oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus curvatus.

    Christophe, G; Deo, J Lara; Kumar, V; Nouaille, R; Fontanille, P; Larroche, C

    2012-07-01

    The feasibility of the conversion of acetic acid, a metabolite commonly obtained during anaerobic fermentation processes, into oils using the yeast Cryptococcus curvatus was reported. This microorganism exhibited very slow growth rates on acetate as carbon source, which led to design a two-stage cultivation process. The first consisted of cell growth on glucose as carbon source until its complete exhaustion. The second step involved the use of acetate as carbon source under nitrogen limitation in order to induce lipid accumulation. A typical experiment performed in a bioreactor involved a preliminary yeast growth with a glucose initial concentration of 15 g/L glucose. Further additions of acetate and nitrogen source allowed a final lipid accumulation up to 50% (w/w). These promising results demonstrated the suitability of the technique proposed.

  8. Isolation and characterization of esters of indole-3-acetic acid from the liquid endosperm of the horse chestnut (Aesculus species)

    Domagalski, W.; Schulze, A.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    Esters of indole-3-acetic acid were extracted and purified from the liquid endosperm of immature fruits of various species of the horse chestnut (Aesculus parviflora, A. baumanni, A. pavia rubra, and A. pavia humulis). The liquid endosperm contained, at least 12 chromatographically distinct esters. One of these compounds was purified and characterized as an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and myo-inositol. A second compound was found to be an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and the disaccharide rutinose (glucosyl-rhamnose). A third compound was partially characterized as an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and a desoxyaminohexose.

  9. Effect of acetic acid in recycling water on ethanol production for cassava in an integrated ethanol-methane fermentation process.

    Yang, Xinchao; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jianhua; Tang, Lei; Mao, Zhonggui

    2016-11-01

    Recently, the integrated ethanol-methane fermentation process has been studied to prevent wastewater pollution. However, when the anaerobic digestion reaction runs poorly, acetic acid will accumulate in the recycling water. In this paper, we studied the effect of low concentration of acetic acid (≤25 mM) on ethanol fermentation at different initial pH values (4.2, 5.2 or 6.2). At an initial pH of 4.2, ethanol yields increased by 3.0% and glycerol yields decreased by 33.6% as the acetic acid concentration was increased from 0 to 25 mM. Raising the concentration of acetic acid to 25 mM increased the buffering capacity of the medium without obvious effects on biomass production in the cassava medium. Acetic acid was metabolized by Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the reason that the final concentration of acetic acid was 38.17% lower than initial concentration at pH 5.2 when 25 mM acetic acid was added. These results confirmed that a low concentration of acetic acid in the process stimulated ethanol fermentation. Thus, reducing the acetic acid concentration to a controlled low level is more advantageous than completely removing it.

  10. Determination of 4-Chloroindole-3-Acetic Acid Methyl Ester in Lathyrus Vicia and Pisum by Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen; Egsgaard, Helge; Larsen, Elfinn

    1980-01-01

    4-Chloroindole-3-acetic acid methyl ester was identified unequivocally in Lathyrus latifolius L., Vicia faba L. and Pisum sativum L. by thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The gas chromatographic system was able to separate underivatized chloroindole-3-acetic acid...... methyl ester isomers. The quantitative determination of 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid methyl ester in immature seeds of these three species was performed by gas chromatography – mass spectrometry using deuterium labelled 4-chloro-indole-3-acetic acid methyl ester as an internal standard. P. sativum...

  11. Anticoccidial effects of acetic acid on performance and pathogenic parameters in broiler chickens challenged with Eimeria tenella

    Rao Z. Abbas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the anticoccidial effect of the different concentrations of the acetic acid in the broiler chickens in comparison with the amprolium anticoccidial. A total of 198 chicks were placed 11 per pen with three pens per treatment. The different concentrations (1%, 2% and 3% of acetic acid and amproilum (at the dose rate of 125ppm were given to the experimental groups in drinking water from 10-19th days of age. One group was kept as infected non medicated control and one as non infected non medicated control. All the groups were inoculated orally with 75,000 sporulated oocysts at the 12th day of age except non infected non medicated control. Anticoccidial effect was evaluated on the basis of performance (weight gain, feed conversion ratio and pathogenic (oocyst score, lesion score and mortality %age parameters. Among acetic acid medicated groups, the maximum anticoccidial effect was seen in the group medicated with 3% acetic acid followed by 2% and 1% acetic acid medicated groups. Amprolium and 3% acetic acid were almost equivalent in suppressing the negative performance and pathogenic effects associated with coccidiosis (Eimeria tenella challenge. In summary, acetic acid has the potential to be used as alternative to chemotherapeutic drugs for Eimeria tenella control. Concentration-dependent anticoccidial effect of acetic acid suggests that further studies should be carried out to determine the possible maximum safe levels of acetic acid with least toxic effects to be used as anticoccidial.

  12. Acetic Acid Bacteria and the Production and Quality of Wine Vinegar

    Albert Mas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of vinegar depends on an oxidation process that is mainly performed by acetic acid bacteria. Despite the different methods of vinegar production (more or less designated as either “fast” or “traditional”, the use of pure starter cultures remains far from being a reality. Uncontrolled mixed cultures are normally used, but this review proposes the use of controlled mixed cultures. The acetic acid bacteria species determine the quality of vinegar, although the final quality is a combined result of technological process, wood contact, and aging. This discussion centers on wine vinegar and evaluates the effects of these different processes on its chemical and sensory properties.

  13. Acetic acid bacteria and the production and quality of wine vinegar.

    Mas, Albert; Torija, María Jesús; García-Parrilla, María del Carmen; Troncoso, Ana María

    2014-01-01

    The production of vinegar depends on an oxidation process that is mainly performed by acetic acid bacteria. Despite the different methods of vinegar production (more or less designated as either "fast" or "traditional"), the use of pure starter cultures remains far from being a reality. Uncontrolled mixed cultures are normally used, but this review proposes the use of controlled mixed cultures. The acetic acid bacteria species determine the quality of vinegar, although the final quality is a combined result of technological process, wood contact, and aging. This discussion centers on wine vinegar and evaluates the effects of these different processes on its chemical and sensory properties.

  14. Reaction Kinetics Between Acetic Acid and Ag2+

    2008-01-01

    <正>The application of the salt-free reagents in the spent fuel reprocessing process has been investigated so much in the last years. Preferable result was obtained in the application of acetohydroxamic acid in the

  15. Recovery of Acetic Acid from An Ethanol Fermentation Broth by Liquid-Liquid Extraction (LLE) Using Various Solvents

    Pham, Thi Thu Huong; Kim, Tae Hyun [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Um, Byung Hwan [Hankyong National University, Anseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) using various solvents was studied for recovery of acetic acid from a synthetic ethanol fermentation broth. The microbial fermentation of sugars presented in hydrolyzate gives rise to acetic acid as a byproduct. In order to obtain pure ethanol for use as a biofuel, fermentation broth should be subjected to acetic acid removal step and the recovered acetic acid can be put to industrial use. Herein, batch LLE experiments were carried out at 25°C using a synthetic fermentation broth comprising 20.0 g l{sup -1} acetic acid and 5.0 g l{sup -1} ethanol. Ethyl acetate (EtOAc), tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO), tri-n-octylamine (TOA), and tri-n-alkylphosphine oxide (TAPO) were utilized as solvents, and the extraction potential of each solvent was evaluated by varying the organic phase-to-aqueous phase ratios as 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0. The highest acetic acid extraction yield was achieved with TAPO; however, the lowest ethanol-to-acetic acid extraction ratio was obtained using TOPO. In a single-stage batch extraction, 97.0 % and 92.4 % of acetic acid could be extracted using TAPO and TOPO when the ratio of organic-to-aqueous phases is 4:1 respectively. A higher solvent-to-feed ratio resulted in an increase in the ethanol-to-acetic acid ratio, which decreased both acetic acid purity and acetic acid extraction yield.

  16. Preparation of Peracetic Acid from Acetic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide: Experimentation and Modeling

    赵雪冰; 张婷; 周玉杰; 刘德华

    2008-01-01

    Based on the kinetic equations and equilibrium constants, some mathematic models were developed for calculating peracetic acid (PAA) concentration, equilibrium conversion rate of hydrogen peroxide, etc. The effects of several parameters on PAA synthesis were investigated by experimentation and modeling. The equilibrium constants determined from the forward and reverse rate constants at 293, 303,313 and 323 K were 2.91, 2.81, 2.72 and 2.63, respectively. The models could predict the values of equilibrium concentration of PAA with average relative deviation of less than 10%. Both of the experimental and model-calculated results demonstrated that temperature and catalyst loading were the most important factors affecting the rate of PAA synthesis, but high temperature led to the decrease of equilibrium concentration of PAA. According to the model, the reaction could achieve equilibrium within 24 h when operated at 303 K with 1%~1.5%(ω) sulfuric acid as catalyst. Additionally, when using anhydrous acetic acid and 30% hydrogen peroxide to prepare PAA, the volumetric ratio of the two solutions should be in the range of 1.2~1.5 in order to obtain the highest equilibrium concentration of PAA. This study can serve as a step towards the further optimization of PAA synthesis and some other related investigations.

  17. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid and methylglyoxal

    Y. Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including pyruvate, oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid plays a central role in the aqueous oxidation of methylglyoxal and it is a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radicals, and pyruvic acid and methylglyoxal experimental samples were analyzed using new analytical methods, in order to better understand the formation of SOA from acetic acid and methylglyoxal. Glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids formed from acetic acid and OH radicals. In contrast to the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal, the aqueous OH radical oxidation of acetic acid did not produce succinic acid and oligomers. This suggests that the methylgloxal-derived oligomers do not form through the acid catalyzed esterification pathway proposed previously. Using results from these experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  18. Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 3, January 1, 1978--March 31, 1978

    Sanderson, J.E.; Wise, D.L.

    1978-06-01

    The program for acetic acid production from marine algae has made significant progress in the current quarter. Some of the significant developments during this period are: (1) conversion of the available reducing equivalents in Chondrus crispus to organic acids has been carried to better than 80% completion; (2) thermophilic fermentations produce higher ratios of acetic acid to total acid than is the case for mesophilic fermentations (80% vs. 50%); (3) a membrane extraction process for removing organic acid products has been developed which has potential for commercial use; (4) a large scale fermentation was shown to convert over 50% of the available carbon in five days; (5) a reducing equivalents balance on the large scale fermentation was closed to with 96% of theoretical.

  19. Monolaurin and acetic acid inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes attached to stainless steel.

    Oh, D H; Marshall, D L

    1996-03-01

    Individual and combined antimicrobial effects of monolaurin and acetic acid on Listeria monocytogenes planktonic cells or stainless-steel-adherent cells were determined in order to evaluate cell viability during a 25-min exposure period at 25 degrees C. A 10(7)-colony-forming units (CFU)/ml population of planktonic cells was completely inactivated by the synergistic combination of 1% acetic acid with 50 or 100 microg/ml of monolaurin within 25 or 20 min, respectively. Either compound alone caused partial but incomplete inactivation within the same time periods. A population of 10(5) CFU/cm2 of 1-day adherent cells on stainless steel was completely inactivated within 25 min, but with the highest concentrations of the combined chemicals, i.e., 1% acetic acid and 100 microg/ml of monolaurin. The combined chemical treatment again synergistically produced greater inhibition. A 10(6)-CFU/cm2 population of 7-day adherent cells was not completely inactivated within 25 min of exposure, although counts did decline. The results demonstrate increased resistance of attached L. monocytogenes to acetic acid and monolaurin and show that resistance increased with culture age. Combinations of organic acids and monolaurin might be considered as sanitizers of food contact surfaces, but activities of such combinations are likely to be less than other commonly used sanitizers.

  20. Culture strategies for lipid production using acetic acid as sole carbon source by Rhodosporidium toruloides.

    Huang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Jia-Nan; Lu, Li-Jun; Peng, Kai-Ming; Yang, Gao-Xiang; Liu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Rhodosporidium toruloides AS 2.1389 was tested using different concentrations of acetic acid as a low-cost carbon source for the production of microbial lipids, which are good raw materials for biodiesel production. It grew and had higher lipid contents in media containing 4-20 g/L acetic acid as the sole carbon source, compared with that in glucose-containing media under the same culture conditions. At acetic acid concentrations as high as 20 g/L and the optimal carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (C/N) of 200 in a batch culture, the highest biomass production was 4.35 g/L, with a lipid content of 48.2%. At acetic acid concentrations as low as 4 g/L, a sequencing batch culture (SBC) with a C/N of 100 increased biomass production to 4.21 g/L, with a lipid content of 38.6%. These results provide usable culture strategies for lipid production by R. toruloides AS 2.1389 when using diverse waste-derived volatile fatty acids.

  1. Sphingolipid biosynthesis upregulation by TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling during yeast adaptive response to acetic acid stress.

    Guerreiro, Joana F; Muir, Alexander; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Thorner, Jeremy; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2016-12-01

    Acetic acid-induced inhibition of yeast growth and metabolism limits the productivity of industrial fermentation processes, especially when lignocellulosic hydrolysates are used as feedstock in industrial biotechnology. Tolerance to acetic acid of food spoilage yeasts is also a problem in the preservation of acidic foods and beverages. Thus understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation and tolerance to acetic acid stress is increasingly important in industrial biotechnology and the food industry. Prior genetic screens for Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with increased sensitivity to acetic acid identified loss-of-function mutations in the YPK1 gene, which encodes a protein kinase activated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) complex 2 (TORC2). We show in the present study by several independent criteria that TORC2-Ypk1 signaling is stimulated in response to acetic acid stress. Moreover, we demonstrate that TORC2-mediated Ypk1 phosphorylation and activation is necessary for acetic acid tolerance, and occurs independently of Hrk1, a protein kinase previously implicated in the cellular response to acetic acid. In addition, we show that TORC2-Ypk1-mediated activation of l-serine:palmitoyl-CoA acyltransferase, the enzyme complex that catalyzes the first committed step of sphingolipid biosynthesis, is required for acetic acid tolerance. Furthermore, analysis of the sphingolipid pathway using inhibitors and mutants indicates that it is production of certain complex sphingolipids that contributes to conferring acetic acid tolerance. Consistent with that conclusion, promoting sphingolipid synthesis by adding exogenous long-chain base precursor phytosphingosine to the growth medium enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Thus appropriate modulation of the TORC2-Ypk1-sphingolipid axis in industrial yeast strains may have utility in improving fermentations of acetic acid-containing feedstocks.

  2. Acetic Acid, the active component of vinegar, is an effective tuberculocidal disinfectant.

    Cortesia, Claudia; Vilchèze, Catherine; Bernut, Audrey; Contreras, Whendy; Gómez, Keyla; de Waard, Jacobus; Jacobs, William R; Kremer, Laurent; Takiff, Howard

    2014-02-25

    Effective and economical mycobactericidal disinfectants are needed to kill both Mycobacterium tuberculosis and non-M. tuberculosis mycobacteria. We found that acetic acid (vinegar) efficiently kills M. tuberculosis after 30 min of exposure to a 6% acetic acid solution. The activity is not due to pH alone, and propionic acid also appears to be bactericidal. M. bolletii and M. massiliense nontuberculous mycobacteria were more resistant, although a 30-min exposure to 10% acetic acid resulted in at least a 6-log10 reduction of viable bacteria. Acetic acid (vinegar) is an effective mycobactericidal disinfectant that should also be active against most other bacteria. These findings are consistent with and extend the results of studies performed in the early and mid-20th century on the disinfectant capacity of organic acids. IMPORTANCE Mycobacteria are best known for causing tuberculosis and leprosy, but infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria are an increasing problem after surgical or cosmetic procedures or in the lungs of cystic fibrosis and immunosuppressed patients. Killing mycobacteria is important because Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains can be multidrug resistant and therefore potentially fatal biohazards, and environmental mycobacteria must be thoroughly eliminated from surgical implements and respiratory equipment. Currently used mycobactericidal disinfectants can be toxic, unstable, and expensive. We fortuitously found that acetic acid kills mycobacteria and then showed that it is an effective mycobactericidal agent, even against the very resistant, clinically important Mycobacterium abscessus complex. Vinegar has been used for thousands of years as a common disinfectant, and if it can kill mycobacteria, the most disinfectant-resistant bacteria, it may prove to be a broadly effective, economical biocide with potential usefulness in health care settings and laboratories, especially in resource-poor countries.

  3. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells.

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin.

  4. CO2-enhanced extraction of acetic acid from fermented wastewater

    Reyhanitash, E.; Zaalberg, B.; IJmker, H.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Schuur, B.

    2015-01-01

    The industrial process of recovering fermentation-based volatile fatty acids (VFAs) utilizes H2SO4 to acidify the fermentation broth containing VFA-salts [e.g. Ca(CH3COO)2] to enable formation of molecular VFAs. Molecular VFAs are then recovered by liquid–liquid extraction. However, acidification wi

  5. Soil washing of chromium- and cadmium-contaminated sludge using acids and ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid chelating agent.

    Gitipour, Saeid; Ahmadi, Soheil; Madadian, Edris; Ardestani, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the effect of soil washing in the removal of chromium- and cadmium-contaminated sludge samples collected from Pond 2 of the Tehran Oil Refinery was investigated. These metals are considered as hazardous substances for human health and the environment. The carcinogenicity of chromate dust has been established for a long time. Cadmium is also a potential environmental toxicant. This study was carried out by collecting sludge samples from different locations in Pond 2. Soil washing was conducted to treat the samples. Chemical agents, such as acetic acid, ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid (EDTA) and hydrochloric acid, were used as washing solutions to remove chromium and cadmium from sludge samples. The results of this study indicated that the highest removal efficiencies from the sludge samples were achieved using a 0.3 M HCl solution with 82.69% and 74.47% for chromium and cadmium, respectively. EDTA (0.1 M) in the best condition extracted 66.81% of cadmium and 72.52% of chromium from the sludges. The lowest efficiency values for the samples, however, were achieved using 3 M acetic acid with 41.7% and 46.96% removals for cadmium and chromium, respectively. The analysis of washed sludge indicated that the heavy metals removal decreased in the order of 3 M acetic acid acid appears to offer a greater potential as a washing agent in remediating the sludge samples.

  6. The influence of surface oxygen and hydroxyl groups on the dehydrogenation of ethylene, acetic acid and hydrogenated vinyl acetate on pure Pd(1 0 0): A DFT study

    Huang, Yanping; Dong, Xiuqin; Yu, Yingzhe; Zhang, Minhua

    2016-12-01

    On the basis of a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type mechanism, the dehydrogenation of ethylene, acetic acid and hydrogenated vinyl acetate (VAH) on pure Pd(1 0 0) with surface oxygen atoms (Os) and hydroxyl groups (OHs) was studied with density functional theory (DFT) method. Our calculation results show that both Os and OHs can consistently reduce the activation energies of dehydrogenation of ethylene, acetic acid and VAH to some degree with only one exception that OHs somehow increase the activation energy of VAH. Based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, the three dehydrogenation reactions in presence of surface Os and OHs are almost consistently favored, compared with the corresponding processes on clean Pd(1 0 0) surfaces, and thus a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type mechanism may not be excluded beforehand when investigating the microscopic performance of the oxygen-assisted vinyl acetate synthesis on Pd(1 0 0) catalysts.

  7. Lipidomic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii reveals critical changes in lipid composition in response to acetic acid stress.

    Lindberg, Lina; Santos, Aline Xs; Riezman, Howard; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555) cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L(-1), while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L(-1) acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS) showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP)2C 2.2×) and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP)2C 2.7×), when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to generate large

  8. Lipidomic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii reveals critical changes in lipid composition in response to acetic acid stress.

    Lina Lindberg

    Full Text Available When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555 cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L(-1, while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L(-1 acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP2C 2.2× and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP2C 2.7×, when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to

  9. Calibration and intercomparison of acetic acid measurements using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS

    K. B. Haase

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid is one of the most abundant organic acids in the ambient atmosphere, with maximum mixing ratios reaching into the tens of parts per billion by volume (ppbv range. The identities and associated magnitudes of the major sources and sinks for acetic acid are poorly characterized, due in part to the limitation in available measurement techniques. This paper demonstrates that Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS can reliably quantify acetic acid vapor in ambient air. Three different PTR-MS configurations were calibrated at low ppbv mixing ratios using permeation tubes, which yielded calibration factors between 7.0 and 10.9 normalized counts per second per ppbv (ncps ppbv−1 at a drift tube field strength of 132 townsend (Td. Detection limits ranged from 0.06 to 0.32 ppbv with dwell times of 5 s. These calibration factors showed negligible humidity dependence. Using the experimentally determined calibration factors, PTR-MS measurements of acetic acid during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT campaign were validated against results obtained using Mist Chambers coupled with Ion Chromatography (MC/IC. An orthogonal least squares linear regression of paired data yielded a slope of 1.14 ± 0.06 (2σ, an intercept of 0.049 ± 20 (2σ ppbv, and an R2 of 0.78. The median mixing ratio of acetic acid on Appledore Island, ME during the ICARTT campaign was 0.530 ± 0.025 ppbv with a minimum of 0.075 ± 0.004 ppbv, and a maximum of 3.555 ± 0.171 ppbv.

  10. Calibration and intercomparison of acetic acid measurements using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    Haase, K.B.; Keene, W.C.; Pszenny, A.A.P.; Mayne, H.R.; Talbot, R.W.; Sive, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Acetic acid is one of the most abundant organic acids in the ambient atmosphere, with maximum mixing ratios reaching into the tens of parts per billion by volume (ppbv) range. The identities and associated magnitudes of the major sources and sinks for acetic acid are poorly characterized, due in part to the limitation in available measurement techniques. This paper demonstrates that Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) can reliably quantify acetic acid vapor in ambient air. Three different PTR-MS configurations were calibrated at low ppbv mixing ratios using permeation tubes, which yielded calibration factors between 7.0 and 10.9 normalized counts per second per ppbv (ncps ppbv−1) at a drift tube field strength of 132 townsend (Td). Detection limits ranged from 0.06 to 0.32 ppbv with dwell times of 5 s. These calibration factors showed negligible humidity dependence. Using the experimentally determined calibration factors, PTR-MS measurements of acetic acid during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) campaign were validated against results obtained using Mist Chambers coupled with Ion Chromatography (MC/IC). An orthogonal least squares linear regression of paired data yielded a slope of 1.14 ± 0.06 (2σ), an intercept of 0.049 ± 20 (2σ) ppbv, and an R2 of 0.78. The median mixing ratio of acetic acid on Appledore Island, ME during the ICARTT campaign was 0.530 ± 0.025 ppbv with a minimum of 0.075 ± 0.004 ppbv, and a maximum of 3.555 ± 0.171 ppbv.

  11. Removal of dicyclohexyl acetic acid from aqueous solution using ultrasound, ozone and their combination.

    Kumar, Pardeep; Headley, John; Peru, Kerry; Bailey, Jon; Dalai, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Naphthenic acids are a complex mixture of organic components, some of which include saturated alkyl-substituted cycloaliphatic carboxylic acids and acyclic aliphatic acids. They are naturally found in hydrocarbon deposits like oil sand, petroleum, bitumen and crude oil. In this study, the oxidation of a relatively high molecular weight naphthenic acid (Dicyclohexyl acetic acid) was investigated using ozonation, ultrasonication and hydrogen peroxide alone and their combinations. Effects on oxidation of dicyclohexyl acetic acid (DAA) were measured for different concentrations of ozone ranging between 0.7 to 3.3 mg L(-1) and pH in the range 6 to 10. Ultrasonication and hydrogen peroxide alone were not effective to oxidize dicyclohexyl acetic acid, but combining ultrasonication with H2O2 had a significant effect on oxidation of dicyclohexyl acetic acid with maximum removal reaching to 84 ± 2.2% with 81 ± 2.1% reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD). Synergistic effects were observed for combining ultrasonication with ozonation and resulted in 100% DAA removal with 98 ± 0.8% reduction in COD within 15 min at 3.3 mg L(-1) ozone concentration and 130 Watts ultrasonication power. The reaction conditions obtained for the maximum oxidation of DAA and COD removal were used for the degradation of naphthenic acids mixture extracted from oil sands process water (OSPW). The percentage oxidation of NAs mixture extracted from OSPW was 89.3 ± 1.1% in ozonation and combined ozonation and ultrasonication, but COD removal observed was 65 ± 1.2% and 78 ± 1.4% for ozonation and combined ozonation and ultrasonication treatments, respectively.

  12. Importance of secondary sources in the atmospheric budgets of formic and acetic acids

    F. Paulot

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a detailed budget of formic and acetic acids, two of the most abundant trace gases in the atmosphere. Our bottom-up estimate of the global source of formic and acetic acids are ~1200 and ~1400 Gmol/yr, dominated by photochemical oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds, in particular isoprene. Their sinks are dominated by wet and dry deposition. We use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to evaluate this budget against an extensive suite of measurements from ground, ship and satellite-based Fourier transform spectrometers, as well as from several aircraft campaigns over North America. The model captures the seasonality of formic and acetic acids well but generally underestimates their concentration, particularly in the Northern midlatitudes. We infer that the source of both carboxylic acids may be up to 50% greater than our estimate and report evidence for a long-lived missing secondary source of carboxylic acids that may be associated with the aging of organic aerosols. Vertical profiles of formic acid in the upper troposphere support a negative temperature dependence of the reaction between formic acid and the hydroxyl radical as suggested by several theoretical studies.

  13. Aqueous-phase hydrogenation of acetic acid over transition metal catalysts

    Olcay, Hakan [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Xu, Lijun [ORNL; Xu, Ye [ORNL; Huber, George [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of acetic acid to ethanol has been carried out in aqueous phase on several metals, with ruthenium being the most active and selective. DFT calculations suggest that the initial CO bond scission yielding acetyl is the key step and that the intrinsic reactivity of the metals accounts for the observed activity.

  14. Yttrium Nitrate mediated Nitration of Phenols at room temperature in Glacial Acetic acid

    MOHABUL A MONDAL; DBASHIS MANDAL; KANCHAN MITRA

    2017-01-01

    Rapid nitration of electron rich phenols using Y(NO₃)₃.6H₂O in glacial acetic acid at room temperature was observed with good yield. The method allows nitration of phenols without oxidation, and isolation of nitration product in a rapid and simple way. The described method is selective for phenols.

  15. Acetic Acid Formation by Selective Aerobic Oxidation of Aqueous Ethanol over Heterogeneous Ruthenium Catalysts

    Gorbanev, Yury; Kegnæs, Søren; Hanning, Christopher William

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalyst systems comprising ruthenium hydroxide supported on different carrier materials, titania, alumina, ceria, and spinel (MgAl2O4), were applied in selective aerobic oxidation ethanol to form acetic acid, an important bulk chemical and food ingredient. The catalysts were...

  16. Population dynamics of acetic acid bacteria during traditional wine vinegar production.

    Vegas, Carlos; Mateo, Estibaliz; González, Angel; Jara, Carla; Guillamón, José Manuel; Poblet, Montse; Torija, Ma Jesús; Mas, Albert

    2010-03-31

    The population dynamics of acetic acid bacteria in traditional vinegar production was determined in two independent vinegar plants at both the species and strain level. The effect of barrels made of four different woods upon the population dynamics was also determined. Acetic acid bacteria were isolated on solid media and the species were identified by RFLP-PCR of 16S rRNA genes and confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, while strains were typed by ERIC-PCR and (GTG)(5)-rep-PCR. The most widely isolated species was Acetobacter pasteurianus, which accounted for 100% of all the isolates during most of the acetification. Gluconacetobacter europaeus only appeared at any notable level at the end of the process in oak barrels from one vinegar plant. The various A. pasteurianus strains showed a clear succession as the concentration of acetic acid increased. In both vinegar plants the relative dominance of different strains was modified as the concentrations of acetic acid increased, and strain diversity tended to reduce at the end of the process.

  17. Ultrastructure of sheep primordial follicles cultured in the presence of indol acetic acid, EGF, and FSH

    Andrade, Evelyn Rabelo; Hyttel, Poul; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda Da Cruz;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ultrastructural characteristics of primordial follicles after culturing of sheep ovarian cortical slices in the presence of indol acetic acid (IAA), Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), and FSH. To evaluate ultrastructure of primordial follicles cultured...

  18. Trapping social wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) in nurseries with acetic acid and isobutanol

    European hornet (Vespa crabro L.) damages bark of nursery trees, and several vespids sting nursery personnel when disturbed. We tested acetic acid and isobutanol lures in traps for V. crabro spring queens, to determine the seasonality of vespid captures, and compare the efficacy of patterns of trap...

  19. Antinociceptive activity of lectins from Diocleinae seeds on acetic acid-induced writhing test in mice.

    Holanda, Fernanda R; Coelho-de-Sousa, Andrelina N; Assreuy, Ana M S; Leal-Cardoso, José Henrique; Pires, Alana F; do Nascimento, Kyria S; Teixeira, Cícero S; Cavada, Benildo S; Santos, Cláudia F

    2009-01-01

    Diocleinae lectins administered per oral route in mice inhibited the abdominal constrictions induced by acetic acid. The percentage of the lectins antinociception varied from 61% for Canavalia grandiflora (ConGf) to 20% for Dioclea violacea. ConGf inhibited contortions at all doses tested but not in a dose-dependent manner, involving carbohydrate recognition.

  20. Acetic acid as an intervention strategy to decontaminate beef carcasses in mexican commercial slaughterhouse

    Laura Reyes Carranza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Beef can be contaminated during the slaughter process, thus other methods, besides the traditional water washing, must be adopted to preserve meat safety. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of 2% acetic acid interventions on the reduction of indicator bacteria on beef carcasses at a commercial slaughterhouse in Mexico. Reduction was measured by the count of mesophilic aerobic bacteria (TPC, total coliform (TC, and fecal coliform (FC (log CFU/ cm². Among the different interventions tested, treatments combining acetic acid solution sprayed following carcass water washing had greater microbial reduction level. Acetic acid solution sprayed at low pressure and longer time (10-30 psi/ 60 s reached higher TPC, TC, and FC reductions than that obtained under high pressure/ shorter time (1,700 psi/ 15 s; P<0.05. Exposure time significantly affected microbial reduction on carcasses. Acetic acid solution sprayed after carcass washing can be successfully used to control sources of indicator bacteria on beef carcasses under commercial conditions.

  1. 75 FR 40736 - Acetic Acid; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance

    2010-07-14

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), requesting an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. This... breakfast cereals, processed meats, prepared table top sweeteners, sports and energy drinks (CODEX GSFA...% and 8%. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classifies acetic acid as ``Generally Recognized...

  2. Vinegar (20% acetic acid) broadcast application for broadleaf weed control in spring-transplanted onions

    Organic weed control research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma to determine the effect of broadcast over-the-top applications of acetic acid (vinegar) on weed control efficacy, crop injury and onion yields. The experiment included 6 weed control treatments (2 application volumes, 2 hand-weeding ...

  3. Biorefining of wheat straw using an acetic and formic acid based organosolv fractionation process

    Snelders, J.; Dornez, E.; Benjelloun-Mlayah, B.; Huijgen, W.J.J.; Wild, de P.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Gerritsma, J.; Courtin, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the potential of acetic and formic acid organosolv fractionation of wheat straw as basis of an integral biorefinery concept, detailed knowledge on yield, composition and purity of the obtained streams is needed. Therefore, the process was performed, all fractions extensively characterized

  4. Batch salicylic acid nitration by nitric acid/acetic acid mixture under isothermal, isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions.

    Andreozzi, R; Canterino, M; Caprio, V; Di Somma, I; Sanchirico, R

    2006-12-01

    Runaway phenomena and thermal explosions can originate during the nitration of salicylic acid by means of a nitric acid/acetic acid mixture when the thermal control is lost, mainly as a result of the formation and thermal decomposition of picric acid. The prediction of the behaviour of this system is thus of great importance in view of possible industrial applications and the need to avoid the occurrence of unwanted dangerous events. During a previous investigation a model was developed to simulate its behaviour when the starting concentration of the substrate is too low, thus, preventing the precipitation of poor soluble intermediates. In this work this model is extended to deal with more concentrated systems even in case of a solid phase separating during the process. To this purpose the previously assessed dependence of the solubility of 3-nitro and 5-nitrosalicylic acids upon temperature and nitric acid concentration is included in the model. It is assumed that when 3-nitro and 5-nitrosalicylic acids are partially suspended in the reacting medium a kinetic regime of "dissolution with reaction" is established; that is, the redissolution of these species is a fast process compared to the successive nitration to give dinitroderivatives. Good results are obtained in the comparison of the experimental data with those calculated both in isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions when the revised model is used.

  5. Radiolysis of aqueous solutions of acetic acid in the presence of Na-montmorillonite

    Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos, S.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1990-01-01

    The gamma-irradiation of 0.8 mol dm-3 aqueous, oxygen-free acetic acid solutions was investigated in the presence or absence of Na-montmorillonite. H2, CH4, CO, CO2, and several polycarboxylic acids were formed in all systems. The primary characteristics observed in the latter system were: (1) Higher yield of the decomposition of acetic acid; (2) Lower yield of the formation of polycarboxylic acids; (3) No effect on the formation of methane; (4) Higher yield of the formation of carbon dioxide; and (5) The reduction of Fe3+ in the octahedral sites of Na-montmorillonite. A possible reaction scheme was proposed to account for the observed changes. The results are important in understanding heterogeneous processes in radiation catalysis and might be significant to prebiotic chemistry.

  6. Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulation using an optimized potential model: pure acetic acid and a mixture of it with ethylene.

    Zhang, Minhua; Chen, Lihang; Yang, Huaming; Sha, Xijiang; Ma, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulation with configurational bias was employed to study the vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) for pure acetic acid and for a mixture of acetic acid and ethylene. An improved united-atom force field for acetic acid based on a Lennard-Jones functional form was proposed. The Lennard-Jones well depth and size parameters for the carboxyl oxygen and hydroxyl oxygen were determined by fitting the interaction energies of acetic acid dimers to the Lennard-Jones potential function. Four different acetic acid dimers and the proportions of them were considered when the force field was optimized. It was found that the new optimized force field provides a reasonable description of the vapor-liquid phase equilibrium for pure acetic acid and for the mixture of acetic acid and ethylene. Accurate values were obtained for the saturated liquid density of the pure compound (average deviation: 0.84 %) and for the critical points. The new optimized force field demonstrated greater accuracy and reliability in calculations of the solubility of the mixture of acetic acid and ethylene as compared with the results obtained with the original TraPPE-UA force field.

  7. Mutants of the pentose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus tolerant to hardwood spent sulfite liquor and acetic acid.

    Harner, Nicole K; Bajwa, Paramjit K; Habash, Marc B; Trevors, Jack T; Austin, Glen D; Lee, Hung

    2014-01-01

    A strain development program was initiated to improve the tolerance of the pentose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus to inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Several rounds of UV mutagenesis followed by screening were used to select for mutants of P. tannophilus NRRL Y2460 with improved tolerance to hardwood spent sulfite liquor (HW SSL) and acetic acid in separate selection lines. The wild type (WT) strain grew in 50 % (v/v) HW SSL while third round HW SSL mutants (designated UHW301, UHW302 and UHW303) grew in 60 % (v/v) HW SSL, with two of these isolates (UHW302 and UHW303) being viable and growing, respectively, in 70 % (v/v) HW SSL. In defined liquid media containing acetic acid, the WT strain grew in 0.70 % (w/v) acetic acid, while third round acetic acid mutants (designated UAA301, UAA302 and UAA303) grew in 0.80 % (w/v) acetic acid, with one isolate (UAA302) growing in 0.90 % (w/v) acetic acid. Cross-tolerance of HW SSL-tolerant mutants to acetic acid and vice versa was observed with UHW303 able to grow in 0.90 % (w/v) acetic acid and UAA302 growing in 60 % (v/v) HW SSL. The UV-induced mutants retained the ability to ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol in defined media. These mutants of P. tannophilus are of considerable interest for bioconversion of the sugars in lignocellulosic hydrolysates to ethanol.

  8. PERVAPORATION SEPARATION OF WATER-ACETIC ACID MIXTURES THROUGH AN-co-AA MEMBRANES TREATED WITH RARE EARTH METAL IONS

    SHEN Zhiquan; ZHANG Fuyao; ZHANG Yifeng

    1995-01-01

    Pervaporation separation of water-acetic acid mixtures through Poly (AN-co-AA)membranes and rare earth metal ions treated Poly(AN-co-AA)membranes was investigated for the first time. The results showed that the treatment with rare earth metal ions could greatly improve the characteristics of the separation of water-acetic acid mixtures.

  9. Chloroindolyl-3-acetic Acid and its Methyl Ester Incorporation of 36Cl in Immature Seeds of Pea and Barley

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1974-01-01

    compounds besides Cl−. One compound, present in pea and probably in barley, cochromatographed with a mixture of 4- and 6-chloroindolyl-3-acetic acid methyl esters. Another, detected in pea, but probably not in barley, cochromatographed with a mixture of 4-and 6-chloroindolyl-3-acetic acids....

  10. 40 CFR 721.10074 - Acetic acid, 2-chloro-, 1-(3,3-dimethylcyclohexyl)ethyl ester.

    2010-07-01

    ...-dimethylcyclohexyl)ethyl ester. 721.10074 Section 721.10074 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10074 Acetic acid, 2-chloro-, 1-(3,3-dimethylcyclohexyl)ethyl ester. (a... acetic acid, 2-chloro-, 1-(3,3-dimethylcyclohexyl)ethyl ester (PMN P-05-568; CAS No. 477218-59-0)...

  11. Primary Action of Indole-3-acetic Acid in Crown Gall Tumors: Increase of Solute Uptake.

    Rausch, T; Kahl, G; Hilgenberg, W

    1984-06-01

    Exogenously added indole-3-acetic acid at a concentration of 100 micromolars stimulates d-glucose uptake (or 3-O-methyl-d-glucose uptake) by 25% in crown gall tumors induced on potato tuber tissue by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain C 58. The titration of the endogenous IAA with the auxin antagonist 2-naphthaleneacetic acid at 100 micromolars reduces d-glucose uptake by about 80%. The apparent inhibition constant K(i) is 21 micromolars. Other auxin antagonists like 1-naphthoxyacetic acid and 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)-2-methylpropionic acid show similar effects. The uptake of the amino acids leucine, methionine, tryptophan, lysine, and aspartic acid is also inhibited by 2-naphthaleneacetic acid to similar degrees. The auxins 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and 2-naphthoxyacetic acid at concentrations between 10 and 100 micromolars inhibit solute uptake only slightly (inhibition less than 20%). The impact of the results on the postulated role of indole-3-acetic acid as a modifier of the electrochemical proton gradient across the plasmalemma in crown gall tumor tissue is discussed.

  12. Primary Action of Indole-3-acetic Acid in Crown Gall Tumors

    Rausch, Thomas; Kahl, Günter; Hilgenberg, Willy

    1984-01-01

    Exogenously added indole-3-acetic acid at a concentration of 100 micromolars stimulates d-glucose uptake (or 3-O-methyl-d-glucose uptake) by 25% in crown gall tumors induced on potato tuber tissue by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain C 58. The titration of the endogenous IAA with the auxin antagonist 2-naphthaleneacetic acid at 100 micromolars reduces d-glucose uptake by about 80%. The apparent inhibition constant Ki is 21 micromolars. Other auxin antagonists like 1-naphthoxyacetic acid and 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)-2-methylpropionic acid show similar effects. The uptake of the amino acids leucine, methionine, tryptophan, lysine, and aspartic acid is also inhibited by 2-naphthaleneacetic acid to similar degrees. The auxins 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and 2-naphthoxyacetic acid at concentrations between 10 and 100 micromolars inhibit solute uptake only slightly (inhibition less than 20%). The impact of the results on the postulated role of indole-3-acetic acid as a modifier of the electrochemical proton gradient across the plasmalemma in crown gall tumor tissue is discussed. PMID:16663625

  13. Extraction and sorption of acetic acid at pH above pK{sub a} to form calcium magnesium acetate

    Reisinger, H.; King, C.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The use of rock salt for deicing roads has many negative effects on automobiles, highway systems, and the environment. Calcium magnesium acetate, hence-forth denoted CMA, has been identified as a more desirable, environmentally benign solid deicer for high-ways, airport runaways, and similar applications. CMA is also of interest as an additive for scavenging sulfur in combustion processes so as to reduce emissions of sulfur oxides and as a catalyst for coal gasification. Different extractants (trioctylphosphine oxide and secondary, tertiary, and quaternary amines) and solid sorbents (tertiary and quaternary amines) were investigated as agents for recovery of acetic acid as part of a process for production of CMA from fermentation acetic acid. The pH and temperature dependencies for uptake of acetic acid by these extractants and sorbents were measured, along with the degrees of regeneration by aqueous suspensions of slaked dolomitic lime. These results enable identification of agents having optimal basicity. Among the extractants, the secondary amine Amberlite LA-2 gave the best combined performance for extraction and regeneration. Among the sorbents, a tertiary amine, Amberlite IRA-35, gave the best performance. Trioctylphosphine oxide does not maintain capacity in the pH range (about 6) most attractive for acetic acid fermentation. Slurred crushed dolomite is not sufficiently basic to accomplish regeneration.

  14. A specialized citric acid cycle requiring succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) confers acetic acid resistance on the acidophile Acetobacter aceti.

    Mullins, Elwood A; Francois, Julie A; Kappock, T Joseph

    2008-07-01

    Microbes tailor macromolecules and metabolism to overcome specific environmental challenges. Acetic acid bacteria perform the aerobic oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid and are generally resistant to high levels of these two membrane-permeable poisons. The citric acid cycle (CAC) is linked to acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti by several observations, among them the oxidation of acetate to CO2 by highly resistant acetic acid bacteria and the previously unexplained role of A. aceti citrate synthase (AarA) in acetic acid resistance at a low pH. Here we assign specific biochemical roles to the other components of the A. aceti strain 1023 aarABC region. AarC is succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase, which replaces succinyl-CoA synthetase in a variant CAC. This new bypass appears to reduce metabolic demand for free CoA, reliance upon nucleotide pools, and the likely effect of variable cytoplasmic pH upon CAC flux. The putative aarB gene is reassigned to SixA, a known activator of CAC flux. Carbon overflow pathways are triggered in many bacteria during metabolic limitation, which typically leads to the production and diffusive loss of acetate. Since acetate overflow is not feasible for A. aceti, a CO(2) loss strategy that allows acetic acid removal without substrate-level (de)phosphorylation may instead be employed. All three aar genes, therefore, support flux through a complete but unorthodox CAC that is needed to lower cytoplasmic acetate levels.

  15. Improvement in ionic conductivities of poly-(2-vinylpyridine) by treatment with crotonic acid and vinyl acetic acid

    Anna Gogoi; Neelotpal Sen Sarma

    2015-06-01

    The synthesis, characterization and improved ionic conductivities of the salts of poly-(2-vinylpyridine) with crotonic acid and vinyl acetic acid are reported here. In this study, the alternating current conductivity measurements were carried out within the temperature range of 30–90° C and the frequency range of 1 Hz–100 kHz in solid state. A two- to three-fold increase in conductivity was observed for vinyl acetic acid salt whereas one- to twofold increase was observed for crotonic acid salt. The ionic transport numbers of the salts were measured with the help of the Wagner polarization technique which reveals that the percentage of ionic character of the salts are significantly higher compared with the polymer. The percentage of water uptake by the polymer and its salts were also observed.

  16. Depressing effect of phenoxyl acetic acids on flotation of minerals containing Ca2+/Mg2+ gangues

    2007-01-01

    Phenoxyl acetic acids were applied to determine their depressing effect on minerals containing Ca2+/Mg2+ gangues. Calcite,mixture of calcite and fluorite, and nickel ore were used in the flotation. And the depression mechanism was studied by the determination of contact angle, zeta potential, adsorptive capacity of collector, and IR analysis as well. It is found that 0.1 mmol/L of phenoxyl acetic acid derived from pyrogallol or gallic acid exhibits strong depressing ability on calcite in almost zero yields at pH value of 9.8, and calcite can be depressed in the flotation of calcite/fluorite mixture for approximate 87% yield of fluorite. The flotation result of practical nickel ore containing serpentine indicates that these two depressants may also show better depression performance to serpentine than traditional depressants such as sodium fluosilicate and carboxylmethyl cellulose. Analysis for the depression mechanism reveals that there exists strong chemical interaction between the depressants and minerals.

  17. Removal of acetic acid from simulated hemicellulosic hydrolysates by emulsion liquid membrane with organophosphorus extractants.

    Lee, Sang Cheol

    2015-09-01

    Selective removal of acetic acid from simulated hemicellulosic hydrolysates containing xylose and sulfuric acid was attempted in a batch emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) system with organophosphorus extractants. Various experimental variables were used to develop a more energy-efficient ELM process. Total operation time of an ELM run with a very small quantity of trioctylphosphine oxide as the extractant was reduced to about a third of those required to attain almost the same extraction efficiency as obtained in previous ELM works without any extractant. Under specific conditions, acetic acid was selectively separated with a high degree of extraction and insignificant loss of xylose, and its purity and enrichment ratio in the stripping phase were higher than 92% and 6, respectively. Also, reused organic membrane solutions exhibited the extraction efficiency as high as fresh organic solutions did. These results showed that the current ELM process would be quite practical.

  18. Biodiesel Production Using Supercritical Methanol with Carbon Dioxide and Acetic Acid

    Chao-Yi Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transesterification of oils and lipids in supercritical methanol is commonly carried out in the absence of a catalyst. In this work, supercritical methanol, carbon dioxide, and acetic acid were used to produce biodiesel from soybean oil. Supercritical carbon dioxide was added to reduce the reaction temperature and increase the fats dissolved in the reaction medium. Acetic acid was added to reduce the glycerol byproduct and increase the hydrolysis of fatty acids. The Taguchi method was used to identify optimal conditions in the biodiesel production process. With an optimal reaction temperature of 280°C, a methanol-to-oil ratio of 60, and an acetic acid-to-oil ratio of 3, a 97.83% yield of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs was observed after 90 min at a reaction pressure of 20 MPa. While the common approach to biodiesel production results in a glycerol byproduct of about 10% of the yield, the practices reported in this research can reduce the glycerol byproduct by 30.2% and thereby meet international standards requiring a FAME content of >96%.

  19. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    Aleksandra Matuszyk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis.

  20. Optimizing high strength acetic acid bioprocess by cognitive methods in an unsteady state cultivation.

    Arnold, S; Becker, T; Delgado, A; Emde, F; Enenkel, A

    2002-08-07

    Methods of adapting micro-organisms to an inhibiting factor in an active industrial bioprocess were examined with an acetic acid fermentation as model. With the aim of automatic control, a fuzzy-logic system was developed on the basis of the collected knowledge of skilled vinegar brewers. In a first step, this fuzzy system was to assess the actual adaptation degree of the bacteria on the basis of data from robust and reasonably priced sensors. From this information an appropriate setpoint value for the inhibiting factor 'final acid concentration' was derived for each batch cycle. As a result a further acid tolerance was found after several batch cycles. This adaptation effect should be used to increase the product concentration to more than 20 g per 100 ml acetic acid with a high productivity. The stepwise adapted culture was productive over the aimed acetic acid concentration, a 10% improvement of the product formation rate could be found compared with the status before conditioning. High product concentration and increased productivity finally result in shorter cycle times, less transport and storage volumes, an improved utilization of energy and material resources, and, last but not least, they are an essential steps towards the fulfillment of economical and ecological demands.

  1. Formic and acetic acid over the central Amazon region, Brazil. I - Dry season

    Andreae, M. O.; Andreae, T. W.; Talbot, R. W.; Harriss, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    The concentrations of formic and acetic acids in the gas phase, atmospheric aerosol, and rainwater samples collected in Amazonia at ground level and in the atmosphere during the Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment in July/August 1985 were analyzed by ion exchange chromatography. The diurnal behavior of both acids at ground level and their vertical distribution in the forest canopy point to the existence of vegetative sources as well as to production by chemical reactions in the atmosphere. The concentrations of formic and acetic acids in the gas phase were about 2 orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding concentrations in the atmospheric aerosol. In rainwater, the total formate and acetate represented about one half of the anion equivalents, in contrast to less than 10 percent of the soluble anionic equivalents contributed by these acids in the atmospheric aerosol. The observed levels of these ions in rainwater are considered to be the result of a combination of chemical reactions in hydrometeors and the scavenging of the gaseous acids by cloud droplets.

  2. Use of acetic and citric acids to control Salmonella Typhimurium in tahini (sesame paste).

    Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Olaimat, Amin N; Osaili, Tareq M; Shaker, Reyad R; Zein Elabedeen, Noor; Jaradat, Ziad W; Abushelaibi, Aisha; Holley, Richard A

    2014-09-01

    Since tahini and its products have been linked to Salmonella illness outbreaks and product recalls in recent years, this study assessed the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to survive or grow in commercial tahini and when hydrated (10% w/v in water), treated with 0.1%-0.5% acetic or citric acids, and stored at 37, 21 and 10 °C for 28 d. S. Typhimurium survived in commercial tahini up to 28 d but was reduced in numbers from 1.7 to 3.3 log10 CFU/ml. However, in the moist or hydrated tahini, significant growth of S. Typhimurium occurred at the tested temperatures. Acetic and citric acids at ≤0.5% reduced S. Typhimurium by 2.7-4.8 log10 CFU/ml and 2.5-3.8 log10 CFU/ml, respectively, in commercial tahini at 28 d. In hydrated tahini the organic acids were more effective. S. Typhimurium cells were not detected in the presence of 0.5% acetic acid after 7 d or with 0.5% citric acid after 21 d at the tested temperatures. The ability of S. Typhimurium to grow or survive in commercial tahini and products containing hydrated tahini may contribute to salmonellosis outbreaks; however, use of acetic and citric acids in ready-to-eat foods prepared from tahini can significantly minimize the risk associated with this pathogen.

  3. A solvent extraction approach to recover acetic acid from mixed waste acids produced during semiconductor wafer process.

    Shin, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Ju-Yup; Kim, Jun-Young; Kim, Hyun-Sang; Lee, Hyang-Sook; Mohapatra, Debasish; Ahn, Jae-Woo; Ahn, Jong-Gwan; Bae, Wookeun

    2009-03-15

    Recovery of acetic acid (HAc) from the waste etching solution discharged from silicon wafer manufacturing process has been attempted by using solvent extraction process. For this purpose 2-ethylhexyl alcohol (EHA) was used as organic solvent. In the pre-treatment stage >99% silicon and hydrofluoric acid was removed from the solution by precipitation. The synthesized product, Na(2)SiF(6) having 98.2% purity was considered of commercial grade having good market value. The waste solution containing 279 g/L acetic acid, 513 g/L nitric acid, 0.9 g/L hydrofluoric acid and 0.030 g/L silicon was used for solvent extraction study. From the batch test results equilibrium conditions for HAc recovery were optimized and found to be 4 stages of extraction at an organic:aqueous (O:A) ratio of 3, 4 stages of scrubbing and 4 stages of stripping at an O:A ratio of 1. Deionized water (DW) was used as stripping agent to elute HAc from organic phase. In the whole batch process 96.3% acetic acid recovery was achieved. Continuous operations were successfully conducted for 100 h using a mixer-settler to examine the feasibility of the extraction system for its possible commercial application. Finally, a complete process flowsheet with material balance for the separation and recovery of HAc has been proposed.

  4. Screening and characterization of ethanol-tolerant and thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria from Chinese vinegar Pei.

    Chen, Yang; Bai, Ye; Li, Dongsheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Ning; Hu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are important microorganisms in the vinegar industry. However, AAB have to tolerate the presence of ethanol and high temperatures, especially in submerged fermentation (SF), which inhibits AAB growth and acid yield. In this study, seven AAB that are tolerant to temperatures above 40 °C and ethanol concentrations above 10% (v/v) were isolated from Chinese vinegar Pei. All the isolated AAB belong to Acetobacter pasteurianus according to 16S rDNA analysis. Among all AAB, AAB4 produced the highest acid yield under high temperature and ethanol test conditions. At 4% ethanol and 30-40 °C temperatures, AAB4 maintained an alcohol-acid transform ratio of more than 90.5 %. High alcohol-acid transform ratio was still maintained even at higher temperatures, namely, 87.2, 77.1, 14.5 and 2.9% at 41, 42, 43 and 44 °C, respectively. At 30 °C and different initial ethanol concentrations (4-10%), the acid yield by AAB4 increased gradually, although the alcohol-acid transform ratio decreased to some extent. However, 46.5, 8.7 and 0.9% ratios were retained at ethanol concentrations of 11, 12 and 13%, respectively. When compared with AS1.41 (an AAB widely used in China) using a 10 L fermentor, AAB4 produced 42.0 g/L acetic acid at 37 °C with 10% ethanol, whereas AS1.41 almost stopped producing acetic acid. In conclusion, these traits suggest that AAB4 is a valuable strain for vinegar production in SF.

  5. Iron dissolution of dust source materials during simulated acidic processing: the effect of sulfuric, acetic, and oxalic acids.

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2013-09-17

    Atmospheric organic acids potentially display different capacities in iron (Fe) mobilization from atmospheric dust compared with inorganic acids, but few measurements have been made on this comparison. We report here a laboratory investigation of Fe mobilization of coal fly ash, a representative Fe-containing anthropogenic aerosol, and Arizona test dust, a reference source material for mineral dust, in pH 2 sulfuric acid, acetic acid, and oxalic acid, respectively. The effects of pH and solar radiation on Fe dissolution have also been explored. The relative capacities of these three acids in Fe dissolution are in the order of oxalic acid > sulfuric acid > acetic acid. Oxalate forms mononuclear bidentate ligand with surface Fe and promotes Fe dissolution to the greatest extent. Photolysis of Fe-oxalate complexes further enhances Fe dissolution with the concomitant degradation of oxalate. These results suggest that ligand-promoted dissolution of Fe may play a more significant role in mobilizing Fe from atmospheric dust compared with proton-assisted processing. The role of atmospheric organic acids should be taken into account in global-biogeochemical modeling to better access dissolved atmospheric Fe deposition flux at the ocean surface.

  6. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice.

    Roager, Henrik M; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper; Frandsen, Henrik L; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Wilcks, Andrea; Skov, Thomas H; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Licht, Tine R

    2014-01-01

    Monocolonization of germ-free (GF) mice enables the study of specific bacterial species in vivo. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM(TM) (NCFM) is a probiotic strain; however, many of the mechanisms behind its health-promoting effect remain unknown. Here, we studied the effects of NCFM on the metabolome of jejunum, cecum, and colon of NCFM monocolonized (MC) and GF mice using liquid chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry (LC-MS). The study adds to existing evidence that NCFM in vivo affects the bile acid signature of mice, in particular by deconjugation. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine as especially the digestion of oligosaccharides (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Additionally, levels of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E acetate) were higher in the intestine of GF mice than in MC mice, suggesting that NCFM affects the vitamin E acetate metabolism. NCFM did not digest vitamin E acetate in vitro, suggesting that direct bacterial metabolism was not the cause of the altered metabolome in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that NCFM affects intestinal carbohydrate metabolism, bile acid metabolism and vitamin E metabolism, although it remains to be investigated whether this effect is unique to NCFM.

  7. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa.

  8. Novel wine yeast with mutations in YAP1 that produce less acetic acid during fermentation.

    Cordente, Antonio G; Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Pretorius, Isak S; Curtin, Christopher D

    2013-02-01

    Acetic acid, a byproduct formed during yeast alcoholic fermentation, is the main component of volatile acidity (VA). When present in high concentrations in wine, acetic acid imparts an undesirable 'vinegary' character that results in a significant reduction in quality and sales. Previously, it has been shown that saké yeast strains resistant to the antifungal cerulenin produce significantly lower levels of VA. In this study, we used a classical mutagenesis method to isolate a series of cerulenin-resistant strains, derived from a commercial diploid wine yeast. Four of the selected strains showed a consistent low-VA production phenotype after small-scale fermentation of different white and red grape musts. Specific mutations in YAP1, a gene encoding a transcription factor required for oxidative stress tolerance, were found in three of the four low-VA strains. When integrated into the genome of a haploid wine strain, the mutated YAP1 alleles partially reproduced the low-VA production phenotype of the diploid cerulenin-resistant strains, suggesting that YAP1 might play a role in (regulating) acetic acid production during fermentation. This study offers prospects for the development of low-VA wine yeast starter strains that could assist winemakers in their effort to consistently produce wine to definable quality specifications.

  9. Influence of acidic pH on hydrogen and acetate production by an electrosynthetic microbiome.

    Edward V LaBelle

    Full Text Available Production of hydrogen and organic compounds by an electrosynthetic microbiome using electrodes and carbon dioxide as sole electron donor and carbon source, respectively, was examined after exposure to acidic pH (∼ 5. Hydrogen production by biocathodes poised at -600 mV vs. SHE increased >100-fold and acetate production ceased at acidic pH, but ∼ 5-15 mM (catholyte volume/day acetate and >1,000 mM/day hydrogen were attained at pH ∼ 6.5 following repeated exposure to acidic pH. Cyclic voltammetry revealed a 250 mV decrease in hydrogen overpotential and a maximum current density of 12.2 mA/cm2 at -765 mV (0.065 mA/cm2 sterile control at -800 mV by the Acetobacterium-dominated community. Supplying -800 mV to the microbiome after repeated exposure to acidic pH resulted in up to 2.6 kg/m3/day hydrogen (≈ 2.6 gallons gasoline equivalent, 0.7 kg/m3/day formate, and 3.1 kg/m3/day acetate ( = 4.7 kg CO2 captured.

  10. Dynamics of three organic acids (malic, acetic and succinic acid) in sunflower exposed to cadmium and lead.

    Niu, Zhixin; Li, Xiaodong; Sun, Lina; Sun, Tieheng

    2013-01-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) has been considered as a good candidate for bioaccumulation of heavy metals. In the present study, sunflower was used to enrich the cadmium and lead in sand culture during 90 days. Biomass, Cd and Pb uptake, three organic acids and pH in cultures were investigated. Results showed that the existence of Cd and Pb showed different interactions on the organic acids exudation. In single Cd treatments, malic and acetic acids in Cd10 showed an incremental tendency with time. In the mixed treatments of Cd and Pb, malic acids increased when 10 and 40 mg x L(-1) Cd were added into Pb50, but acetic acids in Pb50 were inhibited by Cd addition. The Cd10 supplied in Pb10 stimulated the secretion of malic and succinic acids. Moreover, the Cd or Pb uptake in sunflower showed various correlations with pH and some organic acids, which might be due to the fact that the Cd and Pb interfere with the organic acids secretion in rhizosphere of sunflower, and the changes of organic acids altered the form and bioavailability of Cd and Pb in cultures conversely.

  11. Allyl 4-hydroxyphenyl carbonate

    Víctor Hugo Flores Ahuactzin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The title molecule, C10H10O4, is a functionalized carbonate used in the synthetic route to organic glasses. The central CH fragment of the allyl group is disordered over two positions, with occupancies in a 0.758 (10:0.242 (10ratio. This disorder reflects the torsional flexibility of the oxygen–allyl group, although both disordered parts present the expected anticlinal conformation, with O—CH2—CH=CH2 torsion angles of −111 (2 and 119.1 (4°. The crystal structure is based on chains parallel to [010], formed by O...H—O hydrogen bonds involving hydroxyl and carbonyl groups as donors and acceptors, respectively. The molecular packing is further stabilized by two weak C—H...π contacts from the benzene ring of the asymmetric unit with two benzene rings of neighboring molecules.

  12. Main and interaction effects of acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on growth and ethanol productivity of yeasts

    Palmqvist, E.; Grage, H.; Meinander, N.Q.; Hahn-Haegerdal, B. [Univ. of Lund (Sweden)

    1999-04-05

    The influence of the factors acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on the ethanol yield (Y{sub EtOH}) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, bakers` yeast, S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581, and Candida shehatae NJ 23 was investigated using a 2{sup 3}-full factorial design with 3 centerpoints. The results indicated that acetic acid inhibited the fermentation by C. shehatae NJ 23 markedly more than by bakers` yeast, whereas no significant difference in tolerance towards the compounds was detected between the S. cerevisiae strains. Furfural and the lignin derived compound p-hydroxybenzoic acid did not affect any of the yeasts at the cell mass concentration used. The results indicated that the linear model was not adequate to describe the experimental data. Based on the results from the 2{sup 3}-full factorial experiment, an extended experiment was designed based on a central composite design to investigate the influence of the factors on the specific growth rate ({mu}), biomass yield (Y{sub x}), volumetric ethanol productivity (Q{sub EtOH}), and Y{sub EtOH}. Bakers` yeast was chosen in the extended experiment due to its better tolerance towards acetic acid, which makes it a more interesting organism for use in industrial fermentations of lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

  13. Theoretical study of the hydration of atmospheric nucleation precursors with acetic acid.

    Zhu, Yu-Peng; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Jiang, Shuai; Xu, Kang-Ming; Wen, Hui; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Huang, Wei

    2014-09-11

    While atmosphere is known to contain a significant fraction of organic substance and the effect of acetic acid to stabilize hydrated sulfuric acids is found to be close that of ammonia, the details about the hydration of (CH3COOH)(H2SO4)2 are poorly understood, especially for the larger clusters with more water molecules. We have investigated structural characteristics and thermodynamics of the hydrates using density functional theory (DFT) at PW91PW91/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level. The phenomena of the structural evolution may exist during the early stage of the clusters formation, and we tentatively proposed a calculation path for the Gibbs free energies of the clusters formation via the structural evolution. The results in this study supply a picture of the first deprotonation of sulfuric acids for a system consisting of two sulfuric acid molecules, an acetic acid molecule, and up to three waters at 0 and 298.15 K, respectively. We also replace one of the sulfuric acids with a bisulfate anion in (CH3COOH)(H2SO4)2 to explore the difference of acid dissociation between two series of clusters and interaction of performance in clusters growth between ion-mediated nucleation and organics-enhanced nucleation.

  14. Neurotoxicity induced by amyloid beta-peptide and ibotenic acid in organotypic hippocampal cultures: protection by S-allyl-L-cysteine, a garlic compound.

    Ito, Yoshihisa; Ito, Moriyuki; Takagi, Noritaka; Saito, Hiroshi; Ishige, Kumiko

    2003-09-19

    We have assessed amyloid-beta (Abeta)-induced neurotoxicity, with and without added ibotenic acid (IBO), a potent N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) agonist, in an organotypic hippocampal slice culture (OHC). In the OHC, there was little neurotoxicity after treatment with Abeta(25-35) (25 or 50 microM) alone for 48 h. However, with IBO alone neuronal death was observed in the pyramidal cell layer at low concentrations, and there was dramatic neuronal death at concentrations of 65 microM or more. When Abeta was combined with IBO (Abeta+IBO) there was more intense cell death than with IBO alone. S-Allyl-L-cysteine (SAC), one of the organosulfur compounds having a thioallyl group in aged garlic extract, was shown to protect the hippocampal neurons in the CA3 area and the dentate gyrus (DG) from the cell death induced by Abeta+IBO with no change in the CA1 area. Although L-glutamate (500 microM) potentiated the degree of IBO-induced neuronal death, it attenuated the Abeta+IBO-induced neuronal death in both the CA3 area and the DG with no obvious effect on the CA1 area. These results suggest that Abeta+IBO induces extensive neuronal death, and that SAC and L-glutamate protect cells from death in specific areas of the hippocampus. In addition, inhibition using a pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, only provided partial protection from Abeta+IBO-induced toxicity for the neurons in the CA3 area. These results suggest that multiple mechanisms may be involved in Abeta+IBO-induced neuronal death in the OHC.

  15. Effects of acetic acid on the kinetics of xylose fermentation by an engineered, xylose-isomerase-based Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    Bellissimi, Eleonora; van Dijken, Johannes P; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2009-05-01

    Acetic acid, an inhibitor released during hydrolysis of lignocellulosic feedstocks, has previously been shown to negatively affect the kinetics and stoichiometry of sugar fermentation by (engineered) Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. This study investigates the effects of acetic acid on S. cerevisiae RWB 218, an engineered xylose-fermenting strain based on the Piromyces XylA (xylose isomerase) gene. Anaerobic batch cultures on synthetic medium supplemented with glucose-xylose mixtures were grown at pH 5 and 3.5, with and without addition of 3 g L(-1) acetic acid. In these cultures, consumption of the sugar mixtures followed a diauxic pattern. At pH 5, acetic acid addition caused increased glucose consumption rates, whereas specific xylose consumption rates were not significantly affected. In contrast, at pH 3.5 acetic acid had a strong and specific negative impact on xylose consumption rates, which, after glucose depletion, slowed down dramatically, leaving 50% of the xylose unused after 48 h of fermentation. Xylitol production was absent (fermentation in acetic -acid-stressed cultures at pH 3.5 could be restored by applying a continuous, limiting glucose feed, consistent with a key role of ATP regeneration in acetic acid tolerance.

  16. Bio-conversion of apple pomace into ethanol and acetic acid: Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation.

    Parmar, Indu; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2013-02-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose present in apple pomace was investigated using process variables such as enzyme activity of commercial cellulase, pectinase and β-glucosidase, temperature, pH, time, pre-treatments and end product separation. The interaction of enzyme activity, temperature, pH and time had a significant effect (Pfermented using Saccharomyces cerevisae yielding 19.0g ethanol/100g DM. Further bio-conversion using Acetobacter aceti resulted in the production of acetic acid at a concentration of 61.4g/100g DM. The present study demonstrates an improved process of enzymatic hydrolysis of apple pomace to yield sugars and concomitant bioconversion to produce ethanol and acetic acid.

  17. Protective Effect of Ocimum basilicum Essential Oil Against Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    Rashidian, Amir; Roohi, Parnia; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Ghannadi, Ali Reza; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Ocimum basilicum L has been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in Iran. This study investigates the ameliorative effect of Ocimum basilicum essential oil on an acetic acid-induced colitis model in rats. Ocimum basilicum essential oil with 2 doses (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly ameliorated wet weight/length ratio of colonic tissue compared to the control group. Higher doses of essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly reduced ulcer severity, ulcer area, and ulcer index. On the other hand, histological examination revealed the diminution of total colitis index as a marker for inflammatory cell infiltration in the colonic segments of rats treated with Ocimum basilicum essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). The increased level of myeloperoxidase was significantly decreased after the treatment with the essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). These results suggest that Ocimum basilicum exhibits protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis.

  18. A catalyst for the carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid in gaseous phase

    潘平来; 柳忠阳; 朱长城; 袁国卿

    1996-01-01

    A novel Rh/Ys catalyst for the carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid in gaseous phase is reported. The porous carbon beads (Ys) prepared from the carbonation of poly(vinylidene chloride) were used as the support. This catalyst has a specific surface area of 1 000 m2/g, high mechanical strength and thermal stability. The average diameter of the pore is in the range of 0.8 - 1.2nm. Experimental evidence showed that this catalyst was of high activity and selectivity, which could compare to those of the homogeneous catalyst from Monsanto. The catalytic rate could get to 900 g AcOH/g Rh·h during the carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid. The fine spreading of Ph over the Ys surface is the key factor for the activity.

  19. The stability of the acetic acid dimer in microhydrated environments and in aqueous solution.

    Pašalić, Hasan; Tunega, Daniel; Aquino, Adélia J A; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H; Lischka, Hans

    2012-03-28

    The thermodynamic stability of the acetic acid dimer conformers in microhydrated environments and in aqueous solution was studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations using the density functional based tight binding (DFTB) method. To confirm the reliability of this method for the system studied, density functional theory (DFT) and second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculations were performed for comparison. Classical optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS) force field dynamics was used as well. One focus of this work was laid on the study of the capabilities of water molecules to break the hydrogen bonds of the acetic acid dimer. The barrier for insertion of one water molecule into the most stable cyclic dimer is found to lie between 3.25 and 4.8 kcal mol(-1) for the quantum mechanical methods, but only at 1.2 kcal mol(-1) for OPLS. Starting from different acetic acid dimer structures optimized in gas phase, DFTB dynamics simulations give a different picture of the stability in the microhydrated environment (4 to 12 water molecules) as compared to aqueous solution. In the former case all conformers are converted to the hydrated cyclic dimer, which remains stable over the entire simulation time of 1 ns. These results demonstrate that the considered microhydrated environment is not sufficient to dissociate the acetic acid dimer. In aqueous solution, however, the DFTB dynamics shows dissociation of all dimer structures (or processes leading thereto) starting after about 50 ps, demonstrating the capability of the water environment to break up the relatively strong hydrogen bridges. The OPLS dynamics in the aqueous environment shows--in contrast to the DFTB results--immediate dissociation, but a similar long-term behavior.

  20. Inappropriate platelet transfusion in a patient with ethylenediamine tetra- acetic acid (EDTA)--induced pseudothrombocytopenia.

    Kakkar, Naveen; Garg, Geetu

    2006-01-01

    Automated platelet counts in the laboratory may be fictitiously low at times and require manual confirmation. Ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) in few patients and healthy individuals can induce platelet aggregation, giving rise to a spuriously low automated platelet count. This phenomenon which occurs due to the presence of IgG antibodies, if unrecognized, can result in incorrect diagnosis and consequent inappropriate treatment. We present a patient who received inappropriate platelet transfusion as a result of EDTA induced spurious thrombocytopenia.

  1. Adaptive laboratory evolution of ethanologenic Zymomonas mobilis strain tolerant to furfural and acetic acid inhibitors.

    Shui, Zong-Xia; Qin, Han; Wu, Bo; Ruan, Zhi-yong; Wang, Lu-shang; Tan, Fu-Rong; Wang, Jing-Li; Tang, Xiao-Yu; Dai, Li-Chun; Hu, Guo-Quan; He, Ming-Xiong

    2015-07-01

    Furfural and acetic acid from lignocellulosic hydrolysates are the prevalent inhibitors to Zymomonas mobilis during cellulosic ethanol production. Developing a strain tolerant to furfural or acetic acid inhibitors is difficul by using rational engineering strategies due to poor understanding of their underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, strategy of adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) was used for development of a furfural and acetic acid-tolerant strain. After three round evolution, four evolved mutants (ZMA7-2, ZMA7-3, ZMF3-2, and ZMF3-3) that showed higher growth capacity were successfully obtained via ALE method. Based on the results of profiling of cell growth, glucose utilization, ethanol yield, and activity of key enzymes, two desired strains, ZMA7-2 and ZMF3-3, were achieved, which showed higher tolerance under 7 g/l acetic acid and 3 g/l furfural stress condition. Especially, it is the first report of Z. mobilis strain that could tolerate higher furfural. The best strain, Z. mobilis ZMF3-3, has showed 94.84% theoretical ethanol yield under 3-g/l furfural stress condition, and the theoretical ethanol yield of ZM4 is only 9.89%. Our study also demonstrated that ALE method might also be used as a powerful metabolic engineering tool for metabolic engineering in Z. mobilis. Furthermore, the two best strains could be used as novel host for further metabolic engineering in cellulosic ethanol or future biorefinery. Importantly, the two strains may also be used as novel-tolerant model organisms for the genetic mechanism on the "omics" level, which will provide some useful information for inverse metabolic engineering.

  2. Calcifying Tendonitis of the Shoulder: Risk Factors and Effectiveness of Acetic Acid Iontophoresis and Ultrasound

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To clinically characterize calcifying tendonitis of the shoulder (CT) through a prospective quasi-experimental before-and-after study, which provides a level of demonstrable evidence to support the decision-making and demonstrate the effectiveness of acetic acid iontophoresis and ultrasound in the treatment of CT. Methods Prospective, quasi-experimental before-after intervention study was conducted on 44 patients who re...

  3. Endohyphal Bacterium Enhances Production of Indole-3-Acetic Acid by a Foliar Fungal Endophyte

    Hoffman, Michele T.; Gunatilaka, Malkanthi K.; Kithsiri Wijeratne; Leslie Gunatilaka; A Elizabeth Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Numerous plant pathogens, rhizosphere symbionts, and endophytic bacteria and yeasts produce the important phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), often with profound effects on host plants. However, to date IAA production has not been documented among foliar endophytes -- the diverse guild of primarily filamentous Ascomycota that live within healthy, above-ground tissues of all plant species studied thus far. Recently bacteria that live within hyphae of endophytes (endohyphal bacteria) have ...

  4. Copper methanesulfonate-acetic acid as a novel catalytic system for tetrahydropyranylation of alcohols and phenols

    2007-01-01

    A synergistic catalytic effect between copper methanesulfonate and acetic acid in tetrahydropyranylation of alcohols and phenol at room temperature under solvent free condition has been described. Both alcohols (primary, secondary and tertiary) and phenols reacted with 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran smoothly to afford the corresponding tetrahydropyranyl ethers in good yields.(C) 2007 Min Wang. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinetic studies on vapor phase carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid over Rh/Ys catalyst

    柳忠阳; 潘平来; 朱长城; 袁国卿

    1997-01-01

    A novel catalyst Rh/Ys for the carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid with CH3I as the promoter shows excellent activity and selectivity.The reaction is kinetically controlled.The reaction rate is in proportion to the concentration of Rh and CH3I but has nothing to do with those of CH3OHH and CO.The surface active energy is Ea ~51.02 kJ/mol.A mechanism is also proposed.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of the auxin-binding protein 1 in complex with indole-3-acetic acid and naphthalen-1-acetic acid.

    Grandits, Melanie; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-10-01

    Auxin-binding protein 1 (ABP1) is suggested to be an auxin receptor which plays an important role in several processes in green plants. Maize ABP1 was simulated with the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and the synthetic analog naphthalen-1-acetic acid (NAA), to elucidate the role of the KDEL sequence and the helix at the C-terminus. The KDEL sequence weakens the intermolecular interactions between the monomers but stabilizes the C-terminal helix. Conformational changes at the C-terminus occur within the KDEL sequence and are influenced by the binding of the simulated ligands. This observation helps to explain experimental findings on ABP1 interactions with antibodies that are modulated by the presence of auxin, and supports the hypothesis that ABP1 acts as an auxin receptor. Stable hydrogen bonds between the monomers are formed between Glu40 and Glu62, Arg10 and Thr97, Lys39, and Glu62 in all simulations. The amino acids Ile22, Leu25, Trp44, Pro55, Ile130, and Phe149 are located in the binding pocket and are involved in hydrophobic interactions with the ring system of the ligand. Trp151 is stably involved in a face to end interaction with the ligand. The calculated free energy of binding using the linear interaction energy approach showed a higher binding affinity for NAA as compared to IAA. Our simulations confirm the asymmetric behavior of the two monomers, the stronger interaction of NAA than IAA and offers insight into the possible mechanism of ABP1 as an auxin receptor.

  7. Inhibition effects on fermentation of hardwood extracted hemicelluloses by acetic acid and sodium.

    Walton, Sara; van Heiningen, Adriaan; van Walsum, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Extraction of hemicellulose from hardwood chips prior to pulping is a possible method for producing ethanol and acetic acid in an integrated forest bio-refinery, adding value to wood components normally relegated to boiler fuel. Hemicellulose was extracted from hardwood chips using green liquor, a pulping liquor intermediate consisting of aqueous NaOH, Na(2)CO(3), and Na(2)S, at 160 degrees C, held for 110 min in a 20 L rocking digester. The extracted liquor contained 3.7% solids and had a pH of 5.6. The organic content of the extracts was mainly xylo-oligosaccharides and acetic acid. Because it was dilute, the hemicellulose extract was concentrated by evaporation in a thin film evaporator. Concentrates from the evaporator reached levels of up to 10% solids. Inhibitors such as acetic acid and sodium were also concentrated by this method, presenting a challenge for the fermentation organisms. Fermentation experiments were conducted with Escherichia coli K011. The un-concentrated extract supported approximately 70% conversion of the initial sugars in 14 h. An extract evaporated down to 6% solids was also fermentable while a 10% solids extract was not initially fermentable. Strain conditioning was later found to enable fermentation at this level of concentration. Alternative processing schemes or inhibitor removal prior to fermentation are necessary to produce ethanol economically.

  8. Density functional theory study of acetic acid steam reforming on Ni(111)

    Ran, Yan-Xiong; Du, Zhen-Yi; Guo, Yun-Peng; Feng, Jie; Li, Wen-Ying

    2017-04-01

    Catalytic steam reforming of bio-oil is a promising process to convert biomass into hydrogen. To shed light on this process, acetic acid is selected as the model compound of the oxygenates in bio-oil, and density functional theory is applied to investigate the mechanism of acetic acid steam reforming on the Ni(111) surface. The most favorable pathway of this process on the Ni(111) surface is suggested as CH3COOH* → CH3COO* → CH3CO* → CH2CO* → CH2* + CO* → CH* → CHOH* → CHO* → CO*, followed by the water gas shift reaction to produce CO2 and H2. CH* species are identified as the major carbon deposition precursor, and the water gas shift reaction is the rate-determining step during the whole acetic acid steam reforming process, as CO* + OH* → cis-COOH* is kinetically restricted with the highest barrier of 1.85 eV. Furthermore, the formation pathways and initial dissociation of important intermediates acetone and acetaldehyde are also investigated.

  9. Hydrogen Generation from Catalytic Steam Reforming of Acetic Acid by Ni/Attapulgite Catalysts

    Yishuang Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, catalytic steam reforming of acetic acid derived from the aqueous portion of bio-oil for hydrogen production was investigated using different Ni/ATC (Attapulgite Clay catalysts prepared by precipitation, impregnation and mechanical blending methods. The fresh and reduced catalysts were characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption–desorption, TEM and temperature program reduction (H2-TPR. The comprehensive results demonstrated that the interaction between active metallic Ni and ATC carrier was significantly improved in Ni/ATC catalyst prepared by precipitation method, from which the mean of Ni particle size was the smallest (~13 nm, resulting in the highest metal dispersion (7.5%. The catalytic performance of the catalysts was evaluated by the process of steam reforming of acetic acid in a fixed-bed reactor under atmospheric pressure at two different temperatures: 550 °C and 650 °C. The test results showed the Ni/ATC prepared by way of precipitation method (PM-Ni/ATC achieved the highest H2 yield of ~82% and a little lower acetic acid conversion efficiency of ~85% than that of Ni/ATC prepared by way of impregnation method (IM-Ni/ATC (~95%. In addition, the deactivation catalysts after reaction for 4 h were analyzed by XRD, TGA-DTG and TEM, which demonstrated the catalyst deactivation was not caused by the amount of carbon deposition, but owed to the significant agglomeration and sintering of Ni particles in the carrier.

  10. Biotransformations of 2-hydroxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl)acetic acid and the determination of the absolute configuration of all isomers.

    Majewska, Paulina

    2015-08-01

    2-Hydroxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl)acetic acid, a new type of organophosphorus compound possessing two stereogenic centers, was investigated. Racemic 2-butyryloxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl)acetic acid was synthesized and hydrolyzed using four bacterial species as biocatalysts. In all cases the reaction was more or less stereoselective and isomers bearing a phosphorus atom with an (SP)-configuration were hydrolyzed preferentially. The observed (1)H and (31)P NMR chemical shifts of Mosher esters of 2-hydroxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl)acetic acid were correlated with the configurations of both stereogenic centers of all four stereoisomers.

  11. Behaviour of Tributylamine as Entrainer for the Separation of Water and Acetic Acid with Reactive Extractive Distillation

    雷志刚; 李成岳; 陈标华

    2003-01-01

    A new separation method, reactive extractive distillation, was put forward for separating water and acetic acid. The separation mechanism was analyzed through infrared spectra technique. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data at 101.33 kPa for the binary or ternary systems consisting of water, acetic acid and tributylamine were measured. The activity coefficients were correlated by using Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC Equations.The VLE experiment showed that tributylamine could enhance the relative volatility of water to acetic acid. An extractive distillation experiment was carried out and proved that tributylamine was a good extractive solvent.

  12. Unimolecular decomposition of formic and acetic acids: A shock tube/laser absorption study

    Elwardany, A.

    2014-07-16

    The thermal decomposition of formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH), two carboxylic acids which play an important role in oxygenate combustion chemistry, were investigated behind reflected shock waves using laser absorption. The rate constants of the primary decomposition pathways of these acids:(HCOOH → CO + H2 O (R 1); HCOOH → CO2 + H2 (R 2); CH3 COOH → CH4 + CO2 (R 3); CH3 COOH → CH2 CO + H2 O (R 4)) were measured using simultaneous infrared laser absorption of CO, CO2 and H2O at wavelengths of 4.56, 4.18 and 2.93 microns, respectively. Reaction test conditions covered temperatures from 1230 to 1821 K and pressures from 1.0 to 6.5 atm for dilute mixtures of acids (0.25-0.6%) in argon. The rate constants of dehydration (R1) and decarboxylation (R2) reactions of formic acid were calculated by fitting exponential functions to the measured CO, CO2 and H2O time-history profiles. These two decomposition channels were found to be in the fall-off region and have a branching ratio, k1/k2, of approximately 20 over the range of pressures studied here. The best-fit Arrhenius expressions of the first-order rates of R1 and R2 were found to be:(k1 (1 atm) = 1.03 × 1011 exp (- 25651 / T) s- 1 (± 37 %); k1 (6.5 atm) = 9.12 × 1012 exp (- 30275 / T) s- 1 (± 32 %); k2 (1 atm) = 1.79 × 108 exp (- 21133 / T) s- 1 (± 41 %); k2 (6.5 atm) = 2.73 × 108 exp (- 20074 / T) s- 1 (± 37 %)). The rate constants for acetic acid decomposition were obtained by fitting simulated profiles, using an acetic acid pyrolysis mechanism, to the measured species time-histories. The branching ratio, k4/k3, was found to be approximately 2. The decarboxylation and dehydration reactions of acetic acid appear to be in the falloff region over the tested pressure range:(k3 (1 atm) = 3.18 × 1011 exp (- 28679 / T) s- 1 (± 30 %); k3 (6 atm) = 3.51 × 1012 exp (- 31330 / T) s- 1 (± 26 %); k4 (1 atm) = 7.9 × 1011 exp (- 29056 / T) s- 1 (± 34 %); k4 (6 atm) = 6.34 × 1012 exp (- 31330 / T) s

  13. Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 4, April 1-June 30, 1978

    Sanderson, J. E.; Wise, D. L.

    1978-08-28

    To date fermentations of marine algal species run at a controlled pH of 5.5 to 6.0 have exhibited essentially complete conversion to organic acids in as little as 16 days. (By complete conversion is meant conversion of each hexose unit to three acetic acid molecules or higher organic acids on a reducing equivalent basis.) As a result of these rapid rates and high conversions economic calculations have shown that processing costs are sufficiently low to encourage commercial development of this process. In the course of this work a diffusion membrane extraction system has been developed for removing organic acids from the fermentation broth. In addition, a fixed packed bed fermenter with a capacity of approximately 300 liters has been constructed and operated for a six month period. Another significant result is that fermentation at thermophilic temperatures (55/sup 0/C) gives higher ratios of acetic acid to total acid product than at mesophilic temperatures (37/sup 0/C). Manuscripts of two technical presentations based on this work are attached.

  14. Deciphering the origin of cooperative catalysis by dirhodium acetate and chiral spiro phosphoric acid in an asymmetric amination reaction.

    Kisan, Hemanta K; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2014-12-04

    The mechanism of asymmetric amination of diazo-acetate by tert-butyl carbamate catalyzed by dirhodium tetra(trifluoro)acetate and chiral SPINOL-phosphoric acid is examined using DFT (M06 and B3LYP) computations. A cooperative participation of both catalysts is noticed in the stereo-controlling transition state of the reaction.

  15. Membrane fractionation of herring marinade for separation and recovery of fats, proteins, amino acids, salt, acetic acid and water

    Fjerbæk Søtoft, Lene; Lizarazu, Juncal Martin; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz;

    2015-01-01

    containing sugars, amino acids and smaller peptides and a NF permeate containing salt and acetic acid ready for reuse. 42% of the spent marinade is recovered to substitute fresh water and chemicals. The Waste water amount is reduced 62.5%. Proteins are concentrated 30 times, while amino acids and smaller......In the production of marinated herring, nearly one ton of acidic saline marinade is produced per 1.5 tons herring fillet. This spent marinade contains highly valuable compounds such as proteins and amino acids. Membranes are suited to recover these substances. In this work, six membrane stages...... are employed: microfiltration (MF) (0.2 lm), ultrafiltration (UF) (50, 20, 10 and 1 kDa) and nanofiltration (NF). The most promising stages are 50 kDa UF and NF based on SDS–PAGE analyses and total amino acid concentration. The 50 kDa stage produces a protein concentrate (>17 kDa). NF produces a retentate...

  16. Advances in technologies for hydrogenation of acetic acid and acetates to ethanol%醋酸和醋酸酯加氢制乙醇技术进展

    王彪; 王熙庭; 徐国辉

    2013-01-01

      Advances in the technologies for hydrogenation of acetic acid and acetates to ethanol were reviewed. The tow kinds of technology had their advantages and disadvantages, and both should be further improved and developed.%  综述了醋酸直接加氢制乙醇技术与醋酸酯化加氢制乙醇技术的研究进展,指出两种技术各有优缺点,都应进一步完善和发展。

  17. The CgHaa1-Regulon Mediates Response and Tolerance to Acetic Acid Stress in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata.

    Bernardo, Ruben T; Cunha, Diana V; Wang, Can; Pereira, Leonel; Silva, Sónia; Salazar, Sara B; Schröder, Markus S; Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Aoyama, Toshihiro; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Azeredo, Joana; Butler, Geraldine; Mira, Nuno Pereira

    2017-01-05

    To thrive in the acidic vaginal tract, Candida glabrata has to cope with high concentrations of acetic acid. The mechanisms underlying C. glabrata tolerance to acetic acid at low pH remain largely uncharacterized. In this work, the essential role of the CgHaa1 transcription factor (encoded by ORF CAGL0L09339g) in the response and tolerance of C. glabrata to acetic acid is demonstrated. Transcriptomic analysis showed that CgHaa1 regulates, directly or indirectly, the expression of about 75% of the genes activated under acetic acid stress. CgHaa1-activated targets are involved in multiple physiological functions including membrane transport, metabolism of carbohydrates and amino acids, regulation of the activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, and adhesion. Under acetic acid stress, CgHaa1 increased the activity and the expression of the CgPma1 proton pump and contributed to increased colonization of vaginal epithelial cells by C. glabrata CgHAA1, and two identified CgHaa1-activated targets, CgTPO3 and CgHSP30, are herein demonstrated to be determinants of C. glabrata tolerance to acetic acid. The protective effect of CgTpo3 and of CgHaa1 was linked to a role of these proteins in reducing the accumulation of acetic acid inside C. glabrata cells. In response to acetic acid stress, marked differences were found in the regulons controlled by CgHaa1 and by its S. cerevisiae ScHaa1 ortholog, demonstrating a clear divergent evolution of the two regulatory networks. The results gathered in this study significantly advance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the success of C. glabrata as a vaginal colonizer.

  18. Effect of foliar applied kinetin and indole acetic acid on maize plants grown under saline conditions

    Kaya,Cengiz; TUNA, Atilla Levent; OKANT, Abdulkadir Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of kinetin (KIN) and indoleacetic acid (IAA) sprayed on the leaves of salinity-stressed maize (Zea mays L. cv., DK 647 F1) plants grown in field conditions. Salt stress was created by adding 100 mM NaCl to the irrigation water through a drip irrigation system during the irrigation schedule. Kinetin (KIN), indole acetic acid (IAA), and their combinations were sprayed foliarly. Salt stress (S) reduced the total dry matter, grain yield, chlorophyll content, and re...

  19. Potential antibacterial activity of coumarin and coumarin-3-acetic acid derivatives.

    Chattha, Fauzia Anjum; Munawar, Munawar Ali; Nisa, Mehrun; Ashraf, Mohammad; Kousar, Samina; Arshad, Shafia

    2015-05-01

    Coumarin and coumarin-3-acetic acid derivatives were synthesized by reacting phenols with malic acid, ethyl acetoacetate and ethyl acetylsuccinate in appropriate reaction conditions. All synthesized compounds were subjected to test for their antimicrobial activities against variety of gram positive (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative bacterial stains (Shigella sonnei, Escherichia coli) by agar dilution method. Several of them exhibited appreciable good antibacterial activity against the different strains of gram positive and gram negative bacteria. These findings suggest a great potential of these compounds for screening and use as antibacterial agents for further studies with a battery of bacteria.

  20. Electrochemical oxidation of substituted benzylamines in aquo-acetic acid medium: substituent and solvent effects

    A Thirumoorthi; K P Elango

    2007-07-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of nine para- and meta-substituted benzylamines in varying mole fractions of acetic acid in water has been investigated in the presence of 0.1 M sulphuric acid as supporting electrolyte. The oxidation potentials correlate well with Hammett’s substituent constants affording negative reaction constants. The correlation of potential values with macroscopic solvent parameters is non-linear suggesting that the operation of both specific and non-specific solvent-solvent-solute interaction mechanisms. Multiple correlation analysis of the experimental data with Kamlet-Taft solvatochromic parameters is employed.

  1. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Tetrachloroethylene with Acetic Acid as Cometabolism Substrate under Anaerobic Condition

    LI Ye; LIU Fei; CHEN Honghan; SHI Jinhua; WANG Yufan

    2008-01-01

    A series of batch-type experiments with acetate acid as the primary substrate wereperformed using enrichment cultures developed from the anaerobic sludge to investigate the effect ofacetate acid on tetrachloroethylene (PCE) biodegradation. Experimental results indicated that acetateacid was an efficient electron donor in affecting the biotransformability of PCE. Trichloroethylene(TCE) was the primary dehalogenation product, and small amounts of dichloroethylenes (DCEs) werealso detected. No significant further DCEs degradation was detected. PCE degradation rate in theexperiment was 36.6 times faster than background rate in natural groundwater.

  2. Lewis base activation of Lewis acids: catalytic, enantioselective addition of glycolate-derived silyl ketene acetals to aldehydes.

    Denmark, Scott E; Chung, Won-Jin

    2008-06-20

    A catalytic system involving silicon tetrachloride and a chiral, Lewis basic bisphosphoramide catalyst is effective for the addition of glycolate-derived silyl ketene acetals to aldehydes. It was found that the sense of diastereoselectivity could be modulated by changing the size of the substituents on the silyl ketene acetals. In general, the trimethylsilyl ketene acetals derived from methyl glycolates with a large protecting group on the alpha-oxygen provide enantiomerically enriched alpha,beta-dihydroxy esters with high syn-diastereoselectivity, whereas the tert-butyldimethylsilyl ketene acetals derived from bulky esters of alpha-methoxyacetic acid provide enantiomerically enriched alpha,beta-dihydroxy esters with high anti-diastereoselecitvity.

  3. Characterization of acetic acid bacteria in traditional acetic acid fermentation of rice vinegar (komesu) and unpolished rice vinegar (kurosu) produced in Japan.

    Nanda, K; Taniguchi, M; Ujike, S; Ishihara, N; Mori, H; Ono, H; Murooka, Y

    2001-02-01

    Bacterial strains were isolated from samples of Japanese rice vinegar (komesu) and unpolished rice vinegar (kurosu) fermented by the traditional static method. Fermentations have never been inoculated with a pure culture since they were started in 1907. A total of 178 isolates were divided into groups A and B on the basis of enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR and random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting analyses. The 16S ribosomal DNA sequences of strains belonging to each group showed similarities of more than 99% with Acetobacter pasteurianus. Group A strains overwhelmingly dominated all stages of fermentation of both types of vinegar. Our results indicate that appropriate strains of acetic acid bacteria have spontaneously established almost pure cultures during nearly a century of komesu and kurosu fermentation.

  4. An Unexpected Reaction of Allylic Propynoate under Palladium(Ⅱ) Catalysis

    ZHANG,Zhao-Guo(张兆国); LU,Xi-Yan(陆熙炎); LANG,Shen-Hui(郎深慧)

    2002-01-01

    Palladium (Ⅱ) catalyzed reactions of allyl propynoate in the presence of excess halide ions with or without allyl halide or acrolein were studied, yielding (E)-3-halo-2-allyl-acrylic acid as the sole product. A mechanism involving halopalladation, carbopalladation, ring opening and β-heteroatom elimination was prioposed and was further justified by the reaction with deuterated substrate.keywords palladium, enyne, halopalladation, carbopalladation,β-heteroatom elimination was proposed and was further justified by the reaction with deuterated substrate.

  5. An investigation of the Lewis acid mediated 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between N-benzyl-C-(2-pyridyl)nitrone and allylic alcohol. Direct entry to isoxazolidinyl C-nucleosides.

    Merino, Pedro; Tejero, Tomas; Laguna, Mariano; Cerrada, Elena; Moreno, Ana; Lopez, Jose A

    2003-07-07

    The cycloaddition reaction of N-benzyl C-(2-pyridyl) nitrone with allylic alcohol has been carried out to obtain the corresponding 2-benzyl-3-(2-pyridyl)-5-hydroxymethylisoxazolidine. The influence of Lewis acids in the reaction has been studied and a complete 3,5-regioselectivity and cis diastereoselectivity was observed when the reaction was carried out with 1.0 equiv of AgOTf, [Ag(OClO3)(PPh2Me)] or Zn(OTf)2. Insight into the mechanism of the reaction has been obtained by isolating and characterizing (X-ray) the intermediate complexes. Also, a model based on both experimental and theoretical results is proposed.

  6. Control of acetic acid fermentation by quorum sensing via N-acylhomoserine lactones in Gluconacetobacter intermedius.

    Iida, Aya; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2008-04-01

    A number of gram-negative bacteria regulate gene expression in a cell density-dependent manner by quorum sensing via N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). Gluconacetobacter intermedius NCI1051, a gram-negative acetic acid bacterium, produces three different AHLs, N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone, N-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone, and an N-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone with a single unsaturated bond in its acyl chain, as determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Two genes encoding an AHL synthase and a cognate regulator were cloned from strain NCI1051 and designated ginI and ginR, respectively. Disruption of ginI or ginR abolished AHL production, indicating that NCI1051 contains a single set of quorum-sensing genes. Transcriptional analysis showed that ginI is activated by GinR, which is consistent with the finding that there is an inverted repeat whose nucleotide sequence is similar to the sequence bound by members of the LuxR family at position -45 with respect to the transcriptional start site of ginI. A single gene, designated ginA, located just downstream of ginI is transcribed by read-through from the GinR-inducible ginI promoter. A ginA mutant, as well as the ginI and ginR mutants, grew more rapidly in medium containing 2% (vol/vol) ethanol and accumulated acetic acid at a higher rate with a greater final yield than parental strain NCI1051. In addition, these mutants produced larger amounts of gluconic acid than the parental strain. These data demonstrate that the GinI/GinR quorum-sensing system in G. intermedius controls the expression of ginA, which in turn represses oxidative fermentation, including acetic acid and gluconic acid fermentation.

  7. Bioethanol production from lignocellulosics with hot-compressed water treatment followed by acetic acid fermentation and hydrogenolysis

    Saka, S.; Phaiboonsilpa, N.; Nakamura, Y.; Masuda, S.; Lu, X.; Yamauchi, K.; Miyafuji, H.; Kawamoto, H. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation described a newly developed ethanol production system which involves hot-compressed water treatment combined with acetic acid fermentation and catalytic hydrogenation. The hot-compressed water treatment was optimized by using a semi-flow treatment on Japanese beech wood at 230 degrees C/10 MPa for 15 min, and then at 270 degrees C/10 MPa for 15 min. Under these conditions, 54 per cent of the hemicelluloses and 71 wt per cent of the cellulose were hydrolyzed, respectively. However, approximately 12 wt per cent of the wood decomposed into dehydrated and fragmented products. Approximately 88 per cent of the lignin also decomposed. The fermentability of these various compounds to acetic acid was then examined. Monosaccharides as well as some decomposed compounds and lignin-derived compounds were all found to be fermentable to acetic acid with Clostridium thermoaceticum. In particular, glucose, xylose and fructose could be effectively converted to acetic acid with a 70 to 80 per cent yield. Oligosaccharides and polysaccharides were converted with C. thermocellum to glucose and organic acids. Almost all compounds obtained by the hot-compressed water treatment were converted to acetic acid in co-culture fermentation. A flow-type laboratory reactor was used to evaluate ethanol production from acetic acid using a one-step hydrogenation method to ethanol. A very dilute aqueous solution of acetic acid was effectively hydrogenated to ethanol. It was concluded that compared to conventional yeast fermentation, ethanol can be produced more efficiently from lignocellulosics by combining the 3 steps of hot-compressed water treatment followed by acetic acid fermentation and hydrogenation.

  8. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid

    Y. Tan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid is an important intermediate in aqueous methylglyoxal oxidation and a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. Altieri et al. (2008 proposed that acetic acid was the precursor of oligoesters observed in methylglyoxal oxidation. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid at concentrations relevant to atmospheric waters (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radical. Products were analyzed by ion chromatography (IC, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS, and IC-ESI-MS. The formation of glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids were observed. In contrast to methylglyoxal oxidation, succinic acid and oligomers were not detected. Using results from these and methylglyoxal + OH radical experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  9. Oxidation of acetate through reactions of the citric acid cycle by Geobacter sulfurreducens in pure culture and in syntrophic coculture.

    Galushko, A S; Schink, B

    2000-11-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA oxidized acetate to CO2 via citric acid cycle reactions during growth with acetate plus fumarate in pure culture, and with acetate plus nitrate in coculture with Wolinella succinogenes. Acetate was activated by succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase and also via acetate kinase plus phosphotransacetylase. Citrate was formed by citrate synthase. Soluble isocitrate and malate dehydrogenases NADP+ and NAD+, respectively. Oxidation of 2-oxoglutarate was measured as benzyl viologen reduction and strictly CoA-dependent; a low activity was also observed with NADP+. Succinate dehydrogenase and fumarate ductase both were membrane-bound. Succinate oxidation was coupled to NADP+ reduction whereas fumarate reduction was coupled to NADPH and NADH Coupling of succinate oxidation to NADP+ or cytochrome(s) reduction required an ATP-dependent reversed electron transport. Net ATP synthesis proceeded exclusively through electron transport phosphorylation. During fumarate reduction, both NADPH and NADH delivered reducing equivalents into the electron transport chain, which contained a menaquinone. Overall, acetate oxidation with fumarate proceeded through an open loop of citric acid cycle reactions, excluding succinate dehydrogenase, with fumarate reductase as the key reaction for electron delivery, whereas acetate oxidation in the syntrophic coculture required the complete citric acid cycle.

  10. Measurement of the isotope ratio of acetic acid in vinegar by HS-SPME-GC-TC/C-IRMS.

    Hattori, Ryota; Yamada, Keita; Shibata, Hiroki; Hirano, Satoshi; Tajima, Osamu; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2010-06-23

    Acetic acid is the main ingredient of vinegar, and the worth of vinegar often depends on the fermentation of raw materials. In this study, we have developed a simple and rapid method for discriminating the fermentation of the raw materials of vinegar by measuring the hydrogen and carbon isotope ratio of acetic acid using head space solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with gas chromatography-high temperature conversion or combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-TC/C-IRMS). The measurement of acetic acid in vinegar by this method was possible with repeatabilities (1sigma) of +/-5.0 per thousand for hydrogen and +/-0.4 per thousand for carbon, which are sufficient to discriminate the origin of acetic acid. The fermentation of raw materials of several vinegars was evaluated by this method.

  11. Progress of new processes for synthetic acetic acid%合成醋酸新工艺进展

    李好管

    2001-01-01

    分析了醋酸的生产概况;综述了醋酸工艺的进展;介绍了具有工业化前景或学术价值的醋酸合成新工艺的研究开发情况;对我国醋酸工业的发展提出了建议。%The production status of acetic acid was analyzed, the progress of production process of acetic acid was reviewed, and the research and development status of new processes, which had industrial prospect or academic value for synthetic acetic acid was introduced. Some proposals for developing acetic acid industry inland were put forward.

  12. Plasma membrane proteins Yro2 and Mrh1 are required for acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Takabatake, Akiko; Kawazoe, Nozomi; Izawa, Shingo

    2015-03-01

    Yro2 and its paralogous protein Mrh1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have seven predicted transmembrane domains and predominantly localize to the plasma membrane. Their physiological functions and regulation of gene expression have not yet been elucidated in detail. We herein demonstrated that MRH1 was constitutively expressed, whereas the expression of YRO2 was induced by acetic acid stress and entering the stationary phase. Fluorescence microscopic analysis revealed that Mrh1 and Yro2 were distributed as small foci in the plasma membrane under acetic acid stress conditions. The null mutants of these genes (mrh1∆, yro2∆, and mrh1∆yro2∆) showed delayed growth and a decrease in the productivity of ethanol in the presence of acetic acid, indicating that Yro2 and Mrh1 are involved in tolerance to acetic acid stress.

  13. 中国醋酸行业形势分析%Situation analysis of Chinese acetic acid industry

    曹宏兵

    2011-01-01

    The development situation of Chinese acetic acid industry is introduced and the current major problems on it are analyzed. Chinese acetic acid industry is in fierce competition as it has severe overcapacity. The capacities of acetic acid downstream products have been expanding rapidly, but the industry chain homogeneity is very serious. It is pointed out that the development direction for the future of Chinese acetic acid industry should focus on new high-end downstream products.%介绍了近年来醋酸行业发展形势,分析了目前醋酸生产行业中存在的问题,如竞争者众多,醋酸产品供大于求,下游产品扩能迅猛,产业链同质化严重,并指出醋酸行业应以开发高端下游产品为发展方向.

  14. INTERACTIONS OF GOSSYPOL ACETIC ACID,INJECTIO LEONURI AND PROGESTERONE ON MYOMETRIALSTRIPS AN IN VITRO EXPERIMENT OF ELECTRIC FIELD STIMULAION

    TENGJia-Min; TANGDa-Chun; XIAWen-Jia; WUXi-Rui

    1989-01-01

    Effects ofgossypol acetic acid, Injectio Leonuri and progesterone on contractility, tension and stimulation threshold of myometrial strips isolated from mature, nonpregnant rabbits were studied in an electric field stimulation experiment. Results showed that:

  15. Direct Oxidation of Ethene to Acetic Acid over Pd-H4SiW12O40-Based Catalyst

    2001-01-01

    @@The direct oxidation of ethene to acetic acid has the advantages of abundant raw materials and low cost of equipment[1],hence the research for this process has been of much interest in industry application.

  16. Syntrophic acetate oxidation in two-phase (acid-methane) anaerobic digesters.

    Shimada, T; Morgenroth, E; Tandukar, M; Pavlostathis, S G; Smith, A; Raskin, L; Kilian, R E

    2011-01-01

    The microbial processes involved in two-phase anaerobic digestion were investigated by operating a laboratory-scale acid-phase (AP) reactor and analyzing two full-scale, two-phase anaerobic digesters operated under mesophilic (35 °C) conditions. The digesters received a blend of primary sludge and waste activated sludge (WAS). Methane levels of 20% in the laboratory-scale reactor indicated the presence of methanogenic activity in the AP. A phylogenetic analysis of an archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone library of one of the full-scale AP digesters showed that 82% and 5% of the clones were affiliated with the orders Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales, respectively. These results indicate that substantial levels of aceticlastic methanogens (order Methanosarcinales) were not maintained at the low solids retention times and acidic conditions (pH 5.2-5.5) of the AP, and that methanogenesis was carried out by hydrogen-utilizing methanogens of the order Methanobacteriales. Approximately 43, 31, and 9% of the archaeal clones from the methanogenic phase (MP) digester were affiliated with the orders Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanobacteriales, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis of a bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library suggested the presence of acetate-oxidizing bacteria (close relatives of Thermacetogenium phaeum, 'Syntrophaceticus schinkii,' and Clostridium ultunense). The high abundance of hydrogen consuming methanogens and the presence of known acetate-oxidizing bacteria suggest that acetate utilization by acetate oxidizing bacteria in syntrophic interaction with hydrogen-utilizing methanogens was an important pathway in the second-stage of the two-phase digestion, which was operated at high ammonium-N concentrations (1.0 and 1.4 g/L). A modified version of the IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) with extensions for syntrophic acetate oxidation and weak-acid inhibition adequately described the dynamic profiles of volatile acid production

  17. Sources and sinks of formic, acetic, and pyruvic acids over central Amazonia. II - Wet season

    Talbot, R. W.; Andreae, M. O.; Berresheim, H.; Jacob, D. J.; Beecher, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    Potential sources and sinks of formic, acetic, and pyruvic acids over the Amazon forest were investigated using a photochemical model and data collected on gas phase concentrations of these acids in the forest canopy, boundary layer, and free troposphere over the central Amazon Basin during the 1987 wet season. It was found that the atmospheric reactions previously suggested in the literature as sources of carboxylic acids (i.e., the gas phase decomposition of isoprene, the reaction between CH3CO3 and a peroxide, and aqueous phase oxidation of CH2O) appear to be too slow to explain the observed concentrations, suggesting that other atmospheric reactions, so far unidentified, could make a major contribution to the carboxylic acid budgets.

  18. Effects of roxatidine acetate on 24-hour gastric acidity. Early evening versus bedtime administration in healthy subjects.

    Hemery, P; Congard, P; Galmiche, J P; Bonfils, S

    1988-01-01

    The gastric antisecretory activity of roxatidine acetate was studied on 24-hour intragastric pH in 12 healthy male volunteers. The study was randomised, double-blind and double-dummy where either roxatidine acetate 150 mg as a slow release granulated formulation or placebo were administered at 7.30 pm or 10 pm. Roxatidine acetate 150 mg produced a significant decrease in the number of hours during which gastric acidity ranged between pH 1.5 and 4.0 which was consistent with the pharmacokinetic profile of the drug. There was no significant difference between the median intragastric pH values for early evening and bedtime administration of roxatidine acetate. The present data confirm that roxatidine acetate 150 mg inhibits gastric acid secretion but while a single evening dose is effective in controlling intragastric pH the results suggest there is no clear advantage in an early evening dose compared with a bedtime dose.

  19. Acetic acid inhibits nutrient uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: auxotrophy confounds the use of yeast deletion libraries for strain improvement.

    Ding, Jun; Bierma, Jan; Smith, Mark R; Poliner, Eric; Wolfe, Carole; Hadduck, Alex N; Zara, Severino; Jirikovic, Mallori; van Zee, Kari; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2013-08-01

    Acetic acid inhibition of yeast fermentation has a negative impact in several industrial processes. As an initial step in the construction of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with increased tolerance for acetic acid, mutations conferring resistance were identified by screening a library of deletion mutants in a multiply auxotrophic genetic background. Of the 23 identified mutations, 11 were then introduced into a prototrophic laboratory strain for further evaluation. Because none of the 11 mutations was found to increase resistance in the prototrophic strain, potential interference by the auxotrophic mutations themselves was investigated. Mutants carrying single auxotrophic mutations were constructed and found to be more sensitive to growth inhibition by acetic acid than an otherwise isogenic prototrophic strain. At a concentration of 80 mM acetic acid at pH 4.8, the initial uptake of uracil, leucine, lysine, histidine, tryptophan, phosphate, and glucose was lower in the prototrophic strain than in a non-acetic acid-treated control. These findings are consistent with two mechanisms by which nutrient uptake may be inhibited. Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were severely decreased upon acetic acid treatment, which likely slowed ATP-dependent proton symport, the major form of transport in yeast for nutrients other than glucose. In addition, the expression of genes encoding some nutrient transporters was repressed by acetic acid, including HXT1 and HXT3 that encode glucose transporters that operate by facilitated diffusion. These results illustrate how commonly used genetic markers in yeast deletion libraries complicate the effort to isolate strains with increased acetic acid resistance.

  20. Survival mechanism of Escherichia coli O157:H7 against combined treatment with acetic acid and sodium chloride.

    Lee, Sun-Young; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    The combination of salt and acid is commonly used in the production of many foods, including pickles and fermented foods. However, in our previous studies, the addition of salt significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of acetic acid on Escherichia coli O157:H7 in laboratory media and pickled cucumbers. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the mechanism by which salt confers resistance against acetic acid in E. coli O157:H7. The addition of high concentrations (up to 9% or 15% [w/v]) of salt increased the resistance of E. coli O157:H7 to acetic acid treatment. Combined treatment with acetic acid and salt showed varying results among different bacterial strains (an antagonistic effect for E. coli O157:H7 and Shigella and a synergistic effect for Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus). The addition of salt increased the cytoplasmic pH of E. coli O157:H7, but decreased the cytoplasmic pH of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus on treatment with acetic acid. Therefore, the addition of salt increases the acid resistance of E. coli O157:H7 possibly by increasing its acid resistance response and consequently preventing the acidification of its cytoplasm by organic acids.

  1. Effect of Gibberellic Acid, Kinetin and Indole 3-Acetic Acid on Seed Germination Performance of Dianthus caryophyllus (Carnation)

    Rajib Roychowdhury; Anuj Mamgain; Sunanda Ray; Jagatpati Tah

    2012-01-01

    The experiment was undertaken with an objective to investigate the effect of various concentrations of plant growth regulators, i.e., Gibberellic acid (GA3), Kinetin and Indole 3-acetic acid (IAA) on seed germination of Dianthus caryophyllus. Dianthus seeds were soaked in different concentrations (0 ppm or control, 10 ppm, 20 ppm, 30 ppm and 40 ppm) of each of GA3, Kinetin and IAA for 24 h at room temperature (25±2oC). Three replicates of each treatment with ten seeds per replicate wer...

  2. Gluconacetobacter kakiaceti sp. nov., an acetic acid bacterium isolated from a traditional Japanese fruit vinegar.

    Iino, Takao; Suzuki, Rei; Tanaka, Naoto; Kosako, Yoshimasa; Ohkuma, Moriya; Komagata, Kazuo; Uchimura, Tai

    2012-07-01

    Two novel acetic acid bacteria, strains G5-1(T) and I5-1, were isolated from traditional kaki vinegar (produced from fruits of kaki, Diospyros kaki Thunb.), collected in Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strains G5-1(T) and I5-1 formed a distinct subline in the genus Gluconacetobacter and were closely related to Gluconacetobacter swingsii DST GL01(T) (99.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The isolates showed 96-100% DNA-DNA relatedness with each other, but <53% DNA-DNA relatedness with closely related members of the genus Gluconacetobacter. The isolates could be distinguished from closely related members of the genus Gluconacetobacter by not producing 2- and 5-ketogluconic acids from glucose, producing cellulose, growing without acetic acid and with 30% (w/v) d-glucose, and producing acid from sugars and alcohols. Furthermore, the genomic DNA G+C contents of strains G5-1(T) and I5-1 were a little higher than those of their closest phylogenetic neighbours. On the basis of the phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic position, strains G5-1(T) and I5-1 are assigned to a novel species, for which the name Gluconacetobacter kakiaceti sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is G5-1(T) (=JCM 25156(T)=NRIC 0798(T)=LMG 26206(T)).

  3. Involvement of yeast HSP90 isoforms in response to stress and cell death induced by acetic acid.

    Silva, Alexandra; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Fernandes, Angela; Carreto, Laura; Rodrigues, Fernando; Holcik, Martin; Santos, Manuel A S; Ludovico, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Acetic acid-induced apoptosis in yeast is accompanied by an impairment of the general protein synthesis machinery, yet paradoxically also by the up-regulation of the two isoforms of the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) chaperone family, Hsc82p and Hsp82p. Herein, we show that impairment of cap-dependent translation initiation induced by acetic acid is caused by the phosphorylation and inactivation of eIF2α by Gcn2p kinase. A microarray analysis of polysome-associated mRNAs engaged in translation in acetic acid challenged cells further revealed that HSP90 mRNAs are over-represented in this polysome fraction suggesting preferential translation of HSP90 upon acetic acid treatment. The relevance of HSP90 isoform translation during programmed cell death (PCD) was unveiled using genetic and pharmacological abrogation of HSP90, which suggests opposing roles for HSP90 isoforms in cell survival and death. Hsc82p appears to promote survival and its deletion leads to necrotic cell death, while Hsp82p is a pro-death molecule involved in acetic acid-induced apoptosis. Therefore, HSP90 isoforms have distinct roles in the control of cell fate during PCD and their selective translation regulates cellular response to acetic acid stress.

  4. Acetic acid recovery from fast pyrolysis oil. An exploratory study on liquid-liquid reactive extraction using aliphatic tertiary amines

    Mahfud, F. H.; van Geel, F. P.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Heeres, H. J.

    2008-01-01

    Flash pyrolysis oil or Bio-oil (BO), obtained by flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, is very acidic in nature. The major component responsible for this acidity is acetic acid, present in levels up to 2-10 wt%. Here, we report an exploratory study on BO upgrading by reactive extraction of ace

  5. Different response to acetic acid stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and l-ascorbic acid-producing strains.

    Martani, Francesca; Fossati, Tiziana; Posteri, Riccardo; Signori, Lorenzo; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2013-09-01

    Biotechnological processes are of increasing significance for industrial production of fine and bulk chemicals, including biofuels. Unfortunately, under operative conditions microorganisms meet multiple stresses, such as non-optimal pH, temperature, oxygenation and osmotic stress. Moreover, they have to face inhibitory compounds released during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomasses, which constitute the preferential substrate for second-generation processes. Inhibitors include furan derivatives, phenolic compounds and weak organic acids, among which acetic acid is one of the most abundant and detrimental for cells. They impair cellular metabolism and growth, reducing the productivity of the process: therefore, the development of robust cell factories with improved production rates and resistance is of crucial importance. Here we show that a yeast strain engineered to endogenously produce vitamin C exhibits an increased tolerance compared to the parental strain when exposed to acetic acid at moderately toxic concentrations, measured as viability on plates. Starting from this evidence, we investigated more deeply: (a) the nature and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS); (b) the activation of enzymes that act directly as detoxifiers of reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, in parental and engineered strains during acetic acid stress. The data indicate that the engineered strain can better recover from stress by limiting ROS accumulation, independently from SOD activation. The engineered yeast can be proposed as a model for further investigating direct and indirect mechanism(s) by which an antioxidant can rescue cells from organic acid damage; moreover, these studies will possibly provide additional targets for further strain improvements.

  6. Efficient Production Process for Food Grade Acetic Acid by Acetobacter aceti in Shake Flask and in Bioreactor Cultures

    Hassan M. Awad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid is one of the important weak acids which had long history in chemical industries. This weak organic acid has been widely used as one of the key intermediate for many chemical, detergent, wood and food industries. The production of this acid is mainly carried out using submerged fermentation system and the standard strain Acetobacter aceti. In the present work, six different media were chosen from the literatures and tested for acetic acid production. The highest acetic acid production was produced in medium composed of glucose, yeast extract and peptone. The composition of this medium was optimized by changing the concentration of medium components. The optimized medium was composed of (g/L: glucose, 100; yeast extract, 12 and peptone 5 and yielded 53 g/L acetic acid in shake flask after 144 h fermentation. Further optimization in the production process was achieved by transferring the process to semi-industrial scale 16-L stirred tank bioreactor and cultivation under controlled pH condition. Under fully aerobic conditions, the production of acetic acid reached maximal concentration of about 76 g/L and 51 g/L for uncontrolled and controlled pH cultures, respectively.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of mutual azo prodrug of 5-aminosalicylic acid linked to 2-phenylbenzoxazole-2-yl-5-acetic acid in ulcerative colitis

    Jilani JA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Jamal A Jilani,1 Maha Shomaf,2 Karem H Alzoubi3 1Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 2Department of Pathology, Jordan University, Amman, Jordan; 3Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan Abstract: In this study, the syntheses of 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid, (an analogue of a known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug [NSAID] and 5-[4-(benzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acidphenylazo]-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (a novel mutual azo prodrug of 5-aminosalicylic acid [5-ASA] are reported. The structures of the synthesized compounds were confirmed using infrared (IR, hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR, and mass spectrometry (MS spectroscopy. Incubation of the azo compound with rat cecal contents demonstrated the susceptibility of the prepared azo prodrug to bacterial azoreductase enzyme. The azo compound and the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid were evaluated for inflammatory bowel diseases, in trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNB-induced colitis in rats. The synthesized diazo compound and the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid were found to be as effective as 5-aminosalicylic acid for ulcerative colitis. The results of this work suggest that the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid may represent a new lead for treatment of ulcerative colitis. Keywords: benzoxazole acetic acid, azo prodrug, colon drug delivery

  8. Regulation of indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis by branched-chain amino acids in Enterobacter cloacae UW5.

    Parsons, Cassandra V; Harris, Danielle M M; Patten, Cheryl L

    2015-09-01

    The soil bacterium Enterobacter cloacae UW5 produces the rhizosphere signaling molecule indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) via the indolepyruvate pathway. Expression of indolepyruvate decarboxylase, a key pathway enzyme encoded by ipdC, is upregulated by the transcription factor TyrR in response to aromatic amino acids. Some members of the TyrR regulon may also be controlled by branched-chain amino acids and here we show that expression from the ipdC promoter and production of IAA are downregulated by valine, leucine and isoleucine. Regulation of the IAA synthesis pathway by both aromatic and branched-chain amino acids suggests a broader role for this pathway in bacterial physiology, beyond plant interactions.

  9. Impact of gluconic fermentation of strawberry using acetic acid bacteria on amino acids and biogenic amines profile.

    Ordóñez, J L; Sainz, F; Callejón, R M; Troncoso, A M; Torija, M J; García-Parrilla, M C

    2015-07-01

    This paper studies the amino acid profile of beverages obtained through the fermentation of strawberry purée by a surface culture using three strains belonging to different acetic acid bacteria species (one of Gluconobacter japonicus, one of Gluconobacter oxydans and one of Acetobacter malorum). An HPLC-UV method involving diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate (DEEMM) was adapted and validated. From the entire set of 21 amino acids, multiple linear regressions showed that glutamine, alanine, arginine, tryptophan, GABA and proline were significantly related to the fermentation process. Furthermore, linear discriminant analysis classified 100% of the samples correctly in accordance with the microorganism involved. G. japonicus consumed glucose most quickly and achieved the greatest decrease in amino acid concentration. None of the 8 biogenic amines were detected in the final products, which could serve as a safety guarantee for these strawberry gluconic fermentation beverages, in this regard.

  10. 40 CFR 721.2076 - D-Glucuronic acid, polymer with 6-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium magnesium...

    2010-07-01

    ...-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium magnesium potassium sodium salt. 721.2076 Section 721...-Glucuronic acid, polymer with 6-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium magnesium potassium sodium... identified as D-Glucuronic acid, polymer with 6-deoxy-L-mannose and D-glucose, acetate, calcium...

  11. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Synthesis by Activated Sludge Microbes Using Acetic Acid as Carbon Source%活性污泥微生物以乙酸为碳源合成聚羟基烷酸酯的研究

    李伟; 陈银广

    2009-01-01

    聚羟基烷酸酯(polyhydroxyalkanoate,PHA)是一种生物可降解塑料,利用活性污泥合成PHA具有操作方便的优点.本研究对长期驯化的厌氧-好氧活性污泥工艺在厌氧条件下及好氧活性污泥工艺在好氧条件下利用乙酸合成PHA进行了比较分析,发现好氧活性污泥可以合成较多的PHA.在此基础上,研究了好氧条件下乙酸加入次数、乙酸浓度及硝化抑制剂(丙烯基硫脲,ATU)对PHA合成的影响,结果表明,将乙酸分3次加入到反应器、乙酸浓度为2 925 mg/L及加入6.74 mg/L ATU时,可以使污泥挥发性悬浮固体物中PHA的含量达到56.3%.%Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a type of biodegradable plastics. The synthesis of PHA by activated sludge has the advantage of easy operation. With acetic acid as the carbon source, the anaerobic synthesis of PHA in the anaerobic-aerobic activated sludge system was compared with the aerobic one in the aerobic sludge system. It was observed that the aerobic PHA synthesis was greater than the anaerobic one. The influences of acetic acid addition frequency, acetic acid concentration and allyl thiourea (ATU) on aerobic PHA synthesis were further investigated. The results showed that the PHA content accounting for volatile suspended solids reached 56.3 % under conditions of acetic acid addition with frequency of 3, acetic acid concentration of 2 925 mg/L, and ATU concentration of 6.74 mg/L.

  12. Synthesis of novel carbon/silica composites based strong acid catalyst and its catalytic activities for acetalization

    Yueqing Lu; Xuezheng Liang; Chenze Qi

    2012-06-01

    Novel solid acid based on carbon/silica composites are synthesized through one-pot hydrothermal carbonization of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid, sucrose and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). The novel solid acid owned the acidity of 2.0 mmol/g, much higher than that of the traditional solid acids such as Nafion and Amberlyst-15 (0.8 mmol/g). The catalytic activities of the solid acid are investigated through acetalization. The results showed that the novel solid acid was very efficient for the reactions. The high acidity and catalytic activities made the novel carbon/silica composites based solid acid hold great potential for the green chemical processes.

  13. The role of methanogens in acetic acid production under different salinity conditions.

    Xiao, Keke; Guo, Chenghong; Maspolim, Yogananda; Zhou, Yan; Ng, Wun Jern

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a fed-batch acidogenic reactor was operated at a 3 d hydraulic retention time (HRT) and fed with alkaline pre-treated sludge to investigate salinity effects on methanogens' abundance, activities and their consumption of produced acetic acid (HAc) and total volatile fatty acids (VFAs). The salinity concentration was increased step-wise by adding sodium chloride. At 3‰ (parts per thousand) salinity, the average produced volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentration was 2410.16 ± 637.62 mg COD L(-1) and 2.70 ± 0.36 L methane was produced daily in the acidogenic reactor. Further batch tests indicated methanogens showed a HAc degradation rate of 3.81 mg COD g(-1) VSS h(-1) at initial HAc concentration of 1150 mg COD L(-1), and showed tolerance up to 16‰ salinity (3.76 g Na(+) L(-1)) as indicated by a constant HAc degradation rate. The microbiological study indicated this can be related to the predominance of acetate-utilizing Methanosarcinaceae and Methanomicrobiales in the reactor. However, with salinity increased to 20‰ and 40‰, increases in VFAs and HAc production and decreases in methane production, methanogens population, acidogenic bacteria population and acidification extent were observed. This study demonstrated presence of acetate-utilizing methanogens in an acidogenic reactor and their high tolerance to salinity, as well as their negative impacts on net VFAs production. The results would suggest the presence of methanogens in the acidogenic reactor should not be ignored and the recovery of methane from the acidogenic reactor needs to be considered to avoid carbon loss.

  14. Direct carbon-carbon coupling of furanics with acetic acid over Brønsted zeolites

    Gumidyala, Abhishek; Wang, Bin; Crossley, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Effective carbon-carbon coupling of acetic acid to form larger products while minimizing CO2 emissions is critical to achieving a step change in efficiency for the production of transportation fuels from sustainable biomass. We report the direct acylation of methylfuran with acetic acid in the presence of water, all of which can be readily produced from biomass. This direct coupling limits unwanted polymerization of furanics while producing acetyl methylfuran. Reaction kinetics and density functional theory calculations illustrate that the calculated apparent barrier for the dehydration of the acid to form surface acyl species is similar to the experimentally measured barrier, implying that this step plays a significant role in determining the net reaction rate. Water inhibits the overall rate, but selectivity to acylated products is not affected. We show that furanic species effectively stabilize the charge of the transition state, therefore lowering the overall activation barrier. These results demonstrate a promising new route to C–C bond–forming reactions for the production of higher-value products from biomass. PMID:27652345

  15. Efficient sugar release by acetic acid ethanol-based organosolv pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification.

    Zhang, Hongdan; Wu, Shubin

    2014-12-03

    Acetic acid ethanol-based organosolv pretreatment of sugar cane bagasse was performed to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis. The effect of different parameters (including temperature, reaction time, solvent concentration, and acid catalyst dose) on pretreatment prehydrolyzate and subsequent enzymatic digestibility was determined. During the pretreatment process, 11.83 g of xylose based on 100 g of raw material could be obtained. After the ethanol-based pretreatment, the enzymatic hydrolysis was enhanced and the highest glucose yield of 40.99 g based on 100 g of raw material could be obtained, representing 93.8% of glucose in sugar cane bagasse. The maximum total sugar yields occurred at 190 °C, 45 min, 60:40 ethanol/water, and 5% dosage of acetic acid, reaching 58.36 g (including 17.69 g of xylose and 40.67 g of glucose) based on 100 g of raw material, representing 85.4% of total sugars in raw material. Furthermore, characterization of the pretreated sugar cane bagasse using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses were also developed. The results suggested that ethanol-based organosolv pretreatment could enhance enzymatic digestibilities because of the delignification and removal of xylan.

  16. Photodissociation of organic molecules in star-forming regions. II. Acetic acid

    Pilling, S.; Santos, A. C. F.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.

    2006-04-01

    Fragments from organic molecule dissociation (such as reactive ions and radicals) can form interstellar complex molecules like amino acids. The goal of this work is to experimentally study photoionization and photodissociation processes of acetic acid (CH3COOH), a glycine (NH2CH2COOH) precursor molecule, by soft X-ray photons. The measurements were taken at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), employing soft X-ray photons from a toroidal grating monochromator (TGM) beamline (100-310 eV). Mass spectra were obtained using the photoelectron photoion coincidence (PEPICO) method. Kinetic energy distribution and abundances for each ionic fragment have been obtained from the analysis of the corresponding peak shapes in the mass spectra. Absolute photoionization and photodissociation cross sections were also determined. We have found, among the channels leading to ionization, that only 4-6% of CH3COOH survive the strong ionization field. CH3CO^+, COOH+ and CH3+ ions are the main fragments, and the presence of the former may indicate that the production-destruction process of acetic acid in hot molecular cores (HMCs) could decrease the H2O abundance since the net result of this process converts H2O into OH + H^+. The COOH+ ion plays an important role in ion-molecule reactions to form large biomolecules like glycine.

  17. STUDY OF CARBONYLATION OF METHANOL TO ACETIC ACID AND ACETIC ANHYDRIDE OVER A BIDENTATE POLYMER BOUND CIS-DICARBONYLRHODIUM COMPLEX AS CATALYST

    WANG Xiaojun; LIU Zhongyang; PAN Pinglai; YUAN Guoqing

    1996-01-01

    Copolymer of 2-vinylpyridine and vinylacetate coordinated with dicarbonylrhodium used as a catalyst for carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid and anhydride has been studied. The structural characteristics of the copolymer ligand and complex, and the influences of the reaction conditions on the carbonylation catalyzed by this polymer complex have been investigated. In comparison with small molecule catalyst of Rh complex, the bidentate copolymer coordinated complex has better thermal stability. The reaction mechanism of the carbonylation reaction is also illustrated.

  18. Effect of acetic acid on electrochemical deposition of carbon-nitride thin film

    2009-01-01

    Electrochemical deposition method was employed to prepare CNx thin film from methanol-urea solution,and it was shown that adding a little acetic acid in the solution significantly affected the deposition process.After optimizing the experiment conditions,we obtained polycrystalline grains with sizes of about 3―7μm on the faces of single crystal silicon.X-ray diffraction spectrua indicate that the grains are mainly composed of cubic phase mixed with a small amount of β and α phases.

  19. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    by deconjugation and dehydroxylation of bile acids. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine. Especially, the digestion of larger carbohydrates (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Interestingly, we also found vitamin E (α......-tocopherol acetate) in higher levels in the intestine of GF mice compared to MC mice, suggesting that NCFM either metabolizes the compound orindirectly affects the absorption by changing the metabolome in the intestine. The use of NCFM to increase the uptake of vitamin E supplements in humans and animals is a highly...

  20. Performance of a partially packed charcoal pellet bioreactor for acetic acid fermentation.

    Horiuchi, J; Ando, K; Watanabe, S; Tada, K; Kobayashi, M; Kanno, T

    2001-01-01

    The performance of a partially packed charcoal pellet bioreactor was compared to that of a fully packed bioreactor for aerobic acetic acid production. In the fully packed charcoal pellet bioreactor, it was considered that the shortening of an actual retention time of the culture broth limited the bioreactor performance under high dilution rate and high aeration conditions. By reducing the filling ratio of charcoal pellets to 44%, which increased the actual retention time of the culture broth, the maximum productivity increased from 3.9 g/l/h in the fully packed bed bioreactor to 5.7 g/l/h in the partially packed bioreactor without affecting the operational stability.

  1. Hydroxylamine hydrochloride-acetic acid-soluble and -insoluble fractions of pelagic sediment: Readsorption revisited

    Piper, D.Z.; Wandless, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    The extraction of the rare earth elements (REE) from deep-ocean pelagic sediment, using hydroxylamine hydrochloride-acetic acid, leads to the separation of approximately 70% of the bulk REE content into the soluble fraction and 30% into the insoluble fraction. The REE pattern of the soluble fraction, i.e., the content of REE normalized to average shale on an element-by-element basis and plotted against atomic number, resembles the pattern for seawater, whereas the pattern, as well as the absolute concentrations, in the insoluble fraction resembles the North American shale composite. These results preclude significant readsorption of the REE by the insoluble phases during the leaching procedure.

  2. XAS and RIXS study of acetic acid and methyl formate in liquid

    Takahashi, O.; Nishida, N.; Kanai, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tokushima, T.

    2016-05-01

    Structure of acetic acid (AA) and methyl formate (MF) in the liquid phase is studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) experimentally and theoretically. Two distinct XES spectra are observed by tuning photon energy for both molecules. Model structure in the liquid phase is constructed using the classical and first principle molecular dynamics simulations, and XES spectra are calculated using density functional theory. Calculated XES spectra are consistent with experimental ones. The effect of core-hole induced excited state molecular dynamics are discussed.

  3. Catalytic Hydrogenation over Palladium Complex of Molecular Complex of Poly(4-vinylpyridine) with Acetic Acid

    2003-01-01

    The palladium complex of the molecular complex of poly(4-vinylpyridine) with acetic acid(PVP/HAc-Pd) was prepared. Its catalytic activity for the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene was found much higher than that of the corresponding palladium complex of poly(4-vinylpyridine). In the presence of a strong inorganic alkali, especially potassium hydroxide, the catalytic activity is greatly improved. The suitable hydrogenation condition for PVP/HAc-Pd is to use 0.1 mol/L ethanol solution of potassium hydroxide as the hydrogenation medium and the hydrogenation is carried out at 45 ℃.

  4. Sinopec, BP Joint Hands for a World-Class Acetic Acid Base

    Zhang Zheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ China Petroleum and Chemical Corporation (Sinopec) and British Petroleum Co. PLC (BP),both of them are listed in the world top 500enterprises, have jointed their hands to build a world-class acetic acid production base. On November 3, 2005, Sinopec and BP held a ceremony at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse to celebrate the establishment of BP YPC Acetyls Company (Nanjing) Ltd., a joint venture. At the ceremony, Chen Tonghai, Chairman of Sinopec Corp., and Lord Browne, Group Chief Executive of BP, unveiled for the Joint Venture Company.

  5. Application of molecular techniques for identification and ennumeration of acetic acid bacteria

    González Benito, Angel

    2005-01-01

    Application of molecular techniques for identification and enumeration of acetic acid bacteria:Los principales objetivos de la tesis son el desarrollo de técnicas de biología molecular rápidas y fiables para caracterizar bacterias acéticas.Las bacterias acéticas son las principales responsables del picado de los vinos y de la producción de vinagre. Sin embargo, existe un desconocimiento importante sobre su comportamiento y evolución. Las técnicas de enumeración y de identificación basadas en ...

  6. Extraction Kinetics of Rare Earth Elements with sec-Octylphenoxy Acetic Acid

    YUE,Shan-Tang(乐善堂); LIAO,Wu-Ping(廖伍平); LI,De-Qian(李德谦); SU,Qiang(苏锵)

    2002-01-01

    The kinetics of RE (La, Gd, Er, Yb and Y)extraction with sec-octylphenoxy acetic acid was investigated using a constant interfacial area cell with laminar flow at 303 K. The natures of the extracted complexes have some effect on the extraction rate which is controlled by the reaction rate of M(Ⅲ) and extractant molecules at two-phase interface for Er(Ⅲ), Yb(Ⅲ) and Y(Ⅲ), by a mixed chemical reaction-diffusion for Gd(Ⅲ) and a diffusion for La(Ⅲ). The extractant molecules tend to adsorb at the interface. So an interfacial extraction reaction model was derived.

  7. Simulation and Analysis on Multiple Steady States of an Industrial Acetic Acid Dehydration System

    李绍军; 黄定伟

    2011-01-01

    In this work, an industrial acetic acid dehydration system via heterogeneous azeotropic distillation is simulated by Aspen Plus software. Residue curves are used to analyze the distillating behavior, and appropriate operating region of the system is determined. Based on steady states simulation, a sensitivity analysis is carried out to detect the output multiple steady states in the system. Different solution branches are observered when the flow rates of the feed stream and the organic reflux stream are selected as manipulated variables. The performance of the column under different steady states is different. A method is oroposed to achieve the desired steady state.

  8. Simultaneous determination of 2-naphthoxyacetic acid and indole-3-acetic acid by first derivation synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Liu, Xiangxiang; Wan, Yiqun

    2013-07-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive and selective method for simultaneously determining 2-naphthoxyacetic acid (BNOA) and Indole-3-Acetic Acid (IAA) in mixtures has been developed using derivation synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy based on their synchronous fluorescence. The synchronous fluorescence spectra were obtained with Δλ=100 nm in a pH 8.5 NaH2PO4-NaOH buffer solution, and the detected wavelengths of quantitative analysis were set at 239 nm for BNOA and 293 nm for IAA respectively. The over lapped fluorescence spectra were well separated by the synchronous derivative method. Under optimized conditions, the limits of detection (LOD) were 0.003 μg/mL for BNOA and 0.012 μg/mL for IAA. This method is simple and expeditious, and it has been successfully applied to the determination of 2-naphthoxyacetic acid and indole-3-acetic acid in fruit juice samples with satisfactory results. The samples were only filtrated through a 0.45 μm membrane filter, which was free from the tedious separation procedures. The obtaining recoveries were in the range of 83.88-87.43% for BNOA and 80.76-86.68% for IAA, and the relative standard deviations were all less than 5.0%. Statistical comparison of the results with high performance liquid chromatography Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-MS) method revealed good agreement and proved that there were no significant difference in the accuracy and precision between these two methods.

  9. Simultaneous determination of 2-naphthoxyacetic acid and indole-3-acetic acid by first derivation synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy

    Liu, Xiangxiang; Wan, Yiqun

    2013-07-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive and selective method for simultaneously determining 2-naphthoxyacetic acid (BNOA) and Indole-3-Acetic Acid (IAA) in mixtures has been developed using derivation synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy based on their synchronous fluorescence. The synchronous fluorescence spectra were obtained with Δλ = 100 nm in a pH 8.5 NaH2PO4-NaOH buffer solution, and the detected wavelengths of quantitative analysis were set at 239 nm for BNOA and 293 nm for IAA respectively. The over lapped fluorescence spectra were well separated by the synchronous derivative method. Under optimized conditions, the limits of detection (LOD) were 0.003 μg/mL for BNOA and 0.012 μg/mL for IAA. This method is simple and expeditious, and it has been successfully applied to the determination of 2-naphthoxyacetic acid and indole-3-acetic acid in fruit juice samples with satisfactory results. The samples were only filtrated through a 0.45 μm membrane filter, which was free from the tedious separation procedures. The obtaining recoveries were in the range of 83.88-87.43% for BNOA and 80.76-86.68% for IAA, and the relative standard deviations were all less than 5.0%. Statistical comparison of the results with high performance liquid chromatography Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-MS) method revealed good agreement and proved that there were no significant difference in the accuracy and precision between these two methods.

  10. Comparative Genomics of Acetobacterpasteurianus Ab3, an Acetic Acid Producing Strain Isolated from Chinese Traditional Rice Vinegar Meiguichu.

    Xia, Kai; Li, Yudong; Sun, Jing; Liang, Xinle

    2016-01-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus, an acetic acid resistant bacterium belonging to alpha-proteobacteria, has been widely used to produce vinegar in the food industry. To understand the mechanism of its high tolerance to acetic acid and robust ability of oxidizing ethanol to acetic acid (> 12%, w/v), we described the 3.1 Mb complete genome sequence (including 0.28 M plasmid sequence) with a G+C content of 52.4% of A. pasteurianus Ab3, which was isolated from the traditional Chinese rice vinegar (Meiguichu) fermentation process. Automatic annotation of the complete genome revealed 2,786 protein-coding genes and 73 RNA genes. The comparative genome analysis among A. pasteurianus strains revealed that A. pasteurianus Ab3 possesses many unique genes potentially involved in acetic acid resistance mechanisms. In particular, two-component systems or toxin-antitoxin systems may be the signal pathway and modulatory network in A. pasteurianus to cope with acid stress. In addition, the large numbers of unique transport systems may also be related to its acid resistance capacity and cell fitness. Our results provide new clues to understanding the underlying mechanisms of acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter species and guiding industrial strain breeding for vinegar fermentation processes.

  11. Kinetics Studies on Esterification Reaction of Acetic acid with Iso-amyl Alcohol over Ion Exchange Resin as Catalysts

    Bhaskar D. Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The low molecular weight organic esters have pleasing smell and are found in applications in the food industry for synthetic essence and perfume. Esterification reactions are ubiquitous reactions especially in pharmaceutical, perfumery and polymer industries, wherein; both heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysts have been extensively used. Iso-amyl acetate (or Iso-pentyl acetate is often called as banana oil, since it has the recognizable odor of this fruit. Iso-amyl acetate is synthesized by esterification of acetic acid with iso-amyl alcohol. (Eq.1. Since the equilibrium does not help the formation of the ester, it must be shifted to the right, in favor of the product, by using a surplus of one of the starting materials. Iso-amyl acetate is a kind of flavor reagent with fruit taste. The use of H2SO4 often originates the problems such as corrosion for equipments and pollution for environment.

  12. Gluconacetobacter maltaceti sp. nov., a novel vinegar producing acetic acid bacterium.

    Slapšak, Nina; Cleenwerck, Ilse; De Vos, Paul; Trček, Janja

    2013-02-01

    Comparison of HaeIII- and HpaII-restriction profiles of PCR-amplified 16S-23S rDNA ITS regions of Gluconacetobacter sp. LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 with restriction profiles of reference strains of acetic acid bacteria described by Trček and Teuber [34] revealed the same but unique restriction profiles for LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109. Further analyses of nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequences, nearly complete 16S-23S rDNA ITS sequences, as well as concatenated partial sequences of the housekeeping genes dnaK, groEL and rpoB, allocated both strains to a single phylogenetic cluster well separated from the other species of the genus Gluconacetobacter. DNA-DNA hybridizations confirmed their novel species identity by 73% DNA-DNA relatedness between both strains, and values below the species level (<70%) between SKU 1109 and the type strains of the closest phylogenetic neighbors. The classification of strains LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 into a single novel species was confirmed also by AFLP and (GTG)(5)-PCR DNA fingerprinting data, as well as by phenotypic data. Strains LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 can be differentiated from their closely related Gluconacetobacter species, Gluconacetobacter entanii and Gluconacetobacter hansenii, by their ability to form 2-keto-d-gluconic acid from d-glucose, their ability to use d-mannitol, d-gluconate and glycerol as carbon source and form acid from d-fructose, and their ability to grow without acetic acid. The major fatty acid of LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 is C(18:1ω7c) (60.2-64.8%). The DNA G+C content of LMG 1529(T) and SKU 1109 is 62.5 and 63.3mol% respectively. The name Gluconacetobacter maltaceti sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LMG 1529(T) (=NBRC 14815(T)=NCIMB 8752(T)).

  13. The kinetics of process dependent ammonia inhibition of methanogenesis from acetic acid.

    Wilson, Christopher Allen; Novak, John; Takacs, Imre; Wett, Bernhard; Murthy, Sudhir

    2012-12-01

    Advanced anaerobic digestion processes aimed at improving the methanization of sewage sludge may be potentially impaired by the production of inhibitory compounds (e.g. free ammonia). The result of methanogenic inhibition is relatively high effluent concentrations of acetic acid and other soluble organics, as well as reduced methane yields. An extreme example of such an advanced process is the thermal hydrolytic pretreatment of sludge prior to high solids digestion (THD). Compared to a conventional mesophilic anaerobic digestion process (MAD), THD operates in a state of constant inhibition driven by high free ammonia concentrations, and elevated pH values. As such, previous investigations of the kinetics of methanogenesis from acetic acid under uninhibited conditions do not necessarily apply well to the modeling of extreme processes such as THD. By conducting batch ammonia toxicity assays using biomass from THD and MAD reactors, we compared the response of these communities over a broad range of ammonia inhibition. For both processes, increased inhibitor concentrations resulted in a reduction of biomass growth rate (r(max) = μ(max)∙X) and a resulting decrease in the substrate half saturation coefficient (K(S)). These two parameters exhibited a high degree of correlation, suggesting that for a constant transport limited system, the K(S) was mostly a linear function of the growth rate. After correcting for reactor pH and temperature, we found that the THD and MAD biomass were both able to perform methanogenesis from acetate at high free ammonia concentrations (equivalent to 3-5 g/L total ammonia nitrogen), albeit at less than 30% of their respective maximum rates. The reduction in methane production was slightly less pronounced for the THD biomass than for MAD, suggesting that the long term exposure to ammonia had selected for a methanogenic pathway less dependent on those organisms most sensitive to ammonia inhibition (i.e. aceticlastic methanogens).

  14. High temperature stimulates acetic acid accumulation and enhances the growth inhibition and ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under fermenting conditions.

    Woo, Ji-Min; Yang, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Sae-Um; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    2014-07-01

    Cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to high temperatures of up to 42 °C during ethanol fermentation at a high glucose concentration (i.e., 100 g/L) were investigated. Increased temperature correlated with stimulated glucose uptake to produce not only the thermal protectant glycerol but also ethanol and acetic acid. Carbon flux into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle correlated positively with cultivation temperature. These results indicate that the increased demand for energy (in the form of ATP), most likely caused by multiple stressors, including heat, acetic acid, and ethanol, was matched by both the fermentation and respiration pathways. Notably, acetic acid production was substantially stimulated compared to that of other metabolites during growth at increased temperature. The acetic acid produced in addition to ethanol seemed to subsequently result in adverse effects, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. This, in turn, appeared to cause the specific growth rate, and glucose uptake rate reduced leading to a decrease of the specific ethanol production rate far before glucose depletion. These results suggest that adverse effects from heat, acetic acid, ethanol, and oxidative stressors are synergistic, resulting in a decrease of the specific growth rate and ethanol production rate and, hence, are major determinants of cell stability and ethanol fermentation performance of S. cerevisiae at high temperatures. The results are discussed in the context of possible applications.

  15. An acid-stable tert-butyldiarylsilyl (TBDAS) linker for solid-phase organic synthesis.

    Diblasi, Christine M; Macks, Daniel E; Tan, Derek S

    2005-04-28

    [reaction: see text] A new, robust tert-butyldiarylsilyl (TBDAS) linker has been developed for solid-phase organic synthesis. This linker is stable to both protic and Lewis acidic reaction conditions, overcoming a significant limitation of previously reported silyl linkers. Solid-phase acetal deprotection, olefination, asymmetric allylation, and silyl protecting group deblocking reactions have been demonstrated with TBDAS-linked substrates.

  16. Temperature-programmed Deoxygenation of Acetic Acid on Molybdenum Carbide Catalysts

    Nash, Connor P.; Farberow, Carrie A.; Hensley, Jesse E.

    2017-02-07

    Temperature programmed reaction (TPRxn) is a simple yet powerful tool for screening solid catalyst performance at a variety of conditions. A TPRxn system includes a reactor, furnace, gas and vapor sources, flow control, instrumentation to quantify reaction products (e.g., gas chromatograph), and instrumentation to monitor the reaction in real time (e.g., mass spectrometer). Here, we apply the TPRxn methodology to study molybdenum carbide catalysts for the deoxygenation of acetic acid, an important reaction among many in the upgrading/stabilization of biomass pyrolysis vapors. TPRxn is used to evaluate catalyst activity and selectivity and to test hypothetical reaction pathways (e.g., decarbonylation, ketonization, and hydrogenation). The results of the TPRxn study of acetic acid deoxygenation show that molybdenum carbide is an active catalyst for this reaction at temperatures above ca. 300 degree C and that the reaction favors deoxygenation (i.e., C-O bond-breaking) products at temperatures below ca. 400 degrees C and decarbonylation (i.e., C-C bond-breaking) products at temperatures above ca. 400 degrees C.

  17. Synthesis of hierarchical SnO2 nanoflowers with enhanced acetic acid gas sensing properties

    Jin, W. X.; Ma, S. Y.; Tie, Z. Z.; Li, W. Q.; Luo, J.; Cheng, L.; Xu, X. L.; Wang, T. T.; Jiang, X. H.; Mao, Y. Z.

    2015-10-01

    Different morphologies hierarchical flower-like tin dioxide (SnO2) nanostructures were fabricated by changing the volume ratio of glycol and de-ionized water (Vg:Vw = 0, 1:2, 1:1 and 2:1) under a template-free and low-cost hydrothermal method and subsequent calcinations. The architectures, morphologies and gas sensing performances of the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and gas-sensing measurement device. It can be observed that all the nanoflowers were composed of two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets, and the thickness of nanosheets is only about 9 nm when Vg:Vw = 1:1. The sensor based on the product of Vg:Vw = 1:1 exhibited excellent gas sensing performance toward 500 ppm acetic acid at 260 °C, and the response value of this sensor was about 153.6, which was above 7.5 times higher than that of ammonia (about 20.3). In addition, the 3D flower-like SnO2 nanostructures exhibited not only high response and selectivity to ppm level acetone, but also fast response and recovery time within 10 s, demonstrating it can be used as a potential candidate for detecting acetic acid. Finally, the possible formation mechanism was proposed, too.

  18. Electrochemical Polymerization of Carbazole in Acetic Acid Containing Boron Trifluoride Diethyl Etherate

    MIAO,Hua-Ming; ZHANG,Hong-Lin; XU,Jing-Kun; FAN,Chang-Li; DONG,Bin; ZENG,Li-Qiang; ZHAO,Feng

    2008-01-01

    High-quality polycarbazole (PCz) films with an electrical conductivity of 10-2 S·cm-1 were synthesized elec-trochemically by direct anodic oxidation of carbazole in a novel mixed electrolyte of acetic acid containing 26% boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BTDE) and 5% poly(ethylene glycol) with molar mass of 400 (by volume). The oxidation potential of carbazole in this medium was measured to be only 0.89 V vs. a saturated calomel electrode (SCE), which was much lower than that determined in acetonitrile containing 0.1mol·L-1 Bu4NBF4 (1.36 V vs. SCE). PCz films obtained from this medium showed good electrochemical behavior, good thermal stability, and were partly soluble in strong polar organic solvents such as dimethyl sulfoxide and tetrahydrofuran. The fluorescence spectra implied that PCz obtained from this medium was a good blue-light emitter. FT-IR, 1H NMR and theoretical studies showed that the polymerization of carbazole mainly occurred at the 3,6-positions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the electrosyntheses of conducting polymers in mixed electrolyte of acetic acid and BTDE.

  19. Inhibition of food-stimulated acid secretion (intragastric titration) by roxatidine acetate. Dose-response study.

    Bonfils, S; Chen, W W; Vatier, J

    1988-01-01

    In 10 healthy male volunteers a dose-response study was carried out with roxatidine acetate, 75, 150, 300, and 600 mg, and placebo on food-stimulated gastric acid secretion (intragastric titration (IGT]. The design of the study, with drug intake 150 min before starting IGT, enabled stable inhibition over the 90-min observation period of the test. Cumulative secretory results showed a dose-related acid secretion inhibition (67% for 75 mg; 87.6% for 150 mg; 98.8% for 300 mg; 99.6% for 600 mg). The results were statistically significantly different from placebo and from each other, except for 300 mg versus 600 mg. With a Lineweaver-Burk plot, the ED50 was 41 mg and r = 0.98. Peak concentrations of roxatidine were observed either at T 150 or T 180. Significant correlation (r = 0.7; p less than 0.001) was obtained for the percentage inhibition with 75 mg and 150 mg together versus peak concentrations. Antisecretory potency with the IGT model applied to normal subjects appears to be of the same order for roxatidine acetate and for ranitidine.

  20. Methane reacts with heteropolyacids chemisorbed on silica to produce acetic acid under soft conditions

    Sun, Miao

    2013-01-16

    Selective functionalization of methane at moderate temperature is of crucial economic, environmental, and scientific importance. Here, we report that methane reacts with heteropolyacids (HPAs) chemisorbed on silica to produce acetic acid under soft conditions. Specially, when chemisorbed on silica, H 4SiW12O40, H3PW12O 40, H4SiMo12O40, and H 3PMo12O40 activate the primary C-H bond of methane at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. With these systems, acetic acid is produced directly from methane, in a single step, in the absence of Pd and without adding CO. Extensive surface characterization by solid-state NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggests that C-H activation of methane is triggered by the protons in the HPA-silica interface with concerted reduction of the Keggin cage, leading to water formation and hydration of the interface. This is the simplest and mildest way reported to date to functionalize methane. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  1. Alcohol dehydrogenase of acetic acid bacteria: structure, mode of action, and applications in biotechnology.

    Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2010-05-01

    Pyrroquinoline quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (PQQ-ADH) of acetic acid bacteria is a membrane-bound enzyme involved in the acetic acid fermentation by oxidizing ethanol to acetaldehyde coupling with reduction of membranous ubiquinone (Q), which is, in turn, re-oxidized by ubiquinol oxidase, reducing oxygen to water. PQQ-ADHs seem to have co-evolved with the organisms fitting to their own habitats. The enzyme consists of three subunits and has a pyrroloquinoline quinone, 4 heme c moieties, and a tightly bound Q as the electron transfer mediators. Biochemical, genetic, and electrochemical studies have revealed the unique properties of PQQ-ADH since it was purified in 1978. The enzyme is unique to have ubiquinol oxidation activity in addition to Q reduction. This mini-review focuses on the molecular properties of PQQ-ADH, such as the roles of the subunits and the cofactors, particularly in intramolecular electron transport of the enzyme from ethanol to Q. Also, we summarize biotechnological applications of PQQ-ADH as to enantiospecific oxidations for production of the valuable chemicals and bioelectrocatalysis for sensors and fuel cells using indirect and direct electron transfer technologies and discuss unsolved issues and future prospects related to this elaborate enzyme.

  2. Acetic Acid, 2-Undecanone, and (E)-2-Decenal Ultrastructural Malformations on Meloidogyne incognita

    Ntalli, Nikoletta; Ratajczak, Marlena; Oplos, Chrisostomos; Menkissoglu-Spiroudi, Urania; Adamski, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The use of natural compounds to control phytonematodes is significantly increasing, as most of the old synthetic pesticides have been banned due to their eco-hostile character. Plant secondary metabolites are now evaluated as biologically active molecules against Meloidogyne spp. but their target site in the nematode body is rarely specified. Herein, we report on the ultrastructure modifications of the Meloidogyne incognita J2 after treatment with nematicidal plant secondary metabolites, that is acetic acid, (E)-2-decenal, and 2-undecanone. The commercial nematicide fosthiazate acting on acetylcholinesterase was used as control. For this reason, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy have been employed. The acetic acid mainly harmed the cuticle, degenerated the nuclei of pseudocoel cells, and vacuolised the cytoplasm. The (E)-2-decenal and 2-undecanone did neither harm to the cuticle nor the somatic muscles but they degenerated the pseudocoel cells. (E)-2-decenal caused malformation of somatic muscles. According to the above, the nematicidal compounds seem to enter the nematode body principally via the digestive system rather than the cuticle, since the main part of the damage is internal. PMID:28154431

  3. Hydrogen bonding of single acetic acid with water molecules in dilute aqueous solutions

    2009-01-01

    In separation processes,hydrogen bonding has a very significant effect on the efficiency of isolation of acetic acid (HOAc) from HOAc/H2O mixtures. This intermolecular interaction on aggregates composed of a single HOAc molecule and varying numbers of H2O molecules has been examined by using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations (AIMD) and quantum chemical calculations (QCC). Thermodynamic data in aqueous solution were obtained through the self-consistent reaction field calculations and the polarizable continuum model. The aggregation free energy of the aggregates in gas phase as well as in aqueous system shows that the 6-membered ring is the most favorable structure in both states. The relative stability of the ring structures inferred from the thermodynamic properties of the QCC is consistent with the ring distributions of the AIMD simulation. The study shows that in dilute aqueous solution of HOAc the more favorable molecular interaction is the hydrogen bonding between HOAc and H2O molecules,resulting in the separation of acetic acid from the HOAc/H2O mixtures with more difficulty than usual.

  4. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ACETIC ACID LIGNIN-BASED EPOXY BLENDS

    Fangeng Chen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Lignin-based epoxy resin (LER was prepared from phenolated lignin (PL and epichlorohydrin (ECH in the presence of sodium hydroxide. The eucalyptus acetic acid lignin (AAL was first reacted with phenol in the presence of sulfuric acid to obtain PL. Then, PL was reacted with ECH in aqueous sodium hydroxide to obtain LER. LER was mixed with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (E-44 and then cured with triethylenetetramine (TETA. The initial thermal degradation temperature (Td of the cured epoxy blends decreased with the increase in LER content. The residue ratio at 500 °C of the cured epoxy blends (R500, however, increased with the LER content. The maximum adhesive shear strength of the cured epoxy blends was obtained at 20 wt% of LER. The water absorption of epoxy blends increased with increasing the content of LER. SEM photos showed that increasing the content of LER increased inhomogeneity and porosity of epoxy blends.

  5. A novel kinetic model for polysaccharide dissolution during atmospheric acetic acid pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse.

    Zhao, Xuebing; Morikawa, Yuichi; Qi, Feng; Zeng, Jing; Liu, Dehua

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid (AcH) pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse with the catalysis of sulfuric acid (SA) could greatly enhance the enzymatic digestibility of cellulose. However, polysaccharide dissolution happened inevitably during the pretreatment. It was found that the simplest model, which assumes that the total polysaccharides were reactive to be dissolved, could not well describe the kinetic behavior of polysaccharide dissolution. A novel pseudo-homogenous kinetic model was thus developed by introducing a parameter termed as "potential dissolution degree" (δ(d)) based on the multilayered structure of cell wall. It was found that solid xylan and glucan dissolutions were a first-order reaction with respect to the dissolvable fraction. Due to the delignification action of AcH, polysaccharide dissolutions were enhanced in AcH media compared with those in aqueous system. Acetylizations of cellulose and sugars were also observed, and AcH concentration showed a significant influence on the degree of acetylization.

  6. An intercomparison of measurement systems for vapor and particulate phase concentrations of formic and acetic acids

    Keene, William C.; Talbot, Robert W.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Beecher, Kristene; Berresheim, Harold

    1989-01-01

    During June 1986, eight systems for measuring vapor phase and four for measuring particulate phase concentrations of formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH) were intercompared in central Virginia. HCOOH and CH3COOH vapors were sampled by condensate, mist, Chromosorb 103 GC resin, NaOH-coated annular denuders, NaOH-impregnated quartz filters, K2CO3 and NaCO3-impregnated cellulose filters, and Nylasorb membranes. Atmospheric aerosol was collected on Teflon and Nuclepore filters using both hi-vol and lo-vol systems to measure particulate phase concentrations. Performances of the mist chamber and K2CO3-impregnated filter techniques were evaluated using zero air and ambient air spiked with HCOOH(g) and CH3COOH(g), and formaldehyde from permeation sources. The advantages and drawbacks of these methods are reported and discussed.

  7. Photodissociation of organic molecules in star-forming regions II: Acetic acid

    Pilling, S; Boechat-Roberty, H M

    2006-01-01

    Fragments from organic molecule dissociation (such as reactive ions and radicals) can form interstellar complex molecules like amino acids. The goal of this work is to experimentally study photoionization and photodissociation processes of acetic acid (CH$_3$COOH), a glycine (NH$_2$CH$_2$COOH) precursor molecule, by soft X-ray photons. The measurements were taken at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), employing soft X-ray photons from a toroidal grating monochromator (TGM) beamline (100 - 310 eV). Mass spectra were obtained using the photoelectron photoion coincidence (PEPICO) method. Kinetic energy distribution and abundances for each ionic fragment have been obtained from the analysis of the corresponding peak shapes in the mass spectra. Absolute photoionization and photodissociation cross sections were also determined. We have found, among the channels leading to ionization, that only 4-6% of CH$_3$COOH survive the strong ionization field. CH$_3$CO$^+$, COOH$^+$ and CH$_3^+$ ions are the mai...

  8. The effect of homogenization pressure and stages on the amounts of Lactic and Acetic acids of probiotic yoghurt

    R Massoud

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the use of probiotic products especially yogurt, due to having wonderful and health properties, has become popular in the world. In this study, the effect of homogenization pressure (100, 150 and 200 bars and stage (single and two on the amount of lactic and acetic acids was investigated. Yoghurts were manufactured from low-fat milk treated using high pressure homogenization at 100,150 and 200 bar and at 60°C. The amount of lactic and acetic acids was determined after the days 1, 7, 14 and 21 of storage at 4ºC. The experiments were set up using a completely randomized design. With the increase of pressure and stage of homogenization, the amount of both acids was increased (p<0.01. The greatest amount of lactic and acetic acids during the storage period was observed in the sample homogenized at a pressure of 200 bars and two stages.

  9. Acetic acid-assisted hydrothermal fractionation of empty fruit bunches for high hemicellulosic sugar recovery with low byproducts.

    Kim, Dong Young; Um, Byung Hwan; Oh, Kyeong Keun

    2015-07-01

    Xylose, mannose, and galactose (xmg) recovery from empty fruit bunches using acetic acid-assisted hydrothermal (AAH) fractionation method was investigated. Acetic acid has been demonstrated to be effective in xmg recovery in comparison with the liquid hot-water (LHW) fractionation. The maximum xmg recovery yield (50.7 %) from the empty fruit bunch (EFB) was obtained using AAH fractionation at optimum conditions (6.9 wt.% acetic acid at 170 °C and for 18 min); whereas, only 16.2 % of xmg recovery was obtained from the LHW fractionation at the same reaction conditions (170 °C and 18 min). Releasing out the glucose from EFB was kept at low level (<1.0 %) through all tested conditions and consequently negligible 5-HMF and formic acid were analyzed in the hydrolyzate. The production of furfural was also resulted with extremely low level (1.0 g/L).

  10. High efficient acetalization of carbonyl compounds with diols catalyzed by novel carbon-based solid strong acid catalyst

    2007-01-01

    The novel carbon-based acid catalyst has been applied to catalyzing the acetalization and ketalization. The results showed that the catalyst was very efficient with the average yield over 93%. The novel heterogeneous catalyst has the advantages of high activity, wide applicability even to 7-membered ring acetals, strikingly simple workup procedure, non-pollution, and reusability, which will contribute to the green process greatly.

  11. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-12-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains.

  12. Developmental toxicity of mixtures: the water disinfection by-products dichloro-, dibromo- and bromochloro acetic acid in rat embryo culture

    The chlorination of drinking water results in production of numerous disinfection by-products (DBPs). One of the important classes of DBPs is the haloacetic acids. We have previously shown that the haloacetic acids (HAs), dichloro (DCA), dibromo (DBA) and bromochloro (BCA) acetic...

  13. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics.

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-12-22

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains.

  14. Draft Genome Sequences of Gluconobacter cerinus CECT 9110 and Gluconobacter japonicus CECT 8443, Acetic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Grape Must

    Sainz, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of Gluconobacter cerinus strain CECT9110 and Gluconobacter japonicus CECT8443, acetic acid bacteria isolated from grape must. Gluconobacter species are well known for their ability to oxidize sugar alcohols into the corresponding acids. Our objective was to select strains to oxidize effectively d-glucose. PMID:27365351

  15. Regulation of acetic acid production by homo- and heterofermentative lactobacilli in whole-wheat sour-doughs.

    Martínez-Anaya, M A; Llin, M L; Pilar Macías, M; Collar, C

    1994-09-01

    The efficiency of sour-dough as a possible preservative agent of microbial spoilage of bread depends on its acetic acid content. As a secondary metabolite of sugar fermentation by lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid may be promoted in the presence of O2 or H+ acceptors. This paper studies the influence of O2 and high fructose content products (pure sugar, invert sugar, fructose syrup) addition on acetic acid production by hetero- (Lactobacillus brevis 25a, B-21, L-62; L. sanfrancisco L-99) and homofermentative (L. plantarum B-39) lactobacilli in whole-wheat sour-doughs [280 and 250 dough yield (DY)]. The pH and total titratable acidity (TTA) of sour-doughs after 44 h fermentation varied with DY and strain. As expected, the addition of O2 promoted greater increases in TTA with heterofermentative lactobacilli (15-42%) than with L. plantarum (15%). Fructose addition was only effective for heterofermentative strains, but the overall effects were smaller than those observed for oxygenation. The ability of lactobacilli to produce acetic acid in sour-doughs without treatment varied from 0.16 g/100 g flour at 44 h (B-39, 280, 350 DY) to 0.47-0.65% (L-62, 280, 350 DY). The production of acetic acid was positively promoted by all treatments. Oxygenation was again the most effective way of inducing acetic acid production; increases ranged from 54% (B-21) to 269% (L-99, 350 DY). The addition of H+ acceptors had variable effects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Quantifying Effect of Lactic, Acetic, and Propionic Acids on Growth of Molds Isolated from Spoiled Bakery Products.

    Dagnas, Stéphane; Gauvry, Emilie; Onno, Bernard; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2015-09-01

    The combined effect of undissociated lactic acid (0 to 180 mmol/liter), acetic acid (0 to 60 mmol/liter), and propionic acid (0 to 12 mmol/liter) on growth of the molds Aspergillus niger, Penicillium corylophilum, and Eurotium repens was quantified at pH 3.8 and 25°C on malt extract agar acid medium. The impact of these acids on lag time for growth (λ) was quantified through a gamma model based on the MIC. The impact of these acids on radial growth rate (μ) was analyzed statistically through polynomial regression. Concerning λ, propionic acid exhibited a stronger inhibitory effect (MIC of 8 to 20 mmol/liter depending on the mold species) than did acetic acid (MIC of 23 to 72 mmol/liter). The lactic acid effect was null on E. repens and inhibitory on A. niger and P. corylophilum. These results were validated using independent sets of data for the three acids at pH 3.8 but for only acetic and propionic acids at pH 4.5. Concerning μ, the effect of acetic and propionic acids was slightly inhibitory for A. niger and P. corylophilum but was not significant for E. repens. In contrast, lactic acid promoted radial growth of all three molds. The gamma terms developed here for these acids will be incorporated in a predictive model for temperature, water activity, and acid. More generally, results for μ and λ will be used to identify and evaluate solutions for controlling bakery product spoilage.

  17. Helpfulness of the combination of acetic acid and FICE in the detection of Barrett's epithelium and Barrett's associated neoplasias

    Marine Camus; Stanislas Chaussade; Romain Coriat; Sarah Leblanc; Catherine Brezault; Benoit Terris; Elise Pommaret; Marianne Gaudric; Ariane Chryssostalis; Frederic Prat

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the mucosal morphology in Barrett's oesophagus by chromo and magnifying endoscopy.METHODS:A prospective pilot study at a tertiary medical centre was conducted to evaluate the use of acetic acid pulverisation combined with virtual chromoendoscopy using Fujinon intelligent chromoendoscopy (FICE) for semiological characterization of the mucosal morphology in Barrett's oesophagus and its neoplastic complications.Upper endoscopy using high definition white light,2% acid acetic pulverisation and FICE with high definition videoendoscopy were performed in 20 patients including 18 patients who presented with aspects of Barrett's oesophagus at endoscopy examination.Two patients used as controls had normal endoscopy and histological results.Prospectively,videos were watched blind from histological results by three trained FICE technique endoscopists.RESULTS:The videos of patients with high-grade dysplasia showed an irregular mucosal pattern in 14% using high definition white light endoscopy and in 100% using acid acetic-FICE combined.Videos did not identify irregular vascular patterns using high definition white light endoscopy,while acid acetic-FICE combined visualised one in 86% of cases.CONCLUSION:Combined acetic acid and FICE is a promising method for screening high-grade dysplasia and early cancer in Barrett's oesophagus.

  18. Absence of Rtt109p, a fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase, results in improved acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhao, Xinqing; Zhang, Mingming; Bai, Fengwu

    2016-03-01

    RTT109 is a histone acetyltransferase for the acetylation of histone H3. It is still not clear whether RTT109 plays a role in regulation of gene expression under environmental stresses. In this study, the involvement of RTT109 in acetic acid stress tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. It was revealed that the absence of RTT109 enhanced resistance to 5.5 g L(-1) acetic acid, which was indicated by improved growth of RTT109Δ mutant compared with that of the wild-type BY4741 strain. Meanwhile, the lag phase was shortened for 48 h and glucose consumption completed 36 h in advance for RTT109Δ mutant compared to the wild-type strain, with ethanol production rate increased from 0.39 to 0.60 g L(-1) h(-1). Significantly, elevated transcription levels of HSP12, CTT1 and GSH1, as well as increased activities of antioxidant enzymes were observed in RTT109Δ under acetic acid stress. Improved flocculation of RTT109Δ compared to that of the control strain BY4741 under the acetic acid stress was also observed. These results suggest that the absence of RTT109 not only activates transcription of stress responsive genes, but also improves resistance to oxidative stress, which ultimately contributes to improved acetic acid tolerance in S. cerevisiae.

  19. Treatment of sugi (Cryptomeria japonica D.) sapwood with aqueous solution of acetic acid

    LUBao-wang; DUGuang-hua; MATSUITakanao; MATSUSHITAYoh-ichi

    2003-01-01

    Sugi sapwood samples were processed with aqueous solution of acetic acid in order to find the response of the weight of sugi sapwood and the treatment of aqueous solution of acetic acid. The result showed that loss of weight for the treated sugisapwood was about equal to yield of extracts from sugi sapwood, and increased with the increment of the concentration of aqueous solution of acetic acid. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra changes of the treated sugi wood and extracts from sugi sapwood were analyzed by FT-IR spectroscopic technique. Increasing tendency of absorption intensities of the stretching vibration at 3 400 cm-1 of hydroxyl group (OH) and C=C in lignin stretching vibration at 1510 cm-1 of benzene ring inlignin were observed from FT-IR of the treated sugi sapwood. From FT-IR spectra of extracts from sugi sapwood by aqueoussolution of acetic acid, the dissolution of lignin was observed during the treatment with 30% acetic acid solution aqueous.

  20. Short-Chain Fatty Acid Acetate Stimulates Adipogenesis and Mitochondrial Biogenesis via GPR43 in Brown Adipocytes.

    Hu, Jiamiao; Kyrou, Ioannis; Tan, Bee K; Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Ramanjaneya, Manjunath; Tripathi, Gyanendra; Patel, Vanlata; James, Sean; Kawan, Mohamed; Chen, Jing; Randeva, Harpal S

    2016-05-01

    Short-chain fatty acids play crucial roles in a range of physiological functions. However, the effects of short-chain fatty acids on brown adipose tissue have not been fully investigated. We examined the role of acetate, a short-chain fatty acid formed by fermentation in the gut, in the regulation of brown adipocyte metabolism. Our results show that acetate up-regulates adipocyte protein 2, peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, and uncoupling protein-1 expression and affects the morphological changes of brown adipocytes during adipogenesis. Moreover, an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis was observed after acetate treatment. Acetate also elicited the activation of ERK and cAMP response element-binding protein, and these responses were sensitive to G(i/o)-type G protein inactivator, Gβγ-subunit inhibitor, phospholipase C inhibitor, and MAPK kinase inhibitor, indicating a role for the G(i/o)βγ/phospholipase C/protein kinase C/MAPK kinase signaling pathway in these responses. These effects of acetate were mimicked by treatment with 4-chloro-α-(1-methylethyl)-N-2-thiazolylbenzeneacetamide, a synthetic G protein-coupled receptor 43 (GPR43) agonist and were impaired in GPR43 knockdown cells. Taken together, our results indicate that acetate may have important physiological roles in brown adipocytes through the activation of GPR43.

  1. Acetic acid recovery from a hybrid biological-hydrothermal treatment process of sewage sludge - a pilot plant study.

    Andrews, J; Dare, P; Estcourt, G; Gapes, D; Lei, R; McDonald, B; Wijaya, N

    2015-01-01

    A two-stage process consisting of anaerobic fermentation followed by sub-critical wet oxidation was used to generate acetic acid from sewage sludge at pilot scale. Volatile fatty acids, dominated by propionic acid, were produced over 4-6 days in the 2,000 L fermentation reactor, which also achieved 31% solids reduction. Approximately 96% of the carbon was retained in solution over the fermentation stage. Using a 200 L wet oxidation reactor operating in batch mode, the second stage achieved 98% volatile suspended solids (VSS) destruction and 67% total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD) destruction. Acetic acid produced in this stage was recalcitrant to further degradation and was retained in solution. The gross yield from VSS was 16% for acetic acid and 21% for volatile fatty acids across the process, higher than reported yields for wet oxidation alone. The pilot plant results showed that 72% of the incoming phosphorus was retained in the solids, 94% of the nitrogen became concentrated in solution and 41% of the carbon was converted to a soluble state, in a more degradable form. Acetic acid produced from the process has the potential to be used to offset ethanol requirements in biological nutrient removal plants.

  2. Return of the lysergamides. Part II: Analytical and behavioural characterization of N(6) -allyl-6-norlysergic acid diethylamide (AL-LAD) and (2'S,4'S)-lysergic acid 2,4-dimethylazetidide (LSZ).

    Brandt, Simon D; Kavanagh, Pierce V; Westphal, Folker; Elliott, Simon P; Wallach, Jason; Colestock, Tristan; Burrow, Timothy E; Chapman, Stephen J; Stratford, Alexander; Nichols, David E; Halberstadt, Adam L

    2017-01-01

    Lysergic acid N,N-diethylamide (LSD) is perhaps one of the most intriguing psychoactive substances known and numerous analogs have been explored to varying extents in previous decades. In 2013, N(6) -allyl-6-norlysergic acid diethylamide (AL-LAD) and (2'S,4'S)-lysergic acid 2,4-dimethylazetidide (LSZ) appeared on the 'research chemicals'/new psychoactive substances (NPS) market in both powdered and blotter form. This study reports the analytical characterization of powdered AL-LAD and LSZ tartrate samples and their semi-quantitative determination on blotter paper. Included in this study was the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), low and high mass accuracy electrospray MS(/MS), high performance liquid chromatography diode array detection and GC solid-state infrared analysis. One feature shared by serotonergic psychedelics, such as LSD, is the ability to mediate behavioural responses via activation of 5-HT2A receptors. Both AL-LAD and LSZ displayed LSD-like responses in male C57BL/6 J mice when employing the head-twitch response (HTR) assay. AL-LAD and LSZ produced nearly identical inverted-U-shaped dose-dependent effects, with the maximal responses occurring at 200 µg/kg. Analysis of the dose responses by nonlinear regression confirmed that LSZ (ED50  = 114.2 nmol/kg) was equipotent to LSD (ED50  = 132.8 nmol/kg) in mice, whereas AL-LAD was slightly less potent (ED50  = 174.9 nmol/kg). The extent to which a comparison in potency can be translated directly to humans requires further investigation. Chemical and pharmacological data obtained from NPS may assist research communities that are interested in various aspects related to substance use and forensic identification. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Effects of urea and acetic acid on the heme axial ligation structure of ferric myoglobin at very acidic pH.

    Droghetti, Enrica; Sumithran, Suganya; Sono, Masanori; Antalík, Marián; Fedurco, Milan; Dawson, John H; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2009-09-01

    The heme iron coordination of ferric myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of 9.0M urea and 8.0M acetic acid at acidic pH values has been probed by electronic absorption, magnetic circular dichroism and resonance Raman spectroscopic techniques. Unlike Mb at pH 2.0, where heme is not released from the protein despite the acid denaturation and the loss of the axial ligand, upon increasing the concentration of either urea or acetic acid, a spin state change is observed, and a novel, non-native six-coordinated high-spin species prevails, where heme is released from the protein.

  4. Calcifying Tendonitis of the Shoulder: Risk Factors and Effectiveness of Acetic Acid Iontophoresis and Ultrasound

    Fernández Cuadros

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To clinically characterize calcifying tendonitis of the shoulder (CT through a prospective quasi-experimental before-and-after study, which provides a level of demonstrable evidence to support the decision-making and demonstrate the effectiveness of acetic acid iontophoresis and ultrasound in the treatment of CT. Methods Prospective, quasi-experimental before-after intervention study was conducted on 44 patients who referred to the rehabilitation department, Santísima Trinidad’s General Foundation hospital, Salamanca, from June 2014 to April 2016. Outcome measures: 1 Pain: measured by visual analogical scale (VAS; 2 calcification size: in millimetres, both measured radiologically at the beginning/end of treatment; 3 Intervention: Iontophoresis with 5% acetic acid at 4.7 mA × 10 minutes and continuous ultrasound 1 W/cm2 /1 MHz × 5 minutes over calcification. Results Mean age of the subjects was 54.2 years (n = 44, 65.9% female (n = 29, (95% with supraspinatus tendon (n = 38 and 5% with subscapularis (n = 2; 55% had complication in left shoulder (n = 22, 45% in right shoulder (n = 18 and 4.5% bilateral (n = 2. Regarding the occupation, 59.1% had (n = 26 administrative positions and 40.9% manual jobs (n = 18. On personal history: 34.09% were smoker (n = 15, 4.5% had diabetes (n = 2 and calcium intake secondary to osteoporosis was recorded for 2.27% (n = 1 of the subjects. Regarding radiological type: 68.18% formative (n = 30, 38.72% resorptive (n = 14 were observed. Average number of sessions was 19 and 9.01% (n = 4 of the subjects had treatment complications as intolerance/erythema/burn. Average initial pain was 7.7 points (VAS scale, significantly decreased (P = 0.0000 post treatment to 2.2. Initial average size of calcification was 10 mm and significantly decreased (P = 0.0000 post treatment to 3 mm. With respect to the change of calcification: success/cure rate was 56.8% (n = 25, improvement rate was 25% (n = 11; failure rate

  5. Growth inhibitory effect of grape phenolics against wine spoilage yeasts and acetic acid bacteria.

    Pastorkova, E; Zakova, T; Landa, P; Novakova, J; Vadlejch, J; Kokoska, L

    2013-02-15

    This paper investigates the in vitro antimicrobial potential of 15 grape phenolic compounds of various chemical classes (phenolic acids, stilbenes and flavonoids) using the broth microdilution method against yeasts and acetic acid bacteria frequently occurring in deteriorated wine. Pterostilbene (MICs=32-128 μg/mL), resveratrol (MICs=256-512 μg/mL) and luteolin (MICs=256-512 μg/mL) are among six active compounds that possessed the strongest inhibitory effects against all microorganisms tested. In the case of phenolic acids, myricetin, p-coumaric and ferulic acids exhibited selective antimicrobial activity (MICs=256-512 μg/mL), depending upon yeasts and bacteria tested. In comparison with potassium metabisulphite, all microorganisms tested were more susceptible to the phenolics. The results revealed the antibacterial and antiyeast effects against wine spoilage microorganisms of several highly potent phenolics naturally occurring in grapes. These findings also provide arguments for further investigation of stilbenes as prospective compounds reducing the need for the use of sulphites in winemaking.

  6. Sorption of aqueous carbonic, acetic, and oxalic acids onto alpha-alumina.

    Alliot, Cyrille; Bion, Lionel; Mercier, Florence; Toulhoat, Pierre

    2005-07-15

    The presence of organic complexing agents can modify the behavior of a surface. This study aims to better understand the impact of carboxylic acids (acetic, oxalic, and carbonic acids) issued from cellulose degradation and equally naturally present in soils. First, evidence of two different kinds of sites for chloride adsorption onto alpha-alumina and another for sodium sorption was provided. Consequently, no competition between these cation and anion sorptions occurs on alpha-alumina. The associated exchange capacities and ionic exchange constants were measured. Second, the adsorption behavior of the carboxylic acids was studied as a function of aqueous -log[H(+)] and 0.01 to 0.1 M ionic strength (NaCl), and modeled by using mass action law for ideal biphasic systems. The carboxylic acids were found to be adsorbed on the same sites as chloride ions. The competition between organic ligands and chloride ions was satisfactorily accounted for by the model assuming the deprotonated form of the ligands was sorbed on alpha-alumina. The model also allowed us to interpret the adsorption of all species under various conditions without any extra fitting parameters.

  7. Rice straw incorporated just before soil flooding increases acetic acid formation and decreases available nitrogen

    Ronaldir Knoblauch

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Incorporation of rice straw into the soil just before flooding for water-seeded rice can immobilize mineral nitrogen (N and lead to the production of acetic acid harmful to the rice seedlings, which negatively affects grain yield. This study aimed to evaluate the formation of organic acids and variation in pH and to quantify the mineral N concentration in the soil as a function of different times of incorporation of rice straw or of ashes from burning the straw before flooding. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse using an Inceptisol (Typic Haplaquept soil. The treatments were as follows: control (no straw or ash; incorporation of ashes from previous straw burning; rice straw incorporated to drained soil 60 days before flooding; straw incorporated 30 days before flooding; straw incorporated 15 days before flooding and straw incorporated on the day of flooding. Experimental units were plastic buckets with 6.0 kg of soil. The buckets remained flooded throughout the trial period without rice plants. Soil samples were collected every seven days, beginning one day before flooding until the 13th week of flooding for determination of mineral N- ammonium (NH4+ and nitrate (NO3-. Soil solution pH and concentration of organic acids (acetic, propionic and butyric were determined. All NO3- there was before flooding was lost in approximately two weeks of flooding, in all treatments. There was sigmoidal behavior for NH4+ formation in all treatments, i.e., ammonium ion concentration began to rise shortly after soil flooding, slightly decreased and then went up again. On the 91st day of flooding, the NH4+ concentrations in soil was 56 mg kg-1 in the control treatment, 72 mg kg-1 for the 60-day treatment, 73 mg kg-1 for the 30-day treatment and 53 mg kg-1 for the ash incorporation treatment. These ammonium concentrations correspond to 84, 108, 110 and 80 kg ha-1 of N-NH4+, respectively. When the straw was incorporated on the day of flooding or 15 days

  8. Continuous acetic acid production by a packed bed bioreactor employing charcoal pellets derived from waste mushroom medium.

    Horiuchi, J; Tabata, K; Kanno, T; Kobayashi, M

    2000-01-01

    A packed bed bioreactor using charcoal pellets produced from waste mushroom medium by thermal carbonization was developed and applied to continuous acetic acid production. The pellets were characterized by their high specific surface area (200 m2/g) with numerous micropores (2-10 microm). The continuous acetic acid fermentation started up smoothly after seeding and was successfully operated for about 180 d under various retention times. The maximum acetic acid productivity was about 3.9 g/l/h using normal aeration and 6.5 g/l/h using air enriched with 40% O2. The pellets are expected to prove useful as a new packing material for bioreactor in terms of their bacterial affinity, high specific surface area with appropriate pore sizes for bacteria, as well as the operational stability of the system and the low production cost.

  9. The effects of roxatidine acetate on 24-hour intragastric acidity. Investigations in healthy volunteers and comparison with ranitidine and placebo.

    Merki, H S; Witzel, L; Kaufmann, D; Kempf, M; Neumann, J; Scheurle, E; Röhmel, J; Walt, R P

    1988-01-01

    In a series of double-blind randomised studies in normal volunteers with continuous intragastric pH monitoring, the effects of different dosage regimens of roxatidine acetate, a new H2-receptor antagonist, were compared with placebo and ranitidine. Roxatidine acetate 75 mg twice daily decreased median 24-hour gastric acidity from pH 1.6 to 3.2 and median nocturnal acidity from 1.5 to 3.0. Roxatidine acetate 150 mg at bedtime raised median 24-hour pH in the same 17 subjects to 2.4 and nocturnal pH to 5.9. In the second experiment, in 14 volunteers, roxatidine acetate 150 mg at bedtime was as effective as ranitidine 300 mg at night, raising median nocturnal pH from 1.4 to 6.65 compared to 6.7 for ranitidine. However, when drugs were taken after the evening meal (post cenam nocte; PCN) roxatidine acetate 150 mg was less potent than ranitidine 300 mg, with median night-time pH rising from 1.3 to 3.2 and 4.0, respectively, in 28 volunteers. Roxatidine acetate 300 mg PCN produced the greatest rise of pH, to 4.9, suggesting that the true potency ratio of the 2 drugs is between 1 and 2.

  10. Translocation of radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol from kernel to shoot of Zea mays L

    Chisnell, J. R.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Either 5-[3H]indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or 5-[3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was applied to the endosperm of kernels of dark-grown Zea mays seedlings. The distribution of total radioactivity, radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid, and radiolabeled ester conjugated indole-3-acetic acid, in the shoots was then determined. Differences were found in the distribution and chemical form of the radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid in the shoot depending upon whether 5-[3H]indole-3-acetic acid or 5-[3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was applied to the endosperm. We demonstrated that indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol applied to the endosperm provides both free and ester conjugated indole-3-acetic acid to the mesocotyl and coleoptile. Free indole-3-acetic acid applied to the endosperm supplies some of the indole-3-acetic acid in the mesocotyl but essentially no indole-3-acetic acid to the coleoptile or primary leaves. It is concluded that free IAA from the endosperm is not a source of IAA for the coleoptile. Neither radioactive indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol nor IAA accumulates in the tip of the coleoptile or the mesocotyl node and thus these studies do not explain how the coleoptile tip controls the amount of IAA in the shoot.

  11. Indole-3-acetic acid: A widespread physiological code in interactions of fungi with other organisms.

    Fu, Shih-Feng; Wei, Jyuan-Yu; Chen, Hung-Wei; Liu, Yen-Yu; Lu, Hsueh-Yu; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Plants as well as microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi, produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). IAA is the most common plant hormone of the auxin class and it regulates various aspects of plant growth and development. Thus, research is underway globally to exploit the potential for developing IAA-producing fungi for promoting plant growth and protection for sustainable agriculture. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that IAA biosynthesis evolved independently in bacteria, microalgae, fungi, and plants. Present studies show that IAA regulates the physiological response and gene expression in these microorganisms. The convergent evolution of IAA production leads to the hypothesis that natural selection might have favored IAA as a widespread physiological code in these microorganisms and their interactions. We summarize recent studies of IAA biosynthetic pathways and discuss the role of IAA in fungal ecology.

  12. 2-[(1R*,4R*-1,4-Dihydroxycyclohexyl]acetic acid

    Mohammad Arfan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C8H14O4, is an isolation product of the aerial parts of Senecio desfontanei. The acetic acid group is oriented at a dihedral angle of 48.03 (9° with respect to the basal plane of the cyclohexane-1,4-diol chair. An intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond generates an S(6 ring with an envelope conformation. In the crystal, molecules are linked by O—H...O hydrogen bonds, resulting in R33(20 ring motifs and C(2 O—H...O—H...O—H... chains. Overall, a three-dimensional polymeric network arises. A C—H...O contact is also present.

  13. Amperometric Determination of Indole-3-acetic Acid Based on Platinum Nanowires and Carbon Nanotubes

    Ruo Zhong WANG; Lang Tao XIAO; Ming Hui YANG; Jun Hui DING; Feng Li QU; Guo Li SHEN

    2006-01-01

    Platinum nanowire (PtNW) can be grown by electrodeposition in polycarbonate membrane, with the average diameter of the nanowires about 250 nm. The PtNW and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT) are then dispersed into chitosan (CHIT) solution. The resulting PtNW-CNT-CHIT material brings new capabilities for electrochemical devices by using the synergistic action of the electrocatalytic activity of PtNW and CNT. By dropping the PtNW-CNT-CHIT film onto the glassy carbon (GC) electrode surface, and after evaporationan amperometric sensor for the determination of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was developed. The oxidation current of IAA increased significantly at the PtNW-CNT-CHIT film coated GC electrode,in contrast to that at the CNT-CHIT modified GC. The linear response of the sensor is from 50ng/ml to 50 μg/ml with a detection limit of 25 ng/mL.

  14. Strain typing of acetic acid bacteria responsible for vinegar production by the submerged elaboration method.

    Fernández-Pérez, Rocío; Torres, Carmen; Sanz, Susana; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda

    2010-12-01

    Strain typing of 103 acetic acid bacteria isolates from vinegars elaborated by the submerged method from ciders, wines and spirit ethanol, was carried on in this study. Two different molecular methods were utilised: pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of total DNA digests with a number of restriction enzymes, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) - PCR analysis. The comparative study of both methods showed that restriction fragment PFGE of SpeI digests of total DNA was a suitable method for strain typing and for determining which strains were present in vinegar fermentations. Results showed that strains of the species Gluconacetobacter europaeus were the most frequent leader strains of fermentations by the submerged method in the studied vinegars, and among them strain R1 was the predominant one. Results showed as well that mixed populations (at least two different strains) occurred in vinegars from cider and wine, whereas unique strains were found in spirit vinegars, which offered the most stressing conditions for bacterial growth.

  15. Utilization of Vinegar for Isolation of Cellulose Producing Acetic Acid Bacteria

    Aydin, Y. Andelib; Aksoy, Nuran Deveci

    2010-06-01

    Wastes of traditionally fermented Turkish vinegar were used in the isolation of cellulose producing acetic acid bacteria. Waste material was pre-enriched in Hestrin-Schramm medium and microorganisms were isolated by plating dilution series on HS agar plates The isolated strains were subjected to elaborate biochemical and physiological tests for identification. Test results were compared to those of reference strains Gluconacetobacter xylinus DSM 46604, Gluconacetobacter hansenii DSM 5602 and Gluconacetobacter liquefaciens DSM 5603. Seventeen strains, out of which only three were found to secrete the exopolysaccharide cellulose. The highest cellulose yield was recorded as 0.263±0.02 g cellulose L-1 for the strain AS14 which resembled Gluconacetobacter hansenii in terms of biochemical tests.

  16. Structural identifiability of a model for the acetic acid fermentation process.

    Jiménez-Hornero, Jorge E; Santos-Dueñas, Inés M; Garci A-Garci A, Isidoro

    2008-12-01

    Modelling has proved an essential tool for addressing research into biotechnological processes, particularly with a view to their optimization and control. Parameter estimation via optimization approaches is among the major steps in the development of biotechnology models. In fact, one of the first tasks in the development process is to determine whether the parameters concerned can be unambiguously determined and provide meaningful physical conclusions as a result. The analysis process is known as 'identifiability' and presents two different aspects: structural or theoretical identifiability and practical identifiability. While structural identifiability is concerned with model structure alone, practical identifiability takes into account both the quantity and quality of experimental data. In this work, we discuss the theoretical identifiability of a new model for the acetic acid fermentation process and review existing methods for this purpose.

  17. TREATMENT AND RESOURSE REUSE OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER FROM PRODUCTION PROCESS OF PHENYL ACETIC ACID

    PANBingcai; CHENJinlong; 等

    1999-01-01

    The effluent from phenyl acetic acid (Ph CH2COOH) production process can be treated with NDA-999 macroporous polymeric adsorbent with about 100% remopval efficiency of Ph CH2COOH,benzyl alcohol(PhCH2OH) and benzaldehyde(PhCOHO)as well as the decrease in Total Organic Carbon(TOC)from 4691mg/l to <300mg/L.3.7kg phCH2COOH and 120kg NaCl will be recovered from per m3 wastewater and the adsorbent can be reused after being regenerated by NaOH aqueous solution and methanol.Good economic,social and environmental results can be achieved with this method.

  18. Pharmacological Study on Antitumor Activity of 5-Fluorouracil-1-Acetic Acid and Its Rare Earth Complexes

    2000-01-01

    The antitumor activity of 5-fluorouracil-1-acetic acid(HFAA) and its lanthanide complexes(La(FAA)3, Eu(FAA)3) were studied. The results show that HFAA, La(FAA)3 and Eu(FAA)3 with the concentrations of 1.0×10-5~1.0×10-2 μg·ml-1 inhibit the colony formation of leukemia cells(L1210) and the growth of transplanted tumor sarcoma 180(S180), hepatic carcinoma(HEPA) and ehrlich ascites tumor(EC) as well. The maximum inhibitory rate of Eu(FAA)3 for S180 is 38.4%, that HFAA and La(FAA)3 for EC are 22.4% and 43.4%, respectively. The life prolongation rate of Eu(FAA)3 for HEPA bearing mice is as long as 284%.

  19. Isotopic composition of Murchison organic compounds: Intramolecular carbon isotope fractionation of acetic acid. Simulation studies of cosmochemical organic syntheses

    Yuen, G. U.; Cronin, J. R.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, in our laboratories, samples of Murchison acetic acid were decarboxylated successfully and the carbon isotopic composition was measured for the methane released by this procedure. These analyses showed significant differences in C-13/C-12 ratios for the methyl and carboxyl carbons of the acetic acid molecule, strongly suggesting that more than one carbon source may be involved in the synthesis of the Murchison organic compounds. On the basis of this finding, laboratory model systems simulating cosmochemical synthesis are being studied, especially those processes capable of involving two or more starting carbon sources.

  20. Acridone acetic acid, sodium salt, as an agent to stop vitiligo progression: a pilot study.

    Korobko, Igor V; Lomonosov, Konstantin M

    2014-01-01

    Vitiligo progression is attributed to immune system malfunctioning, thus immunomodulating compounds might be beneficial in stopping vitiligo progression which is a prerequisite for successful repigmentation. The goal of this study was to assess efficacy of acridone acetic acid, sodium salt (Na-AAA), an immunomodulating compound with favorable safety profile, in stabilizing active vitiligo, and to reveal prognostic factors of treatment outcome. Sixty consecutive patients with progressing nonsegmental vitiligo were treated with 10 i.m. injections of Na-AAA every other day. Disease stability was assessed in 1, 3, 6, and 12 months post-treatment. Statistical analysis was applied to correlate treatment outcome and available clinical parameters. Of the 60 patients treated, vitiligo stopped progression in 44 patients (73.3%). Older age (p = 0.0219), age of 35 and older (p = 0.0189, odds ratio (OR) = 5.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-20.84) or age of 40 and older (p = 0.0039, OR = 6.48, 95% CI 1.86-22.61), longer disease duration (p = 0.0234), pre-treatment interleukin-6 level over 2 pg/mL (p = 0.0005, OR = 13.7, 95% CI 2.97-63), and over the reference threshold value 5.9 pg/mL (p = 0.0009, OR = 25.8, 95% CI 2.8-239) as well as presence of other autoimmune diseases (p = 0.038, OR = 7.0, 95% CI 1.14-42.97) were negative prognostic factors of treatment success. In conclusion, acridone acetic acid, sodium salt, emerges as an efficient option for stopping vitiligo progression.

  1. Role of Visual Inspection of Cervix with Acetic Acid (VIA in Detecting Precancerous Lesions of Cervix

    Kamrun Nessa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carcinoma of cervix is the most common malignancy in female and a major public health problem worldwide. It is the leading cause of death from cancer among women in low resource settings. In Bangladesh, mortality rate is high as most of the cases with cervical cancer are diagnosed in advanced stage. World Health Organization considers cervical cancer as a preventable disease as it can be identified in preinvasive stage. Considerable efforts have been given in detection and treatment of the condition all over the world. A number of cervical cancer screening tests are available. Among them, visual inspection of cervix with acetic acid is rational and can be competently performed by physicians with proper training. Objective: To find out the feasibility of the visual inspection of cervix with acetic acid for the detection of the precancerous lesions of the cervix in our country. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional, analytical study was carried out among the patients attending the outpatient department of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU who were VIA positive and sent for colposcopy in the colposcopy clinic in the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology in BSMMU from June to December 2004. Two hundred samples were considered for this study. Results: Out of 200 cases, colposcopically 85% had CIN and invasive lesions, 4% had inflammatory lesions while 11% had normal findings. Colposcopy directed punch biopsy revealed positive lesions in 81%, 4% had inflammatory lesions while 15% had normal findings. Conclusion: The study concluded that VIA and colposcopy are the important methods in the evaluation of cervical premalignancy. VIA may be an important tool for screening of cervical cancer in low resource settings as it is simple, easy to perform and cost-effective. After screening, VIA positive cases must be referred for colposcopic evaluation. We can screen cervical cancer by VIA all over the country and thus reduce

  2. Silicone sealers, acetic acid vapours and dental erosion: a work-related risk?

    Johansson, Ann-Katrin; Johansson, Anders; Stan, Vlaicu; Ohlson, Carl-Göran

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the acetic acid released by some silicone sealers during the curing process poses an increased risk for dental erosion, thus constituting an occupational hazard to exposed individuals. The material comprised 13 individuals (x=30 years, 10 men and 3 women) who had been exposed to an average of 4.2 years' (range 0.6-10 years) of working with silicone. Each had comprehensive medical and dental examinations carried out. A sex- and aged-matched group of 20 healthy, unexposed workers from the same company served as controls for the medical examination, while study models from randomly selected sex- and age-matched individuals were used as controls for assessing the severity of erosion. Using a questionnaire, an assessment of the role of various possible factors related to oral and general health, and to dental erosion in particular, was made for each participant in the exposed group. Clinical examination included recordings of severity of dental erosion, presence of "cuppings", DMFT, salivary secretion rate and buffer capacity, visible plaque index and gingival bleeding index. In addition, bitewing radiographs, study casts and intraoral colour transparencies were obtained for each individual. The severity of dental erosion was significantly higher in those exposed to silicone compared to controls. There was also a significant correlation between the period of exposure to silicone in the workplace and severity of erosion. Medical problems, especially with regard to upper respiratory tract symptoms, were significantly more common among exposed individuals than controls. In conclusion, a relationship between occupational exposure to acetic acid vapours from silicone sealers and development of dental erosion would appear to exist.

  3. Variability of Acid-Base Status in Acetate-Free Biofiltration 84% versus Bicarbonate Dialysis

    Harzallah Kais

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of hemodialysis (HD treatment is to achieve the highest level of efficacy in the presence of maximal clinical tolerance. With an aim to offer good hemodynamic stability, as observed during the acetate-free biofiltration 14% (AFB 14% to patients who are intolerant to bicarbonate dialysis (BD and with less cost, we have developed since June 1994, a new HD technique, namely AFB 84%. This study was carried out to analyze acid-base variations during the AFB 84% in comparison to BD in hemodynamically stable patients on regular HD. This was a prospective randomized crossover study carried out on 12 patients (6 males and 6 females for a total of 144 HD sessions (72 BD and 72 AFB 84%. Patients with decompensated cardiomyopathy, respiratory diseases or uncontrolled hypertension were not included in the trial. All the patients were treated with BD or AFB 84%; the latter is characterized by the absence of acetate in the dialysate and a complete correction of buffer balance by post-dilutional infusion of bicarbonate-based replacement solution. The comparison of pre-dialysis arterial acid-base and blood-gas parameters revealed no significant differences of pH, HCO 3 - and paCO 2 levels between the two techniques. Analysis of post-dialysis parameters showed that, among patients dialyzed with BD, there was over correction of metabolic acidosis with a tendency towards metabolic alkalosis. In contrast, in patients dialyzed with AFB 84%, we observed a significant improvement in pH and HCO 3 - levels but the increase in paCO2 level was not significant. A comparison of these parameters between the two techniques showed statistically significant difference in pH, HCO3 - and paCO2 levels, but not for paO2 level. AFB 84% can offer some important advantages with the complete absence of acetate from the substitution fluids, and permits a better correction of metabolic acidosis than BD, without causing alkalosis.

  4. Bacterial dynamics and metabolite changes in solid-state acetic acid fermentation of Shanxi aged vinegar.

    Li, Sha; Li, Pan; Liu, Xiong; Luo, Lixin; Lin, Weifeng

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state acetic acid fermentation (AAF), a natural or semi-controlled fermentation process driven by reproducible microbial communities, is an important technique to produce traditional Chinese cereal vinegars. Highly complex microbial communities and metabolites are involved in traditional Chinese solid-state AAF, but the association between microbiota and metabolites during this process are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed amplicon 16S rRNA gene sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and metabolite analysis to trace the bacterial dynamics and metabolite changes under AAF process. A succession of bacterial assemblages was observed during the AAF process. Lactobacillales dominated all the stages. However, Acetobacter species in Rhodospirillales were considerably accelerated during AAF until the end of fermentation. Quantitative PCR results indicated that the biomass of total bacteria showed a "system microbe self-domestication" process in the first 3 days, and then peaked at the seventh day before gradually decreasing until the end of AAF. Moreover, a total of 88 metabolites, including 8 organic acids, 16 free amino acids, and 66 aroma compounds were detected during AAF. Principal component analysis and cluster analyses revealed the high correlation between the dynamics of bacterial community and metabolites.

  5. Direct conversion of corn cob to formic and acetic acids over nano oxide catalysts

    Liyuan; Cheng; Hong; Liu; Yuming; Cui; Nianhua; Xue; Weiping; Ding

    2014-01-01

    Considering energy shortage, large molecules in corn cob and easy separation of solid catalysts, nano oxides are used to transform corn cob into useful chemicals. Because of the microcrystals, nano oxides offer enough accessible sites for cellulose, hemicellulose and monosaccharide from corn cob hydrolysis and oxidant. Chemical conversion of corn cob to organic acids is investigated over nano ceria, alumina, titania and zirconia under various atmospheres. Liquid products are mainly formic and acetic acids. A small amount of other compounds, such as D-xylose,D-glucose, arabinose and xylitol are also detected simultaneously. The yield of organic acids reaches 25%–29% over the nano oxide of ceria,zirconia and alumina with 3 h reaction time under 453 K and 1.2 MPa O2. The unique and fast conversion of corn cob is directly approached over the nano oxides. The results are comparative to those of biofermentation and offer an alternative method in chemically catalytic conversion of corn cob to useful chemicals in a one-pot chemical process.

  6. [Enhanced phytoextraction of heavy metal contaminated soil by chelating agents and auxin indole-3-acetic acid].

    Zhou, Jian-min; Dang, Zhi; Chen, Neng-chang; Xu, Sheng-guang; Xie, Zhi-yi

    2007-09-01

    The environmental risk of chelating agents such as EDTA application to the heavy metals polluted soils and the stress on plant roots due to the abrupt increase metals concentration limit the wide commercial use of chelate-induced phytoextraction. Chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) were used for enhancing heavy metals uptake from soils by Zea mays L. (corn) in pot experiments. The metals content in plant tissues was quantified using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The results showed that the combination of IAA and EDTA increased the biomass by about 40.0% and the contents of Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in corn shoots by 27.0%, 26.8%, 27.5% and 32.8% respectively, as compared to those in EDTA treatment. While NTA&IAA treatment increased the biomass by about 29.9% and the contents of Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in corn shoots by 31.8%, 27.6%, 17.0% and 26.9% respectively, as compared to those in NTA treatment. These results indicated that corn growth was promoted, and the biomass and the accumulation of heavy metals in plant shoots were increased significantly with the addition of IAA, which probably helps to change the cell membrane properties and the biomass distribution, resulting in the alleviation of the phytotoxicity of metals and the chelating agents.

  7. Autophagy and cathepsin L are involved in the antinociceptive effect of DMBC in a mouse acetic acid-writhing model

    Wei-wei GU; Gui-zhen AO; Yong-ming ZHU; Shi-chang SUN; Qiang ZHOU; Jia-hong FAN; Katunuma NOBUHIKO

    2013-01-01

    Aim:2-(3',5'-Dimethoxybenzylidene) cyclopentanone (DMBC) is a novel synthetic compound with antinociceptive activities.The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of the autophagic-lysosomal pathway in the antinociceptive effect of DMBC in a mouse acetic acid-writhing model.Methods:Mouse acetic acid-writhing test and hotplate test were used to assess the antinociceptive effects of DMBC,3-MA (autophagy inhibitor) and Clik148 (cathepsin L inhibitor).The drugs were administered peripherally (ip) or centrally (icv).Results:Peripheral administration of 3-MA (7.5-30 mg/kg) or Clik148 (10-80 mg/kg) produced potent antinociceptive effect in acetic acid-writhing test.Central administration of 3-MA or Clik148 (12.5-50 nmol/L) produced comparable antinociceptive effect in acetic acid-writhing test.Peripheral administration of DMBC (25-50 mg/kg) produced potent antinociceptive effects in both acetic acidwrithing and hotplate tests.Furthermore,the antinociceptive effect produced by peripheral administration of DMBC (50 mg/kg) in acetic acid-writhing test was antagonized by low doses of 3-MA (3.75 mg/kg) or Clik148 (20 mg/kg) peripherally administered,but was not affected by 3-MA or Clik148 (25 nmol/L) centrally administered.Conclusion:Activation of central autophagy and cathepsin L is involved in nociception in mice,whereas peripheral autophagy and cathepsin L contributes,at least in part,to the antinociceptive effect of DMBC in mice.

  8. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp) residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe) as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA), which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds) occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism. PMID:25588215

  9. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    Ohgi Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA, which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism.

  10. PHOTOINDUCED GRAFTING OF ACRYLIC AND ALLYL MONOMERS ON POLYETHYLENE SURFACE

    ZHANG Zhenfeng; HU Xingzhou; YAN Qing

    1995-01-01

    Photoinduced grafting of acrylic and allyl monomers on polyethylene surface was generally studied by using benzophenone (BP) as a photoinitiator. The grafting process was carried out either in vapor-phase or in solution of the monomers. In the vapor-phase reaction with a filter used to cut off the short wavelength UV light, allyl amine is the most reactive of the four monomers used and acrylic amide is comparatively more reactive than acrylic acid and allyl alcohol. Acetone, as a solvent and carrier for initiator and monomers, however, shows its reactivity to participate the reaction. The solution grafting with a filter is much faster than the corresponding vapor-phase reaction, and a fully covered surface by the grafted polymer can be achieved in this way.

  11. Effectiveness of Alkaline Pretreatment and Acetic Acid Hydrolysis on the Characteristics of Collagen from Fish Skin of Snakehead

    Wulandari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fish skin is one of marine byproducts potential for alternative source of collagen. This study investigated the effectiveness of alkaline and acetic acid pretreatment on the characteristics of collagen from skin snakehead fish. The concentrations of alkaline pretreatment were 0.05; 0.1; 0.15 and 0.2 M for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 hours, acetic acid concentrations were 0.05 M, 0.1 M, 0.15 M and 0.2 M for 1 and 2 hours. The experimental design used for alkaline and acetic acid pretreatment was factorial completely randomized design. The result showed that the concentration of alkaline 0.05 M for 6 hours have significant effect on the elimination of non-collagen protein (p<0.05, whereas for the optimum acetic acid at a concentration 0.1 M for 2 hours significantly different on solubility and swelling. Extraction yields of collagen was 16%, with characteristics of whiteness 66.67%, protein content 96.21%, viscosity 10 cP, Tmax 159.9oC and glass transition temperature 78.55oC. The dominant amino acid composition were glycine (27.11%, proline (13.87% and alanine (12.58%. Functional groups collagen from skin snakehead fish has β-sheet structure which is a characteristic of collagen.

  12. Effectiveness of Alkaline Pretreatment and Acetic Acid Hydrolysis on the Characteristics of Collagen from Fish Skin of Snakehead

    Wulandari Wulandari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fish skin is one of marine byproducts potential for alternative source of collagen. This studyinvestigated the effectiveness of alkaline and acetic acid pretreatment on the characteristics ofcollagen from skin snakehead fish. The concentrations of alkaline pretreatment were 0.05; 0.1; 0.15and 0.2 M for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 hours, acetic acid concentrations were 0.05 M, 0.1 M, 0.15 M and0.2 M for 1 and 2 hours. The experimental design used for alkaline and acetic acid pretreatmentwas factorial completely randomized design. The result showed that the concentration of alkaline0.05 M for 6 hours have significant effect on the elimination of non-collagen protein (p<0.05,whereas for the optimum acetic acid at a concentration 0.1 M for 2 hours significantly differenton solubility and swelling. Extraction yields of collagen was 16%, with characteristics of whiteness66.67%, protein content 96.21%, viscosity 10 cP, Tmax 159.9oC and glass transition temperature78.55oC. The dominant amino acid composition were glycine (27.11%, proline (13.87% andalanine (12.58%. Functional groups collagen from skin snakehead fish has β-sheet structurewhich is a characteristic of collagen.

  13. Preparation of l-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dodecatungstophosphate and its. catalytic performance for esterification of ethanol and acetic acid

    Jiehua SHI; Gao PAN

    2009-01-01

    l-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium dodecatungstophosphate catalyst ([bmim]3PW12040) with high water tolerance was prepared from l-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([bmim]Br) and phosphotungstic acid (H3PW12O40). The catalyst was characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravi-metry-differential scanning calorimetry, n-BuNH2 poten-tiometric titration, elemental analysis and so on. Its catalytic activity for esterification of ethanol and acetic acid to ethyl acetate was measured. The results show that there were three crystal-water molecules in the [bmim]3PW12040 catalyst, and it preserved the primary Keggin structure and acid strength of H3PW12O40. The acid amount of [bmim]3PW12O40 catalyst was less than that of H3PW12O40. The [bmim]3PW12O40 catalyst exhibited higher catalytic activity and reusability in the esterification of ethanol and acetic acid to ethyl acetate.

  14. Gluconacetobacter medellinensis sp. nov., cellulose- and non-cellulose-producing acetic acid bacteria isolated from vinegar.

    Castro, Cristina; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Trcek, Janja; Zuluaga, Robin; De Vos, Paul; Caro, Gloria; Aguirre, Ricardo; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Gañán, Piedad

    2013-03-01

    The phylogenetic position of a cellulose-producing acetic acid bacterium, strain ID13488, isolated from commercially available Colombian homemade fruit vinegar, was investigated. Analyses using nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequences, nearly complete 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences, as well as concatenated partial sequences of the housekeeping genes dnaK, groEL and rpoB, allocated the micro-organism to the genus Gluconacetobacter, and more precisely to the Gluconacetobacter xylinus group. Moreover, the data suggested that the micro-organism belongs to a novel species in this genus, together with LMG 1693(T), a non-cellulose-producing strain isolated from vinegar by Kondo and previously classified as a strain of Gluconacetobacter xylinus. DNA-DNA hybridizations confirmed this finding, revealing a DNA-DNA relatedness value of 81 % between strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T), and values <70 % between strain LMG 1693(T) and the type strains of the closest phylogenetic neighbours. Additionally, the classification of strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T) into a single novel species was supported by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and (GTG)5-PCR DNA fingerprinting data, as well as by phenotypic data. Strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T) could be differentiated from closely related species of the genus Gluconacetobacter by their ability to produce 2- and 5-keto-d-gluconic acid from d-glucose, their ability to produce acid from sucrose, but not from 1-propanol, and their ability to grow on 3 % ethanol in the absence of acetic acid and on ethanol, d-ribose, d-xylose, sucrose, sorbitol, d-mannitol and d-gluconate as carbon sources. The DNA G+C content of strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T) was 58.0 and 60.7 mol%, respectively. The major ubiquinone of LMG 1693(T) was Q-10. Taken together these data indicate that strains ID13488 and LMG 1693(T) represent a novel species of the genus Gluconacetobacter for which the name Gluconacetobacter

  15. THE STUDY OF HENNA LEAVES EXTRACT AS GREEN CORROSION INHIBITOR FOR MILD STEEL IN ACETIC ACID.

    H. G. Chaudhari

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitive action of henna leaves extract on mild steel in acetic acid solution have been investigated by weight-loss, A C impedence and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The study indicates that as acid concentration increases corrosion rate increases. The corrosion inhibition efficiency increases with increase in concentration of extract. The result obtained revealed that henna leaves extract act as efficient inhibitor. The adsorption of the henna leaves extract obeyed Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous, exothermic process accompanied by an increase in entropy. Cathodic and anodic polarization curves show that henna leaves extract is a mixed-type inhibitor. Normal 0 false false false EN-IN X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}   ABSTRACT:    The inhibitive action of henna leaves extract on mild steel in acetic acid solution have been investigated by weight-loss, A C impedence and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The study indicates that as acid concentration increases corrosion rate increases. The corrosion inhibition efficiency increases with increase in concentration of extract. The result obtained revealed that henna leaves extract act as efficient inhibitor. The adsorption of the henna leaves

  16. Anaerobic conversion of lactic acid to acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol by Lactobacillus buchneri

    Elferink, SJWHO; Krooneman, J; Gottschal, JC; Spoelstra, SF; Faber, F; Driehuis, F

    2001-01-01

    The degradation of lactic acid under anoxic conditions was studied in several strains of Lactobacillus buchneri and in close relatives such as Lactobacillus parabuchneri, Lactobacillus kefir, and Lactobacillus hilgardii. Of these lactobacilli, L. buchneri and L. parabuchneri were able to degrade lac

  17. Determination of critical conditions for the esterification of acetic acid with ethanol in the presence of carbon dioxide

    G. M. Platt

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the calculation of critical coordinates for the esterification of acetic acid with ethanol in compressed carbon dioxide. Determination of the critical pressure for this system is useful, since the conversion of this reaction increases with pressure in the two-phase region, reaching a maximum at the critical point. We used a calculation framework based on a coordinate transformation for molar fractions, producing a new compositional domain. For a system with five components (acetic acid + ethanol + ethyl acetate + water + carbon dioxide and one equilibrium reaction, the compositional domain is entirely described by three independent transformed coordinates. The results obtained were compared with experimental observations presented in the literature. The results illustrate the capability of the framework used to determine critical coordinates for reactive systems, and thus its usefulness as a tool for pressure tuning for this esterification reaction in compressed carbon dioxide.

  18. An atom-economic approach to carboxylic acids via Pd-catalyzed direct addition of formic acid to olefins with acetic anhydride as a co-catalyst.

    Wang, Yang; Ren, Wenlong; Shi, Yian

    2015-08-21

    An effective Pd-catalyzed hydrocarboxylation of olefins using formic acid with acetic anhydride as a co-catalyst is described. A variety of carboxylic acids are obtained in good yields with high regioselectivities under mild reaction conditions without the use of toxic CO gas.

  19. Allylation of Aromatic Aldehyde under Microwave Irradiation

    ZHANG,Yu-Mei; JIA,Xue-Feng; WANG,Jin-Xian

    2004-01-01

    @@ Allylation of carbonyl compounds is one of the most interesting processes for the preparation of homoallylic alcohols. Over the past few decades, many reagents have been developed for such reactions[1~3]. In this paper, we first report allylic zinc reagent 1, which can be prepared from zinc dust and allyl bromide conveniently in THF, and reacted with aromatic aldehyde to give homo-allylic alcohols under microwave irradiation.

  20. Mass Transfer and Chemical Reaction Approach of the Kinetics of the Acetylation of Gadung Flour using Glacial Acetic Acid

    Andri Cahyo Kumoro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylation is one of the common methods of modifying starch properties by introducing acetil (CH3CO groups to starch molecules at low temperatures. While most acetylation is conducted using starch as anhidroglucose source and acetic anhydride or vinyl acetate as nucleophilic agents, this work employ reactants, namely flour and glacial acetic acid. The purpose of this work are to study the effect of pH reaction and GAA/GF mass ratio on the rate of acetylation reaction and to determine its rate constants. The acetylation of gadung flour with glacial acetic acid in the presence of sodium hydroxide as a homogenous catalyst was studied at ambient temperature with pH ranging from 8-10 and different mass ratio of acetic acid : gadung flour (1:3; 1:4; and 1:5. It was found that increasing pH, lead to increase the degree of substitution, while increasing GAA/GF mass ratio caused such decreases in the degree of substitution, due to the hydrolysis of the acetylated starch. The desired starch acetylation reaction is accompanied by undesirable hydrolysis reaction of the acetylated starch after 40-50 minutes reaction time. Investigation of kinetics of the reaction observed that the value of mass transfer rate constant (Kcs is smaller than the surface reaction rate constant (k. Thus, it can be concluded that rate controlling step is mass transfer.  © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 7th August 2014; Revised: 8th September 2014; Accepted: 14th September 2014How to Cite: Kumoro, A.C., Amelia, R. (2015. Mass Transfer and Chemical Reaction Approach of the Kinetics of the Acetylation of Gadung Flour using Glacial Acetic Acid. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (1: 30-37. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7181.30-37Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.1.7181.30-37

  1. Influence of phenolic acids on indole acetic acid production and on the type III secretion system gene transcription in food-associated Pseudomonas fluorescens KM05.

    Myszka, Kamila; Schmidt, Marcin T; Olejnik-Schmidt, Agnieszka K; Leja, Katarzyna; Czaczyk, Katarzyna

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of these investigations was to evaluate the reduction capability of phenolic acids (ferulic, chlorogenic, gallic, and p-coumaric acids) on indole acetic acid synthesis by food-associated Pseudomonas fluorescens KM05. Specific genetic primer for the type III secretion system (TTSS) in P. fluorescens KM05 was designed and the influence of phenolic acids on its expression was investigated. In the work the ferulic and chlorogenic acids at the concentration of 0.02 and 0.04 μg/ml affected on bacterial growth pattern and the signal molecules production. The phenolic acids, that were appreciable effective against P. fluorescens KM05 indole acetic acid production, significantly suppressed TTSS gene.

  2. High-yield production of acetic acid by mixed fermentation with yeast and acetic acid bacteria%酵母菌醋酸菌混菌发酵高产醋酸工艺研究

    覃莉; 王志; 陈雄; 雷锦成

    2012-01-01

    The mixed fermentation conditions of yeast and acetic acid bacteria were optimized by single factor tests for high yield of acetic acid using glucose as the substrate. The optimum conditions were as followed: pH value 5.5, seed age of acetic acid bacteria 48h, inoculation interval Oh, acetic acid inoculum 6%, yeast inoculum 0.15%, medium volume 50ml/250ml, fermentation temperature 30℃ and initial reducing sugar content 18%. Under these conditions, acetic acid production reached 10.09g/100ml and the glucose conversion rate reached 90%.%以葡萄糖为底物,利用酵母菌和醋酸菌混合发酵生产醋酸,通过单因素试验筛选了最佳醋酸生产工艺条件.试验结果表明:pH值为5.5,醋酸菌种龄48h,接种间隔0h,醋酸菌接种量6%,酵母菌接种量0.15%,装液量50mL/250mL,发酵温度30℃,初始还原糖含量18%为最优工艺条件,在此工艺条件下醋酸的产量可达到10.09g/100mL,糖转化率达到90%.

  3. Palladium-catalyzed amination of allyl alcohols.

    Ghosh, Raju; Sarkar, Amitabha

    2011-10-21

    An efficient catalytic amination of aryl-substituted allylic alcohols has been developed. The complex [(η(3)-allyl)PdCl](2) modified by a bis phosphine ligand, L, has been used as catalyst in the reaction that afforded a wide range of allyl amines in good to excellent yield under mild conditions.

  4. Startup of anaerobic fluidized bed reactors with acetic acid as the substrate.

    Hsu, Y; Shieh, W K

    1993-02-05

    The startup of anaerobic fluidized bed reactors, which use Manville R-633 beads as the growth support media, acetate enriched bacterial culture as the inoculum, and acetic acid as the sole substrate, is studied. Tow startup strategies are evaluated: one based on maximum and stable substrate utilization and another based on maximum substrate loading controlled by reactor pH. The startup process is characterized using a number of operational parameters.The reactors again excellent total organic carbon (TOC) removal (i.e., > 97% at a feed concentration of 5000 mg TOC/L) and stable methane production (i.e., 0.90 L CH(4)/g TOC, where TOC(r) is TOC removed) at a early stage of the startup process, regardless of the strategies applied. The loading can be increased rapidly without the danger of being overloaded. Significant losses of growth support media and biomass caused by gas effervescence at higher loadings limits the maximum loading that can be safely applied during startup process.A high reactor immobilized biomass inventory is achievable using the porous growth support media (e.g., Manville 633 beads). A rapid increase in loading creates a substrate rich environment that yields more viable reactor biomass. Both substrate utilization rate (batch and continuous) and immobilized biomass inventory stabilize concomitantly at the late stage of the startup process, indicating the attainment of steady-state conditions in reactors. Therefore, they are better parameters that TOC removal and methane production for characterizing the entire startup process of aerobic fluidized bed reactor.The strategy based on maximum substrate loading controlled by reactor pH significantly shortens the startup time. In this case, the reactor attains steady-state conditions approximately 140 days after startup. On the other hand, a startup time of 200 days is required when the strategy based maximum substrate utilization is adopted.

  5. Hyaluronic acid embedded cellulose acetate phthlate core/shell nanoparticulate carrier of 5-fluorouracil.

    Garg, Ashish; Rai, Gopal; Lodhi, Santram; Jain, Alok Pal; Yadav, Awesh K

    2016-06-01

    Aim of this research was to prepare hyaluronic acid-modified-cellulose acetate phthalate (HAC) core shell nanoparticles (NPs) of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). HAC copolymer was synthesized and confirmed by fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. HAC NPs with 5-FU were prepared using HAC copolymer and compared with 5-FU loaded cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) NPs. NPs were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, entrapment efficiency, in-vitro release, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). HAC NPs were found slower release (97.30% in 48h) than (99.25% in 8h) CAP NPs. In cytotoxicity studies, showed great cytotoxic potential of 5-FU loaded HAC NPs in A549, MDA-MD-435 and SK-OV-3 cancer cellline. HAC NPs showing least hemolytic than CAP NPs and 5-FU. Area under curve (AUC), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), mean residence time (MRT) and time to reach maximum plasma concentration Tmax), were observed 4398.1±7.90μgh/mL, 145.45±2.25μg/L, 45.74±0.25h, 72±0.50h, respectively of HAC NPs and 119.92±1.78μgh/mL, 46.38±3.42μg/L, 1.2±0.25h, 0.5±0.02h were observed in plain 5-FU solution. In conclusion, HAC NPs is effective deliver carrier of 5-FU for lung cancer.

  6. Improvement of acetic acid tolerance and fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by disruption of the FPS1 aquaglyceroporin gene.

    Zhang, Jun-Guo; Liu, Xiu-Ying; He, Xiu-Ping; Guo, Xue-Na; Lu, Ying; Zhang, Bo-Run

    2011-02-01

    The FPS1 gene coding for the Fps1p aquaglyceroporin protein of an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was disrupted by inserting CUP1 gene. Wild-type strain, CE25, could only grow on YPD medium containing less than 0.45% (v/v) acetic acid, while recombinant strain T12 with FPS1 disruption could grow on YPD medium with 0.6% (v/v) acetic acid. Under 0.4% (v/v) acetic acid stress (pH 4.26), ethanol production and cell growth rates of T12 were 1.7 ± 0.1 and 0.061 ± 0.003 g/l h, while those of CE25 were 1.2 ± 0.1 and 0.048 ± 0.003 g/l h, respectively. FPS1 gene disruption in an industrial ethanologenic yeast thus increases cell growth and ethanol yield under acetic acid stress, which suggests the potential utility of FPS1 gene disruption for bioethanol production from renewable resources such as lignocelluloses.

  7. The random co-polymer glatiramer acetate rapidly kills primary human leukocytes through sialic-acid-dependent cell membrane damage

    Christiansen, Stig Hill; Zhang, Xianwei; Juul-Madsen, Kristian;

    2017-01-01

    The formulation glatiramer acetate (GA) is widely used in therapy of multiple sclerosis. GA consists of random copolymers of four amino acids, in ratios that produce a predominantly positive charge and an amphipathic character. With the extraordinary complexity of the drug, several pharmacological...

  8. 2-Aryl(pyrrolidin-4-yl)acetic acids are potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors.

    Yan, Lin; Budhu, Richard; Huo, Pei; Lynch, Christopher L; Hale, Jeffrey J; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2006-07-01

    A series of 2-aryl(pyrrolidin-4-yl)acetic acids were synthesized and their biological activities were evaluated as agonists of S1P receptors. These analogs were able to induce lowering of lymphocyte counts in the peripheral blood of mice and were found to have good overall pharmacokinetic properties in rat.

  9. ETHANOL, ACETIC ACID, AND WATER ADSORPTION FROM BINARY AND TERNARY LIQUID MIXTURES ON HIGH-SILICA ZEOLITES

    Adsorption isotherms were measured for ethanol, acetic acid, and water adsorbed on high-silica ZSM-5 zeolite powder from binary and ternary liquid mixtures at room temperature. Ethanol and water adsorption on two high-silica ZSM-5 zeolites with different aluminum contents and a h...

  10. Ru decorated carbon nanotubes - a promising catalyst for reforming bio-based acetic acid in the aqueous phase

    Vlieger, de D.J.M.; Lefferts, L.; Seshan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic reforming of biomass derived waste streams in the aqueous phase is a promising process for the production of sustainable hydrogen. Acetic acid will be a major component (up to 20 wt%) in many anticipated gasification feed streams (e.g. the aqueous fraction of pyrolysis oil). Conventional s

  11. Optimization of acetic acid production from synthesis gas by chemolithotrophic bacterium--Clostridium aceticum using statistical approach.

    Sim, Jia Huey; Kamaruddin, Azlina Harun

    2008-05-01

    Efforts in optimizing reducing agents, cysteine-HCl.H2O and sodium sulfide in order to attain satisfactory responses during acetic acid fermentation have been carried out in this study. Cysteine-HCl.H2O each with five concentrations (0.00-0.50 g/L) was optimized one at a time and followed by sodium sulfide component (0.00-0.50 g/L). Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to determine the optimum concentrations of cysteine-HCl.H2O and sodium sulfide. The statistical analysis showed that the amount of cells produced and efficiency in CO conversion were not affected by sodium sulfide concentration. However, sodium sulfide is required as it does influence the acetic acid production. The optimum reducing agents for acetic acid fermentation was at 0.30 g/L cysteine-HCl.H2O and sodium sulfide respectively and when operated for 60 h cultivation time resulted in 1.28 g/L acetic acid production and 100% CO conversion.

  12. Liquid phase esterification of acetic acid over WO3 promoted β-SiC in a solvent free system.

    Mishra, Gopa; Behera, Gobinda C; Singh, S K; Parida, K M

    2012-12-21

    A series of tungstate promoted β-SiC catalysts was synthesized by a wetness impregnation method. The as synthesized catalysts were unambiguously characterized by XRD, Raman, FTIR, XPS, UV-Vis DRS, TEM, BET surface areas and FE-SEM, and simultaneously the total amount of the acidity of the catalysts was estimated by NH(3)-TPD. The catalytic activities of the synthesized materials were tested in the liquid phase esterification of acetic acid with n-butanol in a solvent free medium. The reaction parameters were optimized to a temperature of 120 °C, molar ratio of butanol and acetic acid of 1:2 and a reaction time of 6 h after performing a number of experiments. Under the optimum conditions, the catalytic esterification revealed a significant effect of 88% conversion with 100% selectivity to butyl acetate in 20 wt% WO(3)/β-SiC. This is the first report on the effective utilization of β-SiC as a catalyst support for liquid phase esterification of acetic acid.

  13. Zinc, magnesium, and calcium ion supplementation confers tolerance to acetic acid stress in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizing xylose.

    Ismail, Ku Syahidah Ku; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential substrate for ethanol production. However, pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials produces inhibitory compounds such as acetic acid, which negatively affect ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Supplementation of the medium with three metal ions (Zn(2+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) ) increased the tolerance of S. cerevisiae toward acetic acid compared to the absence of the ions. Ethanol production from xylose was most improved (by 34%) when the medium was supplemented with 2 mM Ca(2+) , followed by supplementation with 3.5 mM Mg(2+) (29% improvement), and 180 μM Zn(2+) (26% improvement). Higher ethanol production was linked to high cell viability in the presence of metal ions. Comparative transcriptomics between the supplemented cultures and the control suggested that improved cell viability resulted from the induction of genes controlling the cell wall and membrane. Only one gene, FIT2, was found to be up-regulated in common between the three metal ions. Also up-regulation of HXT1 and TKL1 might enhance xylose consumption in the presence of acetic acid. Thus, the addition of ionic nutrients is a simple and cost-effective method to improve the acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae.

  14. Importance of the surrounding colonic mucosa in distinguishing between hyperplastic and adenomatous polyps during acetic acid chromoendoscopy

    Jeong Hwan Kim; Sun-Young Lee; Byung Kook Kim; Won Hyeok Choe; So Young Kwon; In-Kyung Sung; Hyung-Seok Park; Choon-Jo Jin

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To examine the characteristics of colonic polyps, where it is difficult to distinguish adenomatous polyps from hyperplastic polyps, with the aid of acetic acid chromoendoscopy.METHODS: Acetic acid spray was applied to colonic polyps smaller than 10 mm before complete excision. Endoscopic images were taken before and 15-30 s after the acetic acid spray. Both pre- and post-sprayed images were shown to 16 examiners, who were asked to interpret the lesions as either hyperplastic or adenomatous polyps. Regression analysis was performed to determine which factors were most likely related to diagnostic accuracy.RESULTS: In 50 cases tested by the 16 examiners, the overall accuracy was 62.4% (499/800). Regression analysis demonstrated that surrounding colonic mucosa was the only factor that was significantly related to accuracy in discriminating adenomatous from hyperplastic polyps (P < 0.001). Accuracy was higher for polyps with linear surrounding colonic mucosa than for those with nodular surrounding colonic mucosa (P < 0.001), but was not related to the shape, location, or size of the polyp.CONCLUSION: The accuracy of predicting histology is significantly related to the pattern of colonic mucosa surrounding the polyp. Making a histological diagnosis of colon polyps merely by acetic acid spray is helpful for colon polyps with linear, regularly patterned surrounding colonic mucosa, and less so for those with nodular, irregularly patterned surrounding colonic mucosa.

  15. Identification and characterization of thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria strains isolated from coconut water vinegar in Sri Lanka.

    Perumpuli, P A B N; Watanabe, Taisuke; Toyama, Hirohide

    2014-01-01

    From the pellicle formed on top of brewing coconut water vinegar in Sri Lanka, three Acetobacter strains (SL13E-2, SL13E-3, and SL13E-4) that grow at 42 °C and four Gluconobacter strains (SL13-5, SL13-6, SL13-7, and SL13-8) grow at 37 °C were identified as Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii, respectively. Acetic acid production by the isolated Acetobacter strains was examined. All three strains gave 4% acetic acid from 6% initial ethanol at 37 °C, and 2.5% acetic acid from 4% initial ethanol at 40 °C. Compared with the two other strains, SL13E-4 showed both slower growth and slower acetic acid production. As well as the thermotolerant SKU1108 strain, the activities of the alcohol dehydrogenase and the aldehyde dehydrogenase of SL13E-2 and SL13E-4 were more stable than those of the mesophilic strain. The isolated strains were used to produce coconut water vinegar at higher temperatures than typically used for vinegar production.

  16. Synthesis of the [beta]-D-glucosyl ester of [carbonyl-[sup 13]C]-indole-3-acetic acid

    Jakas, A.; Magnus, V. (Rudjer Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia)); Horvat, S.; Sandberg, G. (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1993-10-01

    An efficient, operationally simple synthetic approach to 1-O-([carbonyl-[sup 13]C]-indole-3'-ylacetyl)-[beta]-D-glucopyranose is described. The synthesis was carried out by fusing a fully benzylated 1-O-glucosylpseudourea intermediate with [carbonyl-[sup 13]C]-indole-3-acetic acid, followed by hydrogenolytic removal of the protective groups. (Author).

  17. Integrated phospholipidomics and transcriptomics analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced tolerance to a mixture of acetic acid, furfural, and phenol

    A mixture of acetic acid, furfural and phenol (AFP), three representative lignocellulose derived inhibitors, significantly inhibited the growth and bioethanol production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to uncover mechanisms behind the enhanced tolerance of an inhibitor-tolerant S.cerevisiae s...

  18. Analysis of Bacterial Diversity During Acetic Acid Fermentation of Tianjin Duliu Aged Vinegar by 454 Pyrosequencing.

    Peng, Qian; Yang, Yanping; Guo, Yanyun; Han, Ye

    2015-08-01

    The vinegar pei harbors complex bacterial communities. Prior studies revealing the bacterial diversity involved were mainly conducted by culture-dependent methods and PCR-DGGE. In this study, 454 pyrosequencing was used to investigate the bacterial communities in vinegar pei during the acetic acid fermentation (AAF) of Tianjin Duliu aged vinegar (TDAV). The results showed that there were 7 phyla and 24 families existing in the vinegar pei, with 2 phyla (Firmicutes, Protebacteria) and 4 families (Lactobacillaceae, Acetobacteracae, Enterobacteriaceae, Chloroplast) predominating. The genus-level identification revealed that 9 genera were the relatively stable, consistent components in different stages of AAF, including the most abundant genus Lactobacillus followed by Acetobacter and Serratia. Additionally, the bacterial community in the early fermentation stage was more complex than those in the later stages, indicating that the accumulation of organic acids provided an appropriate environment to filter unwanted bacteria and to accelerate the growth of required ones. This study provided basic information of bacterial patterns in vinegar pei and relevant changes during AAF of TDAV, and could be used as references in the following study on the implementation of starter culture as well as the improvement of AAF process.

  19. Adaptive mutation of Acetobacter pasteurianus SKU1108 enhances acetic acid fermentation ability at high temperature.

    Matsutani, Minenosuke; Nishikura, Mitsuteru; Saichana, Natsaran; Hatano, Tomoyuki; Masud-Tippayasak, Uraiwan; Theergool, Gunjana; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2013-05-20

    In vitro adaptation is one of the most challenging subjects in biology to understand adaptive evolution. Microbial adaptation to temperature is not only interesting in terms of understanding the adaptation mechanism, but also useful for industrial applications. In this study, we attempted the in vitro adaptation of Acetobacter pasteurianus SKU1108 by repeating its cultivation under high-temperature acetic acid fermentation conditions. As a result, thermo-adapted strains having the higher fermentation ability than the wild-type strain were obtained. Mutations and/or disruptions in several proteins of the adapted strains were detected with NGS sequencing technology. In particular, two different adapted strains had mutations or disruptions in three specific genes in common, suggesting that these genes are essential for thermotolerance or fermentation at higher temperature. In order to clarify their involvement in thermotolerance, two of the three genes were disrupted and their phenotype was examined. The results showed that mutations of the two proteins, MarR and an amino acid transporter, are partly responsible for higher fermentation ability and/or thermotolerance. Thus, it was suggested that these elevated abilities of the adapted strains are acquired by assembling several single gene mutations including the above two mutations.

  20. GROWTH, YIELD AND POSTHARVEST QUALITY OF WAX APPLE AS AFFECTED BY NAPHTHALENE ACETIC ACID APPLICATION

    MOHAMMAD MONERUZZAMAN KHANDAKER

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Results of this study represent the first report of the effect of Naphthalene Acetic Acid (NAA on the pre and post harvest quality of wax apple fruit. The wax apple trees were spray treated with 0, 5, 10 and 20 mg L-1 NAA under field conditions during 2008 to 2011. The experiments were carried out in Completely Randomized Design (CRD with six replications. Leaf chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthetic yield, net photosynthetic rate, drymatter content of leaves and total soluble solids and K+content of wax apple fruits were significantly increased after treatments with 10 mg L-1. Polygalacturonase activity significantly decreased with NAA treatments. The application of 5 mg L-1 NAA increased 27% more bud and reduced 42% less fruit drop compared to the control. In addition, higher protein and phosphate synthase activity of leaves, fruit set, fruit growth, larger fruit size and yield were recorded in NAA treated plants. In storage, treated fruits exhibited higher TSS and firmness and less weight loss, browning, titratable acidity, respiration and ethylene production than the control. It is concluded that spraying with 5 and 10 mg L-1 NAA once a week under field conditions produced better fruit growth and yield of the wax apple and maintained better fruit quality in postharvest storage.

  1. The effects of roxatidine acetate (HOE-760) on 24-hour intragastric acidity in healthy volunteers: comparison with ranitidine and placebo.

    Merki, H S; Witzel, L; Kaufmann, D; Kempf, M; Müssig, V; Neumann, J; Scheurle, E; Röhmel, J; Walt, R P

    1988-02-01

    In a series of double-blind randomized studies in normal volunteers using continuous intragastric pH monitoring, the effects of different dosage regimens of roxatidine, a new H2-receptor antagonist, were compared with placebo and ranitidine. Roxatidine acetate, 75 mg twice daily, decreased median 24 h gastric acidity from pH 1.6 to 3.2 and median nocturnal acidity from 1.5 to 3.0. Roxatidine acetate, 150 mg at bedtime, raised median 24 pH of the same 17 subjects to 2.4 and nocturnal pH to 5.9. In another series of experiments, 150 mg roxatidine acetate at bedtime was as effective as ranitidine 300 mg nocte raising median nocturnal pH (14 volunteers) from 1.4 to 6.65 compared to 6.7, respectively. However, when drugs were taken after the evening meal (post cenam nocte, pcn) roxatidine acetate 150 mg was less potent than ranitidine 300 mg with median night-time pH rising from 1.3 to 3.2 and 4.0, respectively, in 28 volunteers. Roxatidine acetate 300 mg pcn raised the pH to 4.9 suggesting that roxatidine is 1-2 times as potent as ranitidine, on a milligram-for-milligram basis.

  2. Synthesis and in vitro antimicrobial activity of novel 2-(3-oxo-1,3-diarylpropylthio)acetic acid derivatives.

    Gezegen, Hayreddin; Karaman, Isa; Ceylan, Mustafa; Dilmaç, Merve

    2012-01-01

    A series of novel 2-(3-oxo-1,3-diarylpropylthio)acetic acid derivatives (3a-l) were prepared by base catalyzed addition of thioglycolic acid to chalcones (1a-l). The antibacterial activities of synthesized compounds were screened against human pathogenic microorganisms by employing the disk-diffusion technique. For the active compounds, also minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined.

  3. 乳清发酵法制备乙酸%Preparation of Acetic Acid from Cheese Whey by Fermentation

    吕海棠; 韩爱霞; 王兆谦; 任彦蓉; 王海鹏; 郗怡佳; 黄靖; 李春花

    2011-01-01

    [目的]研究一种新的两步厌氧发酵法用于从乳清制备乙酸.[方法]以乳清为原料,通过两步发酵法制备出乙酸.在第1步发酵过程中用植物乳杆菌(1.215 8)将乳清中的乳糖发酵成乳酸,在第2步发酵过程中用丙酸杆菌(1.2130)将乳酸发酵成乙酸与丙酸,二者用气相色谱法进行分离,并进行定性与定量分析.[结果]在发酵的第1步过程中,乳酸的转化率达到47.47%;在发酵的第2步过程中用气相色谱仪成功地将乙酸与丙酸进行了分离,分离的乙酸转化率达到5.643%;乙酸浓度在1-8mg/ml范围内时,乙酸进样量与色谱峰面积呈良好的线性关系,方程的相关系数R =0.999 4,回收率为102.7%.[结论]利用该方法从乳清制备乙酸,不仅能合理开发利用乳清,而且还能降低乙酸生产成本,具有良好的开发前景.%[Objective] The object was to study a new two step anaerobic fermentation method for preparing the acetic acid from the cheese whey. [ Method] With the cheese whey as the raw material, the acetic acid was prepared out by the two step fermentation method. In the first step of fermentation process, the lactose in the cheese whey was fermented into the lactic acid by using the plant lactobacillus (1.2158) ; in the second step of fermentation process, the lactic acid were fermented into the acetic acid and propionic acid by using the propionic acid coli (1.2130), both of them were separated by the gas chromatography, and they were made for the qualitative and quantitative analysis. [Result] In the first step of fermentation process, the conversion rates of lactic acid was 47.47%. In the second step of fermentation process, the acetic acid and propionic acid were separated by the gas chromatography successfully, the conversion rates of the separated lactic acid reached 5.643%. When the acetic acid was 1 -8 mg/ml, there was a good linear relationship between the sampling volume of the acetic acid and the

  4. Root-uptake of {sup 14}C derived from acetic acid and {sup 14}C transfer to rice edible parts

    Ogiyama, Shinichi [Office of Biospheric Assessment for Waste Disposal, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: ogiyama@nirs.go.jp; Suzuki, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-5522 (Japan); Inubushi, Kazuyuki [Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, 648 Matsudo, Matsudo-shi 271-8510 (Japan); Takeda, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shigeo [Office of Biospheric Assessment for Waste Disposal, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Three types of culture experiments using paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.) were performed to examine root-uptake of {sup 14}C in the form of acetic acid: double pot experiment (hydroponics), wet culture experiment (submerged sand medium), and chamber experiment (hydroponics and submerged sand medium). The {sup 14}C radioactivity in the plant, mediums, and atmospheric carbon dioxide ({sup 14}CO{sub 2}) in the chamber were determined, and the distribution of {sup 14}C in the plant was visualized using autoradiography. In the double pot experiment, the shoot of the plant and the lower root which was soaked in the culture solution had {sup 14}C radioactivity, but the upper root which did not have contact with the solution had none. There were also {sup 14}C radioactivity in the grains and roots in the wet culture experiment. Results of the chamber experiment showed that {sup 14}CO{sub 2} gas was released from the culture solution in both types of cultures. Results indicated that the {sup 14}C-acetic acid absorbed by rice plant through its root would be very small. Most of the {sup 14}C-acetic acid was transformed into gaseous forms either in the culture solution or rhizosphere. A relatively longer time would be needed to assimilate {sup 14}C derived from acetic acid to grain parts after it was once absorbed by the shoot through the root. Availability of {sup 14}C for the plant in sand culture was considered to be decreased compared with that for the plant in the hydroponics experiment. It was suggested that rice plant absorbed and assimilated {sup 14}C through the plant roots not because of uptake of {sup 14}C-acetic acid but because of uptake of {sup 14}C in gaseous forms such as {sup 14}CO{sub 2}.

  5. Cartilage and bone malformations in the head of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos following exposure to disulfiram and acetic acid hydrazide

    Strecker, Ruben, E-mail: Ruben.Strecker@cos.uni-heidelberg.de [Aquatic Ecology and Toxicology Section, Center for Organismal Studies, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 230, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Weigt, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.weigt@merckgroup.com [Institute of Toxicology, Merck KGaA, 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Braunbeck, Thomas, E-mail: braunbeck@uni-hd.de [Aquatic Ecology and Toxicology Section, Center for Organismal Studies, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 230, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    In order to investigate teratogenic effects, especially on cartilage and bone formation, zebrafish embryos were exposed for 144 h to the dithiocarbamate pesticide disulfiram (20–320 μg/L) and acetic acid hydrazide (0.375–12 g/L), a degradation product of isoniazid. After fixation and full-mount staining, disulfiram could be shown to induce strong cartilage malformations after exposure to ≥ 80 μg/L, whereas acetic acid hydrazide caused cartilage alterations only from 1.5 g/L. Undulating notochords occurred after exposure to disulfiram even at the lowest test concentration of 20 μg/L, whereas at the two lowest concentrations of acetic acid hydrazide (0.375 and 0.75 g/L) mainly fractures of the notochord were observed. Concentrations of acetic acid hydrazide ≥ 1.5 g/L resulted in undulated notochords similar to disulfiram. Cartilages and ossifications of the cranium, including the cleithrum, were individually analyzed assessing the severity of malformation and the degree of ossification in a semi-quantitative approach. Cartilages of the neurocranium such as the ethmoid plate proved to be more stable than cartilages of the pharyngeal skeleton such as Meckel's cartilage. Hence, ossification proved significantly more susceptible than cartilage. The alterations induced in the notochord as well as in the cranium might well be of ecological relevance, since notochord malformation is likely to result in impaired swimming and cranial malformation might compromise regular food uptake. - Highlights: ► Disulfiram and acetic acid hydrazide as notochord, cartilage and bone teratogens ► Zebrafish embryos to model effects on single cartilages and bones in the head ► LC50 calculation and head length measurements after six days post-fertilization ► Lethality, head length and teratogenic effects are dose-dependent. ► Cartilages of the neurocranium are the most stable elements in the head.

  6. The influence of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic-acid-induced colitis in rats.

    Maduzia, D; Matuszyk, A; Ceranowicz, D; Warzecha, Z; Ceranowicz, P; Fyderek, K; Galazka, K; Dembinski, A

    2015-12-01

    Ghrelin has been primarily shown to exhibit protective and therapeutic effect in the gut. Pretreatment with ghrelin inhibits the development of acute pancreatitis and accelerates pancreatic recovery in the course of this disease. In the stomach, ghrelin reduces gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol, stress or alendronate, as well as accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric and duodenal ulcer. The aim of present studies was to investigate the effect of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic acid-induced colitis. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Animals were treated intraperitoneally with saline (control) or ghrelin (4, 8 or 16 nmol/kg/dose). Saline or ghrelin was given twice: 8 and 1 h before induction of colitis. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 1 ml of 4% solution of acetic acid and the severity of colitis was assessed 1 or 24 hours after induction of inflammation. Rectal administration of acetic acid induced colitis in all animals. Damage of colonic wall was seen at the macroscopic and microscopic level. This effect was accompanied by a reduction in colonic blood flow and mucosal DNA synthesis. Moreover, induction of colitis significantly increased mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β), activity of myeloperoxidase and concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA). Mucosal activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was reduced. Pretreatment with ghrelin reduced the area and grade of mucosal damage. This effect was accompanied by an improvement of blood flow, DNA synthesis and SOD activity in colonic mucosa. Moreover, ghrelin administration reduced mucosal concentration of IL-1β and MDA, as well as decreased mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Administration of ghrelin protects the large bowel against the development of the acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect seems to be related to the ghrelin-evoked anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

  7. Protective effect of the methanolic extract of malva parviflora l. leaves on acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats

    Aisha Dugani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a general term describing chronic, idiopathic relapsing, inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology. Previous studies have indicated that Malva parviflora leaf extract possesses anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiulcerogenic activity. activity. This work aimed to investigatee the anti-inflammatory effect of the methanolic (MEMP and aqueous (AEMP extracts of M. parviflora leaves on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods: 42 male Wistar albino rats were divided into seven groups (n = 6. Group I: Normal saline control group with no colitis; Group II: Acetic acid colitis group; Group III: 100 mg/kg/5 d MEMP; Group IV: 200 mg/kg/5 d.MEMP; Group V: 100 mg/kg/5 d AEMP; Group VI: 200 mg/kg/5 d AEMP; Group VII: Prednisolone group (2 mg/kg/5 d. Treatments were followed by induction of colitis using intrarectal instillation of 2 mL of 4% acetic acid. Colon damage was evaluated macroscopically (spleen weight/body weight, colon weight/length ratio and the histological changes were also recorded. Results: The results of this study showed that acetic acid caused severe inflammation of the colon and a significant increase in spleen weight/body weight, and an increase in colon weight/length ratio compared with normal control group. Pretreatment with MEMP and AEMP for 5 days followed by induction of colitis resulted in a significant attenuation of spleen weight and colon weight/length ratio compared with acetic acid control group. Methanolic extract provided better anticolitic effect than aqueous extract; the effect was prominent at the dose of 200 mg/kg. Histopathological findings confirmed the protective effect of the MEMP. Conclusion: In conclusion, MEMP could ameliorate mucosal damage in experimentally induced colitis when given orally.

  8. Characterization of a recombinant flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that co-ferments glucose and xylose: II. influence of pH and acetic acid on ethanol production.

    Matsushika, Akinori; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2012-12-01

    The inhibitory effects of pH and acetic acid on the co-fermentation of glucose and xylose in complex medium by recombinant flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae MA-R4 were evaluated. In the absence of acetic acid, the fermentation performance of strain MA-R4 was similar between pH 4.0-6.0, but was negatively affected at pH 2.5. The addition of acetic acid to batch cultures resulted in negligible inhibition of several fermentation parameters at pH 6.0, whereas the interactive inhibition of pH and acetic acid on the maximum cell and ethanol concentrations, and rates of sugar consumption and ethanol production were observed at pH levels below 5.4. The inhibitory effect of acetic acid was particularly marked for the consumption rate of xylose, as compared with that of glucose. With increasing initial acetic acid concentration, the ethanol yield slightly increased at pH 5.4 and 6.0, but decreased at pH values lower than 4.7. Notably, ethanol production was nearly completely inhibited under low pH (4.0) and high acetic acid (150-200 mM) conditions. Together, these results indicate that the inhibitory effects of acetic acid and pH on ethanol fermentation by MA-R4 are highly synergistic, although the inhibition can be reduced by increasing the medium pH.

  9. Influence of acetic acid on the growth of Escherichia coli K12 during high-cell-density cultivation in a dialysis reactor.

    Nakano, K; Rischke, M; Sato, S; Märkl, H

    1997-11-01

    High-cell-density cultivations of Escherichia coli K12 in a dialysis reactor with controlled levels of dissolved oxygen were carried out with different carbon sources: glucose and glycerol. Extremely high cell concentrations of 190 g/l and 180 g/l dry cell weight were obtained in glucose medium and in glycerol medium respectively. Different behaviour was observed in the formation of acetic acid in these cultivations. In glucose medium, acetic acid was formed during the earlier phase of cultivation. However, in glycerol medium, acetic acid formation started later and was particularly rapid at the end of the cultivation. In order to estimate the influence of acetic acid during these high-cell-density cultivations, the inhibitory effect of acetic acid on cell growth was investigated under different culture conditions. It was found that the inhibition of cell growth by acetic acid in the fermentor was much less than that in a shaker culture. On the basis of the results obtained in these investigations of the inhibitory effect of acetic acid, and the mathematical predictions of cell growth in a dialysis reactor, the influence of acetic acid on high-cell-density cultivation is discussed.

  10. The Carbon Isotopic Content and Concentration of Ambient Formic and Acetic Acid

    Johnson, Bryan Jay

    A direct method for source determination of atmospheric formic and acetic acid, through carbon isotopic analysis of the ambient acids and their potential sources, has been successfully developed and tested. These first carbon isotopic measurements of formic acid in the atmosphere were found to be fairly constant, regardless of location. This is consistent with a single dominating source of formic acid, with vegetation emissions being the most likely controlling source. Collection of relatively large quantities (0.3 -3.0 mg) of the organic acids, which was necessary for carbon isotopic measurements, was effectively accomplished by a new method using calcium hydroxide-treated filters with a high-volume sampler. Samples were collected on a regular basis at Mount Lemmon, Arizona (elevation = 9200 feet A.S.L.). Atmospheric concentrations showed a well-defined seasonal pattern, with the lowest concentrations (about 0.2 ppbv) occurring in the middle of the winter, which steadily increased to a maximum of nearly 2 ppbv in the summer. The ^{13}C content (delta ^{13}C) of HCOOH averaged -20.9 +/- 2.5 ^0/_{00 } during the growing season (April-September) and -23.2 +/- 3.5 ^0/_{00} during the non-growing season at Mount Lemmon. Isotopic measurements of formic acid from several other locations included two west coast marine sites ( delta ^{13} C range of -19.1 to -24.6 ^0/_{00} ), three Colorado Rocky Mountain samples averaging -23.2 +/- 1.0 ^0/_{00}, two from the prairie of North Dakota (-23.5 +/- 1.0 ^0/ _{00}) and three samples collected in the urban Tucson, Arizona area (- 20.8 +/- 3.4 ^0 /_{00}). Source measurements included HCOOH emissions from two species of formicine ants (-18.8 +/- 1.7 ^0/_ {00}), and HCOOH in automobile exhaust (-28 ^0/ _{00} from leaded gasoline, and -48.6 ^0/ _{00} from unleaded). Further support for a biogenic source of atmospheric HCOOH came from the carbon-14 analysis of six Mount Lemmon HCOOH samples (93-113% modern carbon), using accelerator

  11. Evaluation of sanitizing efficacy of acetic acid on Piper betle leaves and its effect on antioxidant properties.

    Singla, Richu; Ganguli, Abhijit; Ghosh, Moushumi; Sohal, Sapna

    2009-01-01

    The sanitizing efficacy of acetic acid and its effect on health beneficial properties of Piper betle leaves were determined. Betel leaves artificially inoculated with Aeromonas, Salmonella and Yersinia were subjected to organic acid (citric acid, acetic acid and lactic acid) treatment. Pathogen populations reduced by 4 log upon individual inoculation and up to 2 log in a mixed cocktail following treatment with 2% acetic acid during storage up to 20 h at 28 degrees C, indicating a residual antimicrobial effect on pathogen during storage. Antioxidant potential ethanolic extracts of both raw and treated P. betle leaves were assayed for free radical scavenging activities against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl. Polyphenols, flavonoids and the reducing power of treated and untreated P. betle were also compared. No significant (P>0.05) changes were observed in antioxidant status; flavonoids, polyphenols and reducing power of treated betel leaves. Results indicate the feasibility of a simple intervention strategy for inactivating pathogens in edible leaves of P. betle.

  12. Identification of new flavone-8-acetic acid metabolites using mouse microsomes and comparison with human microsomes.

    Pham, Minh Hien; Auzeil, Nicolas; Regazzetti, Anne; Dauzonne, Daniel; Dugay, Annabelle; Menet, Marie-Claude; Scherman, Daniel; Chabot, Guy G

    2007-11-01

    Flavone-8-acetic acid (FAA) is a potent anticancer agent in mouse but has not shown activity in humans. Because FAA metabolism could play a role in this interspecies difference, our aim was to identify the metabolites formed in vitro using mouse microsomes compared with those in human microsomes. Mouse microsomes produced six metabolites as detected by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS). Three metabolites were identified as the 3'-, 4'-, or 6-hydroxy-FAA, by comparison with retention times and UV and MS spectra of standards. Two metabolites presented a molecular weight of 296 (FAA = 280) indicating the presence of one oxygen but did not correspond to any monohydroxylated FAA derivative. These two metabolites were identified as epoxides because they were sensitive to epoxide hydrolase. The position of the oxygen was determined by the formation of the corresponding phenols under soft acidic conditions: one epoxide yielded the 3'- and 4'-hydroxy-FAA, thus corresponding to the 3',4'-epoxy-FAA, whereas the other epoxide yielded 5- and 6-hydroxy-FAA, thus identifying the 5,6-epoxy-FAA. The last metabolite was assigned to the 3',4'-dihydrodiol-FAA because of its molecular weight (314) and sulfuric acid dehydration that indicated that the 3'- and 4'-positions were involved. Compared with mouse microsomes, human microsomes (2 pools and 15 individual microsomes) were unable to metabolize FAA to a significant extent. In conclusion, we have identified six new FAA metabolites formed by mouse microsomes, whereas human microsomes could not metabolize this flavonoid to a significant extent. The biological importance of the new metabolites identified herein remains to be evaluated.

  13. Acetalization of Carbonyl Compounds as Pentaerythritol Diacetals and Diketals in the Presence of Cellulose Sulfuric Acid as an Efficient, Biodegradable and Reusable Catalyst

    Shaterian, Hamid Reza; Rigi, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a practical and green method for the acetalization of carbonyl compounds as pentaerythritol diacetals and diketals derivatives using cellulose sulfuric acid as a biodegradable and reusable solid acid catalyst under thermal solvent-free conditions.

  14. Acetic acid increases the phage-encoded enterotoxin A expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    da Silva Ayla

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of acetic acid, a common food preservative, on the bacteriophage-encoded enterotoxin A (SEA expression and production in Staphylococcus aureus was investigated in pH-controlled batch cultures carried out at pH 7.0, 6.5, 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5. Also, genomic analysis of S. aureus strains carrying sea was performed to map differences within the gene and in the temperate phage carrying sea. Results The sea expression profile was similar from pH 7.0 to 5.5, with the relative expression peaking in the transition between exponential and stationary growth phase and falling during stationary phase. The levels of sea mRNA were below the detection limit at pH 5.0 and 4.5, confirmed by very low SEA levels at these pH values. The level of relative sea expression at pH 6.0 and 5.5 were nine and four times higher, respectively, in the transitional phase than in the exponential growth phase, compared to pH 7.0 and pH 6.5, where only a slight increase in relative expression in the transitional phase was observed. Furthermore, the increase in sea expression levels at pH 6.0 and 5.5 were observed to be linked to increased intracellular sea gene copy numbers and extracellular sea-containing phage copy numbers. The extracellular SEA levels increased over time, with highest levels produced at pH 6.0 in the four growth phases investigated. Using mitomycin C, it was verified that SEA was at least partially produced as a consequence of prophage induction of the sea-phage in the three S. aureus strains tested. Finally, genetic analysis of six S. aureus strains carrying the sea gene showed specific sea phage-groups and two versions of the sea gene that may explain the different sea expression and production levels observed in this study. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the increased sea expression in S. aureus caused by acetic acid induced the sea-encoding prophage, linking SEA production to the lifecycle of the phage.

  15. Cervical cancer risk factors and feasibility of visual inspection with acetic acid screening in Sudan

    Ibrahim A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed Ibrahim1, Vibeke Rasch2, Eero Pukkala3, Arja R Aro11Unit for Health Promotion Research, University of Southern Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; 3Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki, FinlandObjectives: To assess the risk factors of cervical cancer and the feasibility and acceptability of a visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA screening method in a primary health center in Khartoum, Sudan.Methods: A cross-sectional prospective pilot study of 100 asymptomatic women living in Khartoum State in Sudan was carried out from December 2008 to January 2009. The study was performed at the screening center in Khartoum. Six nurses and two physicians were trained by a gynecologic oncologist. The patients underwent a complete gynecological examination and filled in a questionnaire on risk factors and feasibility and acceptability. They were screened for cervical cancer by application of 3%–5% VIA. Women with a positive test were referred for colposcopy and treatment.Results: Sixteen percent of screened women were tested positive. Statistically significant associations were observed between being positive with VIA test and the following variables: uterine cervix laceration (odds ratio [OR] 18.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.64–74.8, assisted vaginal delivery (OR 13.2; 95% CI: 2.95–54.9, parity (OR 5.78; 95% CI: 1.41–23.7, female genital mutilation (OR 4.78; 95% CI: 1.13–20.1, and episiotomy (OR 5.25; 95% CI: 1.15–23.8. All these associations remained statistically significant after adjusting for age, educational level, employment, and potential confounding factors such as smoking, number of sexual partners, and use of contraceptive method. Furthermore, the VIA screening method was found to be feasible and acceptable to participants.Conclusion: This pilot study showed that women who have uterine

  16. Ab initio study on the mechanism of rhodium-complexcatalyzed carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid

    LEI; Ming

    2001-01-01

    [1]Thomas, R., Cundari, T. R., Computational studies of transition metal-main group multiple bonding, Chem. Rev., 2000,100: 807.[2]Maricel Torrent, Miquel Sola, Gernot Frenking, Theoretical studies of some transition-metal-mediated reactions of industrial and synthetic importance, Chem. Rev., 2000, 100: 439.[3]Paulik, F. E., Roth, J. F., Catalysts for the low-pressure carbonylation of menthanol to acetic acid, Chem. Commun., 1968,24: 1578.[4]Jiang Hua, Diao Kaisheng, Pan Pinglai et al., A new class of rhodium complexes containing free donor atoms and their intramolecular substitution reaction, Chin. J. Chem., 2000, 18: 752.[5]Jiang Dazhi, Li Xiaobao, Wang Enlai, Synthesis Chemistry ofCarbonylation, Beijing: Chemical Technology Press, 1996.[6]Adamson, G. W., Daly, J. J., Forster, D., Reduction of iolocarbonyl rhodium ions with methyl iodide, structure of the rho-dium acetyl complex: [Me3PhN+], [Rh2I6-(Me(O)2(CO)2)]2-, J. Organomet. Chem., 1974, 71: C 17.[7]Forster, D., On the mechanism of a rhodium-complex-catalyzed carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid, J. Am. Chem.Soc., 1976, 98: 846.[8]Hjortkjaer, J., Jensen, O. R., Rhodium complexes catalyzed methanol carbonylation, Ind. Eng. Chem. Prod. Dev., 1976, 15:46.[9]Jeffrey, P., Wadt, W. R., Ab initio effective core potentials for molecular calculations, Potentials for the transition metalatoms Sc to Hg, J. Chem. Phys., 1995, 82: 270.[10]Frisch, M. J., Trunks, G. W., Schlegel, H. B. et al., Gaussian 94, Pittsburgh PA: Gaussian, Inc., 1995.[11]Lei Ming, Feng Wenlin, Xu Zhenfeng et al., A theoretical study on the key reactions of hydroformylation cycle by modi-fied carbonyl cobalt, Chemical Journal of Chinese University, 2001, 22: 455.[12]Lei Ming, Feng Wenlin, Xu Zhenfeng, Ab initio MO study on the reaction mechanism for carbonyl insertion catalyzed by the carbonyl cobalt complex, Chemical Research in Chinese University, 2000, 19:31.

  17. On the predictive capabilities of CPA for applications in the chemical industry: Mulficomponent mixtures containing methyl-methacrylate, dimethyl-ether or acetic acid

    Tsivintzelis, Ioannis; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    with acetic acid, esters, ethers and alcohols, and in this case for water-acetic acid the CPA-Huron Vidal (CPA-HV) version of the model is used. For the latter binary mixture, new CPA-HV binary parameter sets are estimated using, among others, data for activity coefficients at infinite dilutions. The modeling...... for the acetic acid-water system for which different parameter sets at different temperatures can be recommended. Even with the use of CPA-HV mixing rules, modeling of the acetic acid-water system with few interaction parameters remains a challenging task. Excellent simultaneous VLE and LLE correlation...... is obtained for complex systems such as aqueous mixtures with ethers and esters. The multicomponent results are, with a few exceptions, very satisfactory, especially for the vapor-liquid equilibrium cases. For the demanding aqueous acetic acid-water containing systems, one parameter set is recommended...

  18. Development of an acetic acid tolerant Spathaspora passalidarum strain through evolutionary engineering with resistance to inhibitors compounds of autohydrolysate of Eucalyptus globulus

    Morales, Paulina; Gentina, Juan Carlos; Aroca, German;

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionary engineering strategy based on mutagenesis by UV irradiation and subsequent selectionby continuous cultivation at increasing concentrations of acetic acid in synthetic medium with glucoseand xylose mixtures was used to develop an evolved strain of the yeast Spathaspora passalidarum...... withimproved resistance to acetic acid. After 380 generations, the yeast was able to produce 5.8 g/L ethanolin the presence of 3.5 g/L acetic acid in synthetic medium with mixture of 15 g L−1glucose and 15 g L−1xylose. To demonstrate the improved resistance to acetic acid of the evolved strain compared...... to the nativestrain, growth kinetics and bioethanol production of both strains in batch cultures under microaerobiccondition were performed. The evolved strain reached an ethanol volumetric productivity of 0.23 g/L hand ethanol yield of 0.48 g/g in the presence of 4.5 g/L acetic acid. These results were 7-fold and 2...

  19. Microscopic diagnosis of sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin-fixed stool samples for helminths and intestinal protozoa: a comparison among European reference laboratories.

    Utzinger, J; Botero-Kleiven, S; Castelli, F; Chiodini, P L; Edwards, H; Köhler, N; Gulletta, M; Lebbad, M; Manser, M; Matthys, B; N'Goran, E K; Tannich, E; Vounatsou, P; Marti, H

    2010-03-01

    The present study aimed to compare the diagnostic performance of different European reference laboratories in diagnosing helminths and intestinal protozoa, using an ether-concentration method applied to sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin (SAF)-preserved faecal samples. In total, 102 stool specimens were analysed during a cross-sectional parasitological survey in urban farming communities in Côte d'Ivoire. Five SAF-preserved faecal samples were prepared from each specimen and forwarded to the participating reference laboratories, processed and examined under a microscope adhering to a standard operating procedure (SOP). Schistosoma mansoni (cumulative prevalence: 51.0%) and hookworm (cumulative prevalence: 39.2%) were the predominant helminths. There was excellent agreement (kappa > 0.8; p protozoa were Entamoeba coli (median prevalence: 67.6%), Blastocystis hominis (median prevalence: 55.9%) and Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (median prevalence: 47.1%). Substantial agreement among reference laboratories was found for E. coli (kappa = 0.69), but only fair or moderate agreement was found for other Entamoeba species, Giardia intestinalis and Chilomastix mesnili. There was only poor agreement for B. hominis, Isospora belli and Trichomonas intestinalis. In conclusion, although common helminths were reliably diagnosed by European reference laboratories, there was only moderate agreement between centres for pathogenic intestinal protozoa. Continued external quality assessment and the establishment of a formal network of reference laboratories is necessary to further enhance both accuracy and uniformity in parasite diagnosis.

  20. Distinct Characteristics of Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Phenylacetic Acid, Two Common Auxins in Plants

    Sugawara, Satoko; Mashiguchi, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Keita; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Sakai, Tatsuya; Hanada, Kousuke; Kinoshita-Tsujimura, Kaori; Yu, Hong; Dai, Xinhua; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Takeda-Kamiya, Noriko; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Natsume, Masahiro; Estelle, Mark; Zhao, Yunde; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Kamiya, Yuji; Kasahara, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin plays a central role in many aspects of plant growth and development. IAA is the most studied natural auxin that possesses the property of polar transport in plants. Phenylacetic acid (PAA) has also been recognized as a natural auxin for >40 years, but its role in plant growth and development remains unclear. In this study, we show that IAA and PAA have overlapping regulatory roles but distinct transport characteristics as auxins in plants. PAA is widely distributed in vascular and non-vascular plants. Although the biological activities of PAA are lower than those of IAA, the endogenous levels of PAA are much higher than those of IAA in various plant tissues in Arabidopsis. PAA and IAA can regulate the same set of auxin-responsive genes through the TIR1/AFB pathway in Arabidopsis. IAA actively forms concentration gradients in maize coleoptiles in response to gravitropic stimulation, whereas PAA does not, indicating that PAA is not actively transported in a polar manner. The induction of the YUCCA (YUC) genes increases PAA metabolite levels in Arabidopsis, indicating that YUC flavin-containing monooxygenases may play a role in PAA biosynthesis. Our results provide new insights into the regulation of plant growth and development by different types of auxins. PMID:26076971

  1. Effect of Gibberellic Acid, Kinetin and Indole 3-Acetic Acid on Seed Germination Performance of Dianthus caryophyllus (Carnation

    Rajib Roychowdhury

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was undertaken with an objective to investigate the effect of various concentrations of plant growth regulators, i.e., Gibberellic acid (GA3, Kinetin and Indole 3-acetic acid (IAA on seed germination of Dianthus caryophyllus. Dianthus seeds were soaked in different concentrations (0 ppm or control, 10 ppm, 20 ppm, 30 ppm and 40 ppm of each of GA3, Kinetin and IAA for 24 h at room temperature (25±2oC. Three replicates of each treatment with ten seeds per replicate were arranged for precise physiological analysis. Significant variation was found in all aspects after analysis of variance (ANOVA of each mean value. After two weeks of seed soaking, it was noted that germination percentages were significantly accelerated by lower concentrations (10 and 20 ppm of used hormones. Amongst the three potential growth regulators, 20 ppm was found most effective because it showed highest germination percentage for GA3 (87.46%, Kinetin (78.92% and IAA (75.35%. A great deal of information relating to seed germination practices shows that these plant growth regulators were efficient in overcoming dormancy leading to rapid seed germination. GA3 was selected as best hormone in this study, which showed highest seed germination (87.46%. These results could be useful in large scale cultivation of Dianthus caryophyllus plants to improve its floricultural impact worldwide.

  2. Effect of Gibberellic Acid, Kinetin and Indole 3-Acetic Acid on Seed Germination Performance of Dianthus caryophyllus (Carnation

    Rajib Roychowdhury

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was undertaken with an objective to investigate the effect of various concentrations of plant growth regulators, i.e., Gibberellic acid (GA3, Kinetin and Indole 3-acetic acid (IAA on seed germination of Dianthus caryophyllus. Dianthus seeds were soaked in different concentrations (0 ppm or control, 10 ppm, 20 ppm, 30 ppm and 40 ppm of each of GA3, Kinetin and IAA for 24 h at room temperature (25±2oC. Three replicates of each treatment with ten seeds per replicate were arranged for precise physiological analysis. Significant variation was found in all aspects after analysis of variance (ANOVA of each mean value. After two weeks of seed soaking, it was noted that germination percentages were significantly accelerated by lower concentrations (10 and 20 ppm of used hormones. Amongst the three potential growth regulators, 20 ppm was found most effective because it showed highest germination percentage for GA3 (87.46%, Kinetin (78.92% and IAA (75.35%. A great deal of information relating to seed germination practices shows that these plant growth regulators were efficient in overcoming dormancy leading to rapid seed germination. GA3 was selected as best hormone in this study, which showed highest seed germination (87.46%. These results could be useful in large scale cultivation of Dianthus caryophyllus plants to improve its floricultural impact worldwide.

  3. Studies on the growth and indole-3-acetic acid and abscisic acid content of Zea mays seedlings grown in microgravity

    Schulze, A.; Jensen, P. J.; Desrosiers, M.; Buta, J. G.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements were made of the fresh weight, dry weight, dry weight-fresh weight ratio, free and conjugated indole-3-acetic acid, and free and conjugated abscisic acid in seedlings of Zea mays grown in darkness in microgravity and on earth. Imbibition of the dry kernels was 17 h prior to launch. Growth was for 5 d at ambient orbiter temperature and at a chronic accelerational force of the order of 3 x 10(-5) times earth gravity. Weights and hormone content of the microgravity seedlings were, with minor exceptions, not statistically different from seedlings grown in normal gravity. The tissues of the shuttle-grown plants appeared normal and the seedlings differed only in the lack of orientation of roots and shoots. These findings, based upon 5 d of growth in microgravity, cannot be extrapolated to growth in microgravity for weeks, months, and years, as might occur on a space station. Nonetheless, it is encouraging, for prospects of bioregeneration of the atmosphere and food production in a space station, that no pronounced differences in the parameters measured were apparent during the 5 d of plant seedling growth in microgravity.

  4. Design, preparation and characterization of novel poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid-hyaluronic acid implants containing triptorelin acetate

    Nersi Jafary Omid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormones and their derivatives are widely used to treat different types of diseases such as prostate cancer which is treated by agonists of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. Triptoreline salts are the first therapeutics of this group launched into the market in the form of microparticles (microspheres. Implants, as one of attractive injectable dosage forms, have many advantages over multi-particulate systems. Some of these advantages are dose adjustability, drug absorption improvement, constant release profile, etc. In this research, a new composite of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid and hyaluronic acid was designed and prepared in the form of implants containing triptorelin acetate for administration as an injection under the skin (subcutaneously in arm or thigh area. The manufactured implants characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermas gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy to assess different aspects of structure and morphology. The drug release profile was assessed by high performance liquid chromatography. These characterizations confirmed that the newly designed drug delivery has a good stability during manufacturing process. The release pattern of the implant was also studied and revealed that the release of the model drug follows a zero-order and erosion mechanism. The compatibility between the components of the newly designed implants and the release profile of the delivery system make it a promising device for drug delivery.

  5. Citric acid and ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid as effective washing agents to treat sewage sludge for agricultural reuse.

    Ren, Xianghao; Yan, Rui; Wang, Hong-Cheng; Kou, Ying-Ying; Chae, Kyu-Jung; Kim, In S; Park, Yong-Jin; Wang, Ai-Jie

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the effects of different concentrations of citric acid (CA) and ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) when used as additive reagents for the treatment of sewage sludge for agricultural use. Herein, both the retention of nutrients and removal of metals from the sewage sludge are examined. The average removal rate for the metals after treatment by CA decreased in the order Cu>Pb>Cd>Cr>Zn, while the rates after treatment by EDTA decreased in the order of Pb>Cu>Cr>Cd>Zn. After treatment with CA and EDTA, total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations in the sludge decreased, while the content of available nitrogen and Olsen-P increased. In addition, a multi-criteria analysis model-fuzzy analytic network process method (with 3 main factors and 12 assessment sub-factors) was adopted to evaluate the effectiveness of different treatment methods. The results showed that the optimal CA and EDTA concentrations for sewage sludge treatment were 0.60 and 0.125 mol/L, respectively.

  6. Transport of the two natural auxins, indole-3-butyric acid and indole-3-acetic acid, in Arabidopsis

    Rashotte, Aaron M.; Poupart, Julie; Waddell, Candace S.; Muday, Gloria K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Polar transport of the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is important in a number of plant developmental processes. However, few studies have investigated the polar transport of other endogenous auxins, such as indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), in Arabidopsis. This study details the similarities and differences between IBA and IAA transport in several tissues of Arabidopsis. In the inflorescence axis, no significant IBA movement was detected, whereas IAA is transported in a basipetal direction from the meristem tip. In young seedlings, both IBA and IAA were transported only in a basipetal direction in the hypocotyl. In roots, both auxins moved in two distinct polarities and in specific tissues. The kinetics of IBA and IAA transport appear similar, with transport rates of 8 to 10 mm per hour. In addition, IBA transport, like IAA transport, is saturable at high concentrations of auxin, suggesting that IBA transport is protein mediated. Interestingly, IAA efflux inhibitors and mutations in genes encoding putative IAA transport proteins reduce IAA transport but do not alter IBA movement, suggesting that different auxin transport protein complexes are likely to mediate IBA and IAA transport. Finally, the physiological effects of IBA and IAA on hypocotyl elongation under several light conditions were examined and analyzed in the context of the differences in IBA and IAA transport. Together, these results present a detailed picture of IBA transport and provide the basis for a better understanding of the transport of these two endogenous auxins.

  7. Coaxial electrospinning with acetic acid for preparing ferulic acid/zein composite fibers with improved drug release profiles.

    Yang, Jian-Mao; Zha, Liu-sheng; Yu, Deng-Guang; Liu, Jianyun

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated drug/zein composite fibers prepared using a modified coaxial electrospinning process. With unspinnable acetic acid as sheath liquid and an electrospinnable co-dissolving solution of zein and ferulic acid (FA) as core fluid, the modified coaxial process could run smoothly and continuously without any clogging. Compared with those from the single-fluid electrospinning process, the FA-loaded zein fibers from the modified process were rounder and possessed higher quality in terms of diameter and distribution, as verified by scanning electron microscopic observations of their surface and cross-section. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction showed that fibers from both processes similarly formed a composite with the FA present in the zein matrix in an amorphous state. The driving force of encapsulation of FA into zein fibers was hydrogen bonding, as evidenced by the attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra. However, in vitro dissolution tests demonstrated that the fibers from the coaxial process exhibited better sustained-release profiles with a smaller initial burst effect and less tailing-off release compared with those from the single process. The modified coaxial electrospinning process is a useful tool for generating nanofibers with higher quality and improved functional performance.

  8. Effect of Gibberellic Acid, Kinetin and Indole 3-Acetic Acid on Seed Germination Performance of Dianthus caryophyllus (Carnation

    Rajib Roychowdhury

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was undertaken with an objective to investigate the effect of various concentrations of plant growth regulators, i.e., Gibberellic acid (GA3, Kinetin and Indole 3-acetic acid (IAA on seed germination of Dianthus caryophyllus. Dianthus seeds were soaked in different concentrations (0 ppm or control, 10 ppm, 20 ppm, 30 ppm and 40 ppm of each of GA3, Kinetin and IAA for 24 h at room temperature (25±2oC. Three replicates of each treatment with ten seeds per replicate were arranged for precise physiological analysis. Significant variation was found in all aspects after analysis of variance (ANOVA of each mean value. After two weeks of seed soaking, it was noted that germination percentages were significantly accelerated by lower concentrations (10 and 20 ppm of used hormones. Amongst the three potential growth regulators, 20 ppm was found most effective because it showed highest germination percentage for GA3 (87.46%, Kinetin (78.92% and IAA (75.35%. A great deal of information relating to seed germination practices shows that these plant growth regulators were efficient in overcoming dormancy leading to rapid seed germination. GA3 was selected as best hormone in this study, which showed highest seed germination (87.46%. These results could be useful in large scale cultivation of Dianthus caryophyllus plants to improve its floricultural impact worldwide.

  9. Iridium-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution

    Hartwig, John F.; Pouy, Mark J.

    Iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution has become a valuable method to prepare products from the addition of nucleophiles at the more substituted carbon of an allyl unit. The most active and selective catalysts contain a phosphoramidite ligand possessing at least one arylethyl substituent on the nitrogen atom of the ligand. In these systems, the active catalyst is generated by a base-induced cyclometalation at the methyl group of this substituent to generate an iridium metalacycle bound by the COD ligand of the [Ir(COD)Cl]2 precursor and one additional labile dative ligand. Such complexes catalyze the reactions of linear allylic esters with alkylamines, arylamines, phenols, alcohols, imides, carbamates, ammonia, enolates and enolate equivalents, as well as typical stabilized carbon nucleophiles generated from malonates and cyanoesters. Iridium catalysts for enantioselective allylic substitution have also been generated from phosphorus ligands with substituents bound by heteroatoms, and an account of the studies of such systems, along with a description of the development of iridium catalysts is included.

  10. Production of Bio-gasoline by Co-cracking of Acetic Acid in Bio-oil and Ethanol

    王树荣; 王誉蓉; 蔡勤杰; 郭祚刚

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid was selected as the model compound representing the carboxylic acids present in bio-oil. This work focuses the co-cracking of acetic acid with ethanol for bio-gasoline production. The influences of reac-tion temperature and pressure on the conversion of reactants as well as the selectivity and composition of the crude gasoline phase were investigated. It was found that increasing reaction temperature benefited the conversion of re-actants and pressurized cracking produced a higher crude gasoline yield. At 400 °C and 1 MPa, the conversion of the reactants reached over 99%and the selectivity of the gasoline phase reached 42.79%(by mass). The gasoline phase shows outstanding quality, with a hydrocarbon content of 100%.

  11. PEP3 overexpression shortens lag phase but does not alter growth rate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to acetic acid stress.

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Bradford, C Samuel; Cooley, Ben; Yoshinaga, Allen S; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Abeliovich, Hagai; Penner, Michael H; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2015-10-01

    In fungi, two recognized mechanisms contribute to pH homeostasis: the plasma membrane proton-pumping ATPase that exports excess protons and the vacuolar proton-pumping ATPase (V-ATPase) that mediates vacuolar proton uptake. Here, we report that overexpression of PEP3 which encodes a component of the HOPS and CORVET complexes involved in vacuolar biogenesis, shortened lag phase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to acetic acid stress. By confocal microscopy, PEP3-overexpressing cells stained with the vacuolar membrane-specific dye, FM4-64 had more fragmented vacuoles than the wild-type control. The stained overexpression mutant was also found to exhibit about 3.6-fold more FM4-64 fluorescence than the wild-type control as determined by flow cytometry. While the vacuolar pH of the wild-type strain grown in the presence of 80 mM acetic acid was significantly higher than in the absence of added acid, no significant difference was observed in vacuolar pH of the overexpression strain grown either in the presence or absence of 80 mM acetic acid. Based on an indirect growth assay, the PEP3-overexpression strain exhibited higher V-ATPase activity. We hypothesize that PEP3 overexpression provides protection from acid stress by increasing vacuolar surface area and V-ATPase activity and, hence, proton-sequestering capacity.

  12. Validation of a multi-analyte HPLC-DAD method for determination of uric acid, creatinine, homovanillic acid, niacinamide, hippuric acid, indole-3-acetic acid and 2-methylhippuric acid in human urine.

    Remane, Daniela; Grunwald, Soeren; Hoeke, Henrike; Mueller, Andrea; Roeder, Stefan; von Bergen, Martin; Wissenbach, Dirk K

    2015-08-15

    During the last decades exposure sciences and epidemiological studies attracts more attention to unravel the mechanisms for the development of chronic diseases. According to this an existing HPLC-DAD method for determination of creatinine in urine samples was expended for seven analytes and validated. Creatinine, uric acid, homovanillic acid, niacinamide, hippuric acid, indole-3-acetic acid, and 2-methylhippuric acid were separated by gradient elution (formate buffer/methanol) using an Eclipse Plus C18 Rapid Resolution column (4.6mm×100mm). No interfering signals were detected in mobile phase. After injection of blank urine samples signals for the endogenous compounds but no interferences were detected. All analytes were linear in the selected calibration range and a non weighted calibration model was chosen. Bias, intra-day and inter-day precision for all analytes were below 20% for quality control (QC) low and below 10% for QC medium and high. The limits of quantification in mobile phase were in line with reported reference values but had to be adjusted in urine for homovanillic acid (45mg/L), niacinamide 58.5(mg/L), and indole-3-acetic acid (63mg/L). Comparison of creatinine data obtained by the existing method with those of the developed method showing differences from -120mg/L to +110mg/L with a mean of differences of 29.0mg/L for 50 authentic urine samples. Analyzing 50 authentic urine samples, uric acid, creatinine, hippuric acid, and 2-methylhippuric acid were detected in (nearly) all samples. However, homovanillic acid was detected in 40%, niacinamide in 4% and indole-3-acetic acid was never detected within the selected samples.

  13. Conversion of the refractory ammonia and acetic acid in catalytic wet air oxidation of animal byproducts.

    Fontanier, Virginie; Zalouk, Sofiane; Barbati, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of slaughtered animal byproducts (ABPs) were investigated. Two step experiment was carried out consisting of a non-catalysed WAO run followed by a CWAO run at 170-275 degrees C, 20 MPa, and reaction time 180 min. The WAO (1st step) of sample (5 g/L total organic carbon (TOC)) yielded (82.0 +/- 4)% TOC removal and (78.4 +/- 13.2)% conversion of the initial organic-N into NH4(+)-N. Four metal catalysts (Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru) supported over alumina have been tested in catalytic WAO (2nd step) at elevated pH to enhance ammonia conversion and organic matter removal, particularly acetic acid. It was found that the catalysts Ru, Pt, and Rh had significant effects on the TOC removal (95.1%, 99.5% and 96.7%, respectively) and on the abatement of ammonia (93.4%, 96.7% and 96.3%, respectively) with high nitrogen selectivity. The catalyst Pd was found to have the less activity while Pt had the best performance. The X-Ray diffraction analysis showed that the support of catalyst was not stable under the experimental conditions since it reacted with phosphate present in solution. Nitrite and nitrate ions were monitored during the oxidation reaction and it was concluded that CWAO of ammonia in real waste treatment framework was in good agreement with the results obtained from the literature for ideal solutions of ammonia.

  14. Effects of acut and chronic doses of methoxy acetic acid on hamster sperm fertilising ability

    L. D.C. Peiris; H.D.M. Moore

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effects of acute and chronic doses of methoxy acetic acid (MAA) on in vitro fertilisation by hamster sperm and to correlate the data with the testicular damage. Methods: Adult male hamsters were gavaged with 3 single doses (0, 80, 160 and 650 mg/kg) and 3 chronic doses (0, 8, 32 and 64 mg/kg daily for 5 weeks) of MAA in distilled water. After treatment hamsters were killed at weekly intervals and spermatozoa recovered from the distal cauda epididymides were used to assess the fertilising capacity in vitro. The testes were processed for histological examination. Results: Acute doses showed a significant reduction in sperm fertilising ability from week 3 and 4 after treatment and with the chronic doses, the effects were more extensive and persistent. The results were in correpondence with the testicular damages observed. Conclusion: It is evident that both acute and chronic doses of MAA can impair the sperm function by damaging one or more cell populations in the testis.

  15. Acetic Acid Catalyzed Steam Explosion for Improving the Sugar Recovery of Wheat Straw

    Mengru Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid-catalyzed steam explosion pretreatment was applied to wheat straw at temperatures of 190 and 210 °C for 2, 6, and 10 min of residence time. The effects of pretreatment conditions on the total gravimetric recovery, hemicellulose sugars, glucose content, and yield of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose were studied. The results indicated that the total gravimetric recovery decreases while the solubility of hemicellulose and the yield of cellulose enzymatic hydrolysis increase as the pretreatment severity increases. Pretreatment at 190 °C with a 2-min residence time resulted in the highest total gravimetric recovery, 58.9%. The optimum defiberation, glucose content, and enzymatic hydrolysis yields of 70.4 and 79.6%, respectively, occurred following pretreatment at 210 °C with a 10-min residence time. The optimal pretreatment condition was determined to be 190 °C for 10 min. Under the optimum conditions, the recovery yield of all sugars reached 42.7%. This pretreatment resulted in the highest recovery yield of all sugars.

  16. Highly dispersed supported ruthenium oxide as an aerobic catalyst for acetic acid synthesis

    Laursen, Anders Bo; Gorbanev, Yury; Cavalca, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    (CO3)(OH)16·4(H2O), MgAl2O4, Na2Ti6O13 nanotubes, ZnO, γ-Al2O3, WO3, CeO2, and Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 supports. The CeO2 supported RuOx had the highest activity, and selectivity toward acetic acid, of all the materials when normalized with respect to Ru-loading. This high activity was independent of the surface...... area of the support and the loading of RuOx under the tested conditions. This was attributed to the highly uniform size of the RuOx deposits, demonstrating that the deposition is suitable for producing small nanoparticles at high loadings. To elucidate the reason for the promotional effect of CeO2, Ce0.......5Zr0.5O2 was investigated as a high oxygen storage capacity support, however, this did not result in higher catalytic activity. The high activity of CeO2 supports compared to the low activity ZnO appear correlated to the presence of high valence Ru(VI) species analogous to that observed in literature....

  17. The effect of intracerebroventricular injection of histamine in visceral nociception induced by acetic acid in rats

    Zanboori Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was designed to investigate the role of brain histamine and H1 and H2 receptors in mediating the central perception of visceral pain in rats. Materials and Methods : In conscious rats implanted with a lateral brain ventricle cannula, the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. injection of histamine (2.5, 10, and 40 μg, and chlorpheniramine and ranitidine at the same doses of 5, 20, and 80 μg were investigated on visceral pain. Visceral nociception induced by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of acetic acid (1 mL, 1%, and the number of complete abdominal wall muscle contractions accompanied with stretching of hind limbs (writhes were counted for 1 h. Results : Histamine at doses of 10 and 40 μg and chlorpheniramine and ranitidine at the same doses of 20 and 80 μg, significantly decreased the numbers of writhes (P < 0.05. Pretreatment with chlorpheniramine and ranitidine at the same dose of 80 μg, significantly prevented histamine (40 μg-induced antinociception (P < 0.05. Conclusion : The results of this study suggest that brain histamine may be involved in modulation of visceral antinociception through both central H 1 and H 2 receptors.

  18. Modulation of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis in bacteroids within Medicago sativa nodules.

    Bianco, C; Senatore, B; Arbucci, S; Pieraccini, G; Defez, R

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the dose-response effects of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on Medicago plant growth and dry weight production, we increased the synthesis of IAA in both free-living and symbiosis-stage rhizobial bacteroids during Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. For this purpose, site-directed mutagenesis was applied to modify an 85-bp promoter sequence, driving the expression of iaaM and tms2 genes for IAA biosynthesis. A positive correlation was found between the higher expression of IAA biosynthetic genes in free-living bacteria and the increased production of IAA under both free-living and symbiotic conditions. Plants nodulated by RD65 and RD66 strains, synthetizing the highest IAA concentration, showed a significant (up to 73%) increase in the shoot fresh weight and upregulation of nitrogenase gene, nifH, compared to plants nodulated by the wild-type strain. When these plants were analyzed by confocal microscopy, using an anti-IAA antibody, the strongest signal was observed in bacteroids of Medicago sativa RD66 (Ms-RD66) plants, even when they were located in the senescent nodule zone. We show here a simple system to modulate endogenous IAA biosynthesis in bacteria nodulating legumes suitable to investigate which is the maximum level of IAA biosynthesis, resulting in the maximal increase of plant growth.

  19. A computational NQR study on the hydrogen-bonded lattice of cytosine-5-acetic acid.

    Mirzaei, Mahmoud; Hadipour, Nasser L

    2008-04-15

    A computational study at the level of density functional theory (DFT) employing 6-311++G** standard basis set was carried out to evaluate nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy parameters in cytosine-5-acetic acid (C5AA). Since the electric field gradient (EFG) tensors are very sensitive to the electrostatic environment at the sites of quadruple nuclei, the most possible interacting molecules with the target one were considered in a five-molecule model system of C5AA using X-ray coordinates transforming. The hydrogen atoms positions were optimized and two model systems of original and H-optimized C5AA were considered in NQR calculations. The calculated EFG tensors at the sites of (17)O, (14)N, and (2)H nuclei were converted to their experimentally measurable parameters, quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters. The evaluated NQR parameters reveal that the nuclei in original and H-optimized systems contribute to different hydrogen bonding (HB) interaction. The comparison of calculated parameters between optimized isolated gas-phase and crystalline monomer also shows the relationship between the structural deformation and NQR parameters in C5AA. The basis set superposition error (BSSE) calculations yielded no significant errors for employed basis set in the evaluation of NQR parameters. All the calculations were performed by Gaussian 98 package of program.

  20. Binding of ring-substituted indole-3-acetic acids to human serum albumin.

    Soskić, Milan; Magnus, Volker

    2007-07-01

    The plant hormone, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and its ring-substituted derivatives have recently attracted attention as promising pro-drugs in cancer therapy. Here we present relative binding constants to human serum albumin for IAA and 34 of its derivatives, as obtained using the immobilized protein bound to a support suitable for high-performance liquid chromatography. We also report their octanol-water partition coefficients (logK(ow)) computed from retention data on a C(18) coated silica gel column. A four-parameter QSPR (quantitative structure-property relationships) model, based on physico-chemical properties, is put forward, which accounts for more than 96% of the variations in the binding affinities of these compounds. The model confirms the importance of lipophilicity as a global parameter governing interaction with serum albumin, but also assigns significant roles to parameters specifically related to the molecular topology of ring-substituted IAAs. Bulky substituents at ring-position 6 increase affinity, those at position 2 obstruct binding, while no steric effects were noted at other ring-positions. Electron-withdrawing substituents at position 5 enhance binding, but have no obvious effect at other ring positions.