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  1. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westhall, Erik; Rossetti, Andrea O; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. METHODS: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists...... patients. EEGs were recorded in 103 patients at a median 77 hours after cardiac arrest; 37% had a highly malignant EEG and all had a poor outcome (specificity 100%, sensitivity 50%). Any malignant EEG feature had a low specificity to predict poor prognosis (48%) but if 2 malignant EEG features were present...

  2. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Andrea O.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Wesenberg Kjaer, Troels; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Rosén, Ingmar; Åneman, Anders; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P.; Cronberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. Methods: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists, blinded to outcome, evaluated prospectively recorded EEGs in the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM trial) that randomized patients to 33°C vs 36°C. Routine EEG was performed in patients still comatose after rewarming. EEGs were classified into highly malignant (suppression, suppression with periodic discharges, burst-suppression), malignant (periodic or rhythmic patterns, pathological or nonreactive background), and benign EEG (absence of malignant features). Poor outcome was defined as best Cerebral Performance Category score 3–5 until 180 days. Results: Eight TTM sites randomized 202 patients. EEGs were recorded in 103 patients at a median 77 hours after cardiac arrest; 37% had a highly malignant EEG and all had a poor outcome (specificity 100%, sensitivity 50%). Any malignant EEG feature had a low specificity to predict poor prognosis (48%) but if 2 malignant EEG features were present specificity increased to 96% (p EEG was found in 1% of the patients with a poor outcome. Conclusions: Highly malignant EEG after rewarming reliably predicted poor outcome in half of patients without false predictions. An isolated finding of a single malignant feature did not predict poor outcome whereas a benign EEG was highly predictive of a good outcome. PMID:26865516

  3. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Andrea O.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Wesenberg Kjaer, Troels; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Rosén, Ingmar; Åneman, Anders; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P.; Cronberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. Methods: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists, blinded to outcome, evaluated prospectively recorded EEGs in the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM trial) that randomized patients to 33°C vs 36°C. Routine EEG was performed in patients still comatose after rewarming. EEGs were classified into highly malignant (suppression, suppression with periodic discharges, burst-suppression), malignant (periodic or rhythmic patterns, pathological or nonreactive background), and benign EEG (absence of malignant features). Poor outcome was defined as best Cerebral Performance Category score 3–5 until 180 days. Results: Eight TTM sites randomized 202 patients. EEGs were recorded in 103 patients at a median 77 hours after cardiac arrest; 37% had a highly malignant EEG and all had a poor outcome (specificity 100%, sensitivity 50%). Any malignant EEG feature had a low specificity to predict poor prognosis (48%) but if 2 malignant EEG features were present specificity increased to 96% (p < 0.001). Specificity and sensitivity were not significantly affected by targeted temperature or sedation. A benign EEG was found in 1% of the patients with a poor outcome. Conclusions: Highly malignant EEG after rewarming reliably predicted poor outcome in half of patients without false predictions. An isolated finding of a single malignant feature did not predict poor outcome whereas a benign EEG was highly predictive of a good outcome. PMID:26865516

  4. An accurately fast algorithm of calculating reflection/transmission coefficients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CASTAGNA; J; P

    2008-01-01

    For the boundary between transversely isotropic media with a vertical axis of symmetry (VTI media), the interface between a liquid and a VTI medium, and the free-surface of an elastic half-space of a VTI medium, an accurately fast algorithm was presented for calculating reflection/transmission (R/T) coefficients. Specially, the case of post-critical angle incidence was considered. Although we only performed the numerical calculation for the models of the VTI media, the calculated results can be extended to the models of transversely isotropic media with a horizontal axis of rotation symmetry (HTI media). Compared to previous work, this algorithm can be used not only for the calculation of R/T coefficients of the boundary between ellipsoidally anisotropic media, but also for that between generally anisotropic media, and the speed and accuracy of this algorithm are faster and higher. According to the anisotropic parameters of some rocks given by the published literature, we performed the calculation of R/T coefficients by using this algorithm and analyzed the effect of the rock anisotropy on R/T coefficients. We used Snell’s law and the energy balance principle to perform verification for the calculated results.

  5. Should scatter be corrected in both transmission and emission data for accurate quantitation in cardiac SPET?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ideally, reliable quantitation in single-photon emission tomography (SPET) requires both emission and transmission data to be scatter free. Although scatter in emission data has been extensively studied, it is not well known how scatter in transmission data affects relative and absolute quantitation in reconstructed images. We studied SPET quantitative accuracy for different amounts of scatter in emission and transmission data using a Utah phantom and a cardiac Data Spectrum phantom including different attenuating media. Acquisitions over 180 were considered and three projection sets were derived: 20% images and Jaszczak and triple-energy-window scatter-corrected projections. Transmission data were acquired using gadolinium-153 line sources in a 90-110 keV window using a narrow or wide scanning window. The transmission scans were performed either simultaneously with the emission acquisition or 24 h later. Transmission maps were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and μ values were linearly scaled from 100 to 140 keV. Attenuation-corrected images were reconstructed using a conjugate gradient minimal residual algorithm. The μ value underestimation varied between 4% with a narrow transmission window in soft tissue and 22% with a wide window in a material simulating bone. Scatter in the emission and transmission data had little effect on the uniformity of activity distribution in the left ventricle wall and in a uniformly hot compartment of the Utah phantom. Correcting the transmission data for scatter had no impact on contrast between a hot and a cold region or on signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in regions with uniform activity distribution, while correcting the emission data for scatter improved contrast and reduced SNR. For absolute quantitation, the most accurate results (bias <4% in both phantoms) were obtained when reducing scatter in both emission and transmission data. In conclusion, trying to obtain the same amount of scatter in emission and transmission

  6. Should scatter be corrected in both transmission and emission data for accurate quantitation in cardiac SPET?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhri, G.E. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; U494 INSERM, CHU Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Buvat, I.; Todd-Pokropek, A.; Benali, H. [U494 INSERM, CHU Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Almeida, P. [Servico de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Garcia de Orta, Almada (Portugal); Bendriem, B. [CTI, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2000-09-01

    Ideally, reliable quantitation in single-photon emission tomography (SPET) requires both emission and transmission data to be scatter free. Although scatter in emission data has been extensively studied, it is not well known how scatter in transmission data affects relative and absolute quantitation in reconstructed images. We studied SPET quantitative accuracy for different amounts of scatter in emission and transmission data using a Utah phantom and a cardiac Data Spectrum phantom including different attenuating media. Acquisitions over 180 were considered and three projection sets were derived: 20% images and Jaszczak and triple-energy-window scatter-corrected projections. Transmission data were acquired using gadolinium-153 line sources in a 90-110 keV window using a narrow or wide scanning window. The transmission scans were performed either simultaneously with the emission acquisition or 24 h later. Transmission maps were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and {mu} values were linearly scaled from 100 to 140 keV. Attenuation-corrected images were reconstructed using a conjugate gradient minimal residual algorithm. The {mu} value underestimation varied between 4% with a narrow transmission window in soft tissue and 22% with a wide window in a material simulating bone. Scatter in the emission and transmission data had little effect on the uniformity of activity distribution in the left ventricle wall and in a uniformly hot compartment of the Utah phantom. Correcting the transmission data for scatter had no impact on contrast between a hot and a cold region or on signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in regions with uniform activity distribution, while correcting the emission data for scatter improved contrast and reduced SNR. For absolute quantitation, the most accurate results (bias <4% in both phantoms) were obtained when reducing scatter in both emission and transmission data. In conclusion, trying to obtain the same amount of scatter in emission and

  7. Measuring solar reflectance Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

    2010-05-14

    Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective 'cool colored' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland U.S. latitudes, this metric RE891BN can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {le} 5:12 [23{sup o}]) by as much as 89 W m{sup -2}, and underestimate its peak surface temperature by up to 5 K. Using R{sub E891BN} to characterize roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool-roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear-sky air mass one global horizontal ('AM1GH') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer.

  8. Computational chemical imaging for cardiovascular pathology: chemical microscopic imaging accurately determines cardiac transplant rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Tiwari

    Full Text Available Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients' biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures.

  9. Multivariate Criteria Most Accurately Distinguish Cardiac from Noncardiac Causes of Dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mirza Nubair; Yusuf, Syed Hasan; Ullah, Rafath; Ahmad, Mirza Mujadil; Ellis, Mary K; Yousaf, Haroon; Paterick, Timothy E; Ammar, Khawaja Afzal

    2015-12-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing provides oxygen pulse as a continuous measure of stroke volume, which is superior to other stress-testing methods in which systolic function is measured at baseline and at peak stress. However, the optimal peak oxygen pulse criterion for distinguishing cardiac from noncardiac causes of exercise limitation is unknown. In comparing several peak oxygen pulse criteria against the clinical standard of cardiopulmonary exercise testing, we retrospectively studied 54 consecutive patients referred for cardiopulmonary exercise testing. These exercise tests included measurement of oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, breathing reserve, arterial blood gases at baseline and at peak stress, exercise electrocardiogram, heart rate, and blood pressure response. Results were blindly interpreted and patients were categorized as members either of our Cardiac Group (abnormal result secondary to cardiac causes of exercise limitation) or of our Noncardiac Group (normal or abnormal result secondary to any noncardiac cause of exercise limitation). The accuracy of the peak oxygen pulse criteria ranged from 50% for univariate criterion (≤15 mL/beat), to 61% for oxygen pulse curve pattern, to 63% for bivariate criterion (≤15 mL/beat for men, ≤10 mL/beat for women), to as high as 81% for a multivariate criterion. All multivariate criteria outperformed oxygen pulse curve pattern, univariate, and bivariate criteria. This is the first study to evaluate the optimal peak oxygen pulse criterion for differentiating cardiac from noncardiac causes of exercise limitation. Multivariate criteria (especially a criterion incorporating age, sex, height, and weight) should be used preferentially, as opposed to the commonly used univariate and bivariate criteria.

  10. Accurate wavelength prediction of photonic crystal resonant reflection and applications in refractive index measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron L. C.;

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, photonic crystal resonant reflectors have been increasingly used as the basis for label-free biochemical assays in lab-on-a-chip applications. In both designing and interpreting experimental results, an accurate model describing the optical behavior of such structures is essen......In the past decade, photonic crystal resonant reflectors have been increasingly used as the basis for label-free biochemical assays in lab-on-a-chip applications. In both designing and interpreting experimental results, an accurate model describing the optical behavior of such structures...

  11. Standardization of vitrinite reflectance measurements in shale petroleum systems: How accurate are my Ro data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Vitrinite reflectance generally is considered the most robust thermal maturity parameter available for application to hydrocarbon exploration and petroleum system evaluation. However, until 2011 there was no standardized methodology available to provide guidelines for vitrinite reflectance measurements in shale. Efforts to correct this deficiency resulted in publication of ASTM D7708-11: Standard test method for microscopical determination of the reflectance of vitrinite dispersed in sedimentary rocks. In 2012-2013, an interlaboratory exercise was conducted to establish precision limits for the measurement technique. Six samples, representing a wide variety of shale, were tested in duplicate by 28 analysts in 22 laboratories from 14 countries. Samples ranged from immature to overmature (Ro 0.31-1.53%), from organic-rich to organic-lean (1-22 wt.% total organic carbon), and contained Type I (lacustrine), Type II (marine), and Type III (terrestrial) kerogens. Repeatability values (difference between repetitive results from same operator, same conditions) ranged from 0.03-0.11% absolute reflectance, whereas reproducibility values (difference between results obtained on same test material by different operators, different laboratories) ranged from 0.12-0.54% absolute reflectance. Repeatability and reproducibility degraded consistently with increasing maturity and decreasing organic content. However, samples with terrestrial kerogens (Type III) fell off this trend, showing improved levels of reproducibility due to higher vitrinite content and improved ease of identification. Operators did not consistently meet the reporting requirements of the test method, indicating that a common reporting template is required to improve data quality. The most difficult problem encountered was the petrographic distinction of solid bitumens and low-reflecting inert macerals from vitrinite when vitrinite occurred with reflectance ranges overlapping the other components. Discussion among

  12. Hydrogen sulfide detection based on reflection: from a poison test approach of ancient China to single-cell accurate localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hao; Ma, Zhuoran; Wang, Song; Gong, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2014-08-01

    With the inspiration of an ancient Chinese poison test approach, we report a rapid hydrogen sulfide detection strategy in specific areas of live cells using silver needles with good spatial resolution of 2 × 2 μm(2). Besides the accurate-localization ability, this reflection-based strategy also has attractive merits of convenience and robust response when free pretreatment and short detection time are concerned. The success of endogenous H2S level evaluation in cellular cytoplasm and nuclear of human A549 cells promises the application potential of our strategy in scientific research and medical diagnosis.

  13. Cardiac reflections and natural vibrations: Force-frequency relation recording system in the stress echo lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pianelli Mascia

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inherent ability of ventricular myocardium to increase its force of contraction in response to an increase in contraction frequency is known as the cardiac force-frequency relation (FFR. This relation can be easily obtained in the stress echo lab, where the force is computed as the systolic pressure/end-systolic volume index ratio, and measured for increasing heart rates during stress. Ideally, the noninvasive, imaging independent, objective assessment of FFR would greatly enhance its practical appeal. Objectives 1 – To evaluate the feasibility of the cardiac force measurement by a precordial cutaneous sensor. 2 – To build the curve of force variation as a function of the heart rate. 3 – To compare the standard stress echo results vs. this sensor operator-independent built FFR. Methods The transcutaneous force sensor was positioned in the precordial region in 88 consecutive patients referred for exercise, dipyridamole, or pacing stress. The force was measured as the myocardial vibrations amplitude in the isovolumic contraction period. FFR was computed as the curve of force variation as a function of heart rate. Standard echocardiographic FFR measurements were performed. Results A consistent FFR was obtained in all patients. Both the sensor built and the echo built FFR identifiy pts with normal or abnormal contractile reserve. The best cut-off value of the sensor built FFR was 15.5 g * 10-3 (Sensitivity = 0.85, Specificity = 0.77. Sensor built FFR slope and shape mirror pressure/volume relation during stress. This approach is extendable to daily physiological exercise and could be potentially attractive in home monitoring systems.

  14. Rapid and accurate measurement of the specific surface area of snow using infrared reflectance at 1310 and 1550 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Gallet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though the specific surface area (SSA of snow is a crucial variable to determine the chemical and climatic impact of the snow cover, few data are available on snow SSA because current measurement methods are not simple to use in the field or do not have a sufficient accuracy. We propose here a novel determination method based on the measurement of the hemispherical reflectance of snow in the infrared using the DUFISSS instrument (DUal Frequency Integrating Sphere for Snow SSA measurement. DUFISSS uses 1310 and 1550 nm radiation provided by laser diodes, an integrating sphere 15 cm in diameter, and InGaAs photodiodes. For SSA<60 m2 kg−1, we use the 1310 nm radiation, reflectance is in the range 15 to 50% and the accuracy is 10%. For SSA>60 m2 kg−1, snow is usually of low to very low density (typically 30 to 100 kg m−3 and this produces artifacts caused by the e-folding length of light in snow being too long. We therefore use 1550 nm radiation for SSA>60 m2 kg−1. Reflectance is then in the range 5 to 12%, and the accuracy is 12%. No effect of crystal shape on reflectance was detected. We propose empirical equations to determine SSA from reflectance at both wavelengths, with that for 1310 nm taking into account the snow density. DUFISSS has been tested in the Alps to measure the snow area index (SAI of the Alpine snowpack in a south facing area at 2100 m elevation. This was done by measuring the SSA, thickness and density of the seven main layers of the snowpack in just 30 min, and a value of 5350 was found, significantly greater than in Arctic and subarctic regions. DUFISSS can now be used to help study issues related to polar and Alpine atmospheric chemistry and climate.

  15. Assessment of a sponge layer as a non-reflective boundary treatment with highly accurate gust-airfoil interaction results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellini, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with the numerical performance of a sponge layer as a non-reflective boundary condition. This technique is well known and widely adopted, but only recently have the reasons for a sponge failure been recognised, in analysis by Mani. For multidimensional problems, the ineffectiveness of the method is due to the self-reflections of the sponge occurring when it interacts with an oblique acoustic wave. Based on his theoretical investigations, Mani gives some useful guidelines for implementing effective sponge layers. However, in our opinion, some practical indications are still missing from the current literature. Here, an extensive numerical study of the performance of this technique is presented. Moreover, we analyse a reduced sponge implementation characterised by undamped partial differential equations for the velocity components. The main aim of this paper relies on the determination of the minimal width of the layer, as well as of the corresponding strength, required to obtain a reflection error of no more than a few per cent of that observed when solving the same problem on the same grid, but without employing the sponge layer term. For this purpose, a test case of computational aeroacoustics, the single airfoil gust response problem, has been addressed in several configurations. As a direct consequence of our investigation, we present a well documented and highly validated reference solution for the far-field acoustic intensity, a result that is not well established in the literature. Lastly, the proof of the accuracy of an algorithm for coupling sub-domains solved by the linear and non-liner Euler governing equations is given. This result is here exploited to adopt a linear-based sponge layer even in a non-linear computation.

  16. Cardiac Malpositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Shi Joon; Im, Chung Gie; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Hasn, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    Cardiac Malposition refers to any position of the heart other than a left-sided heart in a situs solitus individual. Associated cardiac malformations are so complex that even angiocardiographic and autopsy studies may not afford an accurate information. Although the terms and classifications used to describe the internal cardiac anatomy and their arterial connections in cardiac malpositions differ and tend to be confusing, common agreement exists on the need for a segmental approach to diagnosis. Authors present 18 cases of cardiac malpositions in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between 1971 and 1979. Authors analyzed the clinical, radiographic, operative and autopsy findings with the emphasis on the angiocardiographic findings. The results are as follows: 1. Among 18 cases with cardiac malpositions, 6 cases had dextrocardia with situs inversus, 9 cases had dextrocardia with situs solitus and 3 cases had levocardia with situs inversus. 2. There was no genuine exception to visceroatrial concordance rule. 3. Associated cardiac malpositions were variable and complex with a tendency of high association of transposition and double outlet varieties with dextrocardia in situs solitus and levocardia in situs inversus. Only one in 6 cases of dextrocardia with situs inversus had pure transposition. 4. In two cases associated pulmonary atresia was found at surgery which was not predicted by angiocardiography. 5. Because many of the associated complex lesions can be corrected surgically provided the diagnosis is accurate, the selective biplane angiocardiography with or without cineradiography is essential.

  17. Cardiac sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Amin; A. Asghari-Roodsari; H.L. Tan

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (I-Na) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of I-Na for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of

  18. Is the pre-hospital ECG after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest accurate for the diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salam, Idrees; Hassager, Christian; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig;

    2016-01-01

    -hospital ROSC-ECG in predicting ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). METHOD: ROSC-ECGs of 145 comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, randomly assigned in the Target Temperature Management trial, were classified according to the current STEMI ECG criteria (third universal definition...... of myocardial infarction). RESULTS: STEs were present in the pre-hospital ROSC-ECG of 78 (54%) patients. A final diagnosis revealed that 69 (48%) patients had STEMI, 31 (21%) patients had non-STEMI and 45 (31%) patients had no myocardial infarction. STE in ROSC-ECGs had a sensitivity of 74% (95% confidence...... intervention was successful in 68% versus 36% (PECG is a suboptimal diagnostic tool to predict STEMI...

  19. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  20. Patients without myocardial accumulation of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine. Does it always reflect cardiac adrenergic dysfunction?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi; Honda, Minoru; Hohjoh, Osamu [Sumitomo Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    Since December 1992 to March 1994, we have performed myocardial imaging with {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-MIBG) in 110 patients to examine myocardial sympathetic integrity. Among them 11 patients (10%) showed no accumulation of {sup 123}I-MIBG in the heart. So we have examined the mechanisms of no myocardial {sup 123}I-MIBG accumulation. {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging was obtained at 20 min and 3 h after intravenous injection of {sup 123}I-MIBG (148 MBq) at rest. In addition to routine tomography, anterior planar imaging of the heart and the whole body imaging were performed. Eleven patients without myocardial {sup 123}I-MIBG accumulation consisted of 5 patients with orthostatic hypotension (including 3 patients with diabetic neuropathy). four patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), one patient with hypertension and one normal subject. In patients with orthostatic hypotension, standing test showed cardiac sympathetic dysfunction. In addition to no myocardial {sup 123}I-MIBG accumulation, accumulation of {sup 123}I-MIBG in the salivary glands was not found in all them. These indicated that in patients with orthostatic hypotension, generalized sympathetic dysfunction caused no myocardial {sup 123}I-MIBG accumulation. But in other 6 patients there was no evidence which suggested the cardiac sympathetic nerve dysfunction. Age, sex, serum norepinephrine level, myocardial perfusion and the medication were not different between the patients with and without myocardial {sup 123}I-MIBG accumulation. So the mechanism of no myocardial {sup 123}I-MIBG accumulation was not clear in these patients. But it was noteworthy that in patients with HCM, no myocardial {sup 123}I-MIBG accumulation appeared in 17% (4/24), and the frequency of no myocardial {sup 123}I-MIBG accumulation in HCM was significantly (p<0.05) higher than in other disease entities when patients with orthostatic hypotension were excluded. (author).

  1. Modest elevation in BNP in asymptomatic hypertensive patients reflects sub-clinical cardiac remodeling, inflammation and extracellular matrix changes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Dermot

    2012-11-01

    In asymptomatic subjects B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes even at levels well below contemporary thresholds used for the diagnosis of heart failure. The mechanisms behind these observations are unclear. We examined the hypothesis that in an asymptomatic hypertensive population BNP would be associated with sub-clinical evidence of cardiac remodeling, inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations. We performed transthoracic echocardiography and sampled coronary sinus (CS) and peripheral serum from patients with low (n = 14) and high BNP (n = 27). Peripheral BNP was closely associated with CS levels (r = 0.92, p<0.001). CS BNP correlated significantly with CS levels of markers of collagen type I and III turnover including: PINP (r = 0.44, p = 0.008), CITP (r = 0.35, p = 0.03) and PIIINP (r = 0.35, p = 0.001), and with CS levels of inflammatory cytokines including: TNF-α (r = 0.49, p = 0.002), IL-6 (r = 0.35, p = 0.04), and IL-8 (r = 0.54, p<0.001). The high BNP group had greater CS expression of fibro-inflammatory biomarkers including: CITP (3.8±0.7 versus 5.1±1.9, p = 0.007), TNF-α (3.2±0.5 versus 3.7±1.1, p = 003), IL-6 (1.9±1.3 versus 3.4±2.7, p = 0.02) and hsCRP (1.2±1.1 versus 2.4±1.1, p = 0.04), and greater left ventricular mass index (97±20 versus 118±26 g\\/m(2), p = 0.03) and left atrial volume index (18±2 versus 21±4, p = 0.008). Our data provide insight into the mechanisms behind the observed negative prognostic impact of modest elevations in BNP and suggest that in an asymptomatic hypertensive cohort a peripheral BNP measurement may be a useful marker of an early, sub-clinical pathological process characterized by cardiac remodeling, inflammation and ECM alterations.

  2. Modest elevation in BNP in asymptomatic hypertensive patients reflects sub-clinical cardiac remodeling, inflammation and extracellular matrix changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dermot Phelan

    Full Text Available In asymptomatic subjects B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes even at levels well below contemporary thresholds used for the diagnosis of heart failure. The mechanisms behind these observations are unclear. We examined the hypothesis that in an asymptomatic hypertensive population BNP would be associated with sub-clinical evidence of cardiac remodeling, inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM alterations. We performed transthoracic echocardiography and sampled coronary sinus (CS and peripheral serum from patients with low (n = 14 and high BNP (n = 27. Peripheral BNP was closely associated with CS levels (r = 0.92, p<0.001. CS BNP correlated significantly with CS levels of markers of collagen type I and III turnover including: PINP (r = 0.44, p = 0.008, CITP (r = 0.35, p = 0.03 and PIIINP (r = 0.35, p = 0.001, and with CS levels of inflammatory cytokines including: TNF-α (r = 0.49, p = 0.002, IL-6 (r = 0.35, p = 0.04, and IL-8 (r = 0.54, p<0.001. The high BNP group had greater CS expression of fibro-inflammatory biomarkers including: CITP (3.8±0.7 versus 5.1±1.9, p = 0.007, TNF-α (3.2±0.5 versus 3.7±1.1, p = 003, IL-6 (1.9±1.3 versus 3.4±2.7, p = 0.02 and hsCRP (1.2±1.1 versus 2.4±1.1, p = 0.04, and greater left ventricular mass index (97±20 versus 118±26 g/m(2, p = 0.03 and left atrial volume index (18±2 versus 21±4, p = 0.008. Our data provide insight into the mechanisms behind the observed negative prognostic impact of modest elevations in BNP and suggest that in an asymptomatic hypertensive cohort a peripheral BNP measurement may be a useful marker of an early, sub-clinical pathological process characterized by cardiac remodeling, inflammation and ECM alterations.

  3. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hye-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. (orig.)

  4. Cardiac tumors: optimal cardiac MR sequences and spectrum of imaging appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the optimal cardiac MRI sequences for and the spectrum of imaging appearances of cardiac tumors. CONCLUSION: Recent technologic advances in cardiac MRI have resulted in the rapid acquisition of images of the heart with high spatial and temporal resolution and excellent myocardial tissue characterization. Cardiac MRI provides optimal assessment of the location, functional characteristics, and soft-tissue features of cardiac tumors, allowing accurate differentiation of benign and malignant lesions.

  5. Remifentanil versus fentanyl during cardiac surgery on the incidence of chronic thoracic pain (REFLECT): Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. de Hoogd (Sjoerd); S.J.G.M. Ahlers (Sabine); E.H.P.A. van Dongen (Eric); D. Tibboel (Dick); A. Dahan (Albert); C.A.J. Knibbe (Catherijne)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Chronic thoracic pain after cardiac surgery is prevalent (11 to 56%) and may affect patients' physical and mental health status. Despite its favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, high doses of remifentanil administered during surgery are reported to cause

  6. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Article.jsp. Accessed June 16, 2014. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 63. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Cardiac arrest and audden aardiac death. In: ...

  7. An overview of cardiac morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Abdulla, Tariq; Summers, Ron; Houyel, Lucile

    2013-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of normal cardiac development is essential for properly understanding the morphogenesis of congenital cardiac malformations that represent the most common congenital anomaly in newborns. The heart is the first organ to function during embryonic development and is fully formed at 8 weeks of gestation. Recent studies stemming from molecular genetics have allowed specification of the role of cellular precursors in the field of heart development. In this article we review the different steps of heart development, focusing on the processes of alignment and septation. We also show, as often as possible, the links between abnormalities of cardiac development and the main congenital heart defects. The development of animal models has permitted the unraveling of many mechanisms that potentially lead to cardiac malformations. A next step towards a better knowledge of cardiac development could be multiscale cardiac modelling. PMID:24138816

  8. Structural and functional screening in human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes accurately identifies cardiotoxicity of multiple drug types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doherty, Kimberly R., E-mail: kimberly.doherty@quintiles.com; Talbert, Dominique R.; Trusk, Patricia B.; Moran, Diarmuid M.; Shell, Scott A.; Bacus, Sarah

    2015-05-15

    Safety pharmacology studies that evaluate new drug entities for potential cardiac liability remain a critical component of drug development. Current studies have shown that in vitro tests utilizing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) may be beneficial for preclinical risk evaluation. We recently demonstrated that an in vitro multi-parameter test panel assessing overall cardiac health and function could accurately reflect the associated clinical cardiotoxicity of 4 FDA-approved targeted oncology agents using hiPS-CM. The present studies expand upon this initial observation to assess whether this in vitro screen could detect cardiotoxicity across multiple drug classes with known clinical cardiac risks. Thus, 24 drugs were examined for their effect on both structural (viability, reactive oxygen species generation, lipid formation, troponin secretion) and functional (beating activity) endpoints in hiPS-CM. Using this screen, the cardiac-safe drugs showed no effects on any of the tests in our panel. However, 16 of 18 compounds with known clinical cardiac risk showed drug-induced changes in hiPS-CM by at least one method. Moreover, when taking into account the Cmax values, these 16 compounds could be further classified depending on whether the effects were structural, functional, or both. Overall, the most sensitive test assessed cardiac beating using the xCELLigence platform (88.9%) while the structural endpoints provided additional insight into the mechanism of cardiotoxicity for several drugs. These studies show that a multi-parameter approach examining both cardiac cell health and function in hiPS-CM provides a comprehensive and robust assessment that can aid in the determination of potential cardiac liability. - Highlights: • 24 drugs were tested for cardiac liability using an in vitro multi-parameter screen. • Changes in beating activity were the most sensitive in predicting cardiac risk. • Structural effects add in

  9. Towards robust specularity detection and inpainting in cardiac images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaleh, Samar M.; Aviles, Angelica I.; Sobrevilla, Pilar; Casals, Alicia; Hahn, James

    2016-03-01

    Computer-assisted cardiac surgeries had major advances throughout the years and are gaining more popularity over conventional cardiac procedures as they offer many benefits to both patients and surgeons. One obvious advantage is that they enable surgeons to perform delicate tasks on the heart while it is still beating, avoiding the risks associated with cardiac arrest. Consequently, the surgical system needs to accurately compensate the physiological motion of the heart which is a very challenging task in medical robotics since there exist different sources of disturbances. One of which is the bright light reflections, known as specular highlights, that appear on the glossy surface of the heart and partially occlude the field of view. This work is focused on developing a robust approach that accurately detects and removes those highlights to reduce their disturbance to the surgeon and the motion compensation algorithm. As a first step, we exploit both color attributes and Fuzzy edge detector to identify specular regions in each acquired image frame. These two techniques together work as restricted thresholding and are able to accurately identify specular regions. Then, in order to eliminate the specularity artifact and give the surgeon a better perception of the heart, the second part of our solution is dedicated to correct the detected regions using inpainting to propagate and smooth the results. Our experimental results, which we carry out in realistic datasets, reveal how efficient and precise the proposed solution is, as well as demonstrate its robustness and real-time performance.

  10. An overview of cardiac morphogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Abdulla, Tariq; Summers, Ron; Houyel, Lucile

    2013-01-01

    International audience Accurate knowledge of normal cardiac development is essential for properly understanding the morphogenesis of congenital cardiac malformations that represent the most common congenital anomaly in newborns. The heart is the first organ to function during embryonic development and is fully formed at 8 weeks of gestation. Recent studies stemming from molecular genetics have allowed specification of the role of cellular precursors in the field of heart development. In th...

  11. Detecting deterministic dy namics of cardiac rhythm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Under the acceptable hypothesis that cardiac rhythm is an approximately deterministic process with a small scale noise component, an available way is provided to construct a model that can reflect its prominent dynamics of the deterministic component. When applied to the analysis of 19 heart rate data sets, three main findings are stated. The obtained model can reflect prominent dynamics of the deterministic component of cardiac rhythm; cardiac chaos is stated in a reliable way; dynamical noise plays an important role in the generation of complex cardiac rhythm.``

  12. Methods in pharmacology: measurement of cardiac output

    OpenAIRE

    Geerts, Bart F; Aarts, Leon P; Jansen, Jos R.

    2011-01-01

    Many methods of cardiac output measurement have been developed, but the number of methods useful for human pharmacological studies is limited. The ‘holy grail’ for the measurement of cardiac output would be a method that is accurate, precise, operator independent, fast responding, non-invasive, continuous, easy to use, cheap and safe. This method does not exist today. In this review on cardiac output methods used in pharmacology, the Fick principle, indicator dilution techniques, arterial pul...

  13. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack or other heart problem. You might consider cardiac rehab if you have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery Heart transplant Procedures such as angioplasty and stenting In some ...

  14. Pay attention to cardiac remodeling in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yawen; Chen, Han; Li, Xiaoqing; Sun, Yuping

    2016-07-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex and multifaceted disease state characterized by fatigue, weakness, and loss of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Recently, the profound negative effects of cancer cachexia on cardiac tissue draw much attention, which is likely to contribute to mortality in tumor-bearing animals. The mechanism of cardiac remodeling is not so clear and involved with a series of molecular alterations. In cancer cachexia model, progressive loss of left ventricular mass and decrease in myocardial function is observed and cardiac autonomic functions are altered. Levels of several emerging cardiovascular neurohormones are found elevating in patients with cancer, but it is still controversial whether the changes could reflect the heart injury accurately. The remedy for cardiac remodeling has been explored. It is showed that exercise can modulate signaling pathways activated by wasting cytokines and impact on the resulting outcomes on heart adaptation. Some drugs, such as bisoprolol, spironolactone, perindopril, tandospirone, and simvastatin, can mitigate adverse effects of the tumor on the heart and prolong survival. PMID:27108265

  15. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Benign Cardiac Masses: A Pictorial Essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Ward

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The differential diagnosis for a cardiac mass includes primary and metastatic neoplasms. While primary cardiac tumors are rare, metastatic disease to the heart is a common finding in cancer patients. Several "tumor-like" processes can mimic a true cardiac neoplasm with accurate diagnosis critical at guiding appropriate management. We present a pictorial essay of the most common benign cardiac masses and "mass-like" lesions with an emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging features.

  17. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Caroline; Angermann, Christiane E; Knop, Stefan; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan

    2008-03-15

    Amyloidoses are a heterogeneous group of multisystem disorders, which are characterized by an extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils. Typically affected are the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. More than half of the patients die due to cardiac involvement. Clinical signs of cardiac amyloidosis are edema of the lower limbs, hepatomegaly, ascites and elevated jugular vein pressure, frequently in combination with dyspnea. There can also be chest pain, probably due to microvessel disease. Dysfunction of the autonomous nervous system or arrhythmias may cause low blood pressure, dizziness, or recurrent syncope. The AL amyloidosis caused by the deposition of immunoglobulin light chains is the most common form. It can be performed by monoclonal gammopathy. The desirable treatment therapy consists of high-dose melphalan therapy twice followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. Due to the high peritransplantation mortality, selection of appropriate patients is mandatory. The ATTR amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by the amyloidogenic form of transthyretin, a plasmaprotein that is synthesized in the liver. Therefore, liver transplantation is the only curative therapy. The symptomatic treatment of cardiac amyloidosis is based on the current guidelines for chronic heart failure according to the patient's New York Heart Association (NYHA) state. Further types of amyloidosis with possible cardiac involvement comprise the senile systemic amyloidosis caused by the wild-type transthyretin, secondary amyloidosis after chronic systemic inflammation, and the beta(2)-microglobulin amyloidosis after long-term dialysis treatment. PMID:18344065

  18. Reflecting Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Simone

    2012-01-01

    This paper demystifies reflective practice on teaching by focusing on the idea of reflection itself and how it has been conceived by two philosophers, Plato and Irigaray. It argues that reflective practice has become a standardized method of defining the teacher in teacher education and teacher accreditation systems. It explores how practices of…

  19. Reflecting reflection in supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    Reflection has moved from the margins to the mainstream in supervision. Notions of reflection have become well established since the late 1980s. These notions have provided useful framing devices to help conceptualize some important processes in guidance and counseling. However, some applications...... associated with reflection and an exploration of alternative conceptions that view reflection within the context of settings which have a more group- and team-based orientation. Drawing on an action research project on health care supervision, the paper questions whether we should reject earlier views...... of reflection, rehabilitate them in order to capture broader connotations or move to new ways of regarding reflection that are more in keeping with not only reflective but also emotive, normative and formative views on supervision. The paper presents a critical perspective on supervision that challenge...

  20. Cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chlumský, Jaromír; Holá, Dana; Hlaváček, Karel; Michal, Michal; Švec, Alexander; Špatenka, Jaroslav; Dušek, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sarcoma is a very rare neoplasm and is difficult to diagnose. The case of a 51-year-old man with a left atrial tumour, locally recurrent three months after its surgical removal, is presented. Computed tomography showed metastatic spread to the lung parenchyma. On revised histology, the mass extirpated was a sarcoma. Because of the metastatic spread, further therapy was symptomatic only; the patient died 15 months after the first manifestation of his problems. Immunohistochemical stain...

  1. Unveiling nonischemic cardiomyopathies with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Niti R; Peterson, Tyler J; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A; Glockner, James; Mankad, Sunil V; Williamson, Eric E

    2014-02-01

    Cardiomyopathy is defined as a heterogeneous group of myocardial disorders with mechanical or electrical dysfunction. Identification of the etiology is important for accurate diagnosis, treatment and prognosis, but continues to be challenging. The ability of cardiac MRI to non-invasively obtain 3D-images of unparalleled resolution without radiation exposure and to provide tissue characterization gives it a distinct advantage over any other diagnostic tool used for evaluation of cardiomyopathies. Cardiac MRI can accurately visualize cardiac morphology and function and also help identify myocardial edema, infiltration and fibrosis. It has emerged as an important diagnostic and prognostic tool in tertiary care centers for work up of patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This review covers the role of cardiac MRI in evaluation of nonischemic cardiomyopathies, particularly in the context of other diagnostic and prognostic imaging modalities. PMID:24417294

  2. Cardiac MRI in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is often used in athletes to image cardiac anatomy and function and is increasingly requested in the context of screening for pathology that can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD). In this thesis, patterns of cardiac adaptation to sports are investigated with C

  3. Speaking Fluently And Accurately

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JosephDeVeto

    2004-01-01

    Even after many years of study,students make frequent mistakes in English. In addition, many students still need a long time to think of what they want to say. For some reason, in spite of all the studying, students are still not quite fluent.When I teach, I use one technique that helps students not only speak more accurately, but also more fluently. That technique is dictations.

  4. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  5. Cardiac output measurement : evaluation of methods in ICU patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, Robert Bernard Pieter de

    2009-01-01

    Accurate clinical assessment of the circulatory status is particular desirable in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) and patients undergoing cardiac, thoracic, or vascular interventions. As the patient’s haemodynamic status may change rapidly, continuous monitoring of cardiac o

  6. Reflective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2013-01-01

    Thomas Farrell's "Reflective Teaching" outlines four principles that take teachers from just doing reflection to making it a way of being. Using the four principles, Reflective Practice Is Evidence Based, Reflective Practice Involves Dialogue, Reflective Practice Links Beliefs and Practices, and Reflective Practice Is a Way of Life,…

  7. Cardiac perception and cardiac control. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, D

    1977-12-01

    The evidence regarding specific cardiac perception and discrimination, and its relationship to voluntary cardiac control, is critically reviewed. Studies are considered in three sections, depending on the method used to assess cardiac perception: questionnaire assessment, discrimination procedures, and heartbeat tracking. The heartbeat tracking procedure would appear to suffer least from interpretative difficulties. Recommendations are made regarding the style of analysis used to assess heartbeat perception in such tracking tasks. PMID:348240

  8. Cardiac MRI and CT features of inheritable and congenital conditions associated with sudden cardiac death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparrow, Patrick; Merchant, Naeem; Provost, Yves; Doyle, Deirdre; Nguyen, Elsie; Paul, Narinder [University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    Cardiac MRI (CMR) and electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) are increasingly important tools in the identification and assessment of cardiac-related disease processes, including those associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD). While the commonest cause of SCD is coronary artery disease (CAD), in patients under 35 years inheritable cardiomyopathies such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy are important aetiologies. CMR in particular offers both accurate delineation of the morphological abnormalities associated with these and other conditions and the possibility for risk stratification for development of ventricular arrhythmias with demonstration of macroscopic scar by delayed enhancement imaging with intravenous gadolinium. (orig.)

  9. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...... is based on determination of the left-ventricular endocardial and epicardial borders. Since manual border detection is laborious, automated segmentation is highly desirable as a fast, objective and reproducible alternative. Automated segmentation will thus enhance comparability between and within cardiac...... studies and increase accuracy by allowing acquisition of thinner MRI-slices. This abstract demonstrates that statistical models of shape and appearance, namely the deformable models: Active Appearance Models, can successfully segment cardiac MRIs....

  10. Reflection, Reflective Practice and Embodied Reflective Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Leigh, Jennifer S; Bailey, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Although widely employed in professional practice of all kinds, ‘reflection’ and ‘reflective practice’ can be considered ‘success words’. That is, they elicit positive and supportive responses and yet the concepts are vague, ill-defined, contradictory and reflective skills can be hard to teach. Using examples from education and somatic movement therapy, we argue that a purely analytical approach to reflective practice that involves reflecting on thoughts alone is likely to lead into a negativ...

  11. A Rabbit Ventricular Action Potential Model Replicating Cardiac Dynamics at Rapid Heart Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan, Aman; Shiferaw, Yohannes; Sato, Daisuke; Baher, Ali; Olcese, Riccardo; Xie, Lai-Hua; Yang, Ming-Jim; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Restrepo, Juan G.; Karma, Alain; Garfinkel, Alan; Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N.

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of the cardiac action potential has proven to be a powerful tool for illuminating various aspects of cardiac function, including cardiac arrhythmias. However, no currently available detailed action potential model accurately reproduces the dynamics of the cardiac action potential and intracellular calcium (Cai) cycling at rapid heart rates relevant to ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. The aim of this study was to develop such a model. Using an existing rabbit ven...

  12. Effects of Aesthetic Chills on a Cardiac Signature of Emotionality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sumpf

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that a cardiac signature of emotionality (referred to as EK, which can be computed from the standard 12 lead electrocardiogram, ECG, predicts inter-individual differences in the tendency to experience and express positive emotion. Here, we investigated whether EK values can be transiently modulated during stimulation with participant-selected music pieces and film scenes that elicit strongly positive emotion.The phenomenon of aesthetic chills, as indicated by measurable piloerection on the forearm, was used to accurately locate moments of peak emotional responses during stimulation. From 58 healthy participants, continuous EK values, heart rate, and respiratory frequency were recorded during stimulation with film scenes and music pieces, and were related to the aesthetic chills. EK values, as well as heart rate, increased significantly during moments of peak positive emotion accompanied by piloerection.These results are the first to provide evidence for an influence of momentary psychological state on a cardiac signature of emotional personality (as reflected in EK values. The possibility to modulate ECG amplitude signatures via stimulation with emotionally significant music pieces and film scenes opens up new perspectives for the use of emotional peak experiences in the therapy of disorders characterized by flattened emotionality, such as depression or schizoid personality disorder.

  13. Effects of Aesthetic Chills on a Cardiac Signature of Emotionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumpf, Maria; Jentschke, Sebastian; Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that a cardiac signature of emotionality (referred to as EK, which can be computed from the standard 12 lead electrocardiogram, ECG), predicts inter-individual differences in the tendency to experience and express positive emotion. Here, we investigated whether EK values can be transiently modulated during stimulation with participant-selected music pieces and film scenes that elicit strongly positive emotion. Methodology/Principal Findings The phenomenon of aesthetic chills, as indicated by measurable piloerection on the forearm, was used to accurately locate moments of peak emotional responses during stimulation. From 58 healthy participants, continuous EK values, heart rate, and respiratory frequency were recorded during stimulation with film scenes and music pieces, and were related to the aesthetic chills. EK values, as well as heart rate, increased significantly during moments of peak positive emotion accompanied by piloerection. Conclusions/Significance These results are the first to provide evidence for an influence of momentary psychological state on a cardiac signature of emotional personality (as reflected in EK values). The possibility to modulate ECG amplitude signatures via stimulation with emotionally significant music pieces and film scenes opens up new perspectives for the use of emotional peak experiences in the therapy of disorders characterized by flattened emotionality, such as depression or schizoid personality disorder. PMID:26083383

  14. Diffuse infiltrative cardiac tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the cardiac magnetic resonance images of an unusual form of cardiac tuberculosis. Nodular masses in a sheet-like distribution were seen to infiltrate the outer myocardium and pericardium along most of the cardiac chambers. The lesions showed significant resolution on antitubercular therapy

  15. Cardiac troponin testing in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies and systemic sclerosis-spectrum disorders: biomarkers to distinguish between primary cardiac involvement and low-grade skeletal muscle disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael; Lilleker, James B; Herrick, Ariane L; Chinoy, Hector

    2015-05-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, an under-recognised manifestation of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc)-spectrum disorders, is associated with significant mortality. Within these two conditions, traditional skeletal muscle enzyme testing may not effectively distinguish between skeletal and cardiac muscle involvement, especially in patients with subclinical cardiac disease. Accurate biomarkers are thus required to screen for cardiac disease, to better inform both therapeutic decision-making and treatment response. The widespread uptake of cardiac troponin testing has revolutionised the management of acute coronary syndromes. While cardiac troponin I (cTnI) appears specific to the myocardium, cardiac troponin T (cTnT) is also expressed by skeletal muscle, including regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. There is increasing interest about the role of cardiac troponins as a putative biomarker of primary cardiac involvement in IIM and SSc-spectrum disorders. Herewith we discuss subclinical cardiac disease in IIM and SSc-spectrum disorders, the respective roles of cTnI and cTnT testing, and the re-expression of cTnT within regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. There remains wide variation in access to cardiac troponin testing nationally and internationally. We propose two pragmatic clinical pathways using cardiac troponins, preferably measuring concomitant cTnT followed by confirmatory (cardiac) cTnI to screen patients for subclinical cardiac disease and/or low-grade skeletal muscle disease activity, and also an agenda for future research.

  16. Cardiac tumours in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Jonathan M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac tumours are benign or malignant neoplasms arising primarily in the inner lining, muscle layer, or the surrounding pericardium of the heart. They can be primary or metastatic. Primary cardiac tumours are rare in paediatric practice with a prevalence of 0.0017 to 0.28 in autopsy series. In contrast, the incidence of cardiac tumours during foetal life has been reported to be approximately 0.14%. The vast majority of primary cardiac tumours in children are benign, whilst approximately 10% are malignant. Secondary malignant tumours are 10–20 times more prevalent than primary malignant tumours. Rhabdomyoma is the most common cardiac tumour during foetal life and childhood. It accounts for more than 60% of all primary cardiac tumours. The frequency and type of cardiac tumours in adults differ from those in children with 75% being benign and 25% being malignant. Myxomas are the most common primary tumours in adults constituting 40% of benign tumours. Sarcomas make up 75% of malignant cardiac masses. Echocardiography, Computing Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the heart are the main non-invasive diagnostic tools. Cardiac catheterisation is seldom necessary. Tumour biopsy with histological assessment remains the gold standard for confirmation of the diagnosis. Surgical resection of primary cardiac tumours should be considered to relieve symptoms and mechanical obstruction to blood flow. The outcome of surgical resection in symptomatic, non-myxomatous benign cardiac tumours is favourable. Patients with primary cardiac malignancies may benefit from palliative surgery but this approach should not be recommended for patients with metastatic cardiac tumours. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy may prolong survival. The prognosis for malignant primary cardiac tumours is generally extremely poor.

  17. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  18. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  19. Cardiac expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is increased in obesity and serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil D Bartels

    Full Text Available Obesity causes lipid accumulation in the heart and may lead to lipotoxic heart disease. Traditionally, the size of the cardiac triglyceride pool is thought to reflect the balance between uptake and beta-oxidation of fatty acids. However, triglycerides can also be exported from cardiomyocytes via secretion of apolipoproteinB-containing (apoB lipoproteins. Lipoprotein formation depends on expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP; the mouse expresses two isoforms of MTP, A and B. Since many aspects of the link between obesity-induced cardiac disease and cardiac lipid metabolism remain unknown, we investigated how cardiac lipoprotein synthesis affects cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes, insulin sensitivity, and function in obese mice. Heart-specific ablation of MTP-A in mice using Cre-loxP technology impaired upregulation of MTP expression in response to increased fatty acid availability during fasting and fat feeding. This resulted in cardiac triglyceride accumulation but unaffected cardiac insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Long-term fat-feeding of male C57Bl/6 mice increased cardiac triglycerides, induced cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes and attenuated heart function. Abolishing cardiac triglyceride accumulation in fat-fed mice by overexpression of an apoB transgene in the heart prevented the induction of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes and improved heart function. The results suggest that in obesity, the physiological increase of cardiac MTP expression serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation albeit without major effects on cardiac insulin sensitivity. Nevertheless, the data suggest that genetically increased lipoprotein secretion prevents development of obesity-induced lipotoxic heart disease.

  20. Reflected Glory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The nebula Messier 78 takes centre stage in this image taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, while the stars powering the bright display take a backseat. The brilliant starlight ricochets off dust particles in the nebula, illuminating it with scattered blue light. Igor Chekalin was the overall winner of ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition with his image of this stunning object. Messier 78 is a fine example of a reflection nebula. The ultraviolet radiation from the stars that illuminate it is not intense enough to ionise the gas to make it glow - its dust particles simply reflect the starlight that falls on them. Despite this, Messier 78 can easily be observed with a small telescope, being one of the brightest reflection nebulae in the sky. It lies about 1350 light-years away in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter) and can be found northeast of the easternmost star of Orion's belt. This new image of Messier 78 from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory is based on data selected by Igor Chekalin in his winning entry to the Hidden Treasures competition [1]. The pale blue tint seen in the nebula in this picture is an accurate representation of its dominant colour. Blue hues are commonly seen in reflection nebulae because of the way the starlight is scattered by the tiny dust particles that they contain: the shorter wavelength of blue light is scattered more efficiently than the longer wavelength red light. This image contains many other striking features apart from the glowing nebula. A thick band of obscuring dust stretches across the image from the upper left to the lower right, blocking the light from background stars. In the bottom right corner, many curious pink structures are also visible, which are created by jets of material being ejected from stars that have recently formed and are still buried deep in dust clouds. Two bright stars, HD 38563A and

  1. Blunt cardiac rupture in patient with liver laceration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文林; 曾伟生; 蒋仁超

    2003-01-01

    The early diagnosis of cardiac rupture is one of the key factors for a successful outcome. However, the accurate diagnosis is often difficult in the early stage of injury, especially when some obvious severe wounds are found in other regions of the body,1,2 for they are easy to disguise the symptom of the heart. We report a case with cardiac rupture and liver trauma caused by traffic accident.

  2. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    RAZ scoring is a simple, accurate and inexpensive screening technique for cardiomyopathy. Although HF QRS ECG is highly sensitive for cardiomyopathy, its specificity may be compromised in patients with cardiac pathologies other than cardiomyopathy, such as uncomplicated coronary artery disease or multiple coronary disease risk factors. Further studies are required to determine whether HF QRS might be useful for monitoring cardiomyopathy severity or the efficacy of therapy in a longitudinal fashion.

  3. Mathematical cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Colli Franzone, Piero; Scacchi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the main mathematical and numerical models in computational electrocardiology, ranging from microscopic membrane models of cardiac ionic channels to macroscopic bidomain, monodomain, eikonal models and cardiac source representations. These advanced multiscale and nonlinear models describe the cardiac bioelectrical activity from the cell level to the body surface and are employed in both the direct and inverse problems of electrocardiology. The book also covers advanced numerical techniques needed to efficiently carry out large-scale cardiac simulations, including time and space discretizations, decoupling and operator splitting techniques, parallel finite element solvers. These techniques are employed in 3D cardiac simulations illustrating the excitation mechanisms, the anisotropic effects on excitation and repolarization wavefronts, the morphology of electrograms in normal and pathological tissue and some reentry phenomena. The overall aim of the book is to present rigorously the mathematica...

  4. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  5. Learning rules from multisource data for cardiac monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Cordier, Marie-Odile; Quiniou, René

    2009-01-01

    This paper formalises the concept of learning symbolic rules from multisource data in a cardiac monitoring context. Our sources, electrocardiograms and arterial blood pressure measures, describe cardiac behaviours from different viewpoints. To learn interpretable rules, we use an Inductive Logic Programming (ILP) method. We develop an original strategy to cope with the dimensionality issues caused by using this ILP technique on a rich multisource language. The results show that our method greatly improves the feasibility and the efficiency of the process while staying accurate. They also confirm the benefits of using multiple sources to improve the diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias.

  6. [Cardiac evaluation before non-cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzenbach, Jan; Boehm, Olaf

    2016-07-01

    Before non-cardiac surgery, evaluation of cardiac function is no frequent part of surgical treatment. European societies of anesthesiology and cardiology published consensus-guidelines in 2014 to present a reasonable approach for preoperative evaluation. This paper intends to differentiate the composite of perioperative risk and to display the guidelines methodical approach to handle it. Features to identify patients at risk from an ageing population with comorbidities, are the classification of surgical risk, functional capacity and risk indices. Application of diagnostic means, should be used adjusted to this risk estimation. Cardiac biomarkers are useful to discover risk of complications or mortality, that cannot be assessed by clinical signs. After preoperative optimization and perioperative cardiac protection, the observation of the postoperative period remains, to prohibit complications or even death. In consideration of limited resources of intensive care department, postoperative ward rounds beyond intensive care units are considered to be an appropriate instrument to avoid or recognize complications early to reduce postoperative mortality. PMID:27479258

  7. Cardiac expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is increased in obesity and serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, Jan M; Hellgren, Lars I;

    2009-01-01

    Obesity causes lipid accumulation in the heart and may lead to lipotoxic heart disease. Traditionally, the size of the cardiac triglyceride pool is thought to reflect the balance between uptake and beta-oxidation of fatty acids. However, triglycerides can also be exported from cardiomyocytes via...... secretion of apolipoproteinB-containing (apoB) lipoproteins. Lipoprotein formation depends on expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP); the mouse expresses two isoforms of MTP, A and B. Since many aspects of the link between obesity-induced cardiac disease and cardiac lipid metabolism...... remain unknown, we investigated how cardiac lipoprotein synthesis affects cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes, insulin sensitivity, and function in obese mice. Heart-specific ablation of MTP-A in mice using Cre-loxP technology impaired upregulation of MTP expression...

  8. Quantifying Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcock, Gordon Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    ´ These are all based on Blooms taxonomy and levels of competence and form a major part of individual student and group learning portfolios. Key Words :Project-Based learning, Reflective Portfolios, Self assessment, Defining learning gains, Developing learning strategies , Reflections on and for learning....... It contrasts the students’ self-assessment in a range of ‘product’ skills such as Revit, Structural Design, Mathematics of construction, Technical Installations; as well as ‘process’ competencies such as ‘Working in a team’, Sharing knowledge, Maintaining a portfolio and Reflecting ON learning and FOR learning......This paper documents 1st semester student reflections on “learning to learn” in a team-based PBL environment with quantitative and qualitative student reflective feedback on the learning gains of 60 Architectural Technology and Construction Management students at VIA University College, Denmark...

  9. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  10. QTc interval in the assessment of cardiac risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elming, Hanne; Brendorp, Bente; Køber, Lars;

    2002-01-01

    In the United States alone 300,000-400,000 people die of sudden cardiac death every year. Much of this mortality is assumed to be caused by ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Prolonged QTc reflect cardiac repolarization prolongation and/or increased repolarization inhomogenity known to be associated...... with increased risk of arrhythmias. The paper gives a review of the possibilities to assess the risk of ventricular arrhythmia and/or cardiac death from QTc. Prolonged QTc may hold independent prognostic importance for mortality in common diseases as ischemic heart disease and diabetes mellitus where...

  11. Multidetector row computed tomography may accurately estimate plaque vulnerability. Does MDCT accurately estimate plaque vulnerability? (Pro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past decade, multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) has become the most reliable and established of the noninvasive examination techniques for detecting coronary heart disease. Now MDCT is chasing intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in terms of spatial resolution. Among the components of vulnerable plaque, MDCT may detect lipid-rich plaque, the lipid pool, and calcified spots using computed tomography number. Plaque components are detected by MDCT with high accuracy compared with IVUS and angioscopy when assessing vulnerable plaque. The TWINS study and TOGETHAR trial demonstrated that angioscopic loss of yellow color occurred independently of volumetric plaque change by statin therapy. These 2 studies showed that plaque stabilization and regression reflect independent processes mediated by different mechanisms and time course. Noncalcified plaque and/or low-density plaque was found to be the strongest predictor of cardiac events, regardless of lesion severity, and act as a potential marker of plaque vulnerability. MDCT may be an effective tool for early triage of patients with chest pain who have a normal electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac enzymes in the emergency department. MDCT has the potential ability to analyze coronary plaque quantitatively and qualitatively if some problems are resolved. MDCT may become an essential tool for detecting and preventing coronary artery disease in the future. (author)

  12. Cardiac metabolism and arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Barth, Andreas S.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.

    2009-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death remains a leading cause of mortality in the Western world, accounting for up to 20% of all deaths in the U.S.1, 2 The major causes of sudden cardiac death in adults age 35 and older are coronary artery disease (70–80%) and dilated cardiomyopathy (10–15%).3 At the molecular level, a wide variety of mechanisms contribute to arrhythmias that cause sudden cardiac death, ranging from genetic predisposition (rare mutations and common polymorphisms in ion channels and structural...

  13. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed...... and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  14. The effect of classification of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death on the efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy in the CARE-HF study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uretsky, B.; Cleland, J.G.F.; Freemantle, N.;

    2006-01-01

    Topic(s): The definition of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death (SCD) differs widely among studies, which will affect the frequency with which it is ascribed as the cause of death. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) was reported to reduce SCD in the CARE-HF study. This could reflect a real effec...

  15. Atrial tumors in cardiac MRI; Vorhoftumoren in der kardialen MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, Nils; Schoth, F.; Guenther, R.W.; Krombach, G. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum RWTH Aachen (Germany); Balzer, J.C.; Neizel, M.; Kuehl, H. [Klinik fuer Kardiologie, Pneumologie und Angiologie, Universitaetsklinikum RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for the diagnosis of cardiac masses. Various cardiac tumors are predisposed to occurring in atrial structures. The aim of this review article is the description of atrial tumors and their morphological features in MRI. In general, cardiac tumors are rare: approximately 0.001-0.03% in autopsy studies. About 75% of them are benign. The most common cardiac tumor is the myxoma. They are predisposed to occur in the atria and show a characteristically strong hyperintense signal on T2-wieghted images in MRI. In other sequences a heterogeneous pattern reflects its variable histological appearance. Lipomas exhibit a signal behavior identical to fatty tissue with a typical passive movement in cine imaging. Fibroelastomas are the most common tumors of the cardiac valves. Consisting of avascular fibrous tissue, they often present with hypointense signal intensities. Thrombi attached to their surface can cause severe emboli even in small tumors. Amongst primary cardiac malignancies, sarcomas are most common and favor the atria. Secondary malignancies of the heart are far more common than primary ones (20-40 times). In case of known malignancies, approximately 10% of patients develop cardiac metastasis at the end of their disease. Lymphogenic metastases favor the pericardium, while hematogenic spread prefers the myocardium. Since they are not real atrial tumors, thrombi and anatomical structures of the atria have to be differentiated from other pathologies. (orig.)

  16. Cardiac cachexia: hic et nunc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncar, Goran; Springer, Jochen; Anker, Markus; Doehner, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac cachexia (CC) is the clinical entity at the end of the chronic natural course of heart failure (HF). Despite the efforts, even the most recent definition of cardiac cachexia has been challenged, more precisely, the addition of new criteria on top of obligatory weight loss. The pathophysiology of CC is complex and multifactorial. A better understanding of pathophysiological pathways in body wasting will contribute to establish potentially novel treatment strategies. The complex biochemical network related with CC and HF pathophysiology underlines that a single biomarker cannot reflect all of the features of the disease. Biomarkers that could pick up the changes in body composition before they convey into clinical manifestations of CC would be of great importance. The development of preventive and therapeutic strategies against cachexia, sarcopenia, and wasting disorders is perceived as an urgent need by healthcare professionals. The treatment of body wasting remains an unresolved challenge to this day. As CC is a multifactorial disorder, it is unlikely that any single agent will be completely effective in treating this condition. Among all investigated therapeutic strategies, aerobic exercise training in HF patients is the most proved to counteract skeletal muscle wasting and is recommended by treatment guidelines for HF. PMID:27386168

  17. Cardiac cachexia: hic et nunc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncar, Goran; Springer, Jochen; Anker, Markus; Doehner, Wolfram; Lainscak, Mitja

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac cachexia (CC) is the clinical entity at the end of the chronic natural course of heart failure (HF). Despite the efforts, even the most recent definition of cardiac cachexia has been challenged, more precisely, the addition of new criteria on top of obligatory weight loss. The pathophysiology of CC is complex and multifactorial. A better understanding of pathophysiological pathways in body wasting will contribute to establish potentially novel treatment strategies. The complex biochemical network related with CC and HF pathophysiology underlines that a single biomarker cannot reflect all of the features of the disease. Biomarkers that could pick up the changes in body composition before they convey into clinical manifestations of CC would be of great importance. The development of preventive and therapeutic strategies against cachexia, sarcopenia, and wasting disorders is perceived as an urgent need by healthcare professionals. The treatment of body wasting remains an unresolved challenge to this day. As CC is a multifactorial disorder, it is unlikely that any single agent will be completely effective in treating this condition. Among all investigated therapeutic strategies, aerobic exercise training in HF patients is the most proved to counteract skeletal muscle wasting and is recommended by treatment guidelines for HF. PMID:27386168

  18. Cardiac Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to assess cardiac risk include: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) : Studies have shown that measuring ... LDL-C but does not respond to typical strategies to lower LDL-C such as diet, exercise, ...

  19. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Risk Factors & Prevention Heart Diseases & Disorders Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) SCA: Who's At Risk? Prevention of SCA What Causes SCA? SCA Awareness Atrial Flutter Heart Block Heart Failure Sick Sinus Syndrome Substances & Heart Rhythm Disorders Symptoms & ...

  20. Socially differentiated cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Larsen, Finn Breinholt;

    2012-01-01

    to a standard rehabilitation programme (SRP). If patients were identified as socially vulnerable, they were offered an extended version of the rehabilitation programme (ERP). Excluded patients were offered home visits by a cardiac nurse. Concordance principles were used in the individualised programme elements......%. Patients were equally distributed to the SRP and the ERP. No inequality was found in attendance and adherence among referred patients. Conclusions: It seems possible to overcome unequal referral, attendance, and adherence in cardiac rehabilitation by organisation of systematic screening and social......Aim: The comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme after myocardial infarction (MI) improves quality of life and results in reduced cardiac mortality and recurrence of MI. Hospitals worldwide face problems with low participation rates in rehabilitation programmes. Inequality...

  1. Cardiac arrest - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basri Lenjani; Besnik Elshani; Nehat Baftiu; Kelmend Pallaska; Kadir Hyseni; Njazi Gashi; Nexhbedin Karemani; Ilaz Bunjaku; Taxhidin Zaimi; Arianit Jakupi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) measures within the golden minutes inEurope.Methods:The material was taken from theUniversityClinical Center ofKosovo -EmergencyCentre inPristina, during the two(2) year period(2010-2011).The collected date belong to the patients with cardiac arrest have been recorded in the patients' log book protocol at the emergency clinic.Results:During the2010 to2011 in the emergency center of theCUCK inPristina have been treated a total of269 patients with cardiac arrest, of whom159 or59.1% have been treated in2010, and110 patients or40.9% in2011.Of the269 patients treated in the emergency centre,93 or34.6% have exited lethally in the emergency centre, and176 or 65.4% have been transferred to other clinics.In the total number of patients with cardiac arrest, males have dominated with186 cases, or69.1%.The average age of patients included in the survey was56.7 year oldSD±16.0 years.Of the269 patients with cardiac arrest, defibrillation has been applied for93 or34.6% of patients.In the outpatient settings defibrillation has been applied for3 or3.2% of patients.Patients were defibrillated with application of one to four shocks. Of27 cases with who have survived cardiac arrest, none of them have suffered cardiac arrest at home,3 or11.1% of them have suffered cardiac arrest on the street, and24 or88.9% of them have suffered cardiac arrest in the hospital.5 out of27 patients survived have ended with neurological impairment.Cardiac arrest cases were present during all days of the week, but frequently most reported cases have been onMonday with32.0% of cases, and onFriday with24.5% of cases. Conclusions:All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care(with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care) the rate of survival is higher.

  2. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  3. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, Marthin; Held, Klaus; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the rehabilitation measures provided for cardiac patients in Germany and to outline its legal basis and outcomes. In Germany the cardiac rehabilitation system is different from rehabilitation measures in other European countries. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany since 1885 is based on specific laws and the regulations of insurance providers. Cardiac rehabilitation has predominantly been offered as an inpatient service, but has recently been complemented by outpatient services. A general agreement on the different indications for offering these two services has yet to be reached. Cardiac rehabilitation is mainly offered after an acute cardiac event and bypass surgery. It is also indicated in severe heart failure and special cases of percutaneous coronary intervention. Most patients are men (>65%) and the age at which events occur is increasing. The benefits obtained during the 3-4 weeks after an acute event, and confirmed in numerous studies, are often later lost under 'usual care' conditions. Many attempts have been made by rehabilitation institutions to improve this deficit by providing intensive aftercare. One instrument set up to achieve this is the nationwide institution currently comprising more than 6000 heart groups with approximately 120000 outpatients. After coronary artery bypass grafting or acute coronary syndrome cardiac rehabilitation can usually be started within 10 days. The multidisciplinary rehabilitation team consists of cardiologists, psychologists, exercise therapists, social workers, nutritionists and nurses. The positive effects of cardiac rehabilitation are also important economically, for example, for the improvement of secondary prevention and vocational integration. PMID:17301623

  4. Cardiac tumours in infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yadava, O.P.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac tumours in infancy are rare and are mostly benign with rhabdomyomas, fibromas and teratomas accounting for the majority. The presentation depends on size and location of the mass as they tend to cause cavity obstruction or arrhythmias. Most rhabdomyomas tend to regress spontaneously but fibromas and teratomas generally require surgical intervention for severe haemodynamic or arrhythmic complications. Other relatively rare cardiac tumours too are discussed along with an Indian perspect...

  5. Infected cardiac hydatid cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Ceviz, M; Becit, N; Kocak, H.

    2001-01-01

    A 24 year old woman presented with chest pain and palpitation. The presence of a semisolid mass—an echinococcal cyst or tumour—in the left ventricular apex was diagnosed by echocardiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The infected cyst was seen at surgery. The cyst was removed successfully by using cardiopulmonary bypass with cross clamp.


Keywords: cardiac hydatid cyst; infected cardiac hydatid cyst

  6. Cardiac applications of optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Christina M; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics.

  7. Systems and methods for remote long standoff biometric identification using microwave cardiac signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, William R. (Inventor); Talukder, Ashit (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Systems and methods for remote, long standoff biometric identification using microwave cardiac signals are provided. In one embodiment, the invention relates to a method for remote biometric identification using microwave cardiac signals, the method including generating and directing first microwave energy in a direction of a person, receiving microwave energy reflected from the person, the reflected microwave energy indicative of cardiac characteristics of the person, segmenting a signal indicative of the reflected microwave energy into a waveform including a plurality of heart beats, identifying patterns in the microwave heart beats waveform, and identifying the person based on the identified patterns and a stored microwave heart beats waveform.

  8. Speckle Tracking Based Strain Analysis Is Sensitive for Early Detection of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangbo An

    Full Text Available Cardiac hypertrophy is a key pathological process of many cardiac diseases. However, early detection of cardiac hypertrophy is difficult by the currently used non-invasive method and new approaches are in urgent need for efficient diagnosis of cardiac malfunction. Here we report that speckle tracking-based strain analysis is more sensitive than conventional echocardiography for early detection of pathological cardiac hypertrophy in the isoproterenol (ISO mouse model. Pathological hypertrophy was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of ISO. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy was established by daily treadmill exercise for six weeks. Strain analysis, including radial strain (RS, radial strain rate (RSR and longitudinal strain (LS, showed marked decrease as early as 3 days after ISO injection. Moreover, unlike the regional changes in cardiac infarction, strain analysis revealed global cardiac dysfunction that affects the entire heart in ISO-induced hypertrophy. In contrast, conventional echocardiography, only detected altered E/E', an index reflecting cardiac diastolic function, at 7 days after ISO injection. No change was detected on fractional shortening (FS, E/A and E'/A' at 3 days or 7 days after ISO injection. Interestingly, strain analysis revealed cardiac dysfunction only in ISO-induced pathological hypertrophy but not the physiological hypertrophy induced by exercise. Taken together, our study indicates that strain analysis offers a more sensitive approach for early detection of cardiac dysfunction than conventional echocardiography. Moreover, multiple strain readouts distinguish pathological cardiac hypertrophy from physiological hypertrophy.

  9. Speckle Tracking Based Strain Analysis Is Sensitive for Early Detection of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xiangbo; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Hao; Lu, Zhizhen; Bai, Yan; Xiao, Han; Zhang, Youyi; Song, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a key pathological process of many cardiac diseases. However, early detection of cardiac hypertrophy is difficult by the currently used non-invasive method and new approaches are in urgent need for efficient diagnosis of cardiac malfunction. Here we report that speckle tracking-based strain analysis is more sensitive than conventional echocardiography for early detection of pathological cardiac hypertrophy in the isoproterenol (ISO) mouse model. Pathological hypertrophy was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of ISO. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy was established by daily treadmill exercise for six weeks. Strain analysis, including radial strain (RS), radial strain rate (RSR) and longitudinal strain (LS), showed marked decrease as early as 3 days after ISO injection. Moreover, unlike the regional changes in cardiac infarction, strain analysis revealed global cardiac dysfunction that affects the entire heart in ISO-induced hypertrophy. In contrast, conventional echocardiography, only detected altered E/E', an index reflecting cardiac diastolic function, at 7 days after ISO injection. No change was detected on fractional shortening (FS), E/A and E'/A' at 3 days or 7 days after ISO injection. Interestingly, strain analysis revealed cardiac dysfunction only in ISO-induced pathological hypertrophy but not the physiological hypertrophy induced by exercise. Taken together, our study indicates that strain analysis offers a more sensitive approach for early detection of cardiac dysfunction than conventional echocardiography. Moreover, multiple strain readouts distinguish pathological cardiac hypertrophy from physiological hypertrophy.

  10. Measuring temporal resolution of cardiac CT reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, David; Heuscher, Dominic

    2005-04-01

    Multi-slice CT today is capable of imaging the heart with excellent temporal resolution. Algorithms have been developed to perform reconstructions combining data from multiple cardiac cycles. This paper presents a simulation phantom that enables a direct measurement of the actual temporal resolution achieved by these algorithms. This is not only useful for assessing the temporal resolution but also for validating the algorithms themselves. A simulation phantom was developed that consists of a 20 cm. diameter water phantom containing an array of cylinders whose intensities are pulsed for various durations ranging from 10 msec. to 250 msec. The intensity varied between the background value of water (0 HU) and 800 HU. By measuring the nominal attenuation value at the center of each cylinder, a curve can be derived representing the response over the given temporal range. A temporal resolution representing the FWHM value is determined based on the half-max value of this curve. Reconstructions were performed using a multi-cycle cardiac algorithm described previously in the literature. The measured FWHM values agree quite well to the temporal resolution predicted by the cardiac algorithm itself. Even the variation along the longitudinal axis can be accounted for by the predicted values. A simulated phantom can be used to accurately assess the temporal resolution of cardiac reconstruction algorithms. Excellent agreement was achieved between the predicted and measured temporal resolution values for the multi-cycle algorithm used in this study.

  11. Reconstruction of dynamic gated cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we propose an image reconstruction procedure which aims to unify gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and dynamic SPECT into a single method. We divide the cardiac cycle into a number of gate intervals as in gated SPECT, but treat the tracer distribution for each gate as a time-varying signal. By using both dynamic and motion-compensated temporal regularization, our reconstruction procedure will produce an image sequence that shows both cardiac motion and time-varying tracer distribution simultaneously. To demonstrate the proposed reconstruction method, we simulated gated cardiac perfusion imaging using the gated mathematical cardiac-torso (gMCAT) phantom with Tc99m-Teboroxime as the imaging agent. Our results show that the proposed method can produce more accurate reconstruction of gated dynamic images than independent reconstruction of individual gate frames with spatial smoothness alone. In particular, our results show that the former could improve the contrast to noise ratio of a simulated perfusion defect by as much as 100% when compared to the latter

  12. Accurate calculation of thermal noise in multilayer coating

    OpenAIRE

    Gurkovsky, Alexey; Vyatchanin, Sergey

    2010-01-01

    We derive accurate formulas for thermal fluctuations in multilayer interferometric coating taking into account light propagation inside the coating. In particular, we calculate the reflected wave phase as a function of small displacements of the boundaries between the layers using transmission line model for interferometric coating and derive formula for spectral density of reflected phase in accordance with Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem. We apply the developed approach for calculation of t...

  13. Towards accurate emergency response behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactor operator emergency response behavior has persisted as a training problem through lack of information. The industry needs an accurate definition of operator behavior in adverse stress conditions, and training methods which will produce the desired behavior. Newly assembled information from fifty years of research into human behavior in both high and low stress provides a more accurate definition of appropriate operator response, and supports training methods which will produce the needed control room behavior. The research indicates that operator response in emergencies is divided into two modes, conditioned behavior and knowledge based behavior. Methods which assure accurate conditioned behavior, and provide for the recovery of knowledge based behavior, are described in detail

  14. Exercise-induced cardiac fatigue in low handicap polo horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAO Bello

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise leads to several changes in the cardiovascular system of horses and may induce abnormalities that are not observed at rest. Little is known about the cardiac effects of intense physical exercise performed by horses in polo competitions. This study aimed at identifying if exercise-induced cardiac fatigue is observed in healthy polo ponies. We examined 25 equine athletes before and after a training match. The results demonstrated post-exercise electrocardiographic alteration such as cardiac arrhythmia, QTc prolongation, abnormal T waves and ST-segment elevation. The post-exercise echocardiogram showed interventricular septum and left ventricle free wall thickness reduction, systolic volume decreased and ejection fraction decreased. These results suggest that polo causes exercise-induced cardiac fatigue. It was not possible to establish accurately the etiology of this abnormality, nor its long-term consequences.

  15. Mechanistically based mapping of human cardiac fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sanjiv M; Zaman, Junaid A B

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms underpinning human cardiac fibrillation remain elusive. In his 1913 paper 'On dynamic equilibrium in the heart', Mines proposed that an activation wave front could propagate repeatedly in a circle, initiated by a stimulus in the vulnerable period. While the dynamics of activation and recovery are central to cardiac fibrillation, these physiological data are rarely used in clinical mapping. Fibrillation is a rapid irregular rhythm with spatiotemporal disorder resulting from two fundamental mechanisms - sources in preferred cardiac regions or spatially diffuse self-sustaining activity, i.e. with no preferred source. On close inspection, however, this debate may also reflect mapping technique. Fibrillation is initiated from triggers by regional dispersion in repolarization, slow conduction and wavebreak, then sustained by non-uniform interactions of these mechanisms. Notably, optical mapping of action potentials in atrial fibrillation (AF) show spiral wave sources (rotors) in nearly all studies including humans, while most traditional electrogram analyses of AF do not. Techniques may diverge in fibrillation because electrograms summate non-coherent waves within an undefined field whereas optical maps define waves with a visually defined field. Also fibrillation operates at the limits of activation and recovery, which are well represented by action potentials while fibrillatory electrograms poorly represent repolarization. We conclude by suggesting areas for study that may be used, until such time as optical mapping is clinically feasible, to improve mechanistic understanding and therapy of human cardiac fibrillation. PMID:26607671

  16. Accurate Modeling of Advanced Reflectarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Min

    Analysis and optimization methods for the design of advanced printed re ectarrays have been investigated, and the study is focused on developing an accurate and efficient simulation tool. For the analysis, a good compromise between accuracy and efficiency can be obtained using the spectral domain...

  17. Cardiac MRI of acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerem Khan, Shamruz; Khan, Shamruz Akarem; Williamson, Eric E; Foley, Thomas A; Cullen, Ethany L; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A

    2013-05-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. New serological biomarkers, such as troponins, have improved the diagnosis of ACS; however, the diagnosis of ACS can still be difficult as there is marked heterogeneity in its presentation and significant overlap with other disorders presenting with chest pain. Evidence is accumulating that cardiac MRI provides information that can aid the detection and differential diagnosis of ACS, guide clinical decision-making and improve risk-stratification after an event. In this review, we present the relevant cardiac MRI techniques that can be used to detect ACS accurately, provide differential diagnosis, identify the sequelae of ACS, and determine prognostication after ACS. PMID:23668741

  18. Inspiring Reflections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchie, Mammo

    2011-01-01

    A numberof Chris Freeman's colleagues were asked to reflect on what they thought describes his life and work in a few words. Some of the colleagues replied including former SPRU students that were taught or supervised by Chris Freeman. Their views on what they thought were Chris Freeman's defining...... but also social exclusion, equity and social justice....

  19. Pediatric cardiac postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. José Otávio Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo, Medical School is a referral center for the treatment of congenital heart diseases of neonates and infants. In the recent years, the excellent surgical results obtained in our institution may be in part due to modern anesthetic care and to postoperative care based on well-structured protocols. The purpose of this article is to review unique aspects of neonate cardiovascular physiology, the impact of extracorporeal circulation on postoperative evolution, and the prescription for pharmacological support of acute cardiac dysfunction based on our cardiac unit protocols. The main causes of low cardiac output after surgical correction of heart congenital disease are reviewed, and methods of treatment and support are proposed as derived from the relevant literature and our protocols.

  20. The cardiac anxiety questionnaire: cross-validation among cardiac inpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, M.H. van; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Deelen, F.M. van; Balkom, A.J. van; Pop, G.A.; Speckens, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: General anxiety symptoms are common in patients with cardiac disease and considered to have an adverse effect on cardiac prognosis. The role of specific cardiac anxiety, however, is still unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the D

  1. THE CARDIAC ANXIETY QUESTIONNAIRE : CROSS-VALIDATION AMONG CARDIAC INPATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, M. H. C. T.; Voshaar, R. C. Oude; van Deelen, F. M.; van Balkom, A. J. L. M.; Pop, G.; Speckens, A. E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: General anxiety symptoms are common in patients with cardiac disease and considered to have an adverse effect on cardiac prognosis. The role of specific cardiac anxiety, however, is still unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the D

  2. A fast and accurate method for echocardiography strain rate imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Vahid; Sahba, Nima; Hajebi, Nima; Nambakhsh, Mohammad Saleh

    2009-02-01

    Recently Strain and strain rate imaging have proved their superiority with respect to classical motion estimation methods in myocardial evaluation as a novel technique for quantitative analysis of myocardial function. Here in this paper, we propose a novel strain rate imaging algorithm using a new optical flow technique which is more rapid and accurate than the previous correlation-based methods. The new method presumes a spatiotemporal constancy of intensity and Magnitude of the image. Moreover the method makes use of the spline moment in a multiresolution approach. Moreover cardiac central point is obtained using a combination of center of mass and endocardial tracking. It is proved that the proposed method helps overcome the intensity variations of ultrasound texture while preserving the ability of motion estimation technique for different motions and orientations. Evaluation is performed on simulated, phantom (a contractile rubber balloon) and real sequences and proves that this technique is more accurate and faster than the previous methods.

  3. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamare, F., E-mail: frederic.lamare@chu-bordeaux.fr; Fernandez, P. [Univ. Bordeaux, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Service de Médecine Nucléaire, Hôpital Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, 29609 Brest (France); Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Mendelstr. 11, 48149 Münster (Germany); Rimoldi, O. E. [Vita-Salute University and Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy and CNR Istituto di Bioimmagini e Fisiologia Molecolare, Milan (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    observed in the performance of the two motion models considered. Superior image SNR and contrast were seen using the affine respiratory motion model in combination with the diastole cardiac bin in comparison to the use of the whole cardiac cycle. In contrast, when simultaneously correcting for cardiac beating and respiration, the elastic respiratory motion model outperformed the affine model. In this context, four cardiac bins associated with eight respiratory amplitude bins seemed to be adequate. Conclusions: Considering the compensation of respiratory motion effects only, both affine and elastic based approaches led to an accurate resizing and positioning of the myocardium. The use of the diastolic phase combined with an affine model based respiratory motion correction may therefore be a simple approach leading to significant quality improvements in cardiac PET imaging. However, the best performance was obtained with the combined correction for both cardiac and respiratory movements considering all the dual-gated bins independently through the use of an elastic model based motion compensation.

  4. Giant Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Eric; Costic, Joseph; Laub, Glenn

    2015-07-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma in a 71-year-old man. The intracardiac mass was discovered incidentally during surveillance for his prostate cancer; however, the patient initially declined intervention. On presentation to our institution 7 years later, the lesion had enlarged significantly, and the patient consented to excision. At surgery, an 8 × 6.5 × 4.8 cm intracardiac mass located on the inferior heart border was excised with an intact capsule through a median sternotomy approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We discuss the diagnostic workup, treatment, and characteristics of this rare cardiac tumor. PMID:26140782

  5. Left and right ventricle assessment with Cardiac CT: validation study vs. Cardiac MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffei, Erica; Seitun, Sara [Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Cardiovascular Radiology Unit, Monastier di Treviso (Italy); Messalli, Giancarlo; Catalano, Onofrio [SDN Foundation - IRCCS, Naples (Italy); Martini, Chiara; Cademartiri, Filippo [Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Cardiovascular Radiology Unit, Monastier di Treviso (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Nieman, Koen; Rossi, Alexia; Mollet, Nico R. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Guaricci, Andrea I. [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Foggia, Department of Cardiology, Foggia (Italy); Tedeschi, Carlo [Ospedale San Gennaro, Department of Cardiology, Naples (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    To compare Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Computed Tomography (CT) for the assessment of left (LV) and right (RV) ventricular functional parameters. Seventy nine patients underwent both Cardiac CT and Cardiac MR. Images were acquired using short axis (SAX) reconstructions for CT and 2D cine b-SSFP (balanced-steady state free precession) SAX sequence for MR, and evaluated using dedicated software. CT and MR images showed good agreement: LV EF (Ejection Fraction) (52 {+-} 14% for CT vs. 52 {+-} 14% for MR; r = 0.73; p > 0.05); RV EF (47 {+-} 12% for CT vs. 47 {+-} 12% for MR; r = 0.74; p > 0.05); LV EDV (End Diastolic Volume) (74 {+-} 21 ml/m{sup 2} for CT vs. 76 {+-} 25 ml/m{sup 2} for MR; r = 0.59; p > 0.05); RV EDV (84 {+-} 25 ml/m{sup 2} for CT vs. 80 {+-} 23 ml/m{sup 2} for MR; r = 0.58; p > 0.05); LV ESV (End Systolic Volume)(37 {+-} 19 ml/m{sup 2} for CT vs. 38 {+-} 23 ml/m{sup 2} for MR; r = 0.76; p > 0.05); RV ESV (46 {+-} 21 ml/m{sup 2} for CT vs. 43 {+-} 18 ml/m{sup 2} for MR; r = 0.70; p > 0.05). Intra- and inter-observer variability were good, and the performance of CT was maintained for different EF subgroups. Cardiac CT provides accurate and reproducible LV and RV volume parameters compared with MR, and can be considered as a reliable alternative for patients who are not suitable to undergo MR. circle Cardiac-CT is able to provide Left and Right Ventricular function. circle Cardiac-CT is accurate as MR for LV and RV volume assessment. (orig.)

  6. Profitable capitation requires accurate costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, D A; Hicks, L L; Balas, E A; West, T D

    1996-01-01

    In the name of costing accuracy, nurses are asked to track inventory use on per treatment basis when more significant costs, such as general overhead and nursing salaries, are usually allocated to patients or treatments on an average cost basis. Accurate treatment costing and financial viability require analysis of all resources actually consumed in treatment delivery, including nursing services and inventory. More precise costing information enables more profitable decisions as is demonstrated by comparing the ratio-of-cost-to-treatment method (aggregate costing) with alternative activity-based costing methods (ABC). Nurses must participate in this costing process to assure that capitation bids are based upon accurate costs rather than simple averages. PMID:8788799

  7. Perioperative management of cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aresti, N A; Malik, A A; Ihsan, K M; Aftab, S M E; Khan, W S

    2014-01-01

    Pre-existing cardiac disease contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality amongst patients undergoing non cardiac surgery. Patients with pre-existing cardiac disease or with risk factors for it, have as much as a 3.9% risk of suffering a major perioperative cardiac event (Lee et al 1999, Devereaux 2005). Furthermore, the incidence of perioperative myocardial infarction (MI) is increased 10 to 50 fold in patients with previous coronary events (Jassal 2008).

  8. Accurate radiative transfer calculations for layered media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Adrian C

    2016-07-01

    Simple yet accurate results for radiative transfer in layered media with discontinuous refractive index are obtained by the method of K-integrals. These are certain weighted integrals applied to the angular intensity distribution at the refracting boundaries. The radiative intensity is expressed as the sum of the asymptotic angular intensity distribution valid in the depth of the scattering medium and a transient term valid near the boundary. Integrated boundary equations are obtained, yielding simple linear equations for the intensity coefficients, enabling the angular emission intensity and the diffuse reflectance (albedo) and transmittance of the scattering layer to be calculated without solving the radiative transfer equation directly. Examples are given of half-space, slab, interface, and double-layer calculations, and extensions to multilayer systems are indicated. The K-integral method is orders of magnitude more accurate than diffusion theory and can be applied to layered scattering media with a wide range of scattering albedos, with potential applications to biomedical and ocean optics. PMID:27409700

  9. Audible reflection density for different late reflection criteria in rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krueger, Donata; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas;

    2012-01-01

    For reasonably accurate but practical auralizations, some simplifications and approximations are needed. The main issue in the present investigation is that the reflection density of a room impulse response, in theory, increases so fast as a quadratic function of the elapsed time, even assuming...... only specular reflections. Therefore in this study, the upper threshold for audible reflection density is investigated for four different transition times of 25, 50, 75, and 100 ms through a headphone listening test. Binaural impulse responses and speech signals simulated in three rooms with different...... characteristics (an empty office, a lecture room, and an auditorium) are used as stimuli. Subjects are asked to increase/decrease the reflection density of a stimulus until they cannot distinguish it from the stimulus that follows the theoretical reflection density for the different transition times in the three...

  10. The cardiac malpositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perloff, Joseph K

    2011-11-01

    Dextrocardia was known in the 17th century and was 1 of the first congenital malformations of the heart to be recognized. Fifty years elapsed before Matthew Baillie published his account of complete transposition in a human of the thoracic and abdominal viscera to the opposite side from what is natural. In 1858, Thomas Peacock stated that "the heart may be congenitally misplaced in various ways, occupying either an unusual position within the thorax, or being situated external to that cavity." In 1915, Maude Abbott described ectopia cordis, and Richard Paltauf's remarkable illustrations distinguished the various types of dextrocardia. In 1928, the first useful classification of the cardiac malpositions was proposed, and in 1966, Elliott et al's radiologic classification set the stage for clinical recognition. The first section of this review deals with the 3 basic cardiac malpositions in the presence of bilateral asymmetry. The second section deals with cardiac malpositions in the presence of bilateral left-sidedness or right-sidedness. Previous publications on cardiac malpositions are replete with an arcane vocabulary that confounds rather than clarifies. Even if the terms themselves are understood, inherent complexity weighs against clarity. This review was designed as a guided tour of an unfamiliar subject.

  11. Hepato-cardiac disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasser; Mahrous; Fouad; Reem; Yehia

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationship between the liver and the heart is important for both hepatologists and cardiologists. Hepato-cardiac diseases can be classified into heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions affecting the heart and the liver at the same time. Differential diagnoses of liver injury are extremely important in a cardiologist’s clinical practice calling for collaboration between cardiologists and hepatologists due to the many other diseases that can affect the liver and mimic haemodynamic injury. Acute and chronic heart failure may lead to acute ischemic hepatitis or chronic congestive hepatopathy. Treatment in these cases should be directed to the primary heart disease. In patients with advanced liver disease, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may develop including hemodynamic changes, diastolic and systolic dysfunctions, reduced cardiac performance and electrophysiological abnormalities. Cardiac evaluation is important for patients with liver diseases especially before and after liver transplantation. Liver transplantation may lead to the improvement of all cardiac changes and the reversal of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. There are systemic diseases that may affect both the liver and the heart concomitantly including congenital, metabolic and inflammatory diseases as well as alcoholism. This review highlights these hepatocardiac diseases

  12. Cardiac effects of vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien; Dicken, Bryan; Bigam, David; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2014-07-01

    Vasopressin is an essential hormone involved in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. It has been in use therapeutically for many decades, with an emphasis on its vasoconstrictive and antidiuretic properties. However, this hormone has a ubiquitous influence and has specific effects on the heart. Although difficult to separate from its powerful vascular effects in the clinical setting, a better understanding of vasopressin's direct cardiac effects could lead to its more effective clinical use for a variety of shock states by maximizing its therapeutic benefit. The cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin are complex and require further elucidation. Complicating our understanding include the various receptors and secondary messengers involved in vasopressin's effects, which may lead to various results based on differing doses and varying environmental conditions. Thus, there have been contradictory reports on vasopressin's action on the coronary vasculature and on its effect on inotropy. However, beneficial results have been found and warrant further study to expand the potential therapeutic role of vasopressin. This review outlines the effect of vasopressin on the coronary vasculature, cardiac contractility, and on hypertrophy and cardioprotection. These cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin represent an interesting area for further study for potentially important therapeutic benefits. PMID:24621650

  13. Cardiac potassium channel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2014-01-01

    About 10 distinct potassium channels in the heart are involved in shaping the action potential. Some of the K(+) channels are primarily responsible for early repolarization, whereas others drive late repolarization and still others are open throughout the cardiac cycle. Three main K(+) channels...

  14. Cardiac pacemaker power sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of chemical and radioisotope batteries used in cardiac pacemakers is presented. The battery systems are examined in terms of longevity, reliability, cost, size and shape, energy density, weight, internal resistance versus time, end-of-life voltage, chemical compatibility, and potential failure mechanisms

  15. Accurate determination of antenna directivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, Mikael

    1997-01-01

    The derivation of a formula for accurate estimation of the total radiated power from a transmitting antenna for which the radiated power density is known in a finite number of points on the far-field sphere is presented. The main application of the formula is determination of directivity from power......-pattern measurements. The derivation is based on the theory of spherical wave expansion of electromagnetic fields, which also establishes a simple criterion for the required number of samples of the power density. An array antenna consisting of Hertzian dipoles is used to test the accuracy and rate of convergence...

  16. Preoperative cardiac computed tomography for demonstration of congenital cardiac septal defect in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aimed to evaluate the role of preoperative cardiac computed tomography (CT) for adults with congenital cardiac septal defect (CSD). Sixty-five consecutive patients who underwent preoperative CT and surgery for CSD were included. The diagnostic accuracy of CT and the concordance rate of the subtype classification of CSD were evaluated using surgical findings as the reference standard. Sixty-five patients without CSD who underwent cardiac valve surgery were used as a control group. An incremental value of CT over echocardiography was described retrospectively. Sensitivity and specificity of CT for diagnosis of CSD were 95 % and 100 %, respectively. The concordance rate of subtype classification was 91 % in CT and 92 % in echocardiography. The maximum size of the defect measured by CT correlated well with surgical measurement (r = 0.82), and the limit of agreement was -0.9 ± 7.42 mm. In comparison with echocardiography, CT was able to detect combined abnormalities in three cases, and exclusively provided correct subtype classification or clarified suspected abnormal findings found on echocardiography in seven cases. Cardiac CT can accurately demonstrates CSD in preoperative adult patients. CT may have an incremental role in preoperative planning, particularly in those with more complex anatomy. (orig.)

  17. Preoperative cardiac computed tomography for demonstration of congenital cardiac septal defect in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hye-Joung; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Joon-Won; Lim, Tae-Hwan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Cardiac Imaging Center, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae-Hee; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Song, Jae-Kwan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Cardiology and Heart Institute, Cardiac Imaging Center, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joon Bum; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Cardiothoracic surgery, Cardiac Imaging Center, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the role of preoperative cardiac computed tomography (CT) for adults with congenital cardiac septal defect (CSD). Sixty-five consecutive patients who underwent preoperative CT and surgery for CSD were included. The diagnostic accuracy of CT and the concordance rate of the subtype classification of CSD were evaluated using surgical findings as the reference standard. Sixty-five patients without CSD who underwent cardiac valve surgery were used as a control group. An incremental value of CT over echocardiography was described retrospectively. Sensitivity and specificity of CT for diagnosis of CSD were 95 % and 100 %, respectively. The concordance rate of subtype classification was 91 % in CT and 92 % in echocardiography. The maximum size of the defect measured by CT correlated well with surgical measurement (r = 0.82), and the limit of agreement was -0.9 ± 7.42 mm. In comparison with echocardiography, CT was able to detect combined abnormalities in three cases, and exclusively provided correct subtype classification or clarified suspected abnormal findings found on echocardiography in seven cases. Cardiac CT can accurately demonstrates CSD in preoperative adult patients. CT may have an incremental role in preoperative planning, particularly in those with more complex anatomy. (orig.)

  18. Parameters for accurate genome alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada Michiaki

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequence alignments form the basis of much research. Genome alignment depends on various mundane but critical choices, such as how to mask repeats and which score parameters to use. Surprisingly, there has been no large-scale assessment of these choices using real genomic data. Moreover, rigorous procedures to control the rate of spurious alignment have not been employed. Results We have assessed 495 combinations of score parameters for alignment of animal, plant, and fungal genomes. As our gold-standard of accuracy, we used genome alignments implied by multiple alignments of proteins and of structural RNAs. We found the HOXD scoring schemes underlying alignments in the UCSC genome database to be far from optimal, and suggest better parameters. Higher values of the X-drop parameter are not always better. E-values accurately indicate the rate of spurious alignment, but only if tandem repeats are masked in a non-standard way. Finally, we show that γ-centroid (probabilistic alignment can find highly reliable subsets of aligned bases. Conclusions These results enable more accurate genome alignment, with reliability measures for local alignments and for individual aligned bases. This study was made possible by our new software, LAST, which can align vertebrate genomes in a few hours http://last.cbrc.jp/.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda, E-mail: ferbraggion@yahoo.com.br [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Teixeira, Sara Reis [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Volpe, Gustavo Jardim [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Divisão de Cardiologia - Universidade Johns Hopkins, Baltimore (United States); Trad, Henrique Simão [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Schmidt, André [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility.

  20. Age- and gender-specific reference values for cardiac chamber geometry and function using three-dimensional echocardiography

    OpenAIRE

    Badano, Luigi P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) enables a comprehensive, accurate and reproducible quantification of cardiac chamber size and function without any geometric assumption about their shape. Superior accuracy and reproducibility of 3DE over stabdard two-dimensional (2DE) approach for cardiac chamber volume measurements in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has been well documented in a number of studies. Both the European Association of Cardiovascular Imag...

  1. On Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasco, Maribel

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how the concept of reflexivity is used in intercultural education. Reflexivity is often presented as a key learning goal in acquiring intercultural competence (ICC). Yet, reflexivity can be defined in different ways, and take different forms across time and space, depending...... on the concepts of selfhood that prevail and how notions of difference are constructed. First, I discuss how the dominant usages of reflexivity in intercultural education reflect and reproduce a Cartesian view of the self that shapes how ICC is conceptualized and taught. I discuss three assumptions that this view...... in designing learning objectives in intercultural education and in devising ways to attain them. Greater attention is also needed in intercultural education to the ways in which selfhood, and hence also reflexivity and constructions of difference, differ across space and time....

  2. Accurate ab initio spin densities

    CERN Document Server

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Legeza, Örs; Reiher, Markus

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys. 2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CA...

  3. The Accurate Particle Tracer Code

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yulei; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The Accurate Particle Tracer (APT) code is designed for large-scale particle simulations on dynamical systems. Based on a large variety of advanced geometric algorithms, APT possesses long-term numerical accuracy and stability, which are critical for solving multi-scale and non-linear problems. Under the well-designed integrated and modularized framework, APT serves as a universal platform for researchers from different fields, such as plasma physics, accelerator physics, space science, fusion energy research, computational mathematics, software engineering, and high-performance computation. The APT code consists of seven main modules, including the I/O module, the initialization module, the particle pusher module, the parallelization module, the field configuration module, the external force-field module, and the extendible module. The I/O module, supported by Lua and Hdf5 projects, provides a user-friendly interface for both numerical simulation and data analysis. A series of new geometric numerical methods...

  4. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Stapleton, Andrew J.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Gibson, Christopher T.

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  5. Accurate thickness measurement of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Stapleton, Andrew J; Shapter, Joseph G; Gibson, Christopher T

    2016-03-29

    Graphene has emerged as a material with a vast variety of applications. The electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene are strongly influenced by the number of layers present in a sample. As a result, the dimensional characterization of graphene films is crucial, especially with the continued development of new synthesis methods and applications. A number of techniques exist to determine the thickness of graphene films including optical contrast, Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy techniques. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), in particular, is used extensively since it provides three-dimensional images that enable the measurement of the lateral dimensions of graphene films as well as the thickness, and by extension the number of layers present. However, in the literature AFM has proven to be inaccurate with a wide range of measured values for single layer graphene thickness reported (between 0.4 and 1.7 nm). This discrepancy has been attributed to tip-surface interactions, image feedback settings and surface chemistry. In this work, we use standard and carbon nanotube modified AFM probes and a relatively new AFM imaging mode known as PeakForce tapping mode to establish a protocol that will allow users to accurately determine the thickness of graphene films. In particular, the error in measuring the first layer is reduced from 0.1-1.3 nm to 0.1-0.3 nm. Furthermore, in the process we establish that the graphene-substrate adsorbate layer and imaging force, in particular the pressure the tip exerts on the surface, are crucial components in the accurate measurement of graphene using AFM. These findings can be applied to other 2D materials.

  6. Neuromuscular blockade in cardiac surgery: An update for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmerling Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been great advancements in cardiac surgery over the last two decades; the widespread use of off-pump aortocoronary bypass surgery, minimally invasive cardiac surgery, and robotic surgery have also changed the face of cardiac anaesthesia. The concept of "Fast-track anaesthesia" demands the use of nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs with short duration of action, combining the ability to provide (if necessary sufficiently profound neuromuscular blockade during surgery and immediate re-establishment of normal neuromuscular transmission at the end of surgery. Postoperative residual muscle paralysis is one of the major hurdles for immediate or early extubation after cardiac surgery. Nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs for cardiac surgery should therefore be easy to titrate, of rapid onset and short duration of action with a pathway of elimination independent from hepatic or renal dysfunction, and should equally not affect haemodynamic stability. The difference between repetitive bolus application and continuous infusion is outlined in this review, with the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics of vecuronium, pancuronium, rocuronium, and cisatracurium. Kinemyography and acceleromyography are the most important currently used neuromuscular monitoring methods. Whereas monitoring at the adductor pollicis muscle is appropriate at the end of surgery, monitoring of the corrugator supercilii muscle better reflects neuromuscular blockade at more central, profound muscles, such as the diaphragm, larynx, or thoraco-abdominal muscles. In conclusion, cisatracurium or rocuronium is recommended for neuromuscular blockade in modern cardiac surgery.

  7. Sudden Cardiac Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipsy María Gutiérrez Báez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the second half of the twentieth century, dying suddenly due to heart-related problems has become the main health issue in all countries where infectious diseases are not prevalent. Sudden death from cardiac causes is an important global health problem. Major databases were searched for the leading causes of sudden cardiac death. It has been demonstrated that there is a group of hereditary diseases with structural alterations or without apparent organic cause that explains many cases of sudden death in young people, whether related or not to physical exertion. Certain population groups are at higher risk for this disease. They are relatively easy to identify and can be the target of primary prevention measures.

  8. Inherited cardiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Charron

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Major advances have been achieved over the two last decades in the field of genetic cardiovascular diseases, not only through increased recognition and understanding of underlying molecular defects but also through rapid translation of knowledge into clinical practice. Genetic counseling and organization of cardiac family screening has become part of the medical management of these diseases, and these should be performed systematically unless an acquired cause has been diagnosed...

  9. Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    MILICA RADISIC; GORDANA VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that clinically sized (1-5 mm thick),compact cardiac constructs containing physiologically high density of viable cells (~108 cells/cm3) can be engineered in vitro by using biomimetic culture systems capable of providing oxygen transport and electrical stimulation, designed to mimic those in native heart. This hypothesis was tested by culturing rat heart cells on polymer scaffolds, either with perfusion of culture medium (physiologic interstitial velocity, supplementation of p...

  10. Cardiac developmental toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Jonathan T Butcher

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is a highly prevalent problem with mostly unknown origins. Many cases of CHD likely involve an environmental exposure coupled with genetic susceptibility, but practical and ethical considerations make nongenetic causes of CHD difficult to assess in humans. The development of the heart is highly conserved across all vertebrate species, making animal models an excellent option for screening potential cardiac teratogens. This review will discuss exposures known to cause ...

  11. Cardiac hybrid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaemperli, Oliver [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Nuclear Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-05-15

    Hybrid cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging allows combined assessment of anatomical and functional aspects of cardiac disease. In coronary artery disease (CAD), hybrid SPECT/CT imaging allows detection of coronary artery stenosis and myocardial perfusion abnormalities. The clinical value of hybrid imaging has been documented in several subsets of patients. In selected groups of patients, hybrid imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy to detect CAD compared to the single imaging techniques. Additionally, this approach facilitates functional interrogation of coronary stenoses and guidance with regard to revascularization procedures. Moreover, the anatomical information obtained from CT coronary angiography or coronary artery calcium scores (CACS) adds prognostic information over perfusion data from SPECT. The use of cardiac hybrid imaging has been favoured by the dissemination of dedicated hybrid systems and the release of dedicated image fusion software, which allow simple patient throughput for hybrid SPECT/CT studies. Further technological improvements such as more efficient detector technology to allow for low-radiation protocols, ultra-fast image acquisition and improved low-noise image reconstruction algorithms will be instrumental to further promote hybrid SPECT/CT in research and clinical practice. (orig.)

  12. Radionuclide assessment of left ventricular function following cardiac surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, W.R.; Jones, R.H.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Use of a high count-rate gamma scintillation camera permits the noninvasive assessment of left ventricular function by nuclear angiocardiography. Counts recorded from the region of the left ventricle at 50- or 100-msec intervals during the first transit of an intravenously administered bolus of radioisotope produce a high-fidelity indicator-dilution curve. Count fluctuations reflect left ventricular volume changes during the cardiac cycle and permit measurement of dv/dt, ejection fraction, mean transit time, and wall motion of this chamber. The present study evaluates (1) the accuracy of this technique compared to standard biplane cineangiography and (2) its usefulness in evaluating patients after cardiac surgery.

  13. Indeterminacy of Spatiotemporal Cardiac Alternans

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in action potential duration (at the cellular level) or in ECG morphology (at the whole heart level), is a marker of ventricular fibrillation, a fatal heart rhythm that kills hundreds of thousands of people in the US each year. Investigating cardiac alternans may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and eventually better algorithms for the prediction and prevention of such dreadful diseases. In paced cardiac tissue, alternans develops under increasingly shorter pacing period. Existing experimental and theoretical studies adopt the assumption that alternans in homogeneous cardiac tissue is exclusively determined by the pacing period. In contrast, we find that, when calcium-driven alternans develops in cardiac fibers, it may take different spatiotemporal patterns depending on the pacing history. Because there coexist multiple alternans solutions for a given pacing period, the alternans pattern on a fiber becomes unpredictable. Usin...

  14. A More Accurate Fourier Transform

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Elya

    2015-01-01

    Fourier transform methods are used to analyze functions and data sets to provide frequencies, amplitudes, and phases of underlying oscillatory components. Fast Fourier transform (FFT) methods offer speed advantages over evaluation of explicit integrals (EI) that define Fourier transforms. This paper compares frequency, amplitude, and phase accuracy of the two methods for well resolved peaks over a wide array of data sets including cosine series with and without random noise and a variety of physical data sets, including atmospheric $\\mathrm{CO_2}$ concentrations, tides, temperatures, sound waveforms, and atomic spectra. The FFT uses MIT's FFTW3 library. The EI method uses the rectangle method to compute the areas under the curve via complex math. Results support the hypothesis that EI methods are more accurate than FFT methods. Errors range from 5 to 10 times higher when determining peak frequency by FFT, 1.4 to 60 times higher for peak amplitude, and 6 to 10 times higher for phase under a peak. The ability t...

  15. Sudden Cardiac Death in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfy, Meagan M; Hutter, Adolph M; Weiner, Rory B

    2016-01-01

    There are clear health benefits to exercise; even so, patients with cardiac conditions who engage in exercise and athletic competition may on rare occasion experience sudden cardiac death (SCD). This article reviews the epidemiology and common causes of SCD in specific athlete populations. There is ongoing debate about the optimal mechanism for SCD prevention, specifically regarding the inclusion of the ECG and/or cardiac imaging in routine preparticipation sports evaluation. This controversy and contemporary screening recommendations are also reviewed. PMID:27486488

  16. Case Report: Penetrating Cardiac Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Grbolar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Penetrating cardiac injurys caused by gunshots and penetrating tools have high mortality rates. The way of injury, how the cardiac area is effected and the presence of cardiac tamponadecauses mortality in different rates. However the better treatment quality of hospitals, increasingoperative techniques, and internel care unit quality has not been change during the years. Searching the literature, we want to present a 42 years old male patient whowas injured by knife and had a 1 cm skin wound on chest with cardiac tamponade. After sternotomy a 7 cm laseration was observed in heart. Cardioraphy was performed.

  17. Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achal Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery exerts a significant strain on the blood bank services and is a model example in which a multi-modal blood-conservation strategy is recommended. Significant bleeding during cardiac surgery, enough to cause re-exploration and/or blood transfusion, increases morbidity and mortality. Hyper-fibrinolysis is one of the important contributors to increased bleeding. This knowledge has led to the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents especially in procedures performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. Nothing has been more controversial in recent times than the aprotinin controversy. Since the withdrawal of aprotinin from the world market, the choice of antifibrinolytic agents has been limited to lysine analogues either tranexamic acid (TA or epsilon amino caproic acid (EACA. While proponents of aprotinin still argue against its non-availability. Health Canada has approved its use, albeit under very strict regulations. Antifibrinolytic agents are not without side effects and act like double-edged swords, the stronger the anti-fibrinolytic activity, the more serious the side effects. Aprotinin is the strongest in reducing blood loss, blood transfusion, and possibly, return to the operating room after cardiac surgery. EACA is the least effective, while TA is somewhere in between. Additionally, aprotinin has been implicated in increased mortality and maximum side effects. TA has been shown to increase seizure activity, whereas, EACA seems to have the least side effects. Apparently, these agents do not differentiate between pathological and physiological fibrinolysis and prevent all forms of fibrinolysis leading to possible thrombotic side effects. It would seem prudent to select the right agent knowing its risk-benefit profile for a given patient, under the given circumstances.

  18. Acute right ventricular myocardial injury and sudden cardiac arrest in a patient with persistent spontaneous coronary vasospasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hung Ming-Yow; Li Ju-Chi; Hao Wen-Rui; Wu Cheng-Hsueh; Hung Ming-Jui

    2011-01-01

    Coronary vasospasm is a rare diagnosis resulting in sudden arrhythmic cardiac arrest. We report a case of a healthy,non-smoking elderly woman resuscitated from arrhythmic cardiac arrest. She had persistent spontaneous coronaxy vasospasm, leading to right ventricular myocardial injury and failure, and shock. She responded quickly to intravenous normal saline bolus infusion, but had irreversible neurological sequelae. Additionally, she had atrial fibrillation preceding ischemic ventricular fibrillation, a rare finding in coronary vasospasm-related cardiac arrest. We suggest immediate coronary angiography of patients in sudden arrhythmic cardiac arrest with acute right ventricular failure for a prompt,accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of the coronary vasospasm.

  19. A system for seismocardiography-based identification of quiescent heart phases: implications for cardiac imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Carson A; Su, Jin-Jyh; McClellan, James H; Brand, Oliver; Bhatti, Pamela T; Buice, Ashley L; Stillman, Arthur E; Tang, Xiangyang; Tridandapani, Srini

    2012-09-01

    Seismocardiography (SCG), a representation of mechanical heart motion, may more accurately determine periods of cardiac quiescence within a cardiac cycle than the electrically derived electrocardiogram (EKG) and, thus, may have implications for gating in cardiac computed tomography. We designed and implemented a system to synchronously acquire echocardiography, EKG, and SCG data. The device was used to study the variability between EKG and SCG and characterize the relationship between the mechanical and electrical activity of the heart. For each cardiac cycle, the feature of the SCG indicating Aortic Valve Closure was identified and its time position with respect to the EKG was observed. This position was found to vary for different heart rates and between two human subjects. A color map showing the magnitude of the SCG acceleration and computed velocity was derived, allowing for direct visualization of quiescent phases of the cardiac cycle with respect to heart rate. PMID:22581141

  20. Computational modeling of cardiac hemodynamics: Current status and future outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rajat; Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; Choi, Young J.; Liu, Hang; Huang, H. Howie; Jain, Saurabh; Younes, Laurent; Abraham, Theodore; George, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of four-dimensional imaging technologies, increasing computational speeds, improved simulation algorithms, and the widespread availability of powerful computing platforms is enabling simulations of cardiac hemodynamics with unprecedented speed and fidelity. Since cardiovascular disease is intimately linked to cardiovascular hemodynamics, accurate assessment of the patient's hemodynamic state is critical for the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. Unfortunately, while a variety of invasive and non-invasive approaches for measuring cardiac hemodynamics are in widespread use, they still only provide an incomplete picture of the hemodynamic state of a patient. In this context, computational modeling of cardiac hemodynamics presents as a powerful non-invasive modality that can fill this information gap, and significantly impact the diagnosis as well as the treatment of cardiac disease. This article reviews the current status of this field as well as the emerging trends and challenges in cardiovascular health, computing, modeling and simulation and that are expected to play a key role in its future development. Some recent advances in modeling and simulations of cardiac flow are described by using examples from our own work as well as the research of other groups.

  1. Cardiac causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension: assessment with multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoey, Edward T.D.; Gopalan, Deepa; Agrawal, S.K.B. [Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Screaton, Nicholas J. [Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Papworth Hospital NHS Trust, Diagnostic Centre, Department of Radiology, Papworth Everard, Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    The causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are diverse and include multiple congenital and acquired cardiac diseases as well as diseases primarily affecting the pulmonary vasculature, lung, pleura and chest wall. The traditional role of CT in evaluating PAH includes assessment of pulmonary vasculature and lung parenchyma with limited assessment of the heart. Advances in multidetector CT technology with improved spatial and temporal resolution now permit accurate delineation of cardiac morphology. CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is widely utilised in the workup of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease and can identify both pulmonary and cardiac causes. As the initial presentation for CTPA is often precipitated by nonspecific, unexplained symptoms and therefore undertaken by a general radiologist, it is important that a systematic approach to the interpretation of these studies, including cardiac evaluation, is routinely adopted. This paper reviews the CT evaluation in pulmonary hypertension with a particular focus on the cardiac causes, their subclassification into congenital systemic to pulmonary shunts and secondary to left heart disease, and their imaging features. It emphasises the use of a systematic approach to interpretation of CTPA examinations both in patients with known PAH and those with previously unsuspected disease. (orig.)

  2. A Reflective Look at Reflecting Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pender, Rebecca L.; Stinchfield, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    This article reviewed existing literature and research on the reflecting team process. There is a dearth of empirical research that explores the reflecting team process and the outcome of counseling that uses reflecting teams. Implications of using reflecting teams for counselors, counselor educators, and clients will be discussed. A call for…

  3. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    OpenAIRE

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira; de Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ...

  4. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  5. Leadership in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Christopher; Patel, Vanash; Ibrahim, Michael; Ahmed, Kamran; Wong, Kathie A; Darzi, Ara; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2011-06-01

    Despite the efficacy of cardiac surgery, less invasive interventions with more uncertain long-term outcomes are increasingly challenging surgery as first-line treatment for several congenital, degenerative and ischemic cardiac diseases. The specialty must evolve if it is to ensure its future relevance. More importantly, it must evolve to ensure that future patients have access to treatments with proven long-term effectiveness. This cannot be achieved without dynamic leadership; however, our contention is that this is not enough. The demands of a modern surgical career and the importance of the task at hand are such that the serendipitous emergence of traditional charismatic leadership cannot be relied upon to deliver necessary change. We advocate systematic analysis and strategic leadership at a local, national and international level in four key areas: Clinical Care, Research, Education and Training, and Stakeholder Engagement. While we anticipate that exceptional individuals will continue to shape the future of our specialty, the creation of robust structures to deliver collective leadership in these key areas is of paramount importance. PMID:20884217

  6. Interventional cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihkala, J; Nykanen, D; Freedom, R M; Benson, L N

    1999-04-01

    Over the past decade, transcatheter interventions have become increasingly important in the treatment of patients with congenital heart lesions. These procedures may be broadly grouped as dilations (e.g., septostomy, valvuloplasty, angioplasty, and endovascular stenting) or as closures (e.g., vascular embolization and device closure of defects). Balloon valvuloplasty has become the treatment of choice for patients in all age groups with simple valvar pulmonic stenosis and, although not curative, seems at least comparable to surgery for congenital aortic stenosis in newborns to young adults. Balloon angioplasty is successfully applied to a wide range of aortic, pulmonary artery, and venous stenoses. Stents are useful in dilating lesions of which the intrinsic elasticity results in vessel recoil after balloon dilation alone. Catheter-delivered coils are used to embolize a wide range of arterial, venous, and prosthetic vascular connections. Although some devices remain investigational, they have been successfully used for closure of many arterial ducts and atrial and ventricular septal defects. In the therapy for patients with complex CHD, best results may be achieved by combining cardiac surgery with interventional catheterization. The cooperation among interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons was highlighted in a report of an algorithm to manage patients with tetralogy of Fallot or pulmonary atresia with diminutive pulmonary arteries, involving balloon dilation, coil embolization of collaterals, and intraoperative stent placement. In this setting, well-planned catheterization procedures have an important role in reducing the overall number of procedures that patients may require over a lifetime, with improved outcomes.

  7. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  8. Pneumothorax in cardiac pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard;

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify risk factors for pneumothorax treated with a chest tube after cardiac pacing device implantation in a population-based cohort.METHODS AND RESULTS: A nationwide cohort study was performed based on data on 28 860 patients from the Danish Pacemaker Register, which included all Danish...... patients who received their first pacemaker (PM) or cardiac resynchronization device from 1997 to 2008. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals for the association between risk factors and pneumothorax treated with a chest tube. The median...... age was 77 years (25th and 75th percentile: 69-84) and 55% were male (n = 15 785). A total of 190 patients (0.66%) were treated for pneumothorax, which was more often in women [aOR 1.9 (1.4-2.6)], and in patients with age >80 years [aOR 1.4 (1.0-1.9)], a prior history of chronic obstructive pulmonary...

  9. Threshold adjusted calcium scoring using CT is less susceptible to cardiac motion and more accurate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, J. M.; Dijkstra, H.; Greuter, M. J. W.; Oudkerk, M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate calcium scoring on computed tomography (CT) using an adjusted threshold depending on the maximum Hounsfield value within the calcification (HU(peak)). The volume of 19 calcifications was retrospectively determined on 64-slice multidetector CT and dual sour

  10. Affect intensity and cardiac arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blascovich, J; Brennan, K; Tomaka, J; Kelsey, R M; Hughes, P; Coad, M L; Adlin, R

    1992-07-01

    Relationships between affect intensity and basal, evoked, and perceived cardiac arousal were investigated in 3 experiments. Affect intensity was assessed using Larsen and Diener's (1987) Affect Intensity Measure (AIM). Cardiac arousal was evoked with exercise in the 1st study and with mental arithmetic in the 2nd and 3rd. Perceived cardiac arousal was measured under optimal conditions using a standard heartbeat discrimination procedure. Women as a group scored higher on the AIM. Affect intensity was unrelated to basal or evoked cardiac arousal and was negatively related to perceived cardiac arousal in all 3 studies. Data suggest that affect intensity, although unrelated to actual physiological arousal, is negatively related to the accuracy with which individuals perceive their own arousal. Results are discussed within the context of an expanded arousal-regulation model (Blascovich, 1990). PMID:1494983

  11. Simulation methods and validation criteria for modeling cardiac ventricular electrophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    Shankarjee Krishnamoorthi; Luigi E Perotti; Nils P Borgstrom; Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Anna Frid; Ponnaluri, Aditya V.; Weiss, James N.; Zhilin Qu; Klug, William S.; Ennis, Daniel B.; Alan Garfinkel

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Krishnamoorthi et al. We describe a sequence of methods to produce a partial differential equation model of the electrical activation of the ventricles. In our framework, we incorporate the anatomy and cardiac microstructure obtained from magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging of a New Zealand White rabbit, the Purkinje structure and the Purkinje-muscle junctions, and an electrophysiologically accurate model of the ventricular myocytes and tissue, which includes transm...

  12. Cardiac output estimation using pulmonary mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hann Christopher E; Chase J; Sundaresan Ashwath; Shaw Geoffrey M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) decreases cardiac output (CO). Accurate measurement of CO is highly invasive and is not ideal for all MV critically ill patients. However, the link between the PEEP used in MV, and CO provides an opportunity to assess CO via MV therapy and other existing measurements, creating a CO measure without further invasiveness. This paper examines...

  13. A method for accurate, non-destructive diagnosis of congenital heart defects from heart specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Abdulla, Tariq; Houyel, Lucile; Paul, Jean-François; Summers, Ron; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    International audience The accurate analysis of congenital heart defect (CHD) specimens is often difficult and up to now required the opening of the heart. The objective of this study is to define a non-destructive method that allows for the precise analysis of each specimen and its different cardiac components in order to improve classification of the defect and thus provide an indication of underpinning causal mechanisms. We propose a method in which the heart volume is acquired by a CT ...

  14. 38 CFR 4.46 - Accurate measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accurate measurement. 4... RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.46 Accurate measurement. Accurate measurement of the length of stumps, excursion of joints, dimensions and location of scars with respect...

  15. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Battum, L J; Huizenga, H; Verdaasdonk, R M; Heukelom, S

    2016-01-21

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner's transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner's optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  16. An improved thin film approximation to accurately determine the optical conductivity of graphene from infrared transmittance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, J. W.; Bol, A. A.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an improved thin film approximation to extract the optical conductivity from infrared transmittance in a simple yet accurate way. This approximation takes into account the incoherent reflections from the backside of the substrate. These reflections are shown to have a significant

  17. Automatic basal slice detection for cardiac analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknezhad, Mahsa; Marchesseau, Stephanie; Brown, Michael S.

    2016-03-01

    Identification of the basal slice in cardiac imaging is a key step to measuring the ejection fraction (EF) of the left ventricle (LV). Despite research on cardiac segmentation, basal slice identification is routinely performed manually. Manual identification, however, has been shown to have high inter-observer variability, with a variation of the EF by up to 8%. Therefore, an automatic way of identifying the basal slice is still required. Prior published methods operate by automatically tracking the mitral valve points from the long-axis view of the LV. These approaches assumed that the basal slice is the first short-axis slice below the mitral valve. However, guidelines published in 2013 by the society for cardiovascular magnetic resonance indicate that the basal slice is the uppermost short-axis slice with more than 50% myocardium surrounding the blood cavity. Consequently, these existing methods are at times identifying the incorrect short-axis slice. Correct identification of the basal slice under these guidelines is challenging due to the poor image quality and blood movement during image acquisition. This paper proposes an automatic tool that focuses on the two-chamber slice to find the basal slice. To this end, an active shape model is trained to automatically segment the two-chamber view for 51 samples using the leave-one-out strategy. The basal slice was detected using temporal binary profiles created for each short-axis slice from the segmented two-chamber slice. From the 51 successfully tested samples, 92% and 84% of detection results were accurate at the end-systolic and the end-diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle, respectively.

  18. Physics of Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karma, Alain

    2013-04-01

    A normal heartbeat is orchestrated by the stable propagation of an excitation wave that produces an orderly contraction. In contrast, wave turbulence in the ventricles, clinically known as ventricular fibrillation (VF), stops the heart from pumping and is lethal without prompt defibrillation. I review experimental, computational, and theoretical studies that have shed light on complex dynamical phenomena linked to the initiation, maintenance, and control of wave turbulence. I first discuss advances made to understand the precursor state to a reentrant arrhythmia where the refractory period of cardiac tissue becomes spatiotemporally disordered; this is known as an arrhythmogenic tissue substrate. I describe observed patterns of transmembrane voltage and intracellular calcium signaling that can contribute to this substrate, and symmetry breaking instabilities to explain their formation. I then survey mechanisms of wave turbulence and discuss novel methods that exploit electrical pacing stimuli to control precursor patterns and low-energy pulsed electric fields to control turbulence.

  19. Capnography during cardiac resuscitation: a clue on mechanisms and a guide to interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Gazmuri, Raúl J.; Kube, Erika

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of the end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PETCO2) during cardiac arrest has been shown to reflect the blood flow being generated by external means and to prognosticate outcome. In the present issue of Critical Care, Grmec and colleagues compared the initial and subsequent PETCO2 in patients who had cardiac arrest precipitated by either asphyxia or ventricular arrhythmia. A much higher PETCO2 was found immediately after intubation in instances of asphyxial arrest. Yet, a...

  20. Mediastinitis after cardiac transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noedir A. G. Stolf

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assessment of incidence and behavior of mediastinitis after cardiac transplantation. METHODS: From 1985 to 1999, 214 cardiac transplantations were performed, 12 (5.6% of the transplanted patients developed confirmed mediastinitis. Patient's ages ranged from 42 to 66 years (mean of 52.3±10.0 years and 10 (83.3% patients were males. Seven (58.3% patients showed sternal stability on palpation, 4 (33.3% patients had pleural empyema, and 2 (16.7% patients did not show purulent secretion draining through the wound. RESULTS: Staphylococcus aureus was the infectious agent identified in the wound secretion or in the mediastinum, or both, in 8 (66.7% patients. Staphylococcus epidermidis was identified in 2 (16.7% patients, Enterococcus faecalis in 1 (8.3% patient, and the cause of mediastinitis could not be determined in 1 (8.3% patient. Surgical treatment was performed on an emergency basis, and the extension of the débridement varied with local conditions. In 2 (16.7% patients, we chose to leave the surgical wound open and performed daily dressings with granulated sugar. Total sternal resection was performed in only 1 (8.3% patient. Out of this series, 5 (41.7% patients died, and the causes of death were related to the infection. Autopsy revealed persistence of mediastinitis in 1 (8.3% patient. CONCLUSION: Promptness in diagnosing mediastinitis and precocious surgical drainage have changed the natural evolution of this disease. Nevertheless, observance of the basic precepts of prophylaxis of infection is still the best way to treat mediastinitis.

  1. Platelets and cardiac arrhythmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas S De Jong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death remains one of the most prevalent modes of death in industrialized countries, and myocardial ischemia due to thrombotic coronary occlusion is its primary cause. The role of platelets in the occurrence of SCD extends beyond coronary flow impairment by clot formation. Here we review the substances released by platelets during clot formation and their arrhythmic properties. Platelet products are released from three types of platelet granules: dense core granules, alpha-granules, and platelet lysosomes. The physiologic properties of dense granule products are of special interest as a potential source of arrhythmic substances. They are released readily upon activation and contain high concentrations of serotonin, histamine, purines, pyrimidines, and ions such as calcium and magnesium. Potential arrhythmic mechanisms of these substances, e.g. serotonin and high energy phosphates, include induction of coronary constriction, calcium overloading, and induction of delayed after-depolarizations. Alpha-granules produce thromboxanes and other arachidonic acid products with many potential arrhythmic effects mediated by interference with cardiac sodium, calcium and potassium channels. Alpha-granules also contain hundreds of proteins that could potentially serve as ligands to receptors on cardiomyocytes. Lysosomal products probably do not have an important arrhythmic effect. Platelet products and ischemia can induce coronary permeability, thereby enhancing interaction with surrounding cardiomyocytes. Antiplatelet therapy is known to improve survival after myocardial infarction. Although an important part of this effect results from prevention of coronary clot formation, there is evidence to suggest that antiplatelet therapy also induces anti-arrhythmic effects during ischemia by preventing the release of platelet activation products.

  2. Predicting the risk of sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, Claudia; Glass, Leon

    2016-05-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the result of a change of cardiac activity from normal (typically sinus) rhythm to a rhythm that does not pump adequate blood to the brain. The most common rhythms leading to SCD are ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). These result from an accelerated ventricular pacemaker or ventricular reentrant waves. Despite significant efforts to develop accurate predictors for the risk of SCD, current methods for risk stratification still need to be improved. In this article we briefly review current approaches to risk stratification. Then we discuss the mathematical basis for dynamical transitions (called bifurcations) that may lead to VT and VF. One mechanism for transition to VT or VF involves a perturbation by a premature ventricular complex (PVC) during sinus rhythm. We describe the main mechanisms of PVCs (reentry, independent pacemakers and abnormal depolarizations). An emerging approach to risk stratification for SCD involves the development of individualized dynamical models of a patient based on measured anatomy and physiology. Careful analysis and modelling of dynamics of ventricular arrhythmia on an individual basis will be essential in order to improve risk stratification for SCD and to lay a foundation for personalized (precision) medicine in cardiology. PMID:26660287

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital cardiac abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging will not replace echocardiography as the simplest and most definitive method of establishing a noninvasive diagnosis in young patients with congenital cardiac malformations, nor will it replace radionuclide angiography for relatively noninvasive detection and quantitation of cardiac shunts. Magnetic resonance imaging is a complementary noninvasive imaging procedure that can answer some questions left in doubt by echocardiography (mainly extracardiac artery and vein assessments) or radionuclide angiography and used as a preferred follow-up imaging method in certain clinical circumstances. In addition, MRI can be a first-line modality for cardiovascular imaging in older patients in whom adequate echo windows are not available. Angiocardiography remains necessary to provide vital physiological data, i.e., chamber pressures, shunt volumes, oxygen saturations, and pulmonary vascular resistance; however, MRI could negate some follow-up catheterizations in appropriate clinical circumstances. High-resolution proton MRI tomography should ultimately permit the accurate evaluation of ventricular volumes, myocardial mass, and the assessment of regional wall motion and ejection fractions. Paramagnetic substances such as manganese ion may ultimately provide a basis for myocardial perfusion imaging. The potential for MRI evaluation of tissue characterization, noninvasive blood-flow measurements, and myocardial metabolism assessment in intriguing and awaits clinical evaluation

  4. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  5. Is it Safe? Adverse drug effects and cardiac arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Varkevisser, R.

    2014-01-01

    The potentially life-threatening polymorphic ventricular arrhythmia Torsade de Pointes (TdP) generally occurs in the setting of delayed ventricular repolarization, as reflected on the ECG by a prolonged QT interval. A growing number of drugs are associated with QT prolongation and/or TdP, as a result, development of promising new drugs has been aborted, and already marketed drugs have received severe restrictions or have been withdrawn. To address this cardiac safety issue, international guid...

  6. Epigenetic regulation in cardiac fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ming; Yu; Yong; Xu

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis represents an adoptive response in the heart exposed to various stress cues. While resolution of the fibrogenic response heralds normalization of heart function, persistent fibrogenesis is usually associated with progressive loss of heart function and eventually heart failure. Cardiac fibrosis is regulated by a myriad of factors that converge on the transcription of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins, a process the epigenetic machinery plays a pivotal role. In this minireview, we summarize recent advances regarding the epigenetic regulation of cardiac fibrosis focusing on the role of histone and DNA modifications and non-coding RNAs.

  7. Cardiac perioperative complications in noncardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Radovanović Dragana; Kolak Radmila; Stokić Aleksandar; Radovanović Zoran; Jovanović Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Anesthesiologists are confronted with an increasing population of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery who are at risk for cardiac complications in the perioperative period. Perioperative cardiac complications are responsible for significant mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of perioperative (operative and postoperative) cardiac complications and correlations between the incidence of perioperative cardiac complications and type of surgical ...

  8. Planar Reflection of Gaseous Detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damazo, Jason Scott

    Pipes containing flammable gaseous mixtures may be subjected to internal detonation. When the detonation normally impinges on a closed end, a reflected shock wave is created to bring the flow back to rest. This study built on the work of Karnesky (2010) and examined deformation of thin-walled stainless steel tubes subjected to internal reflected gaseous detonations. A ripple pattern was observed in the tube wall for certain fill pressures, and a criterion was developed that predicted when the ripple pattern would form. A two-dimensional finite element analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook material properties; the pressure loading created by reflected gaseous detonations was accounted for with a previously developed pressure model. The residual plastic strain between experiments and computations was in good agreement. During the examination of detonation-driven deformation, discrepancies were discovered in our understanding of reflected gaseous detonation behavior. Previous models did not accurately describe the nature of the reflected shock wave, which motivated further experiments in a detonation tube with optical access. Pressure sensors and schlieren images were used to examine reflected shock behavior, and it was determined that the discrepancies were related to the reaction zone thickness extant behind the detonation front. During these experiments reflected shock bifurcation did not appear to occur, but the unfocused visualization system made certainty impossible. This prompted construction of a focused schlieren system that investigated possible shock wave-boundary layer interaction, and heat-flux gauges analyzed the boundary layer behind the detonation front. Using these data with an analytical boundary layer solution, it was determined that the strong thermal boundary layer present behind the detonation front inhibits the development of reflected shock wave bifurcation.

  9. Coupling of cardiac and locomotor rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, R L; Nugent, S T; Marlow, R W; MacLeod, D A; Marble, A E

    1989-01-01

    The pressure within exercising skeletal muscle rises and falls rhythmically during normal human locomotion, the peak pressure reaching levels that intermittently impede blood flow to the exercising muscle. Speculating that a reciprocal relationship between the timing of peak intramuscular and pulsatile arterial pressures should optimize blood flow through muscle and minimize cardiac load, we tested the hypothesis that heart rate becomes entrained with walking and running cadence at some locomotion speeds, by means of electrocardiography and an accelerometer to provide signals reflecting heart rate and cadence, respectively. In 18 of 25 subjects, 1:1 coupling of heart and step rates was present at one or more speeds on a motorized treadmill, generally at moderate to high exercise intensities. To determine how exercise specific this phenomenon is, and to refute the competing hypothesis that coupling is due to vertical accelerations of the heart during locomotion, we had 12 other subjects cycle on an electronically braked bicycle ergometer. Coupling was found between heart rate and pedaling frequency in 10 of them. Cardiac-locomotor coupling appears to be a normal physiological phenomenon, and its identification provides a fresh perspective from which to study endurance.

  10. Robot-assisted cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Norihiko; Watanabe, Go

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of the significant advantages of minimizing surgical trauma has resulted in the development of minimally invasive surgical procedures. Endoscopic surgery offers patients the benefits of minimally invasive surgery, and surgical robots have enhanced the ability and precision of surgeons. Consequently, technological advances have facilitated totally endoscopic robotic cardiac surgery, which has allowed surgeons to operate endoscopically rather than through a median sternotomy during cardiac surgery. Thus, repairs for structural heart conditions, including mitral valve plasty, atrial septal defect closure, multivessel minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting (MIDCAB), and totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), can be totally endoscopic. Robot-assisted cardiac surgery as minimally invasive cardiac surgery is reviewed. PMID:26134073

  11. Recent developments in cardiac pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, D J

    1995-10-01

    Indications for cardiac pacing continue to expand. Pacing to improve functional capacity, which is now common, relies on careful patient selection and technical improvements, such as complex software algorithms and diagnostic capabilities.

  12. Robotic Applications in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan P. Kypson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cardiac surgery has been performed through a median sternotomy, which allows the surgeon generous access to the heart and surrounding great vessels. As a paradigm shift in the size and location of incisions occurs in cardiac surgery, new methods have been developed to allow the surgeon the same amount of dexterity and accessibility to the heart in confined spaces and in a less invasive manner. Initially, long instruments without pivot points were used, however, more recent robotic telemanipulation systems have been applied that allow for improved dexterity, enabling the surgeon to perform cardiac surgery from a distance not previously possible. In this rapidly evolving field, we review the recent history and clinical results of using robotics in cardiac surgery.

  13. Cardiac Biomarkers in Hyperthyroid Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Sangster, Jodi Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hyperthyroidism has substantial effects on the circulatory system. The cardiac biomarkers NT-proBNP and troponin I (cTNI) have proven useful in identifying cats with myocardial disease but have not been as extensively investigated in hyperthyroidism.Hypothesis: Plasma NT-proBNP and cTNI concentrations are higher in cats with primary cardiac disease than in cats with hyperthyroidism and higher in cats with hyperthyroidism than in healthy control cats.Animals: Twenty-three hyperthyr...

  14. Cardiac manifestations in systemic sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sevdalina; Lambova

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, which develops as a direct consequence of systemic sclerosis(SSc), may manifest as myocardial damage, fibrosis of the conduction system, pericardial and, less frequently, as valvular disease. In addition, cardiac complications in SSc may develop as a secondary phenomenon due to pulmonary arterial hypertension and kidney pathology. The prevalence of primary cardiac involvement in SSc is variable and difficult to determine because of the diversity of cardiac manifestations, the presence of subclinical periods, the type of diagnostic tools applied, and the diversity of patient populations. When clinically manifested, cardiac involvement is thought to be an important prognostic factor. Profound microvascular disease is a pathognomonic feature of SSc, as both vasospasm and structural alterations are present. Such alterations are thought to predict macrovascular atherosclerosis over time. There are contradictory reports regarding the prevalence of atherosclerosis in SSc. According to some authors, the prevalence of atherosclerosis of the large epicardial coronary arteries is similar to that of the general population, in contrast with other rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the level of inflammation in SSc is inferior. Thus, the atherosclerotic process may not be as aggressive and not easily detectable in smaller studies. Echocardiography(especially tissue Doppler imaging), single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography are sensitive techniques for earlier detection of both structural and functional scleroderma-related cardiac pathologies. Screening for subclinical cardiac involvement via modern, sensitive tools provides an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, which is of crucial importance for a positive outcome.

  15. Computational Modeling of Cardiac Electromechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamoorthi, Shankarjee

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a leading cause of death worldwide. Notably, the electrophysiologiy and microstructural requirements for a fatal ventricular arrhythmia remain incompletely understood, thereby the treatment remains largely empirical. Standard antiarrhythmic drug therapy has failed to reduce, and in some instances has increased, the incidence of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD). Hence, a more complete understanding of the mechanisms that foment a fatal arrhythmia is needed and computational m...

  16. Current trends in cardiac rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Dafoe, W; Huston, P

    1997-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation can reduce mortality and morbidity for patients with many types of cardiac disease cost-effectively, yet is generally underutilized. Rehabilitation is helpful not only for patients who have had a myocardial infarction but also for those with stable angina or congestive heart failure or those who have undergone myocardial revascularization procedures, a heart transplant or heart valve surgery. The beneficial effects of rehabilitation include a reduction in the rate of de...

  17. Physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ippei; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The heart must continuously pump blood to supply the body with oxygen and nutrients. To maintain the high energy consumption required by this role, the heart is equipped with multiple complex biological systems that allow adaptation to changes of systemic demand. The processes of growth (hypertrophy), angiogenesis, and metabolic plasticity are critically involved in maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. Cardiac hypertrophy is classified as physiological when it is associated with normal cardiac function or as pathological when associated with cardiac dysfunction. Physiological hypertrophy of the heart occurs in response to normal growth of children or during pregnancy, as well as in athletes. In contrast, pathological hypertrophy is induced by factors such as prolonged and abnormal hemodynamic stress, due to hypertension, myocardial infarction etc. Pathological hypertrophy is associated with fibrosis, capillary rarefaction, increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and cellular dysfunction (impairment of signaling, suppression of autophagy, and abnormal cardiomyocyte/non-cardiomyocyte interactions), as well as undesirable epigenetic changes, with these complex responses leading to maladaptive cardiac remodeling and heart failure. This review describes the key molecules and cellular responses involved in physiological/pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27262674

  18. FGF21 and cardiac physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna ePlanavila

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart is not traditionally considered either a target or a site of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21 production. However, recent findings indicate that FGF21 can act as a cardiomyokine; that is, it is produced by cardiac cells at significant levels and acts in an autocrine manner on the heart itself. The heart is sensitive to the effects of FGF21, both systemic and locally generated, owing to the expression in cardiomyocytes of β-Klotho, the key co-receptor known to confer specific responsiveness to FGF21 action. FGF21 has been demonstrated to protect against cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac inflammation, and oxidative stress. FGF21 expression in the heart is induced in response to cardiac insults, such as experimental cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial infarction in rodents, as well as in failing human hearts. Intracellular mechanisms involving PPARα and Sirt1 mediate transcriptional regulation of the FGF21 gene in response to exogenous stimuli. In humans, circulating FGF21 levels are elevated in coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis, and are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings provide new insights into the role of FGF21 in the heart and may offer potential therapeutic strategies for cardiac disease.

  19. [Stem cells and cardiac regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Millan, Maria Ines; Lorenti, Alicia

    2006-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by virtue of their functional attributes: absence of tissue specific differentitated markers, capable of proliferation, able to self-maintain the population, able to produce a large number of differentiated, functional progeny, able to regenerate the tissue after injury. Cell therapy is an alternative for the treatment of several diseases, like cardiac diseases (cell cardiomyoplasty). A variety of stem cells could be used for cardiac repair: from cardiac and extracardiac sources. Each cell type has its own profile of advantages, limitations, and practicability issues in specific clinical settings. Differentiation of bone marrow stem cells to cardiomyocyte-like cells have been observed under different culture conditions. The presence of resident cardiac stem cell population capable of differentiation into cardiomyocyte or vascular lineage suggests that these cells could be used for cardiac tissue repair, and represent a great promise for clinical application. Stem cells mobilization by cytokines may also offer a strategy for cardiac regeneration. The use of stem cells (embryonic and adult) may hold the key to replacing cells lost in many devastating diseases. This potential benefit is a major focus for stem cell research.

  20. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W Robb

    2015-10-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world.

  1. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marie; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm;

    2014-01-01

    genetic testing for DM1. Information on incident cardiac diseases was obtained from the NPR. We estimated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of cardiac disease compared with the background population, overall and according to selected diagnostic subgroups (cardiomyopathy, heart failure, conduction...... disorders, arrhythmias, and device implantation). In the DM cohort, SIR for any cardiac disease was 3.42 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.01-3.86]; for a cardiac disease belonging to the selected subgroups 6.91 (95% CI: 5.93-8.01) and for other cardiac disease 2.59 (95% CI: 2.03-3.25). For a cardiac disease...... belonging to the selected subgroups, the risk was particularly high in the first year after DM diagnosis [SIR 15.4 (95% CI: 10.9-21.3)] but remained significantly elevated in subsequent years [SIR 6.07 (95% CI: 5.11-7.16]). The risk was higher in young cohort members [e.g. 20-39 years: SIR 18.1 (95% CI: 12...

  2. Cardiac imaging. A multimodality approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, Manfred [Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Mainz (Germany); Erbel, Raimund [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Mainz (Germany). Clinic and Polyclinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Barkhausen, Joerg (eds.) [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2009-07-01

    An excellent atlas on modern diagnostic imaging of the heart Written by an interdisciplinary team of experts, Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach features an in-depth introduction to all current imaging modalities for the diagnostic assessment of the heart as well as a clinical overview of cardiac diseases and main indications for cardiac imaging. With a particular emphasis on CT and MRI, the first part of the atlas also covers conventional radiography, echocardiography, angiography and nuclear medicine imaging. Leading specialists demonstrate the latest advances in the field, and compare the strengths and weaknesses of each modality. The book's second part features clinical chapters on heart defects, endocarditis, coronary heart disease, cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, cardiac tumors, pericardial diseases, pulmonary vascular diseases, and diseases of the thoracic aorta. The authors address anatomy, pathophysiology, and clinical features, and evaluate the various diagnostic options. Key features: - Highly regarded experts in cardiology and radiology off er image-based teaching of the latest techniques - Readers learn how to decide which modality to use for which indication - Visually highlighted tables and essential points allow for easy navigation through the text - More than 600 outstanding images show up-to-date technology and current imaging protocols Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach is a must-have desk reference for cardiologists and radiologists in practice, as well as a study guide for residents in both fields. It will also appeal to cardiac surgeons, general practitioners, and medical physicists with a special interest in imaging of the heart. (orig.)

  3. Risk factors and the effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy on cardiac and non-cardiac mortality in MADIT-CRT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkiomaki, Juha S; Ruwald, Anne-Christine; Kutyifa, Valentina;

    2015-01-01

    causes, 108 (63.9%) deemed cardiac, and 61 (36.1%) non-cardiac. In multivariate analysis, increased baseline creatinine was significantly associated with both cardiac and non-cardiac deaths [hazard ratio (HR) 2.97, P ...AIMS: To understand modes of death and factors associated with the risk for cardiac and non-cardiac deaths in patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (CRT-D) vs. implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy, which may help clarify...... the action and limitations of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in relieving myocardial dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: In Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MADIT-CRT), during 4 years of follow-up, 169 (9.3%) of 1820 patients died of known...

  4. Cardiac Biomarkers and Cycling Race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Le Goff, Jean-François Kaux, Sébastien Goffaux, Etienne Cavalier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In cycling as in other types of strenuous exercise, there exists a risk of sudden death. It is important both to understand its causes and to see if the behavior of certain biomarkers might highlight athletes at risk. Many reports describe changes in biomarkers after strenuous exercise (Nie et al., 2011, but interpreting these changes, and notably distinguishing normal physiological responses from pathological changes, is not easy. Here we have focused on the kinetics of different cardiac biomarkers: creatin kinase (CK, creating kinase midbrain (CK-MB, myoglobin (MYO, highly sensitive troponin T (hs-TnT and N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP. The population studied was a group of young trained cyclists participating in a 177-km cycling race. The group of individuals was selected for maximal homogeneity. Their annual training volume was between 10,000 and 16,000 kilometers. The rhythm of races is comparable and averages 35 km/h, depending on the race’s difficulty. The cardiac frequency was recorded via a heart rate monitor. Three blood tests were taken. The first blood test, T0, was taken approximately 2 hours before the start of the race and was intended to gather values which would act as references for the following tests. The second blood test, T1, was realized within 5 minutes of their arrival. The third and final blood test, T3, was taken 3 hours following their arrival. The CK, CK-MB, MYO, hs-TnT and NT-proBNP were measured on the Roche Diagnostic modular E (Manhein, Germany. For the statistical analysis, an ANOVA and post hoc test of Scheffé were calculated with the Statistica Software version 9.1. We noticed an important significant variation in the cardiac frequency between T0 and T1 (p < 0.0001, T0 and T3 (p < 0.0001, and T1 and T3 (p < 0.01. Table 1 shows the results obtained for the different biomarkers. CK and CK-MB showed significant variation between T0-T1 and T0-T3 (p < 0.0001. Myoglobin increased significantly

  5. Cardiac output during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P.; Sørensen, H.;

    2015-01-01

    Several techniques assessing cardiac output (Q) during exercise are available. The extent to which the measurements obtained from each respective technique compares to one another, however, is unclear. We quantified Q simultaneously using four methods: the Fick method with blood obtained from...... the right atrium (Q(Fick-M)), Innocor (inert gas rebreathing; Q(Inn)), Physioflow (impedance cardiography; Q(Phys)), and Nexfin (pulse contour analysis; Q(Pulse)) in 12 male subjects during incremental cycling exercise to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FiO2  = 12%). While all four methods reported...... a progressive increase in Q with exercise intensity, the slopes of the Q/oxygen uptake (VO2) relationship differed by up to 50% between methods in both normoxia [4.9 ± 0.3, 3.9 ± 0.2, 6.0 ± 0.4, 4.8 ± 0.2 L/min per L/min (mean ± SE) for Q(Fick-M), Q(Inn), QP hys and Q(Pulse), respectively; P = 0...

  6. Acute kidney injury in septua- and octogenarians after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Christof

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of septua- and octogenarians undergo cardiac surgery. Acute kidney injury (AKI still is a frequent complication after surgery. We examined the incidence of AKI and its impact on 30-day mortality. Methods A retrospective study between 01/2006 and 08/2009 with 299 octogenarians, who were matched for gender and surgical procedure to 299 septuagenarians at a university hospital. Primary endpoint was AKI after surgery as proposed by the RIFLE definition (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-stage kidney disease. Secondary endpoint was 30-day mortality. Perioperative mortality was predicted with the logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE. Results Octogenarians significantly had a mean higher logistic EuroSCORE compared to septuagenarians (13.2% versus 8.5%; p -1 × 1.73 m-2. In contrast, septuagenarians showed a slightly higher median body mass index (28 kg × m-2 versus 26 kg × m-2 and were more frequently active smoker at time of surgery (6.4% versus 1.6%, p The RIFLE classification provided accurate risk assessment for 30-day mortality and fair discriminatory power. Conclusions The RIFLE criteria allow identifying patients with AKI after cardiac surgery. The high incidence of AKI in septua- and octogenarians after cardiac surgery should prompt the use of RIFLE criteria to identify patients at risk and should stimulate institutional measures that target AKI as a quality improvement initiative for patients at advanced age.

  7. End-expiration Respiratory Gating for a High Resolution Stationary Cardiac SPECT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual-respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or 8 cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (pdefect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (pdefect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on the patient with defect. The results showed that the proposed methods can effectively reduce motion blur in the images caused by both respiratory and cardiac motions, which may lead to more accurate defect detection and

  8. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on the patient with defect. The results showed that the proposed methods can effectively reduce motion blur in the images caused by both respiratory and cardiac motions, which may lead to more accurate defect detection and

  9. Reflectable bases for affine reflection systems

    CERN Document Server

    Azam, Saeid; Yousofzadeh, Malihe

    2011-01-01

    The notion of a "root base" together with its geometry plays a crucial role in the theory of finite and affine Lie theory. However, it is known that such a notion does not exist for the recent generalizations of finite and affine root systems such as extended affine root systems and affine reflection systems. As an alternative, we introduce the notion of a "reflectable base", a minimal subset $\\Pi$ of roots such that the non-isotropic part of the root system can be recovered by reflecting roots of $\\Pi$ relative to the hyperplanes determined by $\\Pi$. We give a full characterization of reflectable bases for tame irreducible affine reflection systems of reduced types, excluding types $E_{6,7,8}$. As a byproduct of our results, we show that if the root system under consideration is locally finite then any reflectable base is an integral base.

  10. Reflectivity, reflexivity and situated reflective practice

    OpenAIRE

    Malthouse, R; Roffey-Barentsen, J; Watts, DM

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of reflective practice referred to as ‘Situated Reflective Practice’ (SRP). The overarching theory is derived from social theories of structuration and reflexivity. In particular, from Giddens’s (1984) theory of structuration, this sees social life as interplay of agency and structure. Discussion of the research reported here centres on the nature of such situated reflection, considers related literature and presents the data collected in a recent small-scale st...

  11. Atresia of the bilateral pulmonary veins: a rare and dismal anomaly identified on cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang-Hyub; Koo, Hyun Jung; Cho, Young Hoon; Lee, Eunsol [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Imaging findings of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia have not been described. To describe cardiac CT findings and clinical outcomes of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia. Three newborns with bilateral pulmonary vein atresia were encountered at our institution during a period of 8 years. We evaluated prenatal echocardiographic findings, clinical presentations, postnatal echocardiographic findings, chest radiographic findings, cardiac CT findings and clinical outcomes. All newborns presented immediately after birth with severe cyanosis, respiratory distress and acidosis that were unresponsive to medical management. Prenatal and postnatal echocardiographic studies and chest radiography were misleading, inconclusive or nonspecific in making the diagnosis in these children; however cardiac CT clearly demonstrated atresia of the bilateral pulmonary veins with multiple small mediastinal collateral veins and pulmonary edema. Surgical treatments were not feasible for this anomaly. Their clinical outcomes were universally dismal and all infants died within 3 days. Cardiac CT provides an accurate diagnosis of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia and leads to prompt treatment decision in these children. (orig.)

  12. Current Roles and Future Applications of Cardiac CT: Risk Stratification of Coronary Artery Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeonyee Elizabeth [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Tae-Hwan [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a noninvasive modality for the assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD), and has been rapidly integrated into clinical cares. CT has changed the traditional risk stratification based on clinical risk to image-based identification of patient risk. Cardiac CT, including coronary artery calcium score and coronary CT angiography, can provide prognostic information and is expected to improve risk stratification of CAD. Currently used conventional cardiac CT, provides accurate anatomic information but not functional significance of CAD, and it may not be sufficient to guide treatments such as revascularization. Recently, myocardial CT perfusion imaging, intracoronary luminal attenuation gradient, and CT-derived computed fractional flow reserve were developed to combine anatomical and functional data. Although at present, the diagnostic and prognostic value of these novel technologies needs to be evaluated further, it is expected that all-in-one cardiac CT can guide treatment and improve patient outcomes in the near future.

  13. Atresia of the bilateral pulmonary veins: a rare and dismal anomaly identified on cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging findings of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia have not been described. To describe cardiac CT findings and clinical outcomes of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia. Three newborns with bilateral pulmonary vein atresia were encountered at our institution during a period of 8 years. We evaluated prenatal echocardiographic findings, clinical presentations, postnatal echocardiographic findings, chest radiographic findings, cardiac CT findings and clinical outcomes. All newborns presented immediately after birth with severe cyanosis, respiratory distress and acidosis that were unresponsive to medical management. Prenatal and postnatal echocardiographic studies and chest radiography were misleading, inconclusive or nonspecific in making the diagnosis in these children; however cardiac CT clearly demonstrated atresia of the bilateral pulmonary veins with multiple small mediastinal collateral veins and pulmonary edema. Surgical treatments were not feasible for this anomaly. Their clinical outcomes were universally dismal and all infants died within 3 days. Cardiac CT provides an accurate diagnosis of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia and leads to prompt treatment decision in these children. (orig.)

  14. Current Roles and Future Applications of Cardiac CT: Risk Stratification of Coronary Artery Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a noninvasive modality for the assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD), and has been rapidly integrated into clinical cares. CT has changed the traditional risk stratification based on clinical risk to image-based identification of patient risk. Cardiac CT, including coronary artery calcium score and coronary CT angiography, can provide prognostic information and is expected to improve risk stratification of CAD. Currently used conventional cardiac CT, provides accurate anatomic information but not functional significance of CAD, and it may not be sufficient to guide treatments such as revascularization. Recently, myocardial CT perfusion imaging, intracoronary luminal attenuation gradient, and CT-derived computed fractional flow reserve were developed to combine anatomical and functional data. Although at present, the diagnostic and prognostic value of these novel technologies needs to be evaluated further, it is expected that all-in-one cardiac CT can guide treatment and improve patient outcomes in the near future

  15. Patch in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Alizadeh Ghavidel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Excessive bleeding presents a risk for the patient in cardiovascular surgery. Local haemostatic agents are of great value to reduce bleeding and related complications. TachoSil (Nycomed, Linz, Austria is a sterile, haemostatic agent that consists of an equine collagen patchcoated with human fibrinogen and thrombin. This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of TachoSil compared to conventional technique.Methods: Forty-two patients scheduled for open heart surgeries, were entered to this study from August 2010 to May 2011. After primary haemostatic measures, patients divided in two groups based on surgeon’s judgment. Group A: 20 patients for whom TachoSil was applied and group B: 22 patients that conventional method using Surgicel (13 patients or wait and see method (9 cases, were performed in order to control the bleeding. In group A, 10 patients were male with mean age of 56.95±15.67 years and in group B, 9 cases were male with mean age of 49.95±14.41 years. In case group 70% (14/20 of the surgeries were redo surgeries versus 100% (22/22 in control group.Results: Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. In TachoSil group 75% of patients required transfusion versus 90.90% in group B (P=0.03.Most transfusions consisted of packed red blood cell; 2±1.13 units in group A versus 3.11±1.44 in group B (P=0.01, however there were no significant differences between two groups regarding the mean total volume of intra and post-operative bleeding. Re-exploration was required in 10% in group A versus 13.63% in group B (P=0.67.Conclusion: TachoSil may act as a superior alternative in different types of cardiac surgery in order to control the bleeding and therefore reducing transfusion requirement.

  16. Cardiac output monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathews Lailu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive and non-invasive methods of estimation of cardiac output (CO were developed to overcome the limitations of invasive nature of pulmonary artery catheterization (PAC and direct Fick method used for the measurement of stroke volume (SV. The important minimally invasive techniques available are: oesophageal Doppler monitoring (ODM, the derivative Fick method (using partial carbon dioxide (CO 2 breathing, transpulmonary thermodilution, lithium indicator dilution, pulse contour and pulse power analysis. Impedance cardiography is probably the only non-invasive technique in true sense. It provides information about haemodynamic status without the risk, cost and skill associated with the other invasive or minimally invasive techniques. It is important to understand what is really being measured and what assumptions and calculations have been incorporated with respect to a monitoring device. Understanding the basic principles of the above techniques as well as their advantages and limitations may be useful. In addition, the clinical validation of new techniques is necessary to convince that these new tools provide reliable measurements. In this review the physics behind the working of ODM, partial CO 2 breathing, transpulmonary thermodilution and lithium dilution techniques are dealt with. The physical and the physiological aspects underlying the pulse contour and pulse power analyses, various pulse contour techniques, their development, advantages and limitations are also covered. The principle of thoracic bioimpedance along with computation of CO from changes in thoracic impedance is explained. The purpose of the review is to help us minimize the dogmatic nature of practice favouring one technique or the other.

  17. Surgical experience with cardiac tumours at the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awang, Y; Sallehuddin, A

    1991-03-01

    Fifteen patients underwent surgery for cardiac tumours in General Hospital Kuala Lumpur between October 1984 and June 1989. Twelve of the patients had cardiac myxomas and underwent excision under cardiopulmonary bypass. Two patients had sarcoma, of which one was excised. The other was inoperable. Another patient had a metastalic malignant melanoma which was inoperable. Of the patients 10 were female and five male. Their ages ranged from 16 to 60 years. All were symptomatic and the commonest mode of presentation was exertional dyspnoea and palpitations. Two presented with cerebral embolisation. The three patients with malignant tumours had constitutional symptoms at the time of surgery. All patients had echocardiography pre-operatively to confirm the diagnosis of cardiac tumour. Only one patient underwent preoperative cardiac catheterisation and angiography. The surgical approach in all patients was through a median sternotomy and all except one were operated under cardiopulmonary bypass. There was no intraoperative embolisation. There was one perioperative death. Fourteen patients were followed up for periods ranging from one to 44 months. Three patients with malignant cardiac tumours died. One had recurrence of myxoma 21 months after the initial surgery. We conclude that excision of cardiac myxomas carry a very small risk following which patients have good prognosis. Malignant tumours carry a bad prognosis. From our experience, we conclude that echocardiography is an extremely accurate tool in the diagnosis of cardiac tumours.

  18. Computed tomography of cardiac pseudotumors and neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anavekar, Nandan S; Bonnichsen, Crystal R; Foley, Thomas A; Morris, Michael F; Martinez, Matthew W; Williamson, Eric E; Glockner, James F; Miller, Dylan V; Breen, Jerome F; Araoz, Philip A

    2010-07-01

    Important features of cardiac masses can be clearly delineated on cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging. This modality is useful in identifying the presence of a mass, its relationship with cardiac and extracardiac structures, and the features that distinguish one type of mass from another. A multimodality approach to the evaluation of cardiac tumors is advocated, with the use of echocardiography, CT imaging and magnetic resonance imaging as appropriately indicated. In this article, various cardiac masses are described, including pseudotumors and true cardiac neoplasms, and the CT imaging findings that may be useful in distinguishing these rare entities are presented. PMID:20705174

  19. Modes of collaborative reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Degeling, Martin; Prilla, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe different modes of collaborative reflection as processes of learning at the workplace. We explain why reflection is a decisive means of learning and - based on the modes we describe - how groups of people can be supported in reflection together. For this, we describe how scheduled, concurrent and spontaneous collaborative reflection can be supported by articulation, guidance and synergizing.

  20. Cardiac Penetrating Injuries and Pseudoaneurysm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shifeng

    2002-01-01

    Objective To discuss the early diagnosis and treatment of cardiac penetrating injuries and pseudoaneurysm. Methods 18 cases of cardiac penetrating injuries, in which 2 cases were complicated with pseudoaneurysm, were diagnosed by emergency operation and color Doppler echocardiography between May 1973 and Dec. 2001 in our hospital. The basis for emergency operation is the injured path locating in cardiac dangerous zone, severe shock or pericardial tamponade. ResultsAmong 18 cases of this study, 17 cases underwent emergency operation. During the operation, 11 cases were found injured in right ventricle, 2 cases were found injured in right atrium, 1 case was found injured in pulmonary artery,4 cases were found injured in left ventricle, 2 cases were found complicated with pseudoaneurysm. 17cases underwent cardiac repair including 1 case of rupture of aneurysm. 1 case underwent elective aneurysm resection. In whole group, 15 cases survived(83.33% ), 3 cases died( 16.67%). The cause of death is mainly hemorrhagic shock. Conclusion Highly suspicious cardiac penetrating injuries or hemopericaridium should undergo direct operative exploration. Pseudoaneurysm should be resected early,which can prevent severe complications.

  1. Vitamin D and Cardiac Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Irene M; Norris, Keith C; Artaza, Jorge N

    2016-01-01

    Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol or 1,25-D3) is the hormonally active metabolite of vitamin D. Experimental studies of vitamin D receptors and 1,25-D3 establish calcitriol to be a critical regulator of the structure and function of the heart. Clinical studies link vitamin D deficiency with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Emerging evidence demonstrates that calcitriol is highly involved in CVD-related signaling pathways, particularly the Wnt signaling pathway. Addition of 1,25-D3 to cardiomyocyte cells and examination of its effects on cardiomyocytes and mainly Wnt11 signaling allowed the specific characterization of the role of calcitriol in cardiac differentiation. 1,25-D3 is demonstrated to: (i) inhibit cell proliferation without promoting apoptosis; (ii) decrease expression of genes related to the regulation of the cell cycle; (iii) promote formation of cardiomyotubes; (iv) induce expression of casein kinase-1-α1, a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway; and (v) increase expression of noncanonical Wnt11, which has been recognized to induce cardiac differentiation during embryonic development and in adult cells. Thus, it appears that vitamin D promotes cardiac differentiation through negative modulation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and upregulation of noncanonical Wnt11 expression. Future work to elucidate the role(s) of vitamin D in cardiovascular disorders will hopefully lead to improvement and potentially prevention of CVD, including abnormal cardiac differentiation in settings such as postinfarction cardiac remodeling. PMID:26827957

  2. Cardiac factors in orthostatic hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löllgen, H.; Dirschedl, P.; Koppenhagen, K.; Klein, K. E.

    Cardiac function is determined by preload, afterload, heart rate and contractility. During orthostatic stress, the footward blood shift is compensated for by an increase of afterload. LBNP is widely used to analyze effects of volume displacement during orthostatic stress. Comparisons of invasive ( right heart catheterization) and non-invasive approach (echocardiography) yielded similar changes. Preload and afterload change with graded LBNP, heart rate increases, and stroke volume and cardiac output decrease. Thus, the working point on the left ventricular function curve is shifted to the left and downward, similar to hypovolemia. However, position on the Frank-Starling curve, the unchanged ejection fraction, and the constant Vcf indicate a normal contractile state during LBNP. A decrease of arterial oxygen partial pressure during LBNP shwos impaired ventilation/perfusion ratio. Finally, LBNP induced cardiac and hemodynamic changes can be effectively countermeasured by dihydroergotamine, a potent venoconstrictor. Comparison of floating catheter data with that of echocardiography resulted in close correlation for cardiac output and stroke volume. In addition, cardiac dimensions changed in a similar way during LBNP. From our findings, echocardiography as a non-invasive procedure can reliably used in LBNP and orthostatic stress tests. Some informations can be obtained on borderline values indicating collaps or orthostatic syncope. Early fainters can be differentiated from late fainters by stroke volume changes.

  3. Animal models of cardiac cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Francesca; Malara, Natalia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2016-09-15

    Cachexia is the loss of body weight associated with several chronic diseases including chronic heart failure (CHF). The cachectic condition is mainly due to loss of skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue depletion. The majority of experimental in vivo studies on cachexia rely on animal models of cancer cachexia while a reliable and appropriate model for cardiac cachexia has not yet been established. A critical issue in generating a cardiac cachexia model is that genetic modifications or pharmacological treatments impairing the heart functionality and used to obtain the heart failure model might likely impair the skeletal muscle, this also being a striated muscle and sharing with the myocardium several molecular and physiological mechanisms. On the other hand, often, the induction of heart damage in the several existing models of heart failure does not necessarily lead to skeletal muscle loss and cachexia. Here we describe the main features of cardiac cachexia and illustrate some animal models proposed for cardiac cachexia studies; they include the genetic calsequestrin and Dahl salt-sensitive models, the monocrotaline model and the surgical models obtained by left anterior descending (LAD) ligation, transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and ascending aortic banding. The availability of a specific animal model for cardiac cachexia is a crucial issue since, besides the common aspects of cachexia in the different syndromes, each disease has some peculiarities in its etiology and pathophysiology leading to cachexia. Such peculiarities need to be unraveled in order to find new targets for effective therapies. PMID:27317993

  4. Epicardial Lineages and Cardiac Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvendra K. Singh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The death of cardiac myocytes resulting from myocardial infarction is a major cause of heart failure worldwide. Effective therapies for regenerating lost cardiac myocytes are lacking. Recently, the epicardium has been implicated as a source of inflammatory cytokines, growth factors and progenitor cells that modulate the response to myocardial injury. During embryonic development, epicardially-derived cells have the potential to differentiate into multiple cardiac lineages, including fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscle and potentially other cell types. In the healthy adult heart, epicardial cells are thought to be generally quiescent. However, injury of the adult heart results in reactivation of a developmental gene program in the epicardium, which leads to increased epicardial cell proliferation and differentiation of epicardium-derived cells (EPDCs into various cardiac lineages. Recent work suggests that epicardial reactivation after injury is accompanied by, and contributes to, a robust inflammatory response. In this review, we describe the current status of research related to epicardial biology in cardiac development and regeneration, highlighting important recent discoveries and ongoing controversies.

  5. Patient specific fluid-structure ventricular modelling for integrated cardiac care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vecchi, A; Nordsletten, D A; Razavi, R; Greil, G; Smith, N P

    2013-11-01

    Cardiac diseases represent one of the primary causes of mortality and result in a substantial decrease in quality of life. Optimal surgical planning and long-term treatment are crucial for a successful and cost-effective patient care. Recently developed state-of-the-art imaging techniques supply a wealth of detailed data to support diagnosis. This provides the foundations for a novel approach to clinical planning based on personalisation, which can lead to more tailored treatment plans when compared to strategies based on standard population metrics. The goal of this study is to develop and apply a methodology for creating personalised ventricular models of blood and tissue mechanics to assess patient-specific metrics. Fluid-structure interaction simulations are performed to analyse the diastolic function in hypoplastic left heart patients, who underwent the first stage of a three-step surgical palliation and whose condition must be accurately evaluated to plan further intervention. The kinetic energy changes generated by the blood propagation in early diastole are found to reflect the intraventricular pressure gradient, giving indications on the filling efficiency. This suggests good agreement between the 3D model and the Euler equation, which provides a simplified relationship between pressure and kinetic energy and could, therefore, be applied in the clinical context. PMID:23340962

  6. MODIS solar reflective calibration traceability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, Jim

    2009-08-01

    Long-term climate data records often consist of observations made by multiple sensors. It is, therefore, extremely important to have instrument overlap, to be able to track instrument stability, to quantify measurement uncertainties, and to establish an absolute measurement scale traceable to the International System of Units (SI). The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a key instrument for both the Terra and Aqua missions, which were launched in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively. It has 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.2μm and observes the Earth at three nadir spatial resolutions: 0.25km, 0.5km, and 1km. MODIS RSB on-orbit calibration is reflectance based with reference to the bi-directional reflectance factor (BRF) of its on-board solar diffuser (SD). The SD BRF characterization was made pre-launch by the instrument vendor using reference samples traceable directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). On-orbit SD reflectance degradation is tracked by an on-board solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). This paper provides details of this calibration chain, from pre-launch to on-orbit operation, and associated uncertainty assessments. Using MODIS as an example, this paper also discusses challenges and key design requirements for future missions developed for accurate climate studies.

  7. MODIS Solar Reflective Calibration Traceability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Butler, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Long-term climate data records often consist of observations made by multiple sensors. It is, therefore, extremely important to have instrument overlap, to be able to track instrument stability, to quantify, measurement uncertainties, and to establish absolute scale traceable to the International System of Units (SI). The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a key instrument for both the Terra and Aqua missions, which were launched in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively. It has 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.2 micrometers and observes the Earth at three nadir spatial resolutions: 0.25km, 0.5km, and 1km. MODIS RSB on-orbit calibration is reflectance based with reference to the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) of its on-board solar diffuser (SD). The SD BRF characterization was made pre-launch by the instrument vendor using reference samples traceable directly to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). On-orbit SD reflectance degradation is tracked by an on-board solar diffuser monitor (SDSM). This paper provides details of this calibration chain, from prelaunch to on-orbit operation, and associated uncertainty assessments. Using MODIS as an example, this paper also discusses challenges and key design requirements for future missions developed for accurate climate studies.

  8. Reflectivity, Reflexivity and Situated Reflective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malthouse, Richard; Roffey-Barentsen, Jodi; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of reflective practice referred to as situated reflective practice. The overarching theory is derived from social theories of structuration and reflexivity. In particular, from Giddens' theory of structuration, which sees social life as an interplay of agency and structure. Discussion of the research reported…

  9. Cardiac perioperative complications in noncardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Dragana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthesiologists are confronted with an increasing population of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery who are at risk for cardiac complications in the perioperative period. Perioperative cardiac complications are responsible for significant mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of perioperative (operative and postoperative cardiac complications and correlations between the incidence of perioperative cardiac complications and type of surgical procedure, age, presence of concurrent diseases. A total of 100 patients with cardiac diseases undergoing noncardiac surgery were included in the prospective study (Group A 50 patients undergoing intraperitoneal surgery and Group B 50 patients undergoing breast and thyroid surgery. The patients were followed up during the perioperative period and after surgery until leaving hospital to assess the occurrence of cardiac events. Cardiac complications (systemic arterial hypertension, systemic arterial hypotension, abnormalities of cardiac conduction and cardiac rhythm, perioperative myocardial ischemia and acute myocardial infarction occurred in 64% of the patients. One of the 100 patients (1% had postoperative myocardial infarction which was fatal. Systemic arterial hypertension occurred in 57% of patients intraoperatively and 33% postoperatively, abnormalities of cardiac rhythm in 31% of patients intraoperatively and 17% postoperatively, perioperative myocardial ischemia in 23% of patients intraoperatively and 11% of postoperatively. The most often cardiac complications were systemic arterial hypertension, abnormalities of cardiac rhythm and perioperative myocardial ischemia. Factors independently associated with the incidence of cardiac complications included the type of surgical procedure, advanced age, duration of anaesthesia and surgery, abnormal preoperative electrocardiogram, abnormal preoperative chest radiography and diabetes.

  10. Laboratory Building for Accurate Determination of Plutonium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The accurate determination of plutonium is one of the most important assay techniques of nuclear fuel, also the key of the chemical measurement transfer and the base of the nuclear material balance. An

  11. Improving reflectance estimation by BRDF-consistent region clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies in reflectance estimation generally require prior segmentation of an image into regions of uniform reflectance. Due to the measurement noise and limited sampling of the BRDF (bi-directional reflectance function) directions, such estimated results of reflectance are not accurate. In this paper, we propose a novel method for reducing uncertainty in reflectance estimates by merging image regions which have consistent reflectance observations. Each image region acts as a reflectance subspace, so merging of the image regions can result in subspace reduction. We propose a Bayesian segmentation framework to decrease the reflectance uncertainty by using novel merging criteria. Finally, a maximum likelihood reflectance estimation is made for each resulting image region. Experimental results verify the feasibility and superiority of this reflectance-oriented region merging method.

  12. Electrophysiological Cardiac Modeling: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Mohammadali; Umapathy, Karthikeyan; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiological modeling in conjunction with experimental and clinical findings has contributed to better understanding of electrophysiological phenomena in various species. As our knowledge on underlying electrical, mechanical, and chemical processes has improved over time, mathematical models of the cardiac electrophysiology have become more realistic and detailed. These models have provided a testbed for various hypotheses and conditions that may not be easy to implement experimentally. In addition to the limitations in experimentally validating various scenarios implemented by the models, one of the major obstacles for these models is computational complexity. However, the ever-increasing computational power of supercomputers facilitates the clinical application of cardiac electrophysiological models. The potential clinical applications include testing and predicting effects of pharmaceutical agents and performing patient-specific ablation and defibrillation. A review of studies involving these models and their major findings are provided.

  13. Cine MR imaging-current use in cardiac diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the current status of cine MR imaging of the heart with special attention to the assessment of cardiac function. Cine MR provides tomographic sectional images with clear distinction between myocardium and flowing blood, and allows accurate volumetry of the cardiac chambers at specific points of the cardiac cycle. From these volume measurements parameters for the cardiac function, such as stroke volumem, ejection fraction, regurgitant fraction and shunt volum are calculated. While determination of chamber volumes can be done using any imaging plane, regional wall motion and wall thickening are evaluated with the short axis images. These images are readily obtained by orienting the slice selective gradient perpendicular to the long axis of the left ventricle. Left ventricular meridional wall stress is also calculated from cine MR images and noninvasive measurements of peak- and end-systolic pressure. Wall stress is an indicator of myocardial function in response to after load and can be used for monitoring patients with myocardial disease, regurgitant valvular disease and hypertension, and might be used to quantitatively assess the response of these diseases to therapy. Diseases causing hypertrophy of the ventricles, such as valvular stenosis, systemic or pulmonary hypertension and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, can be monitored with cine MR by measuring the myocardial mass. A signal void from high velocity jets is caused by regurgitant or stenotic valvular lesion as well as flow across ventricular or atrial septal defects. Measurement of the dimension of the signal void have been correlated with the severity of regurgitation and can be used for semi-quantitation of these lesions. Due to the inherent contrast between blood and myocardium, high temporal resolution, and acquisition of tomographic images encompassing the entire heart, cine MR can serve as a comprehensive cardiac imaging modality that provides quantitative evaluation of anatomy and

  14. Ca2+ Alternans in a Cardiac Myocyte Model that Uses Moment Equations to Represent Heterogeneous Junctional SR Ca2+

    OpenAIRE

    Huertas, Marco A; Smith, Gregory D.; Györke, Sándor

    2010-01-01

    Multiscale whole-cell models that accurately represent local control of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in cardiac myocytes can reproduce high-gain Ca2+ release that is graded with changes in membrane potential. Using a recently introduced formalism that represents heterogeneous local Ca2+ using moment equations, we present a model of cardiac myocyte Ca2+ cycling that exhibits alternating sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release when periodically stimulated by depolarizing voltage pulses. The model...

  15. Urinary Excretion of Liver Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein Accurately Reflects the Degree of Tubulointerstitial Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Takeshi; Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Yasuda, Takashi; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), a biomarker of chronic kidney disease, in the kidney and the degree of tubulointerstitial damage, folic acid (FA)-induced nephropathy was studied in a mouse model system. As renal L-FABP is not expressed in wild-type mice, human L-FABP (hL-FABP) transgenic mice were used in this study. hL-FABP is expressed in the renal proximal tubules of the transgenic mice that were injected intraperitoneally with FA in ...

  16. Understanding the History of Astrology Accurately: Methodological Reflections on Terminology and Anachronism

    OpenAIRE

    Rutkin, H. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I will use two of Roger Bacon’s distinctive phrases—astronomia iudiciaria et operativa and opera et verba sapientium—to build up a picture of his distinctive configuration of the 13thcentury map of knowledge, in which mathematics, perspectiva and astrology are all utterly central. I will then explore how astrology thus configured may be used to explore Bacon’s relation to what we call science, magic and religion, although ...

  17. How accurately does output reflect the nature and design of transdisciplinary research programmes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koier, Elizabeth; Horlings, E.

    2014-01-01

    Many of today’s societal problems are wicked problems that require a new, transdisciplinary approach in which knowledge of scientists and stakeholders from different disciplines is integrated. The evaluation of transdisciplinary science requires a multi-method approach. Bibliometric analysis is cons

  18. DCP-collected absolute target reflectance signatures assist accurate interpretation of ERTS-1 imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, F. P.

    1973-01-01

    Data collection platforms (DCP's) are being used at a Black Hills, South Dakota, test site (MMC 226A) to record radiometric measurements needed to determine solar and atmospheric parameters that affect ERTS-1 multispectral scanner radiance measurements. A total of 72 channels of analog data transmitted from an unattended ground truth site via three DCP's at least six times a day. The system has operated with only minor problems since September, sending forth daily measurements of biophysical responses and atmospheric conditions. Comparisons of scene radiance data calculated from ERTS images with that measured on the ground show the image-measured values to be 35 percent higher for the green channel and 20 percent higher for the red channel for the same scene targets. Radiance values for channels 6 and 7 are nearly the same from the ground data and from the imagery.

  19. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard;

    2013-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  20. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  1. An update on insertable cardiac monitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming J; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Krieger, Derk W

    2015-01-01

    Continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring has undergone compelling progress over the past decades. Cardiac monitoring has emerged from 12-lead electrocardiograms being performed at the discretion of the treating physician to in-hospital telemetry, Holter monitoring, prolonged external event monitoring...

  2. Accurate LAI retrieval method based on PROBA/CHRIS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Leaf area index (LAI is one of the key structural variables in terrestrial vegetation ecosystems. Remote sensing offers a chance to derive LAI in regional scales accurately. Variations of background, atmospheric conditions and the anisotropy of canopy reflectance are three factors that can strongly restrain the accuracy of retrieved LAI. Based on the hybrid canopy reflectance model, a new hyperspectral directional second derivative method (DSD is proposed in this paper. This method can estimate LAI accurately through analyzing the canopy anisotropy. The effect of the background can also be effectively removed. So the inversion precision and the dynamic range can be improved remarkably, which has been proved by numerical simulations. As the derivative method is very sensitive to the random noise, we put forward an innovative filtering approach, by which the data can be de-noised in spectral and spatial dimensions synchronously. It shows that the filtering method can remove the random noise effectively; therefore, the method can be performed to the remotely sensed hyperspectral image. The study region is situated in Zhangye, Gansu Province, China; the hyperspectral and multi-angular image of the study region has been acquired from Compact High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer/Project for On-Board Autonomy (CHRIS/PROBA, on 4 and 14 June 2008. After the pre-processing procedures, the DSD method was applied, and the retrieve LAI was validated by the ground truth of 11 sites. It shows that by applying innovative filtering method, the new LAI inversion method is accurate and effective.

  3. Understanding reflective practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Jacqueline Sian; Dosser, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) requires that nurses and midwives use feedback as an opportunity for reflection and learning, to improve practice. The NMC revalidation process stipulates that practitioners provide examples of how they have achieved this. To reflect in a meaningful way, it is important to understand what is meant by reflection, the skills required, and how reflection can be undertaken successfully. Traditionally, reflection occurs after an event encountered in practice. The authors challenge this perception, suggesting that reflection should be undertaken before, during and after an event. This article provides practical guidance to help practitioners use reflective models to write reflective accounts. It also outlines how the reflective process can be used as a valuable learning tool in preparation for revalidation. PMID:27154119

  4. Elevated sensitivity to cardiac ischemia in proteinuric rats is independent of adverse cardiac remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szymanski, Mariusz K.; Hillege, Hans L.; Danser, A. H. Jan; Garrelds, Ingrid M.; Schoemaker, Regien G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Chronic renal dysfunction severely increases cardiovascular risk. Adverse cardiac remodeling is suggested to play a major role as predisposition for increased cardiac ischemic vulnerability. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of adverse cardiac remodeling in cardiac sen

  5. [Cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography in cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, H; Seki, S; Mizuguchi, A; Tsuchida, H; Watanabe, H; Namiki, A

    1990-04-01

    The cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography, NCCOM3, was evaluated in adult patients (n = 12) who were subjected to coronary artery bypass grafting. Values of cardiac output measured by impedance cardiography were compared to those by the thermodilution method. Changes of base impedance level used as an index of thoracic fluid volume were also investigated before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Correlation coefficient (r) of the values obtained by thermodilution with impedance cardiography was 0.79 and the mean difference was 1.29 +/- 16.9 (SD)% during induction of anesthesia. During the operation, r was 0.83 and the mean difference was -14.6 +/- 18.7%. The measurement by impedance cardiography could be carried out through the operation except when electro-cautery was used. Base impedance level before CPB was significantly lower as compared with that after CPB. There was a negative correlation between the base impedance level and central venous pressure (CVP). No patients showed any signs suggesting lung edema and all the values of CVP, pulmonary artery pressure and blood gas analysis were within normal ranges. From the result of this study, it was concluded that cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography was useful in cardiac surgery, but further detailed examinations will be necessary on the relationship between the numerical values of base impedance and the clinical state of the patients. PMID:2362347

  6. Health Literacy Predicts Cardiac Knowledge Gains in Cardiac Rehabilitation Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Colleen C.; Rawson, Katherine; Hughes, Joel W.; Waechter, Donna; Rosneck, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Health literacy is increasingly recognised as a potentially important patient characteristic related to patient education efforts. We evaluated whether health literacy would predict gains in knowledge after completion of patient education in cardiac rehabilitation. Method: This was a re-post observational analysis study design based on…

  7. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    OpenAIRE

    Kuster, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness, cardiac hypertrophy is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure and is therefore called pathological hypertrophy. That hypertrophy is not bad per se, is illustrated by the hyp...

  8. Evaluation of cardiac blood blow, metabolism and sympathetic nerve function in patients with cardiac failure using PET and SPECT. Prognostic diagnosis based on the analysis of aggravating factors of the disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Shimozu, Junko; Yasumura, Yoshio; Nagatani, Kenzo; Miyatake, Kunio [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    Focusing on the failure of energy metabolism, which is assumed to be attributed to the cardiac muscle disorder of a patient with cardiac failure, the characteristics and diagnostic significance of the metabolic disorders of cadiac muscles were investigated in those patients. The diagnostic efficacy of {beta}-methyl iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) which is a imaging agent for lipid metabolism in the cardiac muscle was assessed in the clinical states of cardiac failure due to pulmonary hypertension. Even if there was a considerable increase in the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), the initial accumulation of BMIPP linearly increased, similarly to the increase in the accumulation of MIBI, a blood flow agent. The initial accumulation of BMIPP was thought to reflect a thicken cardiac muscle and/or increased blood flow. Also, its washing-out rate was suggested to be usable as an clinical indicator to estimate the loading of ventricular pressure. (M.N.)

  9. Characterization of cardiac quiescence from retrospective cardiac computed tomography using a correlation-based phase-to-phase deviation measure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, Carson A.; McClellan, James H. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Drive Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Arepalli, Chesnal D. [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, 3350-950 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E3 (Canada); Auffermann, William F.; Henry, Travis S. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging, 1364 Clifton Road Northeast, Suite 309, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Khosa, Faisal [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Division of Emergency Radiology, 550 Peachtree Street Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia 30308 (United States); Coy, Adam M. [School of Medicine, Emory University, 100 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Tridandapani, Srini, E-mail: stridan@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Winship Cancer Institute, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Drive Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate knowledge of cardiac quiescence is crucial to the performance of many cardiac imaging modalities, including computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). To accurately quantify quiescence, a method for detecting the quiescent periods of the heart from retrospective cardiac computed tomography (CT) using a correlation-based, phase-to-phase deviation measure was developed. Methods: Retrospective cardiac CT data were obtained from 20 patients (11 male, 9 female, 33–74 yr) and the left main, left anterior descending, left circumflex, right coronary artery (RCA), and interventricular septum (IVS) were segmented for each phase using a semiautomated technique. Cardiac motion of individual coronary vessels as well as the IVS was calculated using phase-to-phase deviation. As an easily identifiable feature, the IVS was analyzed to assess how well it predicts vessel quiescence. Finally, the diagnostic quality of the reconstructed volumes from the quiescent phases determined using the deviation measure from the vessels in aggregate and the IVS was compared to that from quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner. Three board-certified radiologists, fellowship-trained in cardiothoracic imaging, graded the diagnostic quality of the reconstructions using a Likert response format: 1 = excellent, 2 = good, 3 = adequate, 4 = nondiagnostic. Results: Systolic and diastolic quiescent periods were identified for each subject from the vessel motion calculated using the phase-to-phase deviation measure. The motion of the IVS was found to be similar to the aggregate vessel (AGG) motion. The diagnostic quality of the coronary vessels for the quiescent phases calculated from the aggregate vessel (P{sub AGG}) and IVS (P{sub IV} {sub S}) deviation signal using the proposed methods was comparable to the quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner (P{sub CT}). The one exception was the RCA, which improved for P{sub AGG} for 18 of the 20 subjects when compared to P

  10. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance and prognosis in cardiac amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roughton Michael

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac involvement is common in amyloidosis and associated with a variably adverse outcome. We have previously shown that cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR can assess deposition of amyloid protein in the myocardial interstitium. In this study we assessed the prognostic value of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE and gadolinium kinetics in cardiac amyloidosis in a prospective longitudinal study. Materials and methods The pre-defined study end point was all-cause mortality. We prospectively followed a cohort of 29 patients with proven cardiac amyloidosis. All patients underwent biopsy, 2D-echocardiography and Doppler studies, 123I-SAP scintigraphy, serum NT pro BNP assay, and CMR with a T1 mapping method and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE. Results Patients with were followed for a median of 623 days (IQ range 221, 1436, during which 17 (58% patients died. The presence of myocardial LGE by itself was not a significant predictor of mortality. However, death was predicted by gadolinium kinetics, with the 2 minute post-gadolinium intramyocardial T1 difference between subepicardium and subendocardium predicting mortality with 85% accuracy at a threshold value of 23 ms (the lower the difference the worse the prognosis. Intramyocardial T1 gradient was a better predictor of survival than FLC response to chemotherapy (Kaplan Meier analysis P = 0.049 or diastolic function (Kaplan-Meier analysis P = 0.205. Conclusion In cardiac amyloidosis, CMR provides unique information relating to risk of mortality based on gadolinium kinetics which reflects the severity of the cardiac amyloid burden.

  11. MRI of cardiac rhabdomyoma in the fetus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivelitz, Dietmar E.; Muehler, Matthias [Institut fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Charite, Schumannstrasse 20/21, 10098, Berlin (Germany); Rake, Annett; Chaoui, Rabih [Klinik fuer Gynaekologie und Geburtshilfe, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Charite, Schumannstrasse 20/21, 10098, Berlin (Germany); Scheer, Ianina [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Abteilung Paediatrische Radiologie, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Charite, Schumannstrasse 20/21, 10098, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are rarely diagnosed in utero and are usually seen on prenatal echocardiography. Cardiac rhabdomyomata can be associated with tuberous sclerosis. Prenatal MRI can be performed to assess associated malformations. This case report illustrates the ability of fetal MRI to image cardiac rhabdomyata and compares it with prenatal and postnatal echocardiography. (orig.)

  12. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.D. Kuster (Diederik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness, c

  13. Childhood cancer survivors: cardiac disease & social outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.M. Feijen

    2015-01-01

    The thesis is divided in two parts; Cardiac health problems and healthcare consumption & social outcomes in CCS. The general aims of part 1 creates optimal conditions for the evaluation of cardiac events in 5-year childhood cancer survivors, evaluation of the long term risk of cardiac events, and to

  14. Invariant Image Watermarking Using Accurate Zernike Moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail A. Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available problem statement: Digital image watermarking is the most popular method for image authentication, copyright protection and content description. Zernike moments are the most widely used moments in image processing and pattern recognition. The magnitudes of Zernike moments are rotation invariant so they can be used just as a watermark signal or be further modified to carry embedded data. The computed Zernike moments in Cartesian coordinate are not accurate due to geometrical and numerical error. Approach: In this study, we employed a robust image-watermarking algorithm using accurate Zernike moments. These moments are computed in polar coordinate, where both approximation and geometric errors are removed. Accurate Zernike moments are used in image watermarking and proved to be robust against different kind of geometric attacks. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated using standard images. Results: Experimental results show that, accurate Zernike moments achieve higher degree of robustness than those approximated ones against rotation, scaling, flipping, shearing and affine transformation. Conclusion: By computing accurate Zernike moments, the embedded bits watermark can be extracted at low error rate.

  15. Cardiac connexins and impulse propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Jansen; T.A.B. van Veen; J.M.T. de Bakker; H.V.M. van Rijen

    2010-01-01

    Gap junctions form the intercellular pathway for cell-to-cell transmission of the cardiac impulse from its site of origin, the sinoatrial node, along the atria, the atrioventricular conduction system to the ventricular myocardium. The component parts of gap junctions are proteins called connexins (C

  16. Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilt, I.A.C. van der

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage(aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. During the course of the aSAH several neurological and medical complications may occur. Cardiac abnormalities after aSAH are observed often and resemble stress cardiomyopathy or Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(Broken Heart Syn

  17. Molecular therapies for cardiac arrhythmias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.J. Boink

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ongoing advances in pharmacology, devices and surgical approaches to treat heart rhythm disturbances, arrhythmias are still a significant cause of death and morbidity. With the introduction of gene and cell therapy, new avenues have arrived for the local modulation of cardiac disease. Th

  18. Historical highlights in cardiac pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, L A

    1990-01-01

    The benchmarks in cardiac pacing are identified, beginning with F. Steiner (1871), who rhythmically stimulated the chloroform-arrested hearts of 3 horses, 1 donkey, 10 dogs, 14 cats, and 8 rabbits. The chloroform-arrested heart in human subjects was paced by T. Greene in the following year (1872) in the UK. In 1882, H. Ziemssen in Germany applied cardiac pacing to a 42-year old woman who had a large defect in the anterior left chest wall subsequent to resection of an enchondroma. Intentional cardiac pacing did not occur until 1932, when A.A. Hyman in the US demonstrated that cardiac pacing could be clinically practical. Hyman made a batteryless pacemaker for delivery in induction shock stimuli (60-120/min) to the atria. His pacemaker was powered by a hand-wound, spring-driven generator which provided 6 min of pacemaking without rewinding. Closed-chest ventricular pacing was introduced in the US in 1952 by P.M. Zoll et al. Zoll (1956) also introduced closed-chest ventricular defibrillation. W.L. Weirich et al. (1958) demonstrated that direct-heart stimulation in closed-chest patients could be achieved with slender wire electrodes. S. Furman and J.B. Schwedel (1959) developed a monopolar catheter electrode for ventricular pacing in man. In the same year, W. Greatbatch and W.M. Chardack developed the implantable pacemaker. PMID:18238328

  19. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei HUA

    2006-01-01

    @@ Congestive heart failure (HF) is a major and growing public health problem. The therapeutic approach includes non-pharmacological measures, pharmacological therapy,mechanical devices, and surgery. Despite the benefits of optimal pharmacologic therapy, the prognosis is still not ideal. At this time, cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT)has gained wide acceptance as an alternative treatment for HF patients with conduction delay.1

  20. Cardiac pacemakers and nuclear batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the introduction giving the indications for cardiac pacemaker therapy with special regard to the use of pacemakers powered by nuclear batteries, reference is made to the resulting radiation exposure of the patient. The activities of the Federal Health Office in this field such as recommendations and surveys including the entire Federal Republic are outlined. (orig.)

  1. CARDIAC TRANSPLANTATION: AN ANESTHETIC CHALLENGE

    OpenAIRE

    Premalatha; Jayaraman,

    2014-01-01

    : Heart transplantation has emerged as the definitive therapy for patients with end-stage cardiomyopathy. The two most common forms of cardiac disease that lead to transplantation are ischemic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy, which together comprise approximately 90% of cases. The other less common forms of heart disease include viral cardiomyopathy, infiltrative cardiomyopathy, postpartum cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease and congenital heart disease

  2. Epidural analgesia for cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Svircevic; M.M. Passier; A.P. Nierich; D. van Dijk; C.J. Kalkman; G.J. van der Heijden

    2013-01-01

    Background A combination of general anaesthesia (GA) with thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) may have a beneficial effect on clinical outcomes by reducing the risk of perioperative complications after cardiac surgery. Objectives The objective of this review was to determine the impact of perioperativ

  3. A robust and accurate formulation of molecular and colloidal electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiang; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y. C.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a re-formulation of the boundary integral method for the Debye-Hückel model of molecular and colloidal electrostatics that removes the mathematical singularities that have to date been accepted as an intrinsic part of the conventional boundary integral equation method. The essence of the present boundary regularized integral equation formulation consists of subtracting a known solution from the conventional boundary integral method in such a way as to cancel out the singularities associated with the Green's function. This approach better reflects the non-singular physical behavior of the systems on boundaries with the benefits of the following: (i) the surface integrals can be evaluated accurately using quadrature without any need to devise special numerical integration procedures, (ii) being able to use quadratic or spline function surface elements to represent the surface more accurately and the variation of the functions within each element is represented to a consistent level of precision by appropriate interpolation functions, (iii) being able to calculate electric fields, even at boundaries, accurately and directly from the potential without having to solve hypersingular integral equations and this imparts high precision in calculating the Maxwell stress tensor and consequently, intermolecular or colloidal forces, (iv) a reliable way to handle geometric configurations in which different parts of the boundary can be very close together without being affected by numerical instabilities, therefore potentials, fields, and forces between surfaces can be found accurately at surface separations down to near contact, and (v) having the simplicity of a formulation that does not require complex algorithms to handle singularities will result in significant savings in coding effort and in the reduction of opportunities for coding errors. These advantages are illustrated using examples drawn from molecular and colloidal electrostatics.

  4. Square and Delta reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Fontanella, Laura; Hayut, Yair

    2016-01-01

    Starting from infinitely many supercompact cardinals, we force a model of ZFC where $\\aleph_{\\omega^2+1}$ satisfies simultaneously a strong principle of reflection, called $\\Delta$-reflection, and a version of the square principle, denoted $\\square(\\aleph_{\\omega^2+1}).$ Thus we show that $\\aleph_{\\omega^2+1}$ can satisfy simultaneously a strong reflection principle and an anti-reflection principle.

  5. Genetic counseling and cardiac care in predictively tested hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers: The patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; Van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with sudden cardiac death. Predictive genetic counseling and testing are performed using adapted Huntington guidelines, that is, psychosocial care and time for reflection are not obligatory and the test result can be d

  6. Genetic counseling and cardiac care in predictively tested hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers: The patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Christiaans; I.M. van Langen; E. Birnie; G.J. Bonsel; A.A.M. Wilde; E.M.A. Smets

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with sudden cardiac death. predictive genetic counseling and testing are performed using adapted Huntington guidelines, that is, psychosocial care and time for reflection are not obligatory and the test result can be d

  7. Accurate tracking control in LOM application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The fabrication of accurate prototype from CAD model directly in short time depends on the accurate tracking control and reference trajectory planning in (Laminated Object Manufacture) LOM application. An improvement on contour accuracy is acquired by the introduction of a tracking controller and a trajectory generation policy. A model of the X-Y positioning system of LOM machine is developed as the design basis of tracking controller. The ZPETC (Zero Phase Error Tracking Controller) is used to eliminate single axis following error, thus reduce the contour error. The simulation is developed on a Maltab model based on a retrofitted LOM machine and the satisfied result is acquired.

  8. Teaching Critical Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Despite long-standing commitment to the notion of critical reflection across the healthcare professions it is unusual for critical theory and practice to be taught as explicit subjects in healthcare higher education. There is evidence to show that reflective techniques such as critical portfolios and reflective diaries can help students to…

  9. Liberating Moral Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horell, Harold D.

    2013-01-01

    The author argues that if we are to foster life-giving and liberating moral reflection, we must first liberate moral reflection from distortions; specifically, from the distorting effects of moral insensitivity, destructive moral relativism, and confusions resulting from a failure to understand the dynamics of moral reflection. The author proposes…

  10. Reflective Learning in Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockbank, Anne, Ed.; McGill, Ian, Ed.; Beech, Nic, Ed.

    This book contains 22 papers on reflective learning in practice. The following papers are included: "Our Purpose" (Ann Brockbank, Ian McGill, Nic Beech); "The Nature and Context of Learning" (Ann Brockbank, Ian McGill, Nic Beech); "Reflective Learning and Organizations" (Ann Brockbank, Ian McGill, Nic Beech); "Reflective Learning in Practice" (Ann…

  11. Effect of Exercise and Vitamin E on Cardiac Troponin Alterations in Myocardium and Serum of Rats after Stressful Intense Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    N.S. AL-Sowyan

    2010-01-01

    Increased concentrations of biomarkers reflecting myocardial stress such as cardiac troponin have been observed following strenuous exercise. The aim of this study was to determine whether the stress of forced exercise would result in injury to the myocardium. The effects of stress induced by short bout strenuous exercise and long term exercise on serum, cardiac and skeletal muscle troponin, also blood glucose and insulin were measured. Moreover, to determine whether vitamin E supplementation...

  12. Cardiac Troponin I: A Valuable Biomarker Indicating the Cardiac Involvement in Fabry Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Tanislav

    Full Text Available Assessment of the clinical severity of Fabry disease (FD, an X-linked, rare, progressive disorder based on a genetic defect in alpha-galactosidase is challenging, especially regarding cardiac involvement. The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of cardiac troponin I (cTnI in discriminating FD patients with cardiac involvement in a large FD patient cohort.cTnI levels were measured with a contemporary sensitive assay in plasma samples taken routinely from FD patients. The assay was calibrated to measure cTnI levels ≥0.01 ng/ml. Elevated cTnI values (cut-off ≥0.04 ng/ml were correlated with clinical data.cTnI was assessed in 62 FD patients (median age: 47 years, males: 36%. Elevated cTnI levels were detected in 23 (37% patients. Patients with a cTnI elevation were older (median 55 years versus 36 years, p<0.001. Elevated cTnI levels were associated with the presence of a LVH (16/23 versus 1/39; OR 65.81, CI: 6.747-641.859; p<0.001. In almost all patients with a left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH elevated cTnI levels were detected (16/17, 94%. Absolute cTnI levels in patients with LVH were higher than in those without (median 0.23 ng/ml versus 0.02 ng/ml; p<0.001. A cTnI level <0.04ng/ml had a high negative predictive value regarding the presence of a LVH (38/39, 97%. In a control group of non-FD patients (n = 17 with LVH (due to hypertension none showed cTnI levels ≥0.01 ng/ml.Elevated cTnI levels are common in FD patients, reflecting cardiac involvement. FD patients might benefit from a continuous cTnI monitoring.

  13. Cardiac Troponin I: A Valuable Biomarker Indicating the Cardiac Involvement in Fabry Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Anne Kathrin; Eichler, Sabrina; Sieweke, Nicole; Speth, Maria; Bauer, Timm; Hamm, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Assessment of the clinical severity of Fabry disease (FD), an X-linked, rare, progressive disorder based on a genetic defect in alpha-galactosidase is challenging, especially regarding cardiac involvement. The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in discriminating FD patients with cardiac involvement in a large FD patient cohort. Methods cTnI levels were measured with a contemporary sensitive assay in plasma samples taken routinely from FD patients. The assay was calibrated to measure cTnI levels ≥0.01 ng/ml. Elevated cTnI values (cut-off ≥0.04 ng/ml) were correlated with clinical data. Results cTnI was assessed in 62 FD patients (median age: 47 years, males: 36%). Elevated cTnI levels were detected in 23 (37%) patients. Patients with a cTnI elevation were older (median 55 years versus 36 years, p<0.001). Elevated cTnI levels were associated with the presence of a LVH (16/23 versus 1/39; OR 65.81, CI: 6.747–641.859; p<0.001). In almost all patients with a left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) elevated cTnI levels were detected (16/17, 94%). Absolute cTnI levels in patients with LVH were higher than in those without (median 0.23 ng/ml versus 0.02 ng/ml; p<0.001). A cTnI level <0.04ng/ml had a high negative predictive value regarding the presence of a LVH (38/39, 97%). In a control group of non-FD patients (n = 17) with LVH (due to hypertension) none showed cTnI levels ≥0.01 ng/ml. Conclusions Elevated cTnI levels are common in FD patients, reflecting cardiac involvement. FD patients might benefit from a continuous cTnI monitoring. PMID:27322070

  14. Reflection Positive Doubles

    CERN Document Server

    Jaffe, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce reflection positive doubles, a general framework for reflection positivity, covering a wide variety of systems in statistical physics and quantum field theory. These systems may be bosonic, fermionic, or parafermionic in nature. Within the framework of reflection positive doubles, we give necessary and sufficient conditions for reflection positivity. We use a reflection-invariant cone to implement our construction. Our characterization allows for a direct interpretation in terms of coupling constants, making it easy to check in concrete situations. We illustrate our methods with numerous examples.

  15. Accurate atomic data for industrial plasma applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griesmann, U.; Bridges, J.M.; Roberts, J.R.; Wiese, W.L.; Fuhr, J.R. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Reliable branching fraction, transition probability and transition wavelength data for radiative dipole transitions of atoms and ions in plasma are important in many industrial applications. Optical plasma diagnostics and modeling of the radiation transport in electrical discharge plasmas (e.g. in electrical lighting) depend on accurate basic atomic data. NIST has an ongoing experimental research program to provide accurate atomic data for radiative transitions. The new NIST UV-vis-IR high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer has become an excellent tool for accurate and efficient measurements of numerous transition wavelengths and branching fractions in a wide wavelength range. Recently, the authors have also begun to employ photon counting techniques for very accurate measurements of branching fractions of weaker spectral lines with the intent to improve the overall accuracy for experimental branching fractions to better than 5%. They have now completed their studies of transition probabilities of Ne I and Ne II. The results agree well with recent calculations and for the first time provide reliable transition probabilities for many weak intercombination lines.

  16. Automatic cardiac gating of small-animal PET from list-mode data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L.; Udias, J.M. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid Univ. (Spain). Grupo de Fisica Nuclear; Vaquero, J.J.; Desco, M. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Aeroespacial; Cusso, L. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain). Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental

    2011-07-01

    This work presents a method to obtain automatically the cardiac gating signal in a PET study of rats, by employing the variation with time of the counts in the cardiac region, that can be extracted from list-mode data. In an initial step, the cardiac region is identified in the image space by backward-projecting a small fraction of the acquired data and studying the variation with time of the counts in each voxel inside said region, with frequencies within 2 and 8 Hz. The region obtained corresponds accurately to the left-ventricle of the heart of the rat. In a second step, the lines-of-response (LORs) connected with this region are found by forward-projecting this region. The time variation of the number of counts in these LORs contains the cardiac motion information that we want to extract. This variation of counts with time is band-pass filtered to reduce noise, and the time signal so obtained is used to create the gating signal. The result was compared with a cardiac gating signal obtained from an ECG acquired simultaneously to the PET study. Reconstructed gated images obtained from both gating information are similar. The method proposed demonstrates that valid cardiac gating signals can be obtained for rats from PET list-mode data. (orig.)

  17. A device for rapid and quantitative measurement of cardiac myocyte contractility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitas, Angelo; Malhotra, Ricky; Li, Tao; Herron, Todd; Jalife, José

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac contractility is the hallmark of cardiac function and is a predictor of healthy or diseased cardiac muscle. Despite advancements over the last two decades, the techniques and tools available to cardiovascular scientists are limited in their utility to accurately and reliably measure the amplitude and frequency of cardiomyocyte contractions. Isometric force measurements in the past have entailed cumbersome attachment of isolated and permeabilized cardiomyocytes to a force transducer followed by measurements of sarcomere lengths under conditions of submaximal and maximal Ca2+ activation. These techniques have the inherent disadvantages of being labor intensive and costly. We have engineered a micro-machined cantilever sensor with an embedded deflection-sensing element that, in preliminary experiments, has demonstrated to reliably measure cardiac cell contractions in real-time. Here, we describe this new bioengineering tool with applicability in the cardiovascular research field to effectively and reliably measure cardiac cell contractility in a quantitative manner. We measured contractility in both primary neonatal rat heart cardiomyocyte monolayers that demonstrated a beat frequency of 3 Hz as well as human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes with a contractile frequency of about 1 Hz. We also employed the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (100 nmol l-1) and observed that our cantilever demonstrated high sensitivity in detecting subtle changes in both chronotropic and inotropic responses of monolayers. This report describes the utility of our micro-device in both basic cardiovascular research as well as in small molecule drug discovery to monitor cardiac cell contractions.

  18. Acquisition and automated 3-D segmentation of respiratory/cardiac-gated PET transmission images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the impact of respiratory motion on attenuation correction of cardiac PET data, we acquired and automatically segmented gated transmission data for a dog breathing on its own under gas anesthesia. Data were acquired for 20 min on a CTI/Siemens ECAT EXACT HR (47-slice) scanner configured for 12 gates in a static study, Two respiratory gates were obtained using data from a pneumatic bellows placed around the dog's chest, in conjunction with 6 cardiac gates from standard EKG gating. Both signals were directed to a LabVIEW-controlled Macintosh, which translated them into one of 12 gate addresses. The respiratory gating threshold was placed near end-expiration to acquire 6 cardiac-gated datasets at end-expiration and 6 cardiac-gated datasets during breaths. Breaths occurred about once every 10 sec and lasted about 1-1.5 sec. For each respiratory gate, data were summed over cardiac gates and torso and lung surfaces were segmented automatically using a differential 3-D edge detection algorithm. Three-dimensional visualizations showed that lung surfaces adjacent to the heart translated 9 mm inferiorly during breaths. Our results suggest that respiration-compensated attenuation correction is feasible with a modest amount of gated transmission data and is necessary for accurate quantitation of high-resolution gated cardiac PET data

  19. Wave Reflection Coefficient Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞聿修; 邵利民; 柳淑学

    2003-01-01

    The wave reflection coefficient frequency spectrum and directional spectrum for concrete face slope breakwaters and rubble mound breakwaters are investigated through physical model tests in the present study. The reflection coefficients of oblique irregular waves are analyzed by the Modified Two-Point Method (MTPM) proposed by the authors. The results show that the wave reflection coefficient decreases with increasing wave frequency and incident angle or decreasing structure slope. The reflection coefficient frequency spectrum and its variation with Iribarren number are given in this paper. The paper also suggests an empirical 3-dimensional reflection coefficient spectrum, i.e. reflection coefficient directional spectrum, which can be used to illustrate quantitatively the variation of reflection coefficient with the incident angle and the Iribarren number for oblique irregular waves.

  20. Clinical application of dual gate Doppler in evaluating cardiac function and synchronization%双多普勒同步取样技术评价心脏功能及同步性的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周燕翔; 冷倩倩; 郭瑞强

    2016-01-01

    Dual gate Doppler is a newly-developed technology in recent years, which can synchronously place two sampling volume. Based on its advantages,dual gate Doppler can not only measure indexes which reflect cardiac function more accurately than conventional Doppler,but also provide a more convenient method to evaluate the cardiac synchronization. And it can reflect the myocardial tissue motions and hemodynamic changes in the heart cavity timely,intuitively and fast,offer a new perspective to quantitatively estimate the coupling relations between wall mechanics and heart cavity fluid mechanics.This article aims to introduce the applications of dual gate Doppler in evaluating cardiac function and synchronization.%双多普勒同步取样技术是近年来出现的新技术;其可以在同一切面同步放置两个取样容积,不仅可以更准确地反映心脏功能,而且可以更简便地评价心脏同步性。同时,双多普勒技术可以实时、直观、快速地显示心肌组织运动与心腔内血流动力学的变化,为定量评价室壁运动力学与心腔内流体力学的耦联关系提供了新视角。本文就双多普勒技术在评价心脏功能及同步性等方面的应用作一综述。

  1. A Case Report on Upper Extremity Pain of Cardiac Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgay Altınbilek

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Upper extremity pain can originate from the musculoskeletal system, or be a reflection of problems originating from various organs. Therefore, it is highly important to perform a detailed clinical evaluation on patients during differential diagnosis. In this case report, we present a 61 year-old male patient who was admitted with pain in both upper extremities and the upper back that presumed to be of cardiac origin following our clinical evaluations. The patient was referred to the cardiology department, where he was diagnosed with coronary heart disease. The patient’s complaints of pain were fully resolved through the application of an intracoronary stent.

  2. Protection by 6-aminonicotinamide against oxidative stress in cardiac cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofgaard, Johannes P; Sigurdardottir, Kristin Sigridur; Treiman, Marek

    2006-01-01

    necrosis following global ischemia in an isolated rat heart, apparently by limiting the oxidative injury component. We therefore explored the antioxidative potential of 6AN in a model using H9C2(2-1) rat cardiac myoblasts exposed to H2O2 stress. Dependent on the specific protocol, 6AN pretreatment for 6....... The protective effect of 6AN was associated with a decrease in total cell content of the reduced glutathione (GSH) by 15-44%, indicative of an oxidative shift in the GSH/GSSG system redox potential. We propose that this redox shift caused an increased Ca2+ leak through ryanodine receptors, reflecting their known...

  3. SAW reflection and scattering by electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-biao; HAN Tao; ZHANG Xiao-dong; WU Hao-dong; SHUI Yong-an

    2005-01-01

    A rigorous analysis of surface acoustic wave (SAW) reflection and scattering by electrodes is of paramount importance in the design of SAW identification tags and sensors. In this paper, a new method based on Green's function concept is used to study reflection and scattering coefficients. By this method the reflection coefficient with its phase angle, transmission coefficient, and bulk wave scattering coefficient, can be obtained rapidly and accurately. To get precise result, the influence of static charge must be taken into account. In the work, we successfully cancelled out the effect of static charge and the validity of the results was checked. As an example, the reflection, transmission and scattering coefficients ora single grounded electrode on 128°YX LiNbO3 is shown.

  4. Cavity ring-down technique for measurement of reflectivity of high reflectivity mirrors with high accuracy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Sridhar; Sandeep K Agarwalla; Sunita Singh; L M Gantayet

    2010-12-01

    A simple, accurate and reliable method for measuring the reflectivity of laser-grade mirrors ( > 99.5 %) based on cavity ring-down (CRD) technique has been success-fully demonstrated in our laboratory using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A fast photomultiplier tube with an oscilloscope was used to detect and analyse the CRD signal. The cavity decay times were measured for three cavities formed by a combination of three mirror pairs. The absolute reflectivities 1, 2, 3 were determined to be 99.94%, 99.63%, 99.52% at normal incidence. The reflectivity of mirrors is measured to an accuracy of 0.01%.

  5. Accurate finite difference methods for time-harmonic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Isaac; Turkel, Eli

    1994-01-01

    Finite difference methods for solving problems of time-harmonic acoustics are developed and analyzed. Multidimensional inhomogeneous problems with variable, possibly discontinuous, coefficients are considered, accounting for the effects of employing nonuniform grids. A weighted-average representation is less sensitive to transition in wave resolution (due to variable wave numbers or nonuniform grids) than the standard pointwise representation. Further enhancement in method performance is obtained by basing the stencils on generalizations of Pade approximation, or generalized definitions of the derivative, reducing spurious dispersion, anisotropy and reflection, and by improving the representation of source terms. The resulting schemes have fourth-order accurate local truncation error on uniform grids and third order in the nonuniform case. Guidelines for discretization pertaining to grid orientation and resolution are presented.

  6. 3D culture for cardiac cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppinger, Christian

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses historical milestones, recent developments and challenges in the area of 3D culture models with cardiovascular cell types. Expectations in this area have been raised in recent years, but more relevant in vitro research, more accurate drug testing results, reliable disease models and insights leading to bioartificial organs are expected from the transition to 3D cell culture. However, the construction of organ-like cardiac 3D models currently remains a difficult challenge. The heart consists of highly differentiated cells in an intricate arrangement.Furthermore, electrical “wiring”, a vascular system and multiple cell types act in concert to respond to the rapidly changing demands of the body. Although cardiovascular 3D culture models have been predominantly developed for regenerative medicine in the past, their use in drug screening and for disease models has become more popular recently. Many sophisticated 3D culture models are currently being developed in this dynamic area of life science. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  7. Cardiac Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy parameter predicts cardiac and cerebrovascular events in type 2 diabetic patients without structural heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy is an established method of assessment of cardiovascular sympathetic function. The aim of the present study was to investigate the long-term cardiovascular predictive value of cardiac 123I-MIBG scintigraphy parameters in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients without structural heart disease. Cardiac 123I-MIBG scintigraphy in 108 patients with type 2 diabetes who did not have structural heart disease, was evaluated. The washout rate (WR) was considered enhanced if it was ≥40%. Accurate follow-up information for 4.6 years was obtained in 54 enhanced WR patients (27 male; mean age, 61±11 years) and in 54 sex- and age-matched preserved WR patients (27 male; mean age, 61±10 years). Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) were investigated. During follow-up, 10 enhanced WR patients developed MACCE including cardiac death, coronary revascularization, stroke, and congestive heart failure, while MACCE occurred in only 3 male patients. The Kaplan-Meier curves indicated that enhanced WR patients had higher incidence of MACCE than those with preserved WR (P123I-MIBG scintigraphy at baseline has long-term cardiovascular predictive value in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes without structural heart disease. (author)

  8. Functional Relevance of Coronary Artery Disease by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Cardiac Computed Tomography: Myocardial Perfusion and Fractional Flow Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Pontone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and it is responsible for an increasing resource burden. The identification of patients at high risk for adverse events is crucial to select those who will receive the greatest benefit from revascularization. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography, but the diagnostic yield of elective invasive coronary angiography remains unfortunately low. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiac magnetic resonance (stress-CMR has emerged as an accurate technique for diagnosis and prognostic stratification of the patients with known or suspected CAD thanks to high spatial and temporal resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and the multiparametric value including the assessment of cardiac anatomy, function, and viability. On the other side, cardiac computed tomography (CCT has emerged as unique technique providing coronary arteries anatomy and more recently, due to the introduction of stress-CCT and noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT, functional relevance of CAD in a single shot scan. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of stress-CMR and CCT in the evaluation of functional relevance of CAD discussing the strength and weakness of each approach.

  9. Aperture taper determination for the half-scale accurate antenna reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Kevin M.

    1990-01-01

    A simulation is described of a proposed microwave reflectance measurement in which the half scale reflector is used in a compact range type of application. The simulation is used to determine an acceptable aperture taper for the reflector which will allow for accurate measurements. Information on the taper is used in the design of a feed for the reflector.

  10. Feedback about more accurate versus less accurate trials: differential effects on self-confidence and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected byfeedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of two conditions: one group received feedback on the most accurate trials, whereas another group received feedback on the least accurate trials. On day 2, participants completed an anxiety questionnaire and performed a retention test. Shin conductance level, as a measure of arousal, was determined. The results indicated that feedback about more accurate trials resulted in more effective learning as well as increased self-confidence. Also, activation was a predictor of performance. PMID:22808705

  11. Nutritional Status and Cardiac Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihyun Ahn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is necessary for the degradation of long-lasting proteins and nonfunctional organelles, and is activated to promote cellular survival. However, overactivation of autophagy may deplete essential molecules and organelles responsible for cellular survival. Lifelong calorie restriction by 40% has been shown to increase the cardiac expression of autophagic markers, which suggests that it may have a cardioprotective effect by decreasing oxidative damage brought on by aging and cardiovascular diseases. Although cardiac autophagy is critical to regulating protein quality and maintaining cellular function and survival, increased or excessive autophagy may have deleterious effects on the heart under some circumstances, including pressure overload-induced heart failure. The importance of autophagy has been shown in nutrient supply and preservation of energy in times of limitation, such as ischemia. Some studies have suggested that a transition from obesity to metabolic syndrome may involve progressive changes in myocardial inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, fibrosis, apoptosis, and myocardial autophagy.

  12. [Cardiac support and replacement therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Christopher; Roewer, Norbert; Muellenbach, Ralf M

    2016-09-01

    Circulatory support represents an integral part within the treatment of the critically ill patient. Sophisticated pharmacologic regimens help to maintain systemic perfusion pressure by increasing vascular tone as well as mediating positive inotropic effects. Besides the administration of catecholamines and phosphodiesterase-III-inhibitors, in particular the administration of levosimendan represents a promising alternative during low-cardiac-output. Nevertheless, sufficient evidence demonstrating a survival benefit for any pharmacologic regimen is nonexistent. In case pharmacological measures do not suffice mechanical cardiopulmonary support (MCS) may be used. MCS may be used during cardiopulmonary resuscitation or a "low-cardiac-output-syndrome" as bridging towards decision, recovery or long-term support. Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vaECMO) may take over cardiopulmonary function and may improve survival as well as neurological outcome after cardiogenic shock or cardiopulmonary resuscitation. PMID:27631451

  13. Heart fields and cardiac morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Robert G; Buckingham, Margaret E; Moorman, Antoon F

    2014-10-01

    In this review, we focus on two important steps in the formation of the embryonic heart: (i) the progressive addition of late differentiating progenitor cells from the second heart field that drives heart tube extension during looping morphogenesis, and (ii) the emergence of patterned proliferation within the embryonic myocardium that generates distinct cardiac chambers. During the transition between these steps, the major site of proliferation switches from progenitor cells outside the early heart to proliferation within the embryonic myocardium. The second heart field and ballooning morphogenesis concepts have major repercussions on our understanding of human heart development and disease. In particular, they provide a framework to dissect the origin of congenital heart defects and the regulation of myocardial proliferation and differentiation of relevance for cardiac repair.

  14. Accurate estimation of indoor travel times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentow, Thor Siiger; Blunck, Henrik; Stisen, Allan;

    2014-01-01

    are collected within the building complex. Results indicate that InTraTime is superior with respect to metrics such as deployment cost, maintenance cost and estimation accuracy, yielding an average deviation from actual travel times of 11.7 %. This accuracy was achieved despite using a minimal-effort setup......The ability to accurately estimate indoor travel times is crucial for enabling improvements within application areas such as indoor navigation, logistics for mobile workers, and facility management. In this paper, we study the challenges inherent in indoor travel time estimation, and we propose...... the InTraTime method for accurately estimating indoor travel times via mining of historical and real-time indoor position traces. The method learns during operation both travel routes, travel times and their respective likelihood---both for routes traveled as well as for sub-routes thereof. In...

  15. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lu

    Full Text Available Modern cochlear implant (CI users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  16. Cardiac Biomarkers in Hyperthyroid Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Sangster, J.K.; Panciera, D L; Abbott, J.A.; Zimmerman, K.C.; Lantis, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyperthyroidism has substantial effects on the circulatory system. The cardiac biomarkers NT‐proBNP and troponin I (cTNI) have proven useful in identifying cats with myocardial disease but have not been extensively investigated in hyperthyroidism. Hypothesis Plasma NT‐proBNP and cTNI concentrations are higher in cats with primary myocardial disease than in cats with hyperthyroidism and higher in cats with hyperthyroidism than in healthy control cats. Animals Twenty‐three hyperthyro...

  17. Historical perspectives of cardiac electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüderitz, Berndt

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of clinical electrophysiology has a long and fascinating history. From earliest times, no clinical symptom impressed the patient (and the physician) more than an irregular heart beat. Although ancient Chinese pulse theory laid the foundation for the study of arrhythmias and clinical electrophysiology in the 5th century BC, the most significant breakthrough in the identification and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias first occurred in this century. In the last decades, our knowledge of electrophysiology and pharmacology has increased exponentially. The enormous clinical significance of cardiac rhythm disturbances has favored these advances. On the one hand, patients live longer and thus are more likely to experience arrhythmias. On the other hand, circulatory problems of the cardiac vessels have increased enormously, and this has been identified as the primary cause of cardiac rhythm disorders. Coronary heart disease has become not just the most significant disease of all, based on the statistics for cause of death. Arrhythmias are the main complication of ischemic heart disease, and they have been directly linked to the frequently arrhythmogenic sudden death syndrome, which is now presumed to be an avoidable "electrical accident" of the heart. A retrospective look--often charming in its own right--may not only make it easier to sort through the copious details of this field and so become oriented in this universe of important and less important facts: it may also provide the observer with a chronological vantage point from which to view the subject. The study of clinical electrophysiology is no dry compendium of facts and figures, but rather a dynamic field of study evolving out of the competition between various ideas, intentions and theories. PMID:19196616

  18. Cardiac Biomarkers and Cycling Race

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Le Goff, Jean-François Kaux, Sébastien Goffaux, Etienne Cavalier

    2015-01-01

    In cycling as in other types of strenuous exercise, there exists a risk of sudden death. It is important both to understand its causes and to see if the behavior of certain biomarkers might highlight athletes at risk. Many reports describe changes in biomarkers after strenuous exercise (Nie et al., 2011), but interpreting these changes, and notably distinguishing normal physiological responses from pathological changes, is not easy. Here we have focused on the kinetics of different cardiac bi...

  19. Functiogenesis of cardiac pacemaker activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tetsuro; Kamino, Kohtaro

    2016-07-01

    Throughout our investigations on the ontogenesis of the electrophysiological events in early embryonic chick hearts, using optical techniques to record membrane potential probed with voltage-sensitive dyes, we have introduced a novel concept of "functiogenesis" corresponding to "morphogenesis". This article gives an account of the framework of "functiogenesis", focusing on the cardiac pacemaker function and the functional organization of the pacemaking area. PMID:26719289

  20. Cardiac involvement in tuberous sclerosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mühler, E G; Turniski-Harder, V; Engelhardt, W.; von Bernuth, G

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the incidence, importance, and history of cardiac involvement in infants and children with tuberous sclerosis. DESIGN--Prospective study; clinical examination, sector and Doppler echocardiography, standard and ambulatory electrocardiography. SETTING--A tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--21 patients with tuberous sclerosis aged 1 day to 16 years (mean 6.3 years); follow up investigations were available in 14 cases (10 retrospective, 4 prospective; mean follow up 4.3 years...

  1. Cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan Liu; Dongmei Chen; Yonggang Wang; Xin Zhao; Yang Zheng

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the distribution characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves and to explore the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia.DATA RETRIEVAL: A computer-based retrieval was performed for papers examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerves, using "heart, autonomic nerve, sympathetic nerve, vagus nerve, nerve distribution, rhythm and atrial fibrillation" as the key words.SELECTION CRITERIA: A total of 165 studies examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerve were screened, and 46 of them were eventually included.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The distribution and characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves were observed, and immunohistochemical staining was applied to determine the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and acetylcholine transferase (main markers of cardiac autonomic nerve distribution). In addition, the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and cardiac arrhythmia was investigated.RESULTS: Cardiac autonomic nerves were reported to exhibit a disordered distribution in different sites, mainly at the surface of the cardiac atrium and pulmonary vein, forming a ganglia plexus. The distribution of the pulmonary vein autonomic nerve was prominent at the proximal end rather than the distal end, at the upper left rather than the lower right, at the epicardial membrane rather than the endocardial membrane, at the left atrium rather than the right atrium, and at the posterior wall rather than the anterior wall. The main markers used for cardiac autonomic nerves were tyrosine hydroxylase and acetylcholine transferase. Protein gene product 9.5 was used to label the immunoreactive nerve distribution, and the distribution density of autonomic nerves was determined using a computer-aided morphometric analysis system.CONCLUSION: The uneven distribution of the cardiac autonomic nerves is the leading cause of the occurrence of arrhythmia, and the cardiac autonomic nerves play an important role in the

  2. [HOLTER TAKES CENTER STAGE INTO FINAL INDICATION OF CARDIAC STIMULATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracía Barrera, Ma De Gracia

    2016-02-01

    The study was performed in order to obtain specific data confirming the influence in the diagnosis of many cardiac pathologies detected by Holter heart rate. Holter heart rate of 24 hours is an electronic device, of small size, which records and stores an electrocardiographic tracing two or three leads, while the patient activities of daily life. It leads us to conduct this study increased requests we've had in our hospital and the numerous reports that have helped in the diagnosis of our patients. We base the study with statistical data, therefore, produce two databases, one that reflects the total of studies conducted in 2013 and another with patients diagnosed with cardiac stimulation and need to refer to it. Crossing these two databases get third with patients referred for cardiac stimulation Holter heart rate realized. With these data we can say that, when this test is requested, it has a great influence on the final diagnosis (87%) and there is a high probability of finding significant findings, without forgetting the clinical and personal aspects of each patient.

  3. Influence of the cardiac myosin hinge region on contractile activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margossian, S S; Krueger, J W; Sellers, J R; Cuda, G; Caulfield, J B; Norton, P; Slayter, H S

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the anti-hinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  4. Accurate Finite Difference Methods for Option Pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Jonas

    2006-01-01

    Stock options are priced numerically using space- and time-adaptive finite difference methods. European options on one and several underlying assets are considered. These are priced with adaptive numerical algorithms including a second order method and a more accurate method. For American options we use the adaptive technique to price options on one stock with and without stochastic volatility. In all these methods emphasis is put on the control of errors to fulfill predefined tolerance level...

  5. Accurate variational forms for multiskyrmion configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, A.D.; Weiss, C.; Wirzba, A.; Lande, A.

    1989-04-17

    Simple variational forms are suggested for the fields of a single skyrmion on a hypersphere, S/sub 3/(L), and of a face-centered cubic array of skyrmions in flat space, R/sub 3/. The resulting energies are accurate at the level of 0.2%. These approximate field configurations provide a useful alternative to brute-force solutions of the corresponding Euler equations.

  6. Efficient Accurate Context-Sensitive Anomaly Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    For program behavior-based anomaly detection, the only way to ensure accurate monitoring is to construct an efficient and precise program behavior model. A new program behavior-based anomaly detection model,called combined pushdown automaton (CPDA) model was proposed, which is based on static binary executable analysis. The CPDA model incorporates the optimized call stack walk and code instrumentation technique to gain complete context information. Thereby the proposed method can detect more attacks, while retaining good performance.

  7. Media for Reflection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    This article develops the concept media for reflection in the interest of conceptualizing the interpretative frames that enable and limit reflection in management and leadership education. The concept ‘media for reflection’ allows us to conceptualize the social and cultural mediation of reflection...... without reducing reflection to an effect of the social structures and cultural norms in which it is embedded. Based on the developed theoretical framework, this article analyses how a renaissance ‘mirror for princes’ and contemporary research-based management education mediate reflection. The content...... of the mediations is analysed as well as the societal and organizational background. Furthermore, the means by which the two media enable and limit reflection in different ways is compared. Finally, the article discusses possible implications of the analysis in terms of management and leadership education....

  8. Sudden cardiac death risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyell, Marc W; Krahn, Andrew D; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2015-06-01

    Arrhythmic sudden cardiac death (SCD) may be caused by ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation or pulseless electric activity/asystole. Effective risk stratification to identify patients at risk of arrhythmic SCD is essential for targeting our healthcare and research resources to tackle this important public health issue. Although our understanding of SCD because of pulseless electric activity/asystole is growing, the overwhelming majority of research in risk stratification has focused on SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. This review focuses on existing and novel risk stratification tools for SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. For patients with left ventricular dysfunction or myocardial infarction, advances in imaging, measures of cardiac autonomic function, and measures of repolarization have shown considerable promise in refining risk. Yet the majority of SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation occurs in patients without known cardiac disease. Biomarkers and novel imaging techniques may provide further risk stratification in the general population beyond traditional risk stratification for coronary artery disease alone. Despite these advances, significant challenges in risk stratification remain that must be overcome before a meaningful impact on SCD can be realized.

  9. Review Article of Cardiac Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jittiporn PURATTANAMAL

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac amyloidosis is a term that means the deposit of abnormal proteins in the myocardium leading to global thickening of the heart walls. The clinical character is that of infiltrative cardiomyopathy. AL amyloidosis is the most common type that involves cardiac failure. Cardiac amyloid precedes clinical congestive heart failure, especially right-sided heart failure. Laboratory investigations have identified the amyloid fibril proteins deposited in the organ tissues. Immunofixation tests are the most sensitive that recognize the paraprotein mean light chain protein or immunoglobulin subtype deposit. Prognosis is poor if AL amyloidosis is untreated. Treatment of systemic involvement in AL amyloidosis is via chemotherapy such as melphalan and prednisolone. UK experts have reported the results of treatment in AL amyloidosis. Regardless of the use of adjunctive chemotherapy, the five-year survival after heart transplantation was generally poorer for AL (20 % at five years, but similar for non-AL amyloidosis (64 % at five years, than heart transplants in other cases. Progression of the systemic disease contributed to increased mortality. A specific treatment that increases the chances of survival is unknown.

  10. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  11. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules

  12. Simple and accurate optical height sensor for wafer inspection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Kei; Nakai, Naoya; Taniguchi, Koichi; Itoh, Masahide

    2016-02-01

    An accurate method for measuring the wafer surface height is required for wafer inspection systems to adjust the focus of inspection optics quickly and precisely. A method for projecting a laser spot onto the wafer surface obliquely and for detecting its image displacement using a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector is known, and a variety of methods have been proposed for improving the accuracy by compensating the measurement error due to the surface patterns. We have developed a simple and accurate method in which an image of a reticle with eight slits is projected on the wafer surface and its reflected image is detected using an image sensor. The surface height is calculated by averaging the coordinates of the images of the slits in both the two directions in the captured image. Pattern-related measurement error was reduced by applying the coordinates averaging to the multiple-slit-projection method. Accuracy of better than 0.35 μm was achieved for a patterned wafer at the reference height and ±0.1 mm from the reference height in a simple configuration.

  13. Accurate phase-shift velocimetry in rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Matsyendra Nath; Vallatos, Antoine; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Holmes, William M.

    2016-06-01

    Spatially resolved Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) velocimetry techniques can provide precious information concerning flow through opaque systems, including rocks. This velocimetry data is used to enhance flow models in a wide range of systems, from oil behaviour in reservoir rocks to contaminant transport in aquifers. Phase-shift velocimetry is the fastest way to produce velocity maps but critical issues have been reported when studying flow through rocks and porous media, leading to inaccurate results. Combining PFG measurements for flow through Bentheimer sandstone with simulations, we demonstrate that asymmetries in the molecular displacement distributions within each voxel are the main source of phase-shift velocimetry errors. We show that when flow-related average molecular displacements are negligible compared to self-diffusion ones, symmetric displacement distributions can be obtained while phase measurement noise is minimised. We elaborate a complete method for the production of accurate phase-shift velocimetry maps in rocks and low porosity media and demonstrate its validity for a range of flow rates. This development of accurate phase-shift velocimetry now enables more rapid and accurate velocity analysis, potentially helping to inform both industrial applications and theoretical models.

  14. Accurate structural correlations from maximum likelihood superpositions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas L Theobald

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The cores of globular proteins are densely packed, resulting in complicated networks of structural interactions. These interactions in turn give rise to dynamic structural correlations over a wide range of time scales. Accurate analysis of these complex correlations is crucial for understanding biomolecular mechanisms and for relating structure to function. Here we report a highly accurate technique for inferring the major modes of structural correlation in macromolecules using likelihood-based statistical analysis of sets of structures. This method is generally applicable to any ensemble of related molecules, including families of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR models, different crystal forms of a protein, and structural alignments of homologous proteins, as well as molecular dynamics trajectories. Dominant modes of structural correlation are determined using principal components analysis (PCA of the maximum likelihood estimate of the correlation matrix. The correlations we identify are inherently independent of the statistical uncertainty and dynamic heterogeneity associated with the structural coordinates. We additionally present an easily interpretable method ("PCA plots" for displaying these positional correlations by color-coding them onto a macromolecular structure. Maximum likelihood PCA of structural superpositions, and the structural PCA plots that illustrate the results, will facilitate the accurate determination of dynamic structural correlations analyzed in diverse fields of structural biology.

  15. Reflection in professional practice

    OpenAIRE

    Hetzner, Stefanie Bianca

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to contribute to the research on professional learning through reflective practice. The main goal is to examine—against the backdrop of workplace changes and errors—individual and contextual factors that are theoretically assumed to influence reflection in the context of professional work. Reflective practice is defined as a retrospective but future- and goal-oriented cognitive-affective process that basically involves (a) the awareness and review of incident...

  16. Pharmacological treatment of cardiac glycoside poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Darren M; Gallapatthy, Gamini; Dunuwille, Asunga; Chan, Betty S

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac glycosides are an important cause of poisoning, reflecting their widespread clinical usage and presence in natural sources. Poisoning can manifest as varying degrees of toxicity. Predominant clinical features include gastrointestinal signs, bradycardia and heart block. Death occurs from ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia. A wide range of treatments have been used, the more common including activated charcoal, atropine, β-adrenoceptor agonists, temporary pacing, anti-digoxin Fab and magnesium, and more novel agents include fructose-1,6-diphosphate (clinical trial in progress) and anticalin. However, even in the case of those treatments that have been in use for decades, there is debate regarding their efficacy, the indications and dosage that optimizes outcomes. This contributes to variability in use across the world. Another factor influencing usage is access. Barriers to access include the requirement for transfer to a specialized centre (for example, to receive temporary pacing) or financial resources (for example, anti-digoxin Fab in resource poor countries). Recent data suggest that existing methods for calculating the dose of anti-digoxin Fab in digoxin poisoning overstate the dose required, and that its efficacy may be minimal in patients with chronic digoxin poisoning. Cheaper and effective medicines are required, in particular for the treatment of yellow oleander poisoning which is problematic in resource poor countries. PMID:26505271

  17. Accurate measurement method for tube's endpoints based on machine vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaoli; Jin, Peng; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Xiao; Sun, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Tubes are used widely in aerospace vehicles, and their accurate assembly can directly affect the assembling reliability and the quality of products. It is important to measure the processed tube's endpoints and then fix any geometric errors correspondingly. However, the traditional tube inspection method is time-consuming and complex operations. Therefore, a new measurement method for a tube's endpoints based on machine vision is proposed. First, reflected light on tube's surface can be removed by using photometric linearization. Then, based on the optimization model for the tube's endpoint measurements and the principle of stereo matching, the global coordinates and the relative distance of the tube's endpoint are obtained. To confirm the feasibility, 11 tubes are processed to remove the reflected light and then the endpoint's positions of tubes are measured. The experiment results show that the measurement repeatability accuracy is 0.167 mm, and the absolute accuracy is 0.328 mm. The measurement takes less than 1 min. The proposed method based on machine vision can measure the tube's endpoints without any surface treatment or any tools and can realize on line measurement.

  18. Inhaled nitric oxide in cardiac surgery: Evidence or tradition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Maria; Romano, Rosalba; Baca, Georgiana; Sarridou, Despoina; Fischer, Andreas; Simon, Andre; Marczin, Nandor

    2015-09-15

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy as a selective pulmonary vasodilator in cardiac surgery has been one of the most significant pharmacological advances in managing pulmonary hemodynamics and life threatening right ventricular dysfunction and failure. However, this remarkable story has experienced a roller-coaster ride with high hopes and nearly universal demonstration of physiological benefits but disappointing translation of these benefits to harder clinical outcomes. Most of our understanding on the iNO field in cardiac surgery stems from small observational or single centre randomised trials and even the very few multicentre trials fail to ascertain strong evidence base. As a consequence, there are only weak clinical practice guidelines on the field and only European expert opinion for the use of iNO in routine and more specialised cardiac surgery such as heart and lung transplantation and left ventricular assist device (LVAD) insertion. In this review the authors from a specialised cardiac centre in the UK with a very high volume of iNO usage provide detailed information on the early observations leading to the European expert recommendations and reflect on the nature and background of these recommendations. We also provide a summary of the progress in each of the cardiac subspecialties for the last decade and initial survey data on the views of senior anaesthetic and intensive care colleagues on these recommendations. We conclude that the combination of high price tag associated with iNO therapy and lack of substantial clinical evidence is not sustainable on the current field and we are risking loosing this promising therapy from our daily practice. Overcoming the status quo will not be easy as there is not much room for controlled trials in heart transplantation or in the current atmosphere of LVAD implantation. However, we call for international cooperation to conduct definite studies to determine the place of iNO therapy in lung transplantation and high

  19. Inhaled nitric oxide in cardiac surgery: Evidence or tradition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Maria; Romano, Rosalba; Baca, Georgiana; Sarridou, Despoina; Fischer, Andreas; Simon, Andre; Marczin, Nandor

    2015-09-15

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy as a selective pulmonary vasodilator in cardiac surgery has been one of the most significant pharmacological advances in managing pulmonary hemodynamics and life threatening right ventricular dysfunction and failure. However, this remarkable story has experienced a roller-coaster ride with high hopes and nearly universal demonstration of physiological benefits but disappointing translation of these benefits to harder clinical outcomes. Most of our understanding on the iNO field in cardiac surgery stems from small observational or single centre randomised trials and even the very few multicentre trials fail to ascertain strong evidence base. As a consequence, there are only weak clinical practice guidelines on the field and only European expert opinion for the use of iNO in routine and more specialised cardiac surgery such as heart and lung transplantation and left ventricular assist device (LVAD) insertion. In this review the authors from a specialised cardiac centre in the UK with a very high volume of iNO usage provide detailed information on the early observations leading to the European expert recommendations and reflect on the nature and background of these recommendations. We also provide a summary of the progress in each of the cardiac subspecialties for the last decade and initial survey data on the views of senior anaesthetic and intensive care colleagues on these recommendations. We conclude that the combination of high price tag associated with iNO therapy and lack of substantial clinical evidence is not sustainable on the current field and we are risking loosing this promising therapy from our daily practice. Overcoming the status quo will not be easy as there is not much room for controlled trials in heart transplantation or in the current atmosphere of LVAD implantation. However, we call for international cooperation to conduct definite studies to determine the place of iNO therapy in lung transplantation and high

  20. Evaluation of Known or Suspected Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankstein, Ron; Waller, Alfonso H

    2016-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disorder of unknown cause, and cardiac sarcoidosis affects at least 25% of patients and accounts for substantial mortality and morbidity from this disease. Cardiac sarcoidosis may present with heart failure, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, AV block, atrial or ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Cardiac involvement can be challenging to detect and diagnose because of the focal nature of the disease, as well as the fact that clinical criteria have limited diagnostic accuracy. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be enhanced by integrating both clinical and imaging findings. This article reviews the various roles that different imaging modalities provide in the evaluation and management of patients with known or suspected cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:26926267

  1. Sensing Cardiac Electrical Activity With a Cardiac Myocyte--Targeted Optogenetic Voltage Indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang Liao, Mei-Ling; de Boer, Teun P; Mutoh, Hiroki; Raad, Nour; Richter, Claudia; Wagner, Eva; Downie, Bryan R; Unsöld, Bernhard; Arooj, Iqra; Streckfuss-Bömeke, Katrin; Döker, Stephan; Luther, Stefan; Guan, Kaomei; Wagner, Stefan; Lehnart, Stephan E; Maier, Lars S; Stühmer, Walter; Wettwer, Erich; van Veen, Toon; Morlock, Michael M; Knöpfel, Thomas; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Monitoring and controlling cardiac myocyte activity with optogenetic tools offer exciting possibilities for fundamental and translational cardiovascular research. Genetically encoded voltage indicators may be particularly attractive for minimal invasive and repeated assessments of cardiac

  2. Cardiac tumours simulating collagen vascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, A. P.; Lanham, J. G.; Doyle, D V

    1986-01-01

    Cardiac tumours can mimic collagen vascular disease and they are often accompanied by profound systemic upset. Both benign and malignant tumours may present in this way. Three cases of cardiac tumour, two malignant and one benign, are reported with just such a presentation. A review of fifteen similar case reports showed that a spectrum of different collagen vascular diseases was diagnosed and treated before the true diagnosis emerged. In half of these cases the cardiac tumour was only diagno...

  3. Disseminated cysticercosis with pulmonary and cardiac involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Jain Bharat; Sankhe Shilpa; Agrawal Mukta; Naphade Prashant

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary and cardiac involvement by cysticercosis is extremely rare, and is usually asymptomatic. We report the case of a 19-year-old boy who presented with a history of headache and vomiting and was found to have disseminated cysticercosis with pulmonary and cardiac involvement; the emphasis is on the rare occurrence of pulmonary, cardiac, pancreatic, intraocular, and extradural spinal canal involvement in the same patient. This case demonstrates the extent to which cysticercosis can be dis...

  4. Electrocardiographically Determination of Cardiac Enlargements in Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Gönül, Remzi; OR, Mehmet Erman; DODURKA, Tamer

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the electrocardiographic parameters necessary to determine cardiac enlargements and to establish and distinguish such complaints from each other in the early stage in dogs with circulatory problems were assessed. The material of the study consisted of 33 dogs 1.5-15 years of age with cardiac enlargements determined from 140 dogs suspected of having cardiac disease based on clinical, radiographic and electrocardiographic analyses. In these dogs, 12 cases of left atrial hypert...

  5. Constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution for the assessment of cardiac output in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; Mortensen, Stefan; Munch, G D W;

    2016-01-01

    To determine the accuracy and precision of constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution cardiac output (CITT-Q) assessment during exercise in humans, using indocyanine green (ICG) dilution and bolus transpulmonary thermodilution (BTD) as reference methods, cardiac output (Q) was determined...... at rest and during incremental one- and two-legged pedaling on a cycle ergometer, and combined arm cranking with leg pedaling to exhaustion in 15 healthy men. Continuous infusions of iced saline in the femoral vein (n = 41) or simultaneously in the femoral and axillary (n = 66) veins with determination......: 6.1-11.1%). In conclusion, cardiac output can be precisely and accurately determined with constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution in exercising humans....

  6. Virtual and augmented medical imaging environments: enabling technology for minimally invasive cardiac interventional guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linte, Cristian A; White, James; Eagleson, Roy; Guiraudon, Gérard M; Peters, Terry M

    2010-01-01

    Virtual and augmented reality environments have been adopted in medicine as a means to enhance the clinician's view of the anatomy and facilitate the performance of minimally invasive procedures. Their value is truly appreciated during interventions where the surgeon cannot directly visualize the targets to be treated, such as during cardiac procedures performed on the beating heart. These environments must accurately represent the real surgical field and require seamless integration of pre- and intra-operative imaging, surgical tracking, and visualization technology in a common framework centered around the patient. This review begins with an overview of minimally invasive cardiac interventions, describes the architecture of a typical surgical guidance platform including imaging, tracking, registration and visualization, highlights both clinical and engineering accuracy limitations in cardiac image guidance, and discusses the translation of the work from the laboratory into the operating room together with typically encountered challenges. PMID:22275200

  7. Dissenting in Reflective Conversations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Boulus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Reflective monitoring of research practices is essential. However, we often lack formal training in the practices of doing action research, and descriptions of actual inquiry practice are seldom included in publications. Our aim is to provide a glimpse of self-reflective practices based on our...

  8. Reflective Practitioner Account

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    干青

    2009-01-01

    This article focus on the reflective account of an English teacher learning and teaching in higher education with the British post-graduate certificate program of the Yunnan Agdculture University.As n practitioner for smny years in English learning and teaching for many years,it reflects in four fields.

  9. Earth's Reflection: Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, Brandon; Hamilton, Cheri

    2011-01-01

    When viewing objects of different colors, you might notice that some appear brighter than others. This is because light is reflected differently from various surfaces, depending on their physical properties. The word "albedo" is used to describe how reflective a surface is. The Earth-atmosphere has a combined albedo of about 30%, a number that is…

  10. Sewage Reflects the Microbiomes of Human Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan J Newton; McLellan, Sandra L.; Dila, Deborah K.; Vineis, Joseph H; Morrison, Hilary G; Eren, A. Murat; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Molecular characterizations of the gut microbiome from individual human stool samples have identified community patterns that correlate with age, disease, diet, and other human characteristics, but resources for marker gene studies that consider microbiome trends among human populations scale with the number of individuals sampled from each population. As an alternative strategy for sampling populations, we examined whether sewage accurately reflects the microbial community of a mixt...

  11. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  12. [Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkkunen, Ilkka; Hoppu, Sanna; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac arrest as the first symptom of coronary artery disease is not uncommon. Some of previously healthy people with sudden cardiac arrest may be saved by effective resuscitation and post-resuscitative therapy. The majority of cardiac arrest patients experience the cardiac arrest outside of the hospital, in which case early recognition of lifelessness, commencement of basic life support and entry to professional care without delay are the prerequisites for recovery. After the heart has started beating again, the clinical picture of post-resuscitation syndrome must be recognized and appropriate treatment utilized. PMID:22204143

  13. New law requires 'medically accurate' lesson plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-17

    The California Legislature has passed a bill requiring all textbooks and materials used to teach about AIDS be medically accurate and objective. Statements made within the curriculum must be supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods, and published in peer-reviewed journals. Some of the current lesson plans were found to contain scientifically unsupported and biased information. In addition, the bill requires material to be "free of racial, ethnic, or gender biases." The legislation is supported by a wide range of interests, but opposed by the California Right to Life Education Fund, because they believe it discredits abstinence-only material.

  14. Niche Genetic Algorithm with Accurate Optimization Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-hua; YAN De-kun

    2005-01-01

    Based on crowding mechanism, a novel niche genetic algorithm was proposed which can record evolutionary direction dynamically during evolution. After evolution, the solutions's precision can be greatly improved by means of the local searching along the recorded direction. Simulation shows that this algorithm can not only keep population diversity but also find accurate solutions. Although using this method has to take more time compared with the standard GA, it is really worth applying to some cases that have to meet a demand for high solution precision.

  15. Investigations on Accurate Analysis of Microstrip Reflectarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Min; Sørensen, S. B.; Kim, Oleksiy S.;

    2011-01-01

    An investigation on accurate analysis of microstrip reflectarrays is presented. Sources of error in reflectarray analysis are examined and solutions to these issues are proposed. The focus is on two sources of error, namely the determination of the equivalent currents to calculate the radiation...... pattern, and the inaccurate mutual coupling between array elements due to the lack of periodicity. To serve as reference, two offset reflectarray antennas have been designed, manufactured and measured at the DTUESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility. Comparisons of simulated and measured data are...

  16. Accurate diagnosis is essential for amebiasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Amebiasis is one of the three most common causes of death from parasitic disease, and Entamoeba histolytica is the most widely distributed parasites in the world. Particularly, Entamoeba histolytica infection in the developing countries is a significant health problem in amebiasis-endemic areas with a significant impact on infant mortality[1]. In recent years a world wide increase in the number of patients with amebiasis has refocused attention on this important infection. On the other hand, improving the quality of parasitological methods and widespread use of accurate tecniques have improved our knowledge about the disease.

  17. Universality: Accurate Checks in Dyson's Hierarchical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godina, J. J.; Meurice, Y.; Oktay, M. B.

    2003-06-01

    In this talk we present high-accuracy calculations of the susceptibility near βc for Dyson's hierarchical model in D = 3. Using linear fitting, we estimate the leading (γ) and subleading (Δ) exponents. Independent estimates are obtained by calculating the first two eigenvalues of the linearized renormalization group transformation. We found γ = 1.29914073 ± 10 -8 and, Δ = 0.4259469 ± 10-7 independently of the choice of local integration measure (Ising or Landau-Ginzburg). After a suitable rescaling, the approximate fixed points for a large class of local measure coincide accurately with a fixed point constructed by Koch and Wittwer.

  18. The seismic reflection inverse problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seismic reflection method seeks to extract maps of the Earth's sedimentary crust from transient near-surface recording of echoes, stimulated by explosions or other controlled sound sources positioned near the surface. Reasonably accurate models of seismic energy propagation take the form of hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations, in which the coefficients represent the spatial distribution of various mechanical characteristics of rock (density, stiffness, etc). Thus the fundamental problem of reflection seismology is an inverse problem in partial differential equations: to find the coefficients (or at least some of their properties) of a linear hyperbolic system, given the values of a family of solutions in some part of their domains. The exploration geophysics community has developed various methods for estimating the Earth's structure from seismic data and is also well aware of the inverse point of view. This article reviews mathematical developments in this subject over the last 25 years, to show how the mathematics has both illuminated innovations of practitioners and led to new directions in practice. Two themes naturally emerge: the importance of single scattering dominance and compensation for spectral incompleteness by spatial redundancy. (topical review)

  19. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage. (a) Definitions. As used in this... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage. 410.49 Section 410.49 Public Health CENTERS...

  20. Tumors of the cardiac conduction system: are they an explanation for otherwise unexplained sudden cardiac death?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Cardiac tumors are well described in the literature. The first reports of cardiac tumors date back hundreds of years.The prevalence of primary cardiac tumors at autopsy ranges from 0.001% to 0.3% with secondary tumors more common than in primary tumors.

  1. Accurate strand-specific quantification of viral RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E Plaskon

    Full Text Available The presence of full-length complements of viral genomic RNA is a hallmark of RNA virus replication within an infected cell. As such, methods for detecting and measuring specific strands of viral RNA in infected cells and tissues are important in the study of RNA viruses. Strand-specific quantitative real-time PCR (ssqPCR assays are increasingly being used for this purpose, but the accuracy of these assays depends on the assumption that the amount of cDNA measured during the quantitative PCR (qPCR step accurately reflects amounts of a specific viral RNA strand present in the RT reaction. To specifically test this assumption, we developed multiple ssqPCR assays for the positive-strand RNA virus o'nyong-nyong (ONNV that were based upon the most prevalent ssqPCR assay design types in the literature. We then compared various parameters of the ONNV-specific assays. We found that an assay employing standard unmodified virus-specific primers failed to discern the difference between cDNAs generated from virus specific primers and those generated through false priming. Further, we were unable to accurately measure levels of ONNV (- strand RNA with this assay when higher levels of cDNA generated from the (+ strand were present. Taken together, these results suggest that assays of this type do not accurately quantify levels of the anti-genomic strand present during RNA virus infectious cycles. However, an assay permitting the use of a tag-specific primer was able to distinguish cDNAs transcribed from ONNV (- strand RNA from other cDNAs present, thus allowing accurate quantification of the anti-genomic strand. We also report the sensitivities of two different detection strategies and chemistries, SYBR(R Green and DNA hydrolysis probes, used with our tagged ONNV-specific ssqPCR assays. Finally, we describe development, design and validation of ssqPCR assays for chikungunya virus (CHIKV, the recent cause of large outbreaks of disease in the Indian Ocean

  2. Accurate pose estimation for forensic identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckx, Gert; Hermans, Jeroen; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    In forensic authentication, one aims to identify the perpetrator among a series of suspects or distractors. A fundamental problem in any recognition system that aims for identification of subjects in a natural scene is the lack of constrains on viewing and imaging conditions. In forensic applications, identification proves even more challenging, since most surveillance footage is of abysmal quality. In this context, robust methods for pose estimation are paramount. In this paper we will therefore present a new pose estimation strategy for very low quality footage. Our approach uses 3D-2D registration of a textured 3D face model with the surveillance image to obtain accurate far field pose alignment. Starting from an inaccurate initial estimate, the technique uses novel similarity measures based on the monogenic signal to guide a pose optimization process. We will illustrate the descriptive strength of the introduced similarity measures by using them directly as a recognition metric. Through validation, using both real and synthetic surveillance footage, our pose estimation method is shown to be accurate, and robust to lighting changes and image degradation.

  3. How Accurately can we Calculate Thermal Systems?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, D; Blomquist, R N; Dean, C; Heinrichs, D; Kalugin, M A; Lee, M; Lee, Y; MacFarlan, R; Nagaya, Y; Trkov, A

    2004-04-20

    I would like to determine how accurately a variety of neutron transport code packages (code and cross section libraries) can calculate simple integral parameters, such as K{sub eff}, for systems that are sensitive to thermal neutron scattering. Since we will only consider theoretical systems, we cannot really determine absolute accuracy compared to any real system. Therefore rather than accuracy, it would be more precise to say that I would like to determine the spread in answers that we obtain from a variety of code packages. This spread should serve as an excellent indicator of how accurately we can really model and calculate such systems today. Hopefully, eventually this will lead to improvements in both our codes and the thermal scattering models that they use in the future. In order to accomplish this I propose a number of extremely simple systems that involve thermal neutron scattering that can be easily modeled and calculated by a variety of neutron transport codes. These are theoretical systems designed to emphasize the effects of thermal scattering, since that is what we are interested in studying. I have attempted to keep these systems very simple, and yet at the same time they include most, if not all, of the important thermal scattering effects encountered in a large, water-moderated, uranium fueled thermal system, i.e., our typical thermal reactors.

  4. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  5. Accurate pattern registration for integrated circuit tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, Zachary H.; Grantham, Steven; Neogi, Suneeta; Frigo, Sean P.; McNulty, Ian; Retsch, Cornelia C.; Wang, Yuxin; Lucatorto, Thomas B.

    2001-07-15

    As part of an effort to develop high resolution microtomography for engineered structures, a two-level copper integrated circuit interconnect was imaged using 1.83 keV x rays at 14 angles employing a full-field Fresnel zone plate microscope. A major requirement for high resolution microtomography is the accurate registration of the reference axes in each of the many views needed for a reconstruction. A reconstruction with 100 nm resolution would require registration accuracy of 30 nm or better. This work demonstrates that even images that have strong interference fringes can be used to obtain accurate fiducials through the use of Radon transforms. We show that we are able to locate the coordinates of the rectilinear circuit patterns to 28 nm. The procedure is validated by agreement between an x-ray parallax measurement of 1.41{+-}0.17 {mu}m and a measurement of 1.58{+-}0.08 {mu}m from a scanning electron microscope image of a cross section.

  6. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  7. Reflection and teaching: a taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, Henk; Cowan, John

    2009-01-01

    A major problem in teaching reflection is that educational objectives for reflection in terms of student behaviour are lacking. Therefore a taxonomy of reflection has been developed based on Bloom’s taxonomy. Reflective assignments can then be better focused on any chosen educational objectives. The act of reflection has been analysed and abstracted from goal, content, context, means, and moment of reflecting. Reflection was operationalised as answering reflective questions. Bloom’s taxonomy ...

  8. ECLS in Pediatric Cardiac Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nardo, Matteo; MacLaren, Graeme; Marano, Marco; Cecchetti, Corrado; Bernaschi, Paola; Amodeo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is an important device in the management of children with severe refractory cardiac and or pulmonary failure. Actually, two forms of ECLS are available for neonates and children: extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and use of a ventricular assist device (VAD). Both these techniques have their own advantages and disadvantages. The intra-aortic balloon pump is another ECLS device that has been successfully used in larger children, adolescents, and adults, but has found limited applicability in smaller children. In this review, we will present the “state of art” of ECMO in neonate and children with heart failure. ECMO is commonly used in a variety of settings to provide support to critically ill patients with cardiac disease. However, a strict selection of patients and timing of intervention should be performed to avoid the increase in mortality and morbidity of these patients. Therefore, every attempt should be done to start ECLS “urgently” rather than “emergently,” before the presence of dysfunction of end organs or circulatory collapse. Even though exciting progress is being made in the development of VADs for long-term mechanical support in children, ECMO remains the mainstay of mechanical circulatory support in children with complex anatomy, particularly those needing rapid resuscitation and those with a functionally univentricular circulation. With the increase in familiarity with ECMO, new indications have been added, such as extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR). The literature supporting ECPR is increasing in children. Reasonable survival rates have been achieved after initiation of support during active compressions of the chest following in-hospital cardiac arrest. Contraindications to ECLS have reduced in the last 5 years and many centers support patients with functionally univentricular circulations. Improved results have been recently achieved in this complex subset of patients. PMID

  9. EVALUATION OF NEONATAL CARDIAC MURMURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaiah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular malformations are the most common cause of congenital malformations, the diagnosis of which requires a close observation in the neonatal period. Early recognition of CHD is important in the neonatal period, as many of them may be fatal if undiagnosed and may require immediate intervention. The objectives of this study are to study the epidemiology of neonatal cardiac murmurs, to identify clinical characteristics which differentiate pathological murmur from functional murmurs and to assess the reliability of clinical evaluation in diagnosing CHD. Method of study included all neonates admitted to the NICU, postnatal ward, attending pediatric OPD or neonatal follow up clinic and were detected to have cardiac murmurs. It was a cross sectional study over a period of 16months. A clinical diagnosis was made based on history and clinical examination. Then Chest X-ray and ECG, Echocardiography was done in all neonates for confirmation of the diagnosis. These neonates were again examined daily till they were in hospital and during the follow-up visit at 6 weeks. The results of 70 neonates in this study conducted over a period of 24 months included the incidence of cardiac murmurs among intramural neonates which was 13.5 for 1000 live births. Most frequent symptom was fast breathing in 10(14.3% cases. VSD was the most common diagnosis clinically in 23 (33% babies. The most frequent Echo diagnosis was acyanotic complex congenital heart disease in 25(36% cases followed by 12(17% cases each of VSD and ASD respectively. Overall in our study 77.1% (54cases of the murmurs were diagnosed correctly and confirmed by Echocardiography The study concluded that it is possible to make clinical diagnosis in many cases of congenital heart diseases, the functional murmurs could be differentiated from those arising from structural heart disease and evaluation of the infants based only on murmurs, few congenital heart diseases can be missed.

  10. Reflectivity in Research Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigina Mortari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article grounds on the assumption that researchers, in order to be not mere technicians but competent practitioners of research, should be able to reflect in a deep way. That means they should reflect not only on the practical acts of research but also on the mental experience which constructs the meaning about practice. Reflection is a very important mental activity, both in private and professional life. Learning the practice of reflection is fundamental because it allows people to engage into a thoughtful relationship with the world-life and thus gain an awake stance about one’s lived experience. Reflection is a crucial cognitive practice in the research field. Reflexivity is largely practiced in qualitative research, where it is used to legitimate and validate research procedures. This study introduces different perspectives of analysis by focusing the discourse on the main philosophical approaches to reflection: pragmatistic, critical, hermeneutic, and finally phenomenological. The thesis of this study is that the phenomenological theory makes possible to analyze in depth the reflective activity and just by that to support an adequate process of training of the researcher.

  11. Review of Teacher's Teaching Reflection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王爽爽

    2015-01-01

    Teacher's teaching reflection has become the core focus in school.However,there are different understandings of the concept of teacher's teaching reflection.The paper introduces and compares different understandings of the concept of teachers' teaching reflection.Based on the summarizing of the concept on reflection and teaching reflection,this paper tries to provide reference for the teacher's teaching reflection.

  12. Cerebral oximetry in cardiac anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vretzakis, George; Georgopoulou, Stauroula; Stamoulis, Konstantinos; Stamatiou, Georgia; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Katsikogianis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Mpakas, Andreas; Beleveslis, Thomas; Koletas, Alexander; Siminelakis, Stavros N.; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral oximetry based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is increasingly used during the perioperative period of cardiovascular operations. It is a noninvasive technology that can monitor the regional oxygen saturation of the frontal cortex. Current literature indicates that it can stratify patients preoperatively according their risk. Intraoperatively, it provides continuous information about brain oxygenation and allows the use of brain as sentinel organ indexing overall organ perfusion and injury. This review focuses on the clinical validity and applicability of this monitor for cardiac surgical patients. PMID:24672700

  13. Cardiac leiomyosarcoma, a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Gill, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    In this case report we present the history of a patient admitted with recurrent pulmonary edema. Transesophageal chocardiography showed a tumour in the left atrium, occluding the ostium of the mitral valve and mimicking intermittent mitral stenosis. Cardiac surgery followed by pathological...... examination revealed that the tumour was a leiomyosarcoma. Images from the echocardiography as well as the pathological findings are shown and discussed. The present case report illustrates that atrial tumors comprise also sarcomas, suggesting the use of careful, rapid diagnostic procedures and treatment...

  14. Cardiac imaging: does radiation matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Knuuti, Juhani

    2012-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation in cardiovascular imaging has generated considerable discussion. Radiation should not be considered in isolation, but rather in the context of a careful examination of the benefits, risks, and costs of cardiovascular imaging. Such consideration requires an understanding of some fundamental aspects of the biology, physics, epidemiology, and terminology germane to radiation, as well as principles of radiological protection. This paper offers a concise, contemporary perspective on these areas by addressing pertinent questions relating to radiation and its application to cardiac imaging. PMID:21828062

  15. Autologous Transfusion in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radmehr H

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Preoperative autologous blood donation is commonly used to reduce exposure to homologous blood transfusions among patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of autologous transfusion on patients' hematocryte value, intra and postoperative blood loss, hospitalization time, the development of infective complications and other factors. Materials and Methods: Between June 2001 to April 2002, 208 patients were underwent cardiac surgery in cardiac surgery ward in Imam Khomeini Medical Center. One or more blood units donate from 104 Patients before cardiopulmonary bypass and heparin injection, and transfused to them after CPB and Protamin injection (autologous Group, group 1. 104 patients underwent cardiac surgery routinely (control group, group 2."nResults: Mean of age was 55.9±8.6 in group 1 and 56.6±9.3 in group 2 (P=NS. 73 male and 31 females were in group 1 and 79 males and 25 females were in group 2 (P=NS. Smoking, familial history, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, renal failure, hypertension, stroke, and history of myocardial infarction was similar in two groups."nSeverity of angina, urgency operation, number vessels disease, duration of cardiopulmonary bypass, duration of aortic cross clamp time, use of internal thoracic artery graft, and number of grafts was similar in both groups. Mean of bleeding post operation was 548 cc in group 1 and 803 cc in-group 2 (P=0.003. Bleeding that need to operation was 1.8% in group 1 and 8.6% in group 2 (P=0.002. Wound infection, mediastinitis, renal failure, ventilatory prolonged, stroke, need to Intra-aortic Balloon Pump (IABP, intraoperative bleeding, and hospital stay was similar in both groups. Mean of extubationt time was 10.2 hours in group 1 and 14.8 hours in group 2 (P=0.001."nConclusion: Preoperative and intra-operative donations are safe and continue to contribute uniquely to blood conservation, providing important options in comprehensive

  16. [Acute cardiac failure in pheochromocytoma.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønler, Morten; Munk, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma (P) is an endocrine catecholamine-secreting tumor. Classical symptoms like hypertension, attacks of sweating, palpitations, headache and palor are related to catecholamine discharge. We provide a case of P in a 71 year-old man presenting with acute cardiac failure, severe reduction...... in left ventricular function and elevated myocardial enzymes. No coronary stenoses were found. The myocardium regained nearly normal systolic function in one and a half month. A renal P was laparoscopicaly removed. We discuss the pathophysiology of catecholamine cardiomyopathy. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Jun-2...

  17. Introduction to noninvasive cardiac mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Laura; Cuculich, Phillip S; Bernus, Olivier; Efimov, Igor; Dubois, Rémi

    2015-03-01

    From the dawn of the twentieth century, the electrocardiogram (ECG) has revolutionized the way clinical cardiology has been practiced, and it has become the cornerstone of modern medicine today. Driven by clinical and research needs for a more precise understanding of cardiac electrophysiology beyond traditional ECG, inverse solution electrocardiography has been developed, tested, and validated. This article outlines the important progress from ECG development, through more extensive measurement of body surface potentials, and the fundamental leap to solving the inverse problem of electrocardiography, with a focus on mathematical methods and experimental validation. PMID:25784020

  18. 10.2.Cardiac arrhythmias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930257 Electrophysiologic study of reperfu-sion arrhythmias.YIN Hong (尹红),et al.Af-fil Hosp,Shandong Med Univ,Jinan.Chin CirJ 1993;8(1):37—39.Twenty dogs of experimental ischemic reper-fusion were studied with a three-dimensionalmapping system of cardiac electric activity andmultiple—level myocardial recordings by bipolarplunge—needle electrodes.27% of the nonsus-tained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) of intra-mural reentry occurred in the ischemic subendo-

  19. A cardiac hemangioma treated by a right minithoracotomy approach with thoracoscopic assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Katsuaki; Tanigawa, Kazuyoshi; Odate, Tomohiro; Miura, Takashi; Tsuneto, Akira; Abe, Kuniko; Hashizume, Koji; Eishi, Kiyoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hemangiomas are extremely rare tumors, accounting for only 2.5% of all cardiac tumors. Most of these develop in the ventricles, and obtaining a good field of view is, therefore, the key to successful operation. A 40-year-old female visited a local hospital due to palpitation. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a spherical high-echo mass (13.5 × 10.7 mm in diameter) between the papillary muscles. She was referred to our hospital to undergo close examination. Cardiac contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was performed to differentiate between malignant and benign lesions. However, this did not provide any findings leading to a definite diagnosis. To make a diagnosis and prevent embolism, the mass was excised using a right minithoracotomy approach with thoracoscopic assistance. The post-operative pathological diagnosis was a cardiac capillary-cavernous hemangioma. A right minithoracotomy approach combined with thoracoscopy allowed accurate evaluation of the mass in the left ventricle beyond the mitral valve and its accurate excision.

  20. Reflections On Innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammu K Radhakrishnan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade or so, Medical education all overthe world has been inundated with innovations ineducation, which include innovations in curriculardesign, delivery as well as assessments. There is a needto reflect on the effectives of these innovationson the learner. Hence the theme chosen for the2009 International Medical Education Conference(IMEC 2009 was “Reflections on Innovations”.The Organising Committee felt that it was timely formedical educators everywhere to reflect and evaluatethe effect of the many innovations adopted by theirschools.

  1. Value reflected health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen; Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the impact of a value-reflected approach in health education by demonstrating the nature of professional competence development connected to this approach. It is based on findings from two three-year health educational development projects carried out by school health nurses...... and researchers at primary schools in Denmark from 2004-2009. We argue for the importance of reflecting on values in school health nursing in order to navigate between human values and values deriving from medicine. Our studies demonstrate that value clarification, peer observation and reflective spaces at work...

  2. Techniques of cardiac output measurement during liver transplantation: arterial pulse wave versus thermodilution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, P.; Lieshout, J.J. van; Novovic, S.;

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we compared continuous cardiac output (CO) obtained from the femoral arterial pressure by simulation of an aortic input impedance model [model-simulated cardiac output (MCO)] to thermodilution cardiac output (TDCO) determined by bolus injection during liver transplantation. Both...... variables were measured in 39 adult patients (13 females) every 10th minute during liver transplant surgery. Paired measurements were compared during the 4 phases of surgery-dissection, anhepatic phase, early reperfusion (the first 15 minutes after reperfusion), and late reperfusion (15-60 minutes after......, and the mutual correlation coefficient was 0.812 (P < 0.001). This study indicates that during liver transplantation surgery, MCO reflects TDCO throughout the operation. Thus, for CO, this less invasive method appears to provide a reliable uninterrupted measurement during orthotopic liver...

  3. Hospital admissions and pharmacotherapy before out-of-hospital cardiac arrest according to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar H;

    2012-01-01

    were identified in the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Register and Copenhagen Medical Emergency Care Unit (2001-2006). We matched every OHCA patients with 10 controls on sex and age. Healthcare contacts were evaluated 30 days before event by individual-level-linkage of nationwide registers. RESULTS......BACKGROUND: The underlying etiology of sudden cardiac death varies with age and is likely to be reflected in type and number of healthcare contacts. We aimed to determine the specific type of healthcare contact shortly before out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) across ages. METHODS: OHCA patients......: We identified 16,924 OHCA patients, median age 70.0 years (Q1-Q3: 59-80). OHCA patients had a higher number of hospitalizations and received more pharmacotherapy compared to the control population across all ages (p for difference 89) were...

  4. Assessment of cardiac sympathetic nerve integrity with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffel, David M. E-mail: raffel@umich.edu; Wieland, Donald M

    2001-07-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays a critical role in the regulation of cardiac function. Abnormalities of cardiac innervation have been implicated in the pathophysiology of many heart diseases, including sudden cardiac death and congestive heart failure. In an effort to provide clinicians with the ability to regionally map cardiac innervation, several radiotracers for imaging cardiac sympathetic neurons have been developed. This paper reviews the development of neuronal imaging agents and discusses their emerging role in the noninvasive assessment of cardiac sympathetic innervation.

  5. The Cardiac Conduction System: Generation and Conduction of the Cardiac Impulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Alan; Finlay, Dewar D; Guldenring, Daniel; Bond, Raymond; Moran, Kieran; McLaughlin, James

    2016-09-01

    In this article, the authors outline the key components behind the automated generation of the cardiac impulses and the effect these impulses have on cardiac myocytes. Also, a description of the key components of the normal cardiac conduction system is provided, including the sinoatrial node, the atrioventricular node, the His bundle, the bundle branches, and the Purkinje network. Finally, an outline of how each stage of the cardiac conduction system is represented on the electrocardiogram is described, allowing the reader of the electrocardiogram to translate background information about the normal cardiac conduction system to everyday clinical practice. PMID:27484656

  6. A visible light imaging device for cardiac rate detection with reduced effect of body movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaotian; Liu, Ming; Zhao, Yuejin

    2014-09-01

    A visible light imaging system to detect human cardiac rate is proposed in this paper. A color camera and several LEDs, acting as lighting source, were used to avoid the interference of ambient light. From people's forehead, the cardiac rate could be acquired based on photoplethysmography (PPG) theory. The template matching method was used after the capture of video. The video signal was discomposed into three signal channels (RGB) and the region of interest was chosen to take the average gray value. The green channel signal could provide an excellent waveform of pulse wave on the account of green lights' absorptive characteristics of blood. Through the fast Fourier transform, the cardiac rate was exactly achieved. But the research goal was not just to achieve the cardiac rate accurately. With the template matching method, the effects of body movement are reduced to a large extent, therefore the pulse wave can be detected even while people are in the moving state and the waveform is largely optimized. Several experiments are conducted on volunteers, and the results are compared with the ones gained by a finger clamped pulse oximeter. The contrast results between these two ways are exactly agreeable. This method to detect the cardiac rate and the pulse wave largely reduces the effects of body movement and can probably be widely used in the future.

  7. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves, E-mail: frederico.mancuso@grupofleury.com.br [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Disciplina de Medicina de Urgência - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira [Disciplina de Medicina de Urgência - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.

  8. Filters in 2D and 3D Cardiac SPECT Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lyra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear cardiac imaging is a noninvasive, sensitive method providing information on cardiac structure and physiology. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT evaluates myocardial perfusion, viability, and function and is widely used in clinical routine. The quality of the tomographic image is a key for accurate diagnosis. Image filtering, a mathematical processing, compensates for loss of detail in an image while reducing image noise, and it can improve the image resolution and limit the degradation of the image. SPECT images are then reconstructed, either by filter back projection (FBP analytical technique or iteratively, by algebraic methods. The aim of this study is to review filters in cardiac 2D, 3D, and 4D SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality mirroring the diagnostic accuracy of SPECT images. Several filters, including the Hanning, Butterworth, and Parzen filters, were evaluated in combination with the two reconstruction methods as well as with a specified MatLab program. Results showed that for both 3D and 4D cardiac SPECT the Butterworth filter, for different critical frequencies and orders, produced the best results. Between the two reconstruction methods, the iterative one might be more appropriate for cardiac SPECT, since it improves lesion detectability due to the significant improvement of image contrast.

  9. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy

  10. Active cardiac model and its application on structure detection from early fetal ultrasound sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yinhui; Wang, Yuanyuan; Shen, Yuzhong; Chen, Ping

    2012-04-01

    The structure of an early fetal heart provides vital information for the diagnosis of fetus defects. However, early fetal hearts are difficult to detect due to their relatively small size and the low signal-to-noise ratio of ultrasound images. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for automatic detection of early fetal cardiac structure from ultrasound images. The proposed method consists of two major parts which are the preprocessing phase and the active cardiac model: (1) The preprocessing phase consists of two sub-steps. (a) The region of interest is first automatically selected based on an accumulated motion image, which is able to represent the motion information of the fetal heart more accurately. (b) Then by combining Rayleigh-trimmed filter and anisotropic diffusion in 3-dimensional space, a despeckling method is developed to suppress the speckle noise and emphasize the motion information for subsequent cardiac structure detection. (2) The active cardiac model is proposed for the detection of fetal heart structure, which is a key contribution of this paper. It takes into account both the structure and motion information of fetal hearts simultaneously. Both learning and inference of the active cardiac model are described in the paper. Experiments on seven ultrasound sequences demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:21620676

  11. Image registration and analysis for quantitative myocardial perfusion: application to dynamic circular cardiac CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isola, A. A.; Schmitt, H.; van Stevendaal, U.; Begemann, P. G.; Coulon, P.; Boussel, L.; Grass, M.

    2011-09-01

    Large area detector computed tomography systems with fast rotating gantries enable volumetric dynamic cardiac perfusion studies. Prospectively, ECG-triggered acquisitions limit the data acquisition to a predefined cardiac phase and thereby reduce x-ray dose and limit motion artefacts. Even in the case of highly accurate prospective triggering and stable heart rate, spatial misalignment of the cardiac volumes acquired and reconstructed per cardiac cycle may occur due to small motion pattern variations from cycle to cycle. These misalignments reduce the accuracy of the quantitative analysis of myocardial perfusion parameters on a per voxel basis. An image-based solution to this problem is elastic 3D image registration of dynamic volume sequences with variable contrast, as it is introduced in this contribution. After circular cone-beam CT reconstruction of cardiac volumes covering large areas of the myocardial tissue, the complete series is aligned with respect to a chosen reference volume. The results of the registration process and the perfusion analysis with and without registration are evaluated quantitatively in this paper. The spatial alignment leads to improved quantification of myocardial perfusion for three different pig data sets.

  12. Wild-Type Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis: Novel Insights From Advanced Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narotsky, David L; Castano, Adam; Weinsaft, Jonathan W; Bokhari, Sabahat; Maurer, Mathew S

    2016-09-01

    Amyloidosis is caused by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein fibrils, resulting in destruction of tissue architecture and impairment of organ function. The most common forms of systemic amyloidosis are light-chain and transthyretin-related (ATTR). ATTR can result from an autosomal dominant hereditary transmission of mutated genes in the transthyretin or from a wild-type form of disease (ATTRwt), previously known as senile cardiac amyloidosis. With the aging of the worldwide population, ATTRwt will emerge as the most common type of cardiac amyloidosis that clinicians encounter. Diagnosis of systemic amyloidosis is often delayed, either because of the false assumption that it is a rare disease, or because of misdiagnosis as a result of mistaking it with other conditions. Clinicians must integrate clinical clues from history, physical examination, and common diagnostic tests to raise suspicion for ATTRwt. The historical gold standard for diagnosis of cardiac amyloid is endomyocardial biopsy analysis with pathological distinction of precursor protein type, but this method often results in delayed diagnosis because of the limited availability of expertise to perform and interpret the endomyocardial biopsy specimen. Emerging noninvasive imaging modalities provide easier, accurate screening for ATTRwt. These modalities include advanced echocardiography, using strain imaging and the myocardial contraction fraction; nuclear scintigraphy, which can differentiate between ATTR and light-chain cardiac amyloid; and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, using extracellular volume measurement, late gadolinium enhancement, and distinct T1 mapping. These novel approaches reveal insights into the prevalence, clinical course, morphological effects, and prognosis of ATTRwt. PMID:27568874

  13. Optimisation of a Generic Ionic Model of Cardiac Myocyte Electrical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianruo Guo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A generic cardiomyocyte ionic model, whose complexity lies between a simple phenomenological formulation and a biophysically detailed ionic membrane current description, is presented. The model provides a user-defined number of ionic currents, employing two-gate Hodgkin-Huxley type kinetics. Its generic nature allows accurate reconstruction of action potential waveforms recorded experimentally from a range of cardiac myocytes. Using a multiobjective optimisation approach, the generic ionic model was optimised to accurately reproduce multiple action potential waveforms recorded from central and peripheral sinoatrial nodes and right atrial and left atrial myocytes from rabbit cardiac tissue preparations, under different electrical stimulus protocols and pharmacological conditions. When fitted simultaneously to multiple datasets, the time course of several physiologically realistic ionic currents could be reconstructed. Model behaviours tend to be well identified when extra experimental information is incorporated into the optimisation.

  14. Simulation evaluation of quantitative myocardial perfusion assessment from cardiac CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2014-03-01

    blood flow estimation. In conclusion, quantitative model-based dynamic cardiac CT perfusion assessment is capable of accurately estimating MBF across a range of cardiac outputs and tissue perfusion states, outperforms comparable static perfusion estimates, and is relatively robust to noise and temporal subsampling.

  15. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  16. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S

    2016-08-25

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  17. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  18. How accurate are SuperCOSMOS positions?

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Adam; Johnston, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Optical positions from the SuperCOSMOS Sky Survey have been compared in detail with accurate radio positions that define the second realisation of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2). The comparison was limited to the IIIaJ plates from the UK/AAO and Oschin (Palomar) Schmidt telescopes. A total of 1373 ICRF2 sources was used, with the sample restricted to stellar objects brighter than $B_J=20$ and Galactic latitudes $|b|>10^{\\circ}$. Position differences showed an rms scatter of $0.16''$ in right ascension and declination. While overall systematic offsets were $<0.1''$ in each hemisphere, both the systematics and scatter were greater in the north.

  19. Accurate renormalization group analyses in neutrino sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haba, Naoyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, Matsue 690-8504 (Japan); Kaneta, Kunio [Kavli IPMU (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Takahashi, Ryo [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, Matsue 690-8504 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Yuya [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    We investigate accurate renormalization group analyses in neutrino sector between ν-oscillation and seesaw energy scales. We consider decoupling effects of top quark and Higgs boson on the renormalization group equations of light neutrino mass matrix. Since the decoupling effects are given in the standard model scale and independent of high energy physics, our method can basically apply to any models beyond the standard model. We find that the decoupling effects of Higgs boson are negligible, while those of top quark are not. Particularly, the decoupling effects of top quark affect neutrino mass eigenvalues, which are important for analyzing predictions such as mass squared differences and neutrinoless double beta decay in an underlying theory existing at high energy scale.

  20. Accurate Telescope Mount Positioning with MEMS Accelerometers

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, László; Pál, András; Csépány, Gergely

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the advantages and challenges of applying microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (MEMS accelerometers) in order to attain precise, accurate and stateless positioning of telescope mounts. This provides a completely independent method from other forms of electronic, optical, mechanical or magnetic feedback or real-time astrometry. Our goal is to reach the sub-arcminute range which is well smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. Here we present how this sub-arcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors and we also detail how our procedures can be extended in order to attain even finer measurements. In addition, our paper discusses how can a complete system design be implemented in order to be a part of a telescope control system.

  1. Accurate Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    The NRAO Green Bank Telescope routinely observes at wavelengths from 3 mm to 1 m. As with all mm-wave telescopes, observing conditions depend upon the variable atmospheric water content. The site provides over 100 days/yr when opacities are low enough for good observing at 3 mm, but winds on the open-air structure reduce the time suitable for 3-mm observing where pointing is critical. Thus, to maximum productivity the observing wavelength needs to match weather conditions. For 6 years the telescope has used a dynamic scheduling system (recently upgraded; www.gb.nrao.edu/DSS) that requires accurate multi-day forecasts for winds and opacities. Since opacity forecasts are not provided by the National Weather Services (NWS), I have developed an automated system that takes available forecasts, derives forecasted opacities, and deploys the results on the web in user-friendly graphical overviews (www.gb.nrao.edu/ rmaddale/Weather). The system relies on the "North American Mesoscale" models, which are updated by the NWS every 6 hrs, have a 12 km horizontal resolution, 1 hr temporal resolution, run to 84 hrs, and have 60 vertical layers that extend to 20 km. Each forecast consists of a time series of ground conditions, cloud coverage, etc, and, most importantly, temperature, pressure, humidity as a function of height. I use the Liebe's MWP model (Radio Science, 20, 1069, 1985) to determine the absorption in each layer for each hour for 30 observing wavelengths. Radiative transfer provides, for each hour and wavelength, the total opacity and the radio brightness of the atmosphere, which contributes substantially at some wavelengths to Tsys and the observational noise. Comparisons of measured and forecasted Tsys at 22.2 and 44 GHz imply that the forecasted opacities are good to about 0.01 Nepers, which is sufficient for forecasting and accurate calibration. Reliability is high out to 2 days and degrades slowly for longer-range forecasts.

  2. Dissenting in Reflective Conversations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Boulus-Rødje, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Reflective monitoring of research practices is essential. However, we often lack formal training in the practices of doing action research, and descriptions of actual inquiry practice are seldom included in publications. Our aim is to provide a glimpse of self-reflective practices based on our...... experience of enacting action research. Our engagement in a large action research project brought about many dilemmas and uncertainties related to our roles and interventions. We focus on these uncertainties as a way of opening the ?black box? of action research ?in the making?. We conceptualize a...... methodological reflective approach that provides space for taking seriously uncertainties experienced in the field as these can be a catalyst for learning and sharpening our theoretical and empirical skills as action researchers. Through first-person inquiry, we investigate how our reflective conversations...

  3. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU, a novel analysis of cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bin; Tong, Suiyang; Ren, Xiaofeng; Xia, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mammalian hearts maintain the capacity for cardiac regeneration. Rapid and sensitive identification of cardiac cellular proliferation is prerequisite for understanding the underlying mechanisms and strategies of cardiac regeneration. The following immunologically related markers of cardiac cells were analyzed: cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5 and Gata 4; specific marker of cardiomyocytes TnT; endothelial cell marker CD31; vascular smooth muscle marker smooth muscle myosin IgG; cardiac resident stem cells markers IsL1, Tbx18, and Wt1. Markers were co-localized in cardiac tissues of embryonic, neonatal, adult, and pathological samples by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining. EdU was also used to label isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro. EdU robustly labeled proliferating cells in vitro and in vivo, co-immunostaining with different cardiac cells markers. EdU can rapidly and sensitively label proliferating cardiac cells in developmental and pathological states. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU is a novel analytical tool for investigating the mechanism and strategies of cardiac regeneration in response to injury. PMID:25480318

  4. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    noise on the patient with defect. The results showed that the proposed methods can effectively reduce motion blur in the images caused by both respiratory and cardiac motions, which may lead to more accurate defect detection and quantifications. This approach can be easily adapted in routine clinical practice on currently available commercial systems. (paper)

  5. Cardiac hydatid cyst revealed by ventricular tachycardia

    OpenAIRE

    Ibn Elhadj, Zied; Boukhris, Marouane; Kammoun, Ikram; Halima, Afef Ben; Addad, Faouzi; Kachboura, Salem

    2013-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a human parasitic infestation caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus Granulosus. The liver and the lungs are the most common locations. Cardiac involvement is rare and accounts for 0.5–2% of all hydatid disease. We report an unusual presentation of cardiac hydatid cyst revealed by ventricular tachycardia in a patient with a history of cerebral hydatid cyst.

  6. Acute cardiac failure in neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sparrow, Patrick

    2012-02-03

    We present a case of rapid onset acute cardiac failure developing as part of neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a 35-year-old woman following treatment with thioridazine and lithium. Post mortem histology of cardiac and skeletal muscle showed similar changes of focal cellular necrosis and vacuolation suggesting a common disease process.

  7. Cardiac MRI of the athlete's heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakken, N.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The increase in pre-participation cardiovascular screening using the Lausanne protocol will ultimately lead to an increased use of cardiac MRI and MDCT in the cardiovascular work-up of athletes. The role of cardiac MRI is well established in the evaluation of cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, aortic st

  8. The Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Tilsted, Hans Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a subregistry to the Western Denmark Heart Registry (WDHR), the Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry (WDHR-CCTR) is a clinical database established in 2008 to monitor and improve the quality of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in Western Denmark. OBJECTIVE: We...

  9. Fetal cardiac interventions: clinical and experimental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Humuruola, Gulimila

    2016-01-01

    Fetal cardiac interventions for congenital heart diseases may alleviate heart dysfunction, prevent them evolving into hypoplastic left heart syndrome, achieve biventricular outcome and improve fetal survival. Candidates for clinical fetal cardiac interventions are now restricted to cases of critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The therapeutic options are advocated as prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of interatrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Experimental research on fetal cardiac intervention involves technical modifications of catheter-based cardiac clinical interventions and open fetal cardiac bypass that cannot be applied in human fetuses for the time being. Clinical fetal cardiac interventions are plausible for midgestation fetuses with the above-mentioned congenital heart defects. The technical success, biventricular outcome and fetal survival are continuously being improved in the conditions of the sophisticated multidisciplinary team, equipment, techniques and postnatal care. Experimental research is laying the foundations and may open new fields for catheter-based clinical techniques. In the present article, the clinical therapeutic options and experimental fetal cardiac interventions are described. PMID:27279868

  10. Is fetal cardiac function gender dependent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clur, S. A. B.; Rengerink, K. Oude; Mol, B. W.; Ottenkamp, J.; Bilardo, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction An increased nuchal translucency (NT) is more common in males. A delayed diastolic cardiac function maturation has been proposed to explain this and the reported gender-related differences in ductus venosus (DV) flow. Objective To investigate gender-related differences in fetal cardiac

  11. Is fetal cardiac function gender dependent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A.B. Clur; K. Oude Rengerink; B.W. Mol; J. Ottenkamp; C.M. Bilardo

    2011-01-01

    An increased nuchal translucency (NT) is more common in males. A delayed diastolic cardiac function maturation has been proposed to explain this and the reported gender-related differences in ductus venosus (DV) flow. To investigate gender-related differences in fetal cardiac function. One hundred a

  12. Preoperative respiratory physical therapy in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac surgery is one of the most common surgical procedures and accounts for more resources expended in cardiovascular medicine than any other single procedure. Because cardiac surgery involves sternal incision and cardiopulmonary bypass, patients usually have a restricted respiratory function in

  13. Cardiac Diseases in People with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Akker, M.; Maaskant, M. A.; van der Meijden, R. J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: In people with ID there is more morbidity than in the general population, including cardiac diseases. Dutch figures on this subject are scarce. Methods: Descriptive study of the prevalence of cardiac diseases in 436 residential clients in Echt, the Netherlands, and comparisons between men and women, age groups, and level and aetiology…

  14. Coagulopathy and hemostatic monitoring in cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Sølbeck, Sacha; Genet, Gustav;

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) causes severe derangements in the hemostatic system, which in turn puts the patient at risks of microvascular bleeding. Excessive transfusion and surgical re-exploration after cardiac surgery are potentially associated with a number of adverse...

  15. Athletes at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to…

  16. CARDIAC SIZE IN THE SUPINE CHESTFILM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERJAGT, EJ; SMITS, HJ

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find a normal value for the cardiac size in the supine position because such a standard is hardly known in the literature. Cardiac size in the erect and supine positions were compared in 165 patients in whom both chest radiographs were performed prior to kidney transplan

  17. Using the Trajectory Framework: reconceptualizing cardiac illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, M H

    1991-01-01

    Cardiac disease is known to be the leading cause of premature morbidity and mortality in the United States. Nursing management of cardiac illnesses, as such, is a primary concern for most practicing nurses. Dramatic changes in cardiac patient populations and associated technology available for treatment indicate a need to reconceptualize the nature of cardiac illness and to consider alternative approaches to guide the care of these patients. Traditional care, to a large degree, has focused upon acute illness, consequently limiting needed attention to the increasing group of patients suffering chronic illness and disability. In the present paper, the major changes in the cardiac patient population and in utilization of available technology are presented. The application of the Corbin and Strauss trajectory framework as an appropriate and useful framework for conceptualizing cardiac illness and care is then discussed. Five characteristics of the framework which render the model particularly well suited to address cardiac care are identified and discussed. These characteristics are: 1) comprehensiveness of care, 2) patient-centered care, 3) gender issues in care, 4) family-focused care, 5) technology and cardiac care. PMID:1763241

  18. Cardiac arrhythmia classification using autoregressive modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan Narayanan; Ge Dingfei; Krishnan Shankar M

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Computer-assisted arrhythmia recognition is critical for the management of cardiac disorders. Various techniques have been utilized to classify arrhythmias. Generally, these techniques classify two or three arrhythmias or have significantly large processing times. A simpler autoregressive modeling (AR) technique is proposed to classify normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and various cardiac arrhythmias including atrial premature contraction (APC), premature ventricular contraction (...

  19. Conditional shape models for cardiac motion estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metz, C.T.; Baka, N.; Kirisli, H.A.;

    2010-01-01

    We propose a conditional statistical shape model to predict patient specific cardiac motion from the 3D end-diastolic CTA scan. The model is built from 4D CTA sequences by combining atlas based segmentation and 4D registration. Cardiac motion estimation is, for example, relevant in the dynamic al...

  20. Drugs, QTc prolongation and sudden cardiac death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.J.M. Straus (Sabine)

    2005-01-01

    textabstract__Abstract__ The term sudden cardiac death pertains to an unexpected death from cardiac causes within a short time period and has been described throughout history. The ancient Egyptians inscribed on the tomb of a nobleman some 4500 years ago that he had died suddenly and without appare

  1. Clinical study of cardiac diseases during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitha Vijay Kamat

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Cardiac diseases in pregnancy constitute high risk pregnancy and require special attention during antepartum, intrapartum and postpartum period. Rheumatic heart disease was the major contribution of cardiac diseases in pregnancy and is seen to be associated with increased maternal morbidity. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(3.000: 855-859

  2. Primary cardiac hemangioendothelioma: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-feng; LIU Ming; ZHU Hong; HAN Wei; HU Cheng-yi; QI Ji-ping; MEI Huan-lin; GE Re-le; ZHOU Min

    2006-01-01

    @@ Primary cardiac hemangioendothelioma is extremely rare.1-3 Up to now less than twenty cases have been reported in English literature, the data about this kind of cardiac tumors are scanty. In this report, a case of a huge hemangio-endothelioma that arose from the right atrium and was successfully resected is presented.

  3. Cardiac manifestations of inborn errors of metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evangeliou, A.; Papadopoulou-Legbelou, K.; Daphnis, E.; Ganotakis, E.; Vavouranakis, I.; Michailidou, H.; Hitoglou-Makedou, A.; Nicolaidou, P.; Wevers, R.A.; Varlamis, G.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate the frequency and type of cardiac manifestations in a defined group of patients with inborn errors of metabolism. This paper also explores the key role of cardiac manifestations in the diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism in daily practice. METHODS: O

  4. Ultrasound Imaging in Teaching Cardiac Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher D.; Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Quinn, Joe G.; Roe, Sean M.; Stewart, Michael T.; Tansey, Etain A.

    2016-01-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such…

  5. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roccio, M.; Goumans, M. J.; Sluijter, J. P. G.; Doevendans, P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new cardiomyo

  6. Cardiac Vagal Regulation and Early Peer Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Paulo A.; Keane, Susan P.; Calkins, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    A sample of 341 5 1/2-year-old children participating in an ongoing longitudinal study was the focus of a study on the relation between cardiac vagal regulation and peer status. To assess cardiac vagal regulation, resting measures of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA change (suppression) to 3 cognitively and emotionally challenging tasks…

  7. Cardiac involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. De Gennaro Colonna

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic disease of unknown etiology characterized by a chronic inflammatory process mainly leading to destruction of synovial membrane of small and major diarthrodial joints. The prevalence of RA within the general adult population is about 1% and female subjects in fertile age result mostly involved. It’s an invalidating disease, associated with changes in life quality and a reduced life expectancy. Moreover, we can observe an increased mortality rate in this population early after the onset of the disease. The mortality excess can be partially due to infective, gastrointestinal, renal or pulmonary complications and malignancy (mainly lung cancer and non- Hodgkin lymphoma. Among extra-articular complications, cardiovascular (CV involvement represents one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Every cardiac structure can be affected by different pathogenic pathways: heart valves, conduction system, myocardium, endocardium, pericardium and coronary arteries. Consequently, different clinical manifestations can be detected, including: pericarditis, myocarditis, myocardial fibrosis, arrhythmias, alterations of conduction system, coronaropathies and ischemic cardiopathy, valvular disease, pulmonary hypertension and heart failure. Considering that early cardiac involvement negatively affects the prognosis, it is mandatory to identify high CV risk RA patients to better define long-term management of this population.

  8. [Technologies for cardiac valve prostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kiyoharu

    2009-07-01

    To show the technological development of cardiac valve prostheses, a historical review of both mechanical and biological valve prostheses and a current overview of modern cardiac valve devices are provided. Scince the 1st implantation of Starr-Edwards ball valve in 1960, both mechanical and biological valve prostheses have advanced. The valve design, the material of the leaflet and the hausing of mechanical prostheses have improved. Currently, the majority of the mechanical prostheses are bileaflet tilting disc valves made of pyrolytic carbon, which is antithromboembolic. However, anticoagulation therapy with warfarin is still required. As for the bioprostheses, although the fixation and anti-mineralization methods of the tissues improved, the durability of these valves is still limited. For the material of the current biological valves, the porcine aortic valve or bovine pericardium are used. The tissues are fixed by non-pressure or low-pressure method in glutaraldehyde solution. A stented and non-stented valves are available. Epoch-making events in this field are the implantation of new bioprosthetic valves using tissue engineering methods and the development of the transcatheter valve replacement therapies.

  9. Cardiac Rehabilitation in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopfer, David W; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-09-01

    The biology of aging and the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD) overlap, with the effect that CVD is endemic in the growing population of older adults. Moreover, CVD in older adults is usually complicated by age-related complexities, including multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, and other intricacies that add to the risks of ambiguous symptoms, deconditioning, iatrogenesis, falls, disability, and other challenges. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a comprehensive lifestyle program that can have particular benefit for older patients with cardiovascular conditions. Although CR was originally designed primarily as an exercise training program for younger adults after a myocardial infarction or coronary artery bypass surgery, it has evolved as a comprehensive lifestyle program (promoting physical activity as well as education, diet, risk reduction, and adherence) for a broader range of CVD (coronary heart disease, heart failure, and valvular heart disease). It provides a valuable opportunity to address and moderate many of the challenges pertinent for the large and growing population of older adults with CVD. Cardiac rehabilitation promotes physical function (cardiorespiratory fitness as well as strength and balance) that helps overcome disease and deconditioning as well as related vulnerabilities such as disability, frailty, and falls. Similarly, CR facilitates education, monitoring, and guidance to reduce iatrogenesis and promote adherence. Furthermore, CR fosters cognition, socialization, and independence in older patients. Yet despite all its conceptual benefits, CR is significantly underused in older populations. This review discusses benefits and the paradoxical underuse of CR, as well as evolving models of care that may achieve greater application and efficacy. PMID:27297002

  10. Lipid partitioning during cardiac stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolwicz, Stephen C

    2016-10-01

    It is well documented that fatty acids serve as the primary fuel substrate for the contracting myocardium. However, extensive research has identified significant changes in the myocardial oxidation of fatty acids during acute or chronic cardiac stress. As a result, the redistribution or partitioning of fatty acids due to metabolic derangements could have biological implications. Fatty acids can be stored as triacylglycerols, serve as critical components for biosynthesis of phospholipid membranes, and form the potent signaling molecules, diacylglycerol and ceramides. Therefore, the contribution of lipid metabolism to health and disease is more intricate than a balance of uptake and oxidation. In this review, the available data regarding alterations that occur in endogenous cardiac lipid pathways during the pathological stressors of ischemia-reperfusion and pathological hypertrophy/heart failure are highlighted. In addition, changes in endogenous lipids observed in exercise training models are presented for comparison. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:27040509

  11. Thoughts on Reflection (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been some acknowledgement in the published literature that reflection is a crucial element of the evidence based library and information practice (EBLIP model we have adopted (Booth 2004, 2006; Grant 2007; Helliwell 2007. As we work through a problem and try to incorporate the best available evidence into our decision making, reflection is required at several stages, including the very identification of the problem through to our assessment of the process itself and what we have learned in order to inform future practice. However, reflection and reflective writing have not fully been integrated into the process we espouse, and very little has been done to look more closely at this element of the model and how it can be integrated into professional learning.In a recently published research article, Sen (2010 confirms the relationship between reflection and several aspects of professional practice. These include critical review and decision making, two aspects that are tied closely to the evidence based process. Sen notes: Students were more likely to show evidence of learning, self‐development, the ability to review issues crucially, awareness of their own mental functions, ability to make decision [sic] and being empowered when they had mastered the art of reflective practice and the more deeply analytical reflective writing. (p.84 EBLIP (the journal tries to incorporate elements of reflection within the articles we publish. While we clearly believe in the need for our profession to do quality research and publish that research so that it can be accessible to practitioners, we also know that research cannot be looked at in isolation. Our evidence summaries are one way of reflecting critically on previously published research, and in the same vein, our classics bring older research studies back to the foreground. This work needs to continue to be discussed and looked at for its impact on our profession.More directly, the Using

  12. Gene transfer to promote cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collesi, Chiara; Giacca, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    There is an impelling need to develop new therapeutic strategies for patients with myocardial infarction and heart failure. Leading from the large quantity of new information gathered over the last few years on the mechanisms controlling cardiomyocyte proliferation during embryonic and fetal life, it is now possible to devise innovative therapies based on cardiac gene transfer. Different protein-coding genes controlling cell cycle progression or cardiomyocyte specification and differentiation, along with microRNA mimics and inhibitors regulating pre-natal and early post-natal cell proliferation, are amenable to transformation in potential therapeutics for cardiac regeneration. These gene therapy approaches are conceptually revolutionary, since they are aimed at stimulating the intrinsic potential of differentiated cardiac cells to proliferate, rather than relying on the implantation of exogenously expanded cells to achieve tissue regeneration. For efficient and prolonged cardiac gene transfer, vectors based on the Adeno-Associated Virus stand as safe, efficient and reliable tools for cardiac gene therapy applications.

  13. Gender differences in cardiac hypertrophic remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrizio, Mario; Marano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is a complex process that occurs in response to different types of cardiac injury such as ischemia and hypertension, and that involves cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscle cells, vascular endothelial cells, and inflammatory cells. The end result is cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, fibrosis, inflammation, vascular, and electrophysiological remodeling. This paper reviews a large number of studies on the influence of gender on pathological cardiac remodeling and shows how sex differences result in different clinical outcomes and therapeutic responses, with males which generally develop greater cardiac remodeling responses than females. Although estrogens appear to have an important role in attenuating adverse cardiac remodeling, the mechanisms through which gender modulates myocardial remodeling remain to be identified. PMID:27364397

  14. Cardiac, Skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I;

    2014-01-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial function. Therefore, this study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in the smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscle. Cardiac......, skeletal, and smooth muscle was harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53±6 yrs) and mitochondrial respiration assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I+II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac, skeletal, to smooth muscle (54±1; 39±4; 15......±1 pmol•s(-1)•mg (-1), pmitochondrial density, also fell progressively from cardiac, skeletal, to smooth muscle (222±13; 115±2; 48±2 umol•g(-1)•min(-1), p

  15. A neonatal blueprint for cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo R. Porrello

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult mammals undergo minimal regeneration following cardiac injury, which severely compromises cardiac function and contributes to the ongoing burden of heart failure. In contrast, the mammalian heart retains a transient capacity for cardiac regeneration during fetal and early neonatal life. Recent studies have established the importance of several evolutionarily conserved mechanisms for heart regeneration in lower vertebrates and neonatal mammals including induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation, epicardial cell activation, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix deposition and immune cell infiltration. In this review, we provide an up-to-date account of the molecular and cellular basis for cardiac regeneration in lower vertebrates and neonatal mammals. The historical context for these recent findings and their ramifications for the future development of cardiac regenerative therapies are also discussed.

  16. 1093 Automatic delineation of endo- and epicardial contours in late-enhancement cardiac MR images

    OpenAIRE

    Hautvast Gilion; Mory Benoit; Fradkin Maxim; Ciofolo Cybele; Breeuwer Marcel

    2008-01-01

    The authors would like to acknowledge BioMed Central for allowing open access to this paper. Please download the publisher version by using http://jcmr-online.com/content/10/S1/A218 International audience We propose a novel method to automatically delineate the endo- and epicardial contours in late-enhancement short-axis cardiac MR images in order to provide an automatic, accurate quantitative viability assessment.

  17. Effects of Radiation Exposure From Cardiac Imaging: How Good Are the Data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about medical exposure to ionizing radiation have become heightened in recent years due to rapid growth in procedure volumes and the high radiation doses incurred from some procedures. This article summarizes the evidence base undergirding concerns about radiation exposure in cardiac imaging. After classifying radiation effects, explaining terminology used to quantify the radiation received by patients, and describing typical doses from cardiac imaging procedures, I address the major epidemiological studies having bearing on radiation effects at doses comparable to those received by patients undergoing cardiac imaging. These include studies of atomic bomb survivors, nuclear industry workers, and children exposed in utero to x-rays, all of which have evidenced increased cancer risks at low doses. Additional higher dose epidemiological studies of cohorts exposed to radiation in the context of medical treatment are described and found to be generally compatible with these cardiac-dose-level studies, albeit with exceptions. Using risk projection models developed by the US National Academies that incorporate these data and reflect several evidence-based assumptions, cancer risk from cardiac imaging can be estimated and compared to benefits from imaging. Several ongoing epidemiological studies will provide better understanding of radiation-associated cancer risks. PMID:22300689

  18. Creation, Identity and Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Beatrice Cheşcă

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper “Creation, Identity and Reflection” approaches the identification in the “mirror” of reality with creation, in other words seeking the authors’ identity in the reflected images. Reflection means attempting to find oneself, the mirror being the main principle of creation. Many characters become interesting only when they step into the world beyond the mirror, when their faces are doubled by the other self or when their selves are returned by other characters. The narcissistic concept of the mirror, i.e. the reflection in the mirror and the representation of the mirror itself, is a recurrent one in literature, but the reflection of the self which is not the self (as it is a reflection does not necessarily appear in a mirror or in a photograph or portrait. Sometimes, the not-self is returned to the self by another person or character. As far as Oscar Wilde’s theories are concerned, the main idea is that people are interesting for their masks, not for their inner nature. What Wilde calls “inner nature” is the characters’ un-reflected self and the mask is the reflection, the self in the mirror. Some characters’ relationships develop within a fiction that they dramatically try to preserve and protect with the risk of suffering. They refuse to take off the masks which define them in the others’ minds and hearts; the narcissistic individuals (both artists and characters seek and love their own image which they project upon facts, thus creating a fictive realm.

  19. Robust and accurate transient light transport decomposition via convolutional sparse coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuemei; Deng, Yue; Lin, Xing; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai; Barsi, Christopher; Raskar, Ramesh

    2014-06-01

    Ultrafast sources and detectors have been used to record the time-resolved scattering of light propagating through macroscopic scenes. In the context of computational imaging, decomposition of this transient light transport (TLT) is useful for applications, such as characterizing materials, imaging through diffuser layers, and relighting scenes dynamically. Here, we demonstrate a method of convolutional sparse coding to decompose TLT into direct reflections, inter-reflections, and subsurface scattering. The method relies on the sparsity composition of the time-resolved kernel. We show that it is robust and accurate to noise during the acquisition process.

  20. Accurate free energy calculation along optimized paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changjun; Xiao, Yi

    2010-05-01

    The path-based methods of free energy calculation, such as thermodynamic integration and free energy perturbation, are simple in theory, but difficult in practice because in most cases smooth paths do not exist, especially for large molecules. In this article, we present a novel method to build the transition path of a peptide. We use harmonic potentials to restrain its nonhydrogen atom dihedrals in the initial state and set the equilibrium angles of the potentials as those in the final state. Through a series of steps of geometrical optimization, we can construct a smooth and short path from the initial state to the final state. This path can be used to calculate free energy difference. To validate this method, we apply it to a small 10-ALA peptide and find that the calculated free energy changes in helix-helix and helix-hairpin transitions are both self-convergent and cross-convergent. We also calculate the free energy differences between different stable states of beta-hairpin trpzip2, and the results show that this method is more efficient than the conventional molecular dynamics method in accurate free energy calculation.

  1. Accurate fission data for nuclear safety

    CERN Document Server

    Solders, A; Jokinen, A; Kolhinen, V S; Lantz, M; Mattera, A; Penttila, H; Pomp, S; Rakopoulos, V; Rinta-Antila, S

    2013-01-01

    The Accurate fission data for nuclear safety (AlFONS) project aims at high precision measurements of fission yields, using the renewed IGISOL mass separator facility in combination with a new high current light ion cyclotron at the University of Jyvaskyla. The 30 MeV proton beam will be used to create fast and thermal neutron spectra for the study of neutron induced fission yields. Thanks to a series of mass separating elements, culminating with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, it is possible to achieve a mass resolving power in the order of a few hundred thousands. In this paper we present the experimental setup and the design of a neutron converter target for IGISOL. The goal is to have a flexible design. For studies of exotic nuclei far from stability a high neutron flux (10^12 neutrons/s) at energies 1 - 30 MeV is desired while for reactor applications neutron spectra that resembles those of thermal and fast nuclear reactors are preferred. It is also desirable to be able to produce (semi-)monoenergetic neutrons...

  2. Fast and Provably Accurate Bilateral Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Kunal N; Dabhade, Swapnil D

    2016-06-01

    The bilateral filter is a non-linear filter that uses a range filter along with a spatial filter to perform edge-preserving smoothing of images. A direct computation of the bilateral filter requires O(S) operations per pixel, where S is the size of the support of the spatial filter. In this paper, we present a fast and provably accurate algorithm for approximating the bilateral filter when the range kernel is Gaussian. In particular, for box and Gaussian spatial filters, the proposed algorithm can cut down the complexity to O(1) per pixel for any arbitrary S . The algorithm has a simple implementation involving N+1 spatial filterings, where N is the approximation order. We give a detailed analysis of the filtering accuracy that can be achieved by the proposed approximation in relation to the target bilateral filter. This allows us to estimate the order N required to obtain a given accuracy. We also present comprehensive numerical results to demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is competitive with the state-of-the-art methods in terms of speed and accuracy. PMID:27093722

  3. INFLUENCE OF MIMIC CARDIAC RATE ON HYDRODYNAMICS OF DIFFERENT MECHANICAL PROSTHETIC CARDIAC VALVES IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-ping Chu; Jin-lian Cheng; Ru-kun Chen; Yu-bo Fan; Fang Pu

    2005-01-01

    Objective To assess the influence of mimic cardiac rate on hydrodynamics of different mechanical prosthetic cardiac valves.Methods US-made CarboMedics bileaflet valve, China-made Jiuling bileaflet valve and C-L tilting disc valve were tested via a pulsatile flow simulator in the aortic position. Testing conditions were set at mimic cardiac rates of 55 bpm, 75 bpm, 100bpm with a constant mimic cardiac output of 4 L/min. The mean pressure differences (△P), leakage volumes (LEV) and closing volumes (CLV) across each valve, and effective orifice areas (EOA) were analyzed.Results Within physiological range, △p, LEV, and CLV decreased as mimic cardiac rate increased, with a large extent of variance. EOA increased along with an increase in mimic cardiac rate. It was a different response in terms of cardiac rate alteration for different types of mechanical prosthetic cardiac valves.Conclusion Mimic cardiac rate change affects hydrodynamics of mechanical prosthetic cardiac valves. Within physiological range, the hydrodynamic of prosthetic bileaflet valve is better than that of tilting disc valve.

  4. Tissue-Doppler assessment of cardiac left ventricular function during short-term adjuvant epirubicin therapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel, Jon M; Sogaard, Peter; Mortensen, Christiane E;

    2011-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the extent of acute anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity reflects the risk for late development of heart failure. The aim of this study was to examine if short-term changes in cardiac function can be detected even after low-dose adjuvant epirubicin therapy for breast...... cancer when using Doppler tissue imaging of longitudinal left ventricular function....

  5. Facilitating management learning: Developing critical reflection through reflective tools

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, David E

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore how the practice of critical reflection within a management learning process can be facilitated through the application of reflective processes and tools. A distinction is drawn between reflection as a form of individual development (of, say, the reflective practitioner), and critical reflection as a route to collective action and a component of organizational learning and change. Critical reflection, however, is not a process that comes naturally to many...

  6. Hypokalemia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately three million people suffer sudden cardiac death annually. These deaths often emerge from a complex interplay of substrates and triggers. Disturbed potassium homeostasis among heart cells is an example of such a trigger. Thus, hypokalemia and, also, more transient...... was found in 24% of hospitalized patients. Hypokalemia is associated with increased risk of arrhythmia in patients with cardiovascular disease, as well as increased all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and heart failure mortality by up to 10-fold. Long-term potassium homeostasis depends on renal...... capacity for potassium exchange. In cardiovascular patients, hypokalemia is often caused by nonpotassium-sparing diuretics, insufficient potassium intake and a shift of potassium into stores by increased potassium uptake stimulated by catecholamines, beta-adrenoceptor agonists and insulin. Interestingly...

  7. Cardiac Rehabilitation: Improving Function and Reducing Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servey, Jessica T; Stephens, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation is a comprehensive multidisciplinary program individually tailored to the needs of patients with cardiovascular disease. The overall goals focus on improving daily function and reducing cardiovascular risk factors. Cardiac rehabilitation includes interventions aimed at lowering blood pressure and improving lipid and diabetes mellitus control, with tobacco cessation, behavioral counseling, and graded physical activity. The physical activity component typically involves 36 sessions over 12 weeks, during which patients participate in supervised exercise under cardiac monitoring. There are also intensive programs that include up to 72 sessions lasting up to 18 weeks, although these programs are not widely available. Additional components of cardiac rehabilitation include counseling on nutrition, screening for and managing depression, and assuring up-to-date immunizations. Cardiac rehabilitation is covered by Medicare and recommended for patients following myocardial infarction, bypass surgery, and stent placement, and for patients with heart failure, stable angina, and several other conditions. Despite proven benefits in mortality rates, depression, functional capacity, and medication adherence, rates of referral for cardiac rehabilitation are suboptimal. Groups less likely to be referred are older adults, women, patients who do not speak English, and persons living in areas where cardiac rehabilitation is not locally available. Additionally, primary care physicians refer patients less often than cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons. PMID:27386722

  8. MRS: a noninvasive window into cardiac metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ewijk, Petronella A; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B; Bekkers, Sebastiaan C A M; Glatz, Jan F C; Wildberger, Joachim E; Kooi, M Eline

    2015-07-01

    A well-functioning heart requires a constant supply of a balanced mixture of nutrients to be used for the production of adequate amounts of adenosine triphosphate, which is the main energy source for most cellular functions. Defects in cardiac energy metabolism are linked to several myocardial disorders. MRS can be used to study in vivo changes in cardiac metabolism noninvasively. MR techniques allow repeated measurements, so that disease progression and the response to treatment or to a lifestyle intervention can be monitored. It has also been shown that MRS can predict clinical heart failure and death. This article focuses on in vivo MRS to assess cardiac metabolism in humans and experimental animals, as experimental animals are often used to investigate the mechanisms underlying the development of metabolic diseases. Various MR techniques, such as cardiac (31) P-MRS, (1) H-MRS, hyperpolarized (13) C-MRS and Dixon MRI, are described. A short overview of current and emerging applications is given. Cardiac MRS is a promising technique for the investigation of the relationship between cardiac metabolism and cardiac disease. However, further optimization of scan time and signal-to-noise ratio is required before broad clinical application. In this respect, the ongoing development of advanced shimming algorithms, radiofrequency pulses, pulse sequences, (multichannel) detection coils, the use of hyperpolarized nuclei and scanning at higher magnetic field strengths offer future perspective for clinical applications of MRS. PMID:26010681

  9. Progress in use of brain natriuretic peptide in congenital heart disease and perioperative pediatric cardiac operation%脑钠肽在小儿先天性心脏病及围手术期的应用进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖书娜

    2013-01-01

    脑钠肽是一种神经内分泌激素,它与先天性心脏病患儿心功能不全和肺动脉高压程度呈正相关,已成为评估先天性心脏病患儿心功能不全程度、反映先天性心脏病患儿术前术后心功能状态的简便、准确的生物化学指标.它对先天性心脏病心脏手术预后有预测作用,对围手术期治疗有指导意义,能减少术后并发症和病死率,成为迅速、即时床边检查的辅助手段.该文就其与先天性心脏病的相关性和在先天性心脏病围手术期应用进展作一概述.%Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a neuroendocrine hormone,which has a positive correlation with degree of cardiac dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension of children with congenital heart disease (CHD).BNP has been shown to be a simple,accurate and useful biochemical indicator in assessing cardiac dysfunction degree and reflecting perioperative cardiac function state of children with CHD.It has prognostic value in congenital heart surgery and can guide the perioperative treatment and reduce the postoperative complications and mortality.It is a quick,instant bedside inspection supplementary means.This article describes the relevance between BNP and CHD and the application progress of BNP in pefioperative of CHD.

  10. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Cheryl Ann

    Often students and educators view assessments as an obligation and finality for a unit. In the current climate of high-stakes testing and accountability, the balance of time, resources and emphasis on students' scores related to assessment have been slanted considerably toward the summative side. This tension between assessment for accountability and assessment to inform teaching strains instruction and educators' ability to use that information to design learning opportunities that help students develop deeper conceptual understanding. A substantive body of research indicates that formative and reflective assessment can significantly improve student learning. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum (BRAC) examines support provided for high school science students through assessment practices. This investigation incorporates the usage of reflective assessments as a guiding practice for differentiated instruction and student choice. Reflective assessment is a metacognitive strategy that promotes self-monitoring and evaluation. The goals of the curriculum are to promote self-efficacy and conceptual understanding in students learning biology through developing their metacognitive awareness. BRAC was implemented in a high school biology classroom. Data from assessments, metacognitive surveys, self-efficacy surveys, reflective journals, student work, a culminating task and field notes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum. The results suggest that students who develop their metacognitive skills developed a deeper conceptual understanding and improved feelings of self-efficacy when they were engaged in a reflective assessment unit embedded with student choice. BRAC is a tool for teachers to use assessments to assist students in becoming metacognitive and to guide student choice in learning opportunities.

  11. Reflecting telescope optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Raymond N

    2004-01-01

    R.N. Wilson's two-volume treatise on reflecting telescope optics has become a classic in its own right. It is intended to give a complete treatment of the subject, addressing professionals in research and industry as well as students of astronomy and amateur astronomers. This first volume, Basic Design Theory and its Historical Development, is devoted to the theory of reflecting telescope optics and systematically recounts the historical progress. The author's approach is morphological, with strong emphasis on the historical development. The book is richly illustrated including spot-diagrams a

  12. The Learning Curve for a Fetal Cardiac Intervention Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P. Emery

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Multiple technical difficulties are encountered when a multidisciplinary team of subspecialists begins a minimally-invasive fetal cardiac interventional program. We describe the learning curve. Study Design. Ten pregnant sheep underwent ultrasound-guided balloon valvuloplasty of the aortic valve. Team members and their roles remained constant through the trial. The time between needle insertion and entrance of the left ventricle at the aortic root was recorded. F-test was used to assess significance (P≤.05. Results. The time required to accurately position the needle tip at the aortic root decreased significantly over the course of the trial, from 12 minutes with the first attempt to one minute with the last (P=.003. Conclusion. A significant learning curve is encountered when a multidisciplinary team begins a minimally-invasive fetal cardiac intervention program. However, technical proficiency can be achieved with practice. Institutions interested in developing such a program should consider practice in an animal model before proceeding to the human fetus.

  13. The floating cardiac fat pad-sign of occult pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Claire; Bokhari, S A Jamal

    2016-08-01

    Pneumothoraces are a possible sequela of chest trauma with potential morbidity and mortality if not recognized and treated promptly. A portable supine chest radiograph is frequently the first radiologic study performed in the setting of trauma. While large pneumothoraces can be readily recognized on these radiographs, smaller pneumothoraces are missed in up to 15 % of trauma patients. There are many radiographic signs of occult pneumothoraces, and we are presenting a new radiographic sign of occult pneumothorax. The floating cardiac fat pad sign occurs when pleural air collects anteriorly and superiorly in the most non-dependent portion of the chest lifting the pericardial fat pad off the diaphragm. Lung markings are still seen surrounding the pericardial fat pad due to the inflated lower lobe of the lung resting dependently. Rapid and accurate identification of pneumothoraces is critical but often difficult on chest radiographs. Although there are many existing radiographic signs for identification of pneumothorax, prospective identification of small pneumothoraces is still relatively poor. Here, we describe an additional sign which aides in the detection of pneumothoraces, the floating cardiac fat pad. When present, this should prompt further evaluation with chest CT or upright chest radiograph. PMID:27250975

  14. Multimodal Registration of gated cardiac PET, CT and MR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research described in this manuscript deals with the multimodal registration of cardiac images from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Position Emission Tomography (PET) and Computerized Tomography (CT). All these modalities are gated to the Electrocardiogram (ECG) and provide information to evaluate cardiac function, and to diagnose and to follow-up cardiovascular pathologies. PET imaging allows the evaluation of ventricular function and MRI is a gold standard for the study of the left ventricular function. The goal of our registration process is to merge functional (from PET) and anatomical images (from CT and MRI). Our process is adapted to the modalities used and is divided in two steps: (i) a global rigid 3-dimensional model-based ICP (Iterative Closest Point) registration between CT and MR data and (ii) an iconic 2-dimensional registration based on Free Form Deformations and Mutual Information. This last step presents an original contribution by using a composite image of CT (which presents epicardic contours) and PET (where endocardic contours are partially visible) data to make mutual information more accurate in representing the similarity with the MR data. To speed up the whole process, we also present a transformation initialization scheme using displacement field obtained form MR data only. The obtained results have been evaluated by experts. (author)

  15. Accurate paleointensities - the multi-method approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of models describing rapid changes in the geomagnetic field over the past millennia critically depends on the availability of reliable paleointensity estimates. Over the past decade methods to derive paleointensities from lavas (the only recorder of the geomagnetic field that is available all over the globe and through geologic times) have seen significant improvements and various alternative techniques were proposed. The 'classical' Thellier-style approach was optimized and selection criteria were defined in the 'Standard Paleointensity Definitions' (Paterson et al, 2014). The Multispecimen approach was validated and the importance of additional tests and criteria to assess Multispecimen results must be emphasized. Recently, a non-heating, relative paleointensity technique was proposed -the pseudo-Thellier protocol- which shows great potential in both accuracy and efficiency, but currently lacks a solid theoretical underpinning. Here I present work using all three of the aforementioned paleointensity methods on suites of young lavas taken from the volcanic islands of Hawaii, La Palma, Gran Canaria, Tenerife, and Terceira. Many of the sampled cooling units are <100 years old, the actual field strength at the time of cooling is therefore reasonably well known. Rather intuitively, flows that produce coherent results from two or more different paleointensity methods yield the most accurate estimates of the paleofield. Furthermore, the results for some flows pass the selection criteria for one method, but fail in other techniques. Scrutinizing and combing all acceptable results yielded reliable paleointensity estimates for 60-70% of all sampled cooling units - an exceptionally high success rate. This 'multi-method paleointensity approach' therefore has high potential to provide the much-needed paleointensities to improve geomagnetic field models for the Holocene.

  16. Towards Accurate Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, Simon David [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been engaged in hardware and software codesign activities for a number of years, indeed, it might be argued that prototyping of clusters as far back as the CPLANT machines and many large capability resources including ASCI Red and RedStorm were examples of codesigned solutions. As the research supporting our codesign activities has moved closer to investigating on-node runtime behavior a nature hunger has grown for detailed analysis of both hardware and algorithm performance from the perspective of low-level operations. The Application Characterization for Exascale (APEX) LDRD was a project concieved of addressing some of these concerns. Primarily the research was to intended to focus on generating accurate and reproducible low-level performance metrics using tools that could scale to production-class code bases. Along side this research was an advocacy and analysis role associated with evaluating tools for production use, working with leading industry vendors to develop and refine solutions required by our code teams and to directly engage with production code developers to form a context for the application analysis and a bridge to the research community within Sandia. On each of these accounts significant progress has been made, particularly, as this report will cover, in the low-level analysis of operations for important classes of algorithms. This report summarizes the development of a collection of tools under the APEX research program and leaves to other SAND and L2 milestone reports the description of codesign progress with Sandia’s production users/developers.

  17. Accurate hydrocarbon estimates attained with radioactive isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To make accurate economic evaluations of new discoveries, an oil company needs to know how much gas and oil a reservoir contains. The porous rocks of these reservoirs are not completely filled with gas or oil, but contain a mixture of gas, oil and water. It is extremely important to know what volume percentage of this water--called connate water--is contained in the reservoir rock. The percentage of connate water can be calculated from electrical resistivity measurements made downhole. The accuracy of this method can be improved if a pure sample of connate water can be analyzed or if the chemistry of the water can be determined by conventional logging methods. Because of the similarity of the mud filtrate--the water in a water-based drilling fluid--and the connate water, this is not always possible. If the oil company cannot distinguish between connate water and mud filtrate, its oil-in-place calculations could be incorrect by ten percent or more. It is clear that unless an oil company can be sure that a sample of connate water is pure, or at the very least knows exactly how much mud filtrate it contains, its assessment of the reservoir's water content--and consequently its oil or gas content--will be distorted. The oil companies have opted for the Repeat Formation Tester (RFT) method. Label the drilling fluid with small doses of tritium--a radioactive isotope of hydrogen--and it will be easy to detect and quantify in the sample

  18. Long Wave Reflection and Transmission over A Sloping Step

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsien-Kuo CHANG; Jin-Cheng LIOU

    2004-01-01

    This investigation examines long wave reflection and transmission induced by a sloping step. Bellman and Kalaba's(1959) invariant imbedding is introduced to find wave reflection. An alternative method matching both the surface elevation and its surface slope of each region at the junction is applied to the determination of wave reflection and transmission.The proposed methods are compared with the accurate numerical results of Porter and Porter (2000) and those of Mei(1983) for a vertical step. The wave reflection obtained for a mildly sloping step differs significantly from the result of Mei. The wave reflection is found to fluctuate owing to wave trapping for the mild sloping step. The height and the face slope of the step are important for determining wave reflection and transmission coefficients.

  19. A time-accurate high-resolution TVD scheme for solving the Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun D.; Liu, Nan-Suey

    1993-01-01

    A total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme has been developed and incorporated into an existing time-accurate high-resolution Navier-Stokes code. The accuracy and the robustness of the resulting solution procedure have been assessed by performing many calculations in four different areas: shock tube flows, regular shock reflection, supersonic boundary layer, and shock boundary layer interactions. These numerical results compare well with corresponding exact solutions or experimental data.

  20. Efficient construction of robust artificial neural networks for accurate determination of superficial sample optical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2015-01-01

    In general, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) systems work with photon diffusion models to determine the absorption coefficient μa and reduced scattering coefficient μs' of turbid samples. However, in some DRS measurement scenarios, such as using short source-detector separations to investigate superficial tissues with comparable μa and μs', photon diffusion models might be invalid or might not have analytical solutions. In this study, a systematic workflow of constructing a rapid, accur...

  1. Sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation attributed to anabolic steroid use in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenfeld, Jana; Deal, Barbara J; Crawford, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone that promote the growth of skeletal muscles and have many recognised cardiovascular effects. We report the clinical presentation and pathological findings of an adolescent male whose sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation was attributed to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The age of our patient reflects the usage of anabolic androgenic steroids among younger athletes and highlights the need for increased awareness among practitioners.

  2. Sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation attributed to anabolic steroid use in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenfeld, Jana; Deal, Barbara J; Crawford, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone that promote the growth of skeletal muscles and have many recognised cardiovascular effects. We report the clinical presentation and pathological findings of an adolescent male whose sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation was attributed to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The age of our patient reflects the usage of anabolic androgenic steroids among younger athletes and highlights the need for increased awareness among practitioners. PMID:26980272

  3. Integral representation of Skorokhod reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Anantharam, Venkat; Konstantopoulos, Takis

    2010-01-01

    We show that a certain integral representation of the one-sided Skorokhod reflection of a continuous bounded variation function characterizes the reflection in that it possesses a unique maximal solution which solves the Skorokhod reflection problem.

  4. New method for describing the performance of cardiac surgery cannulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delius, R E; Montoya, J P; Merz, S I; McKenzie, J; Snedecor, S; Bove, E L; Bartlett, R H

    1992-02-01

    Cardiac surgery cannulas are characterized by external diameter only, which provides little information about the pressure-flow characteristics of a cannula. A system has been developed to describe pressure-flow characteristics with a single, unitless number, M, which is patterned after a Reynolds friction factor correlation. A cannula with a lower M number has a more favorable pressure-flow relationship. The M number was determined for 16 arterials cannulas ranging in size from 10F to 26F and 27 venous cannulas sized 12F to 36F. Pressure-flow characteristics vary considerably among cannulas from different manufacturers despite having similar French sizes. Clinical decisions regarding choice of cannula can be simplified by using the M number, which gives a more accurate description of the performance characteristics of a cannula than the French size designation.

  5. KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION FROM DONORS AFTER CARDIAC DEATH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.L. Rozental

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From 668 kidney transplantations performed during the period 2000–2005 68 grafts were recovered from donors after cardiac death and 176 from donors with confirmed brain death. Early results (number of primarily non-functioning grafts, rates of delayed graft function and acute rejections were similar in both groups. 5-year patient survival was 85% from donors after cardiac death and 88% from donors with confirmed brain death. 5-year graft survival was 77% and 85%, respectively. Results showed that the use of kidney grafts recovered from donors after cardiac death is valuable additional source of donor organs. 

  6. A rare case of primary cardiac lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Kheil, Ayisha Mehtab; Mustafa, Hanif Muhammad; Anand, Dhakshinamurthy Vijay; Banerjee, Prithwish

    2015-01-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with shortness of breath and tachycardia along with systemic symptoms of weight loss and lethargy. A pulmonary embolus was the initial suspected diagnosis but through extensive investigations a rarer cause of his symptoms was identified. This case demonstrates the importance of cardiac imaging in the assessment and non-invasive tissue characterisation of a suspected cardiac tumour; in our case, this was subsequently confirmed by careful histological/immunocytochemical evaluation of the pericardial effusion as a primary cardiac B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, thus enabling appropriate management leading to an excellent clinical outcome. PMID:26538249

  7. Cardiac and Respiratory Disease in Aged Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Celia M

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory and cardiac diseases are common in older horses. Advancing age is a specific risk factor for cardiac murmurs and these are more likely in males and small horses. Airway inflammation is the most common respiratory diagnosis. Recurrent airway obstruction can lead to irreversible structural change and bronchiectasis; with chronic hypoxia, right heart dysfunction and failure can develop. Valvular heart disease most often affects the aortic and/or the mitral valve. Management of comorbidity is an essential element of the therapeutic approach to cardiac and respiratory disease in older equids.

  8. Cardiac Amyloidosis Presenting With Cardiogenic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Ashwad; Brener, Sorin J; Narula, Navneet; Worku, Berhane; Gulkarov, Iosif

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis is an infiltrative disorder of the myocardium. It is the result of one of 4 types of amyloidosis: primary systemic (immunoglobulin light chain), secondary, familial (hereditary), or senile. Cardiac amyloidosis ultimately causes congestive heart failure due to irreversible restrictive cardiomyopathy. Because of the rapid progression of the disease, early recognition and determination of underlying etiology are important for tailored therapy. Current interventions range from conservative heart failure management to autologous stem cell and heart transplantation. We present a case of cardiac amyloidosis accompanying undiagnosed multiple myeloma to illustrate the rapid progression of the disease and the complexities of diagnosing and treating this disorder. PMID:26177555

  9. Runtime software architecture based on reflective middleware

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Gang; MEI Hong; YANG Fuqing

    2004-01-01

    There exists a consensus that software architecture (SA) plays a central role in software development and also plays an important role in the lifecycle phases after software delivery. Particularly, SA can be used to reduce the great difficulty and cost of software maintenance and evolution. In this paper, runtime software architecture (RSA) based on reflective middleware is proposed to support architecture-based software maintenance and evolution. In this approach, the actual states and behaviors of the runtime system can be observed and manipulated in a consistent and understandable way through its architectural view. Being an accurate, up-to-date, semantic and operable view of SA, RSA looks components and connectors as "white-box" entities to accurately and thoroughly describe the runtime system, extends traditional architecture description languages to formally describe itself and naturally inherit plentiful semantics in traditional views of SA, and utilizes reflective middleware to observe and manipulate the runtime system. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, a reflective J2EE application server, called PKUAS, is implemented to observe and manipulate the components, connectors and constraints in the runtime system. Finally, the performance evaluation proves that making RSA explicit and operable at runtime has little effect on the runtime system.

  10. [Definition of accurate planning target volume margins for esophageal cancer radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesueur, P; Servagi-Vernat, S

    2016-10-01

    More than 4000 cases of esophagus neoplasms are diagnosed every year in France. Radiotherapy, which can be delivered in preoperative or exclusive with a concomitant chemotherapy, plays a central role in treatment of esophagus cancer. Even if efficacy of radiotherapy no longer has to be proved, the prognosis of esophagus cancer remains unfortunately poor with a high recurrence rate. Toxicity of esophageal radiotherapy is correlated with the irradiation volume, and limits dose escalation and local control. Esophagus is a deep thoracic organ, which undergoes cardiac and respiratory motion, making the radiotherapy delivery more difficult and increasing the planning target volume margins. Definition of accurate planning target volume margins, taking into account the esophagus' intrafraction motion and set up margins is very important to be sure to cover the clinical target volume and restrains acute and late radiotoxicity. In this article, based on a review of the literature, we propose planning target volume margins adapted to esophageal radiotherapy.

  11. SWIR calibration of Spectralon reflectance factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Butler, James J.; Cooksey, Catherine; Ding, Leibo; Thome, Kurtis J.

    2011-11-01

    Satellite instruments operating in the reflective solar wavelength region require accurate and precise determination of the Bidirectional Reflectance Factor (BRF) of laboratory-based diffusers used in their pre-flight and on-orbit radiometric calibrations. BRF measurements are required throughout the reflected-solar spectrum from the ultraviolet through the shortwave infrared. Spectralon diffusers are commonly used as a reflectance standard for bidirectional and hemispherical geometries. The Diffuser Calibration Laboratory (DCaL) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is a secondary calibration facility with reflectance measurements traceable to those made by the Spectral Tri-function Automated Reference Reflectometer (STARR) facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). For more than two decades, the DCaL has provided numerous NASA projects with BRF data in the ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS) and the Near InfraRed (NIR) spectral regions. Presented in this paper are measurements of BRF from 1475 nm to 1625 nm obtained using an indium gallium arsenide detector and a tunable coherent light source. The sample was a 50.8 mm (2 in) diameter, 99% white Spectralon target. The BRF results are discussed and compared to empirically generated data from a model based on NIST certified values of 6°directional-hemispherical spectral reflectance factors from 900 nm to 2500 nm. Employing a new NIST capability for measuring bidirectional reflectance using a cooled, extended InGaAs detector, BRF calibration measurements of the same sample were also made using NIST's STARR from 1475 nm to 1625 nm at an incident angle of 0° and at viewing angle of 45°. The total combined uncertainty for BRF in this ShortWave Infrared (SWIR) range is less than 1%. This measurement capability will evolve into a BRF calibration service in SWIR region in support of NASA remote sensing missions.

  12. Cardiac carcinoid: tricuspid delayed hyperenhancement on cardiac 64-slice multidetector CT and magnetic resonance imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martos, R

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare condition in adults. Its diagnosis can be easily missed in a patient presenting to a primary care setting. We revised the advantages of using coronary multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing this condition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied a 65-year-old patient with carcinoid heart disease and right heart failure using transthoracic Doppler-echocardiogram, cardiac MDCT and MRI. Cardiac echocardiogram revealed marked thickening and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with dilated right atrium and ventricle. Cardiac MDCT and MRI demonstrated fixation and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with delayed contrast hyperenhancement of the tricuspid annulus. CONCLUSION: This case demonstrates fascinating imaging findings of cardiac carcinoid disease and highlights the increasing utility of contrast-enhanced MRI and cardiac MDCT in the diagnosis of this interesting condition.

  13. Reflection in learning at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steen Høyrup

    2006-01-01

    Three domains and approaches of learning - adult learning, problem-solving and cirtical reflection theory are used as different lenses through which the question: what is reflection and how is reflection related to learning, - are interpreted.......Three domains and approaches of learning - adult learning, problem-solving and cirtical reflection theory are used as different lenses through which the question: what is reflection and how is reflection related to learning, - are interpreted....

  14. Reflecting on Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Rudolf V.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a two-day optics laboratory activity that investigates the scientific phenomenon of reflection, which students are generally familiar with but usually have not studied in depth. This investigation can be used on its own or as part of a larger unit on optics. This lesson encourages students to think critically and…

  15. Lights, Camera, Reflection!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourlam, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    There are many ways to critique teaching, but few are more effective than video. Personal reflection through the use of video allows one to see what really happens in the classrooms--good and bad--and provides a visual path forward for improvement, whether it be in one's teaching, work with a particular student, or learning environment. This…

  16. The Reflective Methodologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Bjørg

    2013-01-01

    in which the practical sense and tacit knowledge are related to questions of power and social actors’ strategies for positioning themselves within a social space. This demands a particular focus on the historical effect of the concept of ‘the reflective practitioner’ as a symbolic marker of identity...

  17. Changes Brought by Reflection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Feng: A number of changes have taken place in Europe after reflection, such as specific anti-terrorist measures, progress in the construction of integration, changes in the structure of political forces and adjustments in the EU foreign policy. Would you make some comments first, Dr. Sun?

  18. Reflection by Porro Prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2010-04-01

    Students all know that reflection from a plane mirror produces an image that is reversed right to left and so cannot be read by anyone but Leonardo da Vinci, who kept his notes in mirror writing. A useful counter-example is the Porro prism, which produces an image that is not reversed.

  19. Wave Reflection Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Larsen, Brian Juul

    The investigation concerns the design of a new internal breakwater in the main port of Ibiza. The objective of the model tests was in the first hand to optimize the cross section to make the wave reflection low enough to ensure that unacceptable wave agitation will not occur in the port. Secondly...

  20. Preventing tomorrow's sudden cardiac death today: part I: Current data on risk stratification for sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khatib, Sana M; Sanders, Gillian D; Bigger, J Thomas; Buxton, Alfred E; Califf, Robert M; Carlson, Mark; Curtis, Anne; Curtis, Jeptha; Fain, Eric; Gersh, Bernard J; Gold, Michael R; Haghighi-Mood, Ali; Hammill, Stephen C; Healey, Jeff; Hlatky, Mark; Hohnloser, Stefan; Kim, Raymond J; Lee, Kerry; Mark, Daniel; Mianulli, Marcus; Mitchell, Brent; Prystowsky, Eric N; Smith, Joseph; Steinhaus, David; Zareba, Wojciech

    2007-06-01

    Accurate and timely prediction of sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a necessary prerequisite for effective prevention and therapy. Although the largest number of SCD events occurs in patients without overt heart disease, there are currently no tests that are of proven predictive value in this population. Efforts in risk stratification for SCD have focused primarily on predicting SCD in patients with known structural heart disease. Despite the ubiquity of tests that have been purported to predict SCD vulnerability in such patients, there is little consensus on which test, in addition to the left ventricular ejection fraction, should be used to determine which patients will benefit from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. On July 20 and 21, 2006, a group of experts representing clinical cardiology, cardiac electrophysiology, biostatistics, economics, and health policy were joined by representatives of the US Food and Drug administration, Centers for Medicare Services, Agency for Health Research and Quality, the Heart Rhythm Society, and the device and pharmaceutical industry for a round table meeting to review current data on strategies of risk stratification for SCD, to explore methods to translate these strategies into practice and policy, and to identify areas that need to be addressed by future research studies. The meeting was organized by the Duke Center for the Prevention of SCD at the Duke Clinical Research Institute and was funded by industry participants. This article summarizes the presentations and discussions that occurred at that meeting.

  1. IS CONSANGUINEOUS MARRIAGE RESPONSIBLE FOR CONGENITAL CARDIAC AND EXTRA-CARDIAC ANOMALIES?

    OpenAIRE

    Nutan Nalini; Sudha

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This article is about the stillbirth in which we found significant numbers of cardiac as well as extracardiac defects, in combination or separately. In this article, we would like to emphasize the anomalies found in consanguineous marriages. AIM To correlate the prevalence of cardiac as well as extracardiac anomalies in consanguineous marriages. Especially, here we would like to focus on the cardiac lesions. MATERIAL AND METHOD The study was ca...

  2. Research on the cardiac MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of unstable angina%核磁共振在不稳定型心绞痛诊治中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鹏; 亓燕

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the cardiac magnetic resonance technique in the diagnosis and treatment of unstable angina application value. Methods:The hospital diagnosed patients with unstable angina as research subjects, were given coronary angiography in patients (CAG) examination, ECG, echocardiography and cardiac MRI examination, recording the results and statistical analysis. Results:Cardiac MRI for>90%stenos is detected heart rate, and coronary angiography (CAG) showed no significant difference (x2=3.257, P>0.05), for0.05);cardiac MRI for cardiac function and cardiac structure determination is better than conventional echocardiography. Conclusion: Cardiac MRI technology to more accurately reflect changes in cardiac structure and function of the stenos is and effort ischemia detection rate with conventional inspection methods have better consistency.%目的:探讨核磁共振技术在不稳定心绞痛诊治中的应用价值。方法:选取经莱芜市人民医院确诊的不稳定心绞痛患者40例,分别给予冠状动脉造影(CAG)、心电图、超声心电图及心脏核磁共振检查,并对结果进行统计学分析。结果:核磁共振在心脏狭窄>90%的检出率高,与CAG间差异无统计学意义(x2=3.257,P>0.05),对<90%的狭窄检出率低,与CAG检查结果间差异有统计学意义(x2=17.267,x2=25.714;P<0.05);核磁共振对心脏狭窄程度高的患者的心肌缺血检出率高,与心电图检出率差异明显,有统计学意义(x2=4.65,P<0.05),但总检出率间差异不明显,无统计学意义(x2=0.251,P>0.05);核磁共振对于心功能及心脏结构的测定效果优于传统的超声心动图。结论:核磁共振技术能更准确的反应心脏结构和功能改变,对狭窄和心机缺血的检出率与传统检查方法有较好一致性。

  3. Subcutaneous Tissue Thickness is an Independent Predictor of Image Noise in Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staniak, Henrique Lane; Sharovsky, Rodolfo [Hospital Universitário - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pereira, Alexandre Costa [Hospital das Clínicas - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Castro, Cláudio Campi de; Benseñor, Isabela M.; Lotufo, Paulo A. [Hospital Universitário - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Medicina - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer, E-mail: msbittencourt@mail.harvard.edu [Hospital Universitário - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    Few data on the definition of simple robust parameters to predict image noise in cardiac computed tomography (CT) exist. To evaluate the value of a simple measure of subcutaneous tissue as a predictor of image noise in cardiac CT. 86 patients underwent prospective ECG-gated coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and coronary calcium scoring (CAC) with 120 kV and 150 mA. The image quality was objectively measured by the image noise in the aorta in the cardiac CTA, and low noise was defined as noise < 30HU. The chest anteroposterior diameter and lateral width, the image noise in the aorta and the skin-sternum (SS) thickness were measured as predictors of cardiac CTA noise. The association of the predictors and image noise was performed by using Pearson correlation. The mean radiation dose was 3.5 ± 1.5 mSv. The mean image noise in CT was 36.3 ± 8.5 HU, and the mean image noise in non-contrast scan was 17.7 ± 4.4 HU. All predictors were independently associated with cardiac CTA noise. The best predictors were SS thickness, with a correlation of 0.70 (p < 0.001), and noise in the non-contrast images, with a correlation of 0.73 (p < 0.001). When evaluating the ability to predict low image noise, the areas under the ROC curve for the non-contrast noise and for the SS thickness were 0.837 and 0.864, respectively. Both SS thickness and CAC noise are simple accurate predictors of cardiac CTA image noise. Those parameters can be incorporated in standard CT protocols to adequately adjust radiation exposure.

  4. Clinical Use of Ultrasensitive Cardiac Troponin I Assay in Intermediate- and High-Risk Surgery Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Kessler Borges

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cardiac troponin levels have been reported to add value in the detection of cardiovascular complications in noncardiac surgery. A sensitive cardiac troponin I (cTnI assay could provide more accurate prognostic information. Methods. This study prospectively enrolled 142 patients with at least one Revised Cardiac Risk Index risk factor who underwent noncardiac surgery. cTnI levels were measured postoperatively. Short-term cardiac outcome predictors were evaluated. Results. cTnI elevation was observed in 47 patients, among whom 14 were diagnosed as having myocardial infarction (MI. After 30 days, 16 patients had major adverse cardiac events (MACE. Excluding patients with a final diagnosis of MI, predictors of cTnI elevation included dialysis, history of heart failure, transoperative major bleeding, and elevated levels of pre- and postoperative N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP. Maximal cTnI values showed the highest sensitivity (94%, specificity (75%, and overall accuracy (AUC 0.89; 95% CI 0.80–0.98 for postoperative MACE. Postoperative cTnI peak level (OR 9.4; 95% CI 2.3–39.2 and a preoperative NT-proBNP level ≥917 pg/mL (OR 3.47; 95% CI 1.05–11.6 were independent risk factors for MACE. Conclusions. cTnI was shown to be an independent prognostic factor for cardiac outcomes and should be considered as a component of perioperative risk assessment.

  5. A self-interaction-free local hybrid functional: Accurate binding energies vis-\\`a-vis accurate ionization potentials from Kohn-Sham eigenvalues

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Tobias; Makmal, Adi; Kronik, Leeor; Kümmel, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    We present and test a new approximation for the exchange-correlation (xc) energy of Kohn-Sham density functional theory. It combines exact exchange with a compatible non-local correlation functional. The functional is by construction free of one-electron self-interaction, respects constraints derived from uniform coordinate scaling, and has the correct asymptotic behavior of the xc energy density. It contains one parameter that is not determined ab initio. We investigate whether it is possible to construct a functional that yields accurate binding energies and affords other advantages, specifically Kohn-Sham eigenvalues that reliably reflect ionization potentials. Tests for a set of atoms and small molecules show that within our local-hybrid form accurate binding energies can be achieved by proper optimization of the free parameter in our functional, along with an improvement in dissociation energy curves and in Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. However, the correspondence of the latter to experimental ionization potent...

  6. Faulty cardiac repolarization reserve in alternating hemiplegia of childhood broadens the phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Fatima; Avbersek, Andreja; Vavassori, Rosaria; Fons, Carmen; Campistol, Jaume; Stagnaro, Michela; De Grandis, Elisa; Veneselli, Edvige; Rosewich, Hendrik; Gianotta, Melania; Zucca, Claudio; Ragona, Francesca; Granata, Tiziana; Nardocci, Nardo; Mikati, Mohamed; Helseth, Ashley R.; Boelman, Cyrus; Minassian, Berge A.; Johns, Sophia; Garry, Sarah I.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Carrilho, Ines; Aylett, Sarah E.; Parton, Matthew; Hanna, Michael G.; Houlden, Henry; Neville, Brian; Kurian, Manju A.; Novy, Jan; Sander, Josemir W.; Lambiase, Pier D.; Behr, Elijah R.; Schyns, Tsveta; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Cross, J. Helen; Kaski, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    , compared with those <16 (P = 0.0095), even with a specific mutation (p.D801N; P = 0.045). Dynamic, beat-to-beat or electrocardiogram-to-electrocardiogram, changes were noted, suggesting the prevalence of abnormalities was underestimated. Electrocardiogram changes occurred independently of seizures or plegic episodes. Electrocardiogram abnormalities are common in alternating hemiplegia, have characteristics reflecting those of inherited cardiac channelopathies and most likely amount to impaired repolarization reserve. The dynamic electrocardiogram and neurological features point to periodic systemic decompensation in ATP1A3-expressing organs. Cardiac dysfunction may account for some of the unexplained premature mortality of alternating hemiplegia. Systematic cardiac investigation is warranted in alternating hemiplegia of childhood, as cardiac arrhythmic morbidity and mortality are potentially preventable. PMID:26297560

  7. Being a reflective teacher——reflection on group management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan; Lehui

    2015-01-01

    <正>Introduction According to Pollard and Triggs(1997),reflective teaching is a process through which the capacity to make such professional judgments can be developed and maintained.Then what is a reflective teacher?Reflective teacher is someone who reflects systematically on her practice in a constant attempt to improve

  8. Quantification in non-invasive cardiac imaging: CT and MR

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Alexia

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The diagnosis and management of cardiac disease require a precise assessment of morphological and functional cardiac parameters. This thesis is divided in three parts. Part I emphasizes the role of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of patients with ischemic heart disease. Part 2 describes the role of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and cardiac CT in the diagnosis, interventional planning, and follow-up of patients with aortic valve stenosis. Part ...

  9. Evaluating the Cancer Therapeutic Potential of Cardiac Glycosides

    OpenAIRE

    José Manuel Calderón-Montaño; Estefanía Burgos-Morón; Manuel Luis Orta; Dolores Maldonado-Navas; Irene García-Domínguez; Miguel López-Lázaro

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides, also known as cardiotonic steroids, are a group of natural products that share a steroid-like structure with an unsaturated lactone ring and the ability to induce cardiotonic effects mediated by a selective inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase. Cardiac glycosides have been used for many years in the treatment of cardiac congestion and some types of cardiac arrhythmias. Recent data suggest that cardiac glycosides may also be useful in the treatment of cancer. These compounds typ...

  10. Thallium cardiac stressing by esophageal pacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, M.L.; Vacek, J.L.; Preston, D.F.; Robinson, R.G.; Feldkamp, M.J. (Univ. of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Forty-three patients were examined with the transesophageal pacing method of cardiac stressing and thallium imaging. Transesophageal cardiac pacing, using a pill electrode or a permanent pacemaker lead, is a safe alternative for patients who are physically unable to exercise. Prior studies suggest that transvenous right atrial pacing with thallium injection is equivalent to physical exercise thallium studies in the detection of coronary artery disease. The esophageal pacing bipolar electrode similarly increases heart rate without the necessity of transvenous pacing or fluoroscopy and without the adverse side effects often seen when using pharmacologic stressing agents (i.e., dipyridamole). The results compare well with cardiac catheterization, echocardiographic, and electrocardiographic results. Cardiac paced stress testing requires no sedation, is performed on an out-patient basis, and causes little if any discomfort for the patient.

  11. National Cardiac Device Surveillance Program Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The National Cardiac Device Surveillance Program Database supports the Eastern Pacemaker Surveillance Center (EPSC) staff in its function of monitoring some 11,000...

  12. Cardiac sympathetic neuronal imaging using PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautamaeki, Riikka; Tipre, Dnyanesh [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Bengel, Frank M. [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Balance of the autonomic nervous system is essential for adequate cardiac performance, and alterations seem to play a key role in the development and progression of various cardiac diseases. PET imaging of the cardiac autonomic nervous system has advanced extensively in recent years, and multiple pre- and postsynaptic tracers have been introduced. The high spatial and temporal resolution of PET enables noninvasive quantification of neurophysiologic processes at the tissue level. Ligands for catecholamine receptors, along with radiolabeled catecholamines and catecholamine analogs, have been applied to determine involvement of sympathetic dysinnervation at different stages of heart diseases such as ischemia, heart failure, and arrhythmia. This review summarizes the recent findings in neurocardiological PET imaging. Experimental studies with several radioligands and clinical findings in cardiac dysautonomias are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 3,2015 What is Computerized Tomography (CT)? CT is a noninvasive test that uses ...

  14. Cardiac assessment of African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Peter A; Marshall, Cecilia; Seyfried, Alice W; Bartin, Anne M

    2011-03-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a common finding in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris) at postmortem exam. To date, treatment attempts have been mostly empirical and unrewarding. The objective of this study was to determine reference cardiac values for captive African hedgehogs based on echocardiogram, electrocardiogram (ECG), and radiographs. Adult African hedgehogs with no clinical signs of cardiac disease (n = 13) were selected. Each animal was anesthetized with isoflurane via facemask and an echocardiogram, ECG, and radiographs were performed. Standard measurements were taken and the descriptive statistics performed. Values were comparable to limited data available in other hedgehog species and other similar-sized exotic species. Two animals were removed from consideration of reference values due to valvular defects that were considered significant. These data are the first establishing cardiac parameters in normal African hedgehogs using radiographic cardiac measurement, echocardiogram, and ECG. Evaluating animals with possible cardiomyopathy may allow for earlier diagnosis and more successful treatment. PMID:22946370

  15. Chronic cough following cardiac transplantation: vagal Mitempfindung?

    OpenAIRE

    Hammond, R R; Ebers, G C

    1992-01-01

    Since operation a cardiac transplant recipient has suffered from chronic, non-productive but intense coughing spells triggered by stimulation of the right external ear. This demonstrates the unusual phenomenon of acquired aberrant sensory referral.

  16. MicroRNAs in cardiac arrhythmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Carlsen, Anting L; Christiansen, Kasper M;

    2014-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetic cardiac condition associated with prolonged ventricular repolarization, primarily a result of perturbations in cardiac ion channels, which predisposes individuals to life-threatening arrhythmias. Using DNA screening and sequencing methods, over 700 different...... LQTS-causing mutations have been identified in 13 genes worldwide. Despite this, the genetic cause of 30-50% of LQTS is presently unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (∼ 22 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by binding complementary sequences within...... cardiovascular diseases. MiR-1 and MiR-133A are the most abundant miRNAs in the heart and have both been reported to regulate cardiac ion channels. We hypothesized that, as a consequence of their role in regulating cardiac ion channels, genetic variation in the genes which encode MiR-1 and MiR-133A might explain...

  17. Nanomaterials for Cardiac Tissue Engineering Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yachen Zhang; Yong Tang; Ying Wang; Liying Zhang

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the emerging cardiac tissue engineering provides a new therapeutic method for heart diseases. And in the tissue engineering, the scaffold material which can mimic the structure of the extracellular matrix properly is a key factor. The rapid expansion of nano-scaffolds during the past ten years has led to new perspectives and advances in biomedical research as well as in clinical practice. Here we search articles published in recent years extensively on cardiac tissue engineering scaffold materials and nanotechnology. And we review the traditional scaffold materials and the advances of the nano-scaffolds in cardiac tissue engineering. A thorough understanding of the nano-scaffolds would enable us to better exploit technologies to research the ideal scaffold material, and promote the cardiac tissue engineering using in the clinical practice as soon as possible.

  18. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sarvesh Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article.

  19. Incidental Cardiac Findings on Thoracic Imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kok, Hong Kuan

    2013-02-07

    The cardiac structures are well seen on nongated thoracic computed tomography studies in the investigation and follow-up of cardiopulmonary disease. A wide variety of findings can be incidentally picked up on careful evaluation of the pericardium, cardiac chambers, valves, and great vessels. Some of these findings may represent benign variants, whereas others may have more profound clinical importance. Furthermore, the expansion of interventional and surgical practice has led to the development and placement of new cardiac stents, implantable pacemaker devices, and prosthetic valves with which the practicing radiologist should be familiar. We present a collection of common incidental cardiac findings that can be readily identified on thoracic computed tomography studies and briefly discuss their clinical relevance.

  20. Leadless Cardiac Pacemakers: Back to the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marc A; Neuzil, Petr; Dukkipati, Srinivas R; Reddy, Vivek Y

    2015-09-01

    Despite significant advances in battery longevity, lead performance, and programming features since the first implanted permanent pacemaker was developed, the basic design of cardiac pacemakers has remained relatively unchanged over the past 50 years. Because of inherent limitations in their design, conventional (transvenous) pacemakers are prone to multiple potential short- and long-term complications. Accordingly, there has been intense interest in a system able to provide the symptomatic and potentially lifesaving therapies of cardiac pacemakers while mitigating many of the risks associated with their weakest link-the transvenous lead. Leadless cardiac pacing represents the future of cardiac pacing systems, similar to the transition that occurred from the use of epicardial pacing systems to the familiar transvenous systems of today. This review summarizes the current evidence and potential benefits of leadless pacing systems, which are either commercially available (in Europe) or under clinical investigation. PMID:26337997

  1. Nonbiopsy Diagnosis of Cardiac Transthyretin Amyloidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillmore, Julian D.; Maurer, Mathew S.; Falk, Rodney H.; Merlini, Giampaolo; Damy, Thibaud; Dispenzieri, Angela; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D.; Berk, John L.; Quarta, Candida C.; Grogan, Martha; Lachmann, Helen J.; Bokhari, Sabahat; Castano, Adam; Dorbala, Sharmila; Johnson, Geoff B.; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Rezk, Tamer; Fontana, Marianna; Palladini, Giovanni; Milani, Paolo; Guidalotti, Pierluigi L.; Flatman, Katarina; Lane, Thirusha; Vonberg, Frederick W.; Whelan, Carol J.; Moon, James C.; Ruberg, Frederick L.; Miller, Edward J.; Hutt, David F.; Hazenberg, Bouke P.; Rapezzi, Claudio; Hawkins, Philip N.

    2016-01-01

    Background-Cardiac transthyretin (ATTR) amyloidosis is a progressive and fatal cardiomyopathy for which several promising therapies are in development. The diagnosis is frequently delayed or missed because of the limited specificity of echocardiography and the traditional requirement for histologica

  2. Cardiac regeneration: different cells same goal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Barnett; M.J.B. van den Hoff

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of mortality, morbidity, hospitalization and impaired quality of life. In most, if not all, pathologic cardiac ischemia ensues triggering a succession of events leading to massive death of cardiomyocytes, fibroblast and extracellular matrix accumulation,

  3. Nanomaterials for Cardiac Myocyte Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Rodolfo Amezcua; Ajay Shirolkar; Carolyn Fraze; David A. Stout

    2016-01-01

    Since their synthesizing introduction to the research community, nanomaterials have infiltrated almost every corner of science and engineering. Over the last decade, one such field has begun to look at using nanomaterials for beneficial applications in tissue engineering, specifically, cardiac tissue engineering. During a myocardial infarction, part of the cardiac muscle, or myocardium, is deprived of blood. Therefore, the lack of oxygen destroys cardiomyocytes, leaving dead tissue and possib...

  4. Haemochromatosis presenting as congestive cardiac failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, J; Cary, N; Schofield, P

    1995-01-01

    A 24 year old man with congestive cardiac failure was found to have grossly increased transferrin saturations, raised serum ferritin, and an iron-laden myocardium on biopsy. Initial treatment with the iron chelator desferrioxamine was replaced by weekly venesection. He was placed on the cardiac transplant list because of severe left ventricular dysfunction but was later removed because his symptoms and function improved. He remains well with few symptoms and is maintained on regular venesecti...

  5. Mortality and Embolic Potential of Cardiac Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Ribeiro Dias; Fábio Fernandes; Félix José Alvarez Ramires; Charles Mady; Cícero Piva de Albuquerque; Fábio Biscegli Jatene

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cardiac tumors are rare, mostly benign with high embolic potential. Objectives: To correlate the histological type of cardiac masses with their embolic potential, implantation site and long term follow up in patients undergoing surgery. Methods: Between January 1986 and December 2011, we retrospectively analyzed 185 consecutive patients who underwent excision of intracardiac mass (119 females, mean age 48±20 years). In 145 patients, the left atrium was the origin site. 72% wer...

  6. Mitochondrial Protein Dynamics in Cardiac Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac mitochondrial proteome contains ~1,500 distinct proteins that carry out necessary metabolic and energetic processes in the heart. To sustain cardiac function, the mitochondrial proteome must be maintained in constant renewal, or turnover, especially under stress conditions. Disruptions of protein turnover can lead to protein damage and proteotoxicity, a hallmark of many heart disease etiologies. Current quantitative proteomics experiments largely focus on the measurement of the st...

  7. MANAGEMENT OF ALLOSENSITIZED CARDIAC TRANSPLANT CANDIDATES

    OpenAIRE

    Velez, Mauricio; Johnson, Maryl R.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation remains the best treatment in advanced heart failure patients with a high risk of death. However, an inadequate supply of donor hearts decreases the likelihood of transplantation for many patients. Ventricular assist devices (VAD) are being increasingly used as a bridge to transplant in patients who may not survive long enough to receive a heart. This expansion in VAD use has been associated with increasing rates of allosensitization in cardiac transplant candidates. A...

  8. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a cardiac transplant recipient

    OpenAIRE

    Pandya, Seema R.; Saloni Paranjape

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of cardiac transplants are being carried out around the world. With increasing longevity, these patients present a unique challenge to non-transplant anesthesiologists for a variety of transplant related or incidental surgeries. The general considerations related to a cardiac transplant recipient are the physiological and pharmacological problems of allograft denervation, the side-effects of immunosuppression, the risk of infection and the potential for rejection. A thoro...

  9. Sexual Dysfunction before and after Cardiac Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Jörg Schumann; Zellweger, Michael J.; Marcello Di Valentino; Simone Piazzalonga; Andreas Hoffmann

    2010-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess sexual function before and after cardiac rehabilitation in relation to medical variables. Methods. Analysis of patients participating in a 12-week exercise-based outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (OCR) between April 1999 and December 2007. Exercise capacity (ExC) and quality of life including sexual function were assessed before and after OCR. Results. Complete data were available in 896 male patients. No sexual activity at all was indic...

  10. Preoperative respiratory physical therapy in cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hulzebos, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac surgery is one of the most common surgical procedures and accounts for more resources expended in cardiovascular medicine than any other single procedure. Because cardiac surgery involves sternal incision and cardiopulmonary bypass, patients usually have a restricted respiratory function in the postoperative period. Moreover, anesthesia and analgesia affect respiratory function during and after the surgical intervention, causing changes in lung volume, diaphragmatic dysfunction, respi...

  11. Acute leukaemoid reaction following cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webb Stephen T

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia is an atypical myeloproliferative disorder with a natural history of progression to acute myeloid leukaemia, a complex and poorly understood response by the bone marrow to stress. Cardiac surgery activates many inflammatory cascades and may precipitate a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. We present a case of undiagnosed chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia who developed rapidly fatal multi-organ dysfunction following cardiac surgery due to an acute leukaemoid reaction.

  12. Remote monitoring of cardiac implantable electronic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Lappegård, Knut Tore

    2015-01-01

    Seminario desarrollado en la Segunda Conferencia Internacional de Comunicación en Salud, celebrada el 23 de octubre de 2015 en la Universidad Carlos III de Madrid Cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) are used with increasing frequency for the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. In Europe, a total number of 550,000 pacemakers and 180,000 defibrillators were implanted in 2014. Follow-up of these patients is a large challenge to the health system and requires a substanti...

  13. Mechanical Thrombectomy for Stroke After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Márcio; Martins, Catarina; Koukoulis, Giovanna; Marques, Marta; Reis, João; Abecassis, Miguel

    2016-08-01

    Stroke after cardiac surgery remains a devastating complication and its treatment options are limited. Systemic fibrinolysis is a relative contraindication, because it raises the risk of systemic hemorrhage. Endovascular therapy, mechanical thrombectomy, and intra-arterial fibrinolysis have emerged as safer options. We present three patients who developed strokes following cardiac surgery who underwent successful mechanical thrombectomy and review the literature on this subject. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12776 (J Card Surg 2016;31:517-520). PMID:27282492

  14. Mitochondria in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) frequently is the unfavorable outcome of pathological heart hypertrophy. In contrast to physiological cardiac hypertrophy, which occurs in response to exercise and leads to full adaptation of contractility to the increased wall stress, pathological hypertrophy occurs in response to volume or pressure overload, ultimately leading to contractile dysfunction and HF. Because cardiac hypertrophy impairs the relationship between ATP demand and production, mitochondrial bioenerget...

  15. Graded vascular autonomic control versus discontinuous cardiac control during gradual upright tilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahjaoui-Bouhaddi, M; Cappelle, S; Henriet, M T; Dumoulin, G; Wolf, J P; Regnard, J

    2000-03-15

    Indexes of heart rate variability (HRV) and the slope of cardiac baroreflex are extensively used for non invasive assessment of circulatory autonomic control in pathophysiology. We performed this study (1) to assess the sensitivity of these indexes towards small graded postural stimulations and (2) to delineate the informations provided about the settings of both vascular tone and cardiac activity. Twenty healthy subjects were randomly tilted for eight minutes at each of the six angles: -10 degrees, 0 degrees (supine), 10 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees. Instant RR-interval and finger blood pressure (BP) were continuously recorded, and venous blood was collected at the end of each 8 min position for catecholamines determination. Group average heart rate, noradrenaline and diastolic BP (DBP) increased linearly with head-up tilt angle from 10 degrees. Systolic BP (SBB) ranked only two distinct series -10 degrees, 0 degrees, 10 degrees versus 30 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees, as did the number of spontaneous baroreflex (SBR) sequences. The spectral power of the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) of RR variability and the ratio LF/HF changed rather abruptly from either 30 degrees or 45 degrees, depending on each individual. Both HF/tot i.e. the ratio of HF to total spectral RR variability and the slope of SBR decreased markedly from 10 degrees to 30 degrees and less but more gradually from 30 degrees to 60 degrees. Thus, our observations argue for gradual adjustments of vascular tone as reflected by highly consistent changes in plasma noradrenaline and diastolic arterial pressure, contrasting with a main discontinuous autonomic setting of cardiac activity as reflected by changes in the harmonic components of spectral RR variability and in the slope of cardiac baroreflex. The pattern of changes in systolic arterial pressure attested the discontinuous cardiac autonomic control rather than the gradual setting of arterial tone. We submit that

  16. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccio, M; Goumans, M J; Sluijter, J P G; Doevendans, P A

    2008-03-01

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new cardiomyocytes to ameliorate the injured myocardium, compensate for the loss of ventricular mass and contractility and eventually restore cardiac function. An array of cell types has been explored in this respect, including skeletal muscle, bone marrow derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC) and more recently cardiac progenitor cells. The best-studied cell types are mouse and human ESC cells, which have undisputedly been demonstrated to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and vascular lineages and have been of great help to understand the differentiation process of pluripotent cells. However, due to their immunogenicity, risk of tumor development and the ethical challenge arising from their embryonic origin, they do not provide a suitable cell source for a regenerative therapy approach. A better option, overcoming ethical and allogenicity problems, seems to be provided by bone marrow derived cells and by the recently identified cardiac precursors. This report will overview current knowledge on these different cell types and their application in cardiac regeneration and address issues like implementation of delivery methods, including tissue engineering approaches that need to be developed alongside.

  17. Surface Electrocardiogram Predictors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghani, Samy A.; Rosenthal, Todd M.; Morin, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is a major cause of death in industrialized nations, with approximately 50% of these deaths attributable to sudden cardiac arrest. If patients at high risk for sudden cardiac arrest can be identified, their odds of surviving fatal arrhythmias can be significantly improved through prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement. This review summarizes the current knowledge pertaining to surface electrocardiogram (ECG) predictors of sudden cardiac arrest. Methods: We conducted a literature review focused on methods of predicting sudden cardiac arrest through noninvasive electrocardiographic testing. Results: Several electrocardiographic-based methods of risk stratification of sudden cardiac arrest have been studied, including QT prolongation, QRS duration, fragmented QRS complexes, early repolarization, Holter monitoring, heart rate variability, heart rate turbulence, signal-averaged ECG, T wave alternans, and T-peak to T-end. These ECG findings have shown variable effectiveness as screening tools. Conclusion: At this time, no individual ECG finding has been found to be able to adequately stratify patients with regard to risk for sudden cardiac arrest. However, one or more of these candidate surface ECG parameters may become useful components of future multifactorial risk stratification calculators. PMID:27660578

  18. Role of Circulating Fibrocytes in Cardiac Fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Jie Lin; Zi-Zhuo Su; Shu-Min Liang; Yu-Yang Chen; Xiao-Rong Shu; Ru-Qiong Nie; Jing-Feng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: It is revealed that circulating fibrocytes are elevated in patients/animals with cardiac fibrosis, and this review aims to provide an introduction to circulating fibrocytes and their role in cardiac fibrosis.Data Sources: This review is based on the data from 1994 to present obtained from PubMed.The search terms were "circulating fibrocytes" and "cardiac fibrosis".Study Selection: Articles and critical reviews, which are related to circulating fibrocytes and cardiac fibrosis, were selected.Results: Circulating fibrocytes, which are derived from hematopoietic stem cells, represent a subset of peripheral blood mononuclear cells exhibiting mixed morphological and molecular characteristics ofhematopoietic and mesenchymal cells (CD34+/CD45+/collagen I+).They can produce extracellular matrix and many cytokines.It is shown that circulating fibrocytes participate in many fibrotic diseases, including cardiac fibrosis.Evidence accumulated in recent years shows that aging individuals and patients with hypertension, heart failure, coronary heart disease, and atrial fibrillation have more circulating fibrocytes in peripheral blood and/or heart tissue, and this elevation of circulating fibrocytes is correlated with the degree of fibrosis in the hearts.Conclusions: Circulating fibrocytes are effector cells in cardiac fibrosis.

  19. Stem cells for cardiac repair: an introduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bastiaan C du Pr(e); Pieter A Doevendans; Linda W van Laake

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Most cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy, are associated with loss of functional cardiomyocytes. Unfortunately, the heart has a limited regenerative capacity and is not able to replace these cardiomyocytes once lost. In recent years, stem cells have been put forward as a potential source for cardiac regeneration. Pre-clinical studies that use stem cell-derived cardiac cells show promising results. The mechanisms, though, are not well understood, results have been variable, sometimes transient in the long term, and often without a mechanistic explanation. There are still several major hurdles to be taken. Stem cell-derived cardiac cells should resemble original cardiac cell types and be able to integrate in the damaged heart. Integration requires administration of stem cell-derived cardiac cells at the right time using the right mode of delivery. Once delivered, transplanted cells need vascularization, electrophysiological coupling with the injured heart, and prevention of immunological rejection. Finally, stem cell therapy needs to be safe, reproducible, and affordable. In this review, we will give an introduction to the principles of stem cell based cardiac repair.

  20. Epigenetic mechanisms in cardiac development and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcus Vallaster; Caroline Dacwag Vallaster; Sean M. Wu

    2012-01-01

    During mammalian development,cardiac specification and ultimately lineage commitment to a specific cardiac cell type is accomplished by the action of specific transcription factors (TFs) and their meticulous control on an epigenetic level.In this review,we detail how cardiacspecific TFs function in concert with nucleosome remodeling and histone-modifying enzymes to regulate a diverse network of genes required for processes such as cell growth and proliferation,or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT),for instance.We provide examples of how several cardiac TFs,such as Nkx2.5,WHSC1,Tbx5,and Tbx1,which are associated with developmental and congenital heart defects,are required for the recruitment of histone modifiers,such as Jarid2,p300,and Ash21,and components of ATP-dependent remodeling enzymes like Brg1,Baf60c,and Baf180.Binding of these TFs to their respective sites at cardiac genes coincides with a distinct pattern of histone marks,indicating that the precise regulation of cardiac gene networks is orchestrated by interactions between TFs and epigenetic modifiers.Furthermore,we speculate that an epigenetic signature,comprised of TF occupancy,histone modifications,and overall chromatin organization,is an underlying mechanism that governs cardiac morphogenesis and disease.

  1. Telocytes in cardiac regeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Yihua; Zhou, Qiulian; Sun, Qi; Xiao, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are a novel type of stromal cells reported by Popescu's group in 2010. The unique feature that distinguishes TCs from other "classical" stromal cells is their extremely long and thin telopodes (Tps). As evidenced by electron microscopy, TCs are widely distributed in almost all tissues and organs. TCs contribute to form a three-dimensional interstitial network and play as active regulators in intercellular communication via homocellular/heterocellular junctions or shed vesicles. Interestingly, increasing evidence suggests the potential role of TCs in regenerative medicine. Although the heart retains some limited endogenous regenerative capacity, cardiac regenerative and repair response is however insufficient to make up the loss of cardiomyocytes upon injury. Developing novel strategies to increase cardiomyocyte renewal and repair is of great importance for the treatment of cardiac diseases. In this review, we focus on the role of TCs in cardiac regeneration and repair. We particularly describe the intercellular communication between TCs and cardiomyocytes, stem/progenitor cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Also, we discuss the current knowledge about TCs in cardiac repair after myocardial injury, as well as their potential roles in cardiac development and aging. TC-based therapy or TC-derived exosome delivery might be used as novel therapeutic strategies to promote cardiac regeneration and repair. PMID:26826525

  2. Reflection and transmission pulse oximetry during compromised peripheral perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pälve, H

    1992-01-01

    The performance of a reflection pulse oximeter and a transmission pulse oximeter was assessed during open-heart surgery when cardiac output, peripheral temperature, pulse pressure, and systolic pressure were low and vascular resistance was high. Before and after extracorporeal circulation (ECC) there was no difference in ability of the sensors to obtain readings and no difference in the accuracy of those readings. During partial ECC, especially after coronary artery bypass grafting, the reflection sensor gave readings earlier and at a lower pulse pressure. In addition, the transmission sensor failed to give any readings for 2 patients on partial ECC, for whom the reflection sensor did give readings. The accuracy of heart rate (HR) data was comparable for both sensors before ECC; however, during partial ECC, the reflection sensor tended to give values closer to the electrocardiographic HR. The accuracy of saturation data given by the reflection oximeter was comparable to that of the transmission oximeter. It is concluded that the accuracy of the saturation and HR data provided by the two methods of pulse oximetry are comparable, but that the reflection sensor is more likely to obtain readings under conditions of poorer peripheral circulation. PMID:1538246

  3. Sidewall reflections in streamlined missile radomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, G. K.; Crockett, M. P.

    Predicted and measured patterns are presented which serve as dramatic illustrations of the 'LLoyd's mirror' effect, in which direct and reflected waves generate interference in the form of unexpected peaks and nulls in radome-enclosed receiving antenna patterns. These effects are associated with a low-gain antenna which is offset from the centerline of a streamlined tangent ogive radome intended for high-speed missile applications. Since many other airborne radome applications require that more than one antenna be located inside a radome cavity, these data furnish insight into what may be expected for offset-antenna locations. The geometrical optics approximations used to obtain reflected wave contributions are noted to be exceptionally accurate foir the small antennas considered.

  4. Clinical linguistics: conversational reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crystal, David

    2013-04-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference participants during that time.

  5. Reflections and Interpretations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reflections and Interpretations is an anthology on The Freedom Writers’ methodology. It is an anthology for all those with a professional need for texts explaining, not only how The Freedom Writers’ tools are being used, but also why they work so convincingly well. It is not an anthology of guide...... of guidelines; it is an anthology of explanations based on theory. And it is an anthology written by Freedom Writer Teachers – who else could do it?...

  6. Transplantation of 5-azacytidine treated cardiac fibroblasts improves cardiac function of infarct hearts in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Cheng-chun; MA Gan-shan; CHEN Ji-yuan

    2010-01-01

    Background Cellular cardiomyoplasty by transplantation of various cell types has been investigated as potential treatments for the improvement of cardiac function after myocardial injury. A major barrier for the clinical application of cell transplantation is obtaining sufficiently large quantities of suitable cells. AIIogeneic cellular cardiomyoplasty may provide an alternative source of abundant, transplantable, myogenic cells by in vitro manipulation of cardiac fibroblasts using chemicals including 5-azacytidine. This study evaluated cardiomyogenic differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts, their survival in myocardial scar tissue, and the effect of the implanted cells on heart function.Methods Primary cardiac fibroblasts from neonatal rats were treated with 5-azacytidine (10 μmol/L) or control.Treatment of 5-azacytidine caused myogenic differentiation of cultured cardiac fibroblasts, as defined by elongation and fusion into multinucleated myotubes with sarcomeric structures as identified by electron microscopy, and positive immunostaining for cardiac specific proteins, troponin I and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) and the gap junction protein connexin 43. The myogenic cells (1.0x106) were transplanted into the infarcted myocardium 2 weeks after coronary artery occlusion.Results By 1 month after transplantation, the converted fibroblasts gave rise to a cluster of cardiac-like muscle cells that in the hearts occupied a large part of the scar with positive immunostaining for the myogenic proteins troponin I and β-MHC. Engrafted cells also expressed the gap junction protein connexin 43 in a disorganized manner. There was no positive staining in the control hearts treated with injections of culture medium. Heart function was evaluated at 6 weeks after myocardial injury with echocardiographic and hemodynamic measurements. Improvement in cardiac function was seen in the hearts transplanted with the 5-azacytidine-treated cardiac fibroblasts which was absent in the

  7. Troponin not just a simple cardiac marker: prognostic significance of cardiac troponin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benny Mulyanto Setiadi; LEI Han; CHANG Jing

    2009-01-01

    Objective The object of this study was to review the role of cardiac troponin as a prognostic factor in acute coronary syndrome patients of varying circumstances.Data sources The data used in this review were obtained mainly from the studies of cardiac troponin reported in pubmed from 1981 to 2006.Study selection Relevant articles on studies of cardiac troponin were selected.Results Elevated cardiac troponin in patients with ST elevation and non ST elevation myocardial infarction was associated with adverse outcomes, including a higher incidence of congestive heart failure, shock, and death. Patients with elevated cardiac troponin value seemed to benefit more from invasive strategies including a percutaneous coronary intervention and bypass surgery, but elevated cardiac troponin was also correlated with adverse outcomes, including a higher degree of failure, shock, and mortality in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention; a higher degree of perioperative myocardial infarction, low cardiac output syndrome, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and new-onset ventricular arrhythmia in patients undergoing bypass surgery were also observed. Elevated troponin after a percutaneous coronary intervention seemed to be associated with short-term adverse outcomes rather than long-term adverse outcomes, unless the elevation of the troponin post percutaneous coronary intervention was quite high (about 5 times above normal). On the contrary, elevated cardiac troponin after bypass surgery was more confusing to analyze since it happened in almost all patients. Furthermore, differences in cutoff values and time measurements in some studies add more confusion; thus, further research is warranted.Conclusions The prognostic value of cardiac troponin is demonstrated in almost all acute coronary syndrome patients. In addition to its high sensitivity and specificity, the prognostic value of cardiac troponin is another reason to make it the "golden cardiac marker' of this time.

  8. Elasticity of developing cardiac tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkut, Stephanie; Swift, Joe; Krieger, Christine; Discher, Dennis

    2011-03-01

    Proper development and function of the heart from the tissue to cellular scale depends on a compliant ECM. Here we study the maturation of embryonic cardiac tissue mechanics in parallel with the effects of extracellular mechanics on individual cardiomyocyte function throughout early development. We used micropipette aspiration to measure local and bulk elastic moduli (E) of embryonic avian heart tissue from days 2-12. We observe stiffening of the early heart tube from E = 1 kPa at day 1 to E = 2 kPa at day 4, reaching neonatal values by day 12. Treating heart tubes with blebbistatin led to 30% decrease in E, indicating a significant but partial actomyosin contribution to mechanics at these stages. We performed a proteomic analysis of intact and decellularized 2-4 day heart tubes by mass spectrometry to quantify the ECM present at these stages. Isolated cardiomyocytes from 2-4 day chick embryos were cultured on collagen-coated PA gels of various stiffnesses. Beating magnitude was modulated by substrates with E = 1-2 kPa, similar to physiological E at those stages.

  9. Atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Once considered as nothing more than a nuisance after cardiac surgery, the importance of postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF has been realized in the last decade, primarily because of the morbidity associated with the condition. Numerous causative factors have been described without any single factor being singled out as the cause of this complication. POAF has been associated with stroke, renal failure and congestive heart failure, although it is difficult to state whether POAF is directly responsible for these complications. Guidelines have been formulated for prevention of POAF. However, very few cardiothoracic centers follow any form of protocol to prevent POAF. Routine use of prophylaxis would subject all patients to the side effects of anti-arrhythmic drugs, while only a minority of the patients do actually develop this problem postoperatively. Withdrawal of beta blockers in the postoperative period has been implicated as one of the major causes of POAF. Amiodarone, calcium channel blockers and a variety of other pharmacological agents have been used for the prevention of POAF. Atrial pacing is a non-pharmacological measure which has gained popularity in the prevention of POAF. There is considerable controversy regarding whether rate control is superior to rhythm control in the treatment of established atrial fibrillation (AF. Amiodarone plays a central role in both rate control and rhythm control in postoperative AF. Newer drugs like dronedarone and ranazoline are likely to come into the market in the coming years.

  10. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Moya, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    NASA seeks to transfer the NASA developed microwave ablation technology, designed for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia (irregular heart beat), to industry. After a heart attack, many cells surrounding the resulting scar continue to live but are abnormal electrically; they may conduct impulses unusually slowly or fire when they would typically be silent. These diseased areas might disturb smooth signaling by forming a reentrant circuit in the muscle. The objective of microwave ablation is to heat and kill these diseased cells to restore appropriate electrical activity in the heart. This technology is a method and apparatus that provides for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In comparison with other methods that involve direct-current pulses or radio frequencies below 1 GHz, this method may prove more effective in treating ventricular tachycardia. This is because the present method provides for greater control of the location, cross-sectional area, and depth of a lesion via selection of the location and design of the antenna and the choice of microwave power and frequency.

  11. Genetics of sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Marwan M; Hotait, Mostafa; London, Barry

    2015-07-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as death within 1 h of symptom onset (witnessed) or within 24 h of being observed alive and symptom free (unwitnessed). It affects more than 3 million people annually worldwide and affects approximately 1/1000 people each year in the USA. Familial studies of syndromes with Mendelian inheritance, candidate genes analyses, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have helped our understanding of the genetics of SCD. We will review the genetics of arrhythmogenic hereditary syndromes with Mendelian inheritance from familial studies with structural heart disease (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy) as well as primary electrical causes (long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and short QT syndrome). In addition, we will review the genetics of intermediate phenotypes for SCD such as coronary artery disease and electrocardiographic variables (QT interval, QRS duration, and RR interval). Finally, we will review rare and common variants that are associated with SCD in the general population and were identified from candidate gene analyses and GWAS. Our understanding of the genetics of SCD will improve by the use of next-generation sequencing/whole-exome sequencing as well as whole-genome sequencing which have the potential to discover unsuspected common and rare genetic variants that might be associated with SCD. PMID:26026997

  12. Cardiac MRI for myocardial ischemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daly, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Proper assessment of the physiologic impact of coronary artery stenosis on the LV myocardium can affect patient prognosis and treatment decisions. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) assesses myocardial perfusion by imaging the myocardium during a first-pass transit of an intravenous gadolinium bolus, with spatial and temporal resolution substantially higher than nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging. Coupled with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging for infarction during the same imaging session, CMR with vasodilating stress perfusion imaging can qualitatively and quantitatively assess the myocardial extent of hypoperfusion from coronary stenosis independent of infarcted myocardium. This approach has been validated experimentally, and multiple clinical trials have established its diagnostic robustness when compared to stress single-photon emission computed tomography. In specialized centers, dobutamine stress CMR has been shown to have incremental diagnostic value above stress echocardiography due to its high imaging quality and ability to image the heart with no restriction of imaging window. This paper reviews the technical aspects, diagnostic utility, prognostic values, challenges to clinical adaptation, and future developments of stress CMR imaging.

  13. Partial reflections of radio waves from the lower ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, D. J.; Tanenbaum, S. B.

    1972-01-01

    The addition of phase difference measurements to partial reflection experiments is discussed, and some advantages of measuring electron density this way are pointed out. The additional information obtained reduces the requirement for an accurate predetermination of collision frequency. Calculations are also made to estimate the errors expected in partial-reflection experiments due to the assumption of Fresnel reflection and to the neglect of coupling between modes. In both cases, the errors are found to be of the same order as known errors in the measurements due to current instrumental limitations.

  14. ICA based automatic segmentation of dynamic H(2)(15)O cardiac PET images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margadán-Méndez, Margarita; Juslin, Anu; Nesterov, Sergey V; Kalliokoski, Kari; Knuuti, Juhani; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we applied an iterative independent component analysis (ICA) method for the separation of cardiac tissue components (myocardium, right, and left ventricle) from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) images. Previous phantom and animal studies have shown that ICA separation extracts the cardiac structures accurately. Our goal in this study was to investigate the methodology with human studies. The ICA separated cardiac structures were used to calculate the myocardial perfusion in two different cases: 1) the regions of interest were drawn manually on the ICA separated component images and 2) the volumes of interest (VOI) were automatically segmented from the component images. For the whole myocardium, the perfusion values of 25 rest and six drug-induced stress studies obtained with these methods were compared to the values from the manually drawn regions of interest on differential images. The separation of the rest and stress studies using ICA-based methods was successful in all cases. The visualization of the cardiac structures from H (2) (15) O PET studies was improved with the ICA separation. Also, the automatic segmentation of the VOI seemed to be feasible. PMID:19273031

  15. Light distribution modulated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pin-Yuan; Chien, Chun-Yu; Sheu, Chia-Rong; Chen, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-06-01

    Typically, a diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system employing a continuous wave light source would need to acquire diffuse reflectances measured at multiple source-detector separations for determining the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of turbid samples. This results in a multi-fiber probe structure and an indefinite probing depth. Here we present a novel DRS method that can utilize a few diffuse reflectances measured at one source-detector separation for recovering the optical properties of samples. The core of innovation is a liquid crystal (LC) cell whose scattering property can be modulated by the bias voltage. By placing the LC cell between the light source and the sample, the spatial distribution of light in the sample can be varied as the scattering property of the LC cell modulated by the bias voltage, and this would induce intensity variation of the collected diffuse reflectance. From a series of Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements, we found that this new light distribution modulated DRS (LDM DRS) system was capable of accurately recover the absorption and scattering coefficients of turbid samples and its probing depth only varied by less than 3% over the full bias voltage variation range. Our results suggest that this LDM DRS platform could be developed to various low-cost, efficient, and compact systems for in-vivo superficial tissue investigation. PMID:27375931

  16. Churg-Strauss syndrome cardiac involvement evaluated by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and positron-emission tomography: a prospective study on 20 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) cardiac involvement is associated with a poor prognosis. Recently cardiac MRI (CMRI) has emerged as a promising technique to detect early CSS cardiac involvement. However, CMRI-detected myocardial delayed enhancement (MDE) could correspond to fibrosis or inflammation. Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET) was previously used in other systemic diseases to distinguish between them. To determine whether the CMRI-MDE detected in CSS patients reflected fibrosis or myocardial inflammation, patients in CSS remission underwent FDG-PET. Twenty consecutive CSS patients in remission (BVAS = 0) were recruited. Fourteen patients [eight men, six women; mean (S.D.) age 49 (9) years; mean disease duration 3.5 (2.9) years] with CMRI-detected MDE, and six patients [four men, two women; mean (S.D.) age 44 (15) years; mean disease duration 3.5 (5.3) years] with normal CMRI underwent FDG-PET. Segments with MDE on CMRI were analysed on FDG-PET images, with myocardial FDG hypo-fixation defining fibrosis and hyper-fixation corresponding inflammation. Among the 14 patients with MDE on CMRI, FDG-PET showed 10 had hypo-fixation, 2 had hyper-fixation and 2 had normal scans. CSS duration at the time of CMRI was shorter for patients with myocardial inflammation than in those with fibrosis. The six patients with normal CMRI had normal FDG-PET images. For CSS patients in remission, CMRI detected subclinical active myocardial lesions and could be recommended to assess cardiac involvement. However, because CMRI-detected MDE can reflect fibrosis or inflammation, FDG-PET might help to distinguish between the two. (authors)

  17. Reflective writing: a management skill

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze students' reflective writing in terms of identifiable outcomes and explore students' thoughts on reflection and reflective writing as a process. Design/methodology/approach – A mixed methods approach is taken with a qualitative analysis of 116 written reflections from MA Librarianship studying management over an eight-month period. A quantitative statistical analysis assesses the relationships between reflective writing and a number of po...

  18. Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Thomas M.; Hammons, B. Eugene; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    1992-01-01

    A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

  19. Myocardial Infarct Segmentation From Magnetic Resonance Images for Personalized Modeling of Cardiac Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukwatta, Eranga; Arevalo, Hermenegild; Li, Kristina; Yuan, Jing; Qiu, Wu; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C; Trayanova, Natalia A; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy

    2016-06-01

    Accurate representation of myocardial infarct geometry is crucial to patient-specific computational modeling of the heart in ischemic cardiomyopathy. We have developed a methodology for segmentation of left ventricular (LV) infarct from clinically acquired, two-dimensional (2D), late-gadolinium enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) images, for personalized modeling of ventricular electrophysiology. The infarct segmentation was expressed as a continuous min-cut optimization problem, which was solved using its dual formulation, the continuous max-flow (CMF). The optimization objective comprised of a smoothness term, and a data term that quantified the similarity between image intensity histograms of segmented regions and those of a set of training images. A manual segmentation of the LV myocardium was used to initialize and constrain the developed method. The three-dimensional geometry of infarct was reconstructed from its segmentation using an implicit, shape-based interpolation method. The proposed methodology was extensively evaluated using metrics based on geometry, and outcomes of individualized electrophysiological simulations of cardiac dys(function). Several existing LV infarct segmentation approaches were implemented, and compared with the proposed method. Our results demonstrated that the CMF method was more accurate than the existing approaches in reproducing expert manual LV infarct segmentations, and in electrophysiological simulations. The infarct segmentation method we have developed and comprehensively evaluated in this study constitutes an important step in advancing clinical applications of personalized simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. PMID:26731693

  20. Seismic reflection imaging, accounting for primary and multiple reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapenaar, Kees; van der Neut, Joost; Thorbecke, Jan; Broggini, Filippo; Slob, Evert; Snieder, Roel

    2015-04-01

    Imaging of seismic reflection data is usually based on the assumption that the seismic response consists of primary reflections only. Multiple reflections, i.e. waves that have reflected more than once, are treated as primaries and are imaged at wrong positions. There are two classes of multiple reflections, which we will call surface-related multiples and internal multiples. Surface-related multiples are those multiples that contain at least one reflection at the earth's surface, whereas internal multiples consist of waves that have reflected only at subsurface interfaces. Surface-related multiples are the strongest, but also relatively easy to deal with because the reflecting boundary (the earth's surface) is known. Internal multiples constitute a much more difficult problem for seismic imaging, because the positions and properties of the reflecting interfaces are not known. We are developing reflection imaging methodology which deals with internal multiples. Starting with the Marchenko equation for 1D inverse scattering problems, we derived 3D Marchenko-type equations, which relate reflection data at the surface to Green's functions between virtual sources anywhere in the subsurface and receivers at the surface. Based on these equations, we derived an iterative scheme by which these Green's functions can be retrieved from the reflection data at the surface. This iterative scheme requires an estimate of the direct wave of the Green's functions in a background medium. Note that this is precisely the same information that is also required by standard reflection imaging schemes. However, unlike in standard imaging, our iterative Marchenko scheme retrieves the multiple reflections of the Green's functions from the reflection data at the surface. For this, no knowledge of the positions and properties of the reflecting interfaces is required. Once the full Green's functions are retrieved, reflection imaging can be carried out by which the primaries and multiples are