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Sample records for accurately reflect cardiac

  1. Development of a force-reflecting robotic platform for cardiac catheter navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun Woo; Choi, Jaesoon; Pak, Hui-Nam; Song, Seung Joon; Lee, Jung Chan; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Seung Min; Sun, Kyung

    2010-11-01

    Electrophysiological catheters are used for both diagnostics and clinical intervention. To facilitate more accurate and precise catheter navigation, robotic cardiac catheter navigation systems have been developed and commercialized. The authors have developed a novel force-reflecting robotic catheter navigation system. The system is a network-based master-slave configuration having a 3-degree of freedom robotic manipulator for operation with a conventional cardiac ablation catheter. The master manipulator implements a haptic user interface device with force feedback using a force or torque signal either measured with a sensor or estimated from the motor current signal in the slave manipulator. The slave manipulator is a robotic motion control platform on which the cardiac ablation catheter is mounted. The catheter motions-forward and backward movements, rolling, and catheter tip bending-are controlled by electromechanical actuators located in the slave manipulator. The control software runs on a real-time operating system-based workstation and implements the master/slave motion synchronization control of the robot system. The master/slave motion synchronization response was assessed with step, sinusoidal, and arbitrarily varying motion commands, and showed satisfactory performance with insignificant steady-state motion error. The current system successfully implemented the motion control function and will undergo safety and performance evaluation by means of animal experiments. Further studies on the force feedback control algorithm and on an active motion catheter with an embedded actuation mechanism are underway. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2010, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The consequence of colour in the accurate interpretation of Sestamibi cardiac studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dojcinovska, S.

    2001-01-01

    This research project is aimed at investigating the effect of colour in the accurate interpretation of Sestamibi cardiac studies. This project looks at the way the chosen colour for display may influence the final diagnosis. Four patient studies were chosen for this study, and each patient's films were displayed in three different colours, these include 'cool' - a combination of purples, reds, blues and yellow, 'smart' (mainly red and orange), and 'black and white' - consisting of various shades of grey. Subjects were AS/Ked to answer a questionnaire related to the studies. The subjects surveyed were from four different groups: Nuclear Medicine physicians, Nuclear Medicine technologists, general practitioners and members of the public. The results support the use of 'cool' colours for display, especially when reports with films are sent to general practitioners. Researches into the human visual system found that colours in the low wavelength end of spectrum seemed to be more easily detected by human eye. This study showed that there was a possible link between colour and the accuracy of diagnosis for Sestamibi cardiac films

  3. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hye-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. (orig.)

  4. Cardiac tumors: optimal cardiac MR sequences and spectrum of imaging appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the optimal cardiac MRI sequences for and the spectrum of imaging appearances of cardiac tumors. CONCLUSION: Recent technologic advances in cardiac MRI have resulted in the rapid acquisition of images of the heart with high spatial and temporal resolution and excellent myocardial tissue characterization. Cardiac MRI provides optimal assessment of the location, functional characteristics, and soft-tissue features of cardiac tumors, allowing accurate differentiation of benign and malignant lesions.

  5. Accurate wavelength prediction of photonic crystal resonant reflection and applications in refractive index measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron L. C.

    2014-01-01

    and superstrate materials. The importance of accounting for material dispersion in order to obtain accurate simulation results is highlighted, and a method for doing so using an iterative approach is demonstrated. Furthermore, an application for the model is demonstrated, in which the material dispersion......In the past decade, photonic crystal resonant reflectors have been increasingly used as the basis for label-free biochemical assays in lab-on-a-chip applications. In both designing and interpreting experimental results, an accurate model describing the optical behavior of such structures...... is essential. Here, an analytical method for precisely predicting the absolute positions of resonantly reflected wavelengths is presented. The model is experimentally verified to be highly accurate using nanoreplicated, polymer-based photonic crystal grating reflectors with varying grating periods...

  6. Measuring solar reflectance - Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul [Heat Island Group, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective ''cool colored'' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland US latitudes, this metric R{sub E891BN} can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {<=} 5:12 [23 ]) by as much as 89 W m{sup -2}, and underestimate its peak surface temperature by up to 5 K. Using R{sub E891BN} to characterize roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear sky air mass one global horizontal (''AM1GH'') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer. (author)

  7. Measuring solar reflectance Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

    2010-05-14

    Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective 'cool colored' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland U.S. latitudes, this metric RE891BN can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {le} 5:12 [23{sup o}]) by as much as 89 W m{sup -2}, and underestimate its peak surface temperature by up to 5 K. Using R{sub E891BN} to characterize roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool-roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear-sky air mass one global horizontal ('AM1GH') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer.

  8. Validation of measurements of Fourier phase and amplitude analysis of technetium99 gated cardiac scans using artificial hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiannikas, J.; Takatani, S.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Underwood, D.A.; Cook, S.A.; Go, R.T.; Napoli, C.; Nose, Y.

    1982-01-01

    The use of artificial hearts, developed for total heart replacement programs, allows assessment of the accuracy of measuring the first Fourier component phase and amplitude when applied to gated cardiac technetium 99 scans. In the extreme example of asynchrony of ventricular contraction in coronary artery disease that of ventricular aneurysms, the first Fourier component measurements of amplitude were highly correlated to volume increases suggesting that the calculated amplitude accurately reflects volume changes. The calculated asynchrony using Fourier analysis of the gated technetium 99 studies of two artificial hearts was highly accurate when compared to the predetermined calculation of phase angle difference and hence degree of asynchrony. The studies suggest that measurement of phase and amplitude using the first Fourier component of time-activity waves of gated cardiac technetium 99 studies accurately measure degree of asynchrony and volume changes respectively

  9. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westhall, Erik; Rossetti, Andrea O.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Wesenberg Kjaer, Troels; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Rosén, Ingmar; Åneman, Anders; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P.; Cronberg, Tobias; Saxena, Manoj; Miller, Jennene; Inskip, Deborah; Macken, Lewis; Finfer, Simon; Eatough, Noel; Hammond, Naomi; Bass, Frances; Yarad, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Anne; Bird, Simon; Jewell, Timothy; Davies, Gareth; Ng, Karl; Coward, Sharon; Stewart, Antony; Micallef, Sharon; Parker, Sharyn; Cortado, Dennis; Gould, Ann; Harward, Meg; Thompson, Kelly; Glass, Parisa; Myburgh, John; Smid, Ondrej; Belholavek, Jan; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Boerma, EC

    2016-01-01

    To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists, blinded to outcome,

  10. Cardiac tumours: non invasive detection and assessment by gated cardiac blood pool radionuclide imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, D.; Wainwright, R.; Brennand-Roper, D.; Deverall, P.; Sowton, E.; Maisey, M.

    1980-01-01

    Four patients with cardiac tumours were investigated by gated cardiac blood pool radionuclide imaging and echocardiography. Contrast angiocardiography was performed in three of the cases. Two left atrial tumours were detected by all three techniques. In one of these cases echocardiography alone showed additional mitral valve stenosis, but isotope imaging indicated tumour size more accurately. A large septal mass was detected by all three methods. In this patient echocardiography showed evidence of left ventricular outflow obstruction, confirmed at cardiac catheterisation, but gated isotope imaging provided a more detailed assessment of the abnormal cardiac anatomy. In the fourth case gated isotope imaging detected a large right ventricular tumour which had not been identified by echocardiography. Gated cardiac blood pool isotope imaging is a complementary technique to echocardiography for the non-invasive detection and assessment of cardiac tumours. (author)

  11. Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  12. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  13. Mathematical basis for the measurement of absolute and fractional cardiac output with diffusible tracers by compartmental analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charkes, N.D.

    1984-01-01

    Using compartmental analysis methods, a mathematical basis is given for the measurement of absolute and fractional cardiac output with diffusible tracers. Cardiac output is shown to be the product of the blood volume and the sum of the rate constants of tracer egress from blood, modified by a factor reflecting transcapillary diffusibility, the transfer fraction. The return of tracer to the blood and distant (intracellular) events are shown to play no role in the solution. Fractional cardiac output is the ratio of the rate constant of tracer egress from blood to an organ, divided by the sum of the egress constants from blood. Predominantly extracellular ions such as sodium or bromide are best suited for this technique, although theoretically any diffusible tracer whose compartmental model can be solved may be used. It is shown that fractional cardiac output is independent of the transfer fraction, and therefore can be measured accurately by tracers which are not freely diffusible

  14. Clinical application of cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    1999-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has replaced planar imaging techniques for myocardial scintigraphy. Thallium-201 was the dominant agent employed for myocardial perfusion imaging. Today new technetium-99m labelled radionuclides have been used as excellent alternatives to 201 Tl for detection of coronary artery disease, prognostification, and even assessment of myocardial viability. Pharmacologic stress imaging using either dipyridamole, adenosine or dobutamine is a substitute for exercise stress. Accurate determination of myocardial viability is vitally important for clinical decision making for patients with LV dysfunction who will most benefit from revascularization. Stunned and hibernated myocardium may result in profound regional LTV dysfunction in absence of necrosis. The various approach such as stress-redistribution-reinjection imaging, rest-redistribution imaging and stress-redistribution-24 hours delayed imaging has been utilized to assess myocardial viability with 201 Tl. Quantitative assessment of 99m Tc MIBI uptake reflect the degree of viability. 123 I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analog of norepinephrine, has been used for scintigraphic assessment of regional cardiac adrenergic innervation. Cardiac sympathetic denervation, assessed by 123 I-MIBG, due to ischemia in non-Q myocardial infarction and unstable angina has been shown. Quantitative cardiac MIBG scintigram was shown to have prognostic value in patients with severe congestive heart failure. 23 I-BMIPP (ρ-methyl-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid) has been used to assess myocardial fatty acid utilization. BMIPP has the memory function of ischemia in unstable angina, since decreased BMIPP uptake persists several days after ischemic episode. Nuclear cardiology in Japan has experienced an expansion in the techniques including use of new radionuclides, 99m Tc perfusion agents, 123 I-MIBG and 23 I-BMIPP and in associated clinical application to the various cardiac diseases

  15. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  16. Daily FOUR score assessment provides accurate prognosis of long-term outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, N; Venot, M; Verdonk, F; Chardon, A; Le Guennec, L; Llerena, M C; Raimbourg, Q; Taldir, G; Luque, Y; Fagon, J-Y; Guerot, E; Diehl, J-L

    2015-05-01

    The accurate prediction of outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is of major importance. The recently described Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) is well adapted to mechanically ventilated patients and does not depend on verbal response. To evaluate the ability of FOUR assessed by intensivists to accurately predict outcome in OHCA. We prospectively identified patients admitted for OHCA with a Glasgow Coma Scale below 8. Neurological assessment was performed daily. Outcome was evaluated at 6 months using Glasgow-Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Categories (GP-CPC). Eighty-five patients were included. At 6 months, 19 patients (22%) had a favorable outcome, GP-CPC 1-2, and 66 (78%) had an unfavorable outcome, GP-CPC 3-5. Compared to both brainstem responses at day 3 and evolution of Glasgow Coma Scale, evolution of FOUR score over the three first days was able to predict unfavorable outcome more precisely. Thus, absence of improvement or worsening from day 1 to day 3 of FOUR had 0.88 (0.79-0.97) specificity, 0.71 (0.66-0.76) sensitivity, 0.94 (0.84-1.00) PPV and 0.54 (0.49-0.59) NPV to predict unfavorable outcome. Similarly, the brainstem response of FOUR score at 0 evaluated at day 3 had 0.94 (0.89-0.99) specificity, 0.60 (0.50-0.70) sensitivity, 0.96 (0.92-1.00) PPV and 0.47 (0.37-0.57) NPV to predict unfavorable outcome. The absence of improvement or worsening from day 1 to day 3 of FOUR evaluated by intensivists provides an accurate prognosis of poor neurological outcome in OHCA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Digital subtraction angiography in cardiac diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Deuk Lin; Kim, Ki Jeong

    1986-01-01

    DSA was done in 133 examinations of 128 patients during 2 years consist of 9 examination of IV DSA and 124 examination of selective cardiac DSA after cardiac catheterization. Open heart surgery was performed in 90 patients and 12 patients showed discrepancy between pre-and post operative diagnosis, showing a total 86.7% of diagnostic accuracy with DSA. We experienced the significant reduction in dose of contrast media, 30-40% of dose of conventional cardiac angiography. It is concluded that DSA is useful in the evaluation of septal defects, valvular disease and other congenital heart disease. DSA is an accurate simple and safe method in evaluating of cardiac diseases.

  18. Accurate estimation of global and regional cardiac function by retrospectively gated multidetector row computed tomography. Comparison with cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belge, Benedicte; Pasquet, Agnes; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J.; Coche, Emmanuel; Gerber, Bernhard L.

    2006-01-01

    Retrospective reconstruction of ECG-gated images at different parts of the cardiac cycle allows the assessment of cardiac function by multi-detector row CT (MDCT) at the time of non-invasive coronary imaging. We compared the accuracy of such measurements by MDCT to cine magnetic resonance (MR). Forty patients underwent the assessment of global and regional cardiac function by 16-slice MDCT and cine MR. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes estimated by MDCT (134±51 and 67±56 ml) were similar to those by MR (137±57 and 70±60 ml, respectively; both P=NS) and strongly correlated (r=0.92 and r=0.95, respectively; both P<0.001). Consequently, LV ejection fractions by MDCT and MR were also similar (55±21 vs. 56±21%; P=NS) and highly correlated (r=0.95; P<0.001). Regional end-diastolic and end-systolic wall thicknesses by MDCT were highly correlated (r=0.84 and r=0.92, respectively; both P<0.001), but significantly lower than by MR (8.3±1.8 vs. 8.8±1.9 mm and 12.7±3.4 vs. 13.3±3.5 mm, respectively; both P<0.001). Values of regional wall thickening by MDCT and MR were similar (54±30 vs. 51±31%; P=NS) and also correlated well (r=0.91; P<0.001). Retrospectively gated MDCT can accurately estimate LV volumes, EF and regional LV wall thickening compared to cine MR. (orig.)

  19. Computational chemical imaging for cardiovascular pathology: chemical microscopic imaging accurately determines cardiac transplant rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Tiwari

    Full Text Available Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients' biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures.

  20. Accurate determination of high-risk coronary lesion type by multidetector cardiac computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasnag, Mirvat; Umakanthan, Branavan; Foster, Gary P

    2008-07-01

    Coronary arteriography (CA) is the standard method to image coronary lesions. Multidetector cardiac computerized tomography (MDCT) provides high-resolution images of coronary arteries, allowing a noninvasive alternative to determine lesion type. To date, no studies have assessed the ability of MDCT to categorize coronary lesion types. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of lesion type categorization by MDCT using CA as a reference standard. Patients who underwent both MDCT and CA within 2 months of each other were enrolled. MDCT and CA images were reviewed in a blinded fashion. Lesions were categorized according to the SCAI classification system (Types I-IV). The origin, proximal and middle segments of the major arteries were analyzed. Each segment comprised a data point for comparison. Analysis was performed using the Spearman Correlation Test. Four hundred eleven segments were studied, of which 110 had lesions. The lesion distribution was as follows: 35 left anterior descending (LAD), 29 circumflex (Cx), 31 right coronary artery (RCA), 2 ramus intermedius, 8 diagonal, 4 obtuse marginal and 2 left internal mammary arteries. Correlations between MDCT and CA were significant in all major vessels (LAD, Cx, RCA) (p < 0.001). The overall correlation coefficient was 0.67. Concordance was strong for lesion Types II-IV (97%) and poor for Type I (30%). High-risk coronary lesion types can be accurately categorized by MDCT. This ability may allow MDCT to play an important noninvasive role in the planning of coronary interventions.

  1. An interesting case of cryptogenic stroke in a young man due to left ventricular non-compaction: role of cardiac MRI in the accurate diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Arun; Das, Anindita; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2014-06-24

    A 28-year-old man arrived for an outpatient cardiac MRI (CMR) study to evaluate cardiac structure. At the age of 24 the patient presented with acute onset expressive aphasia and was diagnosed with ischaemic stroke. Echocardiography at that time was reported as 'apical wall thickening consistent with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy'. CMR revealed a moderately dilated left ventricle with abnormal appearance of the left ventricular (LV) apical segments. Further evaluation was consistent with a diagnosis of LV non-compaction (LVNC) cardiomyopathy with a ratio of non-compacted to compacted myocardium measuring 3. There was extensive delayed hyperenhancement signal involving multiple segments representing a significant myocardial scar which is shown to have a prognostic role. Our patient, with no significant cerebrovascular risk factors, would likely have had an embolic stroke. This case demonstrates the role of CMR in accurately diagnosing LVNC in a patient with young stroke where prior echocardiography was non-diagnostic. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Structural and functional screening in human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes accurately identifies cardiotoxicity of multiple drug types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doherty, Kimberly R., E-mail: kimberly.doherty@quintiles.com; Talbert, Dominique R.; Trusk, Patricia B.; Moran, Diarmuid M.; Shell, Scott A.; Bacus, Sarah

    2015-05-15

    Safety pharmacology studies that evaluate new drug entities for potential cardiac liability remain a critical component of drug development. Current studies have shown that in vitro tests utilizing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) may be beneficial for preclinical risk evaluation. We recently demonstrated that an in vitro multi-parameter test panel assessing overall cardiac health and function could accurately reflect the associated clinical cardiotoxicity of 4 FDA-approved targeted oncology agents using hiPS-CM. The present studies expand upon this initial observation to assess whether this in vitro screen could detect cardiotoxicity across multiple drug classes with known clinical cardiac risks. Thus, 24 drugs were examined for their effect on both structural (viability, reactive oxygen species generation, lipid formation, troponin secretion) and functional (beating activity) endpoints in hiPS-CM. Using this screen, the cardiac-safe drugs showed no effects on any of the tests in our panel. However, 16 of 18 compounds with known clinical cardiac risk showed drug-induced changes in hiPS-CM by at least one method. Moreover, when taking into account the Cmax values, these 16 compounds could be further classified depending on whether the effects were structural, functional, or both. Overall, the most sensitive test assessed cardiac beating using the xCELLigence platform (88.9%) while the structural endpoints provided additional insight into the mechanism of cardiotoxicity for several drugs. These studies show that a multi-parameter approach examining both cardiac cell health and function in hiPS-CM provides a comprehensive and robust assessment that can aid in the determination of potential cardiac liability. - Highlights: • 24 drugs were tested for cardiac liability using an in vitro multi-parameter screen. • Changes in beating activity were the most sensitive in predicting cardiac risk. • Structural effects add in

  3. Left and right ventricle assessment with Cardiac CT: validation study vs. Cardiac MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffei, Erica; Seitun, Sara [Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Cardiovascular Radiology Unit, Monastier di Treviso (Italy); Messalli, Giancarlo; Catalano, Onofrio [SDN Foundation - IRCCS, Naples (Italy); Martini, Chiara; Cademartiri, Filippo [Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Cardiovascular Radiology Unit, Monastier di Treviso (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Nieman, Koen; Rossi, Alexia; Mollet, Nico R. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Guaricci, Andrea I. [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Foggia, Department of Cardiology, Foggia (Italy); Tedeschi, Carlo [Ospedale San Gennaro, Department of Cardiology, Naples (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    To compare Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Computed Tomography (CT) for the assessment of left (LV) and right (RV) ventricular functional parameters. Seventy nine patients underwent both Cardiac CT and Cardiac MR. Images were acquired using short axis (SAX) reconstructions for CT and 2D cine b-SSFP (balanced-steady state free precession) SAX sequence for MR, and evaluated using dedicated software. CT and MR images showed good agreement: LV EF (Ejection Fraction) (52 {+-} 14% for CT vs. 52 {+-} 14% for MR; r = 0.73; p > 0.05); RV EF (47 {+-} 12% for CT vs. 47 {+-} 12% for MR; r = 0.74; p > 0.05); LV EDV (End Diastolic Volume) (74 {+-} 21 ml/m{sup 2} for CT vs. 76 {+-} 25 ml/m{sup 2} for MR; r = 0.59; p > 0.05); RV EDV (84 {+-} 25 ml/m{sup 2} for CT vs. 80 {+-} 23 ml/m{sup 2} for MR; r = 0.58; p > 0.05); LV ESV (End Systolic Volume)(37 {+-} 19 ml/m{sup 2} for CT vs. 38 {+-} 23 ml/m{sup 2} for MR; r = 0.76; p > 0.05); RV ESV (46 {+-} 21 ml/m{sup 2} for CT vs. 43 {+-} 18 ml/m{sup 2} for MR; r = 0.70; p > 0.05). Intra- and inter-observer variability were good, and the performance of CT was maintained for different EF subgroups. Cardiac CT provides accurate and reproducible LV and RV volume parameters compared with MR, and can be considered as a reliable alternative for patients who are not suitable to undergo MR. circle Cardiac-CT is able to provide Left and Right Ventricular function. circle Cardiac-CT is accurate as MR for LV and RV volume assessment. (orig.)

  4. Quantitatively accurate activity measurements with a dedicated cardiac SPECT camera: Physical phantom experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmoghaddas, Amir, E-mail: apour@ottawaheart.ca; Wells, R. Glenn [Physics Department, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6, Canada and Cardiology, The University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y4W7 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Recently, there has been increased interest in dedicated cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanners with pinhole collimation and improved detector technology due to their improved count sensitivity and resolution over traditional parallel-hole cameras. With traditional cameras, energy-based approaches are often used in the clinic for scatter compensation because they are fast and easily implemented. Some of the cardiac cameras use cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detectors which can complicate the use of energy-based scatter correction (SC) due to the low-energy tail—an increased number of unscattered photons detected with reduced energy. Modified energy-based scatter correction methods can be implemented, but their level of accuracy is unclear. In this study, the authors validated by physical phantom experiments the quantitative accuracy and reproducibility of easily implemented correction techniques applied to {sup 99m}Tc myocardial imaging with a CZT-detector-based gamma camera with multiple heads, each with a single-pinhole collimator. Methods: Activity in the cardiac compartment of an Anthropomorphic Torso phantom (Data Spectrum Corporation) was measured through 15 {sup 99m}Tc-SPECT acquisitions. The ratio of activity concentrations in organ compartments resembled a clinical {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi scan and was kept consistent across all experiments (1.2:1 heart to liver and 1.5:1 heart to lung). Two background activity levels were considered: no activity (cold) and an activity concentration 1/10th of the heart (hot). A plastic “lesion” was placed inside of the septal wall of the myocardial insert to simulate the presence of a region without tracer uptake and contrast in this lesion was calculated for all images. The true net activity in each compartment was measured with a dose calibrator (CRC-25R, Capintec, Inc.). A 10 min SPECT image was acquired using a dedicated cardiac camera with CZT detectors (Discovery NM530c, GE

  5. Prevention of sudden cardiac death in young athletes: controversies and conundrums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Strategies for preventing sudden cardiac death in young athletes are predicated on the assumption that: (1) these events reflect pre-existing, clinically silent heart disease, and (2) means for detecting these abnormalities on the pre-participation evaluation are both feasible and accurate. Recent controversy has surrounded both of these presumptions. Some evidence suggests that the myocardial hypertrophy accompanying sports training itself might serve as a substrate for fatal arrhythmias. As well, vigorous debate has arisen over the optimal content of the pre-participation evaluation, particularly regarding the inclusion of routine screening electrocardiograms. As the rarity of these fatal events does not lend itself to an experimental approach, such disagreements are not easily resolved. Consequently, it is expected that decisions regarding approaches to prevention of sudden death in athletes will be dictated largely by region-specific financial, political, and cultural factors. This chapter examines the aetiologies of sudden cardiac death in young athletes as well as the controversies surrounding the prevention of these tragedies. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Cardiac expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is increased in obesity and serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, Jan M; Hellgren, Lars I

    2009-01-01

    Obesity causes lipid accumulation in the heart and may lead to lipotoxic heart disease. Traditionally, the size of the cardiac triglyceride pool is thought to reflect the balance between uptake and beta-oxidation of fatty acids. However, triglycerides can also be exported from cardiomyocytes via...... secretion of apolipoproteinB-containing (apoB) lipoproteins. Lipoprotein formation depends on expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP); the mouse expresses two isoforms of MTP, A and B. Since many aspects of the link between obesity-induced cardiac disease and cardiac lipid metabolism...... remain unknown, we investigated how cardiac lipoprotein synthesis affects cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes, insulin sensitivity, and function in obese mice. Heart-specific ablation of MTP-A in mice using Cre-loxP technology impaired upregulation of MTP expression...

  7. Systems and methods for remote long standoff biometric identification using microwave cardiac signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, William R. (Inventor); Talukder, Ashit (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Systems and methods for remote, long standoff biometric identification using microwave cardiac signals are provided. In one embodiment, the invention relates to a method for remote biometric identification using microwave cardiac signals, the method including generating and directing first microwave energy in a direction of a person, receiving microwave energy reflected from the person, the reflected microwave energy indicative of cardiac characteristics of the person, segmenting a signal indicative of the reflected microwave energy into a waveform including a plurality of heart beats, identifying patterns in the microwave heart beats waveform, and identifying the person based on the identified patterns and a stored microwave heart beats waveform.

  8. Preoperative cardiac computed tomography for demonstration of congenital cardiac septal defect in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hye-Joung; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Joon-Won; Lim, Tae-Hwan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Cardiac Imaging Center, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae-Hee; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Song, Jae-Kwan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Cardiology and Heart Institute, Cardiac Imaging Center, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joon Bum; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Cardiothoracic surgery, Cardiac Imaging Center, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the role of preoperative cardiac computed tomography (CT) for adults with congenital cardiac septal defect (CSD). Sixty-five consecutive patients who underwent preoperative CT and surgery for CSD were included. The diagnostic accuracy of CT and the concordance rate of the subtype classification of CSD were evaluated using surgical findings as the reference standard. Sixty-five patients without CSD who underwent cardiac valve surgery were used as a control group. An incremental value of CT over echocardiography was described retrospectively. Sensitivity and specificity of CT for diagnosis of CSD were 95 % and 100 %, respectively. The concordance rate of subtype classification was 91 % in CT and 92 % in echocardiography. The maximum size of the defect measured by CT correlated well with surgical measurement (r = 0.82), and the limit of agreement was -0.9 ± 7.42 mm. In comparison with echocardiography, CT was able to detect combined abnormalities in three cases, and exclusively provided correct subtype classification or clarified suspected abnormal findings found on echocardiography in seven cases. Cardiac CT can accurately demonstrates CSD in preoperative adult patients. CT may have an incremental role in preoperative planning, particularly in those with more complex anatomy. (orig.)

  9. Cardiac expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is increased in obesity and serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil D Bartels

    Full Text Available Obesity causes lipid accumulation in the heart and may lead to lipotoxic heart disease. Traditionally, the size of the cardiac triglyceride pool is thought to reflect the balance between uptake and beta-oxidation of fatty acids. However, triglycerides can also be exported from cardiomyocytes via secretion of apolipoproteinB-containing (apoB lipoproteins. Lipoprotein formation depends on expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP; the mouse expresses two isoforms of MTP, A and B. Since many aspects of the link between obesity-induced cardiac disease and cardiac lipid metabolism remain unknown, we investigated how cardiac lipoprotein synthesis affects cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes, insulin sensitivity, and function in obese mice. Heart-specific ablation of MTP-A in mice using Cre-loxP technology impaired upregulation of MTP expression in response to increased fatty acid availability during fasting and fat feeding. This resulted in cardiac triglyceride accumulation but unaffected cardiac insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Long-term fat-feeding of male C57Bl/6 mice increased cardiac triglycerides, induced cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes and attenuated heart function. Abolishing cardiac triglyceride accumulation in fat-fed mice by overexpression of an apoB transgene in the heart prevented the induction of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes and improved heart function. The results suggest that in obesity, the physiological increase of cardiac MTP expression serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation albeit without major effects on cardiac insulin sensitivity. Nevertheless, the data suggest that genetically increased lipoprotein secretion prevents development of obesity-induced lipotoxic heart disease.

  10. An Interdisciplinary Education Initiative to Promote Blood Conservation in Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Tamara S; Sherrod, Brad; Kindell, Linda

    Transfusion practices vary extensively for patients undergoing cardiac surgical procedures, leading to high utilization of blood products despite evidence that transfusions negatively impact outcomes. An important factor affecting transfusion practice is recognition of the importance of teams in cardiac surgery care delivery. This article reports an evidenced-based practice (EBP) initiative constructed using the Society of Thoracic Surgery (STS) 2011 Blood Conservation Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) to standardize transfusion practice across the cardiac surgery team at a large academic medical center. Project outcomes included: a) Improvement in clinician knowledge related to the STS Blood Conservation CPGs; and b) Decreased blood product utilization for patients undergoing cardiac surgical procedures. Participants' scores reflected an improvement in the overall knowledge of the STS CPGs noting a 31.1% (p = 0.012) increase in the number of participants whose practice reflected the Blood Conservation CPGs post intervention. Additionally, there was a reduction in overall blood product utilization for all patients undergoing cardiac surgery procedures post intervention (p = 0.005). Interdisciplinary education based on the STS Blood Conservation CPGs is an effective way to reduce transfusion practice variability and decrease utilization of blood products during cardiac surgery.

  11. Dual-Energy Computed Tomography Gemstone Spectral Imaging: A Novel Technique to Determine Human Cardiac Calculus Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Li; Chang, Hsiao-Huang; Ko, Shih-Chi; Huang, Pei-Jung; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the chemical composition of any calculus in different human organs is essential for choosing the best treatment strategy for patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the capability of determining the chemical composition of a human cardiac calculus using gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) mode on a single-source dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in vitro. The cardiac calculus was directly scanned on the Discovery CT750 HD FREEdom Edition using GSI mode, in vitro. A portable fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy was also applied to verify the quantitative accuracy of the DECT measurements. The results of spectral DECT measurements indicate that effective Z values in 3 designated positions located in this calculus were 15.02 to 15.47, which are close to values of 15.74 to 15.86, corresponding to the effective Z values of calcium apatite and hydroxyapatite. The Raman spectral data were also reflected by the predominant Raman peak at 960 cm for hydroxyapatite and the minor peak at 875 cm for calcium apatite. A potential single-source DECT with GSI mode was first used to examine the morphological characteristics and chemical compositions of a giant human cardiac calculus, in vitro. The CT results were consistent with the Raman spectral data, suggesting that spectral CT imaging techniques could be accurately used to diagnose and characterize the compositional materials in the cardiac calculus.

  12. Fully automated laboratory and field-portable goniometer used for performing accurate and precise multiangular reflectance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Justin D.; Bachmann, Charles M.; Ambeau, Brittany L.; Faulring, Jason W.; Ruiz Torres, Andres J.; Badura, Gregory; Myers, Emily

    2017-10-01

    Field-portable goniometers are created for a wide variety of applications. Many of these applications require specific types of instruments and measurement schemes and must operate in challenging environments. Therefore, designs are based on the requirements that are specific to the application. We present a field-portable goniometer that was designed for measuring the hemispherical-conical reflectance factor (HCRF) of various soils and low-growing vegetation in austere coastal and desert environments and biconical reflectance factors in laboratory settings. Unlike some goniometers, this system features a requirement for "target-plane tracking" to ensure that measurements can be collected on sloped surfaces, without compromising angular accuracy. The system also features a second upward-looking spectrometer to measure the spatially dependent incoming illumination, an integrated software package to provide full automation, an automated leveling system to ensure a standard frame of reference, a design that minimizes the obscuration due to self-shading to measure the opposition effect, and the ability to record a digital elevation model of the target region. This fully automated and highly mobile system obtains accurate and precise measurements of HCRF in a wide variety of terrain and in less time than most other systems while not sacrificing consistency or repeatability in laboratory environments.

  13. Constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution for the assessment of cardiac output in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; Mortensen, Stefan; Munch, G D W

    2016-01-01

    To determine the accuracy and precision of constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution cardiac output (CITT-Q) assessment during exercise in humans, using indocyanine green (ICG) dilution and bolus transpulmonary thermodilution (BTD) as reference methods, cardiac output (Q) was determined......: 6.1-11.1%). In conclusion, cardiac output can be precisely and accurately determined with constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution in exercising humans....

  14. Chemical and structural composition study through transmission and reflection electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis of damaged duramater cardiac valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verginelli, G.; Didio, L.J.A.; Puig, L.B.; Allen, D.J.; Highinson, G.H.; Zerbini, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Ten malfunctioning durameter aortic prosthesis, excised surgically after 44 to 54 months of implantation were studied through transmission and reflection electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis. Duramater extracted at necropsy but not used for valve prosthesis and duramater aortic prosthesis not implanted in patients were used as controls. It was concluded that homologous duramater valves present subcellular changes following implantation, with degenerating and proliferating areas which could correspond either to normal adaptation or consequence of degeneration - rebuilding which begins with implantation; it is also emphazised the need for ultramicroscopic studies in evaluating biological tissues and establishing its applicability in cardiac surgery. (M.A.C.) [pt

  15. Quantitative contrast-enhanced first-pass cardiac perfusion MRI at 3 tesla with accurate arterial input function and myocardial wall enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Elodie; Kim, Daniel; Chung, Sohae; Axel, Leon

    2011-09-01

    To develop, and validate in vivo, a robust quantitative first-pass perfusion cardiovascular MR (CMR) method with accurate arterial input function (AIF) and myocardial wall enhancement. A saturation-recovery (SR) pulse sequence was modified to sequentially acquire multiple slices after a single nonselective saturation pulse at 3 Tesla. In each heartbeat, an AIF image is acquired in the aortic root with a short time delay (TD) (50 ms), followed by the acquisition of myocardial images with longer TD values (∼150-400 ms). Longitudinal relaxation rates (R(1) = 1/T(1)) were calculated using an ideal saturation recovery equation based on the Bloch equation, and corresponding gadolinium contrast concentrations were calculated assuming fast water exchange condition. The proposed method was validated against a reference multi-point SR method by comparing their respective R(1) measurements in the blood and left ventricular myocardium, before and at multiple time-points following contrast injections, in 7 volunteers. R(1) measurements with the proposed method and reference multi-point method were strongly correlated (r > 0.88, P < 10(-5)) and in good agreement (mean difference ±1.96 standard deviation 0.131 ± 0.317/0.018 ± 0.140 s(-1) for blood/myocardium, respectively). The proposed quantitative first-pass perfusion CMR method measured accurate R(1) values for quantification of AIF and myocardial wall contrast agent concentrations in 3 cardiac short-axis slices, in a total acquisition time of 523 ms per heartbeat. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Effects of Aesthetic Chills on a Cardiac Signature of Emotionality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sumpf

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that a cardiac signature of emotionality (referred to as EK, which can be computed from the standard 12 lead electrocardiogram, ECG, predicts inter-individual differences in the tendency to experience and express positive emotion. Here, we investigated whether EK values can be transiently modulated during stimulation with participant-selected music pieces and film scenes that elicit strongly positive emotion.The phenomenon of aesthetic chills, as indicated by measurable piloerection on the forearm, was used to accurately locate moments of peak emotional responses during stimulation. From 58 healthy participants, continuous EK values, heart rate, and respiratory frequency were recorded during stimulation with film scenes and music pieces, and were related to the aesthetic chills. EK values, as well as heart rate, increased significantly during moments of peak positive emotion accompanied by piloerection.These results are the first to provide evidence for an influence of momentary psychological state on a cardiac signature of emotional personality (as reflected in EK values. The possibility to modulate ECG amplitude signatures via stimulation with emotionally significant music pieces and film scenes opens up new perspectives for the use of emotional peak experiences in the therapy of disorders characterized by flattened emotionality, such as depression or schizoid personality disorder.

  17. Electrophysiological Monitoring of Brain Injury and Recovery after Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxian Deng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reliable prognostic methods for cerebral functional outcome of post cardiac-arrest (CA patients are necessary, especially since therapeutic hypothermia (TH as a standard treatment. Traditional neurophysiological prognostic indicators, such as clinical examination and chemical biomarkers, may result in indecisive outcome predictions and do not directly reflect neuronal activity, though they have remained the mainstay of clinical prognosis. The most recent advances in electrophysiological methods—electroencephalography (EEG pattern, evoked potential (EP and cellular electrophysiological measurement—were developed to complement these deficiencies, and will be examined in this review article. EEG pattern (reactivity and continuity provides real-time and accurate information for early-stage (particularly in the first 24 h hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injury patients with high sensitivity. However, the signal is easily affected by external stimuli, thus the measurements of EP should be combined with EEG background to validate the predicted neurologic functional result. Cellular electrophysiology, such as multi-unit activity (MUA and local field potentials (LFP, has strong potential for improving prognostication and therapy by offering additional neurophysiologic information to understand the underlying mechanisms of therapeutic methods. Electrophysiology provides reliable and precise prognostication on both global and cellular levels secondary to cerebral injury in cardiac arrest patients treated with TH.

  18. Effects of Aesthetic Chills on a Cardiac Signature of Emotionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumpf, Maria; Jentschke, Sebastian; Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a cardiac signature of emotionality (referred to as EK, which can be computed from the standard 12 lead electrocardiogram, ECG), predicts inter-individual differences in the tendency to experience and express positive emotion. Here, we investigated whether EK values can be transiently modulated during stimulation with participant-selected music pieces and film scenes that elicit strongly positive emotion. The phenomenon of aesthetic chills, as indicated by measurable piloerection on the forearm, was used to accurately locate moments of peak emotional responses during stimulation. From 58 healthy participants, continuous EK values, heart rate, and respiratory frequency were recorded during stimulation with film scenes and music pieces, and were related to the aesthetic chills. EK values, as well as heart rate, increased significantly during moments of peak positive emotion accompanied by piloerection. These results are the first to provide evidence for an influence of momentary psychological state on a cardiac signature of emotional personality (as reflected in EK values). The possibility to modulate ECG amplitude signatures via stimulation with emotionally significant music pieces and film scenes opens up new perspectives for the use of emotional peak experiences in the therapy of disorders characterized by flattened emotionality, such as depression or schizoid personality disorder.

  19. Integrative Cardiac Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    primary cardiac arrest. Circulation. 1998;97(2):155Y160. 8. Sesso HD, Lee IM, Gaziano JM, Rexrode KM, Glynn RJ, Buring JE. Maternal and paternal ...to signal transduction, inflammation, and host–pathogen interactions .27 Whole blood RNA isolation systems such as PAXgene accurately capture in vivo...the effect of healthy behaviors on leukocyte function and leukocyte–endothelium interactions that are important for cardiovascular health

  20. Manifold learning based ECG-free free-breathing cardiac CINE MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Muhammad; Atkinson, David; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Schaeffter, Tobias; Prieto, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    To present and validate a manifold learning (ML)-based method that can estimate both cardiac and respiratory navigator signals from electrocardiogram (ECG)-free free-breathing cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to achieve self-gated retrospective CINE reconstruction. In this work the use of the ML method is demonstrated for 2D cardiac CINE to achieve both cardiac and respiratory self-gating without the need of an external navigator or ECG signal. This is achieved by sequentially applying ML to two sets of retrospectively reconstructed real-time images with differing temporal resolutions. A 1D cardiac signal is estimated by applying ML to high temporal resolution real-time images reconstructed from the acquired data. Using the estimated cardiac signal, a 1D respiratory signal was obtained by applying the ML method to low temporal resolution images reconstructed from the same acquired data for each cardiac cycle. Data were acquired in five volunteers with a 2D golden angle radial trajectory in a balanced steady-state free precession (b-SSFP) acquisition. The accuracy of the estimated cardiac signal was calculated as the standard deviation of the temporal difference between the estimated signal and the recorded ECG. The correlation between the estimated respiratory signal and standard pencil beam navigator signal was evaluated. Gated CINE reconstructions (20 cardiac phases per cycle, temporal resolution ∼30 msec) using the estimated cardiac and respiratory signals were qualitatively compared against conventional ECG-gated breath-hold CINE acquisitions. Accurate cardiac signals were estimated with the proposed method, with an error standard deviation in comparison to ECG lower than 20 msec. Respiratory signals estimated with the proposed method achieved a mean cross-correlation of 94% with respect to standard pencil beam navigator signals. Good quality visual scores of 2.80 ± 0.45 (scores from 0, bad, to 4, excellent quality) were observed for the

  1. Hydrogen sulfide detection based on reflection: from a poison test approach of ancient China to single-cell accurate localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hao; Ma, Zhuoran; Wang, Song; Gong, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2014-08-05

    With the inspiration of an ancient Chinese poison test approach, we report a rapid hydrogen sulfide detection strategy in specific areas of live cells using silver needles with good spatial resolution of 2 × 2 μm(2). Besides the accurate-localization ability, this reflection-based strategy also has attractive merits of convenience and robust response when free pretreatment and short detection time are concerned. The success of endogenous H2S level evaluation in cellular cytoplasm and nuclear of human A549 cells promises the application potential of our strategy in scientific research and medical diagnosis.

  2. Comparison of dye dilution method to radionuclide techniques for cardiac output determination in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, S.S.; Robayo, J.R.; Porter, W.; Smith, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    A study was undertaken to identify the most accurate /sup 99m/Tc-labeled radiopharmaceutical and to determine the accuracy of a noninvasive radionuclide technique or cardiac output determinations. Phase I employed sodium pertechnetate, stannous pyrophosphate with sodium pertechnetate, /sup 99m/Tc red blood cells, and /sup 99m/Tc human serum albumin as radionuclide tracers. Cardiac output was determined by the dye dilution method and then by the invasive radionuclide technique. A pairied t test and regression analysis indicated that /sup 99m/Tc human serum albumin was the most accurate radiopharmaceutical for cardiac output determinations, and the results compared favorably to those obtained by the dye dilution method. In Phase II, /sup 99m/Tc human serum albumin was used as the radionuclide tracer for cardiac output determinations with the noninvasive technique. The results compared favorably to those obtained by the dye dilution method

  3. Evaluation of Paradoxical Septal Motion Following Cardiac Surgery with Gated Cardiac Blood Pool Scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seong Hae; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Cho, Bo Youn; Koh, Chang Soon; Suh, Kyung Phil

    1985-01-01

    The development of paradoxical interventricular septal motion is a common consequence of cardiopulmonary bypass operation. The reason for this postoperative abnormal septal motion is not clear. 41 patients were studied preoperatively and postoperatively with radionuclide blood pool scan to evaluate the frequency of development of paradoxical septal motion with right ventricular volume overload before surgery and the frequency of development of paradoxical septal motion after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, and to evaluate the change of EF related to the development of paradoxical septal motion after cardiac surgery. The results were as follows; 1) 7 of 41 patients with right ventricular volume overload (that is 17%) showed paradoxical septal motion before surgery. But 13 of 34 patients (that is 42%) had paradoxical septal motion after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. So open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass related the development of paradoxical septal motion after surgery. 2) EF significantly decreased in patients who developed paradoxical septal motion after surgery, whereas the EF did not change in the patients who retained normal interventricular septal motion after surgery. So paradoxical septal motion usually reflected some diminution of left ventricular function, immediately after cardiac surgery.

  4. Evaluation of Paradoxical Septal Motion Following Cardiac Surgery with Gated Cardiac Blood Pool Scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seong Hae; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Cho, Bo Youn; Koh, Chang Soon; Suh, Kyung Phil [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-03-15

    The development of paradoxical interventricular septal motion is a common consequence of cardiopulmonary bypass operation. The reason for this postoperative abnormal septal motion is not clear. 41 patients were studied preoperatively and postoperatively with radionuclide blood pool scan to evaluate the frequency of development of paradoxical septal motion with right ventricular volume overload before surgery and the frequency of development of paradoxical septal motion after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, and to evaluate the change of EF related to the development of paradoxical septal motion after cardiac surgery. The results were as follows; 1) 7 of 41 patients with right ventricular volume overload (that is 17%) showed paradoxical septal motion before surgery. But 13 of 34 patients (that is 42%) had paradoxical septal motion after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. So open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass related the development of paradoxical septal motion after surgery. 2) EF significantly decreased in patients who developed paradoxical septal motion after surgery, whereas the EF did not change in the patients who retained normal interventricular septal motion after surgery. So paradoxical septal motion usually reflected some diminution of left ventricular function, immediately after cardiac surgery.

  5. Fast and Accurate Hybrid Stream PCRTMSOLAR Radiative Transfer Model for Reflected Solar Spectrum Simulation in the Cloudy Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiguang; Liu, Xu; Wu, Wan; Kizer, Susan; Baize, Rosemary R.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid stream PCRTM-SOLAR model has been proposed for fast and accurate radiative transfer simulation. It calculates the reflected solar (RS) radiances with a fast coarse way and then, with the help of a pre-saved matrix, transforms the results to obtain the desired high accurate RS spectrum. The methodology has been demonstrated with the hybrid stream discrete ordinate (HSDO) radiative transfer (RT) model. The HSDO method calculates the monochromatic radiances using a 4-stream discrete ordinate method, where only a small number of monochromatic radiances are simulated with both 4-stream and a larger N-stream (N = 16) discrete ordinate RT algorithm. The accuracy of the obtained channel radiance is comparable to the result from N-stream moderate resolution atmospheric transmission version 5 (MODTRAN5). The root-mean-square errors are usually less than 5x10(exp -4) mW/sq cm/sr/cm. The computational speed is three to four-orders of magnitude faster than the medium speed correlated-k option MODTRAN5. This method is very efficient to simulate thousands of RS spectra under multi-layer clouds/aerosols and solar radiation conditions for climate change study and numerical weather prediction applications.

  6. Cardiac Autonomic Function Is Associated With the Coronary Microcirculatory Function in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Scholten, Bernt Johan; Hansen, Christian Stevns; Hasbak, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic dysfunction and cardiac microvascular dysfunction are diabetic complications associated with increased mortality, but the association between these has been difficult to assess. We applied new and sensitive methods to assess this in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM......). In a cross-sectional design, coronary flow reserve (CFR) assessed by cardiac (82)Rb-positron emission tomography/computed tomography, cardiac autonomic reflex tests, and heart rate variability indices were performed in 55 patients with T2DM, without cardiovascular disease, and in 28 control subjects. Cardiac....... A heart rate variability index, reflecting sympathetic and parasympathetic function (low-frequency power), and the late heart-to-mediastinum ratio, reflecting the function of adrenergic receptors and sympathetic activity, were positively correlated with CFR after adjustment for age and heart rate...

  7. Continuous cardiac troponin I release in Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feustel, Andreas; Hahn, Andreas; Schneider, Christian; Sieweke, Nicole; Franzen, Wolfgang; Gündüz, Dursun; Rolfs, Arndt; Tanislav, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder also affecting the heart. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of cardiac troponin I (cTNI) elevation, a sensitive parameter reflecting myocardial damage, in a smaller cohort of FD-patients, and to analyze whether persistent cTNI can be a suitable biomarker to assess cardiac dysfunction in FD. cTNI values were determined at least twice per year in 14 FD-patients (6 males and 8 females) regularly followed-up in our centre. The data were related to other parameters of heart function including cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI). Three patients (21%) without specific vascular risk factors other than FD had persistent cTNI-elevations (range 0.05-0.71 ng/ml, normal: gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in all three individuals with cTNI values ≥0.01, while none of the 11 patients with cTNI <0.01 showed a pathological enhancement (p<0.01). Two subjects with increased cTNI-values underwent coronary angiography, excluding relevant stenoses. A myocardial biopsy performed in one during this procedure demonstrated substantial accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in cardiomyocytes. Continuous cTNI elevation seems to occur in a substantial proportion of patients with FD. The high accordance with LGE, reflecting cardiac dysfunction, suggests that cTNI-elevation can be a useful laboratory parameter for assessing myocardial damage in FD.

  8. C.A.U.S.E.: Cardiac arrest ultra-sound exam--a better approach to managing patients in primary non-arrhythmogenic cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Caleb; Shuler, Klaus; Hannan, Hashibul; Sonyika, Chionesu; Likourezos, Antonios; Marshall, John

    2008-02-01

    Cardiac arrest is a condition frequently encountered by physicians in the hospital setting including the Emergency Department, Intensive Care Unit and medical/surgical wards. This paper reviews the current literature involving the use of ultrasound in resuscitation and proposes an algorithmic approach for the use of ultrasound during cardiac arrest. At present there is the need for a means of differentiating between various causes of cardiac arrest, which are not a direct result of a primary ventricular arrhythmia. Identifying the cause of pulseless electrical activity or asystole is important as the underlying cause is what guides management in such cases. This approach, incorporating ultrasound to manage cardiac arrest aids in the diagnosis of the most common and easily reversible causes of cardiac arrest not caused by primary ventricular arrhythmia, namely; severe hypovolemia, tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, and massive pulmonary embolus. These four conditions are addressed in this paper using four accepted emergency ultrasound applications to be performed during resuscitation of a cardiac arrest patient with the aim of determining the underlying cause of a cardiac arrest. Identifying the underlying cause of cardiac arrest represents the one of the greatest challenges of managing patients with asystole or PEA and accurate determination has the potential to improve management by guiding therapeutic decisions. We include several clinical images demonstrating examples of cardiac tamponade, massive pulmonary embolus, and severe hypovolemia secondary to abdominal aortic aneurysm. In conclusion, this protocol has the potential to reduce the time required to determine the etiology of a cardiac arrest and thus decrease the time between arrest and appropriate therapy.

  9. Accurate computer-aided quantification of left ventricular parameters : experience in 1555 cardiac magnetic resonance studies from the Framingham Heart Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hautvast, G.L.T.F.; Salton, C.J.; Chuang, M.L.; Breeuwer, M.; O'Donnel, C.J.; Manning, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of short-axis functional cardiac magnetic resonance images can be performed using automatic contour detection methods. The resulting myocardial contours must be reviewed and possibly corrected, which can be time-consuming, particularly when performed across all cardiac phases.

  10. Selectivity verification of cardiac troponin monoclonal antibodies for cardiac troponin detection by using conventional ELISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathil, M. F. M.; Arshad, M. K. Md; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Adzhri, R.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Hashim, U.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents preparation and characterization of conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for cardiac troponin detection to determine the selectivity of the cardiac troponin monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies, used to capture and bind the targets in this experiment, are cTnI monoclonal antibody (MAb-cTnI) and cTnT monoclonal antibody (MAb-cTnT), while both cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and T (cTnT) are used as targets. ELISA is performed inside two microtiter plates for MAb-cTnI and MAb-cTnT. For each plate, monoclonal antibodies are tested by various concentrations of cTnI and cTnT ranging from 0-6400 µg/l. The binding selectivity and level of detection between monoclonal antibodies and antigen are determined through visual observation based on the color change inside each well on the plate. ELISA reader is further used to quantitatively measured the optical density of the color changes, thus produced more accurate reading. The results from this experiment are utilized to justify the use of these monoclonal antibodies as bio-receptors for cardiac troponin detection by using field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors coupled with substrate-gate in the future.

  11. Pulmonary artery pulse pressure and wave reflection in chronic pulmonary thromboembolism and primary pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelain, V; Hervé, P; Lecarpentier, Y; Duroux, P; Simonneau, G; Chemla, D

    2001-03-15

    The purpose of this time-domain study was to compare pulmonary artery (PA) pulse pressure and wave reflection in chronic pulmonary thromboembolism (CPTE) and primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH). Pulmonary artery pressure waveform analysis provides a simple and accurate estimation of right ventricular afterload in the time-domain. Chronic pulmonary thromboembolism and PPH are both responsible for severe pulmonary hypertension. Chronic pulmonary thromboembolism and PPH predominantly involve proximal and distal arteries, respectively, and may lead to differences in PA pressure waveform. High-fidelity PA pressure was recorded in 14 patients (7 men/7 women, 46 +/- 14 years) with CPTE (n = 7) and PPH (n = 7). We measured thermodilution cardiac output, mean PA pressure (MPAP), PA pulse pressure (PAPP = systolic - diastolic PAP) and normalized PAPP (nPAPP = PPAP/MPAP). Wave reflection was quantified by measuring Ti, that is, the time between pressure upstroke and the systolic inflection point (Pi), deltaP, that is, the systolic PAP minus Pi difference, and the augmentation index (deltaP/PPAP). At baseline, CPTE and PPH had similar cardiac index (2.4 +/- 0.4 vs. 2.5 +/- 0.5 l/min/m2), mean PAP (59 +/- 9 vs. 59 +/- 10 mm Hg), PPAP (57 +/- 13 vs. 53 +/- 13 mm Hg) and nPPAP (0.97 +/- 0.16 vs. 0.89 +/- 0.13). Chronic pulmonary thromboembolism had shorter Ti (90 +/- 17 vs. 126 +/- 16 ms, p PPAP (0.26 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.09 +/- 0.07, p < 0.01). Our study indicated that: 1) CPTE and PPH with severe pulmonary hypertension had similar PA pulse pressure, and 2) wave reflection is elevated in both groups, and CPTE had increased and anticipated wave reflection as compared with PPH, thus suggesting differences in the pulsatile component of right ventricular afterload.

  12. Guidelines for autopsy investigation of sudden cardiac death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basso, Cristina; Burke, Margaret; Fornes, Paul; Gallagher, Patrick J.; de Gouveia, Rosa Henriques; Sheppard, Mary; Thiene, Gaetano; van der Wal, Allard

    2010-01-01

    Although sudden cardiac death is one of the most important mode of death in Western Countries, pathologists and public health physicians have not given this problem the attention it deserves. New methods of preventing potentially fatal arrhythmias have been developed, and the accurate diagnosis of

  13. Guidelines for autopsy investigation of sudden cardiac death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basso, C.; Burke, M.; Fornes, P.; Gallagher, P. J.; de Gouveia, R. H.; Sheppard, M.; Thiene, G.; van der Wal, A.

    2010-01-01

    Although sudden cardiac death is one of the most important mode of death in Western Countries, pathologists and public health physicians have not given this problem the attention it deserves. New methods of preventing potentially fatal arrhythmias have been developed and the accurate diagnosis of

  14. Guidelines for autopsy investigation of sudden cardiac death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basso, Cristina; Burke, Margaret; Fornes, Paul; Gallagher, Patrick J.; de Gouveia, Rosa Henriques; Sheppard, Mary; Thiene, Gaetano; van der Wal, Allard

    2008-01-01

    Although sudden cardiac death is one of the most important mode of death in Western Countries, pathologists and public health physicians have not given this problem the attention it deserves. New methods of preventing potentially fatal arrhythmias have been developed, and the accurate diagnosis of

  15. Simulation-based Mastery Learning Improves Cardiac Auscultation Skills in Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaghie, William C.; Cohen, Elaine R.; Kaye, Marsha; Wayne, Diane B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiac auscultation is a core clinical skill. However, prior studies show that trainee skills are often deficient and that clinical experience is not a proxy for competence. Objective To describe a mastery model of cardiac auscultation education and evaluate its effectiveness in improving bedside cardiac auscultation skills. Design Untreated control group design with pretest and posttest. Participants Third-year students who received a cardiac auscultation curriculum and fourth year students who did not. Intervention A cardiac auscultation curriculum consisting of a computer tutorial and a cardiac patient simulator. All third-year students were required to meet or exceed a minimum passing score (MPS) set by an expert panel at posttest. Measurements Diagnostic accuracy with simulated heart sounds and actual patients. Results Trained third-year students (n = 77) demonstrated significantly higher cardiac auscultation accuracy compared to untrained fourth year students (n = 31) in assessment of simulated heart sounds (93.8% vs. 73.9%, p auscultation curriculum consisting of deliberate practice with a computer-based tutorial and a cardiac patient simulator resulted in improved assessment of simulated heart sounds and more accurate examination of actual patients. PMID:20339952

  16. Continuous cardiac troponin I release in Fabry disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Feustel

    Full Text Available Fabry disease (FD is a rare lysosomal storage disorder also affecting the heart. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of cardiac troponin I (cTNI elevation, a sensitive parameter reflecting myocardial damage, in a smaller cohort of FD-patients, and to analyze whether persistent cTNI can be a suitable biomarker to assess cardiac dysfunction in FD.cTNI values were determined at least twice per year in 14 FD-patients (6 males and 8 females regularly followed-up in our centre. The data were related to other parameters of heart function including cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI.Three patients (21% without specific vascular risk factors other than FD had persistent cTNI-elevations (range 0.05-0.71 ng/ml, normal: <0.01. cMRI disclosed late gadolinium enhancement (LGE in all three individuals with cTNI values ≥0.01, while none of the 11 patients with cTNI <0.01 showed a pathological enhancement (p<0.01. Two subjects with increased cTNI-values underwent coronary angiography, excluding relevant stenoses. A myocardial biopsy performed in one during this procedure demonstrated substantial accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 in cardiomyocytes.Continuous cTNI elevation seems to occur in a substantial proportion of patients with FD. The high accordance with LGE, reflecting cardiac dysfunction, suggests that cTNI-elevation can be a useful laboratory parameter for assessing myocardial damage in FD.

  17. Dual-gated cardiac PET-clinical feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teraes, Mika; Kokki, Tommi; Noponen, Tommi; Hoppela, Erika; Sipilae, Hannu T.; Knuuti, Juhani [Turku PET Centre, PO BOX 52, Turku (Finland); Durand-Schaefer, Nicolas [General Electric Medical Systems, Buc (France); Pietilae, Mikko [Turku University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Turku (Finland); Kiss, Jan [Turku University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Turku (Finland)

    2010-03-15

    Both respiratory and cardiac motions reduce image quality in myocardial imaging. For accurate imaging of small structures such as vulnerable coronary plaques, simultaneous cardiac and respiratory gating is warranted. This study tests the feasibility of a recently developed robust method for cardiac-respiratory gating. List-mode data with triggers from respiratory and cardiac cycles are rearranged into dual-gated segments and reconstructed with standard algorithms of a commercial PET/CT scanner. Cardiac gates were defined as three fixed phases and one variable diastolic phase. Chest motion was measured with a respiratory gating device and post-processed to determine gates. Preservation of quantification in dual-gated images was tested with an IEC whole-body phantom. Minipig and human studies were performed to evaluate the feasibility of the method. In minipig studies, a coronary catheter with radioactive tip was guided in coronary artery for in vivo and ex vivo acquisitions. Dual gating in humans with suspected cardiac disorders was performed using 18-F-FDG as a tracer. The method was found feasible for in vivo imaging and the radioactive catheter tip was better resolved in gated images. In human studies, the dual gating was found feasible and easy for clinical routine. Maximal movement of myocardial surface in cranio-caudal direction was over 20 mm. The shape of myocardium was clearly different between the gates and papillary muscles become more visible in diastolic images. The first clinical experiences using robust cardiac-respiratory dual gating are encouraging. Further testing in larger clinical populations using tracers designed especially for plaque imaging is warranted. (orig.)

  18. Dual-gated cardiac PET-clinical feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraes, Mika; Kokki, Tommi; Noponen, Tommi; Hoppela, Erika; Sipilae, Hannu T.; Knuuti, Juhani; Durand-Schaefer, Nicolas; Pietilae, Mikko; Kiss, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Both respiratory and cardiac motions reduce image quality in myocardial imaging. For accurate imaging of small structures such as vulnerable coronary plaques, simultaneous cardiac and respiratory gating is warranted. This study tests the feasibility of a recently developed robust method for cardiac-respiratory gating. List-mode data with triggers from respiratory and cardiac cycles are rearranged into dual-gated segments and reconstructed with standard algorithms of a commercial PET/CT scanner. Cardiac gates were defined as three fixed phases and one variable diastolic phase. Chest motion was measured with a respiratory gating device and post-processed to determine gates. Preservation of quantification in dual-gated images was tested with an IEC whole-body phantom. Minipig and human studies were performed to evaluate the feasibility of the method. In minipig studies, a coronary catheter with radioactive tip was guided in coronary artery for in vivo and ex vivo acquisitions. Dual gating in humans with suspected cardiac disorders was performed using 18-F-FDG as a tracer. The method was found feasible for in vivo imaging and the radioactive catheter tip was better resolved in gated images. In human studies, the dual gating was found feasible and easy for clinical routine. Maximal movement of myocardial surface in cranio-caudal direction was over 20 mm. The shape of myocardium was clearly different between the gates and papillary muscles become more visible in diastolic images. The first clinical experiences using robust cardiac-respiratory dual gating are encouraging. Further testing in larger clinical populations using tracers designed especially for plaque imaging is warranted. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamare, F., E-mail: frederic.lamare@chu-bordeaux.fr; Fernandez, P. [Univ. Bordeaux, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Service de Médecine Nucléaire, Hôpital Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, 29609 Brest (France); Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Mendelstr. 11, 48149 Münster (Germany); Rimoldi, O. E. [Vita-Salute University and Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy and CNR Istituto di Bioimmagini e Fisiologia Molecolare, Milan (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    observed in the performance of the two motion models considered. Superior image SNR and contrast were seen using the affine respiratory motion model in combination with the diastole cardiac bin in comparison to the use of the whole cardiac cycle. In contrast, when simultaneously correcting for cardiac beating and respiration, the elastic respiratory motion model outperformed the affine model. In this context, four cardiac bins associated with eight respiratory amplitude bins seemed to be adequate. Conclusions: Considering the compensation of respiratory motion effects only, both affine and elastic based approaches led to an accurate resizing and positioning of the myocardium. The use of the diastolic phase combined with an affine model based respiratory motion correction may therefore be a simple approach leading to significant quality improvements in cardiac PET imaging. However, the best performance was obtained with the combined correction for both cardiac and respiratory movements considering all the dual-gated bins independently through the use of an elastic model based motion compensation.

  20. Genetic loci associated with heart rate variability and their effects on cardiac disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte, Ilja M; Munoz, M Loretto; Tragante, Vinicius; Amare, Azmeraw T; Jansen, Rick; Vaez, Ahmad; von der Heyde, Benedikt; Avery, Christy L; Bis, Joshua C; Dierckx, Bram; van Dongen, Jenny; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Goyette, Philippe; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Huikari, Ville; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Jaju, Deepali; Kerr, Kathleen F; Kluttig, Alexander; Krijthe, Bouwe P; Kumar, Jitender; van der Laan, Sander W; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Maihofer, Adam X; Minassian, Arpi; van der Most, Peter J; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nivard, Michel; Salvi, Erika; Stewart, James D; Thayer, Julian F; Verweij, Niek; Wong, Andrew; Zabaneh, Delilah; Zafarmand, Mohammad H; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Albarwani, Sulayma; Albert, Christine; Alonso, Alvaro; Ashar, Foram; Auvinen, Juha; Axelsson, Tomas; Baker, Dewleen G; de Bakker, Paul I W; Barcella, Matteo; Bayoumi, Riad; Bieringa, Rob J; Boomsma, Dorret; Boucher, Gabrielle; Britton, Annie R; Christophersen, Ingrid; Dietrich, Andrea; Ehret, George B; Ellinor, Patrick T; Eskola, Markku; Felix, Janine F; Floras, John S; Franco, Oscar H; Friberg, Peter; Gademan, Maaike G J; Geyer, Mark A; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Hartman, Catharina A; Hemerich, Daiane; Hofman, Albert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huikuri, Heikki; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Jouven, Xavier; Junttila, Juhani; Juonala, Markus; Kiviniemi, Antti M; Kors, Jan A.; Kumari, Meena; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Laurie, Cathy C; Lefrandt, Joop D.; Li, Yong; Li, Yun; Liao, Duanping; Limacher, Marian C; Lin, Henry J; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lubitz, Steven A; Mahajan, Anubha; McKnight, Barbara; Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mononen, Nina; Morris, Andrew P; Nalls, Mike A; Navis, Gerjan; Neijts, Melanie; Nikus, Kjell; North, Kari E; O'Connor, Daniel T; Ormel, Johan; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Psaty, Bruce M; Raitakari, Olli T; Risbrough, Victoria B; Sinner, Moritz F; Siscovick, David; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Nicholas L; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Staessen, Jan A; Stein, Phyllis K; Stilp, Adrienne M; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Strauch, Konstantin; Sundström, Johan; Swenne, Cees A.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Taylor, Kent D; Teumer, Alexander; Thornton, Timothy A; Tinker, Lesley E; Uitterlinden, André G; van Setten, Jessica; Voss, Andreas; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wong, Quenna; Zhang, Zhu-Ming; Zonderman, Alan B; Cusi, Daniele; Evans, Michele K; Greiser, Halina K; van der Harst, Pim; Hassan, Mohammad; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kääb, Stefan; Kähönen, Mika; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooperberg, Charles; Kuh, Diana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lind, Lars; Nievergelt, Caroline M; O'Donnell, Chris J; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Penninx, Brenda; Reiner, Alexander P; Riese, Harriëtte; Van Roon, Arie M.; Rioux, John D; Rotter, Jerome I; Sofer, Tamar; Stricker, Bruno H; Tiemeier, Henning; Vrijkotte, Tanja G M; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Heckbert, Susan R; Whitsel, Eric A; den Hoed, Marcel; Snieder, Harold; de Geus, Eco J C

    2017-01-01

    Reduced cardiac vagal control reflected in low heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with greater risks for cardiac morbidity and mortality. In two-stage meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for three HRV traits in up to 53,174 individuals of European ancestry, we detect 17

  1. Cardiac MRI in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Masaki; Kato, Shingo; Sakuma, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cine MRI is recognized as the most accurate method for evaluating ventricular function. Late gadolinium-enhanced MRI can clearly delineate subendocardial infarction, and the assessment of transmural extent of infarction on MRI is widely useful for predicting myocardial viability. Stress myocardial perfusion MRI allows for detection of subendocardial myocardial ischemia, and the diagnostic accuracy of stress perfusion MRI is superior to stress perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD). In recent years, image quality, volume coverage, acquisition speed and arterial contrast of 3-dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) have been substantially improved with use of steady-state free precession sequences and parallel imaging techniques, permitting the acquisition of high-quality, whole-heart coronary MRA within a reasonably short imaging time. It is now widely recognized that cardiac MRI has tremendous potential for the evaluation of ischemic heart disease. However, cardiac MRI is technically complicated and its use in clinical practice is relatively limited. With further improvements in education and training, as well as standardization of appropriate study protocols, cardiac MRI will play a central role in managing patients with CAD. (author)

  2. Churg-Strauss syndrome cardiac involvement evaluated by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and positron-emission tomography: a prospective study on 20 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmursztejn, Julien; Guillevin, Loic; Cohen, Pascal; Guilpain, Philippe; Pagnoux, Christian; Mouthon, Luc; Trebossen, Regine; Legmann, Paul; Vignaux, Olivier; Duboc, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) cardiac involvement is associated with a poor prognosis. Recently cardiac MRI (CMRI) has emerged as a promising technique to detect early CSS cardiac involvement. However, CMRI-detected myocardial delayed enhancement (MDE) could correspond to fibrosis or inflammation. Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET) was previously used in other systemic diseases to distinguish between them. To determine whether the CMRI-MDE detected in CSS patients reflected fibrosis or myocardial inflammation, patients in CSS remission underwent FDG-PET. Twenty consecutive CSS patients in remission (BVAS = 0) were recruited. Fourteen patients [eight men, six women; mean (S.D.) age 49 (9) years; mean disease duration 3.5 (2.9) years] with CMRI-detected MDE, and six patients [four men, two women; mean (S.D.) age 44 (15) years; mean disease duration 3.5 (5.3) years] with normal CMRI underwent FDG-PET. Segments with MDE on CMRI were analysed on FDG-PET images, with myocardial FDG hypo-fixation defining fibrosis and hyper-fixation corresponding inflammation. Among the 14 patients with MDE on CMRI, FDG-PET showed 10 had hypo-fixation, 2 had hyper-fixation and 2 had normal scans. CSS duration at the time of CMRI was shorter for patients with myocardial inflammation than in those with fibrosis. The six patients with normal CMRI had normal FDG-PET images. For CSS patients in remission, CMRI detected subclinical active myocardial lesions and could be recommended to assess cardiac involvement. However, because CMRI-detected MDE can reflect fibrosis or inflammation, FDG-PET might help to distinguish between the two. (authors)

  3. Churg-Strauss syndrome cardiac involvement evaluated by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and positron-emission tomography: a prospective study on 20 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmursztejn, Julien [Department of Cardiology, Service Frederic Joliot CEA Orsay, Hopital Cochin, AP-HP, Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, (France); Department of Radiology, Service Frederic Joliot CEA Orsay, Hopital Cochin, AP-HP, Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, (France); Guillevin, Loic; Cohen, Pascal; Guilpain, Philippe; Pagnoux, Christian; Mouthon, Luc [Department of Internal Medicine, Service Frederic Joliot CEA Orsay, Hopital Cochin, AP-HP, Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, (France); Trebossen, Regine [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Service Frederic Joliot CEA Orsay, Hopital Cochin, AP-HP, Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, (France); Legmann, Paul; Vignaux, Olivier [Department of Radiology, Service Frederic Joliot CEA Orsay, Hopital Cochin, AP-HP, Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, (France); Duboc, Denis [Department of Cardiology, Service Frederic Joliot CEA Orsay, Hopital Cochin, AP-HP, Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris, (France)

    2013-07-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) cardiac involvement is associated with a poor prognosis. Recently cardiac MRI (CMRI) has emerged as a promising technique to detect early CSS cardiac involvement. However, CMRI-detected myocardial delayed enhancement (MDE) could correspond to fibrosis or inflammation. Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET) was previously used in other systemic diseases to distinguish between them. To determine whether the CMRI-MDE detected in CSS patients reflected fibrosis or myocardial inflammation, patients in CSS remission underwent FDG-PET. Twenty consecutive CSS patients in remission (BVAS = 0) were recruited. Fourteen patients [eight men, six women; mean (S.D.) age 49 (9) years; mean disease duration 3.5 (2.9) years] with CMRI-detected MDE, and six patients [four men, two women; mean (S.D.) age 44 (15) years; mean disease duration 3.5 (5.3) years] with normal CMRI underwent FDG-PET. Segments with MDE on CMRI were analysed on FDG-PET images, with myocardial FDG hypo-fixation defining fibrosis and hyper-fixation corresponding inflammation. Among the 14 patients with MDE on CMRI, FDG-PET showed 10 had hypo-fixation, 2 had hyper-fixation and 2 had normal scans. CSS duration at the time of CMRI was shorter for patients with myocardial inflammation than in those with fibrosis. The six patients with normal CMRI had normal FDG-PET images. For CSS patients in remission, CMRI detected subclinical active myocardial lesions and could be recommended to assess cardiac involvement. However, because CMRI-detected MDE can reflect fibrosis or inflammation, FDG-PET might help to distinguish between the two. (authors)

  4. Diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Parasympathetic versus sympathetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Akihiko; Kurata, Chinori; Sugi, Toshihiko; Mikami, Tadashi; Shouda, Sakae

    1999-01-01

    Diabetic cardiac autonomic dysfunction often causes lethal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. 123 I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) can evaluate cardiac sympathetic dysfunction, and analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) can reflect cardiac parasympathetic activity. We examined whether cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction assessed by HRV may correlate with sympathetic dysfunction assessed by MIBG in diabetic patients. In 24-hour electrocardiography, we analyzed 4 HRV parameters: high-frequency power (HF), HF in the early morning (EMHF), rMSSD and pNN50. MIBG planar images and SPECT were obtained 15 minutes (early) and 150 minutes (late) after injection and the heart washout rate was calculated. The defect score in 9 left ventricular regions was scored on a 4 point scale (0=normal - 3=severe defect). In 20 selected diabetic patients without congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease and renal failure, parasympathetic HRV parameters had a negative correlation with the sum of defect scores (DS) in the late images (R=-0.47 to -0.59, p<0.05) and some parameters had a negative correlation with the washout rate (R=-0.50 to -0.55, p<0.05). In a total of 64 diabetic patients also, these parameters had a negative correlation with late DS (R=-0.28 to -0.35, p<0.05) and early DS (R=-0.27 to -0.32, p<0.05). The progress of diabetic cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction may parallel the sympathetic one. (author)

  5. Development of new anatomy reconstruction software to localize cardiac isochrones to the cardiac surface from the 12 lead ECG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Peter M; Gordon, Jeffrey P; Laks, Michael M; Boyle, Noel G

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) of the cardiac muscle can help the pre-procedure planning of the ablation of ventricular arrhythmias by reducing the time to localize the origin. Our non-invasive ECGI system, the cardiac isochrone positioning system (CIPS), requires non-intersecting meshes of the heart, lungs and torso. However, software to reconstruct the meshes of the heart, lungs and torso with the capability to check and prevent these intersections is currently lacking. Consequently the reconstruction of a patient specific model with realistic atrial and ventricular wall thickness and incorporating blood cavities, lungs and torso usually requires additional several days of manual work. Therefore new software was developed that checks and prevents any intersections, and thus enables the use of accurate reconstructed anatomical models within CIPS. In this preliminary study we investigated the accuracy of the created patient specific anatomical models from MRI or CT. During the manual segmentation of the MRI data the boundaries of the relevant tissues are determined. The resulting contour lines are used to automatically morph reference meshes of the heart, lungs or torso to match the boundaries of the morphed tissue. Five patients were included in the study; models of the heart, lungs and torso were reconstructed from standard cardiac MRI images. The accuracy was determined by computing the distance between the segmentation contours and the morphed meshes. The average accuracy of the reconstructed cardiac geometry was within 2mm with respect to the manual segmentation contours on the MRI images. Derived wall volumes and left ventricular wall thickness were within the range reported in literature. For each reconstructed heart model the anatomical heart axis was computed using the automatically determined anatomical landmarks of the left apex and the mitral valve. The accuracy of the reconstructed heart models was well within the accuracy of the used

  6. Follow-Up After Cardiac Surgery Should be Extended to at Least 120 Days When Benchmarking Cardiac Surgery Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Laura S; Sloth, Erik; Hjortdal, Vibeke E; Jakobsen, Carl-Johan

    2015-08-01

    Short-term (30 days) mortality frequently is used as an outcome measure after cardiac surgery, although it has been proposed that the follow-up period should be extended to 120 days to allow for more accurate benchmarking. The authors aimed to evaluate whether mortality rates 120 days after surgery were comparable to general mortality and to compare causes of death between the cohort and the general population. A multicenter descriptive cohort study using prospectively entered registry data. University hospital. The cohort was obtained from the Western Denmark Heart Registry and matched to the Danish National Hospital Register as well as the Danish Register of Causes of Death. A weighted, age-matched general population consisting of all Danish patients who died within the study period was identified through the central authority on Danish statistics. A total of 11,988 patients (>15 years) who underwent cardiac-surgery at Aarhus, Aalborg and Odense University Hospitals from April 1, 2006 to December 31, 2012 were included. Coronary artery bypass grafting, valve surgery and combinations. Mortality after cardiac surgery matches with mortality in the general population after 140 days. Mortality curves run almost parallel from this point onwards, regardless of The European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) and intervention. The causes of death in the cohort differed statistically significantly from the background population (pbenchmarking cardiac surgery centers. Regardless of preoperative heart function, heart failure was the consistent leading cause of death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Continuous Glucose Monitoring in the Cardiac ICU: Current Use and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimgeour, Laura A; Potz, Brittany A; Sellke, Frank W; Abid, M Ruhul

    2017-11-01

    Perioperative glucose control is highly important, particularly for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Variable glucose levels before, during and after cardiac surgery lead to increased post-operative complications and patient mortality. [1] Current methods for intensive monitoring and treating hyperglycemia in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) usually involve hourly glucose monitoring and continuous intravenous insulin infusions. With the advent of more accurate subcutaneous glucose monitoring systems, the role of improved glucose control with newer systems deserves consideration for widespread adoption.

  8. Approaching system equilibrium with accurate or not accurate feedback information in a two-route system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-mei; Xie, Dong-fan; Li, Qi

    2015-02-01

    With the development of intelligent transport system, advanced information feedback strategies have been developed to reduce traffic congestion and enhance the capacity. However, previous strategies provide accurate information to travelers and our simulation results show that accurate information brings negative effects, especially in delay case. Because travelers prefer to the best condition route with accurate information, and delayed information cannot reflect current traffic condition but past. Then travelers make wrong routing decisions, causing the decrease of the capacity and the increase of oscillations and the system deviating from the equilibrium. To avoid the negative effect, bounded rationality is taken into account by introducing a boundedly rational threshold BR. When difference between two routes is less than the BR, routes have equal probability to be chosen. The bounded rationality is helpful to improve the efficiency in terms of capacity, oscillation and the gap deviating from the system equilibrium.

  9. Cardiac-Specific Conversion Factors to Estimate Radiation Effective Dose From Dose-Length Product in Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattner, Sigal; Halliburton, Sandra; Thompson, Carla M; Xu, Yanping; Chelliah, Anjali; Jambawalikar, Sachin R; Peng, Boyu; Peters, M Robert; Jacobs, Jill E; Ghesani, Munir; Jang, James J; Al-Khalidi, Hussein; Einstein, Andrew J

    2018-01-01

    This study sought to determine updated conversion factors (k-factors) that would enable accurate estimation of radiation effective dose (ED) for coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and calcium scoring performed on 12 contemporary scanner models and current clinical cardiac protocols and to compare these methods to the standard chest k-factor of 0.014 mSv·mGy -1 cm -1 . Accurate estimation of ED from cardiac CT scans is essential to meaningfully compare the benefits and risks of different cardiac imaging strategies and optimize test and protocol selection. Presently, ED from cardiac CT is generally estimated by multiplying a scanner-reported parameter, the dose-length product, by a k-factor which was determined for noncardiac chest CT, using single-slice scanners and a superseded definition of ED. Metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor radiation detectors were positioned in organs of anthropomorphic phantoms, which were scanned using all cardiac protocols, 120 clinical protocols in total, on 12 CT scanners representing the spectrum of scanners from 5 manufacturers (GE, Hitachi, Philips, Siemens, Toshiba). Organ doses were determined for each protocol, and ED was calculated as defined in International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Effective doses and scanner-reported dose-length products were used to determine k-factors for each scanner model and protocol. k-Factors averaged 0.026 mSv·mGy -1 cm -1 (95% confidence interval: 0.0258 to 0.0266) and ranged between 0.020 and 0.035 mSv·mGy -1 cm -1 . The standard chest k-factor underestimates ED by an average of 46%, ranging from 30% to 60%, depending on scanner, mode, and tube potential. Factors were higher for prospective axial versus retrospective helical scan modes, calcium scoring versus coronary CTA, and higher (100 to 120 kV) versus lower (80 kV) tube potential and varied among scanner models (range of average k-factors: 0.0229 to 0.0277 mSv·mGy -1 cm -1 ). Cardiac k

  10. Pharmacological treatment of cardiac glycoside poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Darren M.; Gallapatthy, Gamini; Dunuwille, Asunga; Chan, Betty S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides are an important cause of poisoning, reflecting their widespread clinical usage and presence in natural sources. Poisoning can manifest as varying degrees of toxicity. Predominant clinical features include gastrointestinal signs, bradycardia and heart block. Death occurs from ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia. A wide range of treatments have been used, the more common including activated charcoal, atropine, ??adrenoceptor agonists, temporary pacing, anti?digoxin Fab a...

  11. Reflective array modeling for reflective and directional SAW transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, D P

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a new approximate method for analyzing reflective SAW transducers, with much of the convenience of the coupled-mode (COM) method but with better accuracy. Transduction accuracy is obtained by incorporating the accurate electrostatic solution, giving for example correct harmonics, and allowance for electrode width variation, in a simple manner. Results are shown for a single-electrode transducer, Natural SPUDT and DART SPUDT, each using theoretically derived parameters. In contrast to the COM, the RAM can give accurate results for short or withdrawal-weighted transducers and for wide analysis bandwidth.

  12. Characterization of cardiac quiescence from retrospective cardiac computed tomography using a correlation-based phase-to-phase deviation measure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, Carson A.; McClellan, James H. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Drive Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Arepalli, Chesnal D. [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, 3350-950 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E3 (Canada); Auffermann, William F.; Henry, Travis S. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging, 1364 Clifton Road Northeast, Suite 309, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Khosa, Faisal [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Division of Emergency Radiology, 550 Peachtree Street Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia 30308 (United States); Coy, Adam M. [School of Medicine, Emory University, 100 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Tridandapani, Srini, E-mail: stridan@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Winship Cancer Institute, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Drive Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate knowledge of cardiac quiescence is crucial to the performance of many cardiac imaging modalities, including computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). To accurately quantify quiescence, a method for detecting the quiescent periods of the heart from retrospective cardiac computed tomography (CT) using a correlation-based, phase-to-phase deviation measure was developed. Methods: Retrospective cardiac CT data were obtained from 20 patients (11 male, 9 female, 33–74 yr) and the left main, left anterior descending, left circumflex, right coronary artery (RCA), and interventricular septum (IVS) were segmented for each phase using a semiautomated technique. Cardiac motion of individual coronary vessels as well as the IVS was calculated using phase-to-phase deviation. As an easily identifiable feature, the IVS was analyzed to assess how well it predicts vessel quiescence. Finally, the diagnostic quality of the reconstructed volumes from the quiescent phases determined using the deviation measure from the vessels in aggregate and the IVS was compared to that from quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner. Three board-certified radiologists, fellowship-trained in cardiothoracic imaging, graded the diagnostic quality of the reconstructions using a Likert response format: 1 = excellent, 2 = good, 3 = adequate, 4 = nondiagnostic. Results: Systolic and diastolic quiescent periods were identified for each subject from the vessel motion calculated using the phase-to-phase deviation measure. The motion of the IVS was found to be similar to the aggregate vessel (AGG) motion. The diagnostic quality of the coronary vessels for the quiescent phases calculated from the aggregate vessel (P{sub AGG}) and IVS (P{sub IV} {sub S}) deviation signal using the proposed methods was comparable to the quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner (P{sub CT}). The one exception was the RCA, which improved for P{sub AGG} for 18 of the 20 subjects when compared to P

  13. Cardiac blood pool emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itti, R.; Philippe, L.; Lorgeron, J.M.; Charbonnier, B.; Raynaud, P.; Brochier, M.

    1983-01-01

    After blood pool labeling using technetium-99m, a series of cardiac pictures is acquired during the rotation of a gamma-camera about the patient. Computer processing leads to reconstruction of various tomographic slices from the original planar projection. Electrocardiographic gating selects the different phases of the cardiac cycle. Individual slices through the left ventricular region are added in order to provide ''thick'' slices on which global and regional parameters of the left ventricular function can be determined. Due to the proportionality existing between count rates and labeled blood volumes, any geometrical model can be avoided. The delineation of regions of interest for count integration is made easier due to the absence of superimposition of structures; no correction for background is necessary. Tomography thus appears to be more consistent and more accurate than the classical methods using planar projections. In addition, right ventricular morphological and kinetic studies can be performed in the same conditions as for the left ventricle [fr

  14. Cardiac causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension: assessment with multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoey, Edward T.D.; Gopalan, Deepa; Agrawal, S.K.B. [Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Screaton, Nicholas J. [Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Papworth Hospital NHS Trust, Diagnostic Centre, Department of Radiology, Papworth Everard, Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    The causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are diverse and include multiple congenital and acquired cardiac diseases as well as diseases primarily affecting the pulmonary vasculature, lung, pleura and chest wall. The traditional role of CT in evaluating PAH includes assessment of pulmonary vasculature and lung parenchyma with limited assessment of the heart. Advances in multidetector CT technology with improved spatial and temporal resolution now permit accurate delineation of cardiac morphology. CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is widely utilised in the workup of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease and can identify both pulmonary and cardiac causes. As the initial presentation for CTPA is often precipitated by nonspecific, unexplained symptoms and therefore undertaken by a general radiologist, it is important that a systematic approach to the interpretation of these studies, including cardiac evaluation, is routinely adopted. This paper reviews the CT evaluation in pulmonary hypertension with a particular focus on the cardiac causes, their subclassification into congenital systemic to pulmonary shunts and secondary to left heart disease, and their imaging features. It emphasises the use of a systematic approach to interpretation of CTPA examinations both in patients with known PAH and those with previously unsuspected disease. (orig.)

  15. Cardiac causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension: assessment with multidetector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoey, Edward T.D.; Gopalan, Deepa; Agrawal, S.K.B.; Screaton, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    The causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are diverse and include multiple congenital and acquired cardiac diseases as well as diseases primarily affecting the pulmonary vasculature, lung, pleura and chest wall. The traditional role of CT in evaluating PAH includes assessment of pulmonary vasculature and lung parenchyma with limited assessment of the heart. Advances in multidetector CT technology with improved spatial and temporal resolution now permit accurate delineation of cardiac morphology. CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is widely utilised in the workup of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease and can identify both pulmonary and cardiac causes. As the initial presentation for CTPA is often precipitated by nonspecific, unexplained symptoms and therefore undertaken by a general radiologist, it is important that a systematic approach to the interpretation of these studies, including cardiac evaluation, is routinely adopted. This paper reviews the CT evaluation in pulmonary hypertension with a particular focus on the cardiac causes, their subclassification into congenital systemic to pulmonary shunts and secondary to left heart disease, and their imaging features. It emphasises the use of a systematic approach to interpretation of CTPA examinations both in patients with known PAH and those with previously unsuspected disease. (orig.)

  16. Medico-legal perspectives on sudden cardiac death in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Antonio; Grassi, Vincenzo M; Campuzano, Oscar; Brion, Maria; Arena, Vincenzo; Partemi, Sara; Coll, Monica; Pascali, Vincenzo L; Brugada, Josep; Carracedo, Angel; Brugada, Ramon

    2017-03-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in a young athlete represents a dramatic event, and an increasing number of medico-legal cases have addressed this topic. In addition to representing an ethical and medico-legal responsibility, prevention of SCD is directly correlated with accurate eligibility/disqualification decisions, with an inappropriate pronouncement in either direction potentially leading to legal controversy. This review summarizes the common causes of SCD in young athletes, divided into structural (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, congenital coronary artery anomalies, etc.), electrical (Brugada, congenital LQT, Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome, etc.), and acquired cardiac abnormalities (myocarditis, etc.). In addition, the roles of hereditary cardiac anomalies in SCD in athletes and the effects of a positive result on them and their families are discussed. The medico-legal relevance of pre-participation screening is analyzed, and recommendations from the American Heart Association and European Society of Cardiology are compared. Finally, the main issues concerning the differentiation between physiologic cardiac adaptation in athletes and pathologic findings and, thereby, definition of the so-called gray zone, which is based on exact knowledge of the mechanism of cardiac remodeling including structural or functional adaptions, will be addressed.

  17. Cardiac Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy parameter predicts cardiac and cerebrovascular events in type 2 diabetic patients without structural heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yufu, Kunio; Takahashi, Naohiko; Okada, Norihiro; Shinohara, Tetsuji; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Hara, Masahide; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu; Saikawa, Tetsunori

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-MIBG) scintigraphy is an established method of assessment of cardiovascular sympathetic function. The aim of the present study was to investigate the long-term cardiovascular predictive value of cardiac 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy parameters in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients without structural heart disease. Cardiac 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy in 108 patients with type 2 diabetes who did not have structural heart disease, was evaluated. The washout rate (WR) was considered enhanced if it was ≥40%. Accurate follow-up information for 4.6 years was obtained in 54 enhanced WR patients (27 male; mean age, 61±11 years) and in 54 sex- and age-matched preserved WR patients (27 male; mean age, 61±10 years). Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) were investigated. During follow-up, 10 enhanced WR patients developed MACCE including cardiac death, coronary revascularization, stroke, and congestive heart failure, while MACCE occurred in only 3 male patients. The Kaplan-Meier curves indicated that enhanced WR patients had higher incidence of MACCE than those with preserved WR (P 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy at baseline has long-term cardiovascular predictive value in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes without structural heart disease. (author)

  18. Multidetector row computed tomography may accurately estimate plaque vulnerability. Does MDCT accurately estimate plaque vulnerability? (Pro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Sei; Imai, Atsuko; Kodama, Kazuhisa

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) has become the most reliable and established of the noninvasive examination techniques for detecting coronary heart disease. Now MDCT is chasing intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in terms of spatial resolution. Among the components of vulnerable plaque, MDCT may detect lipid-rich plaque, the lipid pool, and calcified spots using computed tomography number. Plaque components are detected by MDCT with high accuracy compared with IVUS and angioscopy when assessing vulnerable plaque. The TWINS study and TOGETHAR trial demonstrated that angioscopic loss of yellow color occurred independently of volumetric plaque change by statin therapy. These 2 studies showed that plaque stabilization and regression reflect independent processes mediated by different mechanisms and time course. Noncalcified plaque and/or low-density plaque was found to be the strongest predictor of cardiac events, regardless of lesion severity, and act as a potential marker of plaque vulnerability. MDCT may be an effective tool for early triage of patients with chest pain who have a normal electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac enzymes in the emergency department. MDCT has the potential ability to analyze coronary plaque quantitatively and qualitatively if some problems are resolved. MDCT may become an essential tool for detecting and preventing coronary artery disease in the future. (author)

  19. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Myocarditis Reveals Persistent Disease Activity Despite Normalization of Cardiac Enzymes and Inflammatory Parameters at 3-Month Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Jan; Kottwitz, Jan; Baltensperger, Nora; Kissel, Christine K; Lovrinovic, Marina; Mehra, Tarun; Scherff, Frank; Schmied, Christian; Templin, Christian; Lüscher, Thomas F; Heidecker, Bettina; Manka, Robert

    2017-11-01

    There is a major unmet need to identify high-risk patients in myocarditis. Although decreasing cardiac and inflammatory markers are commonly interpreted as resolving myocarditis, this assumption has not been confirmed as of today. We sought to evaluate whether routine laboratory parameters at diagnosis predict dynamic of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) as persistent LGE has been shown to be a risk marker in myocarditis. Myocarditis was diagnosed based on clinical presentation, high-sensitivity troponin T, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, after exclusion of obstructive coronary artery disease by angiography. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was repeated at 3 months. LGE extent was analyzed with the software GT Volume. Change in LGE >20% was considered significant. Investigated cardiac and inflammatory markers included high-sensitivity troponin T, creatine kinase, myoglobin, N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide, C-reactive protein, and leukocyte count. Twenty-four patients were enrolled. Absolute levels of cardiac enzymes and inflammatory markers at baseline did not predict change in LGE at 3 months. Cardiac and inflammatory markers had normalized in 21 patients (88%). LGE significantly improved in 16 patients (67%); however, it persisted to a lesser degree in 17 of them (71%) and increased in a small percentage (21%) despite normalization of cardiac enzymes. This is the first study reporting that cardiac enzymes and inflammatory parameters do not sufficiently reflect LGE in myocarditis. Although a majority of patients with normalizing laboratory markers experienced improved LGE, in a small percentage LGE worsened. These data suggest that cardiac magnetic resonance imaging might add value to currently existing diagnostic tools for risk assessment in myocarditis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Spatiotemporal processing of gated cardiac SPECT images using deformable mesh modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brankov, Jovan G.; Yang Yongyi; Wernick, Miles N.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a spatiotemporal processing approach, based on deformable mesh modeling, for noise reduction in gated cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography images. Because of the partial volume effect (PVE), clinical cardiac-gated perfusion images exhibit a phenomenon known as brightening--the myocardium appears to become brighter as the heart wall thickens. Although brightening is an artifact, it serves as an important diagnostic feature for assessment of wall thickening in clinical practice. Our proposed processing algorithm aims to preserve this important diagnostic feature while reducing the noise level in the images. The proposed algorithm is based on the use of a deformable mesh for modeling the cardiac motion in a gated cardiac sequence, based on which the images are processed by smoothing along space-time trajectories of object points while taking into account the PVE. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can yield significantly more-accurate results than several existing methods

  1. A Case of Cardiac Cephalalgia Showing Reversible Coronary Vasospasm on Coronary Angiogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, YoungSoon; Jin, Dong Gyu; Jang, Il Mi; Jang, YoungHee; Na, Hae Ri; Kim, SanYun

    2010-01-01

    Background Under certain conditions, exertional headaches may reflect coronary ischemia. Case Report A 44-year-old woman developed intermittent exercise-induced headaches with chest tightness over a period of 10 months. Cardiac catheterization followed by acetylcholine provocation demonstrated a right coronary artery spasm with chest tightness, headache, and ischemic effect of continuous electrocardiography changes. The patient's headache disappeared following intra-arterial nitroglycerine injection. Conclusions A coronary angiogram with provocation study revealed variant angina and cardiac cephalalgia, as per the International Classification of Headache Disorders (code 10.6). We report herein a patient with cardiac cephalalgia that manifested as reversible coronary vasospasm following an acetylcholine provocation test. PMID:20607049

  2. Cardiac regeneration therapy: connections to cardiac physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Naofumi; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2011-12-01

    Without heart transplantation, a large number of patients with failing hearts worldwide face poor outcomes. By means of cardiomyocyte regeneration, cardiac regeneration therapy is emerging with great promise as a means for restoring loss of cardiac function. However, the limited success of clinical trials using bone marrow-derived cells and myoblasts with heterogeneous constituents, transplanted at a wide range of cell doses, has led to disagreement on the efficacy of cell therapy. It is therefore essential to reevaluate the evidence for the efficacy of cell-based cardiac regeneration therapy, focusing on targets, materials, and methodologies. Meanwhile, the revolutionary innovation of cardiac regeneration therapy is sorely needed to help the millions of people who suffer heart failure from acquired loss of cardiomyocytes. Cardiac regeneration has been used only in limited species or as a developing process in the rodent heart; now, the possibility of cardiomyocyte turnover in the human heart is being revisited. In the pursuit of this concept, the use of cardiac stem/progenitor stem cells in the cardiac niche must be focused to usher in a second era of cardiac regeneration therapy for the severely injured heart. In addition, tissue engineering and cellular reprogramming will advance the next era of treatment that will enable current cell-based therapy to progress to "real" cardiac regeneration therapy. Although many barriers remain, the prevention of refractory heart failure through cardiac regeneration is now becoming a realistic possibility.

  3. Cardiac and Respiratory Patterns Synchronize between Persons during Choir Singing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Viktor; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2011-01-01

    Dyadic and collective activities requiring temporally coordinated action are likely to be associated with cardiac and respiratory patterns that synchronize within and between people. However, the extent and functional significance of cardiac and respiratory between-person couplings have not been investigated thus far. Here, we report interpersonal oscillatory couplings among eleven singers and one conductor engaged in choir singing. We find that: (a) phase synchronization both in respiration and heart rate variability increase significantly during singing relative to a rest condition; (b) phase synchronization is higher when singing in unison than when singing pieces with multiple voice parts; (c) directed coupling measures are consistent with the presence of causal effects of the conductor on the singers at high modulation frequencies; (d) the different voices of the choir are reflected in network analyses of cardiac and respiratory activity based on graph theory. Our results suggest that oscillatory coupling of cardiac and respiratory patterns provide a physiological basis for interpersonal action coordination. PMID:21957466

  4. Audible reflection density for different late reflection criteria in rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krueger, Donata; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    For reasonably accurate but practical auralizations, some simplifications and approximations are needed. The main issue in the present investigation is that the reflection density of a room impulse response, in theory, increases so fast as a quadratic function of the elapsed time, even assuming...

  5. Automatic cardiac gating of small-animal PET from list-mode data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L.; Udias, J.M. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid Univ. (Spain). Grupo de Fisica Nuclear; Vaquero, J.J.; Desco, M. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Aeroespacial; Cusso, L. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain). Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental

    2011-07-01

    This work presents a method to obtain automatically the cardiac gating signal in a PET study of rats, by employing the variation with time of the counts in the cardiac region, that can be extracted from list-mode data. In an initial step, the cardiac region is identified in the image space by backward-projecting a small fraction of the acquired data and studying the variation with time of the counts in each voxel inside said region, with frequencies within 2 and 8 Hz. The region obtained corresponds accurately to the left-ventricle of the heart of the rat. In a second step, the lines-of-response (LORs) connected with this region are found by forward-projecting this region. The time variation of the number of counts in these LORs contains the cardiac motion information that we want to extract. This variation of counts with time is band-pass filtered to reduce noise, and the time signal so obtained is used to create the gating signal. The result was compared with a cardiac gating signal obtained from an ECG acquired simultaneously to the PET study. Reconstructed gated images obtained from both gating information are similar. The method proposed demonstrates that valid cardiac gating signals can be obtained for rats from PET list-mode data. (orig.)

  6. 3D cardiac wall thickening assessment for acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, A.; Chan, B. T.; Lim, E.; Liew, Y. M.

    2017-06-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the most severe form of coronary artery disease leading to localized myocardial injury and therefore irregularities in the cardiac wall contractility. Studies have found very limited differences in global indices (such as ejection fraction, myocardial mass and volume) between healthy subjects and AMI patients, and therefore suggested regional assessment. Regional index, specifically cardiac wall thickness (WT) and thickening is closely related to cardiac function and could reveal regional abnormality due to AMI. In this study, we developed a 3D wall thickening assessment method to identify regional wall contractility dysfunction due to localized myocardial injury from infarction. Wall thickness and thickening were assessed from 3D personalized cardiac models reconstructed from cine MRI images by fitting inscribed sphere between endocardial and epicardial wall. The thickening analysis was performed in 5 patients and 3 healthy subjects and the results were compared against the gold standard 2D late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images for infarct localization. The notable finding of this study is the highly accurate estimation and visual representation of the infarct size and location in 3D. This study provides clinicians with an intuitive way to visually and qualitatively assess regional cardiac wall dysfunction due to infarction in AMI patients.

  7. Halogenated anaesthetics and cardiac protection in cardiac and non-cardiac anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landoni Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile anaesthetic agents have direct protective properties against ischemic myocardial damage. The implementation of these properties during clinical anaesthesia can provide an additional tool in the treatment or prevention, or both, of ischemic cardiac dysfunction in the perioperative period. A recent meta-analysis showed that desflurane and sevoflurane reduce postoperative mortality and incidence of myocardial infarction following cardiac surgery, with significant advantages in terms of postoperative cardiac troponin release, need for inotrope support, time on mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit and overall hospital stay. Multicentre, randomised clinical trials had previously demonstrated that the use of desflurane can reduce the postoperative release of cardiac troponin I, the need for inotropic support, and the number of patients requiring prolonged hospitalisation following coronary artery bypass graft surgery either with and without cardiopulmonary bypass. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Guidelines recommend volatile anaesthetic agents during non-cardiac surgery for the maintenance of general anaesthesia in patients at risk for myocardial infarction. Nonetheless, e vidence in non-coronary surgical settings is contradictory and will be reviewed in this paper together with the mechanisms of cardiac protection by volatile agents.

  8. Cardiac time intervals by tissue Doppler imaging M-mode echocardiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Tor

    2016-01-01

    for myocardial myocytes to achieve an LV pressure equal to that of aorta increases, resulting in a prolongation of the isovolumic contraction time (IVCT). Furthermore, the ability of myocardial myocytes to maintain the LV pressure decreases, resulting in reduction in the ejection time (ET). As LV diastolic...... of whether the LV is suffering from impaired systolic or diastolic function. A novel method of evaluating the cardiac time intervals has recently evolved. Using tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) M-mode through the mitral valve (MV) to estimate the cardiac time intervals may be an improved method reflecting global...

  9. Functional cardiac imaging: positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullani, N.A.; Gould, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Dynamic cardiovascular imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease by providing information about the function of the heart. During the past 30 years, cardiovascular imaging has evolved from the simple chest x-ray and fluoroscopy to such sophisticated techniques as invasive cardiac angiography and cinearteriography and, more recently, to noninvasive cardiac CT scanning, nuclear magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography, which reflect more complex physiologic functions. As research tools, CT, NMR, and PET provide quantitative information on global as well as regional ventricular function, coronary artery stenosis, myocardial perfusion, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, or oxygen utilization, with little discomfort or risk to the patient. As imaging modalities become more sophisticated and more oriented toward clinical application, the prospect of routinely obtaining such functional information about the heart is becoming realistic. However, these advances are double-edged in that the interpretation of functional data is more complex than that of the anatomic imaging familiar to most physicians. They will require an enhanced understanding of the physiologic and biochemical processes, as well as of the instrumentation and techniques for analyzing the data. Of the new imaging modalities that provide functional information about the heart, PET is the most useful because it quantitates the regional distribution of radionuclides in vivo. Clinical applications, interpretation of data, and the impact of PET on our understanding of cardiac pathophysiology are discussed. 5 figures

  10. Role of cardiac MRI in nonischemic cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Senthil; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) with its higher spatial resolution is considered the gold standard for evaluating ventricular mass, volumes, and ejection fraction. CMR can be used for accurate diagnosis of several conditions, especially cardiomyopathies. The purpose of this article is to review the utility of CMR in the diagnosis and management of nonischemic cardiomyopathies. We have reviewed both common and rare types of nonischemic cardiomyopathies in detail and elaborated on the specific CMR findings in each. We believe that CMR is an invaluable tool, not only in differentiating nonischemic from ischemic cardiomyopathy, but also in aiding the accurate diagnosis and management of the subtype of nonischemic cardiomyopathy. CMR should routinely be integrated in the diagnostic workup of various cardiomyopathies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Role of cardiac MRI in nonischemic cardiomyopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Anand

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR with its higher spatial resolution is considered the gold standard for evaluating ventricular mass, volumes, and ejection fraction. CMR can be used for accurate diagnosis of several conditions, especially cardiomyopathies. The purpose of this article is to review the utility of CMR in the diagnosis and management of nonischemic cardiomyopathies. We have reviewed both common and rare types of nonischemic cardiomyopathies in detail and elaborated on the specific CMR findings in each. We believe that CMR is an invaluable tool, not only in differentiating nonischemic from ischemic cardiomyopathy, but also in aiding the accurate diagnosis and management of the subtype of nonischemic cardiomyopathy. CMR should routinely be integrated in the diagnostic workup of various cardiomyopathies.

  12. Estimating core temperature in infants and children after cardiac surgery: a comparison of six methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxton, Fiona J C; Justin, Linda; Gillies, Donna

    2004-01-01

    Monitoring temperature in critically ill children is an important component of care, yet the accuracy of methods is often questioned. Temperature measured in the pulmonary artery is considered the 'gold standard', but this route is unsuitable for the majority of patients. An accurate, reliable and less invasive method is, however, yet to be established in paediatric intensive care work. To determine which site most closely reflects core temperature in babies and children following cardiac surgery, by comparing pulmonary artery temperature to the temperature measured at rectal, bladder, nasopharyngeal, axillary and tympanic sites. A convenience sample of 19 postoperative cardiac patients was studied. Temperature was recorded as a continuous measurement from pulmonary artery, rectal, nasopharyngeal and bladder sites. Axillary and tympanic temperatures were recorded at 30 minute intervals for 6 1/2 hours postoperatively. The small sample size of 19 infants and children limits the generalizability of the study. Repeated measures analysis of variance demonstrated no significant difference between pulmonary artery and bladder temperatures, and pulmonary artery and nasopharyngeal temperatures. Intraclass correlation showed that agreement was greatest between pulmonary artery temperature and temperature measured by bladder catheter. There was a significant difference between pulmonary artery temperature and temperature measured at rectal, tympanic and pulmonary artery and axillary sites. Repeated measures analysis showed a significant lag between pulmonary artery and rectal temperature of between 0 and 150 minutes after the 6-hour measurement period. In this study, bladder temperature was shown to be the best estimate of pulmonary artery temperature, closely followed by the temperature measured by nasopharyngeal probe. The results support the use of bladder or nasopharyngeal catheters to monitor temperature in critically ill children after cardiac surgery.

  13. Neuromuscular blockade in cardiac surgery: An update for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmerling Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been great advancements in cardiac surgery over the last two decades; the widespread use of off-pump aortocoronary bypass surgery, minimally invasive cardiac surgery, and robotic surgery have also changed the face of cardiac anaesthesia. The concept of "Fast-track anaesthesia" demands the use of nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs with short duration of action, combining the ability to provide (if necessary sufficiently profound neuromuscular blockade during surgery and immediate re-establishment of normal neuromuscular transmission at the end of surgery. Postoperative residual muscle paralysis is one of the major hurdles for immediate or early extubation after cardiac surgery. Nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs for cardiac surgery should therefore be easy to titrate, of rapid onset and short duration of action with a pathway of elimination independent from hepatic or renal dysfunction, and should equally not affect haemodynamic stability. The difference between repetitive bolus application and continuous infusion is outlined in this review, with the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics of vecuronium, pancuronium, rocuronium, and cisatracurium. Kinemyography and acceleromyography are the most important currently used neuromuscular monitoring methods. Whereas monitoring at the adductor pollicis muscle is appropriate at the end of surgery, monitoring of the corrugator supercilii muscle better reflects neuromuscular blockade at more central, profound muscles, such as the diaphragm, larynx, or thoraco-abdominal muscles. In conclusion, cisatracurium or rocuronium is recommended for neuromuscular blockade in modern cardiac surgery.

  14. Seismocardiography-Based Cardiac Computed Tomography Gating Using Patient-Specific Template Identification and Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jingting; Tridandapani, Srini; Wick, Carson A; Bhatti, Pamela T

    2017-01-01

    To more accurately trigger cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) than electrocardiography (ECG) alone, a sub-system is proposed as an intermediate step toward fusing ECG with seismocardiography (SCG). Accurate prediction of quiescent phases is crucial to prospectively gating CTA, which is susceptible to cardiac motion and, thus, can affect the diagnostic quality of images. The key innovation of this sub-system is that it identifies the SCG waveform corresponding to heart sounds and determines their phases within the cardiac cycles. Furthermore, this relationship is modeled as a linear function with respect to heart rate. For this paper, B-mode echocardiography is used as the gold standard for identifying the quiescent phases. We analyzed synchronous ECG, SCG, and echocardiography data acquired from seven healthy subjects (mean age: 31; age range: 22-48; males: 4) and 11 cardiac patients (mean age: 56; age range: 31-78; males: 6). On average, the proposed algorithm was able to successfully identify 79% of the SCG waveforms in systole and 68% in diastole. The simulated results show that SCG-based prediction produced less average phase error than that of ECG. It was found that the accuracy of ECG-based gating is more susceptible to increases in heart rate variability, while SCG-based gating is susceptible to high cycle to cycle variability in morphology. This pilot work of prediction using SCG waveforms enriches the framework of a comprehensive system with multiple modalities that could potentially, in real time, improve the image quality of CTA.

  15. Evaluation of cardiac blood blow, metabolism and sympathetic nerve function in patients with cardiac failure using PET and SPECT. Prognostic diagnosis based on the analysis of aggravating factors of the disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Shimozu, Junko; Yasumura, Yoshio; Nagatani, Kenzo; Miyatake, Kunio

    1998-01-01

    Focusing on the failure of energy metabolism, which is assumed to be attributed to the cardiac muscle disorder of a patient with cardiac failure, the characteristics and diagnostic significance of the metabolic disorders of cadiac muscles were investigated in those patients. The diagnostic efficacy of β-methyl iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) which is a imaging agent for lipid metabolism in the cardiac muscle was assessed in the clinical states of cardiac failure due to pulmonary hypertension. Even if there was a considerable increase in the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), the initial accumulation of BMIPP linearly increased, similarly to the increase in the accumulation of MIBI, a blood flow agent. The initial accumulation of BMIPP was thought to reflect a thicken cardiac muscle and/or increased blood flow. Also, its washing-out rate was suggested to be usable as an clinical indicator to estimate the loading of ventricular pressure. (M.N.)

  16. Evaluation of cardiac blood blow, metabolism and sympathetic nerve function in patients with cardiac failure using PET and SPECT. Prognostic diagnosis based on the analysis of aggravating factors of the disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Shimozu, Junko; Yasumura, Yoshio; Nagatani, Kenzo; Miyatake, Kunio [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    Focusing on the failure of energy metabolism, which is assumed to be attributed to the cardiac muscle disorder of a patient with cardiac failure, the characteristics and diagnostic significance of the metabolic disorders of cadiac muscles were investigated in those patients. The diagnostic efficacy of {beta}-methyl iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) which is a imaging agent for lipid metabolism in the cardiac muscle was assessed in the clinical states of cardiac failure due to pulmonary hypertension. Even if there was a considerable increase in the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), the initial accumulation of BMIPP linearly increased, similarly to the increase in the accumulation of MIBI, a blood flow agent. The initial accumulation of BMIPP was thought to reflect a thicken cardiac muscle and/or increased blood flow. Also, its washing-out rate was suggested to be usable as an clinical indicator to estimate the loading of ventricular pressure. (M.N.)

  17. Advanced computer techniques for inverse modeling of electric current in cardiac tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, S.A.; Romero, L.A.; Diegert, C.F.

    1996-08-01

    For many years, ECG`s and vector cardiograms have been the tools of choice for non-invasive diagnosis of cardiac conduction problems, such as found in reentrant tachycardia or Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Through skillful analysis of these skin-surface measurements of cardiac generated electric currents, a physician can deduce the general location of heart conduction irregularities. Using a combination of high-fidelity geometry modeling, advanced mathematical algorithms and massively parallel computing, Sandia`s approach would provide much more accurate information and thus allow the physician to pinpoint the source of an arrhythmia or abnormal conduction pathway.

  18. Comparison of PIV with 4D-Flow in a physiological accurate flow phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansom, Kurt; Balu, Niranjan; Liu, Haining; Aliseda, Alberto; Yuan, Chun; Canton, Maria De Gador

    2016-11-01

    Validation of 4D MRI flow sequences with planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) is performed in a physiologically-accurate flow phantom. A patient-specific phantom of a carotid artery is connected to a pulsatile flow loop to simulate the 3D unsteady flow in the cardiovascular anatomy. Cardiac-cycle synchronized MRI provides time-resolved 3D blood velocity measurements in clinical tool that is promising but lacks a robust validation framework. PIV at three different Reynolds numbers (540, 680, and 815, chosen based on +/- 20 % of the average velocity from the patient-specific CCA waveform) and four different Womersley numbers (3.30, 3.68, 4.03, and 4.35, chosen to reflect a physiological range of heart rates) are compared to 4D-MRI measurements. An accuracy assessment of raw velocity measurements and a comparison of estimated and measureable flow parameters such as wall shear stress, fluctuating velocity rms, and Lagrangian particle residence time, will be presented, with justification for their biomechanics relevance to the pathophysiology of arterial disease: atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. Lastly, the framework is applied to a new 4D-Flow MRI sequence and post processing techniques to provide a quantitative assessment with the benchmarked data. Department of Education GAANN Fellowship.

  19. Effect of myocardial perfusion and metabolic interventions on cardiac kinetics of phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) I 123

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reske, S.N.; Schoen, S.; Schmitt, W.; Knopp, R.; Winkler, C.; Machulla, H.J.

    1986-08-01

    The effect of regional myocardial perfusion and flow-independent adrenergic stimulation, as well as lactate-mediated inhibition of cardiac lipolysis, on cardiac IPPA uptake and metabolism was examined in canine hearts (flow studies) and in the isolated perfused Langendorff rat heart (metabolic interventions). In both normal and ischaemic myocardium, local perfusion is a major determinant of cardiac IPPA uptake. In pacing-induced hyperaemia, the strict flow-dependence of cardiac IPPA uptake is not preserved. Adrenergic stimulation raises the rate of oxidation of both palmitic acid /sup 14/C and IPPA. This change is reflected by increased metabolite production released into the perfusate and radioactivity clearance recorded externally. Lactate in high concentrations exerts the opposite effect on cardiac free fatty acid oxidation. IPPA is stored in this condition preferentially in tissue phospholipids and triglycerides.

  20. Effect of myocardial perfusion and metabolic interventions on cardiac kinetics of phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) I 123

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reske, S.N.; Schoen, S.; Schmitt, W.; Knopp, R.; Winkler, C.; Machulla, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of regional myocardial perfusion and flow-independent adrenergic stimulation, as well as lactate-mediated inhibition of cardiac lipolysis, on cardiac IPPA uptake and metabolism was examined in canine hearts (flow studies) and in the isolated perfused Langendorff rat heart (metabolic interventions). In both normal and ischaemic myocardium, local perfusion is a major determinant of cardiac IPPA uptake. In pacing-induced hyperaemia, the strict flow-dependence of cardiac IPPA uptake is not preserved. Adrenergic stimulation raises the rate of oxidation of both palmitic acid 14 C and IPPA. This change is reflected by increased metabolite production released into the perfusate and radioactivity clearance recorded externally. Lactate in high concentrations exerts the opposite effect on cardiac free fatty acid oxidation. IPPA is stored in this condition preferentially in tissue phospholipids and triglycerides. (orig.)

  1. Communication between members of the cardiac arrest team--a postal survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, J; Turner, B; Gabbott, D A

    2001-05-01

    Effective communication enhances team building and is perceived to improve the quality of team performance. A recent publication from the Resuscitation Council (UK) has highlighted this fact and recommended that cardiac arrest team members make contact daily. We wished to identify how often members of this team communicate prior to a cardiopulmonary arrest. A questionnaire on cardiac arrest team composition, leadership, communication and debriefing was distributed nationally to Resuscitation Training Officers (RTOs) and their responses analysed. One hundred and thirty (55%) RTOs replied. Physicians and anaesthetists were the most prominent members of the team. The Medical Senior House Officer is usually nominated as the team leader. Eighty-seven centres (67%) have no communication between team members prior to attending a cardiopulmonary arrest. In 33%, communication occurs but is either informal or fortuitous. The RTOs felt that communication is important to enhance team dynamics and optimise task allocation. Only 7% achieve a formal debrief following a cardiac arrest. Communication between members of the cardiac arrest team before and after a cardiac arrest is poor. Training and development of these skills may improve performance and should be prioritised. Team leadership does not necessarily reflect experience or training.

  2. Filters in 2D and 3D Cardiac SPECT Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lyra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear cardiac imaging is a noninvasive, sensitive method providing information on cardiac structure and physiology. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT evaluates myocardial perfusion, viability, and function and is widely used in clinical routine. The quality of the tomographic image is a key for accurate diagnosis. Image filtering, a mathematical processing, compensates for loss of detail in an image while reducing image noise, and it can improve the image resolution and limit the degradation of the image. SPECT images are then reconstructed, either by filter back projection (FBP analytical technique or iteratively, by algebraic methods. The aim of this study is to review filters in cardiac 2D, 3D, and 4D SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality mirroring the diagnostic accuracy of SPECT images. Several filters, including the Hanning, Butterworth, and Parzen filters, were evaluated in combination with the two reconstruction methods as well as with a specified MatLab program. Results showed that for both 3D and 4D cardiac SPECT the Butterworth filter, for different critical frequencies and orders, produced the best results. Between the two reconstruction methods, the iterative one might be more appropriate for cardiac SPECT, since it improves lesion detectability due to the significant improvement of image contrast.

  3. When Is Network Lasso Accurate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Jung

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The “least absolute shrinkage and selection operator” (Lasso method has been adapted recently for network-structured datasets. In particular, this network Lasso method allows to learn graph signals from a small number of noisy signal samples by using the total variation of a graph signal for regularization. While efficient and scalable implementations of the network Lasso are available, only little is known about the conditions on the underlying network structure which ensure network Lasso to be accurate. By leveraging concepts of compressed sensing, we address this gap and derive precise conditions on the underlying network topology and sampling set which guarantee the network Lasso for a particular loss function to deliver an accurate estimate of the entire underlying graph signal. We also quantify the error incurred by network Lasso in terms of two constants which reflect the connectivity of the sampled nodes.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Volpe, Gustavo Jardim; Trad, Henrique Simão; Schmidt, André

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility

  5. Acquisition and automated 3-D segmentation of respiratory/cardiac-gated PET transmission images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reutter, B.W.; Klein, G.J.; Brennan, K.M.; Huesman, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of respiratory motion on attenuation correction of cardiac PET data, we acquired and automatically segmented gated transmission data for a dog breathing on its own under gas anesthesia. Data were acquired for 20 min on a CTI/Siemens ECAT EXACT HR (47-slice) scanner configured for 12 gates in a static study, Two respiratory gates were obtained using data from a pneumatic bellows placed around the dog's chest, in conjunction with 6 cardiac gates from standard EKG gating. Both signals were directed to a LabVIEW-controlled Macintosh, which translated them into one of 12 gate addresses. The respiratory gating threshold was placed near end-expiration to acquire 6 cardiac-gated datasets at end-expiration and 6 cardiac-gated datasets during breaths. Breaths occurred about once every 10 sec and lasted about 1-1.5 sec. For each respiratory gate, data were summed over cardiac gates and torso and lung surfaces were segmented automatically using a differential 3-D edge detection algorithm. Three-dimensional visualizations showed that lung surfaces adjacent to the heart translated 9 mm inferiorly during breaths. Our results suggest that respiration-compensated attenuation correction is feasible with a modest amount of gated transmission data and is necessary for accurate quantitation of high-resolution gated cardiac PET data

  6. Echocardiographic Evaluation of Pulmonary Pressures and Right Ventricular Function after Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: A Simple Approach for the Intensivist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Beghetti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is diagnosed using cardiac catheterization and is defined as an elevation of mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP greater than 25 mmHg. Although invasive hemodynamics remains the gold standard and is mandatory for disease confirmation, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE is an extremely useful non-invasive and widely available tool that allows for screening and follow-up, in particular, in the acute setting. TTE may be a valuable alternative, allowing for direct measurement and/or indirect assessment of PAP. Because of the complex geometric shape and pattern of contraction of the right ventricle (RV, as well as the inherent complexity of cardiac repair, no single view or measurement can provide definite information on RV function and PAP and/or pulmonary vascular resistance. In addition, specific training and expertise may be necessary to obtain the views and measurements required. Some simple measurements may be of help when rapid evaluation is mandatory and potentially life saving: the assessment of tricuspid and/or pulmonary valve regurgitant jet and the use of the Bernoulli equation allow for measurement of PAP. Measurements such as the analysis of the pulmonary Doppler wave flow, the septal curvature, or the eccentricity index, assessing ventricular interdependence, are useful for indirect assessment. A four-chamber view of the RV gives information on its size, hypertrophy, function (fractional area change, and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion as an evaluation of the longitudinal function. Based on these simple measurements, TTE can provide detection of PH, measurement or estimation of PAP, and assessment of cardiac function. TTE is also of importance in follow up of PH as well as providing an assessment of therapeutic strategies in the postoperative setting of cardiac surgery. However, PAP may be misleading as it is dependent on cardiac output and requires accurate measurements. In the presence of

  7. Na/K pump inactivation, subsarcolemmal Na measurements, and cytoplasmic ion turnover kinetics contradict restricted Na spaces in murine cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fang-Min; Hilgemann, Donald W

    2017-07-03

    Decades ago, it was proposed that Na transport in cardiac myocytes is modulated by large changes in cytoplasmic Na concentration within restricted subsarcolemmal spaces. Here, we probe this hypothesis for Na/K pumps by generating constitutive transsarcolemmal Na flux with the Na channel opener veratridine in whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Using 25 mM Na in the patch pipette, pump currents decay strongly during continuous activation by extracellular K (τ, ∼2 s). In contradiction to depletion hypotheses, the decay becomes stronger when pump currents are decreased by hyperpolarization. Na channel currents are nearly unchanged by pump activity in these conditions, and conversely, continuous Na currents up to 0.5 nA in magnitude have negligible effects on pump currents. These outcomes are even more pronounced using 50 mM Li as a cytoplasmic Na congener. Thus, the Na/K pump current decay reflects mostly an inactivation mechanism that immobilizes Na/K pump charge movements, not cytoplasmic Na depletion. When channel currents are increased beyond 1 nA, models with unrestricted subsarcolemmal diffusion accurately predict current decay (τ ∼15 s) and reversal potential shifts observed for Na, Li, and K currents through Na channels opened by veratridine, as well as for Na, K, Cs, Li, and Cl currents recorded in nystatin-permeabilized myocytes. Ion concentrations in the pipette tip (i.e., access conductance) track without appreciable delay the current changes caused by sarcolemmal ion flux. Importantly, cytoplasmic mixing volumes, calculated from current decay kinetics, increase and decrease as expected with osmolarity changes (τ >30 s). Na/K pump current run-down over 20 min reflects a failure of pumps to recover from inactivation. Simulations reveal that pump inactivation coupled with Na-activated recovery enhances the rapidity and effectivity of Na homeostasis in cardiac myocytes. In conclusion, an autoregulatory mechanism enhances cardiac Na/K pump activity when

  8. Cardiac tamponade: contrast reflux as an indicator of cardiac chamber equalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauta Foeke Jacob

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic hemopericardium remains a rare entity; it does however commonly cause cardiac tamponade which remains a major cause of death in traumatic blunt cardiac injury. Objectives We present a case of blunt chest trauma complicated by cardiac tamponade causing cardiac chamber equalization revealed by reflux of contrast. Case report A 29-year-old unidentified male suffered blunt chest trauma in a motor vehicle collision. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a periaortic hematoma and hemopericardium. Significant contrast reflux was seen in the inferior vena cava and hepatic veins suggesting a change in cardiac chamber pressures. After intensive treatment including cardiac massage this patient expired of cardiac arrest. Conclusion Reflux of contrast on CT imaging can be an indicator of traumatic cardiac tamponade.

  9. Living cardiac patch: the elixir for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Rajesh; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2012-12-01

    A thorough understanding of the cellular and muscle fiber orientation in left ventricular cardiac tissue is of paramount importance for the generation of artificial cardiac patches to treat the ischemic myocardium. The major challenge faced during cardiac patch engineering is to choose a perfect combination of three entities; cells, scaffolds and signaling molecules comprising the tissue engineering triad for repair and regeneration. This review provides an overview of various scaffold materials, their mechanical properties and fabrication methods utilized in cardiac patch engineering. Stem cell therapies in clinical trials and the commercially available cardiac patch materials were summarized in an attempt to provide a recent perspective in the treatment of heart failure. Various tissue engineering strategies employed thus far to construct viable thick cardiac patches is schematically illustrated. Though many strategies have been proposed for fabrication of various cardiac scaffold materials, the stage and severity of the disease condition demands the incorporation of additional cues in a suitable scaffold material. The scaffold may be nanofibrous patch, hydrogel or custom designed films. Integration of stem cells and biomolecular cues along with the scaffold may provide the right microenvironment for the repair of unhealthy left ventricular tissue as well as promote its regeneration.

  10. Regulation of cardiac remodeling by cardiac Na/K-ATPase isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Catherine Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na+/K+-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1-3. The expression of the α subunit of the Na+/K+-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na+/K+-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1 the distribution and function of isoform specific Na+/K+-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2 the role of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling.

  11. Current Roles and Future Applications of Cardiac CT: Risk Stratification of Coronary Artery Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeonyee Elizabeth [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Tae-Hwan [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a noninvasive modality for the assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD), and has been rapidly integrated into clinical cares. CT has changed the traditional risk stratification based on clinical risk to image-based identification of patient risk. Cardiac CT, including coronary artery calcium score and coronary CT angiography, can provide prognostic information and is expected to improve risk stratification of CAD. Currently used conventional cardiac CT, provides accurate anatomic information but not functional significance of CAD, and it may not be sufficient to guide treatments such as revascularization. Recently, myocardial CT perfusion imaging, intracoronary luminal attenuation gradient, and CT-derived computed fractional flow reserve were developed to combine anatomical and functional data. Although at present, the diagnostic and prognostic value of these novel technologies needs to be evaluated further, it is expected that all-in-one cardiac CT can guide treatment and improve patient outcomes in the near future.

  12. Asian consortium on radiation dose of pediatric cardiac CT (ASCI-REDCARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, Peter K.T.; Goo, Hyun Woo; Du, Jing; Ip, Janice J.K.; Kanzaki, Suzu; Kim, Young Jin; Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika; Lilyasari, Oktavia; Siripornpitak, Suvipaporn

    2017-01-01

    With incremental utilization of pediatric cardiac CT in congenital heart disease, it is imperative to define its current radiation dose levels in clinical practice in order to help imagers optimize CT protocols, particularly in Asia and other developing countries where CT physicists are not readily available. To evaluate current radiation dose levels and influencing factors in cardiac CT in children with congenital heart disease in Asia by conducting a retrospective multi-center, multi-vendor study. We included 1,043 pediatric cardiac CT examinations performed in 8 centers between January 2014 and December 2014 to evaluate congenital heart disease. In five weight groups, we calculated radiation dose metrics including volume CT dose index, size-specific dose estimate, dose-length product and effective dose. Age at CT exam, gender, tube voltage, scan mode, CT indication and image reconstruction algorithm were analyzed to learn whether they influenced CT radiation dose. Volume CT dose index, size-specific dose estimate, dose-length product and effective dose of pediatric cardiac CT showed variations in the range of 4.3-23.8 mGy, 4.9-17.6 mGy, 55.8-501.3 mGy circle cm and 1.5-3.2 mSv, respectively, within five weight groups. Gender, tube voltage, scan mode and cardiac function assessment significantly influenced CT radiation dose. This multi-center, multi-vendor study demonstrated variations in radiation dose metrics of pediatric cardiac CT reflecting current practice in Asia. Gender, tube voltage, scan mode and cardiac function assessment should be considered as essential radiation dose-influencing factors in developing optimal pediatric cardiac CT protocols. (orig.)

  13. Asian consortium on radiation dose of pediatric cardiac CT (ASCI-REDCARD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui, Peter K.T. [Hong Kong Baptist Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Du, Jing [Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Ip, Janice J.K. [Queen Mary Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Kanzaki, Suzu [National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Department of Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Kim, Young Jin [Yonsei University, Shinchon Severance Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika [Songklanagarind Hospital, Prince of Songkla University, Department of Radiology, Hat Yai (Thailand); Lilyasari, Oktavia [University of Indonesia, National Cardiovascular Center Harapan Kita, Department of Cardiology, Jakarta (Indonesia); Siripornpitak, Suvipaporn [Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Department of Radiology, Salaya (Thailand)

    2017-07-15

    With incremental utilization of pediatric cardiac CT in congenital heart disease, it is imperative to define its current radiation dose levels in clinical practice in order to help imagers optimize CT protocols, particularly in Asia and other developing countries where CT physicists are not readily available. To evaluate current radiation dose levels and influencing factors in cardiac CT in children with congenital heart disease in Asia by conducting a retrospective multi-center, multi-vendor study. We included 1,043 pediatric cardiac CT examinations performed in 8 centers between January 2014 and December 2014 to evaluate congenital heart disease. In five weight groups, we calculated radiation dose metrics including volume CT dose index, size-specific dose estimate, dose-length product and effective dose. Age at CT exam, gender, tube voltage, scan mode, CT indication and image reconstruction algorithm were analyzed to learn whether they influenced CT radiation dose. Volume CT dose index, size-specific dose estimate, dose-length product and effective dose of pediatric cardiac CT showed variations in the range of 4.3-23.8 mGy, 4.9-17.6 mGy, 55.8-501.3 mGy circle cm and 1.5-3.2 mSv, respectively, within five weight groups. Gender, tube voltage, scan mode and cardiac function assessment significantly influenced CT radiation dose. This multi-center, multi-vendor study demonstrated variations in radiation dose metrics of pediatric cardiac CT reflecting current practice in Asia. Gender, tube voltage, scan mode and cardiac function assessment should be considered as essential radiation dose-influencing factors in developing optimal pediatric cardiac CT protocols. (orig.)

  14. Dynamic low dose I-123-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid metabolic cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, G.L.; Magill, H.L.; Schad, N.C.

    1993-01-01

    Recognition of stunned and hibernating myocardium is essential in this era of cardiac revascularization. Positron emission tomography (PET) accurately identifies viability but is costly and unavailable to most patients. Dynamic low dose I-123-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) metabolic cardiac imaging is a potentially cost-effective alternative to PET. Using transmural myocardial biopsies obtained during coronary bypass surgery as the viability gold standard, resting IPPA imaging agreed with 39/43 (91%) biopsies, with a sensitivity for viability of 33/36(92%) and a specificity of 6/7 (86%) in patients with severe ischemic cardiomyopathy. Eighty percent of IPPA viable, infarcted segments improved wall motion postoperatively. Furthermore, when compared to reinjection thallium (SPECT-Tl) scans after myocardial infarction, there was IPPA-Tl concordance in 27/35 (77%)(Kappa=0.536, p=0.0003). Similar to PET, IPPA demonstrated more viability than SPECT-Tl, 26/35 (74%) vs. 18/35 (51%)(p=0.047). Finally, when compared to transvenous endomyocardial biopsy for detecting rejection following cardiac transplantation, IPPA sensitivity for ≥Grade II rejection was 100%, and IPPA screening assessment for the necessity of biopsy could result in a 31% cost-savings. Therefore, IPPA metabolic cardiac imaging is a safe, inexpensive technique with a promising future. (author)

  15. Lagrangian displacement tracking using a polar grid between endocardial and epicardial contours for cardiac strain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chi; Varghese, Tomy

    2012-04-01

    Accurate cardiac deformation analysis for cardiac displacement and strain imaging over time requires Lagrangian description of deformation of myocardial tissue structures. Failure to couple the estimated displacement and strain information with the correct myocardial tissue structures will lead to erroneous result in the displacement and strain distribution over time. Lagrangian based tracking in this paper divides the tissue structure into a fixed number of pixels whose deformation is tracked over the cardiac cycle. An algorithm that utilizes a polar-grid generated between the estimated endocardial and epicardial contours for cardiac short axis images is proposed to ensure Lagrangian description of the pixels. Displacement estimates from consecutive radiofrequency frames were then mapped onto the polar grid to obtain a distribution of the actual displacement that is mapped to the polar grid over time. A finite element based canine heart model coupled with an ultrasound simulation program was used to verify this approach. Segmental analysis of the accumulated displacement and strain over a cardiac cycle demonstrate excellent agreement between the ideal result obtained directly from the finite element model and our Lagrangian approach to strain estimation. Traditional Eulerian based estimation results, on the other hand, show significant deviation from the ideal result. An in vivo comparison of the displacement and strain estimated using parasternal short axis views is also presented. Lagrangian displacement tracking using a polar grid provides accurate tracking of myocardial deformation demonstrated using both finite element and in vivo radiofrequency data acquired on a volunteer. In addition to the cardiac application, this approach can also be utilized for transverse scans of arteries, where a polar grid can be generated between the contours delineating the outer and inner wall of the vessels from the blood flowing though the vessel.

  16. Initial Efficacy of a Cardiac Rehabilitation Transition Program: Cardiac TRUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Melissa; Boxer, Rebecca; Moore, Shirley M.

    2012-01-01

    Patients recovering from cardiac events are increasingly using postacute care, such as home health care and skilled nursing facility services. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the initial efficacy, feasibility, and safety of a specially designed postacute care transitional rehabilitation intervention for cardiac patients. Cardiac Transitional Rehabilitation Using Self- Management Techniques (Cardiac TRUST) is a family-focused intervention that includes progressive low-intensity walking and education in self-management skills to facilitate recovery following a cardiac event. Using a randomized two-group design, exercise self-efficacy, steps walked, and participation in an outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program were compared in a sample of 38 older adults; 17 who received the Cardiac TRUST program and 21 who received usual care only. At discharge from postacute care, the intervention group had a trend for higher levels of self-efficacy for exercise outcomes (X=39.1, SD=7.4) than the usual care group (X=34.5; SD=7.0) (t-test 1.9, p=.06). During the 6 weeks following discharge, compared with the usual care group, the intervention group had more attendance in out-patient cardiac rehabilitation (33% compared to 11.8%, F=7.1, p=.03) and a trend toward more steps walked during the first week (X=1,307, SD=652 compared to X=782, SD=544, t-test 1.8, p=.07). The feasibility of the intervention was better for the home health participants than for those in the skilled nursing facility and there were no safety concerns. The provision of cardiac-focused rehabilitation during postacute care has the potential to bridge the gap in transitional services from hospitalization to outpatient cardiac rehabilitation for these patients at high risk for future cardiac events. Further evidence of the efficacy of Cardiac TRUST is warranted. PMID:22084960

  17. Imaging features of cardiac myxoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Youyou; Zheng Lili; Li Xiangmin; Zhou Xuhui; Kuang Jianyi; Zhang Wenzhao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the imaging features of cardiac myxoma and their diagnostic values. Methods: Twenty-two patrents with cardiac myxoma were reviewed retrospectively for the clinical, pathologic, and radiologic findings. Posteroanterior and lateral chest radiographs, American Imatron C-150 XP Electron Beam CT examination, and Germany Siemens 1.5T Magnetom Vision MR scan were performed on every patient. Results: (1) Radiographs of 17 patients with left atrial myxoma showed evidence of mitral valve obstruction in 14(82.3%), radiographs of 5 patients with right atrial myxoma demonstrated right atrium enlargement in 3(60%) respectively. (2) CT scans of 22 myxomas demonstrated 18 (81.8%) lesions were hypoattenuated and 4 (19.1%) were isoattenuated relative to the myocardium. Calcification or ossification was seen in 3 patients. All myxomas apart from massive one were found attaching to the atrial septum. Movie mode could dis- play the movement of myxoma across the atrioventicular valves. (3) MRI studies of 22 myxomas showed 19 (86.3%) heterogeneous signal intensity and 3 (13.7%) homogeneous. They exhibited slight high or homogeneous signal intensity with both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted sequences, and low signal intensity with cine gradient recalled echo sequences. Point of attachment was visible in 21 (95.4%) cases. Conclusion: The typical radiograph sign of cardiac myxomas is mitral valve obstruction, CT and MR can demonstrate intracavitary lobular masses attacthing to artrial spetum. The latter two kinds of examinations not only provide accurate assessment of the size, location, and attachment point of these lesions, but also have important qualitative diagnostic advantage. (authors)

  18. Functional Relevance of Coronary Artery Disease by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Cardiac Computed Tomography: Myocardial Perfusion and Fractional Flow Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Pontone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and it is responsible for an increasing resource burden. The identification of patients at high risk for adverse events is crucial to select those who will receive the greatest benefit from revascularization. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography, but the diagnostic yield of elective invasive coronary angiography remains unfortunately low. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiac magnetic resonance (stress-CMR has emerged as an accurate technique for diagnosis and prognostic stratification of the patients with known or suspected CAD thanks to high spatial and temporal resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and the multiparametric value including the assessment of cardiac anatomy, function, and viability. On the other side, cardiac computed tomography (CCT has emerged as unique technique providing coronary arteries anatomy and more recently, due to the introduction of stress-CCT and noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT, functional relevance of CAD in a single shot scan. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of stress-CMR and CCT in the evaluation of functional relevance of CAD discussing the strength and weakness of each approach.

  19. Optimization of Serum Immunoglobulin Free Light Chain Analysis for Subclassification of Cardiac Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halushka, Marc K; Eng, George; Collins, A Bernard; Judge, Daniel P; Semigran, Marc J; Stone, James R

    2015-06-01

    Accurate and rapid classification of cardiac amyloidosis is important for patient management. We have optimized the use of serum free light chain kappa and lambda values to differentiate immunoglobulin light chain amyloid (AL) amyloidosis from transthyretin amyloid and amyloid A using 85 cases of tissue-proven cardiac amyloidosis, in which there was direct classification of amyloidosis by mass spectrometry or immunofluorescence. The serum free light chain kappa/lambda ratios were non-overlapping for the three major groups: AL-lambda (0.01-0.41, n = 30), non-AL (0.52-2.7, n = 43), and AL-kappa (6.7-967, n = 12). A kappa/lambda ratio value between 0.5 and 5.0 had 100 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity for distinguishing AL amyloidosis from non-AL amyloidosis. This optimized range for serum light chain kappa/lambda ratio provides extremely robust classification of cardiac amyloidosis. Cases of cardiac amyloidosis in which the serum kappa/lambda free light chain ratio falls close to these new cutoff values may benefit most from direct amyloid subtyping.

  20. Characterization and validation of new tools for measuring site-specific cardiac troponin I phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoemmes, Stephen F; Stutzke, Crystal A; Du, Yanmei; Browning, Michael D; Buttrick, Peter M; Walker, Lori A

    2014-01-31

    Phosphorylation of cardiac troponin I is a well established mechanism by which cardiac contractility is modulated. However, there are a number of phosphorylation sites on TnI which contribute singly or in combination to influence cardiac function. Accordingly, methods for accurately measuring site-specific TnI phosphorylation are needed. Currently, two strategies are employed: mass spectrometry, which is costly, difficult and has a low throughput; and Western blotting using phospho-specific antibodies, which is limited by the availability of reagents. In this report, we describe a cohort of new site-specific TnI phosphoantibodies, generated against physiologically relevant phosphorylation sites, that are superior to the current commercially available antibodies: to phospho-serine 22/23 which shows a >5-fold phospho-specificity for phosphorylated TnI; to phospho-serine 43, which has >3-fold phospho-specificity for phosphorylated TnI; and phospho-serine 150 which has >2-fold phospho-specificity for phosphorylated TnI. These new antibodies demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity for the phosphorylated TnI than the most widely used commercially available reagents. For example, at a protein load of 20 μg of total cardiac extract, a commercially available antibody recognized both phosphorylated and dephosphorylated TnI to the same degree. At the same protein load our phospho-serine 22/23 antibody exhibited no cross-reactivity with dephosphorylated TnI. These new tools should allow a more accurate assessment and a better understanding of the role of TnI phosphorylation in the response of the heart to pathologic stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Is the pre-hospital ECG after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest accurate for the diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salam, Idrees; Hassager, Christian; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend that comatose out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with ST-segment elevations (STEs) following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) should be referred for an acute coronary angiography. We sought to investigate the diagnostic value of the pre......-hospital ROSC-ECG in predicting ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). METHOD: ROSC-ECGs of 145 comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, randomly assigned in the Target Temperature Management trial, were classified according to the current STEMI ECG criteria (third universal definition...... interval (CI) 62-84), specificity of 65% (95% CI 53-75) and a positive and negative predictive value of 65% (95% CI 54-76) and 73% (95% CI 61-83) in predicting STEMI. Time to ROSC was significantly longer (24 minutes vs. 19 minutes, P=0.02) in STE compared with no STE patients. Percutaneous coronary...

  2. Clinical cardiac positron emission tomography: State of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) has evolved rapidly from a relatively esoteric research tool into clinical applications providing unique, quantitative information on myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and cell membrane function and having a potentially significant impact on cardiovascular medicine. Although there are many different positron radionuclides for imaging diverse myocardial behavior, three radionuclides have reached accepted clinical utility. Cardiac PET using nitrogen-13-ammonia, rubidium-82, and fluoro-18-deoxyglucose has proved accurate and definitive in multiple university and private-practice sites for diagnosing and assessing severity and location of coronary artery disease in symptomatic or asymptomatic patients, for identifying injured but viable myocardium potentially salvageable by revascularization, and for ruling out clinically significant coronary artery stenosis with a high specificity in patients who might otherwise undergo coronary arteriography to document the absence of significant disease. 89 references

  3. A comparative study of defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance during simulated cardiac arrest in nursing student teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eikeland Husebø Sissel I

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although nurses must be able to respond quickly and effectively to cardiac arrest, numerous studies have demonstrated poor performance. Simulation is a promising learning tool for resuscitation team training but there are few studies that examine simulation for training defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (D-CPR in teams from the nursing education perspective. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which nursing student teams follow the D-CPR-algorithm in a simulated cardiac arrest, and if observing a simulated cardiac arrest scenario and participating in the post simulation debriefing would improve team performance. Methods We studied video-recorded simulations of D-CPR performance in 28 nursing student teams. Besides describing the overall performance of D-CPR, we compared D-CPR performance in two groups. Group A (n = 14 performed D-CPR in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario, while Group B (n = 14 performed D-CPR after first observing performance of Group A and participating in the debriefing. We developed a D-CPR checklist to assess team performance. Results Overall there were large variations in how accurately the nursing student teams performed the specific parts of the D-CPR algorithm. While few teams performed opening the airways and examination of breathing correctly, all teams used a 30:2 compression: ventilation ratio. We found no difference between Group A and Group B in D-CPR performance, either in regard to total points on the check list or to time variables. Conclusion We found that none of the nursing student teams achieved top scores on the D-CPR-checklist. Observing the training of other teams did not increase subsequent performance. We think all this indicates that more time must be assigned for repetitive practice and reflection. Moreover, the most important aspects of D-CPR, such as early defibrillation and hands-off time in relation to shock, must be highlighted in team

  4. Experimental and clinical study of cardiac hypertrophy by thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, Yukio

    1983-01-01

    I studied experimentally the myocardial uptake of 201 Tl in cardiac hypertrophy in rat, and clinically evaluated cardiac shape and dimension in the patients with various types of cardiac hypertrophy. Experimentally, both myocardial blood flow (MBF) and Tl uptake were increased with cardiac weight. There were negative correlations between the extraction fraction and MBF. Tl uptake in Hypertrophy is not always dependent on MBF and affected by the altered metabolism of hypertrophied myocardium. Clinical study was performed in 29 normal subjects and in 90 patients with heart disease. The measurements of left ventricular (LV) size by Tl scintigraphy were well correlated with them by echocardiography. Aortic stenosis and hypertensive heart disease showed thick wall and spherical shape. Both mitral (MR) and aortic (AR) regurgitation showed ventricular dilatation, spherical shape (in chronic MR) and ellipsoid shape (in acute MR and in AR). Decreased ventricular size but normal shape was observed in mitral stenosis and cor pulmonale. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy showed thick wall with asymmetric septal hypertrophy, while congestive cardiomyopathy showed thin wall with marked ventricular dilatation and spherical shape. I conclude that heart disease has characteristic figures in dimension and shape which may be reflecting cardiac performance or compensating for the load to the heart, and that 201 Tl scintigraphy is useful evaluating cardiac morphology as well as in diagnosing myocardial ischemia. (J.P.N.)

  5. Cardiac gated ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart

  6. Atresia of the bilateral pulmonary veins: a rare and dismal anomaly identified on cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang-Hyub; Koo, Hyun Jung; Cho, Young Hoon; Lee, Eunsol [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Imaging findings of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia have not been described. To describe cardiac CT findings and clinical outcomes of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia. Three newborns with bilateral pulmonary vein atresia were encountered at our institution during a period of 8 years. We evaluated prenatal echocardiographic findings, clinical presentations, postnatal echocardiographic findings, chest radiographic findings, cardiac CT findings and clinical outcomes. All newborns presented immediately after birth with severe cyanosis, respiratory distress and acidosis that were unresponsive to medical management. Prenatal and postnatal echocardiographic studies and chest radiography were misleading, inconclusive or nonspecific in making the diagnosis in these children; however cardiac CT clearly demonstrated atresia of the bilateral pulmonary veins with multiple small mediastinal collateral veins and pulmonary edema. Surgical treatments were not feasible for this anomaly. Their clinical outcomes were universally dismal and all infants died within 3 days. Cardiac CT provides an accurate diagnosis of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia and leads to prompt treatment decision in these children. (orig.)

  7. Atresia of the bilateral pulmonary veins: a rare and dismal anomaly identified on cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang-Hyub; Koo, Hyun Jung; Cho, Young Hoon; Lee, Eunsol

    2014-01-01

    Imaging findings of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia have not been described. To describe cardiac CT findings and clinical outcomes of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia. Three newborns with bilateral pulmonary vein atresia were encountered at our institution during a period of 8 years. We evaluated prenatal echocardiographic findings, clinical presentations, postnatal echocardiographic findings, chest radiographic findings, cardiac CT findings and clinical outcomes. All newborns presented immediately after birth with severe cyanosis, respiratory distress and acidosis that were unresponsive to medical management. Prenatal and postnatal echocardiographic studies and chest radiography were misleading, inconclusive or nonspecific in making the diagnosis in these children; however cardiac CT clearly demonstrated atresia of the bilateral pulmonary veins with multiple small mediastinal collateral veins and pulmonary edema. Surgical treatments were not feasible for this anomaly. Their clinical outcomes were universally dismal and all infants died within 3 days. Cardiac CT provides an accurate diagnosis of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia and leads to prompt treatment decision in these children. (orig.)

  8. Context indexing of digital cardiac ultrasound records in PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobodzinski, S. Suave; Meszaros, Georg N.

    1998-07-01

    Recent wide adoption of the DICOM 3.0 standard by ultrasound equipment vendors created a need for practical clinical implementations of cardiac imaging study visualization, management and archiving, DICOM 3.0 defines only a logical and physical format for exchanging image data (still images, video, patient and study demographics). All DICOM compliant imaging studies must presently be archived on a 650 Mb recordable compact disk. This is a severe limitation for ultrasound applications where studies of 3 to 10 minutes long are a common practice. In addition, DICOM digital echocardiography objects require physiological signal indexing, content segmentation and characterization. Since DICOM 3.0 is an interchange standard only, it does not define how to database composite video objects. The goal of this research was therefore to address the issues of efficient storage, retrieval and management of DICOM compliant cardiac video studies in a distributed PACS environment. Our Web based implementation has the advantage of accommodating both DICOM defined entity-relation modules (equipment data, patient data, video format, etc.) in standard relational database tables and digital indexed video with its attributes in an object relational database. Object relational data model facilitates content indexing of full motion cardiac imaging studies through bi-directional hyperlink generation that tie searchable video attributes and related objects to individual video frames in the temporal domain. Benefits realized from use of bi-directionally hyperlinked data models in an object relational database include: (1) real time video indexing during image acquisition, (2) random access and frame accurate instant playback of previously recorded full motion imaging data, and (3) time savings from faster and more accurate access to data through multiple navigation mechanisms such as multidimensional queries on an index, queries on a hyperlink attribute, free search and browsing.

  9. Cardiac parasympathetic reactivation following exercise: implications for training prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jamie; Peake, Jonathan M; Buchheit, Martin

    2013-12-01

    The objective of exercise training is to initiate desirable physiological adaptations that ultimately enhance physical work capacity. Optimal training prescription requires an individualized approach, with an appropriate balance of training stimulus and recovery and optimal periodization. Recovery from exercise involves integrated physiological responses. The cardiovascular system plays a fundamental role in facilitating many of these responses, including thermoregulation and delivery/removal of nutrients and waste products. As a marker of cardiovascular recovery, cardiac parasympathetic reactivation following a training session is highly individualized. It appears to parallel the acute/intermediate recovery of the thermoregulatory and vascular systems, as described by the supercompensation theory. The physiological mechanisms underlying cardiac parasympathetic reactivation are not completely understood. However, changes in cardiac autonomic activity may provide a proxy measure of the changes in autonomic input into organs and (by default) the blood flow requirements to restore homeostasis. Metaboreflex stimulation (e.g. muscle and blood acidosis) is likely a key determinant of parasympathetic reactivation in the short term (0-90 min post-exercise), whereas baroreflex stimulation (e.g. exercise-induced changes in plasma volume) probably mediates parasympathetic reactivation in the intermediate term (1-48 h post-exercise). Cardiac parasympathetic reactivation does not appear to coincide with the recovery of all physiological systems (e.g. energy stores or the neuromuscular system). However, this may reflect the limited data currently available on parasympathetic reactivation following strength/resistance-based exercise of variable intensity. In this review, we quantitatively analyse post-exercise cardiac parasympathetic reactivation in athletes and healthy individuals following aerobic exercise, with respect to exercise intensity and duration, and fitness

  10. Cardiac function and cognition in older community-dwelling cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermont, Laura H P; Aly, Mohamed F A; Vuijk, Pieter J; de Boer, Karin; Kamp, Otto; van Rossum, Albert C; Scherder, Erik J A

    2017-11-01

    Cognitive deficits have been reported in older cardiac patients. An underlying mechanism for these findings may be reduced cardiac function. The relationship between cardiac function as represented by different echocardiographic measures and different cognitive function domains in older cardiac patients remains unknown. An older (≥70 years) heterogeneous group of 117 community-dwelling cardiac patients under medical supervision by a cardiologist underwent thorough echocardiographic assessment including left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiac index, left atrial volume index, left ventricular mass index, left ventricular diastolic function, and valvular calcification. During a home visit, a neuropsychological assessment was performed within 7.1 ± 3.8 months after echocardiographic assessment; the neuropsychological assessment included three subtests of a word-learning test (encoding, recall, recognition) to examine one memory function domain and three executive function tests, including digit span backwards, Trail Making Test B minus A, and the Stroop colour-word test. Regression analyses showed no significant linear or quadratic associations between any of the echocardiographic functions and the cognitive function measures. None of the echocardiographic measures as representative of cardiac function was correlated with memory or executive function in this group of community-dwelling older cardiac patients. These findings contrast with those of previous studies. © 2017 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  11. Documentation of pain care processes does not accurately reflect pain management delivered in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Erin E; Bair, Matthew J; Carey, Timothy S; Weinberger, Morris

    2010-03-01

    Researchers and quality improvement advocates sometimes use review of chart-documented pain care processes to assess the quality of pain management. Studies have found that primary care providers frequently fail to document pain assessment and management. To assess documentation of pain care processes in an academic primary care clinic and evaluate the validity of this documentation as a measure of pain care delivered. Prospective observational study. 237 adult patients at a university-affiliated internal medicine clinic who reported any pain in the last week. Immediately after a visit, we asked patients to report the pain treatment they received. Patients completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) to assess pain severity at baseline and 1 month later. We extracted documentation of pain care processes from the medical record and used kappa statistics to assess agreement between documentation and patient report of pain treatment. Using multivariable linear regression, we modeled whether documented or patient-reported pain care predicted change in pain at 1 month. Participants' mean age was 53.7 years, 66% were female, and 74% had chronic pain. Physicians documented pain assessment for 83% of visits. Patients reported receiving pain treatment more often (67%) than was documented by physicians (54%). Agreement between documentation and patient report was moderate for receiving a new pain medication (k = 0.50) and slight for receiving pain management advice (k = 0.13). In multivariable models, documentation of new pain treatment was not associated with change in pain (p = 0.134). In contrast, patient-reported receipt of new pain treatment predicted pain improvement (p = 0.005). Chart documentation underestimated pain care delivered, compared with patient report. Documented pain care processes had no relationship with pain outcomes at 1 month, but patient report of receiving care predicted clinically significant improvement. Chart review measures may not accurately

  12. Cardiac function and cognition in older community-dwelling cardiac patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggermont, Laura H.P.; Aly, Mohamed F.A.; Vuijk, Pieter J.; de Boer, Karin; Kamp, Otto; van Rossum, Albert C.; Scherder, Erik J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cognitive deficits have been reported in older cardiac patients. An underlying mechanism for these findings may be reduced cardiac function. The relationship between cardiac function as represented by different echocardiographic measures and different cognitive function domains in older

  13. Comparing Methods for Cardiac Output: Intraoperatively Doppler-Derived Cardiac Output Measured With 3-Dimensional Echocardiography Is Not Interchangeable With Cardiac Output by Pulmonary Catheter Thermodilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeser, Karin; Zemtsovski, Mikhail; Kofoed, Klaus F; Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Nilsson, Jens C; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse

    2018-01-09

    Estimation of cardiac output (CO) is essential in the treatment of circulatory unstable patients. CO measured by pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution is considered the gold standard but carries a small risk of severe complications. Stroke volume and CO can be measured by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), which is widely used during cardiac surgery. We hypothesized that Doppler-derived CO by 3-dimensional (3D) TEE would agree well with CO measured with pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution as a reference method based on accurate measurements of the cross-sectional area of the left ventricular outflow tract. The primary aim was a systematic comparison of CO with Doppler-derived 3D TEE and CO by thermodilution in a broad population of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. A subanalysis was performed comparing cross-sectional area by TEE with cardiac computed tomography (CT) angiography. Sixty-two patients, scheduled for elective heart surgery, were included; 1 was subsequently excluded for logistic reasons. Inclusion criteria were coronary artery bypass surgery (N = 42) and aortic valve replacement (N = 19). Exclusion criteria were chronic atrial fibrillation, left ventricular ejection fraction below 0.40 and intracardiac shunts. Nineteen randomly selected patients had a cardiac CT the day before surgery. All images were stored for blinded post hoc analyses, and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess agreement between measurement methods, defined as the bias (mean difference between methods), limits of agreement (equal to bias ± 2 standard deviations of the bias), and percentage error (limits of agreement divided by the mean of the 2 methods). Precision was determined for the individual methods (equal to 2 standard deviations of the bias between replicate measurements) to determine the acceptable limits of agreement. We found a good precision for Doppler-derived CO measured by 3D TEE, but although the bias for Doppler-derived CO by 3D compared to

  14. [Cardiac Synchronization Function Estimation Based on ASM Level Set Segmentation Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaonan; Gao, Yuan; Tang, Liang; He, Ying; Zhang, Huie

    At present, there is no accurate and quantitative methods for the determination of cardiac mechanical synchronism, and quantitative determination of the synchronization function of the four cardiac cavities with medical images has a great clinical value. This paper uses the whole heart ultrasound image sequence, and segments the left & right atriums and left & right ventricles of each frame. After the segmentation, the number of pixels in each cavity and in each frame is recorded, and the areas of the four cavities of the image sequence are therefore obtained. The area change curves of the four cavities are further extracted, and the synchronous information of the four cavities is obtained. Because of the low SNR of Ultrasound images, the boundary lines of cardiac cavities are vague, so the extraction of cardiac contours is still a challenging problem. Therefore, the ASM model information is added to the traditional level set method to force the curve evolution process. According to the experimental results, the improved method improves the accuracy of the segmentation. Furthermore, based on the ventricular segmentation, the right and left ventricular systolic functions are evaluated, mainly according to the area changes. The synchronization of the four cavities of the heart is estimated based on the area changes and the volume changes.

  15. The Role of Biomarkers in Decreasing Risk of Cardiac Toxicity after Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Henri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the improvement of cancer therapy, survival related to malignancy has improved, but the prevalence of long-term cardiotoxicity has also increased. Cancer therapies with known cardiac toxicity include anthracyclines, biologic agents (trastuzumab, and multikinase inhibitors (sunitinib. The most frequent presentation of cardiac toxicity is dilated cardiomyopathy associated with poorest prognosis. Monitoring of cardiac toxicity is commonly performed by assessment of left ventricular (LV ejection fraction, which requires a significant amount of myocardial damage to allow detection of cardiac toxicity. Accordingly, this creates the impetus to search for more sensitive and reproducible biomarkers of cardiac toxicity after cancer therapy. Different biomarkers have been proposed to that end, the most studied ones included troponin release resulting from cardiomyocyte damage and natriuretic peptides reflecting elevation in LV filling pressure and wall stress. Increase in the levels of troponin and natriuretic peptides have been correlated with cumulative dose of anthracycline and the degree of LV dysfunction. Troponin is recognized as a highly efficient predictor of early and chronic cardiac toxicity, but there remains some debate regarding the clinical usefulness of the measurement of natriuretic peptides because of divergent results. Preliminary data are available for other biomarkers targeting inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, myocardial ischemia, and neuregulin-1. The purpose of this article is to review the available data to determine the role of biomarkers in decreasing the risk of cardiac toxicity after cancer therapy.

  16. On Optimal, Minimal BRDF Sampling for Reflectance Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Boll; Jensen, Henrik Wann; Ramamoorthi, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is critical for rendering, and accurate material representation requires data-driven reflectance models. However, isotropic BRDFs are 3D functions, and measuring the reflectance of a flat sample can require a million incident and outgoing...... direction pairs, making the use of measured BRDFs impractical. In this paper, we address the problem of reconstructing a measured BRDF from a limited number of samples. We present a novel mapping of the BRDF space, allowing for extraction of descriptive principal components from measured databases......, such as the MERL BRDF database. We optimize for the best sampling directions, and explicitly provide the optimal set of incident and outgoing directions in the Rusinkiewicz parameterization for n = {1, 2, 5, 10, 20} samples. Based on the principal components, we describe a method for accurately reconstructing BRDF...

  17. Recent Developments in the X-Ray Reflectivity Analysis for Rough Surfaces and Interfaces of Multilayered Thin Film Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Fujii

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray reflectometry is a powerful tool for investigations on rough surface and interface structures of multilayered thin film materials. The X-ray reflectivity has been calculated based on the Parratt formalism, accounting for the effect of roughness by the theory of Nevot-Croce conventionally. However, in previous studies, the calculations of the X-ray reflectivity often show a strange effect where interference effects would increase at a rough surface. And estimated surface and interface roughnesses from the X-ray reflectivity measurements did not correspond to the TEM image observation results. The strange result had its origin in a used equation due to a serious mistake in which the Fresnel transmission coefficient in the reflectivity equation is increased at a rough interface because of a lack of consideration of diffuse scattering. In this review, a new accurate formalism that corrects this mistake is presented. The new accurate formalism derives an accurate analysis of the X-ray reflectivity from a multilayer surface of thin film materials, taking into account the effect of roughness-induced diffuse scattering. The calculated reflectivity by this accurate reflectivity equation should enable the structure of buried interfaces to be analyzed more accurately.

  18. Evaluation of left ventricular function by cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Hiroaki; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1982-01-01

    Left ventricular function was evaluated by CT, which was compared with the data of left ventriculography for various cardiac diseases. The end diastolic volume of the left ventricle can be readily computed from CT, with a satisfactory correlation with that of left ventriculography (r = 0.95). The left ventricular ejection fraction, calculated from the areal ratio of the left ventricular lumen in end-diastolic imaging to that in end-sytolic imaging, also roughly reflects left ventricular contractile function, but shows correlation with left ventriculography by only r = 0.79. Although the cardiac output is not sensitive for functional evaluation, it can be directly calculated by means of dynamic scanning and shows a satisfactory correlation with the ear piece pigment dilution (r = 0.85). Evaluation of left ventricular function by CT shows a high precision in comparison with left ventriculography, but still lacks temporal resolving power. (Chiba, N.)

  19. Perspectives on barriers and facilitators to self-care in Lebanese cardiac patients: A qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumit, Nuhad Yazbik; Noureddine, Samar Nayef; Magilvy, Joan Kathy

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Cardiac self-care practices are essential for managing cardiac illness and improving quality of life. However, these practices may be affected by factors that may hinder or facilitate self-care especially in countries that experience political and economic instabilities. The purpose of this study was to explore self-care practices among Lebanese cardiac patients. Another aim was to reveal factors that might influence these self-care practices. This is a qualitative descriptive study. Participants were recruited from a referral medical center in Beirut, Lebanon and interviews took place in their homes. Purposive sample of 15 adult participants, seven females and eight males, diagnosed with coronary artery disease at least a year ago and not in critical condition recruited from the cardiology clinics of the medical center. Data were collected through semi-structured audio-recorded interviews that took place in their places of residents. Three themes emerged from the data: I. The behaviors of cardiac patients demonstrated selected self-care practices; II. Patients identified barriers to self-care reflective of the Lebanese political and socio-economic situation; and, III. Patients described facilitators to self-care consistent with the Lebanese socio-cultural values and norms. The most common self-care practices included taking medications and eating properly. Participants emphasized avoiding stress and being upset as a self-protective measure for cardiac health. Health care costs, family responsibilities, psychological factors and the country's political situation impeded self-care practices whereas family support facilitated them. Lebanese patients reported select self-care practices in dealing with their cardiac illness. Barriers and facilitators to their self-care behaviors reflected the Lebanese context and culture. Thus health care providers must assess their patients' practices within their

  20. Factor analysis with a priori knowledge - application in dynamic cardiac SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitek, A.; Di Bella, E.V.R.; Gullberg, G.T. [Medical Imaging Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology, University of Utah, CAMT, 729 Arapeen Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84108-1218 (United States)

    2000-09-01

    Two factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) methods for the extraction of time-activity curves (TACs) from cardiac dynamic SPECT data sequences were investigated. One method was based on a least squares (LS) approach which was subject to positivity constraints. The other method was the well known apex-seeking (AS) method. A post-processing step utilizing a priori information was employed to correct for the non-uniqueness of the FADS solution. These methods were used to extract {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime TACs from computer simulations and from experimental canine and patient studies. In computer simulations, the LS and AS methods, which are completely different algorithms, yielded very similar and accurate results after application of the correction for non-uniqueness. FADS-obtained blood curves correlated well with curves derived from region of interest (ROI) measurements in the experimental studies. The results indicate that the factor analysis techniques can be used for semi-automatic estimation of activity curves derived from cardiac dynamic SPECT images, and that they can be used for separation of physiologically different regions in dynamic cardiac SPECT studies. (author)

  1. Cardiac Complications, Earlier Treatment, and Initial Disease Severity in Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Joseph Y; Belay, Ermias D; Uehara, Ritei; Maddox, Ryan A; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Nakamura, Yosikazu

    2017-09-01

    To assess if observed higher observed risks of cardiac complications for patients with Kawasaki disease (KD) treated earlier may reflect bias due to confounding from initial disease severity, as opposed to any negative effect of earlier treatment. We used data from Japanese nationwide KD surveys from 1997 to 2004. Receipt of additional intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) (data available all years) or any additional treatment (available for 2003-2004) were assessed as proxies for initial disease severity. We determined associations between earlier or later IVIG treatment (defined as receipt of IVIG on days 1-4 vs days 5-10 of illness) and cardiac complications by stratifying by receipt of additional treatment or by using logistic modeling to control for the effect of receiving additional treatment. A total of 48 310 patients with KD were included in the analysis. In unadjusted analysis, earlier IVIG treatment was associated with a higher risk for 4 categories of cardiac complications, including all major cardiac complications (risk ratio, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.06-1.15). Stratifying by receipt of additional treatment removed this association, and earlier IVIG treatment became protective against all major cardiac complications when controlling for any additional treatment in logistic regressions (OR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.80-1.00). Observed higher risks of cardiac complications among patients with KD receiving IVIG treatment on days 1-4 of the illness are most likely due to underlying higher initial disease severity, and patients with KD should continue to be treated with IVIG as early as possible. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Detecting early cardiac dysfunction with radionuclide cardiac blood-pool imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kegui; Chen Daguang; Lin Haoxue

    1992-01-01

    Cardiac function was measured by radionuclide cardiac blood-pool imaging in 15 normal persons, 19 cases of hypertension, 32 cases of coronary heart disease, 35 cases of coronary heart disease combined with hypertension and 44 cases of myocardial infarction. Significant differences have been found in indices of cardiac function between normal subjects and patients with coronary heart disease and coronary heart disease combined with hypertension, even though the patients were without any clinical sin of cardiac failure. Lowered regional EF and decreased ventricular was motion were found in 38.8% of patients, while 65.7%of patients revealed marked abnormality in MFR. The results indicate that latent cardiac dysfunction is common in patients with coronary heart disease. The earliest change is diastolic function abnormalities

  3. Cardiac Function Remains Impaired Despite Reversible Cardiac Remodeling after Acute Experimental Viral Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Moritz Becher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Infection with Coxsackievirus B3 induces myocarditis. We aimed to compare the acute and chronic phases of viral myocarditis to identify the immediate effects of cardiac inflammation as well as the long-term effects after resolved inflammation on cardiac fibrosis and consequently on cardiac function. Material and Methods. We infected C57BL/6J mice with Coxsackievirus B3 and determined the hemodynamic function 7 as well as 28 days after infection. Subsequently, we analyzed viral burden and viral replication in the cardiac tissue as well as the expression of cytokines and matrix proteins. Furthermore, cardiac fibroblasts were infected with virus to investigate if viral infection alone induces profibrotic signaling. Results. Severe cardiac inflammation was determined and cardiac fibrosis was consistently colocalized with inflammation during the acute phase of myocarditis. Declined cardiac inflammation but no significantly improved hemodynamic function was observed 28 days after infection. Interestingly, cardiac fibrosis declined to basal levels as well. Both cardiac inflammation and fibrosis were reversible, whereas the hemodynamic function remains impaired after healed viral myocarditis in C57BL/6J mice.

  4. Current role of cardiac and extra-cardiac pathologies in clinically indicated cardiac computed tomography with emphasis on status before pulmonary vein isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohns, J.M.; Lotz, J. [Goettingen University Medical Center (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Goettingen (Germany); Menke, J.; Staab, W.; Fasshauer, M.; Kowallick, J.T.; Zwaka, P.A.; Schwarz, A. [Goettingen University Medical Center (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Spiro, J. [Koeln University Hospital (Germany). Radiology; Bergau, L.; Unterberg-Buchwald, C. [Goettingen University Medical Center (Germany). Cardiology and Pneumology

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of cardiac and significant extra-cardiac findings in clinical computed tomography of the heart in patients with atrial fibrillation before pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). Materials and Methods: 224 patients (64 ± 10 years; male 63%) with atrial fibrillation were examined by cardiac 64-slice multidetector CT before PVI. Extra-cardiac findings were classified as 'significant' if they were recommended to additional diagnostics or therapy, and otherwise as 'non-significant'. Additionally, cardiac findings were documented in detail. Results: A total of 724 cardiac findings were identified in 203 patients (91% of patients). Additionally, a total of 619 extra-cardiac findings were identified in 179 patients (80% of patients). Among these extra-cardiac findings 196 (32%) were 'significant', and 423 (68%) were 'non-significant'. In 2 patients (1%) a previously unknown malignancy was detected (esophageal cancer and lung cancer, local stage, no metastasis). 203 additional imaging diagnostics followed to clarify the 'significant' findings (124 additional CT, costs 38,314.69 US dollars). Overall, there were 3.2 cardiac and 2.8 extra-cardiac findings per patient. Extra-cardiac findings appear significantly more frequently in patients over 60 years old, in smokers and in patients with a history of cardiac findings (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Cardiac CT scans before PVI should be screened for extracardiac incidental findings that could have important clinical implications for each patient. (orig.)

  5. An ontology-based annotation of cardiac implantable electronic devices to detect therapy changes in a national registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosier, Arnaud; Mabo, Philippe; Chauvin, Michel; Burgun, Anita

    2015-05-01

    The patient population benefitting from cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is increasing. This study introduces a device annotation method that supports the consistent description of the functional attributes of cardiac devices and evaluates how this method can detect device changes from a CIED registry. We designed the Cardiac Device Ontology, an ontology of CIEDs and device functions. We annotated 146 cardiac devices with this ontology and used it to detect therapy changes with respect to atrioventricular pacing, cardiac resynchronization therapy, and defibrillation capability in a French national registry of patients with implants (STIDEFIX). We then analyzed a set of 6905 device replacements from the STIDEFIX registry. Ontology-based identification of therapy changes (upgraded, downgraded, or similar) was accurate (6905 cases) and performed better than straightforward analysis of the registry codes (F-measure 1.00 versus 0.75 to 0.97). This study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of ontology-based functional annotation of devices in the cardiac domain. Such annotation allowed a better description and in-depth analysis of STIDEFIX. This method was useful for the automatic detection of therapy changes and may be reused for analyzing data from other device registries.

  6. Non-conforming finite-element formulation for cardiac electrophysiology: an effective approach to reduce the computation time of heart simulations without compromising accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Daniel E.; Rojas, Guillermo

    2018-04-01

    Computer simulations constitute a powerful tool for studying the electrical activity of the human heart, but computational effort remains prohibitively high. In order to recover accurate conduction velocities and wavefront shapes, the mesh size in linear element (Q1) formulations cannot exceed 0.1 mm. Here we propose a novel non-conforming finite-element formulation for the non-linear cardiac electrophysiology problem that results in accurate wavefront shapes and lower mesh-dependance in the conduction velocity, while retaining the same number of global degrees of freedom as Q1 formulations. As a result, coarser discretizations of cardiac domains can be employed in simulations without significant loss of accuracy, thus reducing the overall computational effort. We demonstrate the applicability of our formulation in biventricular simulations using a coarse mesh size of ˜ 1 mm, and show that the activation wave pattern closely follows that obtained in fine-mesh simulations at a fraction of the computation time, thus improving the accuracy-efficiency trade-off of cardiac simulations.

  7. Energy expenditure estimation in beta-blocker-medicated cardiac patients by combining heart rate and body movement data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraal, Jos J.; Sartor, Francesco; Papini, Gabriele; Stut, Wim; Peek, Niels; Kemps, Hareld Mc; Bonomi, Alberto G.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of energy expenditure provides an opportunity to monitor physical activity during cardiac rehabilitation. However, the available assessment methods, based on the combination of heart rate (HR) and body movement data, are not applicable for patients using beta-blocker medication.

  8. Direct and simultaneous estimation of cardiac four chamber volumes by multioutput sparse regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xiantong; Zhang, Heye; Islam, Ali; Bhaduri, Mousumi; Chan, Ian; Li, Shuo

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac four-chamber volume estimation serves as a fundamental and crucial role in clinical quantitative analysis of whole heart functions. It is a challenging task due to the huge complexity of the four chambers including great appearance variations, huge shape deformation and interference between chambers. Direct estimation has recently emerged as an effective and convenient tool for cardiac ventricular volume estimation. However, existing direct estimation methods were specifically developed for one single ventricle, i.e., left ventricle (LV), or bi-ventricles; they can not be directly used for four chamber volume estimation due to the great combinatorial variability and highly complex anatomical interdependency of the four chambers. In this paper, we propose a new, general framework for direct and simultaneous four chamber volume estimation. We have addressed two key issues, i.e., cardiac image representation and simultaneous four chamber volume estimation, which enables accurate and efficient four-chamber volume estimation. We generate compact and discriminative image representations by supervised descriptor learning (SDL) which can remove irrelevant information and extract discriminative features. We propose direct and simultaneous four-chamber volume estimation by the multioutput sparse latent regression (MSLR), which enables jointly modeling nonlinear input-output relationships and capturing four-chamber interdependence. The proposed method is highly generalized, independent of imaging modalities, which provides a general regression framework that can be extensively used for clinical data prediction to achieve automated diagnosis. Experiments on both MR and CT images show that our method achieves high performance with a correlation coefficient of up to 0.921 with ground truth obtained manually by human experts, which is clinically significant and enables more accurate, convenient and comprehensive assessment of cardiac functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  9. Reflections on Self-Reflection: Contemplating Flawed Self-Judgments in the Clinic, Classroom, and Office Cubicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, David; Heath, Chip; Suls, Jerry M

    2018-03-01

    We reflect back on our 2004 monograph reviewing the implications of faulty self-judgment for health, education, and the workplace. The review proved popular, no doubt because the importance of accurate self-assessment is best reflected in just how broad the literature is that touches on this topic. We discuss opportunities and challenges to be found in the future study of self-judgment accuracy and error, and suggest that designing interventions aimed at improving self-judgments may prove to be a worthwhile but complex and nuanced task.

  10. Ocean color remote sensing using polarization properties of reflected sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouin, R.; Pouliquen, E.; Breon, F.-M.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of the atmosphere and surface on sunlight backscattered to space by the ocean may be substantially reduced by using the unpolarized component of reflectance instead of total reflectance. At 450 nm, a wavelength of interest in ocean color remote sensing, and for typical conditions, 45% of the unpolarized reflectance may originate from the water body instead of 20% of the total reflectance, which represents a gain of a factor 2.2 in useful signal for water composition retrieval. The best viewing geometries are adjacent to the glitter region; they correspond to scattering angles around 100 deg, but they may change slightly depending on the polarization characteristics of the aerosols. As aerosol optical thickness increases, the atmosphere becomes less efficient at polarizing sunlight, and the enhancement of the water body contribution to unpolarized reflectance is reduced. Since the perturbing effects are smaller on unpolarized reflectance, at least for some viewing geometries, they may be more easily corrected, leading to a more accurate water-leaving signal and, therefore, more accurate estimates of phytoplankton pigment concentration.

  11. Hybrid 3D printing: a game-changer in personalized cardiac medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Harikrishnan K N; Samuel, Bennett P; Vettukattil, Joseph J

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing in congenital heart disease has the potential to increase procedural efficiency and patient safety by improving interventional and surgical planning and reducing radiation exposure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are usually the source datasets to derive 3D printing. More recently, 3D echocardiography has been demonstrated to derive 3D-printed models. The integration of multiple imaging modalities for hybrid 3D printing has also been shown to create accurate printed heart models, which may prove to be beneficial for interventional cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, and as an educational tool. Further advancements in the integration of different imaging modalities into a single platform for hybrid 3D printing and virtual 3D models will drive the future of personalized cardiac medicine.

  12. Shape and dimensions of cardiac chambers: Importance of CT section thickness and orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.A.; Ritman, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) scan data were used to quantitate the geometry of all heart chambers. The Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (DSR) was used to scan dogs with in situ casts of the cardiac chambers. Chamber volumes estimated from DSR images were accurate within 5% of water displacement volume measurements of the actual casts for chambers greater than 11 ml and within 10% of water displacement volumes for chambers less than 11 ml. Anatomic features of the actual cast correlated closely with anatomy visible in computer-generated surface images of the 3D DSR image data. The important effect of reconstructed section thickness and orientation on the fidelity of 3D cardiac geometry is demonstrated

  13. Epidemiology and Outcomes After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Punkaj; Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Hill, Kevin D.; Gaynor, J. William; O’Brien, Sean M.; He, Max; Sheng, Shubin; Schexnayder, Stephen M.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Imamura, Michiaki; Jacobs, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multicenter data regarding cardiac arrest in children undergoing heart operations are limited. We describe epidemiology and outcomes associated with postoperative cardiac arrest in a large multiinstitutional cohort. Methods Patients younger than 18 years in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2007 through 2012) were included. Patient factors, operative characteristics, and outcomes were described for patients with and without postoperative cardiac arrest. Multivariable models were used to evaluate the association of center volume with cardiac arrest rate and mortality after cardiac arrest, adjusting for patient and procedural factors. Results Of 70,270 patients (97 centers), 1,843 (2.6%) had postoperative cardiac arrest. Younger age, lower weight, and presence of preoperative morbidities (all p < 0.0001) were associated with cardiac arrest. Arrest rate increased with procedural complexity across common benchmark operations, ranging from 0.7% (ventricular septal defect repair) to 12.7% (Norwood operation). Cardiac arrest was associated with significant mortality risk across procedures, ranging from 15.4% to 62.3% (all p < 0.0001). In multivariable analysis, arrest rate was not associated with center volume (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71 to 1.57 in low- versus high-volume centers). However, mortality after cardiac arrest was higher in low-volume centers (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.52 to 2.63). This association was present for both high- and low-complexity operations. Conclusions Cardiac arrest carries a significant mortality risk across the stratum of procedural complexity. Although arrest rates are not associated with center volume, lower-volume centers have increased mortality after cardiac arrest. Further study of mechanisms to prevent cardiac arrest and to reduce mortality in those with an arrest is warranted. PMID:25443018

  14. Virtual and augmented medical imaging environments: enabling technology for minimally invasive cardiac interventional guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linte, Cristian A; White, James; Eagleson, Roy; Guiraudon, Gérard M; Peters, Terry M

    2010-01-01

    Virtual and augmented reality environments have been adopted in medicine as a means to enhance the clinician's view of the anatomy and facilitate the performance of minimally invasive procedures. Their value is truly appreciated during interventions where the surgeon cannot directly visualize the targets to be treated, such as during cardiac procedures performed on the beating heart. These environments must accurately represent the real surgical field and require seamless integration of pre- and intra-operative imaging, surgical tracking, and visualization technology in a common framework centered around the patient. This review begins with an overview of minimally invasive cardiac interventions, describes the architecture of a typical surgical guidance platform including imaging, tracking, registration and visualization, highlights both clinical and engineering accuracy limitations in cardiac image guidance, and discusses the translation of the work from the laboratory into the operating room together with typically encountered challenges.

  15. Genetic Counseling and Cardiac Care in Predictively Tested Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutation Carriers: The Patients' Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with sudden cardiac death. predictive genetic counseling and testing are performed using adapted Huntington guidelines, that is, psychosocial care and time for reflection are not obligatory and the test result can be

  16. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  17. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Chung; Sinusas, Albert J; Liu, Chi; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    noise on the patient with defect. The results showed that the proposed methods can effectively reduce motion blur in the images caused by both respiratory and cardiac motions, which may lead to more accurate defect detection and quantifications. This approach can be easily adapted in routine clinical practice on currently available commercial systems. (paper)

  18. Cardiac Concomitants of Feedback and Prediction Error Processing in Reinforcement Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Lucas; Kube, Jana; Villringer, Arno; Neumann, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Successful learning hinges on the evaluation of positive and negative feedback. We assessed differential learning from reward and punishment in a monetary reinforcement learning paradigm, together with cardiac concomitants of positive and negative feedback processing. On the behavioral level, learning from reward resulted in more advantageous behavior than learning from punishment, suggesting a differential impact of reward and punishment on successful feedback-based learning. On the autonomic level, learning and feedback processing were closely mirrored by phasic cardiac responses on a trial-by-trial basis: (1) Negative feedback was accompanied by faster and prolonged heart rate deceleration compared to positive feedback. (2) Cardiac responses shifted from feedback presentation at the beginning of learning to stimulus presentation later on. (3) Most importantly, the strength of phasic cardiac responses to the presentation of feedback correlated with the strength of prediction error signals that alert the learner to the necessity for behavioral adaptation. Considering participants' weight status and gender revealed obesity-related deficits in learning to avoid negative consequences and less consistent behavioral adaptation in women compared to men. In sum, our results provide strong new evidence for the notion that during learning phasic cardiac responses reflect an internal value and feedback monitoring system that is sensitive to the violation of performance-based expectations. Moreover, inter-individual differences in weight status and gender may affect both behavioral and autonomic responses in reinforcement-based learning. PMID:29163004

  19. Cardiac Concomitants of Feedback and Prediction Error Processing in Reinforcement Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Kastner

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Successful learning hinges on the evaluation of positive and negative feedback. We assessed differential learning from reward and punishment in a monetary reinforcement learning paradigm, together with cardiac concomitants of positive and negative feedback processing. On the behavioral level, learning from reward resulted in more advantageous behavior than learning from punishment, suggesting a differential impact of reward and punishment on successful feedback-based learning. On the autonomic level, learning and feedback processing were closely mirrored by phasic cardiac responses on a trial-by-trial basis: (1 Negative feedback was accompanied by faster and prolonged heart rate deceleration compared to positive feedback. (2 Cardiac responses shifted from feedback presentation at the beginning of learning to stimulus presentation later on. (3 Most importantly, the strength of phasic cardiac responses to the presentation of feedback correlated with the strength of prediction error signals that alert the learner to the necessity for behavioral adaptation. Considering participants' weight status and gender revealed obesity-related deficits in learning to avoid negative consequences and less consistent behavioral adaptation in women compared to men. In sum, our results provide strong new evidence for the notion that during learning phasic cardiac responses reflect an internal value and feedback monitoring system that is sensitive to the violation of performance-based expectations. Moreover, inter-individual differences in weight status and gender may affect both behavioral and autonomic responses in reinforcement-based learning.

  20. Cavity ring-down technique for measurement of reflectivity of high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser & Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085,. India. *Corresponding author. E-mail: gsridhar@barc.gov.in. Abstract. A simple, accurate and reliable method for measuring the reflectivity of laser- ... Keywords. Cavity ring-down method; reflectivity measurement; optical resonator.

  1. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab References Anderson L, Taylor RS. Cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart disease: ... of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  2. Relationship between cardiac 123I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging and the transcardiac gradient of neurohumoral factors in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Toshiki; Tsutamoto, Takayoshi; Kinoshita, Masahiko

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic nervous function is altered in congestive heart failure (CHF) and the uptake and washout rate of cardiac 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) are useful markers for evaluating the severity of it. To assess what parameters predict decreased uptake or increased washout rate of MIBG, the concentrations of neurohumoral factor in both the aorta (Ao) and coronary sinus (CS) were measured, as well as hemodynamic parameters by catheterization, in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). MIBG imaging was performed within 1 week of cardiac catheterization. Regarding MIBG parameters, the correlation with the transcardiac gradient of norepinephrine (NE), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and hemodynamics was investigated. Stepwise multivariate regression analysis was used to determine which variables closely correlated with cardiac MIBG parameters. There was a significant increase in the NE level between the Ao (446 pg/ml) and the CS (727 pg/ml). According to stepwise multivariate regression analysis, the heart/mediastinum (H/M) ratio independently correlated with the transcardiac gradient of BNP (r=-0.480, p<0.01), and the washout rate independently correlated with the transcardiac gradient of NE (r=0.481, p<0.01). These findings indicate that the H/M ratio may reflect the transcardiac gradient of BNP, which implies the degree of left ventricular dysfunction and/or damage and the washout rate may reflect altered cardiac sympathetic nerve terminal in DCM patients with CHF, suggesting that both the H/M ratio and washout rate provide important information about the failing ventricle. (author)

  3. Acute kidney injury in septua- and octogenarians after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Christof

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of septua- and octogenarians undergo cardiac surgery. Acute kidney injury (AKI still is a frequent complication after surgery. We examined the incidence of AKI and its impact on 30-day mortality. Methods A retrospective study between 01/2006 and 08/2009 with 299 octogenarians, who were matched for gender and surgical procedure to 299 septuagenarians at a university hospital. Primary endpoint was AKI after surgery as proposed by the RIFLE definition (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-stage kidney disease. Secondary endpoint was 30-day mortality. Perioperative mortality was predicted with the logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE. Results Octogenarians significantly had a mean higher logistic EuroSCORE compared to septuagenarians (13.2% versus 8.5%; p -1 × 1.73 m-2. In contrast, septuagenarians showed a slightly higher median body mass index (28 kg × m-2 versus 26 kg × m-2 and were more frequently active smoker at time of surgery (6.4% versus 1.6%, p The RIFLE classification provided accurate risk assessment for 30-day mortality and fair discriminatory power. Conclusions The RIFLE criteria allow identifying patients with AKI after cardiac surgery. The high incidence of AKI in septua- and octogenarians after cardiac surgery should prompt the use of RIFLE criteria to identify patients at risk and should stimulate institutional measures that target AKI as a quality improvement initiative for patients at advanced age.

  4. Cardiac cachexia: hic et nunc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncar, Goran; Springer, Jochen; Anker, Markus; Doehner, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac cachexia (CC) is the clinical entity at the end of the chronic natural course of heart failure (HF). Despite the efforts, even the most recent definition of cardiac cachexia has been challenged, more precisely, the addition of new criteria on top of obligatory weight loss. The pathophysiology of CC is complex and multifactorial. A better understanding of pathophysiological pathways in body wasting will contribute to establish potentially novel treatment strategies. The complex biochemical network related with CC and HF pathophysiology underlines that a single biomarker cannot reflect all of the features of the disease. Biomarkers that could pick up the changes in body composition before they convey into clinical manifestations of CC would be of great importance. The development of preventive and therapeutic strategies against cachexia, sarcopenia, and wasting disorders is perceived as an urgent need by healthcare professionals. The treatment of body wasting remains an unresolved challenge to this day. As CC is a multifactorial disorder, it is unlikely that any single agent will be completely effective in treating this condition. Among all investigated therapeutic strategies, aerobic exercise training in HF patients is the most proved to counteract skeletal muscle wasting and is recommended by treatment guidelines for HF. PMID:27386168

  5. Identification of cardiac rhythm features by mathematical analysis of vector fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Tamara N; Brooks, Dana H; Triedman, John K

    2005-01-01

    Automated techniques for locating cardiac arrhythmia features are limited, and cardiologists generally rely on isochronal maps to infer patterns in the cardiac activation sequence during an ablation procedure. Velocity vector mapping has been proposed as an alternative method to study cardiac activation in both clinical and research environments. In addition to the visual cues that vector maps can provide, vector fields can be analyzed using mathematical operators such as the divergence and curl. In the current study, conduction features were extracted from velocity vector fields computed from cardiac mapping data. The divergence was used to locate ectopic foci and wavefront collisions, and the curl to identify central obstacles in reentrant circuits. Both operators were applied to simulated rhythms created from a two-dimensional cellular automaton model, to measured data from an in situ experimental canine model, and to complex three-dimensional human cardiac mapping data sets. Analysis of simulated vector fields indicated that the divergence is useful in identifying ectopic foci, with a relatively small number of vectors and with errors of up to 30 degrees in the angle measurements. The curl was useful for identifying central obstacles in reentrant circuits, and the number of velocity vectors needed increased as the rhythm became more complex. The divergence was able to accurately identify canine in situ pacing sites, areas of breakthrough activation, and wavefront collisions. In data from human arrhythmias, the divergence reliably estimated origins of electrical activity and wavefront collisions, but the curl was less reliable at locating central obstacles in reentrant circuits, possibly due to the retrospective nature of data collection. The results indicate that the curl and divergence operators applied to velocity vector maps have the potential to add valuable information in cardiac mapping and can be used to supplement human pattern recognition.

  6. Large-deflection statics analysis of active cardiac catheters through co-rotational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng Qi; Chen Qiu; Mehndiratta, Aadarsh; I-Ming Chen; Haoyong Yu

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a co-rotational concept for large-deflection formulation of cardiac catheters. Using this approach, the catheter is first discretized with a number of equal length beam elements and nodes, and the rigid body motions of an individual beam element are separated from its deformations. Therefore, it is adequate for modelling arbitrarily large deflections of a catheter with linear elastic analysis at the local element level. A novel design of active cardiac catheter of 9 Fr in diameter at the beginning of the paper is proposed, which is based on the contra-rotating double helix patterns and is improved from the previous prototypes. The modelling section is followed by MATLAB simulations of various deflections when the catheter is exerted different types of loads. This proves the feasibility of the presented modelling approach. To the best knowledge of the authors, it is the first to utilize this methodology for large-deflection static analysis of the catheter, which will enable more accurate control of robot-assisted cardiac catheterization procedures. Future work would include further experimental validations.

  7. Guidelines for autopsy investigation of sudden cardiac death: 2017 update from the Association for European Cardiovascular Pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basso, Cristina; Aguilera, Beatriz; Banner, Jytte; Cohle, Stephan; d'Amati, Giulia; de Gouveia, Rosa Henriques; di Gioia, Cira; Fabre, Aurelie; Gallagher, Patrick J.; Leone, Ornella; Lucena, Joaquin; Mitrofanova, Lubov; Molina, Pilar; Parsons, Sarah; Rizzo, Stefania; Sheppard, Mary N.; Mier, Maria Paz Suárez; Kim Suvarna, S.; Thiene, Gaetano; van der Wal, Allard; Vink, Aryan; Michaud, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Although sudden cardiac death (SCD) is one of the most important modes of death in Western countries, pathologists and public health physicians have not given this problem the attention it deserves. New methods of preventing potentially fatal arrhythmias have been developed and the accurate

  8. Defining the Intrinsic Cardiac Risks of Operations to Improve Preoperative Cardiac Risk Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jason B; Liu, Yaoming; Cohen, Mark E; Ko, Clifford Y; Sweitzer, Bobbie J

    2018-02-01

    Current preoperative cardiac risk stratification practices group operations into broad categories, which might inadequately consider the intrinsic cardiac risks of individual operations. We sought to define the intrinsic cardiac risks of individual operations and to demonstrate how grouping operations might lead to imprecise estimates of perioperative cardiac risk. Elective operations (based on Common Procedural Terminology codes) performed from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2015 at hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program were studied. A composite measure of perioperative adverse cardiac events was defined as either cardiac arrest requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation or acute myocardial infarction. Operations' intrinsic cardiac risks were derived from mixed-effects models while controlling for patient mix. Resultant risks were sorted into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk categories, and the most commonly performed operations within each category were identified. Intrinsic operative risks were also examined using a representative grouping of operations to portray within-group variation. Sixty-six low, 30 intermediate, and 106 high intrinsic cardiac risk operations were identified. Excisional breast biopsy had the lowest intrinsic cardiac risk (overall rate, 0.01%; odds ratio, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.25) relative to the average, whereas aorto-bifemoral bypass grafting had the highest (overall rate, 4.1%; odds ratio, 6.61; 95% CI, 5.54 to 7.90). There was wide variation in the intrinsic cardiac risks of operations within the representative grouping (median odds ratio, 1.40; interquartile range, 0.88 to 2.17). A continuum of intrinsic cardiac risk exists among operations. Grouping operations into broad categories inadequately accounts for the intrinsic cardiac risk of individual operations.

  9. Reactivation of the Nkx2.5 cardiac enhancer after myocardial infarction does not presage myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Marcus-André; Doppler, Stefanie A; Li, Xinghai; Lahm, Harald; Santamaria, Gianluca; Cuda, Giovanni; Eichhorn, Stefan; Ratschiller, Thomas; Dzilic, Elda; Dreßen, Martina; Eckart, Annekathrin; Stark, Konstantin; Massberg, Steffen; Bartels, Anna; Rischpler, Christoph; Gilsbach, Ralf; Hein, Lutz; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Wu, Sean M; Lange, Rüdiger; Krane, Markus

    2018-03-20

    The contribution of resident stem or progenitor cells to cardiomyocyte renewal after injury in adult mammalian hearts remains a matter of considerable debate. We evaluated a cell population in the adult mouse heart induced by myocardial infarction (MI) and characterized by an activated Nkx2.5 enhancer element that is specific for multipotent cardiac progenitor cells during embryonic development. We hypothesized that these MI induced cells (MICs) harbor cardiomyogenic properties similar to their embryonic counterparts. MICs reside in the heart and mainly localize to the infarction area and border zone. Interestingly, gene expression profiling of purified MICs one week after infarction revealed increased expression of stem cell markers and embryonic cardiac transcription factors in these cells as compared to the non-mycoyte cell fraction of adult hearts. A subsequent global transcriptome comparison with embryonic cardiac progenitor cells and fibroblasts and in vitro culture of MICs unveiled that (myo-) fibroblastic features predominated and that cardiac transcription factors were only expressed at background levels. Adult injury induced reactivation of a cardiac-specific Nkx2.5 enhancer element known to specifically mark myocardial progenitor cells during embryonic development does not reflect hypothesized embryonic cardiomyogenic properties. Our data suggest a decreasing plasticity of cardiac progenitor (-like) cell populations with increasing age. A re-expression of embryonic, stem or progenitor cell features in the adult heart must be interpreted very carefully with respect to the definition of cardiac resident progenitor cells. Albeit, the abundance of scar formation after cardiac injury suggests a potential to target predestinated activated profibrotic cells to push them towards cardiomyogenic differentiation to improve regeneration.

  10. Mathematical cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Colli Franzone, Piero; Scacchi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the main mathematical and numerical models in computational electrocardiology, ranging from microscopic membrane models of cardiac ionic channels to macroscopic bidomain, monodomain, eikonal models and cardiac source representations. These advanced multiscale and nonlinear models describe the cardiac bioelectrical activity from the cell level to the body surface and are employed in both the direct and inverse problems of electrocardiology. The book also covers advanced numerical techniques needed to efficiently carry out large-scale cardiac simulations, including time and space discretizations, decoupling and operator splitting techniques, parallel finite element solvers. These techniques are employed in 3D cardiac simulations illustrating the excitation mechanisms, the anisotropic effects on excitation and repolarization wavefronts, the morphology of electrograms in normal and pathological tissue and some reentry phenomena. The overall aim of the book is to present rigorously the mathematica...

  11. A high-sugar and high-fat diet impairs cardiac systolic and diastolic function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Salvatore; Mauro, Adolfo G; Mezzaroma, Eleonora; Kraskauskas, Donatas; Marchetti, Carlo; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Van Tassell, Benjamin W; Abbate, Antonio; Toldo, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a clinical syndrome characterized by dyspnea, fatigue, exercise intolerance and cardiac dysfunction. Unhealthy diet has been associated with increased risk of obesity and heart disease, but whether it directly affects cardiac function, and promotes the development and progression of HF is unknown. We fed 8-week old male or female CD-1 mice with a standard diet (SD) or a diet rich in saturated fat and sugar, resembling a "Western" diet (WD). Cardiac systolic and diastolic function was measured at baseline and 4 and 8 weeks by Doppler echocardiography, and left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure (EDP) by cardiac catheterization prior to sacrifice. An additional group of mice received WD for 4 weeks followed by SD (wash-out) for 8 weeks. WD-fed mice experienced a significant decreased in LV ejection fraction (LVEF), reflecting impaired systolic function, and a significant increase in isovolumetric relaxation time (IRT), myocardial performance index (MPI), and LVEDP, showing impaired diastolic function, without any sex-related differences. Switching to a SD after 4 weeks of WD partially reversed the cardiac systolic and diastolic dysfunction. A diet rich in saturated fat and sugars (WD) impairs cardiac systolic and diastolic function in the mouse. Further studies are required to define the mechanism through which diet affects cardiac function, and whether dietary interventions can be used in patients with, or at risk for, HF. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. The relevance of accuracy of heartbeat perception in noncardiac and cardiac chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Stefanie; Gerlach, Alexander L; Achenbach, Stephan; Martin, Alexandra

    2015-04-01

    The development and course of noncardiac chest pain are assumed to be influenced by interoceptive processes. It was investigated whether heartbeat perception was enhanced in patients suffering from noncardiac chest pain and to what degree it was associated with self-reported cognitive-perceptual features and chest pain characteristics. A total of 42 patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), 35 patients with cardiac chest pain, and 52 healthy controls were recruited. Heartbeat perception was assessed using the Schandry task and a modified Brener-Kluvitse task. Self-report measures assessed anxiety sensitivity, somatosensory amplification, heart-focused anxiety, and chest pain characteristics. Heartbeat perception was not more accurate in patients with NCCP, compared to patients with cardiac chest pain and healthy controls. However, in patients with NCCP, the error score (Schandry task) was significantly associated with stronger chest pain impairment, and the response bias (Brener-Kluvitse task) was associated with lower chest pain intensity. Against assumptions of current etiological models, heartbeat perception was not enhanced in patients with NCCP. Chest pain characteristics and particularly their appraisal as threatening might be more relevant to NCCP than the perceptional accuracy of cardiac sensations and should be focused in psychological interventions. However, associations with chest pain impairment suggest cardiac interoception to influence the course of NCCP.

  13. Association between dental caries and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of cardiac origin in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Yasunori; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Zhang, Bo; Uehara, Yoshinari; Ogawa, Masahiro; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nonogi, Hiroshi; Nagao, Ken; Kimura, Takeshi; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-04-01

    Oral infection contributes to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. We hypothesized that dental caries may be associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) of cardiac origin, but not non-cardiac origin. We compared the age-adjusted incidence of OHCA (785,591 cases of OHCA: 55.4% of cardiac origin and 44.6% of non-cardiac origin) to the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries between 2005 and 2011 in the 47 prefectures of Japan. In both the total population and males over 65 years, the number of cases of dental caries was significantly associated with the number of OHCA of total and cardiac origin from 2005 to 2011, but not those of non-cardiac origin. In the total population, the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries was not significantly associated with the age-adjusted incidence of OHCA (total OHCA: r correlation coefficient=0.22, p=0.14; OHCA of cardiac origin: r=0.25, p=0.09; OHCA of non-cardiac origin: r=-0.002, p=0.99). Among male patients over 65 years, the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries was significantly associated with OHCA of total and cardiac origin, but not non-cardiac origin (total OHCA: r=0.47, p<0.001; OHCA of cardiac origin: r=0.37, p=0.01; OHCA of non-cardiac origin: r=0.28, p=0.054). While oral hygiene is important in all age groups, it may be particularly associated with OHCAs of cardiac origin in males over 65 years. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Exercise-related cardiac arrest in cardiac rehabilitation - The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescribed physical activity plays a major role in the rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease, and as with any other form of treatment its benefits must be weighed against its possible risks. This study attempted to establish the safety of cardiac rehabilitation as a medical intervention at the Johannesburg Cardiac ...

  15. Spatial distribution of specialized cardiac care units in the state of Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviana Cirino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the methodology used for assessing the spatial distribution of specialized cardiac care units. METHODS A modeling and simulation method was adopted for the practical application of cardiac care service in the state of Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil, using the p-median model. As the state is divided into 21 health care regions, a methodology which suggests an arrangement of eight intermediate cardiac care units was analyzed, comparing the results obtained using data from 1996 and 2012. RESULTS Results obtained using data from 2012 indicated significant changes in the state, particularly in relation to the increased population density in the coastal regions. The current study provided a satisfactory response, indicated by the homogeneity of the results regarding the location of the intermediate cardiac care units and their respective regional administrations, thereby decreasing the average distance traveled by users to health care units, located in higher population density areas. The validity of the model was corroborated through the analysis of the allocation of the median vertices proposed in 1996 and 2012. CONCLUSIONS The current spatial distribution of specialized cardiac care units is more homogeneous and reflects the demographic changes that have occurred in the state over the last 17 years. The comparison between the two simulations and the current configuration showed the validity of the proposed model as an aid in decision making for system expansion.

  16. DEGRO/DGK guideline for radiotherapy in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauter-Fleckenstein, Benjamin; Steil, Volker; Wenz, Frederik; Israel, Carsten W.; Dorenkamp, Marc; Dunst, Juergen; Roser, Mattias; Schimpf, Rainer; Schaefer, Joerg; Hoeller, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) have cardiac implantable electronic devices [CIEDs, cardiac pacemakers (PMs) and implanted cardioverters/defibrillators (ICDs)]. Ionizing radiation can cause latent and permanent damage to CIEDs, which may result in loss of function in patients with asystole or ventricular fibrillation. Reviewing the current literature, the interdisciplinary German guideline (DEGRO/DGK) was developed reflecting patient risk according to type of CIED, cardiac condition, and estimated radiation dose to the CIED. Planning for RT should consider the CIED specifications as well as patient-related characteristics (pacing-dependent, previous ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation). Antitachyarrhythmia therapy should be suspended in patients with ICDs, who should be under electrocardiographic monitoring with an external defibrillator on stand-by. The beam energy should be limited to 6 (to 10) MV CIEDs should never be located in the beam, and the cumulative scatter radiation dose should be limited to 2 Gy. Personnel must be able to respond adequately in the case of a cardiac emergency and initiate basic life support, while an emergency team capable of advanced life support should be available within 5 min. CIEDs need to be interrogated 1, 3, and 6 months after the last RT due to the risk of latent damage. (orig.) [de

  17. Critical reflection activation analysis - a new near-surface probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.M.F.; Trohidou, K.N.

    1988-09-01

    We propose a new surface analytic technique, Critical Reflection Activation Analysis (CRAA). This technique allows accurate depth profiling of impurities ≤ 100A beneath a surface. The depth profile of the impurity is simply related to the induced activity as a function of the angle of reflection. We argue that the technique is practical and estimate its accuracy. (author)

  18. Sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Parakh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is one of the most common cause of mortality worldwide. Despite significant advances in the medical science, there is little improvement in the sudden cardiac death related mortality. Coronary artery disease is the most common etiology behind sudden cardiac death, in the above 40 years population. Even in the apparently healthy population, there is a small percentage of patients dying from sudden cardiac death. Given the large denominator, this small percentage contributes to the largest burden of sudden cardiac death. Identification of this at risk group among the apparently healthy individual is a great challenge for the medical fraternity. This article looks into the causes and methods of preventing SCD and at some of the Indian data. Details of Brugada syndrome, Long QT syndrome, Genetics of SCD are discussed. Recent guidelines on many of these causes are summarised.

  19. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico José Neves Mancuso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective: To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods: One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results: The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion: The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.

  20. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves, E-mail: frederico.mancuso@grupofleury.com.br [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Disciplina de Medicina de Urgência - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira [Disciplina de Medicina de Urgência - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.

  1. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy

  2. Clinical Use of Ultrasensitive Cardiac Troponin I Assay in Intermediate- and High-Risk Surgery Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Kessler Borges

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cardiac troponin levels have been reported to add value in the detection of cardiovascular complications in noncardiac surgery. A sensitive cardiac troponin I (cTnI assay could provide more accurate prognostic information. Methods. This study prospectively enrolled 142 patients with at least one Revised Cardiac Risk Index risk factor who underwent noncardiac surgery. cTnI levels were measured postoperatively. Short-term cardiac outcome predictors were evaluated. Results. cTnI elevation was observed in 47 patients, among whom 14 were diagnosed as having myocardial infarction (MI. After 30 days, 16 patients had major adverse cardiac events (MACE. Excluding patients with a final diagnosis of MI, predictors of cTnI elevation included dialysis, history of heart failure, transoperative major bleeding, and elevated levels of pre- and postoperative N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP. Maximal cTnI values showed the highest sensitivity (94%, specificity (75%, and overall accuracy (AUC 0.89; 95% CI 0.80–0.98 for postoperative MACE. Postoperative cTnI peak level (OR 9.4; 95% CI 2.3–39.2 and a preoperative NT-proBNP level ≥917 pg/mL (OR 3.47; 95% CI 1.05–11.6 were independent risk factors for MACE. Conclusions. cTnI was shown to be an independent prognostic factor for cardiac outcomes and should be considered as a component of perioperative risk assessment.

  3. Syncope and the risk of sudden cardiac death: Evaluation, management, and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. Koene, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is a clinical syndrome defined as a relatively brief self-limited transient loss of consciousness (TLOC caused by a period of inadequate cerebral nutrient flow. Most often the trigger is an abrupt drop of systemic blood pressure. True syncope must be distinguished from other common non-syncope conditions in which real or apparent TLOC may occur such as seizures, concussions, or accidental falls. The causes of syncope are diverse, but in most instances, are relatively benign (e.g., reflex and orthostatic faints with the main risks being accidents and/or injury. However, in some instances, syncope may be due to more worrisome conditions (particularly those associated with cardiac structural disease or channelopathies; in such circumstances, syncope may be an indicator of increased morbidity and mortality risk, including sudden cardiac death (SCD. Establishing an accurate basis for the etiology of syncope is crucial in order to initiate effective therapy. In this review, we focus primarily on the causes of syncope that are associated with increased SCD risk (i.e., sudden arrhythmic cardiac death, and the management of these patients. In addition, we discuss the limitations of our understanding of SCD in relation to syncope, and propose future studies that may ultimately address how to improve outcomes of syncope patients and reduce SCD risk. Keywords: Syncope, Sudden cardiac death, Risk assessment

  4. Evaluating low pass filters on SPECT reconstructed cardiac orientation estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Shekhar

    2009-02-01

    Low pass filters can affect the quality of clinical SPECT images by smoothing. Appropriate filter and parameter selection leads to optimum smoothing that leads to a better quantification followed by correct diagnosis and accurate interpretation by the physician. This study aims at evaluating the low pass filters on SPECT reconstruction algorithms. Criteria for evaluating the filters are estimating the SPECT reconstructed cardiac azimuth and elevation angle. Low pass filters studied are butterworth, gaussian, hamming, hanning and parzen. Experiments are conducted using three reconstruction algorithms, FBP (filtered back projection), MLEM (maximum likelihood expectation maximization) and OSEM (ordered subsets expectation maximization), on four gated cardiac patient projections (two patients with stress and rest projections). Each filter is applied with varying cutoff and order for each reconstruction algorithm (only butterworth used for MLEM and OSEM). The azimuth and elevation angles are calculated from the reconstructed volume and the variation observed in the angles with varying filter parameters is reported. Our results demonstrate that behavior of hamming, hanning and parzen filter (used with FBP) with varying cutoff is similar for all the datasets. Butterworth filter (cutoff > 0.4) behaves in a similar fashion for all the datasets using all the algorithms whereas with OSEM for a cutoff < 0.4, it fails to generate cardiac orientation due to oversmoothing, and gives an unstable response with FBP and MLEM. This study on evaluating effect of low pass filter cutoff and order on cardiac orientation using three different reconstruction algorithms provides an interesting insight into optimal selection of filter parameters.

  5. Subcutaneous Tissue Thickness is an Independent Predictor of Image Noise in Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staniak, Henrique Lane; Sharovsky, Rodolfo [Hospital Universitário - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pereira, Alexandre Costa [Hospital das Clínicas - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Castro, Cláudio Campi de; Benseñor, Isabela M.; Lotufo, Paulo A. [Hospital Universitário - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Medicina - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer, E-mail: msbittencourt@mail.harvard.edu [Hospital Universitário - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    Few data on the definition of simple robust parameters to predict image noise in cardiac computed tomography (CT) exist. To evaluate the value of a simple measure of subcutaneous tissue as a predictor of image noise in cardiac CT. 86 patients underwent prospective ECG-gated coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and coronary calcium scoring (CAC) with 120 kV and 150 mA. The image quality was objectively measured by the image noise in the aorta in the cardiac CTA, and low noise was defined as noise < 30HU. The chest anteroposterior diameter and lateral width, the image noise in the aorta and the skin-sternum (SS) thickness were measured as predictors of cardiac CTA noise. The association of the predictors and image noise was performed by using Pearson correlation. The mean radiation dose was 3.5 ± 1.5 mSv. The mean image noise in CT was 36.3 ± 8.5 HU, and the mean image noise in non-contrast scan was 17.7 ± 4.4 HU. All predictors were independently associated with cardiac CTA noise. The best predictors were SS thickness, with a correlation of 0.70 (p < 0.001), and noise in the non-contrast images, with a correlation of 0.73 (p < 0.001). When evaluating the ability to predict low image noise, the areas under the ROC curve for the non-contrast noise and for the SS thickness were 0.837 and 0.864, respectively. Both SS thickness and CAC noise are simple accurate predictors of cardiac CTA image noise. Those parameters can be incorporated in standard CT protocols to adequately adjust radiation exposure.

  6. Subcutaneous Tissue Thickness is an Independent Predictor of Image Noise in Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staniak, Henrique Lane; Sharovsky, Rodolfo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Castro, Cláudio Campi de; Benseñor, Isabela M.; Lotufo, Paulo A.; Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer

    2014-01-01

    Few data on the definition of simple robust parameters to predict image noise in cardiac computed tomography (CT) exist. To evaluate the value of a simple measure of subcutaneous tissue as a predictor of image noise in cardiac CT. 86 patients underwent prospective ECG-gated coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and coronary calcium scoring (CAC) with 120 kV and 150 mA. The image quality was objectively measured by the image noise in the aorta in the cardiac CTA, and low noise was defined as noise < 30HU. The chest anteroposterior diameter and lateral width, the image noise in the aorta and the skin-sternum (SS) thickness were measured as predictors of cardiac CTA noise. The association of the predictors and image noise was performed by using Pearson correlation. The mean radiation dose was 3.5 ± 1.5 mSv. The mean image noise in CT was 36.3 ± 8.5 HU, and the mean image noise in non-contrast scan was 17.7 ± 4.4 HU. All predictors were independently associated with cardiac CTA noise. The best predictors were SS thickness, with a correlation of 0.70 (p < 0.001), and noise in the non-contrast images, with a correlation of 0.73 (p < 0.001). When evaluating the ability to predict low image noise, the areas under the ROC curve for the non-contrast noise and for the SS thickness were 0.837 and 0.864, respectively. Both SS thickness and CAC noise are simple accurate predictors of cardiac CTA image noise. Those parameters can be incorporated in standard CT protocols to adequately adjust radiation exposure

  7. A study on the various diameters of the heart and frontal cardiac area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Soo

    1970-01-01

    Cardiac measurement by radiographic method is the most accurate procedure by which physicians can obtain data regarding cardiac size in life. In order to determine the standard values among Koreans, cardiac mensuration by the radiographic frontal cardiac area method was carried out on 225 healthy Korean infants, 111 of whom were males and 114 were females. The results were as follows: 1. Transverse diameter at one month of age is 4.56 ± 0.12 cm in male and 5.00 ± 0.19 cm in female and at eleven months of age 7.35 ± 0.12 cm in male, 7.42 ± 0.09 cm in female. 2. Board diameter at one month of age is 3.94 ± 0.15 cm in male and 4.53 ± 0.19 cm in female and at eleven months of age 5.82 ± 0.14 cm in male, 5.94 ± 0.14 cm in female. 3. Long diameter at one month of age is 3.94 ± 0.15 cm in male and 5.30 ± 0.23 cm in female and at eleven months of age 7.67 ± 0.15 cm in male, 7.55 ± 0.11 cm in female. 4. The obliquity of the cardiac axis shows no significant difference in age and sex. The range of the measurements are between 31 .deg and 37 .deg. 5. Frontal cardiac area at one month of age is 14.36 ± 1.11 cm 2 in male and 18.97 ± 0.14 cm 2 in female and at eleven months of age 35.27 ± 1.21 cm 2 in male, 35.43 ± 0.45 cm 2 in female. 6. In every diameter and frontal cardiac area, except the obliquity of the cardiac axis, show greater value in female at the age of 1 month, but show almost same value in male as in female at the age of 11 months

  8. Intramyocardial strain estimation from cardiac cine MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnakib, Ahmed; Beache, Garth M; Gimel'farb, Georgy; El-Baz, Ayman

    2015-08-01

    proposed geometrical method showed the ability to track the LV wall points throughout the cardiac cycle, thus permitting more accurate strain estimation.

  9. Recurrent late cardiac tamponade following cardiac surgery : a deceiving and potentially lethal complication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harskamp, Ralf E.; Meuzelaar, Jacobus J.

    2010-01-01

    Background - Cardiac tamponade, characterized by inflow obstruction of the heart chambers by extracardiac compression, is a potentially lethal complication following cardiac surgery. Case report - We present a case of recurrent cardiac tamponade following valve surgery. At first presentation,

  10. Circulating miR-126 and miR-499 reflect progression of cardiovascular disease; correlations with uric acid and ejection fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Khanaghaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study was to assess plasma levels of endothelium- and heart-associated microRNAs (miRNAs miR-126 and miR-499, respectively, using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.MethodsA two-step analysis was conducted on 75 patients undergoing off-pomp coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery. Five biomarkers of inflammation and cardiac injury were assessed in addition to the above-mentioned miRNAs.ResultsPlasma concentrations of miRNAs were found to be significantly correlated with plasma levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI (miR-499, r 0.49, p~0.002; miR-126, r = 0.30, p~0.001, indicating cardiac damage. Data analysis revealed that miR-499 had higher sensitivity and specificity for cardiac injury than miR-126, which reflects more endothelial activation. Interestingly, a strong correlation was observed between both miRNAs and uric acid (UA levels with ventricular contractility measured as ejection fraction (EF (miR-499/EF%, r = 0.58, p~0.004; UA/EF%, r = -0.6, p~0.006; UA/miR-499, r = -0.34; UA/miR-126, r = 0.5, p~0.01.ConclusionsIn patients undergoing CABG, circulating miR-126/499 is associated with presentation of traditional risk factors and reflects post-operative response to injury. Plasma pool of miRNAs likely reflects extracellular miRNAs which are proportional to intracellular miRNA levels. Therefore, circulating levels of these miRNAs have prognostic implications in detection of higher risk of future cardiovascular events.

  11. Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy and cardiac pool scintigraphy with technetium-99m labelled human serum albumin of complicated anomalous heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Minoru; Watanabe, Takashi; Murase, Mitsuya; Shimizu, Ken; Abe, Toshio

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has been used in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease, but these studies have not shown the dramatic increase that has occurred in their use in coronary heart disease. In this report, thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy and cardiac pool scintigraphy with technetium-99m labelled human serum albumin of 13 patients with complicated congenital heart disease were compared with contrast angiography. The application of these scanning methods to visualization of the size and shape of ventricle and interventricular septum was very useful. At times these methods give us the more accurate information about cardiac shape, especially of complicated anomalous heart, than contrast angiography. Of course these methods will never replace cardiac catheterization and contrast angiography. But these studies are non-invasive. So it was concluded that these scanning methods had better be applied in patients with complicated cardiac anomaly before invasive contrast angiography. (author)

  12. Small cardiac lesions: fibrosis of papillary muscles and focal cardiac myocytolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steer, A [Hijiyanna Park, Hiroshima JP; Nakashima, N; Kawashima, T; Lee, K K; Danzig, M D; Robertson, T L; Dock, D S

    1977-11-01

    Three types of small cardiac lesions were described and illustrated: (1) focal type of papillary muscle fibrosis, evidently a healed infarct of the papillary muscle present in 13% of the autopsies, is a histologically characteristic lesion associated with coronary artery disease and healed myocardial infarction; (2) diffuse type of papillary muscle fibrosis, probably an aging change present in almost half of the autopsies, is associated with sclerosis of the arteries in the papillary muscle, is identifiable histologically; and apparently is not associated with any cardiac abnormality; and (3) focal cardiac myocytolysis, a unique histologic lesion, usually multifocal without predilection for any area of the heart, is associated with ischemic heart disease, death due to cancer complicated by non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis and microthrombi in small cardiac arteries as well as with other diseases. Differentiation of the 2 types of papillary muscle fibrosis is important in the study of papillary muscle and mitral valve dysfunction. Focal cardiac myocytolysis may contribute to the fatal extension of myocardial infarcts.

  13. Small cardiac lesions: fibrosis of papillary muscles and focal cardiac myocytolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steer, A; Nakashima, T; Kawashima, T; Lee, K K; Danzig, M D; Robertson, T L; Dock, D S

    1977-11-01

    Three types of small cardiac lesions were described and illustrated: (1) focal type of papillary muscle fibrosis, evidently a healed infarct of the papillary muscle present in 13% of the autopsies, is a histologically characteristic lesion associated with coronary artery disease and healed myocardial infarction, (2) diffuse type of papillary muscle fibrosis, probably an aging change present in almost half of the autopsies, is associated with sclerosis of the arteries in the papillary muscle, is identifiable histologically, and apparently is not associated with any cardiac abnormality, and (3) focal cardiac myochtolysis, a unique histologic lesion, usually multifocal without predilection for any area of the heart, is associated with ischemic heart disease, death due to cancer complicated by nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis and microthrombi in small cardiac arteries as well as with other diseases. Differentiation of the 2 types of papillary muscle fibrosis is important in the study of papillary muscle and mitral valve dysfunction. Focal cardiac myocytolysis may contribute to the fatal extension of myocardial infarcts.

  14. Recurrent late cardiac tamponade following cardiac surgery: a deceiving and potentially lethal complication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harskamp, Ralf E.; Meuzelaar, Jacobus J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade, characterized by inflow obstruction of the heart chambers by extracardiac compression, is a potentially lethal complication following cardiac surgery. We present a case of recurrent cardiac tamponade following valve surgery. At first presentation, diagnosis was delayed because of

  15. Computerized method for evaluating diagnostic image quality of calcified plaque images in cardiac CT: Validation on a physical dynamic cardiac phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Martin; Rodgers, Zachary; Giger, Maryellen L.; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Patel, Amit R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In cardiac computed tomography (CT), important clinical indices, such as the coronary calcium score and the percentage of coronary artery stenosis, are often adversely affected by motion artifacts. As a result, the expert observer must decide whether or not to use these indices during image interpretation. Computerized methods potentially can be used to assist in these decisions. In a previous study, an artificial neural network (ANN) regression model provided assessability (image quality) indices of calcified plaque images from the software NCAT phantom that were highly agreeable with those provided by expert observers. The method predicted assessability indices based on computer-extracted features of the plaque. In the current study, the ANN-predicted assessability indices were used to identify calcified plaque images with diagnostic calcium scores (based on mass) from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The basic assumption was that better quality images were associated with more accurate calcium scores. Methods: A 64-channel CT scanner was used to obtain 500 calcified plaque images from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom at different heart rates, cardiac phases, and plaque locations. Two expert observers independently provided separate sets of assessability indices for each of these images. Separate sets of ANN-predicted assessability indices tailored to each observer were then generated within the framework of a bootstrap resampling scheme. For each resampling iteration, the absolute calcium score error between the calcium scores of the motion-contaminated plaque image and its corresponding stationary image served as the ground truth in terms of indicating images with diagnostic calcium scores. The performances of the ANN-predicted and observer-assigned indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores were then evaluated using ROC analysis. Results: Assessability indices provided by the first observer and the corresponding ANN performed

  16. Diffuse infiltrative cardiac tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, Gurpreet S; Kothari, Shyam S

    2011-01-01

    We present the cardiac magnetic resonance images of an unusual form of cardiac tuberculosis. Nodular masses in a sheet-like distribution were seen to infiltrate the outer myocardium and pericardium along most of the cardiac chambers. The lesions showed significant resolution on antitubercular therapy

  17. A visible light imaging device for cardiac rate detection with reduced effect of body movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaotian; Liu, Ming; Zhao, Yuejin

    2014-09-01

    A visible light imaging system to detect human cardiac rate is proposed in this paper. A color camera and several LEDs, acting as lighting source, were used to avoid the interference of ambient light. From people's forehead, the cardiac rate could be acquired based on photoplethysmography (PPG) theory. The template matching method was used after the capture of video. The video signal was discomposed into three signal channels (RGB) and the region of interest was chosen to take the average gray value. The green channel signal could provide an excellent waveform of pulse wave on the account of green lights' absorptive characteristics of blood. Through the fast Fourier transform, the cardiac rate was exactly achieved. But the research goal was not just to achieve the cardiac rate accurately. With the template matching method, the effects of body movement are reduced to a large extent, therefore the pulse wave can be detected even while people are in the moving state and the waveform is largely optimized. Several experiments are conducted on volunteers, and the results are compared with the ones gained by a finger clamped pulse oximeter. The contrast results between these two ways are exactly agreeable. This method to detect the cardiac rate and the pulse wave largely reduces the effects of body movement and can probably be widely used in the future.

  18. An improved method to estimate reflectance parameters for high dynamic range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiying; Deguchi, Koichiro; Li, Renfa; Manabe, Yoshitsugu; Chihara, Kunihiro

    2008-01-01

    Two methods are described to accurately estimate diffuse and specular reflectance parameters for colors, gloss intensity and surface roughness, over the dynamic range of the camera used to capture input images. Neither method needs to segment color areas on an image, or to reconstruct a high dynamic range (HDR) image. The second method improves on the first, bypassing the requirement for specific separation of diffuse and specular reflection components. For the latter method, diffuse and specular reflectance parameters are estimated separately, using the least squares method. Reflection values are initially assumed to be diffuse-only reflection components, and are subjected to the least squares method to estimate diffuse reflectance parameters. Specular reflection components, obtained by subtracting the computed diffuse reflection components from reflection values, are then subjected to a logarithmically transformed equation of the Torrance-Sparrow reflection model, and specular reflectance parameters for gloss intensity and surface roughness are finally estimated using the least squares method. Experiments were carried out using both methods, with simulation data at different saturation levels, generated according to the Lambert and Torrance-Sparrow reflection models, and the second method, with spectral images captured by an imaging spectrograph and a moving light source. Our results show that the second method can estimate the diffuse and specular reflectance parameters for colors, gloss intensity and surface roughness more accurately and faster than the first one, so that colors and gloss can be reproduced more efficiently for HDR imaging.

  19. RELATION BETWEEN PREECLAMPSIA AND CARDIAC ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Aziz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract    INTRODUCTION: Preeclampsia affects about 5-10% of all pregnancies and is a major cause of maternal, fetal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. The cardiovascular system undergoes a host of changes in association with development of preeclampsia. LDH is a useful biochemical marker that reflects the severity of the occurrence of preeclampsia.    METHOD AND MATERIALS: One hundred pregnant women were selected for this study, 50 normal pregnant women as controls and 50 preeclamptic women as the study group.  Cardiac enzymes (serum LDH, serum AST, serum CK and serum CKMB of these women were analyzed.    RESULTS: Mean Serum LDH and mean serum AST concentrations were significantly higher in preeclamptic patients compared to normal pregnant women (348.34 ± 59.17 vs. 255.92 ± 43.26, P < 0.01 and (34.32 ± 10.37 vs. 22.06 ± 5.10, P < 0.01 respectively.     CONCLUSION: LDH and AST may be increased due to liver damage. This endothelial vascular damage is the main cause in the occurrence of preeclampsia. Higher levels of LDH and AST are very useful markers to identify the occurrence of preeclampsia.      Keywords: LDH, Preeclampsia, AST, Cardiac Enzymes.

  20. Do Predation Rates on Artificial Nests Accurately Reflect Predation Rates on Natural Bird Nests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David I. King; Richard M. DeGraaf; Curtice R. Griffin; Thomas J. Maier

    1999-01-01

    Artificial nests are widely used in avian field studies. However, it is unclear how well predation rates on artificial nests reflect predation rates on natural nests. Therefore, we compared survival rates of artificial nests (unused natural nests baited with House Sparrow eggs) with survival rates of active bird nests in the same habitat at the same sites. Survival...

  1. Assessment of cardiac risk before non-cardiac surgery: brain natriuretic peptide in 1590 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dernellis, J; Panaretou, M

    2006-11-01

    To evaluate the predictive value of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) for assessment of cardiac risk before non-cardiac surgery. Consecutively treated patients (947 men, 643 women) whose BNP was measured before non-cardiac surgery were studied. Clinical and ECG variables were evaluated to identify predictors of postoperative cardiac events. Events occurred in 6% of patients: 21 cardiac deaths, 20 non-fatal myocardial infarctions, 41 episodes of pulmonary oedema and 14 patients with ventricular tachycardia. All of these patients had raised plasma BNP concentrations (best cut-off point 189 pg/ml). The only independent predictor of postoperative events was BNP (odds ratio 34.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 17.08 to 68.62, p 300 pg/ml); postoperative event rates were 0%, 5%, 12% and 81%, respectively. In this population of patients evaluated before non-cardiac surgery, BNP is an independent predictor of postoperative cardiac events. BNP > 189 pg/ml identified patients at highest risk.

  2. 123I-MIBG imaging detects cardiac involvement and predicts cardiac events in Churg-Strauss syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiguchi, Yoriko; Morita, Yukiko; Tsurikisawa, Naomi; Akiyama, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    In Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) it is important to detect cardiac involvement, which predicts poor prognosis. This study evaluated whether 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy could detect cardiac damage and predict cardiac events in CSS. 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy was performed in 28 patients with CSS, 12 of whom had cardiac involvement. The early and delayed heart to mediastinum ratio (early H/M and delayed H/M) and washout rate were calculated by using 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy and compared with those in control subjects. Early H/M and delayed H/M were significantly lower and the washout rate was significantly higher in patients with cardiac involvement than in those without and in controls (early H/M, p = 0.0024, p = 0.0001; delayed H/M, p = 0.0002, p = 0.0001; washout rate, p = 0.0012, p = 0.0052 vs those without and vs controls, respectively). Accuracy for detecting cardiac involvement was 86% for delayed H/M and washout rate and 79% for early H/M and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed significantly lower cardiac event-free rates in patients with early H/M ≤ 2.18 and BNP > 21.8 pg/ml than those with early H/M > 2.18 and BNP ≤ 21.8 pg/ml (log-rank test p = 0.006). Cardiac sympathetic nerve function was damaged in CSS patients with cardiac involvement. 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy was useful in detecting cardiac involvement and in predicting cardiac events. (orig.)

  3. Anesthesia and Databases: Pediatric Cardiac Disease as a Role Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vener, David F; Pasquali, Sara K; Mossad, Emad B

    2017-02-01

    Large data sets have now become ubiquitous in clinical medicine; they are particularly useful in high-acuity, low-volume conditions such as congenital heart disease where data must be collected from many centers. These data fall into 2 categories: administrative data arising from hospital admissions and charges and clinical data relating to specific diseases or procedures. In congenital cardiac diseases, there are now over a dozen of these data sets or registries focusing on various elements of patient care. Using probabilistic statistic matching, it is possible to marry administrative and clinical data post hoc using common elements to determine valuable information about care patterns, outcomes, and costs. These data sets can also be used in a collaborative fashion between institutions to drive quality improvement (QI). Because these data may include protected health information (PHI), care must be taken to adhere to federal guidelines on their use. A fundamental principle of large data management is the use of a common language and definition (nomenclature) to be effective. In addition, research derived from these information sources must be appropriately balanced to ensure that risk adjustments for preoperative and surgical factors are taken into consideration during the analysis. Care of patients with cardiac disease both in the United States and abroad consistently shows wide variability in mortality, morbidity, and costs, and there has been a tremendous amount of discussion about the benefits of regionalization of care based on center volume and outcome measurements. In the absence of regionalization, collaborative learning techniques have consistently been shown to minimize this variability and improve care at all centers, but before changes can be made it is necessary to accurately measure accurately current patient outcomes. Outcomes measurement generally falls under hospital-based QI initiatives, but more detailed analysis and research require

  4. Heterogeneous response of cardiac sympathetic function to cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure documented by 11[C]-hydroxy-ephedrine and PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitanio, Selene; Nanni, Cristina; Marini, Cecilia; Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Martignani, Cristian; Dib, Bassam; Fuccio, Chiara; Boriani, Giuseppe; Picori, Lorena; Boschi, Stefano; Morbelli, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an accepted treatment in patients with end-stage heart failure. PET permits the absolute quantification of global and regional homogeneity in cardiac sympathetic innervation. We evaluated the variation of cardiac adrenergic activity in patients with idiopathic heart failure (IHF) disease (NYHA III–IV) after CRT using 11 C-hydroxyephedrine (HED) PET/CT. Methods: Ten IHF patients (mean age = 68; range = 55–81; average left ventricular ejection fraction 26 ± 4%) implanted with a resynchronization device underwent three HED PET/CT studies: PET 1 one week after inactive device implantation; PET 2, one week after PET 1 under stimulated rhythm; PET 3, at 3 months under active CRT. A dedicated software (PMOD 3.4 version) was used to estimate global and regional cardiac uptake of HED through 17 segment polar maps. Results: At baseline, HED uptake was heterogeneously distributed throughout the left ventricle with a variation coefficient of 18 ± 5%. This variable markedly decreased after three months CRT (12 ± 5%, p < 0.01). Interestingly, subdividing the 170 myocardial segments (17 segments of each patient multiplied by the number of patients) into two groups, according to the median value of tracer uptake expressed as % of maximal myocardial uptake (76%), we observed a different behaviour depending on baseline innervation: HED uptake significantly increased only in segments with “impaired innervation” (SUV 2.61 ± 0.92 at PET1 and 3.05 ± 1.67 at three months, p < 0.01). Conclusion: As shown by HED PET/CT uptake and distribution, improvement in homogeneity of myocardial neuronal function reflected a selective improvement of tracer uptake in regions with more severe neuronal damage. Advances in Knowledge: These finding supported the presence of a myocardial regional variability in response of cardiac sympathetic system to CRT and a systemic response involving remote tissues with rich adrenergic innervation

  5. CARDIAC LYMPHOMA IN DOG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Cruz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoma is a lymphoid tumor that originates in hematopoietic organs such as lymph node, spleen or liver. In dogs, the overall prevalence of cardiac tumors was estimated to be only 0.19% based on the results of the survey of a large database, and lymphomas accounts for approximately 2% of all cardiac tumors. In general, the involvement of the myocardium is rarely described in canine lymphoma. Currently, there is no evidence of a viral association with primary cardiac lymphoma in dogs, but other types of immunosuppression may contribute to abnormal events, such as involvement primary cardiac. The aim of this study was to analyze a case of sudden death of a bitch, SRD, aged 10, who had the final diagnosis of cardiac lymphoma.

  6. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzke, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net

  7. Polymer microfiber meshes facilitate cardiac differentiation of c-kit{sup +} human cardiac stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Lijuan [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Thayer, Patrick [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Fan, Huimin [Research Institute of Heart Failure, Shanghai East Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Ledford, Benjamin; Chen, Miao [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Goldstein, Aaron [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Cao, Guohua [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); He, Jia-Qiang, E-mail: jiahe@vt.edu [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2016-09-10

    Electrospun microfiber meshes have been shown to support the proliferation and differentiation of many types of stem cells, but the phenotypic fate of c-kit{sup +} human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs) have not been explored. To this end, we utilized thin (~5 µm) elastomeric meshes consisting of aligned 1.7 µm diameter poly (ester-urethane urea) microfibers as substrates to examine their effect on hCSC viability, morphology, proliferation, and differentiation relative to cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). The results showed that cells on microfiber meshes displayed an elongated morphology aligned in the direction of fiber orientation, lower proliferation rates, but increased expressions of genes and proteins majorly associated with cardiomyocyte phenotype. The early (NK2 homeobox 5, Nkx2.5) and late (cardiac troponin I, cTnI) cardiomyocyte genes were significantly increased on meshes (Nkx=2.5 56.2±13.0, cTnl=2.9±0.56,) over TCPS (Nkx2.5=4.2±0.9, cTnl=1.6±0.5, n=9, p<0.05 for both groups) after differentiation. In contrast, expressions of smooth muscle markers, Gata6 and myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC), were decreased on meshes. Immunocytochemical analysis with cardiac antibody exhibited the similar pattern of above cardiac differentiation. We conclude that aligned microfiber meshes are suitable for guiding cardiac differentiation of hCSCs and may facilitate stem cell-based therapies for treatment of cardiac diseases. - Highlights: • First study to characterize c-kit{sup +} human cardiac stem cells on microfiber meshes. • Microfiber meshes seem reducing cell proliferation, but no effect on cell viability. • Microfiber meshes facilitate the elongation of human cardiac stem cells in culture. • Cardiac but not smooth muscle differentiation were enhanced on microfiber meshes. • Microfiber meshes may be used as cardiac patches in cell-based cardiac therapy.

  8. Radiation exposure to the child during cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, J D; Rummerfield, P S; Gilpin, E A; Kirkpatrick, S E

    1981-07-01

    Few data are available regarding radiation exposure to children during cardiac catheterization. Using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiation exposure was measured during precatheterization chest roentgenography, fluoroscopy (hemodynamic assessment phase of catheterization) and cineangiography in 30 infants and children, ages 3 days to 21 years. Dosimeters were placed over the eyes, thyroid, anterior chest, posterior chest, anterior abdomen, posterior abdomen and gonads. Average absorbed chest doses were 24.5 mR during chest roentgenography, 5810 mR during catheterization fluoroscopy and 1592 mR during cineangiography. During the complete catheterization, average doses were 26 mR to the eyes, 431 mR to the thyroid area, 150 mR to the abdomen and 11 mR to the gonads. Radiation exposure during pediatric cardiac catheterization is low to the eyes and gonads but high to the chest and thyroid area. To decrease radiation dosage we suggest (1) low pulse-rate fluoroscopy; (2) substitution of contrast echocardiography for cineangiography; (3) large-plate abdominal/gonadal shielding; (4) a selective shield for thyroid area; (5) a very small field during catheter manipulation. Minimum radiation consistent with accurate diagnosis is optimal; however, erroneous or incomplete diagnosis is more dangerous than radiation-related hazards.

  9. Radiation exposure to the child during cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldman, J.D.; Rummerfield, P.S.; Gilpin, E.A.; Kirkpatrick, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    Few data are available regarding radiation exposure to children during cardiac catheterization. Using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiation exposure was measured during precatheterization chest roentgenography, fluoroscopy (hemodynamic assessment phase of catheterization) and cineangiography in 30 infants and children, ages 3 days to 21 years. Dosimeters were placed over the eyes, thyroid, anterior chest, posterior chest, anterior abdomen, posterior abdomen and gonads. Average absorbed chest doses were 24.5 mR during chest roentgenography, 5810 mR during catheterization fluoroscopy and 1592 mR during cineangiography. During the complete catheterization, average doses were 26 mR to the eyes, 431 mR to the thyroid area, 150 mR to the abdomen and 11 mR to the gonads. Radiation exposure during pediatric cardiac catheterization is low to the eyes and gonads but high to the chest and thyroid area. To decrease radiation dosage we suggest (1) low pulse-rate fluoroscopy; (2) substitution of contrast echocardiography for cineangiography; (3) large-plate abdominal/gonadal shielding; (4) a selective shield for thyroid area; (5) a very small field during catheter manipulation. Minimum radiation consistent with accurate diagnosis is optimal; however, erroneous or incomplete diagnosis is more dangerous than radiation-related hazards

  10. Radiation exposure to the child during cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldman, J.D.; Rummerfield, P.S.; Gilpin, E.A.; Kirkpatrick, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    Few data are available regarding radiation exposure to children during cardiac catheterization. Using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiation exposure was measured during precatheterization chest roentgenography, fluoroscopy hemodynamic assessment phase of catheterization and cineangiography in 30 infants and children, ages 3 days to 21 years. Dosimeters were placed over the eyes, thyroid, anterior chest, posterior chest, anterior abdomen, posterior abdomen and gonads. Average absorbed chest doses were 24.5 mR during chest roentgenography, 5810 mR during catheterization fluoroscopy and 1592 mR during cineangiography. During the complete catheterization, average doses were 26 mR to the eyes, 431 mR to the thyroid area, 150 mR to the abdomen and 11 mR to the gonads. Radiation exposure during pediatric cardiac catheterization is low to the eyes and gonads but high to the chest and thyroid area. To decrease radiation dosage we suggest: (1) low pulse-rate fluoroscopy; (2) substitution of contrast echocardiography for cineangiography; (3) large-plate abdominal/gonadal shielding; (4) a selective shield for thyroid area; (5) a very small field during catheter manipulation. Minimum radiation consistent with accurate diagnosis is optimal; however, erroneous or incomplete diagnosis is more dangerous than radiation-related hazards

  11. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzold, D.E.; Goward, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the mid latitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 μm, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future. (author)

  12. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Donald E.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the midlatitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 microns, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future.

  13. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed...... and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  14. Autonomic cardiac innervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targets, upon which target-derived trophic factors take over final maturation, synaptic strength and postnatal survival. Although target-derived neurotrophins have a central role to play in development, alternative sources of neurotrophins may also modulate innervation. Both developing and adult sympathetic neurons express proNGF, and adult parasympathetic cardiac ganglion neurons also synthesize and release NGF. The physiological function of these “non-classical” cardiac sources of neurotrophins remains to be determined, especially in relation to autocrine/paracrine sustenance during development.   Cardiac autonomic nerves are closely spatially associated in cardiac plexuses, ganglia and pacemaker regions and so are sensitive to release of neurotransmitter, neuropeptides and trophic factors from adjacent nerves. As such, in many cardiac pathologies, it is an imbalance within the two arms of the autonomic system that is critical for disease progression. Although this crosstalk between sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves has been well established for adult nerves, it is unclear whether a degree of paracrine regulation occurs across the autonomic limbs during development. Aberrant nerve remodeling is a common occurrence in many adult cardiovascular pathologies, and the mechanisms regulating outgrowth or denervation are disparate. However, autonomic neurons display considerable plasticity in this regard with neurotrophins and inflammatory cytokines having a central regulatory

  15. LBM-EP: Lattice-Boltzmann method for fast cardiac electrophysiology simulation from 3D images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaka, S; Mansi, T; Georgescu, B; Pop, M; Wright, G A; Kamen, A; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    Current treatments of heart rhythm troubles require careful planning and guidance for optimal outcomes. Computational models of cardiac electrophysiology are being proposed for therapy planning but current approaches are either too simplified or too computationally intensive for patient-specific simulations in clinical practice. This paper presents a novel approach, LBM-EP, to solve any type of mono-domain cardiac electrophysiology models at near real-time that is especially tailored for patient-specific simulations. The domain is discretized on a Cartesian grid with a level-set representation of patient's heart geometry, previously estimated from images automatically. The cell model is calculated node-wise, while the transmembrane potential is diffused using Lattice-Boltzmann method within the domain defined by the level-set. Experiments on synthetic cases, on a data set from CESC'10 and on one patient with myocardium scar showed that LBM-EP provides results comparable to an FEM implementation, while being 10 - 45 times faster. Fast, accurate, scalable and requiring no specific meshing, LBM-EP paves the way to efficient and detailed models of cardiac electrophysiology for therapy planning.

  16. 2017 multimodality appropriate use criteria for noninvasive cardiac imaging: Export consensus of the Asian society of cardiovascular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Kyong Min Sarah [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong A [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Yeon Hyeon [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-11-15

    In 2010, the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (ASCI) provided recommendations for cardiac CT and MRI, and this document reflects an update of the 2010 ASCI appropriate use criteria (AUC). In 2016, the ASCI formed a new working group for revision of AUC for noninvasive cardiac imaging. A major change that we made in this document is the rating of various noninvasive tests (exercise electrocardiogram, echocardiography, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, radionuclide imaging, cardiac magnetic resonance, and cardiac computed tomography/angiography), compared side by side for their applications in various clinical scenarios. Ninety-five clinical scenarios were developed from eight selected pre-existing guidelines and classified into four sections as follows: 1) detection of coronary artery disease, symptomatic or asymptomatic; 2) cardiac evaluation in various clinical scenarios; 3) use of imaging modality according to prior testing; and 4) evaluation of cardiac structure and function. The clinical scenarios were scored by a separate rating committee on a scale of 1–9 to designate appropriate use, uncertain use, or inappropriate use according to a modified Delphi method. Overall, the AUC ratings for CT were higher than those of previous guidelines. These new AUC provide guidance for clinicians choosing among available testing modalities for various cardiac diseases and are also unique, given that most previous AUC for noninvasive imaging include only one imaging technique. As cardiac imaging is multimodal in nature, we believe that these AUC will be more useful for clinical decision making.

  17. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: Advances in Cardiac Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart disease is one of the lead causes of death worldwide. Many forms of heart disease, including myocardial infarction and pressure-loading cardiomyopathies, result in irreversible cardiomyocyte death. Activated fibroblasts respond to cardiac injury by forming scar tissue, but ultimately this response fails to restore cardiac function. Unfortunately, the human heart has little regenerative ability and long-term outcomes following acute coronary events often include chronic and end-stage heart failure. Building upon years of research aimed at restoring functional cardiomyocytes, recent advances have been made in the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts toward a cardiomyocyte cell fate both in vitro and in vivo. Several experiments show functional improvements in mouse models of myocardial infarction following in situ generation of cardiomyocyte-like cells from endogenous fibroblasts. Though many of these studies are in an early stage, this nascent technology holds promise for future applications in regenerative medicine. In this review, we discuss the history, progress, methods, challenges, and future directions of direct cardiac reprogramming.

  18. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  19. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  20. Effect of exercise position during stress testing on cardiac and pulmonary thallium kinetics and accuracy in evaluating coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    We compared the effects of symptom-limited upright and supine exercise on 201Tl distribution and kinetics in the heart and lungs of 100 consecutive patients. Our analysis was based on data obtained with a digital gamma camera in the 45 degrees left anterior oblique position at 5, 40, 240, and 275 min postadministration of [201Tl]chloride. We found significant differences in the results at the 5- and 40-min intervals; viz, higher cardiac and lower pulmonary thallium activity after upright exercise in 94 subjects at both intervals, and greater variability in total and regional cardiac thallium kinetics after supine exercise. With supine exercise, the relatively low initial cardiac activity, relatively high lung activity, and the greater variability in thallium kinetics combined to make interpretation of quantitative data and cardiac images difficult and less accurate with respect to detection of coronary artery disease. These observations have important implications for the interpreting physician when thallium stress tests are performed in the supine position

  1. Chronic hydrocephalus-induced changes in cerebral blood flow: mediation through cardiac effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Stephen M; Schenk, Soren; Leichliter, Anna; Leibson, Zack; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Luciano, Mark G

    2006-10-01

    Decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) in hydrocephalus is believed to be related to increased intracranial pressure (ICP), vascular compression as the result of enlarged ventricles, or impaired metabolic activity. Little attention has been given to the relationship between cardiac function and systemic blood flow in chronic hydrocephalus (CH). Using an experimental model of chronic obstructive hydrocephalus developed in our laboratory, we investigated the relationship between the duration and severity of hydrocephalus and cardiac output (CO), CBF, myocardial tissue perfusion (MTP), and peripheral blood flow (PBF). Blood flow measures were obtained using the microsphere injection method under controlled hemodynamic conditions in experimental CH (n=23) and surgical control (n=8) canines at baseline and at 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks. Cardiac output measures were made using the Swan-Ganz thermodilution method. Intracranial compliance (ICC) via cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) bolus removal and infusion, and oxygen delivery in CSF and prefrontal cortex (PFC) were also investigated. We observed an initial surgical effect relating to 30% CO reduction and approximately 50% decrease in CBF, MTP, and PBF in both groups 2 weeks postoperatively, which recovered in control animals but continued to decline further in CH animals at 16 weeks. Cerebral blood flow, which was positively correlated with CO (P=0.028), showed no significant relationship with either CSF volume or pressure. Decreased CBF correlated with oxygen deprivation in PFC (P=0.006). Cardiac output was inversely related with ventriculomegaly (P=0.019), but did not correlate with ICP. Decreased CO corresponded to increased ICC, as measured by CSF infusion (P=0.04). Our results suggest that CH may have more of an influence on CO and CBF in the chronic stage than in the early condition, which was dominated by surgical effect. The cause of this late deterioration of cardiac function in hydrocephalus is uncertain, but may reflect

  2. Pregnancy as a cardiac stress model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eunhee; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy occurs during pregnancy as a consequence of both volume overload and hormonal changes. Both pregnancy- and exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy are generally thought to be similar and physiological. Despite the fact that there are shared transcriptional responses in both forms of cardiac adaptation, pregnancy results in a distinct signature of gene expression in the heart. In some cases, however, pregnancy can induce adverse cardiac events in previously healthy women without any known cardiovascular disease. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of non-obstetric mortality during pregnancy. To understand how pregnancy can cause heart disease, it is first important to understand cardiac adaptation during normal pregnancy. This review provides an overview of the cardiac consequences of pregnancy, including haemodynamic, functional, structural, and morphological adaptations, as well as molecular phenotypes. In addition, this review describes the signalling pathways responsible for pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy and angiogenesis. We also compare and contrast cardiac adaptation in response to disease, exercise, and pregnancy. The comparisons of these settings of cardiac hypertrophy provide insight into pregnancy-associated cardiac adaptation. PMID:24448313

  3. The ACTA PORT-score for predicting perioperative risk of blood transfusion for adult cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, A A; Collier, T; Yeates, J; Miles, L F; Fletcher, S N; Evans, C; Richards, T

    2017-09-01

    A simple and accurate scoring system to predict risk of transfusion for patients undergoing cardiac surgery is lacking. We identified independent risk factors associated with transfusion by performing univariate analysis, followed by logistic regression. We then simplified the score to an integer-based system and tested it using the area under the receiver operator characteristic (AUC) statistic with a Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test. Finally, the scoring system was applied to the external validation dataset and the same statistical methods applied to test the accuracy of the ACTA-PORT score. Several factors were independently associated with risk of transfusion, including age, sex, body surface area, logistic EuroSCORE, preoperative haemoglobin and creatinine, and type of surgery. In our primary dataset, the score accurately predicted risk of perioperative transfusion in cardiac surgery patients with an AUC of 0.76. The external validation confirmed accuracy of the scoring method with an AUC of 0.84 and good agreement across all scores, with a minor tendency to under-estimate transfusion risk in very high-risk patients. The ACTA-PORT score is a reliable, validated tool for predicting risk of transfusion for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. This and other scores can be used in research studies for risk adjustment when assessing outcomes, and might also be incorporated into a Patient Blood Management programme. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Human technology after cardiac epigenesis. Artificial heart versus cardiac transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losman, J G

    1977-09-24

    Cardiovascular disease is the chief cause of death in technologically advanced countries and accounts for more than 50% of all deaths in the USA. For a patient with end-stage cardiac failure the only treatment presently available is organ replacement, either by transplantation or by the use of a mechanical heart. Transplantation has demonstrated its value: survival of more than 8 years and restoration of a normal quality of life to patients who were in end-stage cardiac decompensation. However, the prospect of routine clinical application of an artificial heart remains distant. The development of a totally implantable artificial heart still presents a series of challenging engineering problems with regard to strict constraints of size, weight, blood-material compatibility, adaptability of output to demand, efficiency and reliability of the power supply, and safety if nuclear fuel is used. The totally artificial heart is presently not an alternative to the cardiac allograft, but could provide short-term support for patients awaiting cardiac transplantation.

  5. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  6. Directional statistics-based reflectance model for isotropic bidirectional reflectance distribution functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Ko; Lombardi, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a novel parametric bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model that can accurately encode a wide variety of real-world isotropic BRDFs with a small number of parameters. The key observation we make is that a BRDF may be viewed as a statistical distribution on a unit hemisphere. We derive a novel directional statistics distribution, which we refer to as the hemispherical exponential power distribution, and model real-world isotropic BRDFs as mixtures of it. We derive a canonical probabilistic method for estimating the parameters, including the number of components, of this novel directional statistics BRDF model. We show that the model captures the full spectrum of real-world isotropic BRDFs with high accuracy, but a small footprint. We also demonstrate the advantages of the novel BRDF model by showing its use for reflection component separation and for exploring the space of isotropic BRDFs.

  7. Determination of the optimum number of cardiac cycles to differentiate intra-pulmonary shunt and patent foramen ovale by saline contrast two- and three-dimensional echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Nirmanmoh; Abushora, Mohannad Y; Donneyong, Macarius M; Stoddard, Marcus F

    2014-03-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) and intra-pulmonary shunt (IPS) are potential causes of stroke. The most optimum cardiac cycle cutoff for bubbles to appear in the left heart on saline contrast transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) as criteria to differentiate the 2 entities is unknown. Ninety-five adult patients had saline contrast transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), two-dimensional (2D) and 3DTTE. Sensitivity and specificity of each cardiac cycle as cutoff to differentiate a PFO and IPS were obtained. Transesophageal echocardiography showed IPS in 28 and PFO in 15 patients. If bubbles appeared in the left heart within the first 4 cardiac cycles (the 4th cardiac cycle rule) as compared to alternate cutoffs, a PFO was most accurately diagnosed by both 2D and 3DTTE. Bubbles appearing at or after the 5th cardiac cycle most accurately determined an IPS. 3D versus 2DTTE had a trend for a higher sensitivity (61% vs. 36%, P = 0.06), but similar specificity (94% vs. 91%) for IPS. Accuracy of 3DTTE was 84% and 2DTTE was 75% (P = 0.08) for IPS. For PFO, 2DTTE sensitivity (87%) and specificity (98%) did not differ (P = NS) from that of 3DTTE sensitivity (73%) and specificity (100%). This study demonstrates for the first time that the 4th cardiac cycle rule differentiates PFO and IPS most optimally by 2D and 3DTTE. 3DTTE appears to have higher sensitivity for diagnosing IPS. These data suggest that 3DTTE is preferable when IPS is to be diagnosed. Both methods are similar for diagnosing PFO. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Measuring Light Reflectance of BGO Crystal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecek, Martin; Moses, William W.

    2008-10-01

    A scintillating crystal's surface reflectance has to be well understood in order to accurately predict and optimize the crystal's light collection through Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we measure the inner surface reflectance properties for BGO. The measurements include BGO crystals with a mechanically polished surface, rough-cut surface, and chemically etched surface, and with various reflectors attached, both air-coupled and with coupling compound. The measurements are performed with a laser aimed at the center of a hemispherical shaped BGO crystal. The hemispherical shape eliminates any non-perpendicular angles for light entering and exiting the crystal. The reflected light is collected with an array of photodiodes. The laser can be set at an arbitrary angle, and the photodiode array is rotated to fully cover 2pi of solid angle. The current produced in the photodiodes is readout with a digital multimeter connected through a multiplexer. The two rows of photodiodes achieve 5-degree by 4-degree resolution, and the current measurement has a dynamic range of 105:1. The acquired data was not described by the commonly assumed linear combination of specular and diffuse (Lambertian) distributions, except for a very few surfaces. Surface roughness proved to be the most important parameter when choosing crystal setup. The reflector choice was of less importance and of almost no consequence for rough-cut surfaces. Pure specular reflection distribution for all incidence angles was measured for polished surfaces with VM2000 film, while the most Lambertian distribution for any surface finish was measured for titanium dioxide paint. The distributions acquired in this paper will be used to create more accurate Monte Carlo models for light reflection distribution within BGO crystals.

  9. Cardiac CT and cardiac MRI - competitive or complementary for nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshage, W.

    2004-01-01

    In summary, cardiac computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) are two different technologies with distinct imaging properties that gain increasing importance in clinical cardiology. Even though images may look similar, the areas of application of CT and MR are quite different. Clinical applications of cardiac CT focus on on-invasive imaging of the coronary arteries. In this respect, the higher spatial resolution of cardiac CT constitutes a significant advantage as compared to MR and clinical results are superior. Clinical applications of cardiac MR, next to morphologic imaging of the heart, are most frequently found in the context of intra-and pericardial masses, complex congenital anomalies, and the assessment of left ventricular function (dobutamine) and perfusion (adenosine) under stress. The evaluation of the size and localization of myocardial necrosis, scars, and fibrosis gains increasing importance, for example in the workup of myocardial infarction, but also myocarditis and cardiomyopathies. In this respect, magnetic resonance imaging partly constitutes an alternative to nuclear medicine methods. Due to the lack of ionizing radiation and a relatively high spatial resolution, an increase of MR diagnostic procedures at the expense of nuclear medicine can be expected. (orig.)

  10. Relationship between cardiac output and effective renal plasma flow in patients with cardiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGriffin, D; Tauxe, W N; Lewis, C; Karp, R; Mantle, J

    1984-12-01

    The relationship between effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and cardiac output was examined in 46 patients (22 with congestive heart failure and 24 following cardiac surgical procedures) by simultaneously measuring the global ERPF by the single-injection method and cardiac output by the thermodilution method. Of the patients in the heart-failure group, 21 also had pulmonary artery end diastolic pressure (PAEDP) recorded at the same time. ERPF and cardiac output were found to be related by the regression equations: cardiac output = 2.08 + 0.0065 ERPF (r, 080), with a SE of estimate of 0.81 l/min. ERPF and PAEDP were related by the regression equation: PAEDP = 42.02 - 0.0675 ERPF (r, 0.86), with a SE of estimate of 5.5 mm Hg. ERPF may be a useful noninvasive method of estimating cardiac output if it is known that no intrinsic kidney disease is present, and if the error of 0.81 l/min (1 SE of estimate) is within the range of clinical usefulness. The error is principally attributable to the determination of cardiac output by the thermodilution method.

  11. Hybrid options for treating cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umakanthan, Ramanan; Leacche, Marzia; Zhao, David X; Gallion, Anna H; Mishra, Prabodh C; Byrne, John G

    2011-01-01

    The options for treating heart disease have greatly expanded during the course of the last 2 1/2 decades with the advent of hybrid technology. The hybrid option for treating cardiac disease implies using the technology of both interventional cardiology and cardiac surgery to treat cardiac disease. This rapidly developing technology has given rise to new and creative techniques to treat cardiac disease involving coronary artery disease, coronary artery disease and cardiac valve disease, and atrial fibrillation. It has also led to the establishment of new procedural suites called hybrid operating rooms that facilitate the integration of technologies of interventional cardiology catheterization laboratories with those of cardiac surgery operating rooms. The development of hybrid options for treating cardiac disease has also greatly augmented teamwork and collaboration between interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Performance benchmarking in cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schick, D.; Thiele, D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Diagnostic and interventional procedures performed in a cardiac catheter laboratory while demanding high image quality may also result in high patient radiation dose depending on the length or complexity of the procedure. Clinicians using the X-ray equipment require confidence that the system is operating optimally to ensure maximum benefit to the patient with minimum risk. 17 cardiac catheterisation laboratories have been surveyed using a phantom based on the NEMA XR 21 -2000 standard. The testing protocol measures spatial resolution, low contrast detectability, patient dose rate, dynamic range and motion blur for modes of operation and simulated patient sizes applicable to a diagnostic left heart catheter study. The combined results of the assessed laboratories are presented. The latest generation systems with flat-panel detectors exhibit better spatial resolution than older systems with image intensifiers. Phantom measurements show up to a 6 fold variation in dose rate across the range of systems assessed for a given patient size. As expected, some correlation between patient dose rate and the low contrast detectability score is evident. The extent of temporal filtering and pulse width is reflected in the motion blur score. The dynamic range measurements are found to be a less sensitive measure in evaluating system performance. Examination of patient dose results in the context of low contrast detectability score indicates that dose reduction could be achieved without compromising diagnosis on some systems. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  13. Effect of black silicon disordered structures distribution on its wideband reduced reflectance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saab, D Abi; Mostarshedi, S; Basset, P; Protat, S; Angelescu, D; Richalot, E

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple and accurate model for the reflectance simulation of black silicon (BSi) based on the finite element method (FEM). Normalized-root-mean-square error (NRMSE) with experimental measurements below 0.25% has been obtained for wavelength range between 450 and 950 nm. The model is made of a four basic shape cell whose dimensions are extracted from an accurate topography of the BSi obtained by FIB-SEM tomography. Additional BSi modelling techniques were studied, which take into account the BSi irregular topography, demonstrating an important influence of the local structure height variation in the BSi surface spectral reflectance. (paper)

  14. Model-based imaging of cardiac electrical function in human atria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modre, Robert; Tilg, Bernhard; Fischer, Gerald; Hanser, Friedrich; Messnarz, Bernd; Schocke, Michael F. H.; Kremser, Christian; Hintringer, Florian; Roithinger, Franz

    2003-05-01

    Noninvasive imaging of electrical function in the human atria is attained by the combination of data from electrocardiographic (ECG) mapping and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An anatomical computer model of the individual patient is the basis for our computer-aided diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias. Three patients suffering from Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, from paroxymal atrial fibrillation, and from atrial flutter underwent an electrophysiological study. After successful treatment of the cardiac arrhythmia with invasive catheter technique, pacing protocols with stimuli at several anatomical sites (coronary sinus, left and right pulmonary vein, posterior site of the right atrium, right atrial appendage) were performed. Reconstructed activation time (AT) maps were validated with catheter-based electroanatomical data, with invasively determined pacing sites, and with pacing at anatomical markers. The individual complex anatomical model of the atria of each patient in combination with a high-quality mesh optimization enables accurate AT imaging, resulting in a localization error for the estimated pacing sites within 1 cm. Our findings may have implications for imaging of atrial activity in patients with focal arrhythmias.

  15. Cardiac function in acute hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaghue, K.; Hales, I.; Allwright, S.; Cooper, R.; Edwards, A.; Grant, S.; Morrow, A.; Wilmshurst, E.; Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that chronic hypothyroidism may affect cardiac function by several mechanisms. It is not known how long the patient has to be hypothyroid for cardiac involvement to develop. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of a short period of hypothyroidism (10 days) on cardiac function. Nine patients who had had total tyroidectomy, had received ablative radioiodine for thyroid cancer and were euthyroid on replacement therapy were studied while both euthyroid and hypothyroid. Cardiac assessment was performed by X-ray, ECG, echocardiography and gated blood-pool scans. After 10 days of hypothyroidisms, the left-ventricular ejection fraction failed to rise after exercise in 4 of the 9 patients studied, which was significant (P<0.002). No significant changes in cardiac size or function at rest were detected. This functional abnormality in the absence of any demonstrable change in cardiac size and the absence of pericardial effussion with normal basal function suggest that short periods of hypothyroidism may reduce cardiac reserve, mostly because of alterations in metabolic function. (orig.)

  16. Nitrates for the prevention of cardiac morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Xu, Jin; Singh, Balwinder; Yu, Xuerong; Wu, Taixiang; Huang, Yuguang

    2016-08-04

    Cardiac complications are not uncommon in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, especially in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) or at high risk of CAD. Perioperative cardiac complications can lead to mortality and morbidity, as well as higher costs for patient care. Nitrates, which are among the most commonly used cardiovascular drugs, perform the function of decreasing cardiac preload while improving cardiac blood perfusion. Sometimes, nitrates are administered to patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery to reduce the incidence of cardiac complications, especially for patients with CAD. However, their effects on patients' relevant outcomes remain controversial. • To assess effects of nitrates as compared with other interventions or placebo in reducing cardiac risk (such as death caused by cardiac factors, angina pectoris, acute myocardial infarction, acute heart failure and cardiac arrhythmia) in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.• To identify the influence of different routes and dosages of nitrates on patient outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Chinese BioMedical Database until June 2014. We also searched relevant conference abstracts of important anaesthesiology or cardiology scientific meetings, the database of ongoing trials and Google Scholar.We reran the search in January 2016. We added three potential new studies of interest to the list of 'Studies awaiting classification' and will incorporate them into our formal review findings for the review update. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing nitrates versus no treatment, placebo or other pharmacological interventions in participants (15 years of age and older) undergoing non-cardiac surgery under any type of anaesthesia. We used standard methodological procedures as expected by Cochrane. Two review authors selected trials, extracted data from included studies and assessed risk of bias. We

  17. Maternal cardiac metabolism in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Laura X.; Arany, Zolt

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy causes dramatic physiological changes in the expectant mother. The placenta, mostly foetal in origin, invades maternal uterine tissue early in pregnancy and unleashes a barrage of hormones and other factors. This foetal ‘invasion’ profoundly reprogrammes maternal physiology, affecting nearly every organ, including the heart and its metabolism. We briefly review here maternal systemic metabolic changes during pregnancy and cardiac metabolism in general. We then discuss changes in cardiac haemodynamic during pregnancy and review what is known about maternal cardiac metabolism during pregnancy. Lastly, we discuss cardiac diseases during pregnancy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy, and the potential contribution of aberrant cardiac metabolism to disease aetiology. PMID:24448314

  18. {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging detects cardiac involvement and predicts cardiac events in Churg-Strauss syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiguchi, Yoriko; Morita, Yukiko [National Hospital Organization Sagamihara National Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Sagamihara City, Kanagawa (Japan); Tsurikisawa, Naomi; Akiyama, Kazuo [National Hospital Organization Sagamihara National Hospital, Clinical Research Centre for Allergy and Rheumatology, Sagamihara City, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    In Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) it is important to detect cardiac involvement, which predicts poor prognosis. This study evaluated whether {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy could detect cardiac damage and predict cardiac events in CSS. {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy was performed in 28 patients with CSS, 12 of whom had cardiac involvement. The early and delayed heart to mediastinum ratio (early H/M and delayed H/M) and washout rate were calculated by using {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy and compared with those in control subjects. Early H/M and delayed H/M were significantly lower and the washout rate was significantly higher in patients with cardiac involvement than in those without and in controls (early H/M, p = 0.0024, p = 0.0001; delayed H/M, p = 0.0002, p = 0.0001; washout rate, p = 0.0012, p = 0.0052 vs those without and vs controls, respectively). Accuracy for detecting cardiac involvement was 86% for delayed H/M and washout rate and 79% for early H/M and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed significantly lower cardiac event-free rates in patients with early H/M {<=} 2.18 and BNP > 21.8 pg/ml than those with early H/M > 2.18 and BNP {<=} 21.8 pg/ml (log-rank test p = 0.006). Cardiac sympathetic nerve function was damaged in CSS patients with cardiac involvement. {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy was useful in detecting cardiac involvement and in predicting cardiac events. (orig.)

  19. Computerized method for evaluating diagnostic image quality of calcified plaque images in cardiac CT: Validation on a physical dynamic cardiac phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Martin; Rodgers, Zachary; Giger, Maryellen L.; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Patel, Amit R. [Department of Radiology, Committee on Medical Physics, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239 (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 5084, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: In cardiac computed tomography (CT), important clinical indices, such as the coronary calcium score and the percentage of coronary artery stenosis, are often adversely affected by motion artifacts. As a result, the expert observer must decide whether or not to use these indices during image interpretation. Computerized methods potentially can be used to assist in these decisions. In a previous study, an artificial neural network (ANN) regression model provided assessability (image quality) indices of calcified plaque images from the software NCAT phantom that were highly agreeable with those provided by expert observers. The method predicted assessability indices based on computer-extracted features of the plaque. In the current study, the ANN-predicted assessability indices were used to identify calcified plaque images with diagnostic calcium scores (based on mass) from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The basic assumption was that better quality images were associated with more accurate calcium scores. Methods: A 64-channel CT scanner was used to obtain 500 calcified plaque images from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom at different heart rates, cardiac phases, and plaque locations. Two expert observers independently provided separate sets of assessability indices for each of these images. Separate sets of ANN-predicted assessability indices tailored to each observer were then generated within the framework of a bootstrap resampling scheme. For each resampling iteration, the absolute calcium score error between the calcium scores of the motion-contaminated plaque image and its corresponding stationary image served as the ground truth in terms of indicating images with diagnostic calcium scores. The performances of the ANN-predicted and observer-assigned indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores were then evaluated using ROC analysis. Results: Assessability indices provided by the first observer and the corresponding ANN performed

  20. Cardiac events in football and strategies for first-responder treatment on the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Christian; Drezner, Jonathan; Kramer, Efraim; Dvorak, Jiri

    2013-12-01

    The incidence and outcomes of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and global strategies for prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in football are not known. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence of cardiac events in football and to investigate the preventive measures taken among the Fédération International de Football Association (FIFA) member associations internationally. A questionnaire was sent to the member associations of FIFA. The first section addressed the previous events of SCA, SCD or unexplained sports-related sudden death within the last 10 years. Further questions focused on football player medical screening strategies and SCA resuscitation response protocols on the field. 126 of 170 questionnaires were returned (response rate 74.1%), and 103 questionnaires (60.6%) were completed sufficiently to include in further analysis. Overall, 107 cases of SCA/SCD and 5 unexplained football-associated sudden deaths were reported. These events occurred in 52 of 103 responding associations (50.5%). 23 of 112 (20.5%) footballers survived. 12 of 22 (54.5%) players treated with an available automated external defibrillators (AED) on the pitch survived. A national registry to monitor cardiac events was established in only 18.4% of the associations. Most associations (85.4%) provide regular cardiac screening for their national teams while 75% screen teams of the national leagues. An AED is available at all official matches in 68% of associations. National registries to accurately measure SCA/SCD in football are rare and greatly needed. Deficiencies in emergency preparations, undersupply of AEDs on the field during matches, and variability in resuscitation response protocols and training of team-staff members should be addressed to effectively prevent SCD in football.

  1. Split-bolus single-phase cardiac multidetector computed tomography for reliable detection of left atrial thrombus. Comparison to transesophageal echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staab, W.; Zwaka, P.A.; Sohns, J.M.; Schwarz, A.; Lotz, J. [University Medical Center Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Sohns, C.; Vollmann, D.; Zabel, M.; Hasenfuss, G. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology and Pneumology; Schneider, S. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medical Statistics

    2014-11-15

    Evaluation of a new cardiac MDCT protocol using a split-bolus contrast injection protocol and single MDCT scan for reliable diagnosis of LA/LAA thrombi in comparison to TEE, optimizing radiation exposure and use of contrast agent. A total of 182 consecutive patients with drug refractory AF scheduled for PVI (62.6% male, mean age: 64.1 ± 10.2 years) underwent routine diagnostic work including TEE and cardiac MDCT for the evaluation of LA/LAA anatomy and thrombus formation between November 2010 and March 2012. Contrast media injection was split into a pre-bolus of 30 ml and main bolus of 70 ml iodinated contrast agent separated by a short time delay. In this study, split-bolus cardiac MDCT identified 14 of 182 patients with filling defects of the LA/LAA. In all of these 14 patients, abnormalities were found in TEE. All 5 of the 14 patients with thrombus formation in cardiac MDCT were confirmed by TEE. MDCT was 100% accurate for thrombus, with strong but not perfect overall results for SEC equivalent on MDCT.

  2. Maprotiline treatment differentially influences cardiac β-adrenoreceptors expression under normal and stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasa Spasojevic

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in cardiac function were observed in antidepressants treated patients and published in several clinical reports. These detected changes could be either a consequence of the treatment or of depression itself, which has already been proved to be a risk factor in heart diseases. In order to determine a possible influence of chronic treatment with norepinephrinergic reuptake inhibitor, maprotiline, on the heart, we investigated gene expression of cardiac β-adrenoceptors both in controls and in animals with signs of depression. The rats were divided into two groups, unstressed controls and those exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS. The groups were further divided into two subgroups, one receiving daily intraperitoneal injections of vehicle (sterile water and another one maprotiline (10 mg/kg for four weeks. Tissue samples were collected after the last application. Gene expression of cardiac β1- and β2-adrenoceptor was determined using Real-time RT-PCR analysis. Our results show that in control animals expression of both adrenoreceptors was decreased in the right atria after 4 weeks of maprotiline application. Contrary, the same treatment led to a significant increase in expression of cardiac β1-adrenoceptor in the stressed rats, with no change in the characteristics of β2-adrenoceptor. Our findings might reflect the that molecular mechanisms are underlying factors involved in the development of cardiovascular diseases linked with antidepressant treatment.

  3. Cardiac carcinoid: tricuspid delayed hyperenhancement on cardiac 64-slice multidetector CT and magnetic resonance imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martos, R

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare condition in adults. Its diagnosis can be easily missed in a patient presenting to a primary care setting. We revised the advantages of using coronary multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing this condition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied a 65-year-old patient with carcinoid heart disease and right heart failure using transthoracic Doppler-echocardiogram, cardiac MDCT and MRI. Cardiac echocardiogram revealed marked thickening and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with dilated right atrium and ventricle. Cardiac MDCT and MRI demonstrated fixation and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with delayed contrast hyperenhancement of the tricuspid annulus. CONCLUSION: This case demonstrates fascinating imaging findings of cardiac carcinoid disease and highlights the increasing utility of contrast-enhanced MRI and cardiac MDCT in the diagnosis of this interesting condition.

  4. UCP3 Ablation Exacerbates High-Salt Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy and Cardiac Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Lang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Excessive salt intake and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH are both critical for the development of hypertension and heart failure. The uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3 plays a cardio-protective role in early heart failure development. However, the potential role for UCP3 in salt intake and LVH is unclear. Methods: UCP3-/- and C57BL/6 mice were placed on either a normal-salt (NS, 0.5% or a high-salt (HS, 8% diet for 24 weeks. The cardiac function, endurance capacity, energy expenditure, and mitochondrial functional capacity were measured in each group. Results: Elevated blood pressure was only observed in HS-fed UCP3-/- mice. High salt induced cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction were observed in both C57BL/6 and UCP3-/- mice. However, the cardiac lesions were more profound in HS-fed UCP3-/- mice. Furthermore, HS-fed UCP3-/-mice experienced more severe mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction compared with HS-fed C57BL/6 mice, represented by the decreased volume of oxygen consumption and heat production at the whole-body level. Conclusion: UCP3 protein was involved in the incidence of high-salt induced hypertension and the progression of cardiac dysfunction in the early stages of heart failure. UCP3 ablation exacerbated high-salt-induced cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction.

  5. Cardiac retransplantation is an efficacious therapy for primary cardiac allograft failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acker Michael A

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although orthotopic heart transplantation has been an effective treatment for end-stage heart failure, the incidence of allograft failure has increased, necessitating treatment options. Cardiac retransplantation remains the only viable long-term solution for end-stage cardiac allograft failure. Given the limited number of available donor hearts, the long term results of this treatment option need to be evaluated. Methods 709 heart transplants were performed over a 20 year period at our institution. Repeat cardiac transplantation was performed in 15 patients (2.1%. A retrospective analysis was performed to determine the efficacy of cardiac retransplantation. Variables investigated included: 1 yr and 5 yr survival, length of hospitalization, post-operative complications, allograft failure, recipient and donor demographics, renal function, allograft ischemic time, UNOS listing status, blood group, allograft rejection, and hemodynamic function. Results Etiology of primary graft failure included transplant arteriopathy (n = 10, acute rejection (n = 3, hyperacute rejection (n = 1, and a post-transplant diagnosis of metastatic melanoma in the donor (n = 1. Mean age at retransplantation was 45.5 ± 9.7 years. 1 and 5 year survival for retransplantation were 86.6% and 71.4% respectively, as compared to 90.9% and 79.1% for primary transplantation. Mean ejection fraction was 67.3 ± 12.2% at a mean follow-up of 32.6 ± 18.5 mos post-retransplant; follow-up biopsy demonstrated either ISHLT grade 1A or 0 rejection (77.5 ± 95.7 mos post-transplant. Conclusion Cardiac retransplantation is an efficacious treatment strategy for cardiac allograft failure.

  6. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  7. Improved performance of maternal-fetal medicine staff after maternal cardiac arrest simulation-based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Nelli; Eisen, Lewis A; Bayya, Jyothshna V; Dulu, Alina; Bernstein, Peter S; Merkatz, Irwin R; Goffman, Dena

    2011-09-01

    To determine the impact of simulation-based maternal cardiac arrest training on performance, knowledge, and confidence among Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff. Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff (n = 19) participated in a maternal arrest simulation program. Based on evaluation of performance during initial simulations, an intervention was designed including: basic life support course, advanced cardiac life support pregnancy modification lecture, and simulation practice. Postintervention evaluative simulations were performed. All simulations included a knowledge test, confidence survey, and debriefing. A checklist with 9 pregnancy modification (maternal) and 16 critical care (25 total) tasks was used for scoring. Postintervention scores reflected statistically significant improvement. Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff demonstrated statistically significant improvement in timely initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (120 vs 32 seconds, P = .042) and cesarean delivery (240 vs 159 seconds, P = .017). Prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation initiation and pregnancy modifications application are critical in maternal and fetal survival during cardiac arrest. Simulation is a useful tool for Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff to improve skills, knowledge, and confidence in the management of this catastrophic event. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  8. The floating cardiac fat pad-sign of occult pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Claire; Bokhari, S A Jamal

    2016-08-01

    Pneumothoraces are a possible sequela of chest trauma with potential morbidity and mortality if not recognized and treated promptly. A portable supine chest radiograph is frequently the first radiologic study performed in the setting of trauma. While large pneumothoraces can be readily recognized on these radiographs, smaller pneumothoraces are missed in up to 15 % of trauma patients. There are many radiographic signs of occult pneumothoraces, and we are presenting a new radiographic sign of occult pneumothorax. The floating cardiac fat pad sign occurs when pleural air collects anteriorly and superiorly in the most non-dependent portion of the chest lifting the pericardial fat pad off the diaphragm. Lung markings are still seen surrounding the pericardial fat pad due to the inflated lower lobe of the lung resting dependently. Rapid and accurate identification of pneumothoraces is critical but often difficult on chest radiographs. Although there are many existing radiographic signs for identification of pneumothorax, prospective identification of small pneumothoraces is still relatively poor. Here, we describe an additional sign which aides in the detection of pneumothoraces, the floating cardiac fat pad. When present, this should prompt further evaluation with chest CT or upright chest radiograph.

  9. Nuclear cardiac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques

  10. Discovery and progress of direct cardiac reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hidenori; Ieda, Masaki

    2017-06-01

    Cardiac disease remains a major cause of death worldwide. Direct cardiac reprogramming has emerged as a promising approach for cardiac regenerative therapy. After the discovery of MyoD, a master regulator for skeletal muscle, other single cardiac reprogramming factors (master regulators) have been sought. Discovery of cardiac reprogramming factors was inspired by the finding that multiple, but not single, transcription factors were needed to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts. We first reported a combination of cardiac-specific transcription factors, Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT), that could convert mouse fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells, which were designated as induced cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs). Following our first report of cardiac reprogramming, many researchers, including ourselves, demonstrated an improvement in cardiac reprogramming efficiency, in vivo direct cardiac reprogramming for heart regeneration, and cardiac reprogramming in human cells. However, cardiac reprogramming in human cells and adult fibroblasts remains inefficient, and further efforts are needed. We believe that future research elucidating epigenetic barriers and molecular mechanisms of direct cardiac reprogramming will improve the reprogramming efficiency, and that this new technology has great potential for clinical applications.

  11. Optimal Technique in Cardiac Anesthesia Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Svircevic, V.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to evaluate fast-track cardiac anesthesia techniques and investigate their impact on postoperative mortality, morbidity and quality of life. The following topics will be discussed in the thesis. (1.) Is fast track cardiac anesthesia a safe technique for cardiac surgery? (2.) Does thoracic epidural anesthesia have an effect on mortality and morbidity after cardiac surgery? (3.) Does thoracic epidural anesthesia have an effect on quality of life after cardiac surgery? ...

  12. Can cancer researchers accurately judge whether preclinical reports will reproduce?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There is vigorous debate about the reproducibility of research findings in cancer biology. Whether scientists can accurately assess which experiments will reproduce original findings is important to determining the pace at which science self-corrects. We collected forecasts from basic and preclinical cancer researchers on the first 6 replication studies conducted by the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology (RP:CB to assess the accuracy of expert judgments on specific replication outcomes. On average, researchers forecasted a 75% probability of replicating the statistical significance and a 50% probability of replicating the effect size, yet none of these studies successfully replicated on either criterion (for the 5 studies with results reported. Accuracy was related to expertise: experts with higher h-indices were more accurate, whereas experts with more topic-specific expertise were less accurate. Our findings suggest that experts, especially those with specialized knowledge, were overconfident about the RP:CB replicating individual experiments within published reports; researcher optimism likely reflects a combination of overestimating the validity of original studies and underestimating the difficulties of repeating their methodologies.

  13. Multipotent human stromal cells improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction in mice without long-term engraftment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iso, Yoshitaka; Spees, Jeffrey L.; Serrano, Claudia; Bakondi, Benjamin; Pochampally, Radhika; Song, Yao-Hua; Sobel, Burton E.; Delafontaine, Patrick; Prockop, Darwin J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether intravenously administered multipotent stromal cells from human bone marrow (hMSCs) can improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) without long-term engraftment and therefore whether transitory paracrine effects or secreted factors are responsible for the benefit conferred. hMSCs were injected systemically into immunodeficient mice with acute MI. Cardiac function and fibrosis after MI in the hMSC-treated group were significantly improved compared with controls. However, despite the cardiac improvement, there was no evident hMSC engraftment in the heart 3 weeks after MI. Microarray assays and ELISAs demonstrated that multiple protective factors were expressed and secreted from the hMSCs in culture. Factors secreted by hMSCs prevented cell death of cultured cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells under conditions that mimicked tissue ischemia. The favorable effects of hMSCs appear to reflect the impact of secreted factors rather than engraftment, differentiation, or cell fusion

  14. Effect of antioxidant supplementation on exercise-induced cardiac troponin release in cyclists: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Lieke J J; Res, Peter T; Haenen, Guido R; Bast, Aalt; van Loon, Luc J C; van Dieijen-Visser, Marja P; Meex, Steven J R

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac troponin is the biochemical gold standard to diagnose acute myocardial infarction. Interestingly however, elevated cardiac troponin concentrations are also frequently observed during and after endurance-type exercise. Oxidative stress associated with prolonged exercise has been proposed to contribute to cardiac troponin release. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of 4 week astaxanthin supplementation (a potent cartenoid antioxidant) on antioxidant capacity and exercise-induced cardiac troponin release in cyclists. Thirty-two well-trained male cyclists (age 25±5, weight 73±7 kg, maximum O2 uptake 60±5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), Wmax 5.4±0.5 W·kg(-1); mean ± SD) were repeatedly subjected to a laboratory based standardized exercise protocol before and after 4 weeks of astaxanthin (20 mg/day), or placebo supplementation in a double-blind randomized manner. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, at 60 min of cycling and immediately post-exercise (≈ 120 min). The pre-supplementation cycling trial induced a significant rise of median cardiac troponin T concentrations from 3.2 (IQR 3.0-4.2) to 4.7 ng/L (IQR 3.7-6.7), immediately post-exercise (pexercise-induced cardiac troponin T release (p = 0.24), as measured by the incremental area under the curve. Furthermore, the elevation in basal plasma astaxanthin concentrations was not reflected in changes in antioxidant capacity markers (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, uric acid, and malondialdehyde). Markers of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein) and exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage (creatine kinase) were equally unaffected by astaxanthin supplementation. Despite substantial increases in plasma astaxanthin concentrations, astaxanthin supplementation did not improve antioxidant capacity in well-trained cyclists. Accordingly, exercise-induced cardiac troponin T concentrations were not affected by astaxanthin supplementation. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01241877.

  15. An integrated bioimpedance—ECG gating technique for respiratory and cardiac motion compensation in cardiac PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivumäki, Tuomas; Nekolla, Stephan G; Fürst, Sebastian; Loher, Simone; Schwaiger, Markus; Vauhkonen, Marko; Hakulinen, Mikko A

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory motion may degrade image quality in cardiac PET imaging. Since cardiac PET studies often involve cardiac gating by ECG, a separate respiratory monitoring system is required increasing the logistic complexity of the examination, in case respiratory gating is also needed. Thus, we investigated the simultaneous acquisition of both respiratory and cardiac gating signals using II limb lead mimicking electrode configuration during cardiac PET scans of 11 patients. In addition to conventional static and ECG-gated images, bioimpedance technique was utilized to generate respiratory- and dual-gated images. The ability of the bioimpedance technique to monitor intrathoracic respiratory motion was assessed estimating cardiac displacement between end-inspiration and -expiration. The relevance of dual gating was evaluated in left ventricular volume and myocardial wall thickness measurements. An average 7.6  ±  3.3 mm respiratory motion was observed in the study population. Dual gating showed a small but significant increase (4 ml, p = 0.042) in left ventricular myocardial volume compared to plain cardiac gating. In addition, a thinner myocardial wall was observed in dual-gated images (9.3  ±  1.3 mm) compared to cardiac-gated images (11.3  ±  1.3 mm, p = 0.003). This study shows the feasibility of bioimpedance measurements for dual gating in a clinical setting. The method enables simultaneous acquisition of respiratory and cardiac gating signals using a single device with standard ECG electrodes. (paper)

  16. Glutaredoxin-2 controls cardiac mitochondrial dynamics and energetics in mice, and protects against human cardiac pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges N. Kanaan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxin 2 (GRX2, a mitochondrial glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase, is central to glutathione homeostasis and mitochondrial redox, which is crucial in highly metabolic tissues like the heart. Previous research showed that absence of Grx2, leads to impaired mitochondrial complex I function, hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in mice but the impact on mitochondrial structure and function in intact cardiomyocytes and in humans has not been explored. We hypothesized that Grx2 controls cardiac mitochondrial dynamics and function in cellular and mouse models, and that low expression is associated with human cardiac dysfunction. Here we show that Grx2 absence impairs mitochondrial fusion, ultrastructure and energetics in primary cardiomyocytes and cardiac tissue. Moreover, provision of the glutathione precursor, N-acetylcysteine (NAC to Grx2-/- mice did not restore glutathione redox or prevent impairments. Using genetic and histopathological data from the human Genotype-Tissue Expression consortium we demonstrate that low GRX2 is associated with fibrosis, hypertrophy, and infarct in the left ventricle. Altogether, GRX2 is important in the control of cardiac mitochondrial structure and function, and protects against human cardiac pathologies. Keywords: Human heart, Mitochondria, Oxidative stress, Redox, Cardiac metabolism, Cardiac hypertrophy

  17. Preventing tomorrow's sudden cardiac death today: part I: Current data on risk stratification for sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khatib, Sana M; Sanders, Gillian D; Bigger, J Thomas; Buxton, Alfred E; Califf, Robert M; Carlson, Mark; Curtis, Anne; Curtis, Jeptha; Fain, Eric; Gersh, Bernard J; Gold, Michael R; Haghighi-Mood, Ali; Hammill, Stephen C; Healey, Jeff; Hlatky, Mark; Hohnloser, Stefan; Kim, Raymond J; Lee, Kerry; Mark, Daniel; Mianulli, Marcus; Mitchell, Brent; Prystowsky, Eric N; Smith, Joseph; Steinhaus, David; Zareba, Wojciech

    2007-06-01

    Accurate and timely prediction of sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a necessary prerequisite for effective prevention and therapy. Although the largest number of SCD events occurs in patients without overt heart disease, there are currently no tests that are of proven predictive value in this population. Efforts in risk stratification for SCD have focused primarily on predicting SCD in patients with known structural heart disease. Despite the ubiquity of tests that have been purported to predict SCD vulnerability in such patients, there is little consensus on which test, in addition to the left ventricular ejection fraction, should be used to determine which patients will benefit from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. On July 20 and 21, 2006, a group of experts representing clinical cardiology, cardiac electrophysiology, biostatistics, economics, and health policy were joined by representatives of the US Food and Drug administration, Centers for Medicare Services, Agency for Health Research and Quality, the Heart Rhythm Society, and the device and pharmaceutical industry for a round table meeting to review current data on strategies of risk stratification for SCD, to explore methods to translate these strategies into practice and policy, and to identify areas that need to be addressed by future research studies. The meeting was organized by the Duke Center for the Prevention of SCD at the Duke Clinical Research Institute and was funded by industry participants. This article summarizes the presentations and discussions that occurred at that meeting.

  18. Cardiac-specific overexpression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 exacerbates cardiac remodeling in response to pressure overload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujith Dassanayaka

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Pathological cardiac remodeling during heart failure is associated with higher levels of lipid peroxidation products and lower abundance of several aldehyde detoxification enzymes, including aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2. An emerging idea that could explain these findings concerns the role of electrophilic species in redox signaling, which may be important for adaptive responses to stress or injury. The purpose of this study was to determine whether genetically increasing ALDH2 activity affects pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction. Mice subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC for 12 weeks developed myocardial hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction, which were associated with diminished ALDH2 expression and activity. Cardiac-specific expression of the human ALDH2 gene in mice augmented myocardial ALDH2 activity but did not improve cardiac function in response to pressure overload. After 12 weeks of TAC, ALDH2 transgenic mice had larger hearts than their wild-type littermates and lower capillary density. These findings show that overexpression of ALDH2 augments the hypertrophic response to pressure overload and imply that downregulation of ALDH2 may be an adaptive response to certain forms of cardiac pathology. Keywords: Heart failure, Hypertrophy, Oxidative stress, Aldehydes, Cardiac remodeling, Hormesis

  19. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac...... peptides has only been elucidated during the last decade. The cellular synthesis including amino acid modifications and proteolytic cleavages has proven considerably more complex than initially perceived. Consequently, the elimination phase of the peptide products in circulation is not yet well....... An inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...

  20. A library based fitting method for visual reflectance spectroscopy of human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkruysse, Wim; Zhang Rong; Choi, Bernard; Lucassen, Gerald; Svaasand, Lars O; Nelson, J Stuart

    2005-01-01

    The diffuse reflectance spectrum of human skin in the visible region (400-800 nm) contains information on the concentrations of chromophores such as melanin and haemoglobin. This information may be extracted by fitting the reflectance spectrum with an optical diffusion based analytical expression applied to a layered skin model. With the use of the analytical expression, it is assumed that light transport is dominated by scattering. For port wine stain (PWS) and highly pigmented human skin, however, this assumption may not be valid resulting in a potentially large error in visual reflectance spectroscopy (VRS). Monte Carlo based techniques can overcome this problem but are currently too computationally intensive to be combined with previously used fitting procedures. The fitting procedure presented herein is based on a library search which enables the use of accurate reflectance spectra based on forward Monte Carlo simulations or diffusion theory. This allows for accurate VRS to characterize chromophore concentrations in PWS and highly pigmented human skin. The method is demonstrated using both simulated and measured reflectance spectra. An additional advantage of the method is that the fitting procedure is very fast

  1. A library based fitting method for visual reflectance spectroscopy of human skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verkruysse, Wim [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Zhang Rong [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Choi, Bernard [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Lucassen, Gerald [Personal Care Institute, Philips Research, Prof Holstlaan 4, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Svaasand, Lars O [Department of Physical Electronics Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Nelson, J Stuart [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States)

    2005-01-07

    The diffuse reflectance spectrum of human skin in the visible region (400-800 nm) contains information on the concentrations of chromophores such as melanin and haemoglobin. This information may be extracted by fitting the reflectance spectrum with an optical diffusion based analytical expression applied to a layered skin model. With the use of the analytical expression, it is assumed that light transport is dominated by scattering. For port wine stain (PWS) and highly pigmented human skin, however, this assumption may not be valid resulting in a potentially large error in visual reflectance spectroscopy (VRS). Monte Carlo based techniques can overcome this problem but are currently too computationally intensive to be combined with previously used fitting procedures. The fitting procedure presented herein is based on a library search which enables the use of accurate reflectance spectra based on forward Monte Carlo simulations or diffusion theory. This allows for accurate VRS to characterize chromophore concentrations in PWS and highly pigmented human skin. The method is demonstrated using both simulated and measured reflectance spectra. An additional advantage of the method is that the fitting procedure is very fast.

  2. A library based fitting method for visual reflectance spectroscopy of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkruysse, Wim; Zhang, Rong; Choi, Bernard; Lucassen, Gerald; Svaasand, Lars O.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2005-01-01

    The diffuse reflectance spectrum of human skin in the visible region (400-800 nm) contains information on the concentrations of chromophores such as melanin and haemoglobin. This information may be extracted by fitting the reflectance spectrum with an optical diffusion based analytical expression applied to a layered skin model. With the use of the analytical expression, it is assumed that light transport is dominated by scattering. For port wine stain (PWS) and highly pigmented human skin, however, this assumption may not be valid resulting in a potentially large error in visual reflectance spectroscopy (VRS). Monte Carlo based techniques can overcome this problem but are currently too computationally intensive to be combined with previously used fitting procedures. The fitting procedure presented herein is based on a library search which enables the use of accurate reflectance spectra based on forward Monte Carlo simulations or diffusion theory. This allows for accurate VRS to characterize chromophore concentrations in PWS and highly pigmented human skin. The method is demonstrated using both simulated and measured reflectance spectra. An additional advantage of the method is that the fitting procedure is very fast.

  3. Evaluation of a multi-atlas based method for segmentation of cardiac CTA data: a large-scale, multicenter, and multivendor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirisli, H. A.; Schaap, M.; Klein, S.; Papadopoulou, S. L.; Bonardi, M.; Chen, C. H.; Weustink, A. C.; Mollet, N. R.; Vonken, E. J.; Geest, R. J. van der; Walsum, T. van; Niessen, W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is increasingly used for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, CTA is not commonly used for the assessment of ventricular and atrial function, although functional information extracted from CTA data is expected to improve the diagnostic value of the examination. In clinical practice, the extraction of ventricular and atrial functional information, such as stroke volume and ejection fraction, requires accurate delineation of cardiac chambers. In this paper, we investigated the accuracy and robustness of cardiac chamber delineation using a multiatlas based segmentation method on multicenter and multivendor CTA data. Methods: A fully automatic multiatlas based method for segmenting the whole heart (i.e., the outer surface of the pericardium) and cardiac chambers from CTA data is presented and evaluated. In the segmentation approach, eight atlas images are registered to a new patient's CTA scan. The eight corresponding manually labeled images are then propagated and combined using a per voxel majority voting procedure, to obtain a cardiac segmentation. Results: The method was evaluated on a multicenter/multivendor database, consisting of (1) a set of 1380 Siemens scans from 795 patients and (2) a set of 60 multivendor scans (Siemens, Philips, and GE) from different patients, acquired in six different institutions worldwide. A leave-one-out 3D quantitative validation was carried out on the eight atlas images; we obtained a mean surface-to-surface error of 0.94±1.12 mm and an average Dice coefficient of 0.93 was achieved. A 2D quantitative evaluation was performed on the 60 multivendor data sets. Here, we observed a mean surface-to-surface error of 1.26±1.25 mm and an average Dice coefficient of 0.91 was achieved. In addition to this quantitative evaluation, a large-scale 2D and 3D qualitative evaluation was performed on 1380 and 140 images, respectively. Experts evaluated that 49% of the 1380 images

  4. Therapy with mesenchymal stromal cells or conditioned medium reverse cardiac alterations in a high-fat diet-induced obesity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daltro, P S; Barreto, B C; Silva, P G; Neto, P Chenaud; Sousa Filho, P H F; Santana Neta, D; Carvalho, G B; Silva, D N; Paredes, B D; de Alcantara, A C; Freitas, L A R; Couto, R D; Santos, R R; Souza, B S F; Soares, M B P; Macambira, S G

    2017-10-01

    Obesity is associated with numerous cardiac complications, including arrhythmias, cardiac fibrosis, remodeling and heart failure. Here we evaluated the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and their conditioned medium (CM) to treat cardiac complications in a mouse model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. After obesity induction and HFD withdrawal, obese mice were treated with MSCs, CM or vehicle. Cardiac function was assessed using electrocardiography, echocardiography and treadmill test. Body weight and biochemical parameters were evaluated. Cardiac tissue was used for real time (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and histopathologic analysis. Characterization of CM by protein array showed the presence of different cytokines and growth factors, including chemokines, osteopontin, cystatin C, Serpin E1 and Gas 6. HFD-fed mice presented cardiac arrhythmias, altered cardiac gene expression and fibrosis reflected in physical exercise incapacity associated with obesity and diabetes. Administration of MSCs or CM improved arrhythmias and exercise capacity. This functional improvement correlated with normalization of GATA4 gene expression in the hearts of MSC- or CM-treated mice. The gene expression of connexin 43, troponin I, adiponectin, transforming growth factor (TGF) β, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP1) were significantly reduced in MSCs, but not in CM-treated mice. Moreover, MSC or CM administration reduced the intensity of cardiac fibrosis. Our results suggest that MSCs and CM have a recovery effect on cardiac disturbances due to obesity and corroborate to the paracrine action of MSCs in heart disease models. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 9 Reduces Cardiac Fibrosis and Improves Cardiac Function in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morine, Kevin J; Qiao, Xiaoying; York, Sam; Natov, Peter S; Paruchuri, Vikram; Zhang, Yali; Aronovitz, Mark J; Karas, Richard H; Kapur, Navin K

    2018-02-27

    Background -Heart failure is a growing cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1) promotes cardiac fibrosis, but also activates counter-regulatory pathways that serve to regulate TGF-β1 activity in heart failure. Bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9) is a member of the TGFβ family of cytokines and signals via the downstream effector protein Smad1. Endoglin is a TGFβ co-receptor that promotes TGF-β1 signaling via Smad3 and binds BMP9 with high affinity. We hypothesized that BMP9 limits cardiac fibrosis by activating Smad1 and attenuating Smad3 and further that neutralizing endoglin activity promotes BMP9 activity. Methods -We examined BMP9 expression and signaling in human cardiac fibroblasts and human subjects with heart failure. We utilized the thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) induced model of heart failure to evaluate the functional effect of BMP9 signaling on cardiac remodeling. Results -BMP9 expression is increased in the circulation and left ventricle (LV) of human subjects with heart failure and is expressed by cardiac fibroblasts. Next, we observed that BMP9 attenuates Type I collagen synthesis in human cardiac fibroblasts using recombinant human BMP9 and an siRNA approach. In BMP9 -/- mice subjected to TAC, loss of BMP9 activity promotes cardiac fibrosis, impairs LV function, and increases LV levels of phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3), not pSmad1. In contrast, treatment of wild-type mice subjected to TAC with recombinant BMP9 limits progression of cardiac fibrosis, improves LV function, enhances myocardial capillary density, and increases LV levels of pSmad1, not pSmad3 compared to vehicle treated controls. Since endoglin binds BMP9 with high affinity, we explored the effect of reduced endoglin activity on BMP9 activity. Neutralizing endoglin activity in human cardiac fibroblasts or in wild-type mice subjected to TAC induced heart failure limits collagen production, increases BMP9 protein levels, and increases

  6. Feasibility of Stereo-Infrared Tracking to Monitor Patient Motion During Cardiac SPECT Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Beach, Richard D.; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Boening, Guido; Bruyant, Philippe P.; Feng, Bing; Fulton, Roger R.; Gennert, Michael A.; Nadella, Suman; King, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Patient motion during cardiac SPECT imaging can cause diagnostic imaging artifacts. We investigated the feasibility of monitoring patient motion using the Polaris motion-tracking system. This system uses passive infrared reflection from small spheres to provide real-time position data with vendor stated 0.35 mm accuracy and 0.2 mm repeatability. In our configuration, the Polaris system views through the SPECT gantry toward the patient's head. List-mode event data was temporally synchronized w...

  7. Evaluation of cerebral-cardiac syndrome using echocardiography in a canine model of acute traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Rong; Yang, Weizhong; Wang, Xiumei; Xu, Zhen; Liu, Xiaodong; Sun, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have confirmed that traumatic brain injury (TBI) can induce general adaptation syndrome (GAS), which subsequently results in myocardial dysfunction and damage in some patients with acute TBI; this condition is also termed as cerebral-cardiac syndrome. However, most clinicians ignore the detection and treatment of myocardial dysfunction, and instead concentrate only on the serious neural damage that is observed in acute TBI, which is one of the most important fatal factors. Therefore, clarification is urgently needed regarding the relationship between TBI and myocardial dysfunction. In the present study, we evaluated 18 canine models of acute TBI, by using real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography and strain rate imaging to accurately evaluate myocardial function and regional microcirculation, including the strain rate of the different myocardial segments, time-amplitude curves, mean ascending slope of the curve, and local myocardial blood flow. Our results suggest that acute TBI often results in cerebral-cardiac syndrome, which rapidly progresses to the serious stage within 3 days. This study is the first to provide comprehensive ultrasonic characteristics of cerebral-cardiac syndrome in an animal model of TBI.

  8. Effects of local cardiac denervation on cardiac innervation and ventricular arrhythmia after chronic myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Liu

    Full Text Available Modulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS has already been demonstrated to display antiarrhythmic effects in patients and animals with MI. In this study, we investigated whether local cardiac denervation has any beneficial effects on ventricular electrical stability and cardiac function in the chronic phase of MI.Twenty-one anesthetized dogs were randomly assigned into the sham-operated, MI and MI-ablation groups, respectively. Four weeks after local cardiac denervation, LSG stimulation was used to induce VPCs and VAs. The ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT and the incidence of inducible VPCs were measured with electrophysiological protocol. Cardiac innervation was determined with immunohistochemical staining of growth associated protein-43 (GAP43 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH. The global cardiac and regional ventricular function was evaluated with doppler echocardiography in this study.Four weeks after operation, the incidence of inducible VPC and VF in MI-ablation group were significantly reduced compared to the MI dogs (p<0.05. Moreover, local cardiac denervation significantly improved VFT in the infarcted border zone (p<0.05. The densities of GAP43 and TH-positive nerve fibers in the infarcted border zone in the MI-ablation group were lower than those in the MI group (p<0.05. However, the local cardiac denervation did not significantly improve cardiac function in the chronic phase of MI, determined by the left ventricle diameter (LV, left atrial diameter (LA, ejection fraction (EF.Summarily, in the chronic phase of MI, local cardiac denervation reduces the ventricular electrical instability, and attenuates spatial heterogeneity of sympathetic nerve reconstruction. Our study suggests that this methodology might decrease malignant ventricular arrhythmia in chronic MI, and has a great potential for clinical application.

  9. Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant Prevents Cardiac Dysfunction Induced by Tafazzin Gene Knockdown in Cardiac Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tafazzin, a mitochondrial acyltransferase, plays an important role in cardiolipin side chain remodeling. Previous studies have shown that dysfunction of tafazzin reduces cardiolipin content, impairs mitochondrial function, and causes dilated cardiomyopathy in Barth syndrome. Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated in the development of cardiomyopathy and are also the obligated byproducts of mitochondria. We hypothesized that tafazzin knockdown increases ROS production from mitochondria, and a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant prevents tafazzin knockdown induced mitochondrial and cardiac dysfunction. We employed cardiac myocytes transduced with an adenovirus containing tafazzin shRNA as a model to investigate the effects of the mitochondrial antioxidant, mito-Tempo. Knocking down tafazzin decreased steady state levels of cardiolipin and increased mitochondrial ROS. Treatment of cardiac myocytes with mito-Tempo normalized tafazzin knockdown enhanced mitochondrial ROS production and cellular ATP decline. Mito-Tempo also significantly abrogated tafazzin knockdown induced cardiac hypertrophy, contractile dysfunction, and cell death. We conclude that mitochondria-targeted antioxidant prevents cardiac dysfunction induced by tafazzin gene knockdown in cardiac myocytes and suggest mito-Tempo as a potential therapeutic for Barth syndrome and other dilated cardiomyopathies resulting from mitochondrial oxidative stress.

  10. Cardiac involvement in genotype-positive Fabry disease patients assessed by cardiovascular MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozor, Rebecca; Grieve, Stuart M; Tchan, Michel C; Callaghan, Fraser; Hamilton-Craig, Christian; Denaro, Charles; Moon, James C; Figtree, Gemma A

    2016-02-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has the potential to provide early detection of cardiac involvement in Fabry disease. We aimed to gain further insight into this by assessing a cohort of Fabry patients using CMR. Fifty genotype-positive Fabry subjects (age 45±2 years; 50% male) referred for CMR and 39 matched controls (age 40±2 years; 59% male) were recruited. Patients had a mean Mainz severity score index of 15±2 (range 0-46), reflecting an overall mild degree of disease severity. Compared with controls, Fabry subjects had a 34% greater left ventricular mass (LVM) index (82±5 vs 61±2 g/m(2), p=0.001) and had a significantly greater papillary muscle contribution to total LVM (13±1 vs 6±0.5%, pgadolinium enhancement (LGE) was present in 15 Fabry subjects (9/21 males and 6/23 females). The most common site for LGE was the basal inferolateral wall (93%, 14/15). There was a positive association between LVM index and LGE. Despite this, there were two males and three females with no LVH that displayed LGE. Of Fabry subjects who were not on enzyme replacement therapy at enrolment (n=28), six were reclassified as having cardiac involvement (four LVH-negative/LGE-positive, one LVH-positive/LGE-positive and one LVH-positive/LGE-negative). CMR was able to detect cardiac involvement in 48% of this Fabry cohort, despite the overall mild disease phenotype of the cohort. Of those not on ERT, 21% were reclassified as having cardiac involvement allowing improved risk stratification and targeting of therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Boosters and barriers for direct cardiac reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talkhabi, Mahmood; Zonooz, Elmira Rezaei; Baharvand, Hossein

    2017-06-01

    Heart disease is currently the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, which accounts for approximately 33% of all deaths. Recently, a promising and alchemy-like strategy has been developed called direct cardiac reprogramming, which directly converts somatic cells such as fibroblasts to cardiac lineage cells such as cardiomyocytes (CMs), termed induced CMs or iCMs. The first in vitro cardiac reprogramming study, mediated by cardiac transcription factors (TFs)-Gata4, Tbx5 and Mef2C-, was not enough efficient to produce an adequate number of fully reprogrammed, functional iCMs. As a result, numerous combinations of cardiac TFs exist for direct cardiac reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts. However, the efficiency of direct cardiac reprogramming remains low. Recently, a number of cellular and molecular mechanisms have been identified to increase the efficiency of direct cardiac reprogramming and the quality of iCMs. For example, microgrooved substrate, cardiogenic growth factors [VEGF, FGF, BMP4 and Activin A], and an appropriate stoichiometry of TFs boost the direct cardiac reprogramming. On the other hand, serum, TGFβ signaling, activators of epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and some epigenetic factors (Bmi1 and Ezh2) are barriers for direct cardiac reprogramming. Manipulating these mechanisms by the application of boosters and removing barriers can increase the efficiency of direct cardiac reprogramming and possibly make iCMs reliable for cell-based therapy or other potential applications. In this review, we summarize the latest trends in cardiac TF- or miRNA-based direct cardiac reprogramming and comprehensively discuses all molecular and cellular boosters and barriers affecting direct cardiac reprogramming. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation attributed to anabolic steroid use in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenfeld, Jana; Deal, Barbara J; Crawford, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone that promote the growth of skeletal muscles and have many recognised cardiovascular effects. We report the clinical presentation and pathological findings of an adolescent male whose sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation was attributed to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The age of our patient reflects the usage of anabolic androgenic steroids among younger athletes and highlights the need for increased awareness among practitioners.

  13. Imaging in cardiac mass lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundinger, A.; Gruber, H.P.; Dinkel, E.; Geibel, A.; Beck, A.; Wimmer, B.; Schlosser, V.

    1992-01-01

    In 26 patients with cardiac mass lesions confirmed by surgery, diagnostic imaging was performed preoperatively by means of two-dimensional echocardiography (26 patients), angiography (12 patients), correlative computed tomography (CT, 8 patients), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, 3 patients). Two-dimensional echocardiography correctly identified the cardiac masses in all patients. Angiography missed two of 12 cardiac masses; CT missed one of eight. MRI identified three of three cardiac masses. Although the sensitivity of two-dimensional echocardiography was high (100%), all methods lacked specificity. None of the methods allowed differentiation between myxoma (n=13) and thrombus (n=7). Malignancy of the lesions was successfully predicted by noninvasive imaging methods in all six patients. However, CT and MRI provided additional information concerning cardiac mural infiltration, pericardial involvement, and extracardiac tumor extension, and should be integrated within a preoperative imaging strategy. Thus two-dimensional echocardiography is the method of choice for primary assessment of patients with suspected cardiac masses. Further preoperative imaging by CT or MRI can be limited to patients with malignancies suspected on the grounds of pericardial effusion or other clinical results. (author)

  14. Reduced Right Ventricular Function Predicts Long-Term Cardiac Re-Hospitalization after Cardiac Surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leela K Lella

    Full Text Available The significance of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF, independent of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG and valve procedures remains unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the significance of abnormal RVEF by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR, independent of LVEF in predicting outcomes of patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve surgery.From 2007 to 2009, 109 consecutive patients (mean age, 66 years; 38% female were referred for pre-operative CMR. Abnormal RVEF and LVEF were considered 30 days outcomes included, cardiac re-hospitalization, worsening congestive heart failure and mortality. Mean clinical follow up was 14 months.Forty-eight patients had reduced RVEF (mean 25% and 61 patients had normal RVEF (mean 50% (p<0.001. Fifty-four patients had reduced LVEF (mean 30% and 55 patients had normal LVEF (mean 59% (p<0.001. Patients with reduced RVEF had a higher incidence of long-term cardiac re-hospitalization vs. patients with normal RVEF (31% vs.13%, p<0.05. Abnormal RVEF was a predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization (HR 3.01 [CI 1.5-7.9], p<0.03. Reduced LVEF did not influence long-term cardiac re-hospitalization.Abnormal RVEF is a stronger predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization than abnormal LVEF in patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve procedures.

  15. The Influence of Cardiac Risk Factor Burden on Cardiac Stress Test Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, Jon W; Li, Morgan; Orazulike, Chidubem; Emerman, Charles L

    2011-06-01

    Chest pain is the most common admission diagnosis for observation unit patients. These patients often undergo cardiac stress testing to further risk stratify for coronary artery disease (CAD). The decision of whom to stress is currently based on clinical judgment. We sought to determine the influence of cardiac risk factor burden on cardiac stress test outcome for patients tested from an observation unit, inpatient or outpatient setting. We performed a retrospective observational cohort study for all patients undergoing stress testing in our institution from June 2006 through July 2007. Cardiac risk factors were collected at the time of stress testing. Risk factors were evaluated in a summative fashion using multivariate regression adjusting for age and known coronary artery disease. The model was tested for goodness of fit and collinearity and the c statistic was calculated using the receiver operating curve. A total of 4026 subjects were included for analysis of which 22% had known CAD. The rates of positive outcome were 89 (12.0%), 95 (12.6%), and 343 (16.9%) for the OU, outpatients, and hospitalized patients respectively. While the odds of a positive test outcome increased for additional cardiac risk factors, ROC curve analysis indicates that simply adding the number of risk factors does not add significant diagnostic value. Hospitalized patients were more likely to have a positive stress test, OR 1.41 (1.10 - 1.81). Our study does not support basing the decision to perform a stress test on the number of cardiac risk factors.

  16. Hemispherical reflectance model for passive images in an outdoor environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Charles C; Thai, Bea; Yamaoka, Neil; Aboutalib, Omar

    2015-05-01

    We present a hemispherical reflectance model for simulating passive images in an outdoor environment where illumination is provided by natural sources such as the sun and the clouds. While the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) accurately produces radiance from any objects after the illumination, using the BRDF in calculating radiance requires double integration. Replacing the BRDF by hemispherical reflectance under the natural sources transforms the double integration into a multiplication. This reduces both storage space and computation time. We present the formalism for the radiance of the scene using hemispherical reflectance instead of BRDF. This enables us to generate passive images in an outdoor environment taking advantage of the computational and storage efficiencies. We show some examples for illustration.

  17. Characterization of respiratory and cardiac motion from electro-anatomical mapping data for improved fusion of MRI to left ventricular electrograms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Roujol

    Full Text Available Accurate fusion of late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and electro-anatomical voltage mapping (EAM is required to evaluate the potential of MRI to identify the substrate of ventricular tachycardia. However, both datasets are not acquired at the same cardiac phase and EAM data is corrupted with respiratory motion limiting the accuracy of current rigid fusion techniques. Knowledge of cardiac and respiratory motion during EAM is thus required to enhance the fusion process. In this study, we propose a novel approach to characterize both cardiac and respiratory motion from EAM data using the temporal evolution of the 3D catheter location recorded from clinical EAM systems. Cardiac and respiratory motion components are extracted from the recorded catheter location using multi-band filters. Filters are calibrated for each EAM point using estimates of heart rate and respiratory rate. The method was first evaluated in numerical simulations using 3D models of cardiac and respiratory motions of the heart generated from real time MRI data acquired in 5 healthy subjects. An accuracy of 0.6-0.7 mm was found for both cardiac and respiratory motion estimates in numerical simulations. Cardiac and respiratory motions were then characterized in 27 patients who underwent LV mapping for treatment of ventricular tachycardia. Mean maximum amplitude of cardiac and respiratory motion was 10.2±2.7 mm (min = 5.5, max = 16.9 and 8.8±2.3 mm (min = 4.3, max = 14.8, respectively. 3D Cardiac and respiratory motions could be estimated from the recorded catheter location and the method does not rely on additional imaging modality such as X-ray fluoroscopy and can be used in conventional electrophysiology laboratory setting.

  18. New developments for the detection and treatment of cardiac vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerkin, Kevin J; Ali, Ziad A; Mancini, Donna M

    2017-02-15

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a major limitation to long-term survival after heart transplantation. Innovative new techniques to diagnose CAV have been applied to detect disease. This review will examine the current diagnostic and treatment options available to clinicians for CAV. Diagnostic modalities addressing the pathophysiology underlying CAV (arterial wall thickening and decreased coronary blood flow) improve diagnostic sensitivity when compared to traditional (angiography and dobutamine stress echocardiography) techniques. Limited options are available to prevent and treat CAV; however, progress has been made in making an earlier and more accurate diagnosis. Future research is needed to identify the optimal time to modify immunosuppression and investigate novel treatments for CAV.

  19. Cardiac Arrest: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Handouts Cardiac arrest (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Cardiac Arrest updates ... this? GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Cardiac arrest Related Health Topics Arrhythmia CPR Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators National Institutes ...

  20. Reflective terahertz (THz) imaging: system calibration using hydration phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Neha; Garritano, James; Lee, Yoon Kyung; Tewari, Priyamvada; Sung, Shijun; Maccabi, Ashkan; Nowroozi, Bryan; Babakhanian, Meghedi; Sanghvi, Sajan; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) hydration sensing continues to gain traction in the medical imaging community due to its unparalleled sensitivity to tissue water content. Rapid and accurate detection of fluid shifts following induction of thermal skin burns as well as remote corneal hydration sensing have been previously demonstrated in vivo using reflective, pulsed THz imaging. The hydration contrast sensing capabilities of this technology were recently confirmed in a parallel 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging study, in which burn areas are associated with increases in local mobile water content. Successful clinical translation of THz sensing, however, still requires quantitative assessments of system performance measurements, specifically hydration concentration sensitivity, with tissue substitutes. This research aims to calibrate the sensitivity of a novel, reflective THz system to tissue water content through the use of hydration phantoms for quantitative comparisons of THz hydration imagery.Gelatin phantoms were identified as an appropriate tissue-mimicking model for reflective THz applications, and gel composition, comprising mixtures of water and protein, was varied between 83% to 95% hydration, a physiologically relevant range. A comparison of four series of gelatin phantom studies demonstrated a positive linear relationship between THz reflectivity and water concentration, with statistically significant hydration sensitivities (p hydration). The THz-phantom interaction is simulated with a three-layer model using the Transfer Matrix Method with agreement in hydration trends. Having demonstrated the ability to accurately and noninvasively measure water content in tissue equivalent targets with high sensitivity, reflective THz imaging is explored as a potential tool for early detection and intervention of corneal pathologies.

  1. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswara Sarma Mallela

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future.

  2. Cardiac radiology: centenary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roos, Albert; Higgins, Charles B

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, cardiac imaging technologies have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of acquired and congenital heart disease. Many important contributions to the field of cardiac imaging were initially reported in Radiology. The field developed from the early stages of cardiac imaging, including the use of coronary x-ray angiography and roentgen kymography, to nowadays the widely used echocardiographic, nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) applications. It is surprising how many of these techniques were not recognized for their potential during their early inception. Some techniques were described in the literature but required many years to enter the clinical arena and presently continue to expand in terms of clinical application. The application of various CT and MR contrast agents for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is a case in point, as the utility of contrast agents continues to expand the noninvasive characterization of myocardium. The history of cardiac imaging has included a continuous process of advances in our understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, along with advances in imaging technology that continue to the present day.

  3. Myocardial strain assessment by cine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using non-rigid registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsadok, Yossi; Friedman, Zvi; Haluska, Brian A; Hoffmann, Rainer; Adam, Dan

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate a novel post-processing method for assessment of longitudinal mid-myocardial strain in standard cine cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging sequences. Cine CMR imaging and tagged cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (TMRI) were performed in 15 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and 15 healthy volunteers served as control group. A second group of 37 post-AMI patients underwent both cine CMR and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) CMR exams. Speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) was performed in 36 of these patients. Cine CMR, TMRI and STE were analyzed to obtain longitudinal strain. LGE-CMR datasets were analyzed to evaluate scar extent. Comparison of peak systolic strain (PSS) measured from CMR and TMRI yielded a strong correlation (r=0.86, pcine CMR data. The method was found to be highly correlated with strain measurements obtained by TMRI and STE. This tool allows accurate discrimination between different transmurality states of myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Simulation evaluation of quantitative myocardial perfusion assessment from cardiac CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2014-03-01

    blood flow estimation. In conclusion, quantitative model-based dynamic cardiac CT perfusion assessment is capable of accurately estimating MBF across a range of cardiac outputs and tissue perfusion states, outperforms comparable static perfusion estimates, and is relatively robust to noise and temporal subsampling.

  5. A Novel Fibrosis Index Comprising a Non-Cholesterol Sterol Accurately Predicts HCV-Related Liver Cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydreborg, Magdalena; Lisovskaja, Vera; Lagging, Martin

    2014-01-01

    of the present study was to create a model for accurate prediction of liver cirrhosis based on patient characteristics and biomarkers of liver fibrosis, including a panel of non-cholesterol sterols reflecting cholesterol synthesis and absorption and secretion. We evaluated variables with potential predictive...

  6. The impact of obesity in the cardiac lipidome and its consequences in the cardiac damage observed in obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Royo, Gema; Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Gutiérrez, Beatriz; Jurado-López, Raquel; Gallardo, Isabel; Montero, Olimpio; Bartolomé, Mª Visitación; Román, José Alberto San; Salaices, Mercedes; Nieto, María Luisa; Cachofeiro, Victoria

    To explore the impact of obesity on the cardiac lipid profile in rats with diet-induced obesity, as well as to evaluate whether or not the specific changes in lipid species are associated with cardiac fibrosis. Male Wistar rats were fed either a high-fat diet (HFD, 35% fat) or standard diet (3.5% fat) for 6 weeks. Cardiac lipids were analyzed using by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. HFD rats showed cardiac fibrosis and enhanced levels of cardiac superoxide anion (O 2 ), HOMA index, adiposity, and plasma leptin, as well as a reduction in those of cardiac glucose transporter (GLUT 4), compared with control animals. Cardiac lipid profile analysis showed a significant increase in triglycerides, especially those enriched with palmitic, stearic, and arachidonic acid. An increase in levels of diacylglycerol (DAG) was also observed. No changes in cardiac levels of diacyl phosphatidylcholine, or even a reduction in total levels of diacyl phosphatidylethanolamine, diacyl phosphatidylinositol, and sphingomyelins (SM) was observed in HFD, as compared with control animals. After adjustment for other variables (oxidative stress, HOMA, cardiac hypertrophy), total levels of DAG were independent predictors of cardiac fibrosis while the levels of total SM were independent predictors of the cardiac levels of GLUT 4. These data suggest that obesity has a significant impact on cardiac lipid composition, although it does not modulate the different species in a similar manner. Nonetheless, these changes are likely to participate in the cardiac damage in the context of obesity, since total DAG levels can facilitate the development of cardiac fibrosis, and SM levels predict GLUT4 levels. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Fundamental study on the characteristics of a radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeter with no energy compensation filter for measuring patient entrance doses in cardiac interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Mamoru; Chida, Koichi; Moritake, Takashi; Koguchi, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tadaya; Kadowaki, Ken; Oosaka, Hajime; Tosa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac interventional procedures have been increasing year by year. However, radiation skin injuries have been still reported. There is a necessity to measure the patient entrance skin dose (ESD), but an accurate dose measurement method has not been established. To measure the ESD, a lot of radiophotoluminescence dosemeters (RPLDs) provide an accurate measurement of the direct actual ESD at the points they are arrayed. The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of RPLD to measure the ESD. As a result, X-ray permeable RPLD (with no tin filter) did not interfere with the percutaneous coronary intervention procedure. The RPLD also had good fundamental performance characteristics. Although the RPLD had a little energy dependence, it showed excellent dose and dose-rate linearity, and good angular dependence. In conclusion, by calibrating the energy dependence, RPLDs are useful dosemeter to measure the ESD in cardiac intervention. (authors)

  8. [Cardiac cachexia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miján, Alberto; Martín, Elvira; de Mateo, Beatriz

    2006-05-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF), especially affecting the right heart, frequently leads to malnutrition. If the latter is severe and is combined to other factors, it may lead to cardiac cachexia. This one is associated to increased mortality and lower survival of patients suffering from it. The causes of cardiac cachexia are diverse, generally associated to maintenance of a negative energy balance, with increasing evidence of its multifactorial origin. Neurohumoral, inflammatory, immunological, and metabolic factors, among others, are superimposed in the patient with CHF, leading to involvement and deterioration of several organs and systems, since this condition affects both lean (or active cellular) mass and adipose and bone tissue osteoporosis. Among all, the most pronounced deterioration may be seen at skeletal muscle tissue, at both structural and functional levels, the heart not being spared. As for treatment, it should be based on available scientific evidence. Assessment of nutritional status of any patient with CHF is a must, with the requirement of nutritional intervention in case of malnutrition. In this situation, especially if accompanied by cardiac cachexia, it is required to modify energy intake and oral diet quality, and to consider the indication of specific complementary or alternative artificial nutrition. Besides, the causal relationship of the beneficial role of moderate physical exertion is increasing, as well as modulation of metabolic and inflammatory impairments observed in cardiac cachexia with several drugs, leading to a favorable functional and structural response in CHF patients.

  9. A method to quantify mechanobiologic forces during zebrafish cardiac development using 4-D light sheet imaging and computational modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Vedula

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Blood flow and mechanical forces in the ventricle are implicated in cardiac development and trabeculation. However, the mechanisms of mechanotransduction remain elusive. This is due in part to the challenges associated with accurately quantifying mechanical forces in the developing heart. We present a novel computational framework to simulate cardiac hemodynamics in developing zebrafish embryos by coupling 4-D light sheet imaging with a stabilized finite element flow solver, and extract time-dependent mechanical stimuli data. We employ deformable image registration methods to segment the motion of the ventricle from high resolution 4-D light sheet image data. This results in a robust and efficient workflow, as segmentation need only be performed at one cardiac phase, while wall position in the other cardiac phases is found by image registration. Ventricular hemodynamics are then quantified by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations in the moving wall domain with our validated flow solver. We demonstrate the applicability of the workflow in wild type zebrafish and three treated fish types that disrupt trabeculation: (a chemical treatment using AG1478, an ErbB2 signaling inhibitor that inhibits proliferation and differentiation of cardiac trabeculation; (b injection of gata1a morpholino oligomer (gata1aMO suppressing hematopoiesis and resulting in attenuated trabeculation; (c weak-atriumm58 mutant (wea with inhibited atrial contraction leading to a highly undeveloped ventricle and poor cardiac function. Our simulations reveal elevated wall shear stress (WSS in wild type and AG1478 compared to gata1aMO and wea. High oscillatory shear index (OSI in the grooves between trabeculae, compared to lower values on the ridges, in the wild type suggest oscillatory forces as a possible regulatory mechanism of cardiac trabeculation development. The framework has broad applicability for future cardiac developmental studies focused on quantitatively

  10. Cardiac Catheterization (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Educators Search English Español Cardiac Catheterization KidsHealth / For Kids / Cardiac Catheterization What's in this article? What Is ...

  11. Imaging in blunt cardiac injury: Computed tomographic findings in cardiac contusion and associated injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Mark M; Raptis, Demetrios A; Cummings, Kristopher W; Mellnick, Vincent M; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Schuerer, Douglas J; Raptis, Constantine A

    2016-05-01

    Blunt cardiac injury (BCI) may manifest as cardiac contusion or, more rarely, as pericardial or myocardial rupture. Computed tomography (CT) is performed in the vast majority of blunt trauma patients, but the imaging features of cardiac contusion are not well described. To evaluate CT findings and associated injuries in patients with clinically diagnosed BCI. We identified 42 patients with blunt cardiac injury from our institution's electronic medical record. Clinical parameters, echocardiography results, and laboratory tests were recorded. Two blinded reviewers analyzed chest CTs performed in these patients for myocardial hypoenhancement and associated injuries. CT findings of severe thoracic trauma are commonly present in patients with severe BCI; 82% of patients with ECG, cardiac enzyme, and echocardiographic evidence of BCI had abnormalities of the heart or pericardium on CT; 73% had anterior rib fractures, and 64% had pulmonary contusions. Sternal fractures were only seen in 36% of such patients. However, myocardial hypoenhancement on CT is poorly sensitive for those patients with cardiac contusion: 0% of right ventricular contusions and 22% of left ventricular contusions seen on echocardiography were identified on CT. CT signs of severe thoracic trauma are frequently present in patients with severe BCI and should be regarded as indirect evidence of potential BCI. Direct CT findings of myocardial contusion, i.e. myocardial hypoenhancement, are poorly sensitive and should not be used as a screening tool. However, some left ventricular contusions can be seen on CT, and these patients could undergo echocardiography or cardiac MRI to evaluate for wall motion abnormalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiac changes in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding-Barclay, Michael A; Stern, Jessica; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder, which is associated with many different medical complications as a result of the weight loss and malnutrition that characterise this illness. It has the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. A large portion of deaths are attributable to the cardiac abnormalities that ensue as a result of the malnutrition associated with anorexia nervosa. In this review, the cardiac complications of anorexia nervosa will be discussed. A comprehensive literature review on cardiac changes in anorexia nervosa was carried out. There are structural, functional, and rhythm-type changes that occur in patients with anorexia nervosa. These become progressively significant as ongoing weight loss occurs. Cardiac changes are inherent to anorexia nervosa and they become more life-threatening and serious as the anorexia nervosa becomes increasingly severe. Weight restoration and attention to these cardiac changes are crucial for a successful treatment outcome.

  13. Obesity-associated cardiac pathogenesis in broiler breeder hens: Pathological adaption of cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C Y; Lin, H Y; Chen, Y W; Ko, Y J; Liu, Y J; Chen, Y H; Walzem, R L; Chen, S E

    2017-07-01

    Broiler hens consuming feed to appetite (ad libitum; AL) show increased mortality. Feed restriction (R) typically improves reproductive performance and livability of hens. Rapidly growing broilers can exhibit increased mortality due to cardiac insufficiency but it is unknown whether the increased mortality of non-R broiler hens is also due to cardiac compromise. To assess cardiac growth and physiology in fully mature birds, 45-week-old hens were either continued on R rations or assigned to AL feeding for 7 or 21 days. AL hens exhibited increased bodyweight, adiposity, absolute and relative heart weight, ventricular hypertrophy, and cardiac protein/DNA ratio by d 21 (P hens (P Hens allowed AL feeding for 70 d exhibited a higher incidence of mortality (40% vs. 10%) in association with ascites, pericardial effusion, and ventricle dilation. A higher incidence of irregular ECG patterns and rhythmicity consistent with persistently elevated systolic blood pressure and ventricle fibrosis were observed in AL hens (P feeding in broiler hens results in maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy that progresses to overt pathogenesis in contractility and thereby increases mortality. Feed restriction provides clear physiological benefit to heart function of adult broiler hens. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  14. Item Construction Using Reflective, Formative, or Rasch Measurement Models: Implications for Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christina Hamme; Gischlar, Karen L.; Peterson, N. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Measures that accurately capture the phenomenon are critical to research and practice in group work. The vast majority of group-related measures were developed using the reflective measurement model rooted in classical test theory (CTT). Depending on the construct definition and the measure's purpose, the reflective model may not always be the…

  15. Characterization of Glutamatergic Neurons in the Rat Atrial Intrinsic Cardiac Ganglia that Project to the Cardiac Ventricular Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic cardiac nervous system modulates cardiac function by acting as an integration site for regulating autonomic efferent cardiac output. This intrinsic system is proposed to be composed of a short cardio-cardiac feedback control loop within the cardiac innervation hierarchy. For example, electrophysiological studies have postulated the presence of sensory neurons in intrinsic cardiac ganglia for regional cardiac control. There is still a knowledge gap, however, about the anatomical location and neurochemical phenotype of sensory neurons inside intrinsic cardiac ganglia. In the present study, rat intrinsic cardiac ganglia neurons were characterized neurochemically with immunohistochemistry using glutamatergic markers: vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 (VGLUT1; VGLUT2), and glutaminase (GLS), the enzyme essential for glutamate production. Glutamatergic neurons (VGLUT1/VGLUT2/GLS) in the ICG that have axons to the ventricles were identified by retrograde tracing of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injected in the ventricular wall. Co-labeling of VGLUT1, VGLUT2, and GLS with the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) was used to evaluate the relationship between post-ganglionic autonomic neurons and glutamatergic neurons. Sequential labeling of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in adjacent tissue sections was used to evaluate the co-localization of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in ICG neurons. Our studies yielded the following results: (1) intrinsic cardiac ganglia contain glutamatergic neurons with GLS for glutamate production and VGLUT1 and 2 for transport of glutamate into synaptic vesicles; (2) atrial intrinsic cardiac ganglia contain neurons that project to ventricle walls and these neurons are glutamatergic; (3) many glutamatergic ICG neurons also were cholinergic, expressing VAChT. (4) VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 co-localization occurred in ICG neurons with variation of their protein expression level. Investigation of both glutamatergic and cholinergic ICG

  16. Scoring of late gadolinium enhancement in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging can predict cardiac events in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojiri, Ayumi; Hongo, Kenichi; Kawai, Makoto; Komukai, Kimiaki; Sakuma, Toru; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2011-01-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents myocardial fibrosis and may be related to the clinical outcome of various heart diseases. This study evaluated the relationship between LGE and cardiac events in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) using a new scoring method. This study retrospectively followed 46 HCM patients without heart failure symptoms for 3.8±1.8 years. Gadolinium-enhanced cardiac MRI was performed in all patients. Cardiac events including newly developed heart failure or ventricular tachyarrhythmia were evaluated during the follow-up period. We evaluated the predictive factors to identify the patients with cardiac events. None of the risk factors reported to be related to poor outcome or the existence of LGE alone could predict cardiac events, which might be due to the small number of subjects investigated in this study. A new scoring method for LGE-positive areas (LGE score) was applied and higher LGE score can predict cardiac events in this study population. The proposed LGE score for cardiac MRI is considered to be a potentially valid method for assessing cardiac events in HCM patients. (author)

  17. Safety in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for

  18. Fetal Primary Cardiac Tumors During Perinatal Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fetal primary cardiac tumors are rare, but they may cause complications, which are sometimes life threatening, including arrhythmias, hydrops fetalis, ventricular outflow/inflow obstruction, cardiac failure, and even sudden death. Among fetal primary cardiac tumors, rhabdomyomas are most common, followed by teratomas, fibromas, hemangiomas, and myxomas. Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, has been reported to be an effective drug to cause tumor remission in three neonates with multiple cardiac rhabdomyomas. Neonatal cardiac surgery for the resection of primary cardiac tumors found by fetal echocardiography has been reported sporadically. However, open fetal surgery for pericardial teratoma resection, which was performed successfully via a fetal median sternotomy in one case report, could be a promising intervention to rescue these patients with large pericardial effusions. These recent achievements undoubtedly encourage further development in early management of fetal cardiac tumors. Owing to the rarity of fetal primary cardiac tumors, relevant information in terms of prenatal diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis remains to be clarified.

  19. Memory-induced nonlinear dynamics of excitation in cardiac diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landaw, Julian; Qu, Zhilin

    2018-04-01

    Excitable cells, such as cardiac myocytes, exhibit short-term memory, i.e., the state of the cell depends on its history of excitation. Memory can originate from slow recovery of membrane ion channels or from accumulation of intracellular ion concentrations, such as calcium ion or sodium ion concentration accumulation. Here we examine the effects of memory on excitation dynamics in cardiac myocytes under two diseased conditions, early repolarization and reduced repolarization reserve, each with memory from two different sources: slow recovery of a potassium ion channel and slow accumulation of the intracellular calcium ion concentration. We first carry out computer simulations of action potential models described by differential equations to demonstrate complex excitation dynamics, such as chaos. We then develop iterated map models that incorporate memory, which accurately capture the complex excitation dynamics and bifurcations of the action potential models. Finally, we carry out theoretical analyses of the iterated map models to reveal the underlying mechanisms of memory-induced nonlinear dynamics. Our study demonstrates that the memory effect can be unmasked or greatly exacerbated under certain diseased conditions, which promotes complex excitation dynamics, such as chaos. The iterated map models reveal that memory converts a monotonic iterated map function into a nonmonotonic one to promote the bifurcations leading to high periodicity and chaos.

  20. Focused cardiac ultrasound is feasible in the general practice setting and alters diagnosis and management of cardiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Yates

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ultrasound-assisted examination of the cardiovascular system with focused cardiac ultrasound by the treating physician is non-invasive and changes diagnosis and management of patient’s with suspected cardiac disease. This has not been reported in a general practice setting. Aim: To determine whether focused cardiac ultrasound performed on patients aged over 50 years changes the diagnosis and management of cardiac disease by a general practitioner. Design and setting: A prospective observational study of 80 patients aged over 50 years and who had not received echocardiography or chest CT within 12 months presenting to a general practice. Method: Clinical assessment and management of significant cardiac disorders in patients presenting to general practitioners were recorded before and after focused cardiac ultrasound. Echocardiography was performed by a medical student with sufficient training, which was verified by an expert. Differences in diagnosis and management between conventional and ultrasound-assisted assessment were recorded. Results and conclusion: Echocardiography and interpretation were acceptable in all patients. Significant cardiac disease was detected in 16 (20% patients, including aortic stenosis in 9 (11% and cardiac failure in 7 (9%, which were missed by clinical examination in 10 (62.5% of these patients. Changes in management occurred in 12 patients (15% overall and 75% of those found to have significant cardiac disease including referral for diagnostic echocardiography in 8 (10%, commencement of heart failure treatment in 3 (4% and referral to a cardiologist in 1 patient (1%. Routine focused cardiac ultrasound is feasible and frequently alters the diagnosis and management of cardiac disease in patients aged over 50 years presenting to a general practice.

  1. Cardiac integrins the ties that bind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D G; Reaves, T A; Shih, D T; Burgess, W; Borg, T K; Terracio, L

    1998-01-01

    An elaborate series of morphogenetic events must be precisely coordinated during development to promote the formation of the elaborate three-dimensional structure of the normal heart. In this study we focus on discussing how interconnections between the cardiac myocyte and its surrounding environment regulate cardiac form and function. In vitro experiments from our laboratories provide direct evidence that cardiac cell shape is regulated by a dynamic interaction between constituents of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and by specific members of the integrin family of matrix receptors. Our data indicates that phenotypic information is stored in the tertiary structure and chemical identity of the ECM. This information appears to be actively communicated and transduced by the α1β1 integrin molecule into an intracellular signal that regulates cardiac cell shape and myofibrillar organization. In this study we have assessed the phenotypic consequences of suppressing the expression and accumulation of the α1 integrin molecule in aligned cultures of cardiac myocytes. In related experiments we have examined how the overexpression of α2 and α5 integrin, integrins normally not present or present at very low copy number on the cell surface of neonatal cardiac myocytes, affect cardiac protein metabolism. We also consider how biochemical signals and the mechanical signals mediated by the integrins may converge on common intracellular signaling pathways in the heart. Experiments with the whole embryo culture system indicate that angiotensin II, a peptide that carries information concerning cardiac load, plays a role in controling cardiac looping and the proliferation of myofibrils during development.

  2. Cardiac fluid dynamics meets deformation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Ferro, Matteo; Stolfo, Davide; De Paris, Valerio; Lesizza, Pierluigi; Korcova, Renata; Collia, Dario; Tonti, Giovanni; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Pedrizzetti, Gianni

    2018-02-20

    Cardiac function is about creating and sustaining blood in motion. This is achieved through a proper sequence of myocardial deformation whose final goal is that of creating flow. Deformation imaging provided valuable contributions to understanding cardiac mechanics; more recently, several studies evidenced the existence of an intimate relationship between cardiac function and intra-ventricular fluid dynamics. This paper summarizes the recent advances in cardiac flow evaluations, highlighting its relationship with heart wall mechanics assessed through the newest techniques of deformation imaging and finally providing an opinion of the most promising clinical perspectives of this emerging field. It will be shown how fluid dynamics can integrate volumetric and deformation assessments to provide a further level of knowledge of cardiac mechanics.

  3. Mitochondrial function in engineered cardiac tissues is regulated by extracellular matrix elasticity and tissue alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra-Leite, Davi M; Andres, Allen M; Petersen, Andrew P; Ariyasinghe, Nethika R; Cho, Nathan; Lee, Jezell A; Gottlieb, Roberta A; McCain, Megan L

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondria in cardiac myocytes are critical for generating ATP to meet the high metabolic demands associated with sarcomere shortening. Distinct remodeling of mitochondrial structure and function occur in cardiac myocytes in both developmental and pathological settings. However, the factors that underlie these changes are poorly understood. Because remodeling of tissue architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM) elasticity are also hallmarks of ventricular development and disease, we hypothesize that these environmental factors regulate mitochondrial function in cardiac myocytes. To test this, we developed a new procedure to transfer tunable polydimethylsiloxane disks microcontact-printed with fibronectin into cell culture microplates. We cultured Sprague-Dawley neonatal rat ventricular myocytes within the wells, which consistently formed tissues following the printed fibronectin, and measured oxygen consumption rate using a Seahorse extracellular flux analyzer. Our data indicate that parameters associated with baseline metabolism are predominantly regulated by ECM elasticity, whereas the ability of tissues to adapt to metabolic stress is regulated by both ECM elasticity and tissue alignment. Furthermore, bioenergetic health index, which reflects both the positive and negative aspects of oxygen consumption, was highest in aligned tissues on the most rigid substrate, suggesting that overall mitochondrial function is regulated by both ECM elasticity and tissue alignment. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial function is regulated by both ECM elasticity and myofibril architecture in cardiac myocytes. This provides novel insight into how extracellular cues impact mitochondrial function in the context of cardiac development and disease. NEW & NOTEWORTHY A new methodology has been developed to measure O 2 consumption rates in engineered cardiac tissues with independent control over tissue alignment and matrix elasticity. This led to the findings that matrix

  4. Dual energy cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, Patricia; Deviggiano, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Granillo, Gastón

    2017-06-01

    Conventional single energy CT suffers from technical limitations related to the polychromatic nature of X-rays. Dual energy cardiac CT (DECT) shows promise to attenuate and even overcome some of these limitations, and might broaden the scope of patients eligible for cardiac CT towards the inclusion of higher risk patients. This might be achieved as a result of both safety (contrast reduction) and physiopathological (myocardial perfusion and characterization) issues. In this article, we will review the main clinical cardiac applications of DECT, that can be summarized in two core aspects: coronary artery evaluation, and myocardial evaluation.

  5. Reflective and refractive objects for mixed reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Martin; Traxler, Christoph; Winklhofer, Christoph; Wimmer, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rendering method which integrates reflective or refractive objects into a differential instant radiosity (DIR) framework usable for mixed-reality (MR) applications. This kind of objects are very special from the light interaction point of view, as they reflect and refract incident rays. Therefore they may cause high-frequency lighting effects known as caustics. Using instant-radiosity (IR) methods to approximate these high-frequency lighting effects would require a large amount of virtual point lights (VPLs) and is therefore not desirable due to real-time constraints. Instead, our approach combines differential instant radiosity with three other methods. One method handles more accurate reflections compared to simple cubemaps by using impostors. Another method is able to calculate two refractions in real-time, and the third method uses small quads to create caustic effects. Our proposed method replaces parts in light paths that belong to reflective or refractive objects using these three methods and thus tightly integrates into DIR. In contrast to previous methods which introduce reflective or refractive objects into MR scenarios, our method produces caustics that also emit additional indirect light. The method runs at real-time frame rates, and the results show that reflective and refractive objects with caustics improve the overall impression for MR scenarios.

  6. Convolutional neural network regression for short-axis left ventricle segmentation in cardiac cine MR sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li Kuo; Liew, Yih Miin; Lim, Einly; McLaughlin, Robert A

    2017-07-01

    Automated left ventricular (LV) segmentation is crucial for efficient quantification of cardiac function and morphology to aid subsequent management of cardiac pathologies. In this paper, we parameterize the complete (all short axis slices and phases) LV segmentation task in terms of the radial distances between the LV centerpoint and the endo- and epicardial contours in polar space. We then utilize convolutional neural network regression to infer these parameters. Utilizing parameter regression, as opposed to conventional pixel classification, allows the network to inherently reflect domain-specific physical constraints. We have benchmarked our approach primarily against the publicly-available left ventricle segmentation challenge (LVSC) dataset, which consists of 100 training and 100 validation cardiac MRI cases representing a heterogeneous mix of cardiac pathologies and imaging parameters across multiple centers. Our approach attained a .77 Jaccard index, which is the highest published overall result in comparison to other automated algorithms. To test general applicability, we also evaluated against the Kaggle Second Annual Data Science Bowl, where the evaluation metric was the indirect clinical measures of LV volume rather than direct myocardial contours. Our approach attained a Continuous Ranked Probability Score (CRPS) of .0124, which would have ranked tenth in the original challenge. With this we demonstrate the effectiveness of convolutional neural network regression paired with domain-specific features in clinical segmentation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Endothelial Function as a Possible Significant Determinant of Cardiac Function during Exercise in Patients with Structural Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonpei Takase

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was investigated the role that endothelial function and systemic vascular resistance (SVR play in determining cardiac function reserve during exercise by a new ambulatory radionuclide monitoring system (VEST in patients with heart disease. The study population consisted of 32 patients. The patients had cardiopulmonary stress testing using the treadmill Ramp protocol and the VEST. The anaerobic threshold (AT was autodetermined using the V-slope method. The SVR was calculated by determining the mean blood pressure/cardiac output. Flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD was measured in the brachial artery to evaluate endotheilial function. FMD and the percent change f'rom rest to AT in SVR correlated with those from rest to AT in ejection fraction and peak ejection ratio by VEST, respectively. Our findings suggest that FMD in the brachial artery and the SVR determined by VEST in patients with heart disease can possibly reflect cardiac function reserve during aerobic exercise.

  8. Importance of Calibration Method in Central Blood Pressure for Cardiac Structural Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Kazuaki; Yang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Nolan, Mark T; Negishi, Tomoko; Pathan, Faraz; Marwick, Thomas H; Sharman, James E

    2016-09-01

    Central blood pressure (CBP) independently predicts cardiovascular risk, but calibration methods may affect accuracy of central systolic blood pressure (CSBP). Standard central systolic blood pressure (Stan-CSBP) from peripheral waveforms is usually derived with calibration using brachial SBP and diastolic BP (DBP). However, calibration using oscillometric mean arterial pressure (MAP) and DBP (MAP-CSBP) is purported to provide more accurate representation of true invasive CSBP. This study sought to determine which derived CSBP could more accurately discriminate cardiac structural abnormalities. A total of 349 community-based patients with risk factors (71±5years, 161 males) had CSBP measured by brachial oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph, IEM GmbH, Stolberg, Germany) using 2 calibration methods: MAP-CSBP and Stan-CSBP. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and left atrial dilatation (LAD) were measured based on standard guidelines. MAP-CSBP was higher than Stan-CSBP (149±20 vs. 128±15mm Hg, P curve analyses, MAP-CSBP significantly better discriminated LVH compared with Stan-CSBP (area under the curve (AUC) 0.66 vs. 0.59, P = 0.0063) and brachial SBP (0.62, P = 0.027). Continuous net reclassification improvement (NRI) (P AUC 0.63 vs. 0.56, P = 0.005) and conventional brachial SBP (0.58, P = 0.006), whereas Stan-CSBP provided no better discrimination than conventional brachial BP (P = 0.09). CSBP is calibration dependent and when oscillometric MAP and DBP are used, the derived CSBP is a better discriminator for cardiac structural abnormalities. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2016. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The cardiac sonography workforce in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Steve; Poppe, Katrina; Whalley, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The aim of this paper is to investigate the cardiac sonography workforce characteristics and registration requirements in New Zealand (NZ), with a comparison to similar workforces internationally. Methods: The Survey of Clinical Echocardiography in New Zealand 2 (SCANZ2) audit was performed in December 2010. All of NZ's public‐funded District Health Board (DHB) centers providing echocardiography services responded to questions relating to staff, equipment, procedure types and patient statistics. The Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB), Clinical Physiologists Registration Board (CPRB) and Australian Sonographers Association Registry (ASAR) websites were reviewed in March 2012 for registered sonographers with a cardiac scope of practice. The cardiac sonography workforces in Australia, the UK, the USA and Canada were investigated for comparison. Results: There are 84 cardiac sonographers (60.3 full‐time equivalent) working in DHBs: 71% from a cardiac technical background; 40% have post‐graduate qualifications; a further 17% are undertaking post‐graduate qualifications; and 59 cardiac sonographers have registration with professional bodies in NZ and/or Australia. Cardiac sonographers in NZ do not undergo compulsory registration, but other sonographers in NZ have compulsory registration with the MRTB. Sonographers are predominantly not licensed internationally. Discussion: Disparity exists between registration of cardiac and non‐cardiac sonographers in NZ. Many cardiac sonographers have voluntary registration but few are registered with the MRTB. Reasons for this include professional alignment, educational qualifications and representation. International trends show increased pressure from governments and professional bodies to regulate sonographers. Conclusion: This study provides a snapshot of the cardiac sonography workforce in NZ for the first time. PMID:28191178

  10. Optimal Technique in Cardiac Anesthesia Recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svircevic, V.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to evaluate fast-track cardiac anesthesia techniques and investigate their impact on postoperative mortality, morbidity and quality of life. The following topics will be discussed in the thesis. (1.) Is fast track cardiac anesthesia a safe technique for cardiac surgery?

  11. Effect of antioxidant supplementation on exercise-induced cardiac troponin release in cyclists: a randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieke J J Klinkenberg

    Full Text Available Cardiac troponin is the biochemical gold standard to diagnose acute myocardial infarction. Interestingly however, elevated cardiac troponin concentrations are also frequently observed during and after endurance-type exercise. Oxidative stress associated with prolonged exercise has been proposed to contribute to cardiac troponin release. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of 4 week astaxanthin supplementation (a potent cartenoid antioxidant on antioxidant capacity and exercise-induced cardiac troponin release in cyclists.Thirty-two well-trained male cyclists (age 25±5, weight 73±7 kg, maximum O2 uptake 60±5 mL·kg(-1·min(-1, Wmax 5.4±0.5 W·kg(-1; mean ± SD were repeatedly subjected to a laboratory based standardized exercise protocol before and after 4 weeks of astaxanthin (20 mg/day, or placebo supplementation in a double-blind randomized manner. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, at 60 min of cycling and immediately post-exercise (≈ 120 min.The pre-supplementation cycling trial induced a significant rise of median cardiac troponin T concentrations from 3.2 (IQR 3.0-4.2 to 4.7 ng/L (IQR 3.7-6.7, immediately post-exercise (p<0.001. Four weeks of astaxanthin supplementation significantly increased mean basal plasma astaxanthin concentrations from non-detectable values to 175±86 µg·kg(-1. However, daily astaxanthin supplementation had no effect on exercise-induced cardiac troponin T release (p = 0.24, as measured by the incremental area under the curve. Furthermore, the elevation in basal plasma astaxanthin concentrations was not reflected in changes in antioxidant capacity markers (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, uric acid, and malondialdehyde. Markers of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage (creatine kinase were equally unaffected by astaxanthin supplementation.Despite substantial increases in plasma astaxanthin concentrations

  12. Emergency room thoracotomy for acute traumatic cardiac tamponade caused by a blunt cardiac injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Ishida

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: A prompt diagnosis using FAST and treatment can be lifesaving in traumatic acute cardiac tamponade. A pericardiotomy via a thoracotomy is mandatory for lifesaving cardiac decompression in acute traumatic cardiac tamponade in cases of ineffective drainage due to clot formation within the pericardial space.

  13. Motivational factors of adherence to cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Hooman; Shahriari, Mohsen; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2012-05-01

    Main suggested theories about patients' adherence to treatment regimens recognize the importance of motivation in positive changes in behaviors. Since cardiac diseases are chronic and common, cardiac rehabilitation as an effective prevention program is crucial in management of these diseases. There is always concern about the patients' adherence to cardiac rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to describe the motivational factors affecting the patients' participation and compliance to cardiac rehabilitation by recognizing and understanding the nature of patients' experiences. The participants were selected among the patients with cardiac diseases who were referred to cardiac rehabilitation in Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Iran. The purposive sampling method was used and data saturation achieved after 8 semi-structured interviews. The three main concepts obtained from this study are "beliefs", "supporters" and "group cohesion". In cardiac rehabilitation programs, emphasis on motivational factors affects the patient's adherence. It is suggested that in cardiac rehabilitation programs more attention should be paid to patients' beliefs, the role of patients' supporters and the role of group-based rehabilitation.

  14. Cardiac Limited Ultrasound Examination Techniques to Augment the Bedside Cardiac Physical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Bruce J; Shaw, David J; Amundson, Stan A; Phan, James N; Blanchard, Daniel G; DeMaria, Anthony N

    2015-09-01

    The current practice of physical diagnosis is dependent on physician skills and biases, inductive reasoning, and time efficiency. Although the clinical utility of echocardiography is well known, few data exist on how to integrate 2-dimensional screening "quick-look" ultrasound applications into a novel, modernized cardiac physical examination. We discuss the evidence basis behind ultrasound "signs" pertinent to the cardiovascular system and elemental in synthesis of bedside diagnoses and propose the application of a brief cardiac limited ultrasound examination based on these signs. An ultrasound-augmented cardiac physical examination can be taught in traditional medical education and has the potential to improve bedside diagnosis and patient care. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. Coleridge: a computer tool for assisting musical reflection and self-explanation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cook

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the mid-1980s, there has been a movement away from knowledge supplied by the teacher and towards talking, reflecting and explaining as ways to learn. An example of this change in focus is provided by the self-explanation work of Chi et al (1994 who describe an approach to talking science rather than hearing science. According to Chi and coworkers, generating explanations to oneself (self-explanations facilitates the integration of new information into existing knowledge. Reflecting about one's own learning is the same as thinking about learning or metacognition. Metacognition can be defined as the understanding of knowledge, an understanding that can be reflected in either effective use or overt description of the knowledge in question (Brown, 1987. This definition of metacognition requires of a learner both internalized thinking about learning (that is, reflection, and externalized communication, through language or action, that indicates an understanding of knowledge (that is, a self-explanation. In the work described in this paper the overall pedagogical goal is to encourage creative reflection in learners. Creative reflection is defined as the ability of a learner to imagine musical opportunities in novel situations, and then to make accurate predictions (verbally about these opportunities. To succeed at creative reflection there should be a correspondence between what a learner predicts will happen and what actually happens. An example would be a learner first writing a musical phrase using musical notation, then predicting verbally how that phrase will sound, playing the phrase back on a piano, and finally evaluating if the prediction was accurate or not. Very little work has been done on how computers can be used to support talking, reflecting and explaining in the creative subject-area of musical composition. The rest of this paper addresses this issue.

  16. Modeling the effect of reflection from metallic walls on spectroscopic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zastrow, K.-D.; Keatings, S. R.; O'Mullane, M. G.; Marot, L.; Temmerman, G. de

    2008-01-01

    A modification of JET is presently being prepared to bring operational experience with ITER-like first wall (Be) and divertor (W) materials, geometry and plasma parameters. Reflectivity measurements of JET sample tiles have been performed and the data are used within a simplified model of the JET and ITER vessels to predict additional contributions to quantitative spectroscopic measurements. The most general method to characterize reflectivity is the bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF). For extended sources however, such as bremsstrahlung and edge emission of fuel and intrinsic impurities, the results obtained in the modeling are almost as accurate if the total reflectivity with ideal Lambertian angular dependence is used. This is in contrast to the experience in other communities, such as optical design, lighting design, or rendering who deal mostly with pointlike light sources. This result is so far based on a very limited set of measurements and will be reassessed when more detailed BRDF measurements of JET tiles have been made. If it is true it offers the possibility of in situ monitoring of the reflectivity of selected parts of the wall during exposure to plasma operation, while remeasurement of the BRDF is performed during interventions. For a closed vessel structure such as ITER, it is important to consider multiple reflections. This makes it more important to represent the whole of the vessel reasonably accurately in the model, which on the other hand is easier to achieve than for the more complex internal structure of JET. In both cases the dominant contribution is from the first reflection, and a detailed model of the areas intersected by lines of sight of diagnostic interest is required.

  17. A fiberoptic reflection oximeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsman, M L; Knop, N; Kwant, G; Mook, G A; Zijlstra, W G

    1978-03-20

    A catheter tip oximeter is described consisting of a cardiac catheter containing optical fibers, and incandescent light source, a light detection unit and a processing unit. Half of the optical fibers guide the light to the blood at the tip of the catheter, the other half the backscattered (reflected) light to the detection unit. The detection unit contains a dichroic mirror, transmitting most of the light with lambda less than 800 nm and reflecting most of the light with lambda greater than 900 nm, thus splitting the light into two beams. These pass through interference filters with nominal wavelengths of 640 and 920 nm respectively, and are focused on silicium barrier layer photocells. The photocell signals are amplified and fed into a divider giving the ratio of measuring (R640) and compensating (R920) photocell output. The relationship between log R640/R920 and oxygen saturation is represented by a slightly curved line. The relation may be linearized by subtracting a constant voltage from the divided output before taking the logarithm. The slope of the calibration line is dependent on the total haemoglobin concentration. Nonetheless an average calibration line can be used between 70 and 100% oxygen saturation. For 78 measurements of pig blood samples in this range (haemoglobin concentration between 96 and 161 g.1(-1)), the standard deviation of the difference between the fiberoptic oximeter and a Radiometer OSM1 oxygen saturation meter was 1.9% saturation, for 152 samples over the entire saturation range the standard deviation of the difference was 3.1% saturation. The influence of the flow velocity of blood on the light reflection depends on wavelength as well as on oxygen saturation. Therefore, complete compensation for the flow effect is not possible by simple means.

  18. Crisis management during anaesthesia: cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runciman, W B; Morris, R W; Watterson, L M; Williamson, J A; Paix, A D

    2005-06-01

    Cardiac arrest attributable to anaesthesia occurs at the rate of between 0.5 and 1 case per 10 000 cases, tends to have a different profile to that of cardiac arrest occurring elsewhere, and has an in-hospital mortality of 20%. However, as individual practitioners encounter cardiac arrest rarely, the rapidity with which the diagnosis is made and the consistency of appropriate management varies considerably. To examine the role of a previously described core algorithm "COVER ABCD-A SWIFT CHECK", supplemented by a sub-algorithm for cardiac arrest, in the management of cardiac arrest occurring in association with anaesthesia. The potential performance of this structured approach for each the relevant incidents among the first 4000 reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study (AIMS) was compared with the actual management as reported by the anaesthetists involved. There were 129 reports of cardiac arrest associated with anaesthesia among the first 4000 AIMS incident reports. Identified aetiological factors were grouped into five categories: (1) anaesthetic technique (11 cases with this category alone; 32 with this and one or more of the other categories, representing 25% of all 129 cardiac arrests); (2) drug related (16; 32, 25%); (3) associated with surgical procedure (9; 29, 22%); (4) associated with pre-existing medical or surgical disease (30; 82, 64%); (5) unknown (8; 14, 11%). The "real life" presentation and management of cardiac arrest in association with anaesthesia differs substantially from that detailed in general published guidelines. Cardiac rhythms at the time were sinus bradycardia (23%); asystole (22%); tachycardia/ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (14%); and normal (7%), with a further third unknown. Details of treatment were recorded in 110 reports; modalities employed included cardiac compression (72%); adrenaline (61%); 100% oxygen (58%); atropine (38%); intravenous fluids (25%), and electrical defibrillation (17%). There

  19. Iterative reflectivity-constrained velocity estimation for seismic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaya, Shogo; Verschuur, D. J. Eric

    2018-03-01

    This paper proposes a reflectivity constraint for velocity estimation to optimally solve the inverse problem for active seismic imaging. This constraint is based on the velocity model derived from the definition of reflectivity and acoustic impedance. The constraint does not require any prior information of the subsurface and large extra computational costs, like the calculation of so-called Hessian matrices. We incorporate this constraint into the Joint Migration Inversion algorithm, which simultaneously estimates both the reflectivity and velocity model of the subsurface in an iterative process. Using so-called full wavefield modeling, the misfit between forward modeled and measured data is minimized. Numerical and field data examples are given to demonstrate the validity of our proposed algorithm in case accurate initial models and the low frequency components of observed seismic data are absent.

  20. Fundamental study on the characteristics of a radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeter with no energy compensation filter for measuring patient entrance doses in cardiac interventional procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Mamoru; Chida, Koichi; Moritake, Takashi; Koguchi, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tadaya; Oosaka, Hajime; Tosa, Tetsuo; Kadowaki, Ken

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac interventional procedures have been increasing year by year. However, radiation skin injuries have been still reported. There is a necessity to measure the patient entrance skin dose (ESD), but an accurate dose measurement method has not been established. To measure the ESD, a lot of radiophotoluminescence dosemeters (RPLDs) provide an accurate measurement of the direct actual ESD at the points they are arrayed. The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of RPLD to measure the ESD. As a result, X-ray permeable RPLD (with no tin filter) did not interfere with the percutaneous coronary intervention procedure. The RPLD also had good fundamental performance characteristics. Although the RPLD had a little energy dependence, it showed excellent dose and dose-rate linearity, and good angular dependence. In conclusion, by calibrating the energy dependence, RPLDs are useful dosemeter to measure the ESD in cardiac intervention. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Integrating atlas and graph cut methods for right ventricle blood-pool segmentation from cardiac cine MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangi, Shusil; Linte, Cristian A.

    2017-03-01

    Segmentation of right ventricle from cardiac MRI images can be used to build pre-operative anatomical heart models to precisely identify regions of interest during minimally invasive therapy. Furthermore, many functional parameters of right heart such as right ventricular volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass and thickness can also be assessed from the segmented images. To obtain an accurate and computationally efficient segmentation of right ventricle from cardiac cine MRI, we propose a segmentation algorithm formulated as an energy minimization problem in a graph. Shape prior obtained by propagating label from an average atlas using affine registration is incorporated into the graph framework to overcome problems in ill-defined image regions. The optimal segmentation corresponding to the labeling with minimum energy configuration of the graph is obtained via graph-cuts and is iteratively refined to produce the final right ventricle blood pool segmentation. We quantitatively compare the segmentation results obtained from our algorithm to the provided gold-standard expert manual segmentation for 16 cine-MRI datasets available through the MICCAI 2012 Cardiac MR Right Ventricle Segmentation Challenge according to several similarity metrics, including Dice coefficient, Jaccard coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and Mean absolute distance error.

  2. Exploring the relationship between sequence similarity and accurate phylogenetic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarel, Brandi L; Morrison, Hilary G; Pearson, William

    2006-11-01

    We have characterized the relationship between accurate phylogenetic reconstruction and sequence similarity, testing whether high levels of sequence similarity can consistently produce accurate evolutionary trees. We generated protein families with known phylogenies using a modified version of the PAML/EVOLVER program that produces insertions and deletions as well as substitutions. Protein families were evolved over a range of 100-400 point accepted mutations; at these distances 63% of the families shared significant sequence similarity. Protein families were evolved using balanced and unbalanced trees, with ancient or recent radiations. In families sharing statistically significant similarity, about 60% of multiple sequence alignments were 95% identical to true alignments. To compare recovered topologies with true topologies, we used a score that reflects the fraction of clades that were correctly clustered. As expected, the accuracy of the phylogenies was greatest in the least divergent families. About 88% of phylogenies clustered over 80% of clades in families that shared significant sequence similarity, using Bayesian, parsimony, distance, and maximum likelihood methods. However, for protein families with short ancient branches (ancient radiation), only 30% of the most divergent (but statistically significant) families produced accurate phylogenies, and only about 70% of the second most highly conserved families, with median expectation values better than 10(-60), produced accurate trees. These values represent upper bounds on expected tree accuracy for sequences with a simple divergence history; proteins from 700 Giardia families, with a similar range of sequence similarities but considerably more gaps, produced much less accurate trees. For our simulated insertions and deletions, correct multiple sequence alignments did not perform much better than those produced by T-COFFEE, and including sequences with expressed sequence tag-like sequencing errors did not

  3. Derivation of a regional active-optical reflectance sensor corn algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Active-optical reflectance sensor (AORS) algorithms developed for in-season corn (Zea mays L.) N management have traditionally been derived using sub-regional scale information. However, studies have shown these previously developed AORS algorithms are not consistently accurate when used on a region...

  4. Chronic defensiveness and neuroendocrine dysfunction reflect a novel cardiac troponin T cut point: The SABPA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan, Leoné; Hamer, Mark; von Känel, Roland; Lambert, Gavin W; Delport, Rhena; Steyn, Hendrik S; Malan, Nicolaas T

    2017-11-01

    Sympatho-adrenal responses are activated as an innate defense coping (DefS) mechanism during emotional stress. Whether these sympatho-adrenal responses drive cardiac troponin T (cTnT) increases are unknown. Therefore, associations between cTnT and sympatho-adrenal responses were assessed. A prospective bi-ethnic cohort, excluding atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction and stroke cases, was followed for 3 years (N=342; 45.6±9.0years). We obtained serum high-sensitive cTnT and exposure measures [Coping-Strategy-Indicator, depression/Patient-Health-Questionnarie-9, 24h BP, 24h heart-rate-variability (HRV) and 24h urinary catecholamines]. Blacks showed moderate depression (45% vs. 16%) and 24h hypertension (67% vs. 42%) prevalence compared to Whites. A receiver-operating-characteristics cTnT cut-point 4.2ng/L predicting hypertension in Blacks was used as binary outcome measure in relation to exposure measures [AUC 0.68 (95% CI 0.60-0.76); sensitivity/specificity 63/70%; P≤0.001]. Bi-ethnic cTnT-incidence was similar (Blacks=27%, Whites=25%) with cTnT-recovery better in Blacks (9%) compared to Whites (5%), P=0.001. In cross-sectional analyses, elevated cTnT was related to DefS [OR 1.08 (95% CI 0.99-1.16); P=0.06]; 24h BP [OR 1.03-1.04 (95% CI 1.01-1.08); P≤0.02] and depressed HRV [OR 2.19 (95% CI 1.09-4.41); P=0.03] in Blacks, but not in Whites. At 3year follow-up, elevated cTnT was related to attenuated urine norepinephrine:creatinine ratio in Blacks [OR 1.46 (95% CI 1.01-2.10); P=0.04]. In Whites, a cut point of 5.6ng/L cTnT predicting hypertension was not associated with exposure measures. Central neural control systems exemplified a brain-heart stress pathway. Desensitization of sympatho-adrenal responses occurred with initial neural- (HRV) followed by neuroendocrine dysfunction (norepinephrine:creatinine) in relation to elevated cTnT. Chronic defensiveness may thus drive the desensitization or physiological depression, reflecting ischemic heart disease

  5. How Cardiac Anesthesiology Can Help "STEM" the Tide of Under-representation of Minorities in Science and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Elliott; Lai, Yvonne; Egun, Christyanna; Fitzsimons, Michael G

    2018-04-01

    The field of medicine is built upon science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), yet the United States is rapidly falling behind when it comes to educating the next generation in these disciplines, especially under-represented populations. The authors reflect on existing educational literature surrounding efforts to promote interest in STEM among students and under-represented populations. The authors advocate for greater efforts toward the development of youth programing. Cardiac anesthesia is uniquely positioned as a subspecialty to advance the goal of promoting interest in STEM in diverse groups of young students. The authors describe their development and implementation of a community outreach program to enhance interest in medicine through a cardiac dissection experience. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Robotic Applications in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan P. Kypson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cardiac surgery has been performed through a median sternotomy, which allows the surgeon generous access to the heart and surrounding great vessels. As a paradigm shift in the size and location of incisions occurs in cardiac surgery, new methods have been developed to allow the surgeon the same amount of dexterity and accessibility to the heart in confined spaces and in a less invasive manner. Initially, long instruments without pivot points were used, however, more recent robotic telemanipulation systems have been applied that allow for improved dexterity, enabling the surgeon to perform cardiac surgery from a distance not previously possible. In this rapidly evolving field, we review the recent history and clinical results of using robotics in cardiac surgery.

  7. Gene expression in cardiac tissues from infants with idiopathic conotruncal defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lofland Gary K

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF is the most commonly observed conotruncal congenital heart defect. Treatment of these patients has evolved dramatically in the last few decades, yet a genetic explanation is lacking for the failure of cardiac development for the majority of children with TOF. Our goal was to perform genome wide analyses and characterize expression patterns in cardiovascular tissue (right ventricle, pulmonary valve and pulmonary artery obtained at the time of reconstructive surgery from 19 children with tetralogy of Fallot. Methods We employed genome wide gene expression microarrays to characterize cardiovascular tissue (right ventricle, pulmonary valve and pulmonary artery obtained at the time of reconstructive surgery from 19 children with TOF (16 idiopathic and three with 22q11.2 deletions and compared gene expression patterns to normally developing subjects. Results We detected a signal from approximately 26,000 probes reflecting expression from about half of all genes, ranging from 35% to 49% of array probes in the three tissues. More than 1,000 genes had a 2-fold change in expression in the right ventricle (RV of children with TOF as compared to the RV from matched control infants. Most of these genes were involved in compensatory functions (e.g., hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis and cardiac dilation. However, two canonical pathways involved in spatial and temporal cell differentiation (WNT, p = 0.017 and Notch, p = 0.003 appeared to be generally suppressed. Conclusions The suppression of developmental networks may represent a remnant of a broad malfunction of regulatory pathways leading to inaccurate boundary formation and improper structural development in the embryonic heart. We suggest that small tissue specific genomic and/or epigenetic fluctuations could be cumulative, leading to regulatory network disruption and failure of proper cardiac development.

  8. Pre-transplantation specification of stem cells to cardiac lineage for regeneration of cardiac tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Maritza; Finan, Amanda; Penn, Marc

    2009-03-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a lead cause of mortality in the Western world. Treatment of acute MI is focused on restoration of antegrade flow which inhibits further tissue loss, but does not restore function to damaged tissue. Chronic therapy for injured myocardial tissue involves medical therapy that attempts to minimize pathologic remodeling of the heart. End stage therapy for chronic heart failure (CHF) involves inotropic therapy to increase surviving cardiac myocyte function or mechanical augmentation of cardiac performance. Not until the point of heart transplantation, a limited resource at best, does therapy focus on the fundamental problem of needing to replace injured tissue with new contractile tissue. In this setting, the potential for stem cell therapy has garnered significant interest for its potential to regenerate or create new contractile cardiac tissue. While to date adult stem cell therapy in clinical trials has suggested potential benefit, there is waning belief that the approaches used to date lead to regeneration of cardiac tissue. As the literature has better defined the pathways involved in cardiac differentiation, preclinical studies have suggested that stem cell pretreatment to direct stem cell differentiation prior to stem cell transplantation may be a more efficacious strategy for inducing cardiac regeneration. Here we review the available literature on pre-transplantation conditioning of stem cells in an attempt to better understand stem cell behavior and their readiness in cell-based therapy for myocardial regeneration.

  9. Penetrating cardiac injury by wire thrown from a lawn mower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, P A; Reul, G J

    1979-01-01

    The first successful surgically treated case of penetrating heart injury, specifically the right ventricle, caused by a fragment of coat hanger wire thrown by a lawn mower, is reported. Though traumatic heart injuries are rare, this case represents accurate surgical management and judgment, especially in the preoperative phase which resulted in early operating and excellent postoperative results. It is our feeling that if the patient can be transferred safely to the operating room the mortality rate is considerably lowered; however, emergency room thoracotomy, which will undoubtedly result in a greater survival rate from these spectacular injuries, should be performed in the emergency center if cardiac activity ceases or the patient's condition deteriorates considerably.

  10. [Role of cardiac magnetic resonance in cardiac involvement of Fabry disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Viviana M; Barba, Miguel Angel; Torrá, Roser; Pérez De Isla, Leopoldo; López, Mónica; Calli, Andrea; Feltes, Gisela; Torras, Joan; Valverde, Victor; Zamorano, José L

    2010-09-04

    Fabry disease is a hereditary disorder. Clinical manifestations are multisystemic. The majority of the patients remain undiagnosed until late in life, when alterations could be irreversible. Early detection of cardiac symptoms is of major interest in Fabry's disease (FD) in order to gain access to enzyme replacement therapy. Echo-Doppler tissular imaging (TDI) has been used as a cardiologic early marker in FD. This study is intended to determine whether the cardiac magnetic resonance is as useful tool as TDI for the early detection of cardiac affectation in FD. Echocardiography, tissue Doppler and Cardio magnetic resonance was performed in 20 patients with confirmed Fabry Disease. Left ventricular hypertrophy was defined as septum and left ventricular posterior wall thickness ≥12 mm. An abnormal TDI velocity was defined as (Sa), (Ea) and/or (Aa) velocities gadolinium-enhanced images sequences were obtained using magnetic resonance. Twenty patients included in the study were divided into three groups: 1. Those without left ventricular hypertrophy nor tissue Doppler impairment 2. Those without left ventricular hypertrophy and tissue Doppler impairment 3. Those with left ventricular hypertrophy and Tissue Doppler impairment. Late gadolinium enhancement was found in only one patient, who has already altered DTI and LVH. Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is the only diagnostic tool able to provide early detection of cardiac affectation in patients with FD. Magnetic resonance provides information of the disease severity in patients with LVH, but can not be used as an early marker of cardiac disease in patients with FD. However MRI could be of great value for diagnostic stratification. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Mathematical Models of Cardiac Pacemaking Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pan; Lines, Glenn T.; Maleckar, Mary M.; Tveito, Aslak

    2013-10-01

    Over the past half century, there has been intense and fruitful interaction between experimental and computational investigations of cardiac function. This interaction has, for example, led to deep understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling; how it works, as well as how it fails. However, many lines of inquiry remain unresolved, among them the initiation of each heartbeat. The sinoatrial node, a cluster of specialized pacemaking cells in the right atrium of the heart, spontaneously generates an electro-chemical wave that spreads through the atria and through the cardiac conduction system to the ventricles, initiating the contraction of cardiac muscle essential for pumping blood to the body. Despite the fundamental importance of this primary pacemaker, this process is still not fully understood, and ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac pacemaking function are currently under heated debate. Several mathematical models of sinoatrial node cell membrane electrophysiology have been constructed as based on different experimental data sets and hypotheses. As could be expected, these differing models offer diverse predictions about cardiac pacemaking activities. This paper aims to present the current state of debate over the origins of the pacemaking function of the sinoatrial node. Here, we will specifically review the state-of-the-art of cardiac pacemaker modeling, with a special emphasis on current discrepancies, limitations, and future challenges.

  12. Contribution of cardiac and extra-cardiac disease burden to risk of cardiovascular outcomes varies by ejection fraction in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Emil; Claggett, Brian; Køber, Lars

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Patients with heart failure (HF) often have multiple co-morbidities that contribute to the risk of adverse cardiovascular (CV) and non-CV outcomes. We assessed the relative contribution of cardiac and extra-cardiac disease burden and demographic factors to CV outcomes in HF patients...... Association class, systolic blood pressure, time since HF diagnosis, HF medication use), extra-cardiac (body mass index, creatinine, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, smoker), and demographic (age, gender) categories, and calculated subscores for each patient representing the burden......EF patients (PAR: 76% cardiac disease vs. 58% extra-cardiac disease, P vs. 49% extra-cardiac disease, P

  13. Directed fusion of cardiac spheroids into larger heterocellular microtissues enables investigation of cardiac action potential propagation via cardiac fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markes, Alexander R.; Okundaye, Amenawon O.; Qu, Zhilin; Mende, Ulrike; Choi, Bum-Rak

    2018-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids generated through cellular self-assembly provide cytoarchitectural complexities of native tissue including three-dimensionality, extensive cell-cell contacts, and appropriate cell-extracellular matrix interactions. They are increasingly suggested as building blocks for larger engineered tissues to achieve shapes, organization, heterogeneity, and other biomimetic complexities. Application of these tissue culture platforms is of particular importance in cardiac research as the myocardium is comprised of distinct but intermingled cell types. Here, we generated scaffold-free 3D cardiac microtissue spheroids comprised of cardiac myocytes (CMs) and/or cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) and used them as building blocks to form larger microtissues with different spatial distributions of CMs and CFs. Characterization of fusing homotypic and heterotypic spheroid pairs revealed an important influence of CFs on fusion kinetics, but most strikingly showed rapid fusion kinetics between heterotypic pairs consisting of one CF and one CM spheroid, indicating that CMs and CFs self-sort in vitro into the intermixed morphology found in the healthy myocardium. We then examined electrophysiological integration of fused homotypic and heterotypic microtissues by mapping action potential propagation. Heterocellular elongated microtissues which recapitulate the disproportionate CF spatial distribution seen in the infarcted myocardium showed that action potentials propagate through CF volumes albeit with significant delay. Complementary computational modeling revealed an important role of CF sodium currents and the spatial distribution of the CM-CF boundary in action potential conduction through CF volumes. Taken together, this study provides useful insights for the development of complex, heterocellular engineered 3D tissue constructs and their engraftment via tissue fusion and has implications for arrhythmogenesis in cardiac disease and repair. PMID:29715271

  14. Directed fusion of cardiac spheroids into larger heterocellular microtissues enables investigation of cardiac action potential propagation via cardiac fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Yun Kim

    Full Text Available Multicellular spheroids generated through cellular self-assembly provide cytoarchitectural complexities of native tissue including three-dimensionality, extensive cell-cell contacts, and appropriate cell-extracellular matrix interactions. They are increasingly suggested as building blocks for larger engineered tissues to achieve shapes, organization, heterogeneity, and other biomimetic complexities. Application of these tissue culture platforms is of particular importance in cardiac research as the myocardium is comprised of distinct but intermingled cell types. Here, we generated scaffold-free 3D cardiac microtissue spheroids comprised of cardiac myocytes (CMs and/or cardiac fibroblasts (CFs and used them as building blocks to form larger microtissues with different spatial distributions of CMs and CFs. Characterization of fusing homotypic and heterotypic spheroid pairs revealed an important influence of CFs on fusion kinetics, but most strikingly showed rapid fusion kinetics between heterotypic pairs consisting of one CF and one CM spheroid, indicating that CMs and CFs self-sort in vitro into the intermixed morphology found in the healthy myocardium. We then examined electrophysiological integration of fused homotypic and heterotypic microtissues by mapping action potential propagation. Heterocellular elongated microtissues which recapitulate the disproportionate CF spatial distribution seen in the infarcted myocardium showed that action potentials propagate through CF volumes albeit with significant delay. Complementary computational modeling revealed an important role of CF sodium currents and the spatial distribution of the CM-CF boundary in action potential conduction through CF volumes. Taken together, this study provides useful insights for the development of complex, heterocellular engineered 3D tissue constructs and their engraftment via tissue fusion and has implications for arrhythmogenesis in cardiac disease and repair.

  15. Myocordial perfusion SPECT with dipyridamole stress test in cardiac syndrome X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czepczynski, R.; Smolarek, I.; Sowinski, J.; Rogacka, D.; Kazmierczak, M.; Wysocki, H.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac syndrome X defines patients with typical anginal chest pain, a positive exercise ECG stress test and angiographically normal coronary arteries. Aim of this study was to evaluate the role of myocardial perfusion SPECT with dipyridamole stress in the diagnosis of cardiac syndrome X. Patients, methods: 68 patients with syndrome X aged 32 to 60 years were subjected to myocardial imaging using 99m Tc-MIBI according to the two-days protocol: at rest and after dipyridamole infusion. Semiquantitative evaluation of the images was based on the assessment of 99m Tc-MIBI uptake in 17 myocardial segments using a 5-points scale (0 point - normal uptake, 4 points - no uptake). Scores obtained in each segment were summed up, constituting the summed rest score (SRS) and summed stress score (SSS). Results: mean SRS was 7.9 ± 4.8 and mean SSS was 7.2 ± 4.4 (non-significant difference). Individual comparison of SRS and SSS values revealed three patterns of scintigraphic images: (1) in 25 patients (36.8%), a paradoxical improvement of perfusion at stress images was found, (2) in 23 patients (33.8%), the myocardial perfusion deteriorated after dipyridamole, (3) in 20 patients (29.4%), no significant change of the myocordial perfusion between rest and stress images occurred. Conclusions: in cardiac syndrome X, myocardial SPECT with dipyridamole stress shows different patterns of myocardial perfusion that reflects heterogeneity of this pathology. (orig.)

  16. Kubelka-Munk reflectance theory applied to porcelain veneer systems using a colorimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, B K; Johnston, W M; Saba, R F

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the ability of Kubelka-Munk reflectance theory to predict color parameters of veneer porcelain on various backings using colorimetric measurements. Tristimulus absorption and scattering coefficients were used to predict the respective tristimulus reflectance values of A1, D3, and translucent porcelain samples after they had been bonded to light and dark substrates using universal, opaque, and untinted shades of bonding resin. Observed and predicted reflectance values exhibited high correlation (r2 > or = 0.93 for each porcelain shade). Kubelka-Munk theory offers an accurate prediction for the resultant colorimetric reflectance parameters of veneer porcelain bonded to variously colored backings.

  17. Real time assessment of RF cardiac tissue ablation with optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Sharareh, S

    2008-03-20

    An optical spectroscopy approach is demonstrated allowing for critical parameters during RF ablation of cardiac tissue to be evaluated in real time. The method is based on incorporating in a typical ablation catheter transmitting and receiving fibers that terminate at the tip of the catheter. By analyzing the spectral characteristics of the NIR diffusely reflected light, information is obtained on such parameters as, catheter-tissue proximity, lesion formation, depth of penetration of the lesion, formation of char during the ablation, formation of coagulum around the ablation site, differentiation of ablated from healthy tissue, and recognition of micro-bubble formation in the tissue.

  18. Is Ocean Reflectance Acquired by Citizen Scientists Robust for Science Applications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyan Yang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring the dynamics of the productivity of ocean water and how it affects fisheries is essential for management. It requires data on proper spatial and temporal scales, which can be provided by operational ocean colour satellites. However, accurate productivity data from ocean colour imagery is only possible with proper validation of, for instance, the atmospheric correction applied to the images. In situ water reflectance data are of great value due to the requirements for validation and reflectance is traditionally measured with the Surface Acquisition System (SAS solar tracker system. Recently, an application for mobile devices, “HydroColor”, was developed to acquire water reflectance data. We examined the accuracy of the water reflectance measures acquired by HydroColor with the help of both trained and untrained citizens, under different environmental conditions. We used water reflectance data acquired by SAS solar tracker and by HydroColor onboard the BC ferry Queen of Oak Bay from July to September 2016. Monte Carlo permutation F tests were used to assess whether the differences between measurements collected by SAS solar tracker and HydroColor with citizens were significant. Results showed that citizen HydroColor measurements were accurate in red, green, and blue bands, as well as red/green and red/blue ratios under different environmental conditions. In addition, we found that a trained citizen obtained higher quality HydroColor data especially under clear skies at noon.

  19. Physiologic stress interventions in cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buda, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    Physiologic stress interventions are designed to assess the reserve capability of coronary flow and myocardial function. In the normal individual, a sufficiently intense physiologic stress may increase coronary flow and cardiac output by 500% to 600%. However, in patients with cardiac disease, these reserve responses may be absent, or considerably blunted. Thus, physiologic stress testing has proved extremely helpful in detecting cardiac abnormalities when resting cardiac function appears normal. Although dynamic exercise remains the standard approach to physiologic stress testing, a number of other interventions have been used, including: (1) isometric exercise, (2) atrial pacing, (3) cold pressor testing, (4) postextrasystolic potentiation, (5) volume loading, and (6) negative intrathoracic pressure. Each of these may be considered an alternative physiologic intervention whenever dynamic exercise is not feasible. These alternative approaches are important since, in our experience, 20% to 30% of subjects are unable to perform dynamic exercise, or exercise inadequately to produce a sufficiently intense cardiac stress. This chapter reviews physiologic considerations, indications, contraindications, protocols, and results of these physiologic stress interventions when used in combination with cardiac radionuclide procedures

  20. A Case Report on Upper Extremity Pain of Cardiac Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgay Altınbilek

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Upper extremity pain can originate from the musculoskeletal system, or be a reflection of problems originating from various organs. Therefore, it is highly important to perform a detailed clinical evaluation on patients during differential diagnosis. In this case report, we present a 61 year-old male patient who was admitted with pain in both upper extremities and the upper back that presumed to be of cardiac origin following our clinical evaluations. The patient was referred to the cardiology department, where he was diagnosed with coronary heart disease. The patient’s complaints of pain were fully resolved through the application of an intracoronary stent.

  1. Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy in adult Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yu

    2013-07-01

    In response to stress and extracellular signals, the heart undergoes a process called cardiac hypertrophy during which cardiomyocytes increase in size. If untreated, cardiac hypertrophy can progress to overt heart failure that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The identification of molecular signals that cause or modify cardiomyopathies is necessary to understand how the normal heart progresses to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK signaling is essential for normal human cardiac function, and the inhibition of RTKs can cause dilated cardiomyopathies. However, neither investigations of activated RTK signaling pathways nor the characterization of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the adult fly heart has been previously described. Therefore, we developed strategies using Drosophila as a model to circumvent some of the complexities associated with mammalian models of cardiovascular disease. Transgenes encoding activated EGFRA887T, Ras85DV12 and Ras85DV12S35, which preferentially signal to Raf, or constitutively active human or fly Raf caused hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as determined by decreased end diastolic lumen dimensions, abnormal cardiomyocyte fiber morphology and increased heart wall thicknesses. There were no changes in cardiomyocyte cell numbers. Additionally, activated Raf also induced an increase in cardiomyocyte ploidy compared with control hearts. However, preventing increases in cardiomyocyte ploidy using fizzy-related (Fzr RNAi did not rescue Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that Raf-mediated polyploidization is not required for cardiac hypertrophy. Similar to mammals, the cardiac-specific expression of RNAi directed against MEK or ERK rescued Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy. However, the cardiac-specific expression of activated ERKD334N, which promotes hyperplasia in non-cardiac tissues, did not cause myocyte hypertrophy. These results suggest that ERK is necessary, but not sufficient, for Raf

  2. Cardiac anatomy and physiology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaghan, M

    1998-04-01

    This article reviews the normal anatomy and physiology of the heart. Understanding the normal anatomic and physiologic relationships described in this article will help perioperative nurses care for patients who are undergoing cardiac procedures. Such knowledge also assists nurses in educating patients about cardiac procedures and about activities that can prevent, reverse, or improve cardiac illness.

  3. Use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective follow-up study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Ratika; Tang, Anthony; Wells, George; Blackburn, Josée; Stiell, Ian; Simpson, Christopher; Dorian, Paul; Yee, Raymond; Cameron, Doug; Connolly, Stuart; Birnie, David; Nichol, Graham

    2004-01-01

    Background Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are at high risk of recurrent arrests, many of which could be prevented with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). We sought to determine the ICD insertion rate among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and to determine factors associated with ICD implantation. Methods The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) study is a prospective, multiphase, before–after study assessing the effectiveness of prehospital interventions for people experiencing cardiac arrest, trauma or respiratory arrest in 19 Ontario communities. We linked OPALS data describing survivors of cardiac arrest with data from all defibrillator implantation centres in Ontario. Results From January 1997 to April 2002, 454 patients in the OPALS study survived to hospital discharge after experiencing an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The mean age was 65 (standard deviation 14) years, 122 (26.9%) were women, 398 (87.7%) had a witnessed arrest, 372 (81.9%) had an initial rhythm of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF), and 76 (16.7%) had asystole or another arrhythmia. The median cerebral performance category at discharge (range 1–5, 1 = normal) was 1. Only 58 (12.8%) of the 454 patients received an ICD. Patients with an initial rhythm of VT/VF were more likely than those with an initial rhythm of asystole or another rhythm to undergo device insertion (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 9.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31–71.50). Similarly, patients with a normal cerebral performance score were more likely than those with abnormal scores to undergo ICD insertion (adjusted OR 12.52, 95% CI 1.74–92.12). Interpretation A minority of patients who survived cardiac arrest underwent ICD insertion. It is unclear whether this low usage rate reflects referral bias, selection bias by electrophysiologists, supply constraint or patient preference. PMID:15505267

  4. Usefulness of cardiac 125I-metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake for evaluation of cardiac sympathetic nerve abnormalities in diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Nanami; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Shigeta, Yukio

    1992-01-01

    We investigated cardiac sympathetic nerve abnormalities in streptozocin-induced diabetic rats using 125 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG). The radioactivity ratio of cardiac tissue to 1 ml blood (H/B) was used as an index of cardiac MIBG uptake. Cardiac 125 I-MIBG uptake (H/B) in 4-, 8- and 20-wk diabetic rats was 48% lower than that in control rats. Similar results were obtained even when the data were corrected for g wet tissue weight. Although there was no improvement in H/B following 2-wk insulin treatment, the H/B ratio increased significantly, to 85% of control levels, following 4 wk insulin treatment indicating the reversibility of impaired MIBG uptake in diabetic rats. In vivo reserpine treatment resulted in a 50% reduction in the H/B value in control rats. However, the treatment did not significantly suppress uptake in diabetic rats. Cardiac norepinephrine content in both * 4- and ** 8-wk diabetic rats was significantly ( * p ** p 125 I-MIBG in diabetic rats is significantly impaired due to cardiac sympathetic nerve abnormalities. These abnormalities are reversible, however, dependent on the diabetic state. (author)

  5. Cardiac troponins--Translational biomarkers in cardiology: Theory and practice of cardiac troponin high-sensitivity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamcova, Michaela; Popelova-Lencova, Olga; Jirkovsky, Eduard; Simko, Fedor; Gersl, Vladimir; Sterba, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Tn is a unique translational biomarker in cardiology whose potential has not been diminished in the new era of high sensitive assays. cTns can be valuable markers in cardiac diseases as well as in infectious diseases and respiratory diseases. Furthermore, the role of cTns is growing in the routine evaluation of cardioxicity and in determining the efficacy/safety ratio of novel cardioprotective strategies in clinical settings. cTns can detect myocardial injury not only in a wide spectrum of laboratory animals in experimental studies in vivo, but also in isolated heart models or cardiomyocytes in vitro. The crucial issue regarding the cross-species usage of cardiac troponin investigation remains the choice of cardiac troponin testing. This review summarizes the recent proteomic data on aminoacid sequences of cTnT and cTnI in various species, as well as selected analytical characteristics of human cardiac troponin high-sensitivity assays. Due to the highly phylogenetically conserved structure of troponins, the same bioindicator can be investigated using the same method in both clinical and experimental cardiology, thus contributing to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of cardiac diseases as well as to increased effectiveness of troponin use in clinical practice. Measuring cardiac troponins using commercially available human high-sensitivity cardiac troponin tests with convenient antibodies selected on the basis of adequate proteomic knowledge can solve many issues which would otherwise be difficult to address in clinical settings for various ethical and practical reasons. Our survey could help elaborate the practical guidelines for optimizing the choice of cTns assay in cardiology. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. ASCI 2010 contrast media guideline for cardiac imaging: a report of the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging guideline working group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Kakuya; Tsai, I-Chen; Chan, Carmen; Yu, Wei; Yong, Hwan Seok; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2010-01-01

    The use of contrast media for cardiac imaging becomes increasing as the widespread of cardiac CT and cardiac MR. A radiologist needs to carefully consider the indication and the injection protocol of contrast media to be used as well as the possibility of adverse effect. There are several guidelines for contrast media in western countries. However, these are focusing the adverse effect of contrast media. The Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, the only society dedicated to cardiovascular imaging in Asia, formed a Working Group and created a guideline, which summarizes the integrated knowledge of contrast media for cardiac imaging. In cardiac imaging, coronary artery evaluation is feasible by non-contrast MR angiography, which can be an alternative examination in high risk patients for the use of iodine contrast media. Furthermore, the body habitus of Asian patients is usually smaller than that of their western counterparts. This necessitates modifications in the injection protocol and in the formula for calculation of estimated glomerular filtration rate. This guideline provided fundamental information for the use of contrast media for Asian patients in cardiac imaging. PMID:20931289

  7. Acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-feng; Wang, Xian

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac injury is the most serious adverse event in acupuncture therapy. The causes include needling chest points near the heart, the cardiac enlargement and pericardial effusion that will enlarge the projected area on the body surface and make the proper depth of needling shorter, and the incorrect needling method of the points. Therefore, acupuncture practitioners must be familiar with the points of the heart projected area on the chest and the correct needling methods in order to reduce the risk of acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

  8. Mathematical Models of Cardiac Pacemaking Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan eLi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past half century, there has been intense and fruitful interaction between experimental and computational investigations of cardiac function. This interaction has, for example, led to deep understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling; how it works, as well as how it fails. However, many lines of inquiry remain unresolved, among them the initiation of each heartbeat. The sinoatrial node, a cluster of specialized pacemaking cells in the right atrium of the heart, spontaneously generates an electro-chemical wave that spreads through the atria and through the cardiac conduction system to the ventricles, initiating the contraction of cardiac muscle essential for pumping blood to the body. Despite the fundamental importance of this primary pacemaker, this process is still not fully understood, and ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac pacemaking function are currently under heated debate. Several mathematical models of sinoatrial node cell membrane electrophysiology have been constructed as based on different experimental data sets and hypotheses. As could be expected, these differing models offer diverse predictions about cardiac pacemaking activities. This paper aims to present the current state of debate over the origins of the pacemaking function of the sinoatrial node. Here, we will specifically review the state-of-the-art of cardiac pacemaker modeling, with a special emphasis on current discrepancies, limitations, and future challenges.

  9. Nevomelanocytic atypia detection by in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrida Vaišnorienė

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Nevus with histopathologically confirmed nevomelanocytic atypia (dysplastic nevus could not be distinguished from nevus without atypia using analyzed in vivo RCM features of melanocytic atypia. More accurate diagnostics by means of in vivo RCM needs further investigation on reflectance of single and nested cutaneous melanocytes in benign and malignant skin lesions.

  10. Transcriptional profile of isoproterenol-induced cardiomyopathy and comparison to exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy and human cardiac failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIver Lauren J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy in mice has been used in a number of studies to model human cardiac disease. In this study, we compared the transcriptional response of the heart in this model to other animal models of heart failure, as well as to the transcriptional response of human hearts suffering heart failure. Results We performed microarray analyses on RNA from mice with isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy and mice with exercise-induced physiological hypertrophy and identified 865 and 2,534 genes that were significantly altered in pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy models, respectively. We compared our results to 18 different microarray data sets (318 individual arrays representing various other animal models and four human cardiac diseases and identified a canonical set of 64 genes that are generally altered in failing hearts. We also produced a pairwise similarity matrix to illustrate relatedness of animal models with human heart disease and identified ischemia as the human condition that most resembles isoproterenol treatment. Conclusion The overall patterns of gene expression are consistent with observed structural and molecular differences between normal and maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy and support a role for the immune system (or immune cell infiltration in the pathology of stress-induced hypertrophy. Cross-study comparisons such as the results presented here provide targets for further research of cardiac disease that might generally apply to maladaptive cardiac stresses and are also a means of identifying which animal models best recapitulate human disease at the transcriptional level.

  11. Accurate diffraction data integration by the EVAL15 profile prediction method : Application in chemical and biological crystallography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xian, X.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate integration of reflection intensities plays an essential role in structure determination of the crystallized compound. A new diffraction data integration method, EVAL15, is presented in this thesis. This method uses the principle of general impacts to predict ab inito three-dimensional

  12. 47. A cardiac center experience with Brugada syndrome who survived sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Suliman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is a heritable arrhythmia syndrome that is characterized by an electrocardiographic pattern consisting of coved-type ST-segment elevation (2 mm followed by a negative T wave in the right precordial leads, V1 through V3 (often referred to as type 1 Brugada electrocardiographic pattern, here we describe 3 cases of Brugada who survived sudden cardiac death (SCD cardiac center experience with survived Brugada syndrome patients – case series. First Case: The Father 45 years old male, presented in 2005 after involvement in unprovoked motor vehicle accident, the patient was the driver who lost consciousness and rushed to the hospital. On arrival to our ER and putting the patient on the bed, the ER doctor observed a brief episode of VF on the monitor. The patient was taken to the catheterization Lab , his coronaries were normal. The diagnosis of Brugada was established and the patient received a defibrillator. At That Time all family members were screened and were negative. Second Case: The Son of the first patient 5 years later his 23 years old male rushed to our ER after he lost consciousness, he was passenger in the car of his friend. Third Case: The pilot A military pilot aged a male 35 years old was in very good health when he lost consciousness and brought to the hospital after resuscitation in 2005. He had full invasive cardiac evaluation, subsequently he received a defibrillator in the same admission period, till 2015 he is doing fine. Brugada syndrome is associated with high tendency for sudden cardiac death. In our three cases the first clinical presentation was survived sudden cardiac death (SCD and all three male patients survived. We did not encounter a female patient who survived sudden cardiac death.

  13. Multimodal Registration of gated cardiac PET, CT and MR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baty, X.

    2007-07-01

    The research described in this manuscript deals with the multimodal registration of cardiac images from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Position Emission Tomography (PET) and Computerized Tomography (CT). All these modalities are gated to the Electrocardiogram (ECG) and provide information to evaluate cardiac function, and to diagnose and to follow-up cardiovascular pathologies. PET imaging allows the evaluation of ventricular function and MRI is a gold standard for the study of the left ventricular function. The goal of our registration process is to merge functional (from PET) and anatomical images (from CT and MRI). Our process is adapted to the modalities used and is divided in two steps: (i) a global rigid 3-dimensional model-based ICP (Iterative Closest Point) registration between CT and MR data and (ii) an iconic 2-dimensional registration based on Free Form Deformations and Mutual Information. This last step presents an original contribution by using a composite image of CT (which presents epicardic contours) and PET (where endocardic contours are partially visible) data to make mutual information more accurate in representing the similarity with the MR data. To speed up the whole process, we also present a transformation initialization scheme using displacement field obtained form MR data only. The obtained results have been evaluated by experts. (author)

  14. Experimental reconstruction of a highly reflecting fiber Bragg grating by using spectral regularization and inverse scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Amir; Horowitz, Moshe; Kieckbusch, Sven; Brinkmeyer, Ernst

    2007-10-01

    We demonstrate experimentally, for the first time to our knowledge, a reconstruction of a highly reflecting fiber Bragg grating from its complex reflection spectrum by using a regularization algorithm. The regularization method is based on correcting the measured reflection spectrum at the Bragg zone frequencies and enables the reconstruction of the grating profile using the integral-layer-peeling algorithm. A grating with an approximately uniform profile and with a maximum reflectivity of 99.98% was accurately reconstructed by measuring only its complex reflection spectrum.

  15. Evaluating the Cancer Therapeutic Potential of Cardiac Glycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Calderón-Montaño

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac glycosides, also known as cardiotonic steroids, are a group of natural products that share a steroid-like structure with an unsaturated lactone ring and the ability to induce cardiotonic effects mediated by a selective inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase. Cardiac glycosides have been used for many years in the treatment of cardiac congestion and some types of cardiac arrhythmias. Recent data suggest that cardiac glycosides may also be useful in the treatment of cancer. These compounds typically inhibit cancer cell proliferation at nanomolar concentrations, and recent high-throughput screenings of drug libraries have therefore identified cardiac glycosides as potent inhibitors of cancer cell growth. Cardiac glycosides can also block tumor growth in rodent models, which further supports the idea that they have potential for cancer therapy. Evidence also suggests, however, that cardiac glycosides may not inhibit cancer cell proliferation selectively and the potent inhibition of tumor growth induced by cardiac glycosides in mice xenografted with human cancer cells is probably an experimental artifact caused by their ability to selectively kill human cells versus rodent cells. This paper reviews such evidence and discusses experimental approaches that could be used to reveal the cancer therapeutic potential of cardiac glycosides in preclinical studies.

  16. Real-Time Three-Dimensional Echocardiography: Characterization of Cardiac Anatomy and Function-Current Clinical Applications and Literature Review Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Omar; Beckett, Morgan Q; James, Aaron W; Loehr, Megan N; Lewis, Taylor G; Hassan, Tahmin; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Our review of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) discusses the diagnostic utility of RT3DE and provides a comparison with two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE) in clinical cardiology. A Pubmed literature search on RT3DE was performed using the following key words: transthoracic, two-dimensional, three-dimensional, real-time, and left ventricular (LV) function. Articles included perspective clinical studies and meta-analyses in the English language, and focused on the role of RT3DE in human subjects. Application of RT3DE includes analysis of the pericardium, right ventricular (RV) and LV cavities, wall motion, valvular disease, great vessels, congenital anomalies, and traumatic injury, such as myocardial contusion. RT3DE, through a transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), allows for increasingly accurate volume and valve motion assessment, estimated LV ejection fraction, and volume measurements. Chamber motion and LV mass approximation have been more accurately evaluated by RT3DE by improved inclusion of the third dimension and quantification of volumetric movement. Moreover, RT3DE was shown to have no statistical significance when comparing the ejection fractions of RT3DE to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Analysis of RT3DE data sets of the LV endocardial exterior allows for the volume to be directly quantified for specific phases of the cardiac cycle, ranging from end systole to end diastole, eliminating error from wall motion abnormalities and asymmetrical left ventricles. RT3DE through TTE measures cardiac function with superior diagnostic accuracy in predicting LV mass, systolic function, along with LV and RV volume when compared with 2DE with comparable results to CMR.

  17. Real-Time Three-Dimensional Echocardiography: Characterization of Cardiac Anatomy and Function—Current Clinical Applications and Literature Review Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Q. Beckett

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Our review of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE discusses the diagnostic utility of RT3DE and provides a comparison with two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE in clinical cardiology. A Pubmed literature search on RT3DE was performed using the following key words: transthoracic, two-dimensional, three-dimensional, real-time, and left ventricular (LV function. Articles included perspective clinical studies and meta-analyses in the English language, and focused on the role of RT3DE in human subjects. Application of RT3DE includes analysis of the pericardium, right ventricular (RV and LV cavities, wall motion, valvular disease, great vessels, congenital anomalies, and traumatic injury, such as myocardial contusion. RT3DE, through a transthoracic echocardiography (TTE, allows for increasingly accurate volume and valve motion assessment, estimated LV ejection fraction, and volume measurements. Chamber motion and LV mass approximation have been more accurately evaluated by RT3DE by improved inclusion of the third dimension and quantification of volumetric movement. Moreover, RT3DE was shown to have no statistical significance when comparing the ejection fractions of RT3DE to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR. Analysis of RT3DE data sets of the LV endocardial exterior allows for the volume to be directly quantified for specific phases of the cardiac cycle, ranging from end systole to end diastole, eliminating error from wall motion abnormalities and asymmetrical left ventricles. RT3DE through TTE measures cardiac function with superior diagnostic accuracy in predicting LV mass, systolic function, along with LV and RV volume when compared with 2DE with comparable results to CMR.

  18. Applying measured reflection from the ground to simulations of thermal perfromance of solar collectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon

    2009-01-01

    representation of the reflection from the ground. In this study a more accurate description of the albedo is obtained based on detailed measurements from a solar hat, installed at ASIAQ’s climate station in Sisimiut, Greenland. The solar hat measures the global radiation on horizontal, the total radiation......Solar radiation on tilted and vertical surfaces in the Arctic is, in large parts of the year, strongly influenced by reflection from snow. In connection with planning and optimization of energy efficient buildings and solar energy systems in the Arctic, it is important to have an accurate...... on vertical surfaces facing north, south, east and west, and radiation reflected from the ground on vertical surfaces facing north, south, east and west. Based on measured data from 2004-2007 the albedo is determined for each month of the year as a function of the difference between the solar azimuth...

  19. [Experimental therapy of cardiac remodeling with quercetin-containing drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, M A; Pavlyuchenko, V B; Tumanovskaya, L V; Dosenko, V E; Moybenko, A A

    2013-01-01

    It was shown that continuous beta-adrenergic hyperstimulation resulted in cardiac function disturbances and fibrosis of cardiac tissue. Treatment with quercetin-containing drugs, particularly, water-soluble corvitin and tableted quertin exerted favourable effect on cardiac hemodynamics, normalized systolic and diastolic function in cardiac remodeling, induced by sustained beta-adrenergic stimulation. It was estimated that conducted experimental therapy limited cardiac fibrosis area almost three-fold, that could be associated with first and foremost improved cardiac distensibility, characteristics of diastolic and also pump function in cardiac remodeling.

  20. Meteorological information in GPS-RO reflected signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Boniface

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of the atmosphere can be obtained globally with the radio-occultation technique. However, the lowest layers of the atmosphere are less accurately extracted. A good description of these layers is important for the good performance of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP systems, and an improvement of the observational data available for the low troposphere would thus be of great interest for data assimilation. We outline here how supplemental meteorological information close to the surface can be extracted whenever reflected signals are available. We separate the reflected signal through a radioholographic filter, and we interpret it with a ray tracing procedure, analyzing the trajectories of the electromagnetic waves over a 3-D field of refractive index. A perturbation approach is then used to perform an inversion, identifying the relevant contribution of the lowest layers of the atmosphere to the properties of the reflected signal, and extracting some supplemental information to the solution of the inversion of the direct propagation signals. It is found that there is a significant amount of useful information in the reflected signal, which is sufficient to extract a stand-alone profile of the low atmosphere, with a precision of approximately 0.1 %. The methodology is applied to one reflection case.

  1. Cardiac imaging. A multimodality approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thelen, Manfred; Erbel, Raimund; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Barkhausen, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    An excellent atlas on modern diagnostic imaging of the heart Written by an interdisciplinary team of experts, Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach features an in-depth introduction to all current imaging modalities for the diagnostic assessment of the heart as well as a clinical overview of cardiac diseases and main indications for cardiac imaging. With a particular emphasis on CT and MRI, the first part of the atlas also covers conventional radiography, echocardiography, angiography and nuclear medicine imaging. Leading specialists demonstrate the latest advances in the field, and compare the strengths and weaknesses of each modality. The book's second part features clinical chapters on heart defects, endocarditis, coronary heart disease, cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, cardiac tumors, pericardial diseases, pulmonary vascular diseases, and diseases of the thoracic aorta. The authors address anatomy, pathophysiology, and clinical features, and evaluate the various diagnostic options. Key features: - Highly regarded experts in cardiology and radiology off er image-based teaching of the latest techniques - Readers learn how to decide which modality to use for which indication - Visually highlighted tables and essential points allow for easy navigation through the text - More than 600 outstanding images show up-to-date technology and current imaging protocols Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach is a must-have desk reference for cardiologists and radiologists in practice, as well as a study guide for residents in both fields. It will also appeal to cardiac surgeons, general practitioners, and medical physicists with a special interest in imaging of the heart. (orig.)

  2. Theory of relativistic radiation reflection from plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonoskov, Arkady

    2018-01-01

    We consider the reflection of relativistically strong radiation from plasma and identify the physical origin of the electrons' tendency to form a thin sheet, which maintains its localisation throughout its motion. Thereby, we justify the principle of relativistic electronic spring (RES) proposed in [Gonoskov et al., Phys. Rev. E 84, 046403 (2011)]. Using the RES principle, we derive a closed set of differential equations that describe the reflection of radiation with arbitrary variation of polarization and intensity from plasma with an arbitrary density profile for an arbitrary angle of incidence. We confirm with ab initio PIC simulations that the developed theory accurately describes laser-plasma interactions in the regime where the reflection of relativistically strong radiation is accompanied by significant, repeated relocation of plasma electrons. In particular, the theory can be applied for the studies of plasma heating and coherent and incoherent emissions in the RES regime of high-intensity laser-plasma interaction.

  3. Cross sectional imaging of cardiac tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimovic, R.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Primary cardiac tumors are a rare entity whose incidence, according to surgery and autopsy reports, is 0.3% to 0.7% of all cardiac tumors. Metastasis to the heart from other primary cancers is 30 times more common. Only 25% of primary cardiac tumors are malignant, and, of these, 75% are sarcomas. Malignant primary cardiac sarcomas are usually located in the right atrium and are most commonly angiosarcoma. In the left atrium, the most common malignant tumors are pleomorphic sarcoma and leiomyosarcoma. Symptom presentation for cardiac tumors is quite varied, but it is dependent upon tumor location and size, rather than upon histologic characteristics. Presentation includes congestive heart failure from intracardiac obstruction, systemic embolization, constitutional symptoms, and arrhythmias. Left atrial sarcomas tend to be more solid and less infiltrative than right-sided sarcomas; consequently, they tend to metastasize later. They usually present with symptoms of blood-flow obstruction and substantial, life-threatening congestive heart failure. Right-sided cardiac tumors are usually malignant and appear as bulky, infiltrative masses that grow in an outward pattern. These are usually fast-growing tumors that metastasize early and do not present with congestive heart failure until late in the disease. The diagnosis of cardiac tumors relies heavily on the use of multiple imaging techniques, including cardiac computed tomography (CT), cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), and echocardiography. Important imaging data to collect include information on the size of the intracardiac mass, the mobility of the mass (an important predictor of prognosis and embolic potential), myocardial invasion, and cardiac chamber location. These factors will provide the means to diagnosis and prognosis. Other important data to collect include the mechanism of tumor implantation, the relationship of the tumor with adjacent structures, the surgeon route of access to the heart

  4. A model of survival following pre-hospital cardiac arrest based on the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Masha; Barnes, Vanessa; Whyman, Andrew; Currell, Alex; Bernard, Stephen; Walker, Tony; Smith, Karen L

    2007-11-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of sudden cardiac arrest patients in Victoria, Australia, as captured via the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Register (VACAR). We used the VACAR data to construct a new model of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), which was specified in accordance with observed trends. All cases of cardiac arrest in Victoria that were attended by Victorian ambulance services during the period of 2002-2005. Overall survival to hospital discharge was 3.8% among 18,827 cases of OHCA. Survival was 15.7% among 1726 bystander witnessed, adult cardiac arrests of presumed cardiac aetiology, presenting in ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT), where resuscitation was attempted. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, bystander CPR, cardiac arrest (CA) location, response time, age and sex were predictors of VF/VT, which, in turn, was a strong predictor of survival. The same factors that affected VF/VT made an additional contribution to survival. However, for bystander CPR, CA location and response time this additional contribution was limited to VF/VT patients only. There was no detectable association between survival and age younger than 60 years or response time over 15min. The new model accounts for relationships among predictors of survival. These relationships indicate that interventions such as reduced response times and bystander CPR act in multiple ways to improve survival.

  5. Sudden Cardiac Arrest during Participation in Competitive Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Cameron H; Allan, Katherine S; Connelly, Kim A; Cunningham, Kris; Morrison, Laurie J; Dorian, Paul

    2017-11-16

    The incidence of sudden cardiac arrest during participation in sports activities remains unknown. Preparticipation screening programs aimed at preventing sudden cardiac arrest during sports activities are thought to be able to identify at-risk athletes; however, the efficacy of these programs remains controversial. We sought to identify all sudden cardiac arrests that occurred during participation in sports activities within a specific region of Canada and to determine their causes. In this retrospective study, we used the Rescu Epistry cardiac arrest database (which contains records of every cardiac arrest attended by paramedics in the network region) to identify all out-of-hospital cardiac arrests that occurred from 2009 through 2014 in persons 12 to 45 years of age during participation in a sport. Cases were adjudicated as sudden cardiac arrest (i.e., having a cardiac cause) or as an event resulting from a noncardiac cause, on the basis of records from multiple sources, including ambulance call reports, autopsy reports, in-hospital data, and records of direct interviews with patients or family members. Over the course of 18.5 million person-years of observation, 74 sudden cardiac arrests occurred during participation in a sport; of these, 16 occurred during competitive sports and 58 occurred during noncompetitive sports. The incidence of sudden cardiac arrest during competitive sports was 0.76 cases per 100,000 athlete-years, with 43.8% of the athletes surviving until they were discharged from the hospital. Among the competitive athletes, two deaths were attributed to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and none to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Three cases of sudden cardiac arrest that occurred during participation in competitive sports were determined to have been potentially identifiable if the athletes had undergone preparticipation screening. In our study involving persons who had out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, the incidence of sudden cardiac

  6. Standardization of the first-trimester fetal cardiac examination using spatiotemporal image correlation with tomographic ultrasound and color Doppler imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, S; Turan, O M; Ty-Torredes, K; Harman, C R; Baschat, A A

    2009-06-01

    The challenges of the first-trimester examination of the fetal heart may in part be overcome by technical advances in three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound techniques. Our aim was to standardize the first-trimester 3D imaging approach to the cardiac examination to provide the most consistent and accurate display of anatomy. Low-risk women with normal findings on first-trimester screening at 11 to 13 + 6 weeks had cardiac ultrasound using the following sequence: (1) identification of the four-chamber view; (2) four-dimensional (4D) volume acquisition with spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC) and color Doppler imaging (angle = 20 degrees, sweep 10 s); (3) offline, tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI) analysis with standardized starting plane (four-chamber view), slice number and thickness; (4) assessment of fetal cardiac anatomy (four-chamber view, cardiac axis, size and symmetry, atrioventricular valves, great arteries and descending aorta) with and without color Doppler. 107 consecutive women (age, 16-42 years, body mass index 17.2-50.2 kg/m(2)) were studied. A minimum of three 3D volumes were obtained for each patient, transabdominally in 91.6%. Fetal motion artifact required acquisition of more than three volumes in 20%. The median time for TUI offline analysis was 100 (range, 60-240) s. Individual anatomic landmarks were identified in 89.7-99.1%. Visualization of all structures in one panel was observed in 91 patients (85%). Starting from a simple two-dimensional cardiac landmark-the four-chamber view-the standardized STIC-TUI technique enables detailed segmental cardiac evaluation of the normal fetal heart in the first trimester. (c) 2009 ISUOG.

  7. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and cardiac ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, Beatriz; Gredilla, Ricardo

    According with different international organizations, cardiovascular diseases are becoming the first cause of death in western countries. Although exposure to different risk factors, particularly those related to lifestyle, contribute to the etiopathogenesis of cardiac disorders, the increase in average lifespan and aging are considered major determinants of cardiac diseases events. Mitochondria and oxidative stress have been pointed out as relevant factors both in heart aging and in the development of cardiac diseases such as heart failure, cardiac hypertrophy and diabetic cardiomyopathy. During aging, cellular processes related with mitochondrial function, such as bioenergetics, apoptosis and inflammation are altered leading to cardiac dysfunction. Increasing our knowledge about the mitochondrial mechanisms related with the aging process, will provide new strategies in order to improve this process, particularly the cardiovascular ones. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Proteostasis in cardiac health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Robert H; Brundel, Bianca J J M

    2017-11-01

    The incidence and prevalence of cardiac diseases, which are the main cause of death worldwide, are likely to increase because of population ageing. Prevailing theories about the mechanisms of ageing feature the gradual derailment of cellular protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and loss of protein quality control as central factors. In the heart, loss of protein patency, owing to flaws in genetically-determined design or because of environmentally-induced 'wear and tear', can overwhelm protein quality control, thereby triggering derailment of proteostasis and contributing to cardiac ageing. Failure of protein quality control involves impairment of chaperones, ubiquitin-proteosomal systems, autophagy, and loss of sarcomeric and cytoskeletal proteins, all of which relate to induction of cardiomyocyte senescence. Targeting protein quality control to maintain cardiac proteostasis offers a novel therapeutic strategy to promote cardiac health and combat cardiac disease. Currently marketed drugs are available to explore this concept in the clinical setting.

  9. Cardiac imaging: working towards fully-automated machine analysis & interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, Piotr J; Dey, Damini; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Motwani, Manish; Berman, Daniel S; Germano, Guido

    2017-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging plays a critical role in managing patients with cardiovascular disease. Although subjective visual interpretation remains the clinical mainstay, quantitative analysis facilitates objective, evidence-based management, and advances in clinical research. This has driven developments in computing and software tools aimed at achieving fully automated image processing and quantitative analysis. In parallel, machine learning techniques have been used to rapidly integrate large amounts of clinical and quantitative imaging data to provide highly personalized individual patient-based conclusions. Areas covered: This review summarizes recent advances in automated quantitative imaging in cardiology and describes the latest techniques which incorporate machine learning principles. The review focuses on the cardiac imaging techniques which are in wide clinical use. It also discusses key issues and obstacles for these tools to become utilized in mainstream clinical practice. Expert commentary: Fully-automated processing and high-level computer interpretation of cardiac imaging are becoming a reality. Application of machine learning to the vast amounts of quantitative data generated per scan and integration with clinical data also facilitates a move to more patient-specific interpretation. These developments are unlikely to replace interpreting physicians but will provide them with highly accurate tools to detect disease, risk-stratify, and optimize patient-specific treatment. However, with each technological advance, we move further from human dependence and closer to fully-automated machine interpretation.

  10. Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rod S; Dalal, Hayes; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Zawada, Anna

    2010-01-20

    The burden of cardiovascular disease world-wide is one of great concern to patients and health care agencies alike. Traditionally centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes are offered to individuals after cardiac events to aid recovery and prevent further cardiac illness. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes have been introduced in an attempt to widen access and participation. To determine the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes compared with supervised centre-based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, health-related quality of life and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. We updated the search of a previous review by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2007, Issue 4), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL from 2001 to January 2008. We checked reference lists and sought advice from experts. No language restrictions were applied. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (e.g. hospital, gymnasium, sports centre) with home-based programmes, in adults with myocardial infarction, angina, heart failure or who had undergone revascularisation. Studies were selected independently by two reviewers, and data extracted by a single reviewer and checked by a second one. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Twelve studies (1,938 participants) met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies recruited a lower risk patient following an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and revascularisation. There was no difference in outcomes of home- versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation in mortality risk ratio (RR) was1.31 (95% confidence interval (C) 0.65 to 2.66), cardiac events, exercise capacity standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.11 (95% CI -0.35 to 0.13), as well as in modifiable risk factors (systolic blood pressure; diastolic blood pressure; total cholesterol

  11. Toll-like receptor 9 mediated responses in cardiac fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Kristine Ohm

    Full Text Available Altered cardiac Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 signaling is important in several experimental cardiovascular disorders. These studies have predominantly focused on cardiac myocytes or the heart as a whole. Cardiac fibroblasts have recently been attributed increasing significance in mediating inflammatory signaling. However, putative TLR9-signaling through cardiac fibroblasts remains non-investigated. Thus, our aim was to explore TLR9-signaling in cardiac fibroblasts and investigate the consequence of such receptor activity on classical cardiac fibroblast cellular functions. Cultivated murine cardiac fibroblasts were stimulated with different TLR9 agonists (CpG A, B and C and assayed for the secretion of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α [TNFα], CXCL2 and interferon α/β. Expression of functional cardiac fibroblast TLR9 was proven as stimulation with CpG B and -C caused significant CXCL2 and TNFα-release. These responses were TLR9-specific as complete inhibition of receptor-stimulated responses was achieved by co-treatment with a TLR9-antagonist (ODN 2088 or chloroquine diphosphate. TLR9-stimulated responses were also found more potent in cardiac fibroblasts when compared with classical innate immune cells. Stimulation of cardiac fibroblasts TLR9 was also found to attenuate migration and proliferation, but did not influence myofibroblast differentiation in vitro. Finally, results from in vivo TLR9-stimulation with subsequent fractionation of specific cardiac cell-types (cardiac myocytes, CD45+ cells, CD31+ cells and cardiac fibroblast-enriched cell-fractions corroborated our in vitro data and provided evidence of differentiated cell-specific cardiac responses. Thus, we conclude that cardiac fibroblast may constitute a significant TLR9 responder cell within the myocardium and, further, that such receptor activity may impact important cardiac fibroblast cellular functions.

  12. A self-interaction-free local hybrid functional: Accurate binding energies vis-à-vis accurate ionization potentials from Kohn-Sham eigenvalues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Tobias; Kümmel, Stephan; Kraisler, Eli; Makmal, Adi; Kronik, Leeor

    2014-01-01

    We present and test a new approximation for the exchange-correlation (xc) energy of Kohn-Sham density functional theory. It combines exact exchange with a compatible non-local correlation functional. The functional is by construction free of one-electron self-interaction, respects constraints derived from uniform coordinate scaling, and has the correct asymptotic behavior of the xc energy density. It contains one parameter that is not determined ab initio. We investigate whether it is possible to construct a functional that yields accurate binding energies and affords other advantages, specifically Kohn-Sham eigenvalues that reliably reflect ionization potentials. Tests for a set of atoms and small molecules show that within our local-hybrid form accurate binding energies can be achieved by proper optimization of the free parameter in our functional, along with an improvement in dissociation energy curves and in Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. However, the correspondence of the latter to experimental ionization potentials is not yet satisfactory, and if we choose to optimize their prediction, a rather different value of the functional's parameter is obtained. We put this finding in a larger context by discussing similar observations for other functionals and possible directions for further functional development that our findings suggest

  13. Fiber-optic intra-aortic balloon therapy and its role within cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarham, G; Clements, A; Morris, C; Cumberland, T; Bryan, M; Oliver, M; Burrows, H; Mulholland, J

    2013-03-01

    The patient population has changed and the cardiothoracic team are now operating on patients with more co-morbidity. One of the significant aspects of this increased co-morbidity, which affects both short- and long-term outcomes, is compromised left ventricular function. Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) technology offers these patients and the cardiac team an easily accessible, cost-effective, mechanical assist device. Arterial pressure monitoring for IABP therapy: Fluid-filled transducers used to measure the aortic waveform can be unreliable and inconsistent. Fiber-optic manometers located in the very tip of the IAB catheters provide accurate and fast, high quality measurements. This, in turn, presents the opportunity for the hardware and algorithm to measure key markers on the arterial waveform and optimise left ventricular support. It also provides the potential for automatic in vivo calibration, further increasing the accuracy and quality of the IAB support. The effect of fiber-optic IABP therapy on clinical management: A dual centre prospective audit comparing fluid-filled versus fiber-optic arterial pressure monitoring showed a 96% reduction in IAB-related perfusion on-site call-outs (17 vs. 1, respectively) and a 94% reduction in sub-optimal timing (55/98 vs. 2/94, respectively). The improved timing algorithms utilise the pressure information received 50 msecs faster than with fluid-filled transducers, measuring key markers on the pressure waveform and adjusting inflation and deflation accurately on a beat per beat basis. Fiber-optic IAB technology and, specifically, these improved algorithms provide better beat per beat mechanical support. Given our evolving patient population, this technology will not only play an increased role, but will have a significant impact on cardiac surgery.

  14. Multimodality imaging to guide cardiac interventional procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, Laurens Franciscus

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, a number of new cardiac interventional procedures have been introduced. Catheter ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) have been refined and are now considered a good treatment option in patients with drug-refractory AF. In cardiac pacing, cardiac resynchronization

  15. [Cardiac involvement in Churg-Strauss syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucato, Antonio; Maestroni, Silvia; Masciocco, Gabriella; Ammirati, Enrico; Bonacina, Edgardo; Pedrotti, Patrizia

    2015-09-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome, recently renamed eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), is a rare form of systemic vasculitis, characterized by disseminated necrotizing vasculitis with extravascular granulomas occurring among patients with asthma and tissue eosinophilia. EGPA is classified as a small and medium-sized vessel vasculitis associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and the hypereosinophilic syndrome. Typical clinical features include asthma, sinusitis, transient pulmonary infiltrates and neuropathy. Blood eosinophils are often >1500/µl or more than 10% on the differential leukocyte count. Blood eosinophils should always be tested in unexplained cardiac disorders, and may normalize even after low doses of corticosteroids. ANCA are positive in 40-60% of cases, mainly anti-myeloperoxidase. Heart involvement occurs in approximately 15-60% of EGPA patients, especially those who are ANCA negative. Any cardiac structure can be involved, and patients present with myocarditis, heart failure, pericarditis, arrhythmia, coronary arteritis, valvulopathy, intracavitary cardiac thrombosis. Although cardiovascular involvement is usually an early manifestation, it can also occur later in the course of the disease. A significant proportion of patients with cardiac involvement is asymptomatic. In the absence of symptoms and major ECG abnormalities, cardiac involvement may be detected in nearly 40% of the patients. All patients with EGPA should be studied not only with a detailed history of cardiac symptoms and ECG, but also with echocardiography; if abnormalities are detected, a cardiac magnetic resonance study should be performed. Coronary angiography and endomyocardial biopsy should be reserved to selected cases. Heart involvement carries a poor prognosis and causes 50% of the deaths of these patients. It is often insidious and underestimated. Optimal therapy is therefore important and based on high-dose corticosteroids plus immunosuppressive

  16. Design of a hybrid model for cardiac arrhythmia classification based on Daubechies wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Rekha; Ranganathan, Vidhyapriya

    2018-06-05

    Automation in cardiac arrhythmia classification helps medical professionals make accurate decisions about the patient's health. The aim of this work was to design a hybrid classification model to classify cardiac arrhythmias. The design phase of the classification model comprises the following stages: preprocessing of the cardiac signal by eliminating detail coefficients that contain noise, feature extraction through Daubechies wavelet transform, and arrhythmia classification using a collaborative decision from the K nearest neighbor classifier (KNN) and a support vector machine (SVM). The proposed model is able to classify 5 arrhythmia classes as per the ANSI/AAMI EC57: 1998 classification standard. Level 1 of the proposed model involves classification using the KNN and the classifier is trained with examples from all classes. Level 2 involves classification using an SVM and is trained specifically to classify overlapped classes. The final classification of a test heartbeat pertaining to a particular class is done using the proposed KNN/SVM hybrid model. The experimental results demonstrated that the average sensitivity of the proposed model was 92.56%, the average specificity 99.35%, the average positive predictive value 98.13%, the average F-score 94.5%, and the average accuracy 99.78%. The results obtained using the proposed model were compared with the results of discriminant, tree, and KNN classifiers. The proposed model is able to achieve a high classification accuracy.

  17. Myocardial ischaemia and the cardiac nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A

    1999-01-01

    The intrinsic cardiac nervous system has been classically considered to contain only parasympathetic efferent postganglionic neurones which receive inputs from medullary parasympathetic efferent preganglionic neurones. In such a view, intrinsic cardiac ganglia act as simple relay stations of parasympathetic efferent neuronal input to the heart, the major autonomic control of the heart purported to reside solely in the brainstem and spinal cord. Data collected over the past two decades indicate that processing occurs within the mammalian intrinsic cardiac nervous system which involves afferent neurones, local circuit neurones (interconnecting neurones) as well as both sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent postganglionic neurones. As such, intrinsic cardiac ganglionic interactions represent the organ component of the hierarchy of intrathoracic nested feedback control loops which provide rapid and appropriate reflex coordination of efferent autonomic neuronal outflow to the heart. In such a concept, the intrinsic cardiac nervous system acts as a distributive processor, integrating parasympathetic and sympathetic efferent centrifugal information to the heart in addition to centripetal information arising from cardiac sensory neurites. A number of neurochemicals have been shown to influence the interneuronal interactions which occur within the intrathoracic cardiac nervous system. For instance, pharmacological interventions that modify beta-adrenergic or angiotensin II receptors affect cardiomyocyte function not only directly, but indirectly by influencing the capacity of intrathoracic neurones to regulate cardiomyocytes. Thus, current pharmacological management of heart disease may influence cardiomyocyte function directly as well as indirectly secondary to modifying the cardiac nervous system. This review presents a brief summary of developing concepts about the role of the cardiac nervous system in regulating the normal heart. In addition, it provides some

  18. Network interactions within the canine intrinsic cardiac nervous system: implications for reflex control of regional cardiac function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Eric; Salavatian, Siamak; Southerland, E Marie; Vinet, Alain; Jacquemet, Vincent; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the study were to determine how aggregates of intrinsic cardiac (IC) neurons transduce the cardiovascular milieu versus responding to changes in central neuronal drive and to determine IC network interactions subsequent to induced neural imbalances in the genesis of atrial fibrillation (AF). Activity from multiple IC neurons in the right atrial ganglionated plexus was recorded in eight anaesthetized canines using a 16-channel linear microelectrode array. Induced changes in IC neuronal activity were evaluated in response to: (1) focal cardiac mechanical distortion; (2) electrical activation of cervical vagi or stellate ganglia; (3) occlusion of the inferior vena cava or thoracic aorta; (4) transient ventricular ischaemia, and (5) neurally induced AF. Low level activity (ranging from 0 to 2.7 Hz) generated by 92 neurons was identified in basal states, activities that displayed functional interconnectivity. The majority (56%) of IC neurons so identified received indirect central inputs (vagus alone: 25%; stellate ganglion alone: 27%; both: 48%). Fifty per cent transduced the cardiac milieu responding to multimodal stressors applied to the great vessels or heart. Fifty per cent of IC neurons exhibited cardiac cycle periodicity, with activity occurring primarily in late diastole into isovolumetric contraction. Cardiac-related activity in IC neurons was primarily related to direct cardiac mechano-sensory inputs and indirect autonomic efferent inputs. In response to mediastinal nerve stimulation, most IC neurons became excessively activated; such network behaviour preceded and persisted throughout AF. It was concluded that stochastic interactions occur among IC local circuit neuronal populations in the control of regional cardiac function. Modulation of IC local circuit neuronal recruitment may represent a novel approach for the treatment of cardiac disease, including atrial arrhythmias. PMID:23818689

  19. Diagnostic value of electron-beam computed tomography (EBT). I. cardiac applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzweiler, C.N.H.; Lembcke, A.; Rogalla, P.; Taupitz, M.; Wiese, T.H.; Hammm, B.; Becker, C.R.; Reiser, M.F.; Felix, R.; Knollmann, F.D.; Georgi, M.; Weisser, G.; Lehmann, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam tomography (EBT) directly competes with other non-invasive imaging modalities, such as multislice computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and echocardiography, in the diagnostic assessment of cardiac diseases. EBT is the gold standard for the detection and quantification of coronary calcium as a preclinical sign of coronary artery disease (CAD). Its standardized examination protocols and the broad experience with this method favor EBT. First results with multislice CT indicate that this new technology may be equivalent to EBT for coronary calcium studies. The principal value of CT-based coronary calcium measurements continues to be an issue of controversy amongst radiologists and cardiologists due to lack of prospective randomized trials. Coronary angiography with EBT is characterized by a high negative predictive value and, in addition, may be indicated in some patients with manifest CAD. It remains to be shown whether coronary angiography with multislice CT is reliable and accurate enough to be introduced into the routine work-up, to replace some of the many strictly diagnostic coronary catheterizations in Germany and elsewhere. Assessment of coronary stent patency with EBT is associated with several problems and in our opinion cannot be advocated as a routine procedure. EBT may be recommended for the evaluation of coronary bypasses to look for bypass occlusions and significant stenoses, which, however, can be equally well achieved with multislice CT. Quantification of myocardial perfusion with EBT could not replace MRI or other modalities in this field. EBT has proven to be accurate, reliable and in some instances equivalent to MRI, which is the gold standard for the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of cardiac function. Some disadvantages not the least of which is the limited distribution of electron beam scanners, favor MRI for functional assessment of the heart. (orig.) [de

  20. Plasma cytokines do not reflect expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine mRNA at organ level after cardiopulmonary bypass in neonatal pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix-Christensen, V.; Vestergaard, C.; Chew, M.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Plasma concentrations of inflammatory markers are increased in response to the trauma of cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). It is, however, unknown whether the plasma cytokine levels and cytokine mRNA expression at organ level reflect each other. Methods: Twenty...

  1. Development and Psychometric Validation of HIPER-Q to Assess Knowledge of Hypertensive Patients in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rafaella Zulianello Dos; Bonin, Christiani Decker Batista; Martins, Eliara Ten Caten; Pereira Junior, Moacir; Ghisi, Gabriela Lima de Melo; Macedo, Kassia Rosangela Paz de; Benetti, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    The absence of instruments capable of measuring the level of knowledge of hypertensive patients in cardiac rehabilitation programs about their disease reflects the lack of specific recommendations for these patients. To develop and validate a questionnaire to evaluate the knowledge of hypertensive patients in cardiac rehabilitation programs about their disease. A total of 184 hypertensive patients (mean age 60.5 ± 10 years, 66.8% men) were evaluated. Reproducibility was assessed by calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficient using the test-retest method. Internal consistency was assessed by the Cronbach's alpha and the construct validity by the exploratory factorial analysis. The final version of the instrument had 17 questions organized in areas considered important for patient education. The instrument proposed showed a clarity index of 8.7 (0.25). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.804 and the Cronbach's correlation coefficient was 0.648. Factor analysis revealed five factors associated with knowledge areas. Regarding the criterion validity, patients with higher education level and higher family income showed greater knowledge about hypertension. The instrument has a satisfactory clarity index and adequate validity, and can be used to evaluate the knowledge of hypertensive participants in cardiac rehabilitation programs.

  2. Point of care hematocrit and hemoglobin in cardiac surgery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Gerard J; Browne, Joe

    2007-05-01

    The use of point-of-care blood gas analyzers in cardiac surgery has been on the increase over the past decade. The availability of these analyzers in the operating room and post-operative intensive care units eliminates the time delays to transport samples to the main laboratory and reduces the amount of blood sampled to measure such parameters as electrolytes, blood gases, lactates, glucose and hemoglobin/hematocrit. Point-of-care analyzers also lead to faster and more reliable clinical decisions while the patient is still on the heart lung machine. Point-of-care devices were designed to provide safe, appropriate and consistent care of those patients in need of rapid acid/base balance and electrolyte management in the clinical setting. As a result, clinicians rely on their values to make decisions regarding ventilation, acid/base management, transfusion and glucose management. Therefore, accuracy and reliability are an absolute must for these bedside analyzers in both the cardiac operating room and the post-op intensive care units. Clinicians have a choice of two types of technology to measure hemoglobin/hematocrit during bypass, which subsequently determines their patient's level of hemodilution, as well as their transfusion threshold. All modern point-of-care blood gas analyzers measure hematocrit using a technology called conductivity, while other similar devices measure hemoglobin using a technology called co-oximetry. The two methods are analyzed and compared in this review. The literature indicates that using conductivity to measure hematocrit during and after cardiac surgery could produce inaccurate results when hematocrits are less than 30%, and, therefore, result in unnecessary homologous red cell transfusions in some patients. These inaccuracies are influenced by several factors that are common and unique to cardiopulmonary bypass, and will also be reviewed here. It appears that the only accurate, consistent and reliable method to determine hemodilution

  3. Neuromuscular diseases after cardiac transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateen, Farrah J.; van de Beek, Diederik; Kremers, Walter K.; Daly, Richard C.; Edwards, Brooks S.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.; Wijdicks, Eelco F. M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac transplantation is a therapeutic option in end-stage heart failure. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) disease is known to occur in cardiac transplant recipients but has not been fully characterized. METHODS: This retrospective cohort review reports the PNS-related concerns of 313

  4. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  5. High-sensitivity detection of cardiac troponin I with UV LED excitation for use in point-of-care immunoassay

    OpenAIRE

    Rodenko, Olga; Eriksson, Susann; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Troldborg, Carl Peder; Fodgaard, Henrik; van Os, Sylvana; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    High-sensitivity cardiac troponin assay development enables determination of biological variation in healthy populations, more accurate interpretation of clinical results and points towards earlier diagnosis and rule-out of acute myocardial infarction. In this paper, we report on preliminary tests of an immunoassay analyzer employing an optimized LED excitation to measure on a standard troponin I and a novel research high-sensitivity troponin I assay. The limit of detection is improved by fac...

  6. FET-biosensor for cardiac troponin biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Arshad Mohd Khairuddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myocardial infarction or myocardial infarction (MI is a major health problem, due to diminished flow of blood to the heart, leads to higher rates of mortality and morbidity. The most specific markers for cardiac injury are cardiac troponin I (cTnI and cardiac troponin T (cTnT which have been considered as ‘gold standard’. Due to higher specificity, determination of the level of cardiac troponins became a predominant indicator for MI. Currently, field-effect transistor (FET-based biosensors have been main interest to be implemented in portable sensors with the ultimate application in point-of-care testing (POCT. In this paper, we review on the FET-based biosensor based on its principle of operation, integration with nanomaterial, surface functionalization as well as immobilization, and the introduction of additional gate (for ambipolar conduction on the device architecture for the detection of cardiac troponin I (cTnI biomarker.

  7. A case of multiple cardiac calcified amorphous tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit Chowdhary

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac calcified amorphous tumours of the heart are rare non-neoplastic cardiac masses that can present like a malignant mass or an intra-cardiac thrombus. We report an extremely unusual case of a 73 year old man who presented to hospital with dyspnoea and subsequent investigations revealed multiple cardiac CATs.

  8. Cardiac pacing systems and implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs): a radiological perspective of equipment, anatomy and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burney, K. E-mail: apqz59@dsl.pipex.comk1511@hotmail.com; Burchard, F.; Papouchado, M.; Wilde, P

    2004-08-01

    Cardiac pacing is a proven and effective treatment in the management of many cardiac arrhythmias. Implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) are beneficial for certain patient groups with a history of serious, recurrent ventricular dysrhythmias, with a high risk of sudden cardiac death. Pacemaker devices take many forms and are highly visible on the chest radiograph. The radiographic appearances of ICDs and pacemakers can be similar and are subject to similar complications. The anatomical approach to the implantation, the type of device used and anatomical variations will all affect the appearance of these devices on the chest film. Pacemaker complications identified radiographically include pneumothorax, lead malpositioning, lead displacement or fracture, fracture of outer conductor coil, loose connection between the lead and pacemaker connector block, lack of redundant loops in paediatric patients and excessive manipulation of the device by the patient (Twiddler's syndrome). This pictorial review highlights the role of chest radiography in the diagnosis of post-cardiac pacing and ICD insertion complications, as well as demonstrating the normal appearances of the most frequently implanted devices.

  9. Effect of global cardiac ischemia on human ventricular fibrillation: insights from a multi-scale mechanistic model of the human heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan V Kazbanov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute regional ischemia in the heart can lead to cardiac arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation (VF, which in turn compromise cardiac output and result in secondary global cardiac ischemia. The secondary ischemia may influence the underlying arrhythmia mechanism. A recent clinical study documents the effect of global cardiac ischaemia on the mechanisms of VF. During 150 seconds of global ischemia the dominant frequency of activation decreased, while after reperfusion it increased rapidly. At the same time the complexity of epicardial excitation, measured as the number of epicardical phase singularity points, remained approximately constant during ischemia. Here we perform numerical studies based on these clinical data and propose explanations for the observed dynamics of the period and complexity of activation patterns. In particular, we study the effects on ischemia in pseudo-1D and 2D cardiac tissue models as well as in an anatomically accurate model of human heart ventricles. We demonstrate that the fall of dominant frequency in VF during secondary ischemia can be explained by an increase in extracellular potassium, while the increase during reperfusion is consistent with washout of potassium and continued activation of the ATP-dependent potassium channels. We also suggest that memory effects are responsible for the observed complexity dynamics. In addition, we present unpublished clinical results of individual patient recordings and propose a way of estimating extracellular potassium and activation of ATP-dependent potassium channels from these measurements.

  10. Cardiac imaging. A multimodality approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, Manfred [Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Mainz (Germany); Erbel, Raimund [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Mainz (Germany). Clinic and Polyclinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Barkhausen, Joerg (eds.) [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2009-07-01

    An excellent atlas on modern diagnostic imaging of the heart Written by an interdisciplinary team of experts, Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach features an in-depth introduction to all current imaging modalities for the diagnostic assessment of the heart as well as a clinical overview of cardiac diseases and main indications for cardiac imaging. With a particular emphasis on CT and MRI, the first part of the atlas also covers conventional radiography, echocardiography, angiography and nuclear medicine imaging. Leading specialists demonstrate the latest advances in the field, and compare the strengths and weaknesses of each modality. The book's second part features clinical chapters on heart defects, endocarditis, coronary heart disease, cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, cardiac tumors, pericardial diseases, pulmonary vascular diseases, and diseases of the thoracic aorta. The authors address anatomy, pathophysiology, and clinical features, and evaluate the various diagnostic options. Key features: - Highly regarded experts in cardiology and radiology off er image-based teaching of the latest techniques - Readers learn how to decide which modality to use for which indication - Visually highlighted tables and essential points allow for easy navigation through the text - More than 600 outstanding images show up-to-date technology and current imaging protocols Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach is a must-have desk reference for cardiologists and radiologists in practice, as well as a study guide for residents in both fields. It will also appeal to cardiac surgeons, general practitioners, and medical physicists with a special interest in imaging of the heart. (orig.)

  11. Occurrence and Magnitude of High Reflectance Materials on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuno, R. G.; Boyd, A. K.; Robinson, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    We utilize a Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) 643 nm photometrically normalized (30°, 0°, 30°; i, e, g) reflectance map to investigate the occurrence and origin of high reflectance materials on the Moon. Compositional differences (mainly iron and titanium content) and maturity state (e.g. Copernican crater rays and swirls) are the predominant factors affecting reflectance variations observed on the Moon. Therefore, comparing reflectance values of different regions yields insight into the composition and relative exposure age of lunar materials. But an accurate comparison requires precise reflectance values normalized across every region being investigated. The WAC [1] obtains monthly near-global ground coverage, each month's observations acquired with different lighting conditions. Boyd et al. [2] utilized a geologically homogeneous subset [0°N to 90°N, 146°E to 148°E] of the WAC observations to determine an equation that describes how viewing and lighting angles affect reflectance values. A normalized global reflectance map was generated by applying the local empirical solution globally, with photometric angles derived from the WAC Global Lunar Digital Terrain Model (DTM)(GLD100) [3]. The GLD100 enables accurate correction of reflectance differences caused by local topographic undulations at the scale of 300 meters. We compare reflectance values across the Moon within 80°S to 80°N latitude. The features with the highest reflectance are steep crater walls within Copernican aged craters, such as the walls of Giordano Bruno, which have normalized reflectance values up to 0.35. Near-impact ejecta of some craters have high reflectance values, such as Virtanen (0.22). There are also broad relatively flat features with high reflectance, such as the 900-km Thales-Compton region (0.24) and the 600-km extent of Anaxagoras (Copernican age) ejecta (0.20). Since the interior of Anaxagoras contains occurrences of pure anorthosite [4], the high

  12. Cardiac stress test as a risk-stratification tool for posttransplant cardiac outcomes in diabetic kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neeraj; Parikh, Samir; Bhatt, Udayan; Vonvisger, Jon; Nori, Uday; Hasan, Ayesha; Samavedi, Srinivas; Andreoni, Kenneth; Henry, Mitchell; Pelletier, Ronald; Rajab, Amer; Elkhammas, Elmahdi; Pesavento, Todd

    2012-12-27

    The utility of cardiac stress testing as a risk-stratification tool before kidney transplantation remains debatable owing to discordance with coronary angiography and outcome yields at different centers. We conducted a retrospective study of 273 diabetic kidney transplant recipients from 2006 to 2010. By protocol, all diabetic patients underwent pharmacological radionucleotide stress test or dobutamine stress echocardiography before transplant. We compared the 1-year cardiac outcomes between those with negative stress test results and those with positive stress test results. Patients with a positive stress test result (n=67) underwent coronary angiogram, and significant coronary artery disease (≥70% coronary stenosis) was found in 35 (52.2%) patients. Of the latter, 32 (91.4%) underwent cardiac revascularization (24 underwent cardiac stenting and 8 underwent coronary artery bypass grafting). The rest (n=35) were treated medically. Within 1 year after transplant, the group with positive stress test results experienced more cardiac events (34.3% vs. 3.9%, P<0.001) including acute myocardial infarction (22.4% vs. 3.4%, P<0.001) and ventricular arrhythmias (8.9% vs. 0.05%, P=0.001), higher all-cause mortality (19.4% vs. 4.8%, P<0.001), and cardiac mortality (17.9% vs. 0.9%, P<0.001) compared with the group with negative stress test results. In this diabetic population, stress testing showed positive and negative predictive values of 34.3% and 96.1%, respectively. Pharmacological cardiac stress testing provided excellent risk stratification in diabetic kidney transplant recipients.

  13. Use of 3D Printed Models in Medical Education: A Randomized Control Trial Comparing 3D Prints versus Cadaveric Materials for Learning External Cardiac Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kah Heng Alexander; Loo, Zhou Yaw; Goldie, Stephen J.; Adams, Justin W.; McMenamin, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an emerging technology capable of readily producing accurate anatomical models, however, evidence for the use of 3D prints in medical education remains limited. A study was performed to assess their effectiveness against cadaveric materials for learning external cardiac anatomy. A double blind randomized…

  14. Pathological links between stroke and cardiac arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaila Ghanekar; Sydney Corey; Trenton Lippert; Cesar V.Borlongan

    2017-01-01

    There may be a pathological connection between cardiac failure and ischemic stroke.In this article we describe pertinent research that demonstrates subsequent death of cardiac and neural myocytes in the post ischemic stroke brain.Current stroke therapy overlooks the connection between cardiac and cerebrovascular events and fails to address the shared risk factors.Current pre-clinical stroke investigations have provided evidence that suggests the presence of an indirect cell death pathway in which toxic molecules emanate from the stroke brain and trigger cardiac cell death.On the other hand,other studies highlight the presence of a reverse cell death cascade in which toxic molecules from the heart,following cardiac arrest,travel to the brain and induce ischemic cell death.Further examination of these putative cell death pathways between ischemic stroke and cardiac arrest will prompt the advancement of innovative treatments specifically targeting both diseases,leading to ameliorated clinical results of patients diagnosed with heart failure and ischemic stroke.

  15. The definition of exertion-related cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, M; Thompson, P D

    2011-02-01

    Vigorous physical activity increases the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) but there is no standard definition as to what constitutes an exertion-related cardiac event, specifically the time interval between physical exertion and cardiac event. A systematic review of studies related to exertion-related cardiac events was performed and the time interval between exertion and the event or the symptoms leading to the event was looked for in all the articles selected for inclusion. A total of 12 of 26 articles "suggested" or "defined" exertion-related events as those events whose symptoms started during or within 1 h of exertion. Others used definitions of 0.5 h, 2 h, "during exertion", "during or immediately post exertion" and "during or within several hours after exertion". It is suggested, therefore, that the definition of an exertion-related cardiac event be established as a cardiac event in which symptoms started during or within 1 h of physical exertion.

  16. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  17. Radiation exposure during cardiac catheterization procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kicken, P.J.H.; Huyskens, C.J.; Michels, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    For some time there has been an increased interest in more information about radiation exposure during cardiac catheterization because of: relatively high doses to workers and patient; rapid increase of numbers of examinations; introduction of new procedure-types (e.g. Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angiography, PTCA) and introduction of new techniques (e.g. Digital Subtraction Angiography, DSA). This paper reports about a study on the exposure to medical personnel and patient in two major hospitals in the Netherlands. The Total number of cardiac catheterization procedures in both hospitals amounts to circa 3000 per year (approximately 10% of all cardiac procedures c.q. 20% of all PTCA procedures in the Netherlands). This study is related to 1300 cardiac examinations

  18. Incidental Cardiac Findings on Thoracic Imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kok, Hong Kuan

    2013-02-07

    The cardiac structures are well seen on nongated thoracic computed tomography studies in the investigation and follow-up of cardiopulmonary disease. A wide variety of findings can be incidentally picked up on careful evaluation of the pericardium, cardiac chambers, valves, and great vessels. Some of these findings may represent benign variants, whereas others may have more profound clinical importance. Furthermore, the expansion of interventional and surgical practice has led to the development and placement of new cardiac stents, implantable pacemaker devices, and prosthetic valves with which the practicing radiologist should be familiar. We present a collection of common incidental cardiac findings that can be readily identified on thoracic computed tomography studies and briefly discuss their clinical relevance.

  19. An update on insertable cardiac monitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming J; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Krieger, Derk W

    2015-01-01

    Continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring has undergone compelling progress over the past decades. Cardiac monitoring has emerged from 12-lead electrocardiograms being performed at the discretion of the treating physician to in-hospital telemetry, Holter monitoring, prolonged external event monitoring...... turning point in the field of arrhythmia management. However, their role in the detection of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation after cryptogenic strokes has yet to evolve. This will be the main focus of this review. Issues surrounding patient selection, clinical relevance and determination of cost......-effectiveness for prolonged cardiac monitoring require further studies. Furthermore, insertable cardiac monitoring has not only the potential to augment diagnostic capabilities but also to improve the management of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation....

  20. Cardiac output measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Möller Petrun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, developments in the measuring of cardiac output and other haemodynamic variables are focused on the so-called minimally invasive methods. The aim of these methods is to simplify the management of high-risk and haemodynamically unstable patients. Due to the need of invasive approach and the possibility of serious complications the use of pulmonary artery catheter has decreased. This article describes the methods for measuring cardiac output, which are based on volume measurement (Fick method, indicator dilution method, pulse wave analysis, Doppler effect, and electrical bioimpedance.

  1. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... magnesium. These minerals help your heart's electrical system work. Abnormally high or low levels can cause cardiac arrest. Severe physical stress. Anything that causes a severe stress on your ...

  2. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of the items and services furnished under the plan. (iii) The goals set for the individual under the... prescribed exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, psychosocial assessment, and outcomes assessment... section. Intensive cardiac rehabilitation site means a hospital outpatient setting or physician's office...

  3. A Comparison of a Machine Learning Model with EuroSCORE II in Predicting Mortality after Elective Cardiac Surgery: A Decision Curve Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allyn, Jérôme; Allou, Nicolas; Augustin, Pascal; Philip, Ivan; Martinet, Olivier; Belghiti, Myriem; Provenchere, Sophie; Montravers, Philippe; Ferdynus, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    The benefits of cardiac surgery are sometimes difficult to predict and the decision to operate on a given individual is complex. Machine Learning and Decision Curve Analysis (DCA) are recent methods developed to create and evaluate prediction models. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using a prospective collected database from December 2005 to December 2012, from a cardiac surgical center at University Hospital. The different models of prediction of mortality in-hospital after elective cardiac surgery, including EuroSCORE II, a logistic regression model and a machine learning model, were compared by ROC and DCA. Of the 6,520 patients having elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, 6.3% died. Mean age was 63.4 years old (standard deviation 14.4), and mean EuroSCORE II was 3.7 (4.8) %. The area under ROC curve (IC95%) for the machine learning model (0.795 (0.755-0.834)) was significantly higher than EuroSCORE II or the logistic regression model (respectively, 0.737 (0.691-0.783) and 0.742 (0.698-0.785), p machine learning model, in this monocentric study, has a greater benefit whatever the probability threshold. According to ROC and DCA, machine learning model is more accurate in predicting mortality after elective cardiac surgery than EuroSCORE II. These results confirm the use of machine learning methods in the field of medical prediction.

  4. Nppa and Nppb act redundantly during zebrafish cardiac development to confine AVC marker expression and reduce cardiac jelly volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassini, Daniela R; Lagendijk, Anne K; De Angelis, Jessica E; Da Silva, Jason; Jeanes, Angela; Zettler, Nicole; Bower, Neil I; Hogan, Benjamin M; Smith, Kelly A

    2018-05-11

    Atrial natriuretic peptide ( nppa/anf ) and brain natriuretic peptide ( nppb/bnp ) form a gene cluster with expression in the chambers of the developing heart. Despite restricted expression, a function in cardiac development has not been demonstrated by mutant analysis. This is attributed to functional redundancy however their genomic location in cis has impeded formal analysis. Using genome-editing, we generated mutants for nppa and nppb and found single mutants indistinguishable from wildtype whereas nppa / nppb double mutants display heart morphogenesis defects and pericardial oedema. Analysis of atrioventricular canal (AVC) markers show expansion of bmp4 , tbx2b, has2 and versican expression into the atrium of double mutants. This expanded expression correlates with increased extracellular matrix in the atrium. Using a biosensor for Hyaluronic acid to measure the cardiac jelly (cardiac extracellular matrix), we confirm cardiac jelly expansion in nppa / nppb double mutants. Finally, bmp4 knockdown rescues the expansion of has2 expression and cardiac jelly in double mutants. This definitively shows that nppa and nppb function redundantly during cardiac development to restrict gene expression to the AVC, preventing excessive cardiac jelly synthesis in the atrial chamber. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Segmentation of left ventricle myocardium in porcine cardiac cine MR images using a hybrid of fully convolutional neural networks and convolutional LSTM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongqing; Icke, Ilknur; Dogdas, Belma; Parimal, Sarayu; Sampath, Smita; Forbes, Joseph; Bagchi, Ansuman; Chin, Chih-Liang; Chen, Antong

    2018-03-01

    In the development of treatments for cardiovascular diseases, short axis cardiac cine MRI is important for the assessment of various structural and functional properties of the heart. In short axis cardiac cine MRI, Cardiac properties including the ventricle dimensions, stroke volume, and ejection fraction can be extracted based on accurate segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) myocardium. One of the most advanced segmentation methods is based on fully convolutional neural networks (FCN) and can be successfully used to do segmentation in cardiac cine MRI slices. However, the temporal dependency between slices acquired at neighboring time points is not used. Here, based on our previously proposed FCN structure, we proposed a new algorithm to segment LV myocardium in porcine short axis cardiac cine MRI by incorporating convolutional long short-term memory (Conv-LSTM) to leverage the temporal dependency. In this approach, instead of processing each slice independently in a conventional CNN-based approach, the Conv-LSTM architecture captures the dynamics of cardiac motion over time. In a leave-one-out experiment on 8 porcine specimens (3,600 slices), the proposed approach was shown to be promising by achieving average mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.84, Hausdorff distance (HD) of 6.35 mm, and average perpendicular distance (APD) of 1.09 mm when compared with manual segmentations, which improved the performance of our previous FCN-based approach (average mean DSC=0.84, HD=6.78 mm, and APD=1.11 mm). Qualitatively, our model showed robustness against low image quality and complications in the surrounding anatomy due to its ability to capture the dynamics of cardiac motion.

  6. Pediatric cardiac postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. José Otávio Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo, Medical School is a referral center for the treatment of congenital heart diseases of neonates and infants. In the recent years, the excellent surgical results obtained in our institution may be in part due to modern anesthetic care and to postoperative care based on well-structured protocols. The purpose of this article is to review unique aspects of neonate cardiovascular physiology, the impact of extracorporeal circulation on postoperative evolution, and the prescription for pharmacological support of acute cardiac dysfunction based on our cardiac unit protocols. The main causes of low cardiac output after surgical correction of heart congenital disease are reviewed, and methods of treatment and support are proposed as derived from the relevant literature and our protocols.

  7. CARFMAP: A Curated Pathway Map of Cardiac Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieu T Nim

    Full Text Available The adult mammalian heart contains multiple cell types that work in unison under tightly regulated conditions to maintain homeostasis. Cardiac fibroblasts are a significant and unique population of non-muscle cells in the heart that have recently gained substantial interest in the cardiac biology community. To better understand this renaissance cell, it is essential to systematically survey what has been known in the literature about the cellular and molecular processes involved. We have built CARFMAP (http://visionet.erc.monash.edu.au/CARFMAP, an interactive cardiac fibroblast pathway map derived from the biomedical literature using a software-assisted manual data collection approach. CARFMAP is an information-rich interactive tool that enables cardiac biologists to explore the large body of literature in various creative ways. There is surprisingly little overlap between the cardiac fibroblast pathway map, a foreskin fibroblast pathway map, and a whole mouse organism signalling pathway map from the REACTOME database. Among the use cases of CARFMAP is a common task in our cardiac biology laboratory of identifying new genes that are (1 relevant to cardiac literature, and (2 differentially regulated in high-throughput assays. From the expression profiles of mouse cardiac and tail fibroblasts, we employed CARFMAP to characterise cardiac fibroblast pathways. Using CARFMAP in conjunction with transcriptomic data, we generated a stringent list of six genes that would not have been singled out using bioinformatics analyses alone. Experimental validation showed that five genes (Mmp3, Il6, Edn1, Pdgfc and Fgf10 are differentially regulated in the cardiac fibroblast. CARFMAP is a powerful tool for systems analyses of cardiac fibroblasts, facilitating systems-level cardiovascular research.

  8. CARFMAP: A Curated Pathway Map of Cardiac Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nim, Hieu T; Furtado, Milena B; Costa, Mauro W; Kitano, Hiroaki; Rosenthal, Nadia A; Boyd, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    The adult mammalian heart contains multiple cell types that work in unison under tightly regulated conditions to maintain homeostasis. Cardiac fibroblasts are a significant and unique population of non-muscle cells in the heart that have recently gained substantial interest in the cardiac biology community. To better understand this renaissance cell, it is essential to systematically survey what has been known in the literature about the cellular and molecular processes involved. We have built CARFMAP (http://visionet.erc.monash.edu.au/CARFMAP), an interactive cardiac fibroblast pathway map derived from the biomedical literature using a software-assisted manual data collection approach. CARFMAP is an information-rich interactive tool that enables cardiac biologists to explore the large body of literature in various creative ways. There is surprisingly little overlap between the cardiac fibroblast pathway map, a foreskin fibroblast pathway map, and a whole mouse organism signalling pathway map from the REACTOME database. Among the use cases of CARFMAP is a common task in our cardiac biology laboratory of identifying new genes that are (1) relevant to cardiac literature, and (2) differentially regulated in high-throughput assays. From the expression profiles of mouse cardiac and tail fibroblasts, we employed CARFMAP to characterise cardiac fibroblast pathways. Using CARFMAP in conjunction with transcriptomic data, we generated a stringent list of six genes that would not have been singled out using bioinformatics analyses alone. Experimental validation showed that five genes (Mmp3, Il6, Edn1, Pdgfc and Fgf10) are differentially regulated in the cardiac fibroblast. CARFMAP is a powerful tool for systems analyses of cardiac fibroblasts, facilitating systems-level cardiovascular research.

  9. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw…

  10. Lentiginosis, Deafness and Cardiac Abnormalities*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... His height. mass. intelligence and genitalia were normal. The aSSOCiatIOn between deafness and disturbance of cardiac conduction and between pigmented skin lesions and cardiac abnormalities, has been well described. Should. ~I patient present with multiple lentigines and/or familial sensineural ...

  11. Low to high frequency ratio of heart rate variability spectra fails to describe sympatho-vagal balance in cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milicević, Goran

    2005-06-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects an influence of autonomic nervous system on heart work. In healthy subjects, ratio between low and high frequency components (LF/HF ratio) of HRV spectra represents a measure of sympatho-vagal balance. The ratio was defined by the authorities as an useful clinical tool, but it seems that it fails to summarise sympatho-vagal balance in a clinical setting. Value of the method was re-evaluated in several categories of cardiac patients. HRV was analysed from 24-hour Holter ECGs in 132 healthy subjects, and 2159 cardiac patients dichotomised by gender, median of age, diagnosis of myocardial infarction or coronary artery surgery, left ventricular systolic function and divided by overall HRV into several categories. In healthy subjects, LF/HF ratio correlated with overall HRV negatively, as expected. The paradoxical finding was obtained in cardiac patients; the lower the overall HRV and the time-domain indices of vagal modulation activity were the lower the LF/HF ratio was. If used as a measure of sympatho-vagal balance, long-term recordings of LF/HF ratio contradict to clinical finding and time-domain HRV indices in cardiac patients. The ratio cannot therefore be used as a reliable marker of autonomic activity in a clinical setting.

  12. Dynamic and quantitative evaluation of degenerative mitral valve disease: a dedicated framework based on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturla, Francesco; Onorati, Francesco; Puppini, Giovanni; Pappalardo, Omar A; Selmi, Matteo; Votta, Emiliano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Redaelli, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Accurate quantification of mitral valve (MV) morphology and dynamic behavior over the cardiac cycle is crucial to understand the mechanisms of degenerative MV dysfunction and to guide the surgical intervention. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging has progressively been adopted to evaluate MV pathophysiology, although a dedicated framework is required to perform a quantitative assessment of the functional MV anatomy. We investigated MV dynamic behavior in subjects with normal MV anatomy (n=10) and patients referred to surgery due to degenerative MV prolapse, classified as fibro-elastic deficiency (FED, n=9) and Barlow's disease (BD, n=10). A CMR-dedicated framework was adopted to evaluate prolapse height and volume and quantitatively assess valvular morphology and papillary muscles (PAPs) function over the cardiac cycle. Multiple comparison was used to investigate the hallmarks associated to MV degenerative prolapse and evaluate the feasibility of anatomical and functional distinction between FED and BD phenotypes. On average, annular dimensions were significantly (Pframework allows for the quantitative and dynamic evaluation of MV apparatus, with quantifiable annular alterations representing the primary hallmark of severe MV degeneration. This may aid surgeons in the evaluation of the severity of MV dysfunction and the selection of the appropriate MV treatment.

  13. Automatic referral to cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jane P

    2008-01-01

    The pervasive negative impact of cardiovascular disease in the United States is well documented. Although advances have been made, the campaign to reduce the occurrence, progression, and mortality continues. Determining evidence-based data is only half the battle. Implementing new and updated clinical guidelines into daily practice is a challenging task. Cardiac rehabilitation is an example of a proven intervention whose benefit is hindered through erratic implementation. The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR), the American College of Cardiology (ACC), and the American Heart Association (AHA) have responded to this problem by publishing the AACVPR/ACC/AHA 2007 Performance Measures on Cardiac Rehabilitation for Referral to and Delivery of Cardiac Rehabilitation/Secondary Prevention Services. This new national guideline recommends automatic referral to cardiac rehabilitation for every eligible patient (performance measure A-1). This article offers guidance for the initiation of an automatic referral system, including individualizing your protocol with regard to electronic or paper-based order entry structures.

  14. Association of morning blood pressure surge with carotid intima-media thickness and cardiac dysfunction in patients with cardiac syndrome-X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Ragab A; Goda, Mohammad; Galal, Islam; Ghareb, Mohamed S

    2018-05-23

    Background & hypothesis: We hypothesized that exaggerated morning blood pressure surge, may contribute in cardiac dysfunction and arterial stiffness in patients with cardiac syndrome X. Thus we investigated the impact of morning blood pressure surge on cardiac function and carotid intima-media thickness in subjects with cardiac syndrome X. We studied patients with cardiac syndrome X using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and investigated the association of morning blood pressure surge with carotid intima thickness, left atrial volume index and left ventricular filling (E/e'). Seventy patients with cardiac syndrome X were enrolled for the study and compared with 70 age and sex matched controls. Patients with cardiac syndrome X were stratified based on the systolic morning blood pressure surge value of control subjects to patients with exaggerated blood pressure surge (n = 42) and those with normal morning blood pressure surge (n = 28). Basal heart rate (p blood pressure surge group than those with morning blood pressure surge group. Morning blood pressure surge was significantly correlated with carotid intima-media thickness, high sensitive C-reactive protein, left atrial volume index and E/e' ratio in patients with cardiac syndrome X. In multivariate analysis, exaggerated morning blood pressure surge was the only independent predictor of increased carotid intima-media thickness (OR = 2.379; p blood pressure surge is an independent predictor for arterial stiffness and diastolic dysfunction in patients with cardiac syndrome X.

  15. Pediatric cardiac emergencies: Children are not small adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frazier Aisha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with adults, cardiac emergencies are infrequent in children and clinical presentation is often quite variable. In adults, cardiac emergencies are most commonly related to complications of coronary artery disease; however, in pediatric cases, the coronaries are only rarely the underlying problem. Pediatric cardiac emergencies comprise a range of pathology including but not limited to undiagnosed congenital heart disease in the infant; complications of palliated congenital heart disease in children; arrhythmias related to underlying cardiac pathology in the teenager and acquired heart disease. The emergency room physician and pediatric intensivist will usually be the first and second lines of care for pediatric cardiac emergencies and thus it is imperative that they have knowledge of the diverse presentations of cardiac disease in order to increase the likelihood of delivering early appropriate therapy and referral. The objective of this review is to outline cardiac emergencies in the pediatric population and contrast the presentation with adults.

  16. Cardiac biomarkers in Neonatology

    OpenAIRE

    Vijlbrief, D.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the role for cardiac biomarkers in neonatology was investigated. Several clinically relevant results were reported. In term and preterm infants, hypoxia and subsequent adaptation play an important role in cardiac biomarker elevation. The elevated natriuretic peptides are indicative of abnormal function; elevated troponins are suggestive for cardiomyocyte damage. This methodology makes these biomarkers of additional value in the treatment of newborn infants, separate or as a co...

  17. Inhibition of Uncoupling Protein 2 Attenuates Cardiac Hypertrophy Induced by Transverse Aortic Constriction in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bing Ji

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 is critical in regulating energy metabolism. Due to the significant change in energy metabolism of myocardium upon pressure overload, we hypothesize that UCP2 could contribute to the etiology of cardiac hypertrophy. Methods: Adult male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to pressure overload by using transverse aortic constriction (TAC, and then received genipin (a UCP2 selective inhibitor; 25 mg/kg/d, ip or vehicle for three weeks prior to histologic assessment of myocardial hypertrophy. ATP concentration, ROS level, and myocardial apoptosis were also examined. A parallel set of experiments was also conducted in UCP2-/- mice. Results: TAC induced left ventricular hypertrophy, as reflected by increased ventricular weight/thickness and increased size of myocardial cell (vs. sham controls. ATP concentration was decreased; ROS level was increased. Apoptosis and fibrosis markers were increased. TAC increased mitochondrial UCP2 expression in the myocardium at both mRNA and protein levels. Genipin treatment attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and the histologic/biochemical changes described above. Hypertrophy and associated changes induced by TAC in UCP2-/- mice were much less pronounced than in WT mice. Conclusions: Blocking UCP2 expression attenuates cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload.

  18. Cardiac sympathetic neuronal imaging using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautamaeki, Riikka; Tipre, Dnyanesh; Bengel, Frank M.

    2007-01-01

    Balance of the autonomic nervous system is essential for adequate cardiac performance, and alterations seem to play a key role in the development and progression of various cardiac diseases. PET imaging of the cardiac autonomic nervous system has advanced extensively in recent years, and multiple pre- and postsynaptic tracers have been introduced. The high spatial and temporal resolution of PET enables noninvasive quantification of neurophysiologic processes at the tissue level. Ligands for catecholamine receptors, along with radiolabeled catecholamines and catecholamine analogs, have been applied to determine involvement of sympathetic dysinnervation at different stages of heart diseases such as ischemia, heart failure, and arrhythmia. This review summarizes the recent findings in neurocardiological PET imaging. Experimental studies with several radioligands and clinical findings in cardiac dysautonomias are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Medical Image of the Week: Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Severe RV Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wickstrom K

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 56-year-old man with history a of alcohol abuse presents with progressive shortness of breath on exertion, bilateral lower extremity swelling and 12-pound weight gain over two weeks. His transthoracic echocardiography (Figure 1 demonstrated severely increased global right ventricle (RV size, severely dilated right atrium (RA, severe pulmonary artery (PA dilation, moderate tricuspid regurgitation (TR and right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP estimated at 85 + central venous pressure (CVP in the context of severely reduced RV systolic function. Right heart catheterization (RHC showed PA pressure (systolic/diastolic, mean of 94/28, 51 mmHg with a PA occlusion pressure of 12 mmHg. After extensive evaluation, our patient’s presentation of right heart failure seemed to be a manifestation of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Our patient subsequently had cardiac MRI (cMRI with findings shown above (Figure 2. CMRI is a valuable, three-dimensional imaging modality that provides detailed morphology of the cardiac chambers along with accurate

  20. Machine Learning of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Engineered Cardiac Tissue Contractility for Automated Drug Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene K. Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurately predicting cardioactive effects of new molecular entities for therapeutics remains a daunting challenge. Immense research effort has been focused toward creating new screening platforms that utilize human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and three-dimensional engineered cardiac tissue constructs to better recapitulate human heart function and drug responses. As these new platforms become increasingly sophisticated and high throughput, the drug screens result in larger multidimensional datasets. Improved automated analysis methods must therefore be developed in parallel to fully comprehend the cellular response across a multidimensional parameter space. Here, we describe the use of machine learning to comprehensively analyze 17 functional parameters derived from force readouts of hPSC-derived ventricular cardiac tissue strips (hvCTS electrically paced at a range of frequencies and exposed to a library of compounds. A generated metric is effective for then determining the cardioactivity of a given drug. Furthermore, we demonstrate a classification model that can automatically predict the mechanistic action of an unknown cardioactive drug.

  1. Intrinsic cardiac nervous system in tachycardia induced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Rakesh C; Cardinal, Rene; Smith, Frank M; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Armour, J Andrew

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that early-stage heart failure differentially affects the intrinsic cardiac nervous system's capacity to regulate cardiac function. After 2 wk of rapid ventricular pacing in nine anesthetized canines, cardiac and right atrial neuronal function were evaluated in situ in response to enhanced cardiac sensory inputs, stimulation of extracardiac autonomic efferent neuronal inputs, and close coronary arterial administration of neurochemicals that included nicotine. Right atrial neuronal intracellular electrophysiological properties were then evaluated in vitro in response to synaptic activation and nicotine. Intrinsic cardiac nicotine-sensitive, neuronally induced cardiac responses were also evaluated in eight sham-operated, unpaced animals. Two weeks of rapid ventricular pacing reduced the cardiac index by 54%. Intrinsic cardiac neurons of paced hearts maintained their cardiac mechano- and chemosensory transduction properties in vivo. They also responded normally to sympathetic and parasympathetic preganglionic efferent neuronal inputs, as well as to locally administered alpha-or beta-adrenergic agonists or angiotensin II. The dose of nicotine needed to modify intrinsic cardiac neurons was 50 times greater in failure compared with normal preparations. That dose failed to alter monitored cardiovascular indexes in failing preparations. Phasic and accommodating neurons identified in vitro displayed altered intracellular membrane properties compared with control, including decreased membrane resistance, indicative of reduced excitability. Early-stage heart failure differentially affects the intrinsic cardiac nervous system's capacity to regulate cardiodynamics. While maintaining its capacity to transduce cardiac mechano- and chemosensory inputs, as well as inputs from extracardiac autonomic efferent neurons, intrinsic cardiac nicotine-sensitive, local-circuit neurons differentially remodel such that their capacity to

  2. [Cardiac sarcoidosis: Diagnosis and therapeutic challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen Aubart, F; Nunes, H; Mathian, A; Haroche, J; Hié, M; Le-Thi Huong Boutin, D; Cluzel, P; Soussan, M; Waintraub, X; Fouret, P; Valeyre, D; Amoura, Z

    2017-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disorder of unknown cause characterized by non-caseating granuloma in young adults. Cardiac involvement is rare and range from 2 to 75% depending on diagnostic criteria. Cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis may be asymptomatic or may manifest as rhythm/conduction troubles or congestive heart failure. The diagnosis and treatment of cardiac sarcoidosis may be challenging. However, advances have come in recent years from the use of cardiac MRI and 18 FDG-TEP scanner, as well as from the stratification of the risk of ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation. Due to the rarity of the disease, there is no reliable prospective large study to guide therapeutic strategy for cardiac sarcoidosis. Corticosteroids are probably efficacious, in particular in case of atrio-ventricular block or moderate heart failure. Immunosuppressive drugs have not been largely studied but methotrexate could be helpful. In refractory forms, TNF-α antagonists have been used with success. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Robotic cardiac surgery: an anaesthetic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Gao, Changqing

    2014-08-01

    Robotic cardiac surgery with the da Vinci robotic surgical system offers the benefits of a minimally invasive procedure, including a smaller incision and scar, reduced risk of infection, less pain and trauma, less bleeding and blood transfusion requirements, shorter hospital stay and decreased recovery time. Robotic cardiac surgery includes extracardiac and intracardiac procedures. Extracardiac procedures are often performed on a beating heart. Intracardiac procedures require the aid of peripheral cardiopulmonary bypass via a minithoracotomy. Robotic cardiac surgery, however, poses challenges to the anaesthetist, as the obligatory one-lung ventilation (OLV) and CO2 insufflation may reduce cardiac output and increase pulmonary vascular resistance, potentially resulting in hypoxaemia and haemodynamic compromise. In addition, surgery requires appropriate positioning of specialised cannulae such as an endopulmonary vent, endocoronary sinus catheter, and endoaortic clamp catheter under the guidance of transoesophageal echocardiography. Therefore, cardiac anaesthetists should have a working knowledge of these systems, OLV and haemodynamic support. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Epworth HealthCare cardiac surgery audit report 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorley, T; Baker, L

    2012-10-01

    2011 is the first year Epworth has contributed to Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons cardiac surgery database. There is now a 30-day follow-up data for all cardiac surgical patients as well as benchmarking of our results with 19 public hospitals and 6 private hospitals contributing data to the Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons. This is an extension of the John Fuller Melbourne University database that has compiled cardiac surgery data for the last 30 years. © 2012 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  5. The potential of cardiac allografts from donors after cardiac death at the University of Wisconsin Organ Procurement Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Satoru; Anderson, James E; Johnson, Maryl R; Edwards, Niloo M; Kohmoto, Takushi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential availability of hearts from adult donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors within an acceptable hypoxic period. We retrospectively reviewed a donor database from the University of Wisconsin Organ Procurement Organization Donor Tracking System between 2004 and 2006. The DCD population (n=78) was screened using our inclusion criteria for DCD cardiac donor suitability, including warm ischaemic time (WIT) limit of 30 min. In the same period, 70 hearts were donated from brain-dead donors. Of 78 DCD donors, 12 (15%) met our proposed DCD cardiac donor criteria. The mean WIT of these 12 DCD donors was 21 min (range 14-29 min). When inclusion criteria are further narrowed to (1) age Based on our proposed DCD cardiac donor criteria, the potential application of DCD cardiac donors would represent an increase in cardiac donation of 17% (12/70) during the 3-year period. When the criteria were narrowed to the initial 'ideal' case, only two donors met such criteria, suggesting that such 'ideal' DCD donors are rare but they do exist. Copyright 2009 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 3D shape measurement of automotive glass by using a fringe reflection technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skydan, O. A.; Lalor, M. J.; Burton, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    In automotive and glass making industries, there is a need for accurately measuring the 3D shapes of reflective surfaces to speed up and ensure product development and manufacturing quality by using non-contact techniques. This paper describes a technique for the measurement of non-full-field reflective surfaces of automotive glass by using a fringe reflection technique. Physical properties of the measurement surfaces do not allow us to apply optical geometries used in existing techniques for surface measurement based upon direct fringe pattern illumination. However, this property of surface reflectivity can be used to implement similar ideas from existing techniques in a new improved method. In other words, the reflective surface can be used as a mirror to reflect illuminated fringe patterns onto a screen behind. It has been found that in the case of implementing the reflective fringe technique, the phase-shift distribution depends not only on the height of the object but also on the slope at each measurement point. This requires the solving of differential equations to find the surface slope and height distributions in the x and y directions and development of the additional height reconstruction algorithms. The main focus has been made on developing a mathematical model of the optical sub-system and discussing ways for its practical implementation including calibration procedures. A number of implemented image processing algorithms for system calibration and data analysis are discussed and two experimental results are given for automotive glass surfaces with different shapes and defects. The proposed technique showed the ability to provide accurate non-destructive measurement of 3D shapes of the reflective automotive glass surfaces and can be used as a key element for a glass shape quality control system on-line or in a laboratory environment.

  7. Cardiac Ochronosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erek, Ersin; Casselman, Filip P.A.; Vanermen, Hugo

    2004-01-01

    We report the case of 67-year-old woman who underwent aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair due to ochronotic valvular disease (alkaptonuria), which was diagnosed incidentally during cardiac surgery. PMID:15745303

  8. STEM promotion through museum exhibits on cardiac monitoring & cardiac rhythm management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Countryman, Jordan D; Dow, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    Formal education in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) does not successfully engage all of the students who have potential to become skilled in STEM activities and careers. Museum exhibits may be able to reach and engage a broader range of the public. STEM Exhibits that are both understandable and capture the imagination of viewers may contribute toward increased interest in STEM activities. One such topic for such an exhibit could be cardiac pacemakers and cardioverter defibrillators that sustain life. Although museums have existed for centuries, the available types of exhibit designs has dramatically increased in recent decades due to innovations in technology. Science and technology museums have especially taken advantage of the progression of exhibit design to developed new ways to communicate to their viewers. These novel presentation tools allow museums to more effectively convey to and engage viewers. This paper examines the techniques employed by museums in exhibits and considers the practices of several museums with exhibits related to cardiac monitoring (CM) and cardiac rhythm management (CRM).

  9. [Monitoring of Crack Propagation in Repaired Structures Based on Characteristics of FBG Sensors Reflecting Spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shen-fang; Jin, Xin; Qiu, Lei; Huang, Hong-mei

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the security of aircraft repaired structures, a method of crack propagation monitoring in repaired structures is put forward basing on characteristics of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) reflecting spectra in this article. With the cyclic loading effecting on repaired structure, cracks propagate, while non-uniform strain field appears nearby the tip of crack which leads to the FBG sensors' reflecting spectra deformations. The crack propagating can be monitored by extracting the characteristics of FBG sensors' reflecting spectral deformations. A finite element model (FEM) of the specimen is established. Meanwhile, the distributions of strains which are under the action of cracks of different angles and lengths are obtained. The characteristics, such as main peak wavelength shift, area of reflecting spectra, second and third peak value and so on, are extracted from the FBGs' reflecting spectral which are calculated by transfer matrix algorithm. An artificial neural network is built to act as the model between the characteristics of the reflecting spectral and the propagation of crack. As a result, the crack propagation of repaired structures is monitored accurately and the error of crack length is less than 0.5 mm, the error of crack angle is less than 5 degree. The accurately monitoring problem of crack propagation of repaired structures is solved by taking use of this method. It has important significance in aircrafts safety improvement and maintenance cost reducing.

  10. Cardiac imaging in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority

  11. Cardiac imaging in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  12. Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein attenuates cardiac hypertrophy by inhibition of ERK1/2 and TGF-β signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Song

    Full Text Available AIMS: It has been reported that cardiac ankyrin repeat protein is associated with heart development and diseases. This study is aimed to investigate the role of CARP in heart hypertrophy in vivo. METHODS AND RESULTS: We generated a cardiac-specific CARP-overexpressing transgenic mouse. Although such animals did not display any overt physiological abnormality, they developed less cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload than did wildtype mice, as indicated by heart weight/body weight ratios, echocardiographic and histological analyses, and expression of hypertrophic markers. These mice also exhibited less cardiac hypertrophy after infusion of isoproterenol. To gain a molecular insight into how CARP attenuated heart hypertrophy, we examined expression of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade and found that the concentrations of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and MEK were markedly reduced in the hearts of transgenic mice subjected to pressure overload. In addition, the expressions of TGF-β and phosphorylated Smad3 were significantly downregulated in the hearts of CARP Tg mice in response to pressure overload. Furthermore, addition of human TGF-β1 could reverse the inhibitory effect of CARP on the hypertrophic response induced by phenylephrine in cardiomyocytes. It was also evidenced that the inhibitory effect of CARP on cardiac hypertrophy was not attributed to apoptosis. CONCLUSION: CARP attenuates cardiac hypertrophy, in which the ERK and TGF-β pathways may be involved. Our findings highlight the significance of CARP as an anti-hypertrophic factor in therapy of cardiac hypertrophy.

  13. Reflecting reflection in supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    associated with reflection and an exploration of alternative conceptions that view reflection within the context of settings which have a more group- and team-based orientation. Drawing on an action research project on health care supervision, the paper questions whether we should reject earlier views...... of reflection, rehabilitate them in order to capture broader connotations or move to new ways of regarding reflection that are more in keeping with not only reflective but also emotive, normative and formative views on supervision. The paper presents a critical perspective on supervision that challenge...... the current reflective paradigm I supervision and relate this to emotive, normative and formative views supervision. The paper is relevant for Nordic educational research into the supervision and guidance...

  14. Direct cone-beam cardiac reconstruction algorithm with cardiac banding artifact correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Chiang, Beshan S.; Hein, Ilmar A.

    2006-01-01

    Multislice helical computed tomography (CT) is a promising noninvasive technique for coronary artery imaging. Various factors can cause inconsistencies in cardiac CT data, which can result in degraded image quality. These inconsistencies may be the result of the patient physiology (e.g., heart rate variations), the nature of the data (e.g., cone-angle), or the reconstruction algorithm itself. An algorithm which provides the best temporal resolution for each slice, for example, often provides suboptimal image quality for the entire volume since the cardiac temporal resolution (TRc) changes from slice to slice. Such variations in TRc can generate strong banding artifacts in multi-planar reconstruction images or three-dimensional images. Discontinuous heart walls and coronary arteries may compromise the accuracy of the diagnosis. A β-blocker is often used to reduce and stabilize patients' heart rate but cannot eliminate the variation. In order to obtain robust and optimal image quality, a software solution that increases the temporal resolution and decreases the effect of heart rate is highly desirable. This paper proposes an ECG-correlated direct cone-beam reconstruction algorithm (TCOT-EGR) with cardiac banding artifact correction (CBC) and disconnected projections redundancy compensation technique (DIRECT). First the theory and analytical model of the cardiac temporal resolution is outlined. Next, the performance of the proposed algorithms is evaluated by using computer simulations as well as patient data. It will be shown that the proposed algorithms enhance the robustness of the image quality against inconsistencies by guaranteeing smooth transition of heart cycles used in reconstruction

  15. Cardiac ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Ratheal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac ablation is a procedure that uses either radiofrequency or cryothermal energy to destroy cells in the heart to terminate and/or prevent arrhythmias. The indications for cardiac catheter ablation include refractory, symptomatic arrhythmias, with more specific guidelines for atrial fibrillation in particular. The ablation procedure itself involves mapping the arrhythmia and destruction of the aberrant pathway in an effort to permanently prevent the arrhythmia. There are many types of arrhythmias, and they require individualized approaches to ablation based on their innately different electrical pathways. Ablation of arrhythmias, such as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, AV nodal reentrant tachycardia, and atrial-fibrillation, is discussed in this review. Ablation has a high success rate overall and minimal complication rates, leading to improved quality of life in many patients.

  16. Cardiac transplantation: 15 years experience Cardiology Institute of Child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceruti, B; Chiesa, P.; Tambasco, J.; Anzibar, R.; Gutierrez, C.; Barboza, S.; Manfredi, A.; Leone, R.

    2012-01-01

    The cardiac transplant is the treatment of choice for the cardiac insufficiency when there is not another therapeutic alternative that prolongs the life expectancy. On December 1996 The Cardiology Institute of child begin the program of Cardiac Insufficiency and Transplants of the Institute of Pediatric Cardiology, achieving the first cardiac transplant in a 14-year-old child in Uruguay. Three years later they put in practice the program of cardiac transplant in adults

  17. [Hydatidosis simulating a cardiac tumour with pulmonary metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Izquierdo, Marta; Martín-Trenor, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The presence of multiple symptomatic pulmonary nodules and one cardiac tumour in a child requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Until a few decades ago, the diagnosis of a cardiac tumour was difficult and was based on a high index of suspicion from indirect signs, and required angiocardiography for confirmation. Echocardiography and other imaging techniques have also helped in the detection of cardiac neoplasms. However, it is not always easy to make the correct diagnosis. The case is presented of a 12 year-old boy with pulmonary symptoms, and diagnosed with a cardiac tumour with lung metastases. The presence of numerous pulmonary nodules was confirmed in our hospital. The echocardiogram detected a solid cardiac nodule in the right ventricle. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the findings and the diagnosis. Puncture-aspiration of a lung nodule gave the diagnosis of hydatidosis. He underwent open-heart surgery with cardiac cyst resection and treated with anthelmintics. The lung cysts were then excised, and he recovered uneventfully. This child had multiple pulmonary nodules and a solid cardiac nodule, and was suspected of having a cardiac tumour with pulmonary metastases. However, given the clinical history, background and morphology of pulmonary nodules, another possible aetiology for consideration is echinococcosis. The clinical picture of cardiac hydatidosis and its complications is highly variable. The clinical history is essential in these cases, as well as having a high index of suspicion. Hydatidosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of a solid, echogenic, cardiac nodule. The treatment for cardiopulmonary hydatid cysts is surgical, followed by anthelmintics. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiac CT for planning redo cardiac surgery: effect of knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction on image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Seitaro; Weissman, Gaby; Weigold, W. Guy; Vembar, Mani

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction (IMR) on image quality in cardiac CT performed for the planning of redo cardiac surgery by comparing IMR images with images reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) and hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR). We studied 31 patients (23 men, 8 women; mean age 65.1 ± 16.5 years) referred for redo cardiac surgery who underwent cardiac CT. Paired image sets were created using three types of reconstruction: FBP, HIR, and IMR. Quantitative parameters including CT attenuation, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of each cardiovascular structure were calculated. The visual image quality - graininess, streak artefact, margin sharpness of each cardiovascular structure, and overall image quality - was scored on a five-point scale. The mean image noise of FBP, HIR, and IMR images was 58.3 ± 26.7, 36.0 ± 12.5, and 14.2 ± 5.5 HU, respectively; there were significant differences in all comparison combinations among the three methods. The CNR of IMR images was better than that of FBP and HIR images in all evaluated structures. The visual scores were significantly higher for IMR than for the other images in all evaluated parameters. IMR can provide significantly improved qualitative and quantitative image quality at in cardiac CT for planning of reoperative cardiac surgery. (orig.)

  19. Fatal cardiac glycoside poisoning due to mistaking foxglove for comfrey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, I-Lin; Yu, Jiun-Hao; Lin, Chih-Chuan; Seak, Chen-June; Olson, Kent R; Chen, Hsien-Yi

    2017-08-01

    Accidental ingestion of foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) can cause significant cardiac toxicity. We report a patient who ingested foxglove mistaking it for comfrey and developed refractory ventricular arrhythmias. The patient died despite treatment with digoxin-specific antibody fragments (DSFab) and veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO). A 55-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with nausea, vomiting and generalized weakness eight hours after drinking "comfrey" tea. She had bradycardia (54 beats/min) and hyperkalemia (7.6 mEq/L). Electrocardiogram revealed a first-degree atrioventricular conduction block with premature atrial contractions, followed by polymorphic ventricular tachycardia three hours after arrival. A serum digoxin level was 151.2 ng/mL. The patient developed ventricular fibrillation while waiting for Digibind infusion. Resuscitation was performed and an emergent VA-ECMO was set up. A total of eight vials of Digibind were given over the next 16 hours. She temporarily regained consciousness, but remained hemodynamically unstable and subsequently developed lower limb ischemia and multiple organ failure, and she expired on hospital day seven. A botanist confirmed that the plant was foxglove. The diagnosis of cardiac glycoside plant poisoning can be difficult in the absence of an accurate exposure history. In facilities where DSFab is unavailable or insufficient, early VA-ECMO might be considered in severely cardiotoxic patients unresponsive to conventional therapy.

  20. Diagnosis of cardiac allograft rejection with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulen, R.L.; Fraser, C.D.; Hutchins, G.M.; Baumgartner, W.A.; Reitz, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    Serial MR images and endomyocardial biopsy specimens of heterotopic cervical cardiac allotransplants were obtained in six dogs during 2 weeks of immunosuppression followed by 1 week without such therapy. A surface coil and gated spin-echo technique were used. Myocardial intensity (MI) measurements and histopathologic interpretations were performed independently. All six dogs showed a decrease in MI between their first and second MR studies, while showing no rejection. One dog had no rejection and died; in five dogs studies gated to every other beat showed progressive increase in MI that correlated significantly with increasing rejection, though absolute MI values did not correlated with a specific biopsy score. Severe rejection also caused overt increase in myocardial mass. The MI in the early postoperative period may reflect reperfusion injury. Absolute intensity values cannot predict rejection. Serial studies in transplant patients may prove clinically useful

  1. Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs' exercise therapy for patients undergoing cardiac surgery: National Korean Questionnaire Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yong Gon; Jang, Mi Ja; Park, Won Hah; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Sung, Jidong

    2017-02-01

    Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (ICR) has been commonly conducted after cardiac surgery in many countries, and has been reported a lots of results. However, until now, there is inadequacy of data on the status of ICR in Korea. This study described the current status of exercise therapy in ICR that is performed after cardiac surgery in Korean hospitals. Questionnaires modified by previous studies were sent to the departments of thoracic surgery of 10 hospitals in Korea. Nine replies (response rate 90%) were received. Eight nurses and one physiotherapist completed the questionnaire. Most of the education on wards after cardiac surgery was conducted by nurses. On postoperative day 1, four sites performed sitting on the edge of bed, sit to stand, up to chair, and walking in the ward. Only one site performed that exercise on postoperative day 2. One activity (stairs up and down) was performed on different days at only two sites. Patients received education preoperatively and predischarge for preventing complications and reducing muscle weakness through physical inactivity. The results of the study demonstrate that there are small variations in the general care provided by nurses after cardiac surgery. Based on the results of this research, we recommended that exercise therapy programs have to conduct by exercise specialists like exercise physiologists or physiotherapists for patients in hospitalization period.

  2. N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide elevations in the course of septic and non-septic shock reflect systolic left ventricular dysfunction assessed by transpulmonary thermodilution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Johan Groeneveld

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: In septic and non-septic shock, NT-proBNP elevations reflect systolic left ventricular dysfunction and are associated with a poor outcome. They may help recognition of cardiac dysfunction in shock and its management when invasive hemodynamic monitoring is not yet instituted.

  3. Weighted least-square approach for simultaneous measurement of multiple reflective surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shouhong; Bills, Richard E.; Freischlad, Klaus

    2007-09-01

    Phase shifting interferometry (PSI) is a highly accurate method for measuring the nanometer-scale relative surface height of a semi-reflective test surface. PSI is effectively used in conjunction with Fizeau interferometers for optical testing, hard disk inspection, and semiconductor wafer flatness. However, commonly-used PSI algorithms are unable to produce an accurate phase measurement if more than one reflective surface is present in the Fizeau interferometer test cavity. Examples of test parts that fall into this category include lithography mask blanks and their protective pellicles, and plane parallel optical beam splitters. The plane parallel surfaces of these parts generate multiple interferograms that are superimposed in the recording plane of the Fizeau interferometer. When using wavelength shifting in PSI the phase shifting speed of each interferogram is proportional to the optical path difference (OPD) between the two reflective surfaces. The proposed method is able to differentiate each underlying interferogram from each other in an optimal manner. In this paper, we present a method for simultaneously measuring the multiple test surfaces of all underlying interferograms from these superimposed interferograms through the use of a weighted least-square fitting technique. The theoretical analysis of weighted least-square technique and the measurement results will be described in this paper.

  4. Technique for producing cardiac radionuclide motion images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, I.C.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1975-01-01

    Sequential frames of different portions of the cardiac cycle are gated into a minicomputer by using an EKG signal recorded onto digital tape simultaneously with imaging information. Serial display of these frames on the computer oscilloscope or projection of 35-mm half frames of these images provides a cardiac motion image with information content adequate for qualitatively assessing cardiac motion. (U.S.)

  5. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HRS Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... people of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  6. Cardiac cell modelling: Observations from the heart of the cardiac physiome project

    KAUST Repository

    Fink, Martin; Niederer, Steven A.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Fenton, Flavio H.; Koivumä ki, Jussi T.; Seemann, Gunnar; Thul, Rü diger; Zhang, Henggui; Sachse, Frank B.; Beard, Dan; Crampin, Edmund J.; Smith, Nicolas P.

    2011-01-01

    In this manuscript we review the state of cardiac cell modelling in the context of international initiatives such as the IUPS Physiome and Virtual Physiological Human Projects, which aim to integrate computational models across scales and physics. In particular we focus on the relationship between experimental data and model parameterisation across a range of model types and cellular physiological systems. Finally, in the context of parameter identification and model reuse within the Cardiac Physiome, we suggest some future priority areas for this field. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. The cardiac patient in Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamsi-Pasha, Majed; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Ramadan is one of the five fundamental pillars of Islam. During this month, the majority of the 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide observe an absolute fast from dawn to sunset without any drink or food. Our review shows that the impact of fasting during Ramadan on patients with stable cardiac disease is minimal and does not lead to any increase in acute events. Most patients with the stable cardiac disease can fast safely. Most of the drug doses and their regimen are easily manageable during this month and may need not to be changed. Ramadan fasting is a healthy nonpharmacological means for improving cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the Muslims, who suffer from chronic diseases, insist on fasting Ramadan despite being exempted by religion. The Holy Quran specifically exempts the sick from fasting. This is particularly relevant if fasting worsens one's illness or delays recovery. Patients with unstable angina, recent myocardial infarction, uncontrolled hypertension, decompensated heart failure, recent cardiac intervention or cardiac surgery or any debilitating diseases should avoid fasting.

  8. Investigating patients' preferences for cardiac rehabilitation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Trine; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Willaing, Ingrid

    2006-01-01

    the preferences for the offer of participation in various cardiac rehabilitation program activities: smoking cessation course, physical exercise program, personal meetings with cardiac nurse, group meetings managed by cardiac nurses, and nutritional counseling guidance. The questionnaire was sent to 742 former...

  9. Social inequality in phase II cardiac rehabilitation attendance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Maria; Egerod, Ingrid; Overgaard, Dorthe

    2018-01-01

    : Thirty per cent attended full cardiac rehabilitation. Patients with low educational attainment, comorbidities, long commute to cardiac rehabilitation centre, and lone dwelling were less likely to attend full cardiac rehabilitation, whereas patients with high anxiety and depression score were more likely...

  10. Elastic reflection based waveform inversion with a nonlinear approach

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Qiang

    2017-08-16

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a highly nonlinear problem due to the complex reflectivity of the Earth, and this nonlinearity only increases under the more expensive elastic assumption. In elastic media, we need a good initial P-wave velocity and even a better initial S-wave velocity models with accurate representation of the low model wavenumbers for FWI to converge. However, inverting for the low wavenumber components of P- and S-wave velocities using reflection waveform inversion (RWI) with an objective to fit the reflection shape, rather than produce reflections, may mitigate the limitations of FWI. Because FWI, performing as a migration operator, is in preference of the high wavenumber updates along reflectors. We propose a nonlinear elastic RWI that inverts for both the low wavenumber and perturbation components of the P- and S-wave velocities. To generate the full elastic reflection wavefields, we derive an equivalent stress source made up by the inverted model perturbations and incident wavefields. We update both the perturbation and propagation parts of the velocity models in a nested fashion. Applications on synthetic isotropic models and field data show that our method can efficiently update the low and high wavenumber parts of the models.

  11. Elastic reflection based waveform inversion with a nonlinear approach

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Qiang; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a highly nonlinear problem due to the complex reflectivity of the Earth, and this nonlinearity only increases under the more expensive elastic assumption. In elastic media, we need a good initial P-wave velocity and even a better initial S-wave velocity models with accurate representation of the low model wavenumbers for FWI to converge. However, inverting for the low wavenumber components of P- and S-wave velocities using reflection waveform inversion (RWI) with an objective to fit the reflection shape, rather than produce reflections, may mitigate the limitations of FWI. Because FWI, performing as a migration operator, is in preference of the high wavenumber updates along reflectors. We propose a nonlinear elastic RWI that inverts for both the low wavenumber and perturbation components of the P- and S-wave velocities. To generate the full elastic reflection wavefields, we derive an equivalent stress source made up by the inverted model perturbations and incident wavefields. We update both the perturbation and propagation parts of the velocity models in a nested fashion. Applications on synthetic isotropic models and field data show that our method can efficiently update the low and high wavenumber parts of the models.

  12. Accuracy and efficiency in the binary star reflection effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The geometric and irradiation heating problems for the binary star reflection effect theory are developed in terms of equipotential level surfaces and are sufficiently general so as to include eccentric orbits and nonsynchronous (even centrifugally limited) rotation and to treat multiple reflection. The requisite physics, mathematics, and logic are then presented and the computations are organized so that a given quantity is computed only as often as necessary, emphasizing the distinction between local surface quantities and aspect-related quantities. The local geometric, bolometric, and wavelength-specific quantities are grouped for storage according to how often they need to be recomputed. Some tests of a computer program based on this reflection model are given in the form of graphs in which program results are compared to a special exact case, and with results from an earlier program. The new program gives intuitively reasonable output for all tests, and the tests give an idea of how accurate the old program is, adopting the detailed reflection computations of the new program as a standard for comparison. A table is given which shows the convergence of the multiple reflection computations to a constant distribution of surface effective temperature. 11 refs

  13. Adaptive responses of cardiac function to fetal postural change as gestational age increases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo Jin; Choi, Hye Jin; Yang, Sun Young; Koo, Boo Hae; Ahn, Ki Hoon; Hong, Soon Cheol; Oh, Min-Jeong; Kim, Hai-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The cardiovascular system maintains homeostasis through a series of adaptive responses to physiological requirements. However, little is known about the adaptation of fetal cardiac function to gravity, according to gestational age. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the adaptive responses of cardiac function to postural changes, using Tei index measurements. Methods Fetal echocardiography and Doppler examination were performed on 114 women with vertex singleton pregnancies at 19 to 40 weeks' gestation. Participants were placed in an upright seated position, and the Tei index for fetal left ventricular cardiac function was measured. The women were then moved into a supine position and the Tei index was re-measured. Results The mean Tei index when measured in an upright seated position was significantly lower than that measured in a supine positioning for all fetuses (0.528±0.103 vs. 0.555±0.106, P=0.014, respectively). This difference was also noted in fetuses with a gestational age of 28–40 weeks (0.539±0.107 vs. 0.574±0.102, P=0.011, respectively). However, there was no difference in the Tei index between an upright seated and a supine position among fetuses with a gestational age of Postural changes from an upright seated to a supine position result in an increased Tei index after a gestational age of 28 weeks. This appears to reflect maturation in the adaptive responses of the fetal cardiovascular system to postural changes. PMID:27896244

  14. Cardiac Tamponade following Mitral Valve Replacement for Active Infective Endocarditis with Ring Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Periannular extension and abscess formation are rare but deadly complications of infective endocarditis (IE with high mortality. Multimodality cardiac imaging, invasive and noninvasive, is needed to accurately define the extent of the disease. Debridement, reconstruction, and valve replacement, often performed in an emergent setting, remain the treatment of choice. Here we present a case of severe IE in a 29-year-old intravenous drug user who after undergoing debridement of the abscess, annular reconstruction, and mitral valve replacement (MVR presented with recurrence of shortness of breath and pedal edema. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE showed a 6.2×5.5 cm cavity, posterior to and communicating with the left ventricle through a 3 cm wide fistulous opening, in proximity of the reconstructed mitral annulus. The patient underwent a redo MVR with patch closure of the fistulous opening, with good clinical outcome. This case highlights the classic TTE findings and the necessity for close follow-up in the perioperative period in patients undergoing surgery for periannular extension of infection. A cardiac magnetic resonance imaging can be considered, preoperatively, in such cases to identify the extent of myocardial involvement and surgical planning.

  15. [Cardiac sarcoidosis: diagnostics, treatment and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudziak, Maria; Jankowska, Hanna; Dorniak, Karolina

    2018-03-27

    Sarcoidosis is a generalised granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Cardiac involvement may affect conduction system, myocardium, valvular apparatus and pericardium. Clinical spectrum ranges from asymptomatic involvement to sudden cardiac death. Patients with biopsy-proven extracardiac sarcoidosis should be screened for cardiac involvement (standard ECG, 24-hour Holter ECG, echocardiography) and in case of any abnormalities found on these tests, more advanced diagnostic methods should be used. Steroid treatment is still the mainstay of therapy in cardiac sarcoidosis. Several immunosuppresive agents are also effective and used in different combinations with steroids, as well as heart failure treatment (including ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers and diuretics). Advanced heart block requires pacemaker implantation, and implantable cardioverterdefibrillator is an effective treatment in primary and secondary prophylaxis of sudden cardiac death. Heart transplantation is considered in advanced, drug-resistant heart failure or incessant ventricular arrhythmias unresponsive to other forms of therapy. © 2018 MEDPRESS.

  16. Cardiac catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tests. However, it is very safe when done by an experienced team. The risks include: Cardiac tamponade Heart attack Injury to a coronary artery Irregular heartbeat Low blood pressure Reaction to the contrast dye Stroke Possible complications ...

  17. Cardiac hybrid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaemperli, Oliver [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Nuclear Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-05-15

    Hybrid cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging allows combined assessment of anatomical and functional aspects of cardiac disease. In coronary artery disease (CAD), hybrid SPECT/CT imaging allows detection of coronary artery stenosis and myocardial perfusion abnormalities. The clinical value of hybrid imaging has been documented in several subsets of patients. In selected groups of patients, hybrid imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy to detect CAD compared to the single imaging techniques. Additionally, this approach facilitates functional interrogation of coronary stenoses and guidance with regard to revascularization procedures. Moreover, the anatomical information obtained from CT coronary angiography or coronary artery calcium scores (CACS) adds prognostic information over perfusion data from SPECT. The use of cardiac hybrid imaging has been favoured by the dissemination of dedicated hybrid systems and the release of dedicated image fusion software, which allow simple patient throughput for hybrid SPECT/CT studies. Further technological improvements such as more efficient detector technology to allow for low-radiation protocols, ultra-fast image acquisition and improved low-noise image reconstruction algorithms will be instrumental to further promote hybrid SPECT/CT in research and clinical practice. (orig.)

  18. Cardiac Cachexia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Raposo André

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is a chronic, progressive, and incurable disease. Cardiac cachexia is a strong predictor of poor prognosis, regardless of other important variables. This review intends to gather evidence to enable recognition of cardiac cachexia, identification of early stages of muscle waste and sarcopenia, and improve identification of patients with terminal heart failure in need of palliative care, whose symptoms are no longer controlled by usual medical measures. The pathophysiology is complex and multifactorial. There are many treatment options to prevent or revert muscle waste and sarcopenia; although, these strategies are less effective in advanced stages of cardiac cachexia. In these final stages, symptomatic palliation plays an important role, focussing on the patient’s comfort and avoiding the ‘acute model’ treatment of aggressive, disproportionate, and inefficient care. In order to provide adequate care and attempt to prevent this syndrome, thus reducing its impact on healthcare, there should be improved communication between general practitioners, internal medicine physicians, cardiologists, and palliative care specialists since heart failure has an unforeseeable course and is associated with an increasing number of deaths and different levels of suffering.

  19. "Just-In-Time" Simulation Training Using 3-D Printed Cardiac Models After Congenital Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Laura J; Su, Lillian; Hynes, Conor F; Krieger, Axel; Alfares, Fahad A; Ramakrishnan, Karthik; Zurakowski, David; Marshall, M Blair; Kim, Peter C W; Jonas, Richard A; Nath, Dilip S

    2016-03-01

    High-fidelity simulation using patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) models may be effective in facilitating pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) provider training for clinical management of congenital cardiac surgery patients. The 3D-printed heart models were rendered from preoperative cross-sectional cardiac imaging for 10 patients undergoing congenital cardiac surgery. Immediately following surgical repair, a congenital cardiac surgeon and an intensive care physician conducted a simulation training session regarding postoperative care utilizing the patient-specific 3D model for the PCICU team. After the simulation, Likert-type 0 to 10 scale questionnaire assessed participant perception of impact of the training session. Seventy clinicians participated in training sessions, including 22 physicians, 38 nurses, and 10 ancillary care providers. Average response to whether 3D models were more helpful than standard hand off was 8.4 of 10. Questions regarding enhancement of understanding and clinical ability received average responses of 9.0 or greater, and 90% of participants scored 8 of 10 or higher. Nurses scored significantly higher than other clinicians on self-reported familiarity with the surgery (7.1 vs. 5.8; P = .04), clinical management ability (8.6 vs. 7.7; P = .02), and ability enhancement (9.5 vs. 8.7; P = .02). Compared to physicians, nurses and ancillary providers were more likely to consider 3D models more helpful than standard hand off (8.7 vs. 7.7; P = .05). Higher case complexity predicted greater enhancement of understanding of surgery (P = .04). The 3D heart models can be used to enhance congenital cardiac critical care via simulation training of multidisciplinary intensive care teams. Benefit may be dependent on provider type and case complexity. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. [Thromboelastography and its use in cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ak, Koray; Atalan, Nazan; Tekeli, Atike; Işbir, Selim; Civelek, Ali; Emekli, Nesrin; Arsan, Sinan

    2008-04-01

    Thromboelastography is an alternative method to conventional coagulation tests for the general evaluation of hemostatic system. Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass is accomplished by complex alterations of hemostasis, including acquired dysfunction of platelets, consumption coagulopathy and increased fibrinolysis. Despite major advances in blood conservation methods and perioperative care of the patients, transfusion rates in cardiac surgery remain high. Thromboelastography has an ability to assess almost all components of haemostatic system globally. Currently, thromboelastography is used with standard coagulation tests to decrease the microvascular bleeding and homologous blood transfusion in cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. In this review, we aimed to discuss thromboelastography technology and its usage in cardiac surgery.

  1. Radiation exposure of children during cardiac catheterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popp, W.

    1979-01-01

    It is well known that in adults, cardiac catheterisation involves the highest possible radiation exposure for a single examination. The paper now investigates the radiation exposure in paediatric cardiac cathetrisations. Dosimeters attached to the children during the examination were used as well as phantom measurements under the conditions of cardiac catheterisation. With the aid of the phantom, also the total energy absorption during an examination procedure was determined. This value was estimated to be 80 mJ. In spite of the high individual exposure, the contribution to the population exposure is low due to the small number of cardiac catheterisations. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 MKO [de

  2. Towards clinical molecular diagnosis of inherited cardiac conditions: a comparison of bench-top genome DNA sequencers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzhong Li

    Full Text Available Molecular genetic testing is recommended for diagnosis of inherited cardiac disease, to guide prognosis and treatment, but access is often limited by cost and availability. Recently introduced high-throughput bench-top DNA sequencing platforms have the potential to overcome these limitations.We evaluated two next-generation sequencing (NGS platforms for molecular diagnostics. The protein-coding regions of six genes associated with inherited arrhythmia syndromes were amplified from 15 human samples using parallelised multiplex PCR (Access Array, Fluidigm, and sequenced on the MiSeq (Illumina and Ion Torrent PGM (Life Technologies. Overall, 97.9% of the target was sequenced adequately for variant calling on the MiSeq, and 96.8% on the Ion Torrent PGM. Regions missed tended to be of high GC-content, and most were problematic for both platforms. Variant calling was assessed using 107 variants detected using Sanger sequencing: within adequately sequenced regions, variant calling on both platforms was highly accurate (Sensitivity: MiSeq 100%, PGM 99.1%. Positive predictive value: MiSeq 95.9%, PGM 95.5%. At the time of the study the Ion Torrent PGM had a lower capital cost and individual runs were cheaper and faster. The MiSeq had a higher capacity (requiring fewer runs, with reduced hands-on time and simpler laboratory workflows. Both provide significant cost and time savings over conventional methods, even allowing for adjunct Sanger sequencing to validate findings and sequence exons missed by NGS.MiSeq and Ion Torrent PGM both provide accurate variant detection as part of a PCR-based molecular diagnostic workflow, and provide alternative platforms for molecular diagnosis of inherited cardiac conditions. Though there were performance differences at this throughput, platforms differed primarily in terms of cost, scalability, protocol stability and ease of use. Compared with current molecular genetic diagnostic tests for inherited cardiac arrhythmias

  3. Central-peripheral neural network interactions evoked by vagus nerve stimulation: functional consequences on control of cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardell, Jeffrey L; Rajendran, Pradeep S; Nier, Heath A; KenKnight, Bruce H; Armour, J Andrew

    2015-11-15

    Using vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), we sought to determine the contribution of vagal afferents to efferent control of cardiac function. In anesthetized dogs, the right and left cervical vagosympathetic trunks were stimulated in the intact state, following ipsilateral or contralateral vagus nerve transection (VNTx), and then following bilateral VNTx. Stimulations were performed at currents from 0.25 to 4.0 mA, frequencies from 2 to 30 Hz, and a 500-μs pulse width. Right or left VNS evoked significantly greater current- and frequency-dependent suppression of chronotropic, inotropic, and lusitropic function subsequent to sequential VNTx. Bradycardia threshold was defined as the current first required for a 5% decrease in heart rate. The threshold for the right vs. left vagus-induced bradycardia in the intact state (2.91 ± 0.18 and 3.47 ± 0.20 mA, respectively) decreased significantly with right VNTx (1.69 ± 0.17 mA for right and 3.04 ± 0.27 mA for left) and decreased further following bilateral VNTx (1.29 ± 0.16 mA for right and 1.74 ± 0.19 mA for left). Similar effects were observed following left VNTx. The thresholds for afferent-mediated effects on cardiac parameters were 0.62 ± 0.04 and 0.65 ± 0.06 mA with right and left VNS, respectively, and were reflected primarily as augmentation. Afferent-mediated tachycardias were maintained following β-blockade but were eliminated by VNTx. The increased effectiveness and decrease in bradycardia threshold with sequential VNTx suggest that 1) vagal afferents inhibit centrally mediated parasympathetic efferent outflow and 2) the ipsilateral and contralateral vagi exert a substantial buffering capacity. The intact threshold reflects the interaction between multiple levels of the cardiac neural hierarchy. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Management of Patients After Cardiac Arrest: Now the Real Work Begins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Varinder K; Grunau, Brian E; Debicki, Derek B; Zhou, Jian; Hegazy, Ahmed F; McPherson, Terry; Nagpal, A Dave

    2018-02-01

    Survival with a good quality of life after cardiac arrest continues to be abysmal. Coordinated resuscitative care does not end with the effective return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC)-in fact, quite the contrary is true. Along with identifying and appropriately treating the precipitating cause, various components of the post-cardiac arrest syndrome also require diligent observation and management, including post-cardiac arrest neurologic injury and myocardial dysfunction, systemic ischemia-reperfusion phenomenon with potential consequent multiorgan failure, and the various sequelae of critical illness. There is growing evidence that an early invasive approach to coronary reperfusion with percutaneous coronary intervention, together with active targeted temperature management and optimization of hemodynamic, ventilator, and metabolic parameters, may improve survival and neurologic outcomes in cardiac arrest survivors. Neuroprognostication is complex, as are survivorship issues and long-term rehabilitation. Our paramedics, emergency physicians, and resuscitation specialists are all to be congratulated for ever-increasing success with ROSC… but now the real work begins. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Accurate artificial boundary conditions for the semi-discretized linear Schrödinger and heat equations on rectangular domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Songsong; Yang, Yibo; Pang, Gang; Antoine, Xavier

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to design some accurate artificial boundary conditions for the semi-discretized linear Schrödinger and heat equations in rectangular domains. The Laplace transform in time and discrete Fourier transform in space are applied to get Green's functions of the semi-discretized equations in unbounded domains with single-source. An algorithm is given to compute these Green's functions accurately through some recurrence relations. Furthermore, the finite-difference method is used to discretize the reduced problem with accurate boundary conditions. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the accuracy of our method in the case of the linear Schrödinger and heat equations. It is shown that the reflection at the corners is correctly eliminated.

  6. Cardiac findings in 31 patients with Noonan's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertola Débora Romeo

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cardiac findings in 31 Noonan syndrome patients. METHODS: Thirty-one (18 males and 13 femalespatients from 26 families affected with Noonan's syndrome were evaluated from the cardiac point of view with electrocardiography and echodopplercardiography. RESULTS: Twenty patients had some type of cardiac abnormality. The most frequent was pulmonary valve stenosis followed by hypertrophic myocardiopathy, commonly associated with valve defects. Upper deviation of the QRS axis was observed in 80% of these patients. CONCLUSION: In view of the high frequency and diversity of cardiac abnormalities present in Noonan syndrome, cardiac evaluation with electrocardiography and echocardiography should be performed in all patients diagnostically suspected of having this disease.

  7. Development and Psychometric Validation of HIPER-Q to Assess Knowledge of Hypertensive Patients in Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella Zulianello dos Santos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The absence of instruments capable of measuring the level of knowledge of hypertensive patients in cardiac rehabilitation programs about their disease reflects the lack of specific recommendations for these patients. Objective: To develop and validate a questionnaire to evaluate the knowledge of hypertensive patients in cardiac rehabilitation programs about their disease. Methods: A total of 184 hypertensive patients (mean age 60.5 ± 10 years, 66.8% men were evaluated. Reproducibility was assessed by calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficient using the test-retest method. Internal consistency was assessed by the Cronbach’s alpha and the construct validity by the exploratory factorial analysis. Results: The final version of the instrument had 17 questions organized in areas considered important for patient education. The instrument proposed showed a clarity index of 8.7 (0.25. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.804 and the Cronbach’s correlation coefficient was 0.648. Factor analysis revealed five factors associated with knowledge areas. Regarding the criterion validity, patients with higher education level and higher family income showed greater knowledge about hypertension. Conclusion: The instrument has a satisfactory clarity index and adequate validity, and can be used to evaluate the knowledge of hypertensive participants in cardiac rehabilitation programs.

  8. Drug-Induced Rhabdomyolysis with Elevated Cardiac Troponin T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gro Egholm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential role of cardiac troponin in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction has led to the development of high-sensitivity assays, which are able to detect very small amounts of myocardial necrosis. The high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T assay, however, is not entirely specific for myocardial injury. This case report describes a 48-year-old woman, who, two years after cardiac transplantation, presented with rhabdomyolysis. During the course of the disease, her troponin T level was elevated on repeated occasions, but other definitive evidence of myocardial injury was not found. Asymptomatic cardiac troponin T elevations during rhabdomyolysis may be due to either cardiac involvement or false positive results stemming from skeletal muscle injury.

  9. J Waves for Predicting Cardiac Events in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Toyonobu; Hayashi, Kenshi; Konno, Tetsuo; Sakata, Kenji; Fujita, Takashi; Hodatsu, Akihiko; Nagata, Yoji; Teramoto, Ryota; Nomura, Akihiro; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Furusho, Hiroshi; Takamura, Masayuki; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Fujino, Noboru; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2017-10-01

    This study sought to investigate whether the presence of J waves was associated with cardiac events in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). It has been uncertain whether the presence of J waves predicts life-threatening cardiac events in patients with HCM. This study evaluated consecutive 338 patients with HCM (207 men; age 61 ± 17 years of age). A J-wave was defined as J-point elevation >0.1 mV in at least 2 contiguous inferior and/or lateral leads. Cardiac events were defined as sudden cardiac death, ventricular fibrillation or sustained ventricular tachycardia, or appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator therapy. The study also investigated whether adding the J-wave in a conventional risk model improved a prediction of cardiac events. J waves were seen in 46 (13.6%) patients at registration. Cardiac events occurred in 31 patients (9.2%) during median follow-up of 4.9 years (interquartile range: 2.6 to 7.1 years). In a Cox proportional hazards model, the presence of J waves was significantly associated with cardiac events (adjusted hazard ratio: 4.01; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.78 to 9.05; p = 0.001). Compared with the conventional risk model, the model using J waves in addition to conventional risks better predicted cardiac events (net reclassification improvement, 0.55; 95% CI: 0.20 to 0.90; p = 0.002). The presence of J waves was significantly associated with cardiac events in HCM. Adding J waves to conventional cardiac risk factors improved prediction of cardiac events. Further confirmatory studies are needed before considering J-point elevation as a marker of risk for use in making management decisions regarding risk in patients with HCM. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fusion of 4D echocardiography and cine cardiac magnetic resonance volumes using a salient spatio-temporal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atehortúa, Angélica; Garreau, Mireille; Romero, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    An accurate left (LV) and right ventricular (RV) function quantification is important to support evaluation, diagnosis and prognosis of cardiac pathologies such as the cardiomyopathies. Currently, diagnosis by ultrasound is the most cost-effective examination. However, this modality is highly noisy and operator dependent, hence prone to errors. Therefore, fusion with other cardiac modalities may provide complementary information and improve the analysis of the specific pathologies like cardiomyopathies. This paper proposes an automatic registration between two complementary modalities, 4D echocardiography and Magnetic resonance images, by mapping both modalities to a common space of salience where an optimal registration between them is estimated. The obtained matrix transformation is then applied to the MRI volume which is superimposed to the 4D echocardiography. Manually selected marks in both modalities are used to evaluate the precision of the superimposition. Preliminary results, in three evaluation cases, show the distance between these marked points and the estimated with the transformation is about 2 mm.

  11. Improved bioavailability of targeted Curcumin delivery efficiently regressed cardiac hypertrophy by modulating apoptotic load within cardiac microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Aramita; Rana, Santanu; Banerjee, Durba; Mitra, Arkadeep; Datta, Ritwik; Naskar, Shaon; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis acts as a prime modulator of cardiac hypertrophy leading to heart failure, a major cause of human mortality worldwide. Recent therapeutic interventions have focussed on translational applications of diverse pharmaceutical regimes among which, Curcumin (from Curcuma longa) is known to have an anti-hypertrophic potential but with limited pharmacological efficacies due to low aqueous solubility and poor bioavailability. In this study, Curcumin encapsulated by carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) nanoparticle conjugated to a myocyte specific homing peptide was successfully delivered in bioactive form to pathological myocardium for effective regression of cardiac hypertrophy in a rat (Rattus norvegicus) model. Targeted nanotization showed higher cardiac bioavailability of Curcumin at a low dose of 5 mg/kg body weight compared to free Curcumin at 35 mg/kg body weight. Moreover, Curcumin/CMC-peptide treatment during hypertrophy significantly improved cardiac function by downregulating expression of hypertrophy marker genes (ANF, β-MHC), apoptotic mediators (Bax, Cytochrome-c) and activity of apoptotic markers (Caspase 3 and PARP); whereas free Curcumin in much higher dose showed minimal improvement during compromised cardiac function. Targeted Curcumin treatment significantly lowered p53 expression and activation in diseased myocardium via inhibited interaction of p53 with p300-HAT. Thus attenuated acetylation of p53 facilitated p53 ubiquitination and reduced the apoptotic load in hypertrophied cardiomyocytes; thereby limiting cardiomyocytes' need to enter the regeneration cycle during hypertrophy. This study elucidates for the first time an efficient targeted delivery regimen for Curcumin and also attributes towards probable mechanistic insight into its therapeutic pote