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Sample records for accurate frequency dependent

  1. Frequency dependence of polarization phase difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.S.; Rao, Y.S.; Wang, J.R.

    1993-09-01

    Polarimetric AIRSAR data of July 13, 1990 acquired over Mahatango watershed area was processed for the identification of corn fields an forested areas. Polarization Phase Difference (PPD) values were computed for the corn fields at P-, L- and C- bands and studied as a function of frequency. The results compare well with the model calculations at 24 deg. incidence angle where as the locations of corn fields were computed to be at 35 deg. incidence angle. The discrepancy is attributed to lack of accurate ground truth and the undulating topography of the corn fields. Another study reported here deals with the usefulness of Polarization Index (PI) for the study of vegetation. PI was found to be dependent on frequency for corn fields where as for forest trees no such dependence was noticed. PI HH,HV is more useful parameter compared to PI HH,VV even for the study of corn fields. (author). 19 refs, 7 figs

  2. Accurate Estimation of Low Fundamental Frequencies from Real-Valued Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the difficult problem of estimating low fundamental frequencies from real-valued measurements is addressed. The methods commonly employed do not take the phenomena encountered in this scenario into account and thus fail to deliver accurate estimates. The reason for this is that the......In this paper, the difficult problem of estimating low fundamental frequencies from real-valued measurements is addressed. The methods commonly employed do not take the phenomena encountered in this scenario into account and thus fail to deliver accurate estimates. The reason...... for this is that they employ asymptotic approximations that are violated when the harmonics are not well-separated in frequency, something that happens when the observed signal is real-valued and the fundamental frequency is low. To mitigate this, we analyze the problem and present some exact fundamental frequency estimators...

  3. Quantitative interpretation of the magnetic susceptibility frequency dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustra, Andrea; Mendonça, Carlos A.; Leite, Aruã; Jovane, Luigi; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.

    2018-05-01

    Low-field mass-specific magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements using multifrequency alternating fields are commonly used to evaluate concentration of ferrimagnetic particles in the transition of superparamagnetic (SP) to stable single domain (SSD). In classical palaeomagnetic analyses, this measurement serves as a preliminary assessment of rock samples providing rapid, non-destructive, economical and easy information of magnetic properties. The SP-SSD transition is relevant in environmental studies because it has been associated with several geological and biogeochemical processes affecting magnetic mineralogy. MS is a complex function of mineral-type and grain-size distribution, as well as measuring parameters such as external field magnitude and frequency. In this work, we propose a new technique to obtain quantitative information on grain-size variations of magnetic particles in the SP-SSD transition by inverting frequency-dependent susceptibility. We introduce a descriptive parameter named as `limiting frequency effect' that provides an accurate estimation of MS loss with frequency. Numerical simulations show the methodology capability in providing data fitting and model parameters in many practical situations. Real-data applications with magnetite nanoparticles and core samples from sediments of Poggio le Guaine section of Umbria-Marche Basin (Italy) provide additional information not clearly recognized when interpreting cruder MS data. Caution is needed when interpreting frequency dependence in terms of single relaxation processes, which are not universally applicable and depend upon the nature of magnetic mineral in the material. Nevertheless, the proposed technique is a promising tool for SP-SSD content analyses.

  4. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for frequency-dependent radiative transfer equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wenjun, E-mail: sun_wenjun@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Jiang, Song, E-mail: jiang@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Xu, Kun, E-mail: makxu@ust.hk [Department of Mathematics and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong (China); Li, Shu, E-mail: li_shu@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an extension of previous work (Sun et al., 2015 [22]) of the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations to the frequency-dependent (multi-group) radiative transfer system. Different from the gray radiative transfer equations, where the optical opacity is only a function of local material temperature, the simulation of frequency-dependent radiative transfer is associated with additional difficulties from the frequency-dependent opacity. For the multiple frequency radiation, the opacity depends on both the spatial location and the frequency. For example, the opacity is typically a decreasing function of frequency. At the same spatial region the transport physics can be optically thick for the low frequency photons, and optically thin for high frequency ones. Therefore, the optical thickness is not a simple function of space location. In this paper, the UGKS for frequency-dependent radiative system is developed. The UGKS is a finite volume method and the transport physics is modeled according to the ratio of the cell size to the photon's frequency-dependent mean free path. When the cell size is much larger than the photon's mean free path, a diffusion solution for such a frequency radiation will be obtained. On the other hand, when the cell size is much smaller than the photon's mean free path, a free transport mechanism will be recovered. In the regime between the above two limits, with the variation of the ratio between the local cell size and photon's mean free path, the UGKS provides a smooth transition in the physical and frequency space to capture the corresponding transport physics accurately. The seemingly straightforward extension of the UGKS from the gray to multiple frequency radiation system is due to its intrinsic consistent multiple scale transport modeling, but it still involves lots of work to properly discretize the multiple groups in order to design an asymptotic preserving (AP

  5. Accurate frequency measurements on gyrotrons using a ''gyro-radiometer''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebuffi, L.

    1986-08-01

    Using an heterodyne system, called ''Gyro-radiometer'', accurated frequency measurements have been carried out on VARIAN 60 GHz gyrotrons. Changing the principal tuning parameters of a gyrotron, we have detected frequency variations up to 100 MHz, ∼ 40 MHz frequency jumps and smaller jumps (∼ 10 MHz) when mismatches in the transmission line were present. FWHM bandwidth of 300 KHz, parasitic frequencies and frequency drift during 100 msec pulses have also been observed. An efficient method to find a stable-, high power-, long pulse-working point of a gyrotron loaded by a transmission line, has been derived. In general, for any power value it is possible to find stable working conditions tuning the principal parameters of the tube in correspondance of a maximum of the emitted frequency

  6. Frequency dependent changes in NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind eKumar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity is thought to mediate several forms of learning, and can be induced by spike trains containing a small number of spikes occurring with varying rates and timing, as well as with oscillations. We computed the influence of these variables on the plasticity induced at a single NMDAR containing synapse using a reduced model that was analytically tractable, and these findings were confirmed using detailed, multi-compartment model. In addition to explaining diverse experimental results about the rate and timing dependence of synaptic plasticity, the model made several novel and testable predictions. We found that there was a preferred frequency for inducing long-term potentiation (LTP such that higher frequency stimuli induced lesser LTP, decreasing as 1/f when the number of spikes in the stimulus was kept fixed. Among other things, the preferred frequency for inducing LTP varied as a function of the distance of the synapse from the soma. In fact, same stimulation frequencies could induce LTP or LTD depending on the dendritic location of the synapse. Next, we found that rhythmic stimuli induced greater plasticity then irregular stimuli. Furthermore, brief bursts of spikes significantly expanded the timing dependence of plasticity. Finally, we found that in the ~5-15Hz frequency range both rate- and timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms work synergistically to render the synaptic plasticity most sensitive to spike-timing. These findings provide computational evidence that oscillations can have a profound influence on the plasticity of an NMDAR-dependent synapse, and show a novel role for the dendritic morphology in this process.

  7. Accurate 3He polarimetry using the Rb Zeeman frequency shift due to the Rb-3He spin-exchange collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romalis, M.V.; Cates, G.D.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a method of 3 He polarimetry relying on the polarization-dependent frequency shift of the Rb Zeeman resonance. Our method is ideally suited for on-line measurements of the 3 He polarization produced by spin-exchange optical pumping. To calibrate the frequency shift we performed an accurate measurement of the imaginary part of the Rb- 3 He spin-exchange cross section in the temperature range typical for spin-exchange optical pumping of 3 He. We also present a detailed study of possible systematic errors in the frequency shift polarimetry. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  8. Frequency dependent polarization in blazars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernsson, C.I.

    1984-10-01

    It is argued that the intrinsic frequency dependent polarization in blazars finds its most straightforward explanations in terms of a single rather than a multicomponent sourcemodel. In order to reproduce the observations, under the assumption that the emission mechanism is optically thin synchrotron radiation, both a well ordered magnetic field and an electron distribution with a sharp break or cuttoff are necessary. Non-uniform pitch angle distribution and/or environments where synchrotron losses are important are both conducive to producing strong frequency dependent polarization. Reasons are put forth as to why such conditions ar expected to occur in blazars. Two specific models are discussed in detail and it is shown that they are both able to produce strong frequency dependent polarization, even when the spectral index changes by a small amount only. (orig.)

  9. Engineering frequency-dependent superfluidity in Bose-Fermi mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzamasovs, Maksims; Liu, Bo

    2018-04-01

    Unconventional superconductivity and superfluidity are among the most exciting and fascinating quantum phenomena in condensed-matter physics. Usually such states are characterized by nontrivial spin or spatial symmetry of the pairing order parameter, such as "spin triplet" or "p wave." However, besides spin and spatial dependence the order parameter may have unconventional frequency dependence which is also permitted by Fermi-Dirac statistics. Odd-frequency fermionic pairing is an exciting paradigm when discussing exotic superfluidity or superconductivity and is yet to be realized in experiments. In this paper we propose a symmetry-based method of controlling frequency dependence of the pairing order parameter via manipulating the inversion symmetry of the system. First, a toy model is introduced to illustrate that frequency dependence of the order parameter can be achieved through our proposed approach. Second, by taking advantage of recent rapid developments in producing spin-orbit-coupled dispersions in ultracold gases, we propose a Bose-Fermi mixture to realize such frequency-dependent superfluid. The key idea is introducing the frequency-dependent attraction between fermions mediated by Bogoliubov phonons with asymmetric dispersion. Our proposal should pave an alternative way for exploring frequency-dependent superfluids with cold atoms.

  10. Accurate millimetre and submillimetre rest frequencies for cis- and trans-dithioformic acid, HCSSH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudenzano, D.; Laas, J.; Bizzocchi, L.; Lattanzi, V.; Endres, C.; Giuliano, B. M.; Spezzano, S.; Palumbo, M. E.; Caselli, P.

    2018-04-01

    Context. A better understanding of sulphur chemistry is needed to solve the interstellar sulphur depletion problem. A way to achieve this goal is to study new S-bearing molecules in the laboratory, obtaining accurate rest frequencies for an astronomical search. We focus on dithioformic acid, HCSSH, which is the sulphur analogue of formic acid. Aims: The aim of this study is to provide an accurate line list of the two HCSSH trans and cis isomers in their electronic ground state and a comprehensive centrifugal distortion analysis with an extension of measurements in the millimetre and submillimetre range. Methods: We studied the two isomers in the laboratory using an absorption spectrometer employing the frequency-modulation technique. The molecules were produced directly within a free-space cell by glow discharge of a gas mixture. We measured lines belonging to the electronic ground state up to 478 GHz, with a total number of 204 and 139 new rotational transitions, respectively, for trans and cis isomers. The final dataset also includes lines in the centimetre range available from literature. Results: The extension of the measurements in the mm and submm range lead to an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion parameters. This allows us to predict frequencies with estimated uncertainties as low as 5 kHz at 1 mm wavelength. Hence, the new dataset provided by this study can be used for astronomical search. Frequency lists are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/612/A56

  11. Accurate modeling of high frequency microelectromechanical systems (MEMS switches in time- and frequency-domainc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Coccetti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we present an accurate investigation of three different techniques for the modeling of complex planar circuits. The em analysis is performed by means of different electromagnetic full-wave solvers in the timedomain and in the frequency-domain. The first one is the Transmission Line Matrix (TLM method. In the second one the TLM method is combined with the Integral Equation (IE method. The latter is based on the Generalized Transverse Resonance Diffraction (GTRD. In order to test the methods we model different structures and compare the calculated Sparameters to measured results, with good agreement.

  12. Frequency-Dependent Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticle Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majetich, Sara [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-05-17

    In the proposed research program we will investigate the time- and frequency-dependent behavior of ordered nanoparticle assemblies, or nanoparticle crystals. Magnetostatic interactions are long-range and anisotropic, and this leads to complex behavior in nanoparticle assemblies, particularly in the time- and frequency-dependent properties. We hypothesize that the high frequency performance of composite materials has been limited because of the range of relaxation times; if a composite is a dipolar ferromagnet at a particular frequency, it should have the advantages of a single phase material, but without significant eddy current power losses. Arrays of surfactant-coated monodomain magnetic nanoparticles can exhibit long-range magnetic order that is stable over time. The magnetic domain size and location of domain walls is governed not by structural grain boundaries but by the shape of the array, due to the local interaction field. Pores or gaps within an assembly pin domain walls and limit the domain size. Measurements of the magnetic order parameter as a function of temperature showed that domains can exist at high temoerature, and that there is a collective phase transition, just as in an exchange-coupled ferromagnet. Dipolar ferromagnets are not merely of fundamental interest; they provide an interesting alternative to exchange-based ferromagnets. Dipolar ferromagnets made with high moment metallic particles in an insulating matrix could have high permeability without large eddy current losses. Such nanocomposites could someday replace the ferrites now used in phase shifters, isolators, circulators, and filters in microwave communications and radar applications. We will investigate the time- and frequency-dependent behavior of nanoparticle crystals with different magnetic core sizes and different interparticle barrier resistances, and will measure the magnetic and electrical properties in the DC, low frequency (0.1 Hz - 1 kHz), moderate frequency (10 Hz - 500

  13. Complete FDTD analysis of microwave heating processes in frequency-dependent and temperature dependent media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, F.; Jecko, B. [Univ. de Limoges (France). Inst. de Recherche en Communications Optiques et Microondes

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the temperature rise in a material modifies its physical properties and, particularly, its dielectric permittivity. The dissipated electromagnetic power involved in microwave heating processes depending on {var_epsilon}({omega}), the electrical characteristics of the heated media must vary with the temperature to achieve realistic simulations. In this paper, the authors present a fast and accurate algorithm allowing, through a combined electromagnetic and thermal procedure, to take into account the influence of the temperature on the electrical properties of materials. First, the temperature dependence of the complex permittivity ruled by a Debye relaxation equation is investigated, and a realistic model is proposed and validated. Then, a frequency-dependent finite-differences time-domain ((FD){sup 2}TD) method is used to assess the instantaneous electromagnetic power lost by dielectric hysteresis. Within the same iteration, a time-scaled form of the heat transfer equation allows one to calculate the temperature distribution in the heated medium and then to correct the dielectric properties of the material using the proposed model. These new characteristics will be taken into account by the EM solver at the next iteration. This combined algorithm allows a significant reduction of computation time. An application to a microwave oven is proposed.

  14. Frequency-Dependent Tidal Triggering of Low Frequency Earthquakes Near Parkfield, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, L.; Burgmann, R.; Shelly, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of small periodic stress perturbations on earthquake generation is not clear, however, the rate of low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) near Parkfield, California has been found to be strongly correlated with solid earth tides. Laboratory experiments and theoretical analyses show that the period of imposed forcing and source properties affect the sensitivity to triggering and the phase relation of the peak seismicity rate and the periodic stress, but frequency-dependent triggering has not been quantitatively explored in the field. Tidal forcing acts over a wide range of frequencies, therefore the sensitivity to tidal triggering of LFEs provides a good probe to the physical mechanisms affecting earthquake generation. In this study, we consider the tidal triggering of LFEs near Parkfield, California since 2001. We find the LFEs rate is correlated with tidal shear stress, normal stress rate and shear stress rate. The occurrence of LFEs can also be independently modulated by groups of tidal constituents at semi-diurnal, diurnal and fortnightly frequencies. The strength of the response of LFEs to the different tidal constituents varies between LFE families. Each LFE family has an optimal triggering frequency, which does not appear to be depth dependent or systematically related to other known properties. This suggests the period of the applied forcing plays an important role in the triggering process, and the interaction of periods of loading history and source region properties, such as friction, effective normal stress and pore fluid pressure, produces the observed frequency-dependent tidal triggering of LFEs.

  15. A Novel Multimode Waveguide Coupler for Accurate Power Measurement of Traveling Wave Tube Harmonic Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler fabricated from two dissimilar waveguides is capable of isolating the power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT). In addition to accurate power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave frequencies.

  16. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Thompson, Kelly G.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2011-01-01

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique. (author)

  17. Fluctuation-dissipation theorem for frequency-dependent specific heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe; Nielsen, Johannes K.

    1996-01-01

    A derivation of the fluctuation-dissipation (FD) theorem for the frequency-dependent specific heat of a system described by a master equation is presented. The FD theorem is illustrated by a number of simple examples, including a system described by a linear Langevin equation, a two-level system......, and a system described by the energy master equation. It is shown that for two quite different models with low-energy cutoffs—a collection of two-level systems and a system described by the energy master equation—the frequency-dependent specific heat in dimensionless units becomes universal at low temperatures......, i.e., independent of both energy distribution and temperature. These two models give almost the same universal frequency-dependent specific heat, which compares favorably to experiments on supercooled alcohols....

  18. Frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance in neural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Daqing; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Xu, Peng; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-08-01

    Biological neurons receive multiple noisy oscillatory signals, and their dynamical response to the superposition of these signals is of fundamental importance for information processing in the brain. Here we study the response of neural systems to the weak envelope modulation signal, which is superimposed by two periodic signals with different frequencies. We show that stochastic resonance occurs at the beat frequency in neural systems at the single-neuron as well as the population level. The performance of this frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance is influenced by both the beat frequency and the two forcing frequencies. Compared to a single neuron, a population of neurons is more efficient in detecting the information carried by the weak envelope modulation signal at the beat frequency. Furthermore, an appropriate fine-tuning of the excitation-inhibition balance can further optimize the response of a neural ensemble to the superimposed signal. Our results thus introduce and provide insights into the generation and modulation mechanism of the frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance in neural systems.

  19. An accurate, fast, and scalable solver for high-frequency wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda-Núñez, L.; Taus, M.; Hewett, R.; Demanet, L.

    2017-12-01

    In many science and engineering applications, solving time-harmonic high-frequency wave propagation problems quickly and accurately is of paramount importance. For example, in geophysics, particularly in oil exploration, such problems can be the forward problem in an iterative process for solving the inverse problem of subsurface inversion. It is important to solve these wave propagation problems accurately in order to efficiently obtain meaningful solutions of the inverse problems: low order forward modeling can hinder convergence. Additionally, due to the volume of data and the iterative nature of most optimization algorithms, the forward problem must be solved many times. Therefore, a fast solver is necessary to make solving the inverse problem feasible. For time-harmonic high-frequency wave propagation, obtaining both speed and accuracy is historically challenging. Recently, there have been many advances in the development of fast solvers for such problems, including methods which have linear complexity with respect to the number of degrees of freedom. While most methods scale optimally only in the context of low-order discretizations and smooth wave speed distributions, the method of polarized traces has been shown to retain optimal scaling for high-order discretizations, such as hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin methods and for highly heterogeneous (and even discontinuous) wave speeds. The resulting fast and accurate solver is consequently highly attractive for geophysical applications. To date, this method relies on a layered domain decomposition together with a preconditioner applied in a sweeping fashion, which has limited straight-forward parallelization. In this work, we introduce a new version of the method of polarized traces which reveals more parallel structure than previous versions while preserving all of its other advantages. We achieve this by further decomposing each layer and applying the preconditioner to these new components separately and

  20. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morozovska, Anna N; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-07-28

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. However, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. Here, we suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. Our combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute to the EM response.

  1. Frequency dependent magneto-transport in charge transfer Co(II) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Bikash Kumar; Saha, Shyamal K., E-mail: cnssks@iacs.res.in

    2014-09-01

    A charge transfer chelated system containing ferromagnetic metal centers is the ideal system to investigate the magneto-transport and magneto-dielectric effects due to the presence of both electronic as well as magnetic properties and their coupling. Magneto-transport properties in materials are usually studied through dc charge transport under magnetic field. As frequency dependent conductivity is an essential tool to understand the nature of carrier wave, its spatial extension and their mutual interaction, in the present work, we have investigated frequency dependent magneto-transport along with magnetization behavior in [Co{sub 2}(II)-(5-(4-PhMe)-1,3,4-oxadiazole-H{sup +}-2-thiolate){sub 5}](OAc){sub 4} metal complex to elucidate the nature of above quantities and their response under magnetic field in the transport property. We have used the existing model for ac conduction incorporating the field dependence to explain the frequency dependent magneto-transport. It is seen that the frequency dependent magneto-transport could be well explained using the existing model for ac conduction. -Highlights: • Chelated Co(II) complex is synthesized for magneto-transport applications. • Frequency dependent magneto-transport and magnetization behavior are studied. • Nature of carrier wave, its spatial extension is investigated under magnetic field. • Existing model for ac conduction is used with magnetic field dependence.

  2. Small arteries can be accurately studied in vivo, using high frequency ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Tfelt-Hansen, P

    1993-01-01

    We have validated measurements of diameters of the superficial temporal artery and other small arteries in man with a newly developed 20 MHz ultrasound scanner with A, B and M-mode imaging. The diameter of a reference object was 1.202 mm vs. 1.205 mm as measured by stereomicroscopy (nonsignifican......-gauge plethysmography (nonsignificant). Pulsations were 4.6% in the radial artery. We conclude that high frequency ultrasound provides an accurate and reproducible measure of the diameter of small and medium sized human arteries in vivo....

  3. Velocity form of the Kohn-Sham frequency-dependent polarizability equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolotti, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    A single equation is derived for the determination of the first-order correction to the frequency-dependent density, due to the perturbation of a time-varying electric field. This new expression for the first-order correction to the frequency-dependent Kohn-Sham amplitudes depends explicitly upon the velocity form of the dipole-moment operator and the square of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian

  4. Strings on a Violin: Location Dependence of Frequency Tuning in Active Dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anindita; Rathour, Rahul K; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2017-01-01

    Strings on a violin are tuned to generate distinct sound frequencies in a manner that is firmly dependent on finger location along the fingerboard. Sound frequencies emerging from different violins could be very different based on their architecture, the nature of strings and their tuning. Analogously, active neuronal dendrites, dendrites endowed with active channel conductances, are tuned to distinct input frequencies in a manner that is dependent on the dendritic location of the synaptic inputs. Further, disparate channel expression profiles and differences in morphological characteristics could result in dendrites on different neurons of the same subtype tuned to distinct frequency ranges. Alternately, similar location-dependence along dendritic structures could be achieved through disparate combinations of channel profiles and morphological characteristics, leading to degeneracy in active dendritic spectral tuning. Akin to strings on a violin being tuned to different frequencies than those on a viola or a cello, different neuronal subtypes exhibit distinct channel profiles and disparate morphological characteristics endowing each neuronal subtype with unique location-dependent frequency selectivity. Finally, similar to the tunability of musical instruments to elicit distinct location-dependent sounds, neuronal frequency selectivity and its location-dependence are tunable through activity-dependent plasticity of ion channels and morphology. In this morceau, we explore the origins of neuronal frequency selectivity, and survey the literature on the mechanisms behind the emergence of location-dependence in distinct forms of frequency tuning. As a coda to this composition, we present some future directions for this exciting convergence of biophysical mechanisms that endow a neuron with frequency multiplexing capabilities.

  5. Accurate Frequency Estimation Based On Three-Parameter Sine-Fitting With Three FFT Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple DFT-based golden section searching algorithm (DGSSA for the single tone frequency estimation. Because of truncation and discreteness in signal samples, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT and Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT are inevitable to cause the spectrum leakage and fence effect which lead to a low estimation accuracy. This method can improve the estimation accuracy under conditions of a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and a low resolution. This method firstly uses three FFT samples to determine the frequency searching scope, then – besides the frequency – the estimated values of amplitude, phase and dc component are obtained by minimizing the least square (LS fitting error of three-parameter sine fitting. By setting reasonable stop conditions or the number of iterations, the accurate frequency estimation can be realized. The accuracy of this method, when applied to observed single-tone sinusoid samples corrupted by white Gaussian noise, is investigated by different methods with respect to the unbiased Cramer-Rao Low Bound (CRLB. The simulation results show that the root mean square error (RMSE of the frequency estimation curve is consistent with the tendency of CRLB as SNR increases, even in the case of a small number of samples. The average RMSE of the frequency estimation is less than 1.5 times the CRLB with SNR = 20 dB and N = 512.

  6. Frequency-dependent absorbance of broadband terahertz wave in dense plasma sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yan; Qi, Binbin; Jiang, Xiankai; Zhu, Zhi; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhu, Yiming

    2018-05-01

    Due to the ability of accurate fingerprinting and low-ionization for different substances, terahertz (THz) technology has a lot of crucial applications in material analysis, information transfer, and safety inspection, etc. However, the spectral characteristic of atmospheric gas and ionized gas has not been widely investigated, which is important for the remote sensing application. Here, in this paper, we investigate the absorbance of broadband terahertz wave in dense plasma sheet generated by femtosecond laser pulses. It was found that as the terahertz wave transmits through the plasma sheet formed, respectively, in carbon dioxide, oxygen, argon and nitrogen, spectrum presents completely different and frequency-dependent absorbance. The reasons for these absorption peaks are related to the molecular polarity, electric charge, intermolecular and intramolecular interactions, and collisional absorption of gas molecules. These results have significant implications for the remote sensing of gas medium.

  7. Frequency-dependent ultrasound-induced transformation in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Jeremy; Windmill, James; Agbeze-Onuma, Maduka; Kalin, Robert M; Argondizza, Peter; Knapp, Charles W

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasound-enhanced gene transfer (UEGT) is continuing to gain interest across many disciplines; however, very few studies investigate UEGT efficiency across a range of frequencies. Using a variable frequency generator, UEGT was tested in E. coli at six ultrasonic frequencies. Results indicate frequency can significantly influence UEGT efficiency positively and negatively. A frequency of 61 kHz improved UEGT efficiency by ~70 % higher, but 99 kHz impeded UEGT to an extent worse than no ultrasound exposure. The other four frequencies (26, 133, 174, and 190 kHz) enhanced transformation compared to no ultrasound, but efficiencies did not vary. The influence of frequency on UEGT efficiency was observed across a range of operating frequencies. It is plausible that frequency-dependent dynamics of mechanical and chemical energies released during cavitational-bubble collapse (CBC) are responsible for observed UEGT efficiencies.

  8. Frequency-dependent micromechanics of cellularized biopolymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Chris; Kim, Jihan; McIntyre, David; Sun, Bo

    Mechanical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence many cellular behaviors such as growth, differentiation, and migration. These are dynamic processes in which the cells actively remodel the ECM. Reconstituted collagen gel is a common model ECM for studying cell-ECM interactions in vitro because collagen is the most abundant component of mammalian ECM and gives the ECM its material stiffness. We embed micron-sized particles in collagen and use holographic optical tweezers to apply forces to the particles in multiple directions and over a range of frequencies up to 10 Hz. We calculate the local compliance and show that it is dependent on both the direction and frequency of the applied force. Performing the same measurement on many particles allows us to characterize the spatial inhomogeneity of the mechanical properties and shows that the compliance decreases at higher frequencies. Performing these measurements on cell-populated collagen gels shows that cellular remodeling of the ECM changes the mechanical properties of the collagen and we investigate whether this change is dependent on the local strain and distance from nearby cells.

  9. An efficient realization of frequency dependent boundary conditions in an acoustic finite-difference time-domain model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escolano-Carrasco, José; Jacobsen, Finn; López, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method provides a simple and accurate way of solving initial boundary value problems. However, most acoustic problems involve frequency dependent boundary conditions, and it is not easy to include such boundary conditions in an FDTD model. Although solutions...... to this problem exist, most of them have high computational costs, and stability cannot always be ensured. In this work, a solution is proposed based on "mixing modelling strategies"; this involves separating the FDTD mesh and the boundary conditions (a digital filter representation of the impedance...

  10. Joint accurate time and stable frequency distribution infrastructure sharing fiber footprint with research network

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtěch, J.; Šlapák, M.; Škoda, P.; Radil, J.; Havliš, O.; Altmann, M.; Münster, P.; Velč, R.; Kundrát, J.; Altmannová, L.; Vohnout, R.; Horváth, T.; Hůla, M.; Smotlacha, V.; Čížek, Martin; Pravdová, Lenka; Řeřucha, Šimon; Hrabina, Jan; Číp, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2017), s. 1-7, č. článku 027101. ISSN 0091-3286 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : accurate time * stable frequency * wavelength division multiplexing * bidirectional reciprocal path * Sagnac effect Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.082, year: 2016

  11. Comment on “Frequency-dependent dispersion in porous media”

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Yohan

    2012-07-10

    In a recent paper, Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez used the technique of volume averaging to derive a "frequency-dependent" dispersion tensor, Dγ*, the goal of which is to describe solute transport in porous media undergoing periodic processes. We describe two issues related to this dispersion tensor. First, we demonstrate that the definition of Dγ* is erroneous and derive a corrected version, Dγ*c. With this modification, the approach of Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez becomes strictly equivalent to the one devised by Moyne. Second, we show that the term "frequency-dependent dispersion" is misleading because Dγ* and Dγ*c do not depend on the process operating frequency, χ. The study carried out by Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez represents a spectral analysis of the relaxation of Dγ* towards its steady-state, independent of any periodic operation or excitation. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  12. Frequency dependence of p-mode frequency shifts induced by magnetic activity in Kepler solar-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salabert, D.; Régulo, C.; Pérez Hernández, F.; García, R. A.

    2018-04-01

    The variations of the frequencies of the low-degree acoustic oscillations in the Sun induced by magnetic activity show a dependence on radial order. The frequency shifts are observed to increase towards higher-order modes to reach a maximum of about 0.8 μHz over the 11-yr solar cycle. A comparable frequency dependence is also measured in two other main sequence solar-like stars, the F-star HD 49933, and the young 1 Gyr-old solar analog KIC 10644253, although with different amplitudes of the shifts of about 2 μHz and 0.5 μHz, respectively. Our objective here is to extend this analysis to stars with different masses, metallicities, and evolutionary stages. From an initial set of 87 Kepler solar-like oscillating stars with known individual p-mode frequencies, we identify five stars showing frequency shifts that can be considered reliable using selection criteria based on Monte Carlo simulations and on the photospheric magnetic activity proxy Sph. The frequency dependence of the frequency shifts of four of these stars could be measured for the l = 0 and l = 1 modes individually. Given the quality of the data, the results could indicate that a physical source of perturbation different from that in the Sun is dominating in this sample of solar-like stars.

  13. Variation in female morph frequencies and mating frequencies : random, frequency-dependent harassment or male mimicry?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammers, Martijn; Van Gossum, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Female-limited colour polymorphisms occur in a variety of species, where often one female morph (androchrome) resembles the body coloration of the conspecific male, whereas the other (gynochrome) does not. We tested predictions of two frequency-dependent hypotheses that are commonly invoked to

  14. Instrumentation for high-frequency meteorological observations from research vessel

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    VijayKumar, K.; Khalap, S.; Mehra, P.

    Ship provides an attractive platform from which high-frequency meteorological observations (e.g., wind components, water vapor density, and air temperature) can be made accurately. However, accurate observations of meteorological variables depend...

  15. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C; Bex, Peter J

    2015-11-25

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy.

  16. Solution of the comoving-frame equation of transfer in spherically symmetric flows. IV. Frequency-dependent source functions for scattering by atoms and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalas, D.; Kunasz, P.B.; Hummer, D.G.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical method is presented of solving the radiative transfer equation in the comoving frame of a spherically symmetric expanding atmosphere in which both the line and the electron-scattering source function can depend on frequency (i.e., when there is partial frequency redistribution in the scattering process). This method is used to assess the adequacy of various assumptions regarding frequency redistribution in the comoving frame and to discuss the effects of electron scattering more accurately than previously possible. The methods developed here can be used in realistic model atmospheres to account for the (major) effects of electron scattering upon emergent flux profiles

  17. Characterization of frequency-dependent glass transition temperature by Vogel-Fulcher relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yu; Jin Li

    2008-01-01

    The complex mechanical modulus of polymer and polymer based composite materials showed a frequency-dependent behaviour during glass transition relaxation, which was historically modelled by the Arrhenius equation. However, this might not be true in a broad frequency domain based on the experience from the frequency dependence of the complex dielectric permittivity, which resulted from the same glass transition relaxation as for the complex mechanical modulus. Considering a good correspondence between dielectric and mechanical relaxation during glass transition, the Vogel-Fulcher relationship, previously proposed for the frequency dependence of dielectric permittivity, is introduced for that of the mechanical modulus; and the corresponding static glass transition temperature (T f ) was first determined for polymer and polymer based composite materials. (fast track communication)

  18. Time-domain analysis of frequency dependent inertial wave forces on cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2013-01-01

    a simple time-domain procedure for the inertial force, in which the frequency dependence is represented via a simple explicit time filter on the wave particle acceleration or velocity. The frequency dependence of the inertia coefficient is known analytically as a function of the wave......-number, and the relevant range of waves shorter than about six times the diameter typically corresponds to deep water waves. This permits a universal non-dimensional frequency representation, that is converted to rational form to provide the relevant filter equation. Simple time-domain simulations demonstrate...... the reduction of the resonant part of the response for natural structural frequencies above the dominating wave frequency....

  19. Frequency dependence of the active impedance component of silicon thin-film resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belogurov, S.V.; Gostilo, V.V.; Yurov, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    A high-resistant resistor on the silicon thin-film substrate considerably superior in noise and frequency performance than commercial resistors is described. The frequency dependence of the active impedance component is tested for determining noise and frequency dependences of silicon thin-film resistors. The obtained results permit to calculate the energy equivalent of resistor noise in nuclear radiation detection units at any temperature according to its frequency characteristic at room temperature

  20. Temperature dependence of the resonance frequency of thermogravimetric devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iervolino, E.; Riccio, M.; Van Herwaarden, A.W.; Irace, A.; Breglio, G.; Van der Vlist, W.; Sarro, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the temperature dependence of the resonance frequency of thermogravimetric (TG) devices for tip heating over the temperature range of View the MathML source 25–600?C. The resonance frequency of a fabricated TG device shows to be temperature independent for tip heating up to

  1. Reproducibility of frequency-dependent low frequency fluctuations in reaction time over time and across tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zan-Zan; Qu, Hui-Jie; Tian, Zhuo-Ling; Han, Meng-Jian; Fan, Yi; Ge, Lie-Zhong; Zang, Yu-Feng; Zhang, Hang

    2017-01-01

    Increased levels of reaction time variability (RTV) are characteristics of sustained attention deficits. The clinical significance of RTV has been widely recognized. However, the reliability of RTV measurements has not been widely studied. The present study aimed to assess the test-retest reliability of RTV conventional measurements, e.g., the standard deviation (SD), the coefficient of variation (CV), and a new measurement called the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) of RT. In addition, we aimed to assess differences and similarities of these measurements between different tasks. Thirty-seven healthy college students participated in 2 tasks, i.e., an Eriksen flanker task (EFT) and a simple reaction task (SRT), twice over a mean interval of 56 days. Conventional measurements of RTV including RT-SD and RT-CV were assessed first. Then the RT time series were converted into frequency domains, and RT-ALFF was further calculated for the whole frequency band (0.0023-0.167 Hz) and for a few sub-frequency bands including Slow-6 (frequency bands (Slow-3), but SRT RT-ALFF values showed slightly higher ICC values than EFT values in lower frequency bands (Slow-5 and Slow-4). 2) RT-ALFF magnitudes in each sub-frequency band were greater for the SRT than those for the EFT. 3) The RT-ALFF in the Slow-4 of the EFT was found to be correlated with the RT-ALFF in the Slow-5 of the SRT for both two visits, but no consistently significant correlation was found between the same frequency bands. These findings reveal good test-retest reliability for conventional measurements and for the RT-ALFF of RTV. The RT-ALFF presented frequency-dependent similarities across tasks. All of our results reveal the presence of different frequency structures between the two tasks, and thus the frequency-dependent characteristics of different tasks deserve more attention in future studies.

  2. Frequency-dependent Dispersion Measures and Implications for Pulsar Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, J. M.; Shannon, R. M.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency2). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ˜ 4 × 10-5 pc cm-3 for pulsars at ˜1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm-3 but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  3. Anomalous frequency-dependent ionic conductivity of lesion-laden human-brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, David; Akhtari, Massoud; Fallah, Aria; Vinters, Harry V.; Mathern, Gary W.

    2017-10-01

    We study the effect of lesions on our four-electrode measurements of the ionic conductivity of (˜1 cm3) samples of human brain excised from patients undergoing pediatric epilepsy surgery. For most (˜94%) samples, the low-frequency ionic conductivity rises upon increasing the applied frequency. We attributed this behavior to the long-range (˜0.4 mm) diffusion of solvated sodium cations before encountering intrinsic impenetrable blockages such as cell membranes, blood vessels, and cell walls. By contrast, the low-frequency ionic conductivity of some (˜6%) brain-tissue samples falls with increasing applied frequency. We attribute this unusual frequency-dependence to the electric-field induced liberation of sodium cations from traps introduced by the unusually severe pathology observed in samples from these patients. Thus, the anomalous frequency-dependence of the ionic conductivity indicates trap-producing brain lesions.

  4. Staurosporine Inhibits Frequency-Dependent Myofilament Desensitization in Intact Rabbit Cardiac Trabeculae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth D. Varian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofilament calcium sensitivity decreases with frequency in intact healthy rabbit trabeculae and associates with Troponin I and Myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation. We here tested whether serine-threonine kinase activity is primarily responsible for this frequency-dependent modulations of myofilament calcium sensitivity. Right ventricular trabeculae were isolated from New Zealand White rabbit hearts and iontophoretically loaded with bis-fura-2. Twitch force-calcium relationships and steady state force-calcium relationships were measured at frequencies of 1 and 4 Hz at 37 °C. Staurosporine (100 nM, a nonspecific serine-threonine kinase inhibitor, or vehicle (DMSO was included in the superfusion solution before and during the contractures. Staurosporine had no frequency-dependent effect on force development, kinetics, calcium transient amplitude, or rate of calcium transient decline. The shift in the pCa50 of the force-calcium relationship was significant from 6.05±0.04 at 1 Hz versus 5.88±0.06 at 4 Hz under control conditions (vehicle, P<0.001 but not in presence of staurosporine (5.89±0.08 at 1 Hz versus 5.94±0.07 at 4 Hz, P=NS. Phosphoprotein analysis (Pro-Q Diamond stain confirmed that staurosporine significantly blunted the frequency-dependent phosphorylation at Troponin I and Myosin light chain-2. We conclude that frequency-dependent modulation of calcium sensitivity is mediated through a kinase-specific effect involving phosphorylation of myofilament proteins.

  5. IDENTIFYING ANTHROPOGENIC METALLIC POLLUTANTS USING FREQUENCY DEPENDENT MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN ABUJA METROPOLIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatto S. Solomon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil formed from lithological and weathering processes of parent rocks generally exhibit paramagnetic properties due to some minerals contained in the rocks and thus have significant value of magnetic susceptibility. This susceptibility arising from the influence of the parent rocks tend to mask anthropogenic grains pollutants released into the environment by human activities. Hence, it becomes difficult to identify the effect of the lithological and anthropogenic magnetic susceptibility in complex soil found in urban areas. The superparamagnetic effect of lithological soil, a single state domain and multi-domain state of anthropogenic grains can easily be investigated by frequency dependent measurements where readings between 0-2.0% indicates the absence of lithological influence, 2.0-8.0% indicates multi-domain grains or mixture of both single stage and multi-domian grains and 8.0-12% indicates the superparamagntic (SP grain from lithological origin. In this work frequency dependent measurements were carried out along 5 selected road networks within the 5 districts of Abuja phase 1. Measurements were also carried out in 379 random points at the surface and depth of 40.0cm to investigate the distribution of anthropogenic grains in Abuja metropolis using the Bartington susceptibility meter. Frequency dependent measurements along the selected road networks indicate0-3.0% immediately after the roads pavement to a distance of about 3.0m from the road, indicating that the magnetic susceptibility arise mostly form anthropogenic influence rather than lithological processes. At the distance of 3.0-8.0m, frequency dependent values of about 3.0-8.0% were recorded, indicating mixture of both superparamagnetic and multi-domain grains. Beyond the distance of 8.0m, the frequency dependent values are mostly above 8.0.0%, indicating virtually all SP grains. The spatial distribution frequency dependent surface map shows the presence of anthropogenic grains in

  6. Low-frequency (0.7-7.4 mHz geomagnetic field fluctuations at high latitude: frequency dependence of the polarization pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cafarella

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A statistical analysis of the polarization pattern of low-frequency geomagnetic field fluctuations (0.7-7.4 mHz covering the entire 24-h interval was performed at the Antarctic station Terra Nova Bay (80.0°S geomagnetic latitude throughout 1997 and 1998. The results show that the polarization pattern exhibits a frequency dependence, as can be expected from the frequency dependence of the latitude where the coupling between the magnetospheric compressional mode and the field line resonance takes place. The polarization analysis of single pulsation events shows that wave packets with different polarization sense, depending on frequency, can be simultaneously observed.

  7. Is it possible to explore Peccei-Quinn axions from frequency-dependence radiation dimming?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, Raul; Pena-Garay, Carlos; Verde, Licia

    2011-01-01

    We explore how the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion parameter space can be constrained by the frequency-dependence dimming of radiation from astrophysical objects. To do so we perform accurate calculations of photon-axion conversion in the presence of a variable magnetic field. We propose several tests where the PQ axion parameter space can be explored with current and future astronomical surveys: the observed spectra of isolated neutron stars, occultations of background objects by white dwarfs and neutron stars, the light-curves of eclipsing binaries containing a white dwarf. We find that the lack of dimming of the light-curve of a detached eclipsing white dwarf binary recently observed, leads to relevant constraints on the photon-axion conversion. Current surveys designed for Earth-like planet searches are well matched to strengthen and improve the constraints on the PQ axion using astrophysical objects radiation dimming.

  8. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT DISPERSION MEASURES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PULSAR TIMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Shannon, R. M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Stinebring, D. R., E-mail: cordes@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: ryan.shannon@csiro.au, E-mail: dan.stinebring@oberlin.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH 44074 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency{sup 2}). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ∼ 4 × 10{sup −5} pc cm{sup −3} for pulsars at ∼1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm{sup −3} but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  9. The KFM, A Homemade Yet Accurate and Dependable Fallout Meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearny, C.H.

    2001-11-20

    The KFM is a homemade fallout meter that can be made using only materials, tools, and skills found in millions of American homes. It is an accurate and dependable electroscope-capacitor. The KFM, in conjunction with its attached table and a watch, is designed for use as a rate meter. Its attached table relates observed differences in the separations of its two leaves (before and after exposures at the listed time intervals) to the dose rates during exposures of these time intervals. In this manner dose rates from 30 mR/hr up to 43 R/hr can be determined with an accuracy of {+-}25%. A KFM can be charged with any one of the three expedient electrostatic charging devices described. Due to the use of anhydrite (made by heating gypsum from wallboard) inside a KFM and the expedient ''dry-bucket'' in which it can be charged when the air is very humid, this instrument always can be charged and used to obtain accurate measurements of gamma radiation no matter how high the relative humidity. The heart of this report is the step-by-step illustrated instructions for making and using a KFM. These instructions have been improved after each successive field test. The majority of the untrained test families, adequately motivated by cash bonuses offered for success and guided only by these written instructions, have succeeded in making and using a KFM. NOTE: ''The KFM, A Homemade Yet Accurate and Dependable Fallout Meter'', was published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory report in1979. Some of the materials originally suggested for suspending the leaves of the Kearny Fallout Meter (KFM) are no longer available. Because of changes in the manufacturing process, other materials (e.g., sewing thread, unwaxed dental floss) may not have the insulating capability to work properly. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has not tested any of the suggestions provided in the preface of the report, but they have been used by other groups. When using these

  10. Tidal dissipation in the Moon. Learning from the "incorrect" frequency dependence measured by the LLR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efroimsky, M.

    2012-09-01

    It was demonstrated back in 2001 that fitting of the LLR data results in the quality factor Q of the Moon scaling as the frequency ξ to a negative power [8]: Q ˜ ξp , where p = -0.19 . (1) At the same time, numerous measurements by various seismological teams agree on the exponent being positive, not negative [4]. The positive sign of the exponent stems also from geodetic measurements [1], and it finds its explanation within the theory of friction in minerals [5]. On all these grounds, the aforementioned finding by the LLR team appears to be implausible and to disagree with the conventional wisdom of solid state mechanics and seismology. A later reexamination in [9] rendered a less upsetting value, p = -0.09 , which was still negative and still seemed to contradict our knowledge of microphysical processes in solids. The authors later wrote [10]: "There is a weak dependence of tidal specific dissipation Q on period. The Q increases from ˜ 30 at a month to ˜ 35 at one year. Q for rock is expected to have a weak dependence on tidal period, but it is expected to decrease with period rather than increase. The frequency dependence of Q deserves further attention and should be improved." A possible explanation of this paradox comes from the observation that the LLR measurements provided information on the tidal and not seismic dissipation. The difference between these two processes comes from self-gravitation of the celestial body. To address the problem accurately, one has to calculate the tidal factors kl sin ɛl showing up in the Darwin-Kaula expansion for the tidal torque or force. Here kl is the degree-l Love number, while ɛl is the appropriate tidal lag. Sometimes sin ɛl is denoted with 1/Q , which is not recommended, because this notation does not distinguish between the tidal reaction appropriate to harmonics of different degree. This notation also puts one at risk of confusing the tidal damping with the seismic damping, two process that have much in common

  11. KFM: a homemade yet accurate and dependable fallout meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearny, C.H.; Barnes, P.R.; Chester, C.V.; Cortner, M.W.

    1978-01-01

    The KFM is a homemade fallout meter that can be made using only materials, tools, and skills found in millions of American homes. It is an accurate and dependable electroscope-capacitor. The KFM, in conjunction with its attached table and a watch, is designed for use as a rate meter. Its attached table relates observed differences in the separations of its two leaves (before and after exposures at the listed time intervals) to the dose rates during exposures of these time intervals. In this manner dose rates from 30 mR/hr up to 43 R/hr can be determined with an accuracy of +-25%. A KFM can be charged with any one of the three expedient electrostatic charging devices described. Due to the use of anhydrite (made by heating gypsum from wallboard) inside a KFM and the expedient ''dry-bucket'' in which it can be charged when the air is very humid, this instrument always can be charged and used to obtain accurate measurements of gamma radiation no matter how high the relative humidity. The step-by-step illustrated instructions for making and using a KFM are presented. These instructions have been improved after each successive field test. The majority of the untrained test families, adequately motivated by cash bonuses offered for success and guided only by these written instructions, have succeeded in making and using a KFM

  12. Anisotropy of the apparent frequency dependence of backscatter in formalin fixed human myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C S; Verdonk, E D; Wickline, S A; Perez, J E; Miller, J G

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of the frequency dependence of ultrasonic backscatter are presented for specific angles of insonification for regions of infarcted and noninfarcted human myocardium. A 5-MHz transducer was used to insonify cylindrical cores taken from 7 noninfarcted regions and 12 infarcted regions of the left ventricular free wall of 6 formalin-fixed human hearts explanted because of ischemic cardiomyopathy. The dependence of apparent (uncompensated for diffraction effects and attenuation) backscatter on frequency was approximated by a power-law dependence, magnitude of B(f)2 = afn. Under ideal conditions in a lossless medium, the effect of not compensating for the effects of diffraction and attenuation leads to the value of n to be 2.0 for Rayleigh scatterers while the frequency dependence of the fully compensated backscatter coefficient would be f4. The value of n was determined over the frequency range, 3-7 MHz. Both nonifarcted and infarcted myocardium exhibited anisotropy of the frequency dependence of backscatter, with maxima occurring at angles that were perpendicular to the predominant myofiber direction and minima when parallel to the fibers. Perpendicular insonification yielded results for n of 1.8 +/- 0.1 for noninfarcted myocardium and 1.2 +/- 0.1 for infarcted myocardium while parallel insonification yielded results of 0.4 +/- 0.1 for noninfarcted and 0.0 +/- 0.1 for infarcted myocardium. The functional form of the angle-dependent backscatter is similar for both noninfarcted and infarcted myocardium, although the frequency dependence is clearly different for both tissue states for all angles of insonification. The results of this study indicate that the anisotropy of the frequency dependence of backscatter may play a significant role in ultrasonic imaging and is an important consideration for ultrasonic tissue characterization in myocardium.

  13. Frequency dependence of coherently amplified two-photon emission from hydrogen molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hideaki; Miyamoto, Yuki; Hiraki, Takahiro; Masuda, Takahiko; Sasao, Noboru; Uetake, Satoshi; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Koji; Yoshimura, Motohiko

    2017-12-01

    We investigate how the efficiency of coherently amplified two-photon emission depends on the frequency of one of the two emitted photons, namely the signal photon. This is done over the wavelength range of 5.048-10.21 μ m by using the vibrational transition of parahydrogen. The efficiency increases with the frequency of the signal photon. Considering experimental errors, our results are consistent with the theoretical prediction for the present experimental conditions. This study is an experimental demonstration of the frequency dependence of coherently amplified two-photon emission, and also presents its potential as a light source.

  14. The infrared Hall effect in YBCO: Temperature and frequency dependence of Hall scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grayson, M.; Cerne, J.; Drew, H.D.; Schmadel, D.C.; Hughes, R.; Preston, J.S.; Kung, P.J.; Vale, L.

    1999-01-01

    The authors measure the Hall angle, θ H , in YBCO films in the far- and mid-infrared to determine the temperature and frequency dependence of the Hall scattering. Using novel modulation techniques they measure both the Faraday rotation and ellipticity induced by these films in high magnetic fields to deduce the complex conductivity tensor. They observe a strong temperature dependence of the mid-infrared Hall conductivity in sharp contrast to the weak dependence of the longitudinal conductivity. By fitting the frequency dependent normal state Hall angle to a Lorentzian θ H (ω) = ω H /(γ H minus iω) they find the Hall frequency, ω H , is nearly independent of temperature. The Hall scattering rate, γ H , is consistent with γ H ∼ T 2 up to 200 K and is remarkably independent of IR frequency suggesting non-Fermi liquid behavior

  15. A new rate-dependent model for high-frequency tracking performance enhancement of piezoactuator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lizhi; Xiong, Zhenhua; Wu, Jianhua; Ding, Han

    2017-05-01

    Feedforward-feedback control is widely used in motion control of piezoactuator systems. Due to the phase lag caused by incomplete dynamics compensation, the performance of the composite controller is greatly limited at high frequency. This paper proposes a new rate-dependent model to improve the high-frequency tracking performance by reducing dynamics compensation error. The rate-dependent model is designed as a function of the input and input variation rate to describe the input-output relationship of the residual system dynamics which mainly performs as phase lag in a wide frequency band. Then the direct inversion of the proposed rate-dependent model is used to compensate the residual system dynamics. Using the proposed rate-dependent model as feedforward term, the open loop performance can be improved significantly at medium-high frequency. Then, combining the with feedback controller, the composite controller can provide enhanced close loop performance from low frequency to high frequency. At the frequency of 1 Hz, the proposed controller presents the same performance as previous methods. However, at the frequency of 900 Hz, the tracking error is reduced to be 30.7% of the decoupled approach.

  16. The vestibular implant: Frequency-dependency of the electrically evoked Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR shows frequency-dependent behavior. This study investigated whether the characteristics of the electrically evoked VOR (eVOR elicited by a vestibular implant, showed the same frequency-dependency.Twelve vestibular electrodes implanted in 7 patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction were tested. Stimuli consisted of amplitude-modulated electrical stimulation with a sinusoidal profile at frequencies of 0.5Hz, 1Hz, and 2Hz. The main characteristics of the eVOR were evaluated and compared to the natural VOR characteristics measured in a group of age-matched healthy volunteers who were subjected to horizontal whole body rotations with equivalent sinusoidal velocity profiles at the same frequencies.A strong and significant effect of frequency was observed in the total peak eye velocity of the eVOR. This effect was similar to that observed in the natural VOR. Other characteristics of the (eVOR (angle, habituation-index, and asymmetry showed no significant frequency-dependent effect. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that, at least at the specific (limited frequency range tested, responses elicited by a vestibular implant closely mimic the frequency-dependency of the normal vestibular system.

  17. Dependence of excitation frequency of resonant circuit on RF irradiation position of MRI equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Masato; Yamada, Tsutomu; Takemura, Yasushi; Niwa, Touru; Inoue, Tomio

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermia using implants is a cancer treatment in which cancer tissue is heated to over 42.5 deg C to selectively kill the cancer cells. In this study, a resonant circuit was used as an implant, and a weak magnetic field of radiofrequency (RF) pulses from a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device was used as an excitation source. We report here how the temperature of the resonant circuit was controlled by changing the excitation frequency of the MRI. As a result, the temperature rise of the resonant circuit was successfully found to depend on its position in the MRI device. This significant result indicates that the temperature of the resonant circuit can be controlled only by adjusting the excitation position. Accurate temperature control is therefore expected to be possible by combining this control technique with the temperature measurement function of MRI equipment. (author)

  18. Frequency and voltage dependent electrical responses of poly(triarylamine) thin film-based organic Schottky diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar Mohamad, Khairul; Tak Hoh, Hang; Alias, Afishah; Ghosh, Bablu Kumar; Fukuda, Hisashi

    2017-11-01

    A metal-organic-metal (MOM) type Schottky diode based on poly (triarylamine) (PTAA) thin films has been fabricated by using the spin coating method. Investigation of the frequency dependent conductance-voltage (G-V-f) and capacitance-voltage (C-V-f) characteristics of the ITO/PTAA/Al MOM type diode were carried out in the frequency range from 12 Hz to 100 kHz using an LCR meter at room temperature. The frequency and bias voltage dependent electrical response were determined by admittance-based measured method in terms of an equivalent circuit model of the parallel combination of resistance and capacitance (RC circuit). Investigation revealed that the conductance is frequency and a bias voltage dependent in which conductance continuous increase as the increasing frequency, respectively. Meanwhile, the capacitance is dependent on frequency up to a certain value of frequency (100 Hz) but decreases at high frequency (1 - 10 kHz). The interface state density in the Schottky diode was determined from G-V and C-V characteristics. The interface state density has values almost constant of 2.8 x 1012 eV-1cm-2 with slightly decrease by increasing frequencies. Consequently, both series resistance and interface trap density were found to decrease with increasing frequency. The frequency dependence of the electrical responses is attributed the distribution density of interface states that could follow the alternating current (AC) signal.

  19. Assessing the utility of frequency dependent nudging for reducing biases in biogeochemical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, Karl B.; Fennel, Katja; Thompson, Keith R.; Bianucci, Laura

    2014-09-01

    Bias errors, resulting from inaccurate boundary and forcing conditions, incorrect model parameterization, etc. are a common problem in environmental models including biogeochemical ocean models. While it is important to correct bias errors wherever possible, it is unlikely that any environmental model will ever be entirely free of such errors. Hence, methods for bias reduction are necessary. A widely used technique for online bias reduction is nudging, where simulated fields are continuously forced toward observations or a climatology. Nudging is robust and easy to implement, but suppresses high-frequency variability and introduces artificial phase shifts. As a solution to this problem Thompson et al. (2006) introduced frequency dependent nudging where nudging occurs only in prescribed frequency bands, typically centered on the mean and the annual cycle. They showed this method to be effective for eddy resolving ocean circulation models. Here we add a stability term to the previous form of frequency dependent nudging which makes the method more robust for non-linear biological models. Then we assess the utility of frequency dependent nudging for biological models by first applying the method to a simple predator-prey model and then to a 1D ocean biogeochemical model. In both cases we only nudge in two frequency bands centered on the mean and the annual cycle, and then assess how well the variability in higher frequency bands is recovered. We evaluate the effectiveness of frequency dependent nudging in comparison to conventional nudging and find significant improvements with the former.

  20. Evolutionary Graphs with Frequency Dependent Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Pu-Yan; Zhang, Pei-Ai

    Evolutionary graph theory was recently proposed by Lieberman et al. in 2005. In the previous papers about evolutionary graphs (EGs), the fitness of the residents in the EGs is in general assumed to be unity, and the fitness of a mutant is assumed to be a constant r. We aim to extend EG to general cases in this paper, namely, the fitness of a mutant is heavily dependent upon frequency. The corresponding properties for these new EGs are analyzed, and the fixation probability is obtained for large population.

  1. High-frequency spin-dependent tunnelling in magnetic nanocomposites: Magnetorefractive effect and magnetoimpedance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, Alexander [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: granov@magn.ru; Kozlov, Andrey [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Nedukh, Sergey [Institute of Radiophysics and Electronics NAS of Ukraine, Kharkov 61085 (Ukraine); Tarapov, Sergey [Institute of Radiophysics and Electronics NAS of Ukraine, Kharkov 61085 (Ukraine)

    2005-07-15

    Since the dielectric permittivity is linear with frequency-dependent conductivity, high-frequency properties for any kind of magnetic materials with the high magnetoresistance depend on magnetization. It manifests as magnetorefractive effect (MRE) in the infrared region of spectrum and as magnetoimpedance (MI) in the frequency range between radio and microwaves. The main mechanism of both MRE and MI in nanocomposites with tunnel-type magnetoresistance is high-frequency spin-dependent tunnelling. We report on recent results of theoretical and experimental investigations of MRE and MI in nanocomposites Co{sub 51.5}Al{sub 19.5}O{sub 29}, Co{sub 50.2}Ti{sub 9.1}O{sub 40.7}, Co{sub 52.3}Si{sub 12.2}O{sub 35.5} and (Co{sub 0,4}Fe{sub 0,6}){sub 48}(MgF){sub 52}. Most of the obtained experimental data for MRE and MI are consistent with the theory based on considering the tunnel junction between adjacent granules in percolation cluster as a capacitor.

  2. Drive frequency dependent phase imaging in piezoresponse force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bo Huifeng; Kan Yi; Lu Xiaomei; Liu Yunfei; Peng Song; Wang Xiaofei; Cai Wei; Xue Ruoshi; Zhu Jinsong

    2010-01-01

    The drive frequency dependent piezoresponse (PR) phase signal in near-stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals is studied by piezoresponse force microscopy. It is clearly shown that the local and nonlocal electrostatic forces have a great contribution to the PR phase signal. The significant PR phase difference of the antiparallel domains are observed at the contact resonances, which is related to the electrostatic dominated electromechanical interactions of the cantilever and tip-sample system. Moreover, the modulation voltage induced frequency shift at higher eigenmodes could be attributed to the change of indention force depending on the modulation amplitude with a piezoelectric origin. The PR phase of the silicon wafer is also measured for comparison. It is certificated that the electrostatic interactions are universal in voltage modulated scanning probe microscopy and could be extended to other phase imaging techniques.

  3. Studies of frequency dependent C-V characteristics of neutron irradiated p+-n silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zheng; Kraner, H.W.

    1990-10-01

    Frequency-dependent capacitance-voltage fluence (C-V) characteristics of neutron irradiated high resistivity silicon p + -n detectors have been observed up to a fluence of 8.0 x 10 12 n/cm 2 . It has been found that frequency dependence of the deviation of the C-V characteristic (from its normal V -1/2 dependence), is strongly dependent on the ratio of the defect density and the effective doping density N t /N' d . As the defect density approaches the effective dopant density, or N t /N' d → 1, the junction capacitance eventually assumes the value of the detector geometry capacitance at high frequencies (f ≤ 10 5 Hz), independent of voltage. A two-trap-level model using the concept of quasi-fermi levels has been developed, which predicts both the effects of C-V frequency dependence and dopant compensation observed in this study

  4. Frequency and voltage dependent electrical responses of poly(triarylamine thin film-based organic Schottky diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Khairul Anuar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A metal-organic-metal (MOM type Schottky diode based on poly (triarylamine (PTAA thin films has been fabricated by using the spin coating method. Investigation of the frequency dependent conductance-voltage (G-V-f and capacitance-voltage (C-V-f characteristics of the ITO/PTAA/Al MOM type diode were carried out in the frequency range from 12 Hz to 100 kHz using an LCR meter at room temperature. The frequency and bias voltage dependent electrical response were determined by admittance-based measured method in terms of an equivalent circuit model of the parallel combination of resistance and capacitance (RC circuit. Investigation revealed that the conductance is frequency and a bias voltage dependent in which conductance continuous increase as the increasing frequency, respectively. Meanwhile, the capacitance is dependent on frequency up to a certain value of frequency (100 Hz but decreases at high frequency (1 – 10 kHz. The interface state density in the Schottky diode was determined from G-V and C-V characteristics. The interface state density has values almost constant of 2.8 x 1012 eV−1cm−2 with slightly decrease by increasing frequencies. Consequently, both series resistance and interface trap density were found to decrease with increasing frequency. The frequency dependence of the electrical responses is attributed the distribution density of interface states that could follow the alternating current (AC signal.

  5. Visuomotor Entrainment and the Frequency-Dependent Response of Walking Balance to Perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Jason R; Francis, Carrie; Allen, Matt; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-08-26

    Visuomotor entrainment, or the synchronization of motor responses to visual stimuli, is a naturally emergent phenomenon in human standing. Our purpose was to investigate the prevalence and resolution of visuomotor entrainment in walking and the frequency-dependent response of walking balance to perturbations. We used a virtual reality environment to manipulate optical flow in ten healthy young adults during treadmill walking. A motion capture system recorded trunk, sacrum, and heel marker trajectories during a series of 3-min conditions in which we perturbed a virtual hallway mediolaterally with systematic changes in the driving frequencies of perceived motion. We quantified visuomotor entrainment using spectral analyses and balance deficits using trunk sway, gait variability, and detrended fluctuation analyses (DFA). ML kinematics were highly sensitive to visual perturbations, and instinctively synchronized (i.e., entrained) to a broad range of driving frequencies of perceived ML motion. However, the influence of visual perturbations on metrics of walking balance was frequency-dependent and governed by their proximity to stride frequency. Specifically, we found that a driving frequency nearest to subjects' average stride frequency uniquely compromised trunk sway, gait variability, and step-to-step correlations. We conclude that visuomotor entrainment is a robust and naturally emerging phenomenon during human walking, involving coordinated and frequency-dependent adjustments in trunk sway and foot placement to maintain balance at the whole-body level. These findings provide mechanistic insight into how the visuomotor control of walking balance is disrupted by visual perturbations and important reference values for the emergence of balance deficits due to age, injury, or disease.

  6. Time-domain representation of frequency-dependent foundation impedance functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, E.

    2006-01-01

    Foundation impedance functions provide a simple means to account for soil-structure interaction (SSI) when studying seismic response of structures. Impedance functions represent the dynamic stiffness of the soil media surrounding the foundation. The fact that impedance functions are frequency dependent makes it difficult to incorporate SSI in standard time-history analysis software. This paper introduces a simple method to convert frequency-dependent impedance functions into time-domain filters. The method is based on the least-squares approximation of impedance functions by ratios of two complex polynomials. Such ratios are equivalent, in the time-domain, to discrete-time recursive filters, which are simple finite-difference equations giving the relationship between foundation forces and displacements. These filters can easily be incorporated into standard time-history analysis programs. Three examples are presented to show the applications of the method.

  7. Frequency Dependence of Damping and Compliance in Loudspeaker Suspensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Knud; Tinggaard, Carsten; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2010-01-01

    ]. It is an empirical model mathematically describing the effects of visco-elasticity in loudspeaker suspensions. The evaluation is to a high degree based on test loudspeakers with rubber surrounds with a high content of plasticizer combining high compliance and high damping. This is very effective to reduce rim...... resonances, but less used in high quality loudspeakers today – where “Low Loss Rubber Surround” is currently seen as a marketing feature, as it is expected to have positive impact on sound quality. The plasticized type of surround shows significant creep, followed by compliance and damping increasing towards...... - with the additives normally used to adjust stiffness and damping - neither frequency dependency of compliance nor creep are significant problems. Despite this, experience shows that frequency dependent mechanical damping nevertheless might be present. In this paper some modifications to the LOG-model are proposed...

  8. Simultaneous transmission of accurate time, stable frequency, data, and sensor system over one fiber with ITU 100 GHz grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Tomas; Munster, Petr; Vojtech, Josef; Velc, Radek; Oujezsky, Vaclav

    2018-01-01

    Optical fiber is the most used medium for current telecommunication networks. Besides data transmissions, special advanced applications like accurate time or stable frequency transmissions are more common, especially in research and education networks. On the other hand, new applications like distributed sensing are in ISP's interest because e.g. such sensing allows new service: protection of fiber infrastructure. Transmission of all applications in a single fiber can be very cost efficient but it is necessary to evaluate possible interaction before real application and deploying the service, especially if standard 100 GHz grid is considered. We performed laboratory measurement of simultaneous transmission of 100 G data based on DP-QPSK modulation format, accurate time, stable frequency and sensing system based on phase sensitive OTDR through two types of optical fibers, G.655 and G.653. These fibers are less common than G.652 fiber but thanks to their slightly higher nonlinear character, there are suitable for simulation of the worst case which can arise in a real network.

  9. Frequency-dependent hydrodynamic interaction between two solid spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gerhard; Schmid, Friederike

    2017-12-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions play an important role in many areas of soft matter science. In simulations with implicit solvent, various techniques such as Brownian or Stokesian dynamics explicitly include hydrodynamic interactions a posteriori by using hydrodynamic diffusion tensors derived from the Stokes equation. However, this equation assumes the interaction to be instantaneous which is an idealized approximation and only valid on long time scales. In the present paper, we go one step further and analyze the time-dependence of hydrodynamic interactions between finite-sized particles in a compressible fluid on the basis of the linearized Navier-Stokes equation. The theoretical results show that at high frequencies, the compressibility of the fluid has a significant impact on the frequency-dependent pair interactions. The predictions of hydrodynamic theory are compared to molecular dynamics simulations of two nanocolloids in a Lennard-Jones fluid. For this system, we reconstruct memory functions by extending the inverse Volterra technique. The simulation data agree very well with the theory, therefore, the theory can be used to implement dynamically consistent hydrodynamic interactions in the increasingly popular field of non-Markovian modeling.

  10. Mathematical modelling of frequency-dependent hysteresis and energy loss of FeBSiC amorphous alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koprivica, Branko; Milovanovic, Alenka; Mitrovic, Nebojsa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a novel mathematical model of frequency-dependent magnetic hysteresis. The major hysteresis loop in this model is represented by the ascending and descending curve over an arctangent function. The parameters of the hysteresis model have been calculated from a measured hysteresis loop of the FeBSiC amorphous alloy sample. A number of measurements have been performed with this sample at different frequencies of the sinusoidal excitation magnetic field. A variation of the coercive magnetic field with the frequency has been observed and used in the modelling of frequency-dependent hysteresis with the proposed model. A comparison between measured and modelled hysteresis loops has been presented. Additionally, the areas of the obtained hysteresis loops, representing the energy loss per unit volume, have been calculated and the dependence of the energy loss on the frequency is shown. Furthermore, two models of the frequency dependence of the coercivity and two models of the energy loss separation have been used for fitting the experimental and simulation results. The relations between these models and their parameters have been observed and analysed. Also, the relations between parameters of the hysteresis model and the parameters of the energy loss separation models have been analysed and discussed. - Highlights: • A mathematical model of frequency-dependent hysteresis is proposed. • Dependence of coercivity and energy loss per unit volume on frequency is modelled. • Equivalence between models and relation between model parameters are presented.

  11. Peculiarities of frequency dependence of type 3 solar radio bursts duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsybko, Ya.G.

    1989-01-01

    From the averaged data of type 3 bursts at the fixed frequencies in the range 12.5-25 MHz and out of this limit it is concluded that there exist two branges of the burst duration dependence on the frequency. This splitting allows to distinguish bursts occurring at the fundamental and the second harmonics of the plasma frequency decreasing with height in the solar corona. The type 3b radiation is characterized by a separate diagram of the mean duration versus frequency of the stria-bursts at the fundamental harmonic

  12. Tuning of Human Modulation Filters Is Carrier-Frequency Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Andrew J. R.; Reiss, Joshua D.; McAlpine, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies employing speech stimuli to investigate ‘cocktail-party’ listening have focused on entrainment of cortical activity to modulations at syllabic (5 Hz) and phonemic (20 Hz) rates. The data suggest that cortical modulation filters (CMFs) are dependent on the sound-frequency channel in which modulations are conveyed, potentially underpinning a strategy for separating speech from background noise. Here, we characterize modulation filters in human listeners using a novel behavioral method. Within an ‘inverted’ adaptive forced-choice increment detection task, listening level was varied whilst contrast was held constant for ramped increments with effective modulation rates between 0.5 and 33 Hz. Our data suggest that modulation filters are tonotopically organized (i.e., vary along the primary, frequency-organized, dimension). This suggests that the human auditory system is optimized to track rapid (phonemic) modulations at high sound-frequencies and slow (prosodic/syllabic) modulations at low frequencies. PMID:24009759

  13. Frequency and Magnetic Field Dependence of the Skin Depth in Co-rich Soft Magnetic Microwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zhukov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We studied giant magnetoimpedance (GMI effect in magnetically soft amorphous Co-rich microwires in the extended frequency range. From obtained experimentally dependences of GMI ratio on magnetic field and different frequencies we estimated the penetration depth and its dependence on applied magnetic field and frequency

  14. An efficient and accurate method to obtain the energy-dependent Green function for general potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, T; Heller, E J; Parrott, R E

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent quantum mechanics provides an intuitive picture of particle propagation in external fields. Semiclassical methods link the classical trajectories of particles with their quantum mechanical propagation. Many analytical results and a variety of numerical methods have been developed to solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The time-dependent methods work for nearly arbitrarily shaped potentials, including sources and sinks via complex-valued potentials. Many quantities are measured at fixed energy, which is seemingly not well suited for a time-dependent formulation. Very few methods exist to obtain the energy-dependent Green function for complicated potentials without resorting to ensemble averages or using certain lead-in arrangements. Here, we demonstrate in detail a time-dependent approach, which can accurately and effectively construct the energy-dependent Green function for very general potentials. The applications of the method are numerous, including chemical, mesoscopic, and atomic physics

  15. A hybrid transport-diffusion Monte Carlo method for frequency-dependent radiative-transfer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Thompson, Kelly G.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations in optically thick media. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many smaller Monte Carlo steps, thus improving the efficiency of the simulation. In this paper, we present an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold, as optical thickness is typically a decreasing function of frequency. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo, which results in a hybrid transport-diffusion scheme. With a set of frequency-dependent test problems, we confirm the accuracy and increased efficiency of our new DDMC method.

  16. Modulation of the Object/Background Interaction by Spatial Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanju Ren

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available With regard to the relationship between object and background perception in the natural scene images, functional isolation hypothesis and interactive hypothesis were proposed. Based on previous studies, the present study investigated the role of spatial frequency in the relationship between object and background perception in the natural scene images. In three experiments, participants reported the object, background, or both after seeing each picture for 500 ms followed by a mask. The authors found that (a backgrounds were identified more accurately when they contained a consistent rather than an inconsistent object, independently of spatial frequency; (b objects were identified more accurately in a consistent than an inconsistent background under the condition of low spatial frequencies but not high spatial frequencies; (c spatial frequency modulation remained when both objects and backgrounds were reported simultaneously. The authors conclude that object/background interaction is partially dependent on spatial frequency.

  17. Stimulus Ratio and Level Dependence of Low- and Mid-Frequency Distortion-Product Otoacoustic Emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Tornvig; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    ratios f2/f1 (1.05-1.50) and three stimulus sound pressure levels L1/L2 (65/45, 65/55, 70/60) were measured in each configuration. The DPOAE response was isolated with the discrete Fourier transformation (DFT). The DFT measures the DPOAE response accurately only when the DPOAE frequency and both stimulus...... examples of low-frequency DPOAEs exist in the literature. Overcoming the decreasing response level and increasing noise level with decreasing frequency may provide a non-invasive window into the inner-ear mechanics of low-frequency hearing. Eighteen out of 21 young human adults screened (19-30 years) had......-frequency range. The stimulus level has similar effects in both frequency ranges, that is, the ratio-magnitude response increases and broadens with increasing level. The combined observations could indicate a difference between apical and basal cochlear physiology....

  18. Frequency and temperature dependence of ferromagnetic linewidth in exchange biased Permalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubitz, P.; Rubinstein, M.; Krebs, J. J.; Cheng, S.-F.

    2001-01-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance linewidths were measured at 9.5 and 35 GHz and in the temperature range from 77 to 350 K for thin Permalloy (Py) films exchange biased by adjacent layers of NiO, CoO, or IrMn. Compared to unoxidized Py alone, for which the linewidth is nearly temperature independent in this range and scales linearly with frequency, exchange biased Py has broader lines with distinctive temperature dependences for each bias material at 9.5 GHz. Different temperature dependences were observed at 35 GHz. Our results are consistent with relaxation related to thermally driven reversal of the antiferromagnetic grains. Intrinsic damping and inhomogeneities also add to the widths. The qualitative features of the temperature and frequency dependences of the linewidths can be described with the usual expression for the slow relaxation linewidth mechanism. The temperature dependence of the relaxation time is taken from Neel's expression for the reversal time using appropriate rate prefactors and activation energies. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  19. Concept of frequency separation in life prediction for time-dependent fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, L.F.

    1976-01-01

    Two methods are described to improve the predictive capability of the frequency-modified fatigue equations for time-dependent fatigue. These built-on the earlier approach and are applicable to severely unbalanced hysteresis loops. Comparisons made with various wave-shape investigations show favorable results. A new form of hysteresis loop is introduced utilizing frequency separation concepts. 4 tables, 11 fig

  20. The Frequency Spectral Properties of Electrode-Skin Contact Impedance on Human Head and Its Frequency-Dependent Effects on Frequency-Difference EIT in Stroke Detection from 10Hz to 1MHz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yang

    Full Text Available Frequency-difference electrical impedance tomography (fdEIT reconstructs frequency-dependent changes of a complex impedance distribution. It has a potential application in acute stroke detection because there are significant differences in impedance spectra between stroke lesions and normal brain tissues. However, fdEIT suffers from the influences of electrode-skin contact impedance since contact impedance varies greatly with frequency. When using fdEIT to detect stroke, it is critical to know the degree of measurement errors or image artifacts caused by contact impedance. To our knowledge, no study has systematically investigated the frequency spectral properties of electrode-skin contact impedance on human head and its frequency-dependent effects on fdEIT used in stroke detection within a wide frequency band (10 Hz-1 MHz. In this study, we first measured and analyzed the frequency spectral properties of electrode-skin contact impedance on 47 human subjects' heads within 10 Hz-1 MHz. Then, we quantified the frequency-dependent effects of contact impedance on fdEIT in stroke detection in terms of the current distribution beneath the electrodes and the contact impedance imbalance between two measuring electrodes. The results showed that the contact impedance at high frequencies (>100 kHz significantly changed the current distribution beneath the electrode, leading to nonnegligible errors in boundary voltages and artifacts in reconstructed images. The contact impedance imbalance at low frequencies (<1 kHz also caused significant measurement errors. We conclude that the contact impedance has critical frequency-dependent influences on fdEIT and further studies on reducing such influences are necessary to improve the application of fdEIT in stroke detection.

  1. The Frequency Spectral Properties of Electrode-Skin Contact Impedance on Human Head and Its Frequency-Dependent Effects on Frequency-Difference EIT in Stroke Detection from 10Hz to 1MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Dai, Meng; Xu, Canhua; Zhang, Ge; Li, Weichen; Fu, Feng; Shi, Xuetao; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2017-01-01

    Frequency-difference electrical impedance tomography (fdEIT) reconstructs frequency-dependent changes of a complex impedance distribution. It has a potential application in acute stroke detection because there are significant differences in impedance spectra between stroke lesions and normal brain tissues. However, fdEIT suffers from the influences of electrode-skin contact impedance since contact impedance varies greatly with frequency. When using fdEIT to detect stroke, it is critical to know the degree of measurement errors or image artifacts caused by contact impedance. To our knowledge, no study has systematically investigated the frequency spectral properties of electrode-skin contact impedance on human head and its frequency-dependent effects on fdEIT used in stroke detection within a wide frequency band (10 Hz-1 MHz). In this study, we first measured and analyzed the frequency spectral properties of electrode-skin contact impedance on 47 human subjects' heads within 10 Hz-1 MHz. Then, we quantified the frequency-dependent effects of contact impedance on fdEIT in stroke detection in terms of the current distribution beneath the electrodes and the contact impedance imbalance between two measuring electrodes. The results showed that the contact impedance at high frequencies (>100 kHz) significantly changed the current distribution beneath the electrode, leading to nonnegligible errors in boundary voltages and artifacts in reconstructed images. The contact impedance imbalance at low frequencies (<1 kHz) also caused significant measurement errors. We conclude that the contact impedance has critical frequency-dependent influences on fdEIT and further studies on reducing such influences are necessary to improve the application of fdEIT in stroke detection.

  2. Frequency dependence of quantum path interference in non-collinear high-order harmonic generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Shi-Yang; He Xin-Kui; Teng Hao; Ye Peng; Wang Li-Feng; He Peng; Wei Zhi-Yi

    2016-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) driven by two non-collinear beams including a fundamental and its weak second harmonic is numerically studied. The interference of harmonics from adjacent electron quantum paths is found to be dependent on the relative delay of the driving pulse, and the dependences are different for different harmonic orders. This frequency dependence of the interference is attributed to the spatial frequency chirp in the HHG beam resulting from the harmonic dipole phase, which in turn provides a potential way to gain an insight into the generation of high-order harmonics. As an example, the intensity dependent dipole phase coefficient α is retrieved from the interference fringe. (paper)

  3. Hydrogen-enhanced fatigue crack growth in steels and its frequency dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Hisao; Takakuwa, Osamu; Yamabe, Junichiro; Matsuoka, Saburo

    2017-07-28

    In the context of the fatigue life design of components, particularly those destined for use in hydrogen refuelling stations and fuel cell vehicles, it is important to understand the hydrogen-induced, fatigue crack growth (FCG) acceleration in steels. As such, the mechanisms for acceleration and its influencing factors are reviewed and discussed in this paper, with a special focus on the peculiar frequency dependence of the hydrogen-induced FCG acceleration. Further, this frequency dependence is debated by introducing some potentially responsible elements, along with new experimental data obtained by the authors.This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  4. Accurate deuterium spectroscopy for fundamental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wcisło, P.; Thibault, F.; Zaborowski, M.; Wójtewicz, S.; Cygan, A.; Kowzan, G.; Masłowski, P.; Komasa, J.; Puchalski, M.; Pachucki, K.; Ciuryło, R.; Lisak, D.

    2018-07-01

    We present an accurate measurement of the weak quadrupole S(2) 2-0 line in self-perturbed D2 and theoretical ab initio calculations of both collisional line-shape effects and energy of this rovibrational transition. The spectra were collected at the 247-984 Torr pressure range with a frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectrometer linked to an optical frequency comb (OFC) referenced to a primary time standard. Our line-shape modeling employed quantum calculations of molecular scattering (the pressure broadening and shift and their speed dependencies were calculated, while the complex frequency of optical velocity-changing collisions was fitted to experimental spectra). The velocity-changing collisions are handled with the hard-sphere collisional kernel. The experimental and theoretical pressure broadening and shift are consistent within 5% and 27%, respectively (the discrepancy for shift is 8% when referred not to the speed averaged value, which is close to zero, but to the range of variability of the speed-dependent shift). We use our high pressure measurement to determine the energy, ν0, of the S(2) 2-0 transition. The ab initio line-shape calculations allowed us to mitigate the expected collisional systematics reaching the 410 kHz accuracy of ν0. We report theoretical determination of ν0 taking into account relativistic and QED corrections up to α5. Our estimation of the accuracy of the theoretical ν0 is 1.3 MHz. We observe 3.4σ discrepancy between experimental and theoretical ν0.

  5. Spatial resolution dependence on spectral frequency in human speech cortex electrocorticography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Leah; Hamilton, Liberty S.; Edwards, Erik; Bouchard, Kristofer E.; Chang, Edward F.

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Electrocorticography (ECoG) has become an important tool in human neuroscience and has tremendous potential for emerging applications in neural interface technology. Electrode array design parameters are outstanding issues for both research and clinical applications, and these parameters depend critically on the nature of the neural signals to be recorded. Here, we investigate the functional spatial resolution of neural signals recorded at the human cortical surface. We empirically derive spatial spread functions to quantify the shared neural activity for each frequency band of the electrocorticogram. Approach. Five subjects with high-density (4 mm center-to-center spacing) ECoG grid implants participated in speech perception and production tasks while neural activity was recorded from the speech cortex, including superior temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus, and postcentral gyrus. The cortical surface field potential was decomposed into traditional EEG frequency bands. Signal similarity between electrode pairs for each frequency band was quantified using a Pearson correlation coefficient. Main results. The correlation of neural activity between electrode pairs was inversely related to the distance between the electrodes; this relationship was used to quantify spatial falloff functions for cortical subdomains. As expected, lower frequencies remained correlated over larger distances than higher frequencies. However, both the envelope and phase of gamma and high gamma frequencies (30-150 Hz) are largely uncorrelated (<90%) at 4 mm, the smallest spacing of the high-density arrays. Thus, ECoG arrays smaller than 4 mm have significant promise for increasing signal resolution at high frequencies, whereas less additional gain is achieved for lower frequencies. Significance. Our findings quantitatively demonstrate the dependence of ECoG spatial resolution on the neural frequency of interest. We demonstrate that this relationship is consistent across patients and

  6. Frequency, moisture content, and temperature dependent dielectric properties of potato starch related to drying with radio-frequency/microwave energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhuozhuo; Guo, Wenchuan

    2017-08-24

    To develop advanced drying methods using radio-frequency (RF) or microwave (MW) energy, dielectric properties of potato starch were determined using an open-ended coaxial-line probe and network analyzer at frequencies between 20 and 4,500 MHz, moisture contents between 15.1% and 43.1% wet basis (w.b.), and temperatures between 25 and 75 °C. The results showed that both dielectric constant (ε') and loss factor (ε″) were dependent on frequency, moisture content, and temperature. ε' decreased with increasing frequency at a given moisture content or temperature. At low moisture contents (≤25.4% w.b.) or low temperatures (≤45 °C), ε″ increased with increasing frequency. However, ε″ changed from decrease to increase with increasing frequency at high moisture contents or temperatures. At low temperatures (25-35 °C), both ε' and ε″ increased with increasing moisture content. At low moisture contents (15.1-19.5% w.b.), they increased with increasing temperature. The change trends of ε' and ε″ were different and dependent on temperature and moisture content at their high levels. The penetration depth (d p ) decreased with increasing frequency. RF treatments may provide potential large-scale industrial drying application for potato starch. This research offers useful information on dielectric properties of potato starch related to drying with electromagnetic energy.

  7. Frequency-dependent complex modulus of the uterus: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiss, Miklos Z [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Hobson, Maritza A [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Varghese, Tomy [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Harter, Josephine [Department of Surgical Pathology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kliewer, Mark A [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Hartenbach, Ellen M [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Zagzebski, James A [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2006-08-07

    The frequency-dependent complex moduli of human uterine tissue have been characterized. Quantification of the modulus is required for developing uterine ultrasound elastography as a viable imaging modality for diagnosing and monitoring causes for abnormal uterine bleeding and enlargement, as well assessing the integrity of uterine and cervical tissue. The complex modulus was measured in samples from hysterectomies of 24 patients ranging in age from 31 to 79 years. Measurements were done under small compressions of either 1 or 2%, at low pre-compression values (either 1 or 2%), and over a frequency range of 0.1-100 Hz. Modulus values of cervical tissue monotonically increased from approximately 30-90 kPa over the frequency range. Normal uterine tissue possessed modulus values over the same range, while leiomyomas, or uterine fibroids, exhibited values ranging from approximately 60-220 kPa.

  8. Frequency-dependent complex modulus of the uterus: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, Miklos Z; Hobson, Maritza A; Varghese, Tomy; Harter, Josephine; Kliewer, Mark A; Hartenbach, Ellen M; Zagzebski, James A

    2006-01-01

    The frequency-dependent complex moduli of human uterine tissue have been characterized. Quantification of the modulus is required for developing uterine ultrasound elastography as a viable imaging modality for diagnosing and monitoring causes for abnormal uterine bleeding and enlargement, as well assessing the integrity of uterine and cervical tissue. The complex modulus was measured in samples from hysterectomies of 24 patients ranging in age from 31 to 79 years. Measurements were done under small compressions of either 1 or 2%, at low pre-compression values (either 1 or 2%), and over a frequency range of 0.1-100 Hz. Modulus values of cervical tissue monotonically increased from approximately 30-90 kPa over the frequency range. Normal uterine tissue possessed modulus values over the same range, while leiomyomas, or uterine fibroids, exhibited values ranging from approximately 60-220 kPa

  9. Tuning of gravity-dependent and gravity-independent vertical angular VOR gain changes by frequency of adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushin, Sergei B

    2012-06-01

    The gain of the vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) was adaptively increased and decreased in a side-down head orientation for 4 h in two cynomolgus monkeys. Adaptation was performed at 0.25, 1, 2, or 4 Hz. The gravity-dependent and -independent gain changes were determined over a range of head orientations from left-side-down to right-side-down at frequencies from 0.25 to 10 Hz, before and after adaptation. Gain changes vs. frequency data were fit with a Gaussian to determine the frequency at which the peak gain change occurred, as well as the tuning width. The frequency at which the peak gravity-dependent gain change occurred was approximately equal to the frequency of adaptation, and the width increased monotonically with increases in the frequency of adaptation. The gravity-independent component was tuned to the adaptive frequency of 0.25 Hz but was uniformly distributed over all frequencies when the adaptation frequency was 1-4 Hz. The amplitude of the gravity-independent gain changes was larger after the aVOR gain decrease than after the gain increase across all tested frequencies. For the aVOR gain decrease, the phase lagged about 4° for frequencies below the adaptation frequency and led for frequencies above the adaptation frequency. For gain increases, the phase relationship as a function of frequency was inverted. This study demonstrates that the previously described dependence of aVOR gain adaptation on frequency is a property of the gravity-dependent component of the aVOR only. The gravity-independent component of the aVOR had a substantial tuning curve only at an adaptation frequency of 0.25 Hz.

  10. Exploring Moho sharpness in Northeastern North China Craton with frequency-dependence analysis of Ps receiver function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Yao, H.; Chen, L.; WANG, X.; Fang, L.

    2017-12-01

    The North China Craton (NCC), one of the oldest cratons in the world, has attracted wide attention in Earth Science for decades because of the unusual Mesozoic destruction of its cratonic lithosphere. Understanding the deep processes and mechanism of this craton destruction demands detailed knowledge about the deep structure of this region. In this study, we calculate P-wave receiver functions (RFs) with two-year teleseismic records from the North China Seismic Array ( 200 stations) deployed in the northeastern NCC. We observe both diffused and concentered PpPs signals from the Moho in RF waveforms, which indicates heterogeneous Moho sharpness variations in the study region. Synthetic Ps phases generated from broad positive velocity gradients at the depth of the Moho (referred as Pms) show a clear frequency dependence nature, which in turn is required to constrain the sharpness of the velocity gradient. Practically, characterizing such a frequency dependence feature in real data is challenging, because of low signal-to-noise ratio, contaminations by multiples generated from shallow structure, distorted signal stacking especially in double-peak Pms signals, etc. We attempt to address these issues by, firstly, utilizing a high-resolution Moho depth model of this region to predict theoretical delay times of Pms that facilitate more accurate Pms identifications. The Moho depth model is derived by wave-equation based poststack depth migration on both Ps phase and surface-reflected multiples in RFs in our previous study (Zhang et al., submitted to JGR). Second, we select data from a major back azimuth range of 100° - 220° that includes 70% teleseismic events due to the uneven data coverage and to avoid azimuthal influence as well. Finally, we apply an adaptive cross-correlation stacking of Pms signals in RFs for each station within different frequency bands. High-quality Pms signals at different frequencies will be selected after careful visual inspection and adaptive

  11. Simple and accurate model for voltage-dependent resistance of metallic carbon nanotube interconnects: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamacli, Serhan; Avci, Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    In this work, development of a voltage dependent resistance model for metallic carbon nanotubes is aimed. Firstly, the resistance of metallic carbon nanotube interconnects are obtained from ab initio simulations and then the voltage dependence of the resistance is modeled through regression. Self-consistent non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory is used for calculating the voltage dependent resistance of metallic carbon nanotubes. It is shown that voltage dependent resistances of carbon nanotubes can be accurately modeled as a polynomial function which enables rapid integration of carbon nanotube interconnect models into electronic design automation tools.

  12. Range-separated time-dependent density-functional theory with a frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebolini, Elisa, E-mail: elisa.rebolini@kjemi.uio.no; Toulouse, Julien, E-mail: julien.toulouse@upmc.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2016-03-07

    We present a range-separated linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) which combines a density-functional approximation for the short-range response kernel and a frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter approximation for the long-range response kernel. This approach goes beyond the adiabatic approximation usually used in linear-response TDDFT and aims at improving the accuracy of calculations of electronic excitation energies of molecular systems. A detailed derivation of the frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel is given using many-body Green-function theory. Preliminary tests of this range-separated TDDFT method are presented for the calculation of excitation energies of the He and Be atoms and small molecules (H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}). The results suggest that the addition of the long-range second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel overall slightly improves the excitation energies.

  13. Mutational jackpot events generate effective frequency-dependent selection in adapting populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallatschek, Oskar

    The site-frequency spectrum is one the most easily measurable quantities that characterize the genetic diversity of a population. While most neutral models predict that site frequency spectra should decay with increasing frequency, a high-frequency uptick has been reported in many populations. Anomalies in the high-frequency tail are particularly unsettling because the highest frequencies can be measured with greatest accuracy. Here, we show that an uptick in the spectrum of neutral mutations generally arises when mutant frequencies are dominated by rare jackpot events, mutational events with large descendant numbers. This leads to an effective pattern of frequency-dependent selection (or unstable internal equilibrium at one half frequency) that causes an accumulation of high-frequency polymorphic sites. We reproduce the known uptick occurring for recurrent hitchhiking (genetic draft) as well as rapid adaptation, and (in the future) generalize the shape of the high-frequency tail to other scenarios that are dominated by jackpot events, such as frequent range expansions. We also tackle (in the future) the inverse approach to use the high-frequency uptick for learning about the tail of the offspring number distribution. Positively selected alleles need to surpass, typically, an u NSF Career Award (PoLS), NIH NIGMS R01, Simons Foundation.

  14. Accurate calibration of the velocity-dependent one-scale model for domain walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, A.M.M.; Martins, C.J.A.P.; Shellard, E.P.S.

    2013-01-01

    We study the asymptotic scaling properties of standard domain wall networks in several cosmological epochs. We carry out the largest field theory simulations achieved to date, with simulation boxes of size 2048 3 , and confirm that a scale-invariant evolution of the network is indeed the attractor solution. The simulations are also used to obtain an accurate calibration for the velocity-dependent one-scale model for domain walls: we numerically determine the two free model parameters to have the values c w =0.34±0.16 and k w =0.98±0.07, which are of higher precision than (but in agreement with) earlier estimates.

  15. Accurate calibration of the velocity-dependent one-scale model for domain walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, A.M.M., E-mail: up080322016@alunos.fc.up.pt [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Martins, C.J.A.P., E-mail: Carlos.Martins@astro.up.pt [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Shellard, E.P.S., E-mail: E.P.S.Shellard@damtp.cam.ac.uk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-08

    We study the asymptotic scaling properties of standard domain wall networks in several cosmological epochs. We carry out the largest field theory simulations achieved to date, with simulation boxes of size 2048{sup 3}, and confirm that a scale-invariant evolution of the network is indeed the attractor solution. The simulations are also used to obtain an accurate calibration for the velocity-dependent one-scale model for domain walls: we numerically determine the two free model parameters to have the values c{sub w}=0.34{+-}0.16 and k{sub w}=0.98{+-}0.07, which are of higher precision than (but in agreement with) earlier estimates.

  16. The role of age, gender, mood states and exercise frequency on exercise dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sebastiano; Hausenblas, Heather A; Oliva, Patrizia; Cuzzocrea, Francesca; Larcan, Rosalba

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to explore the prevalence, and the role of mood, exercise frequency, age, and gender differences of exercise dependence. Regular exercisers (N = 409) completed a socio-demographic questionnaire, the Exercise Dependence Scale, and the Profile of Mood States. For data analyses, the participants were stratified for sex and age (age ranges = young adults: 18-24 years, adults: 25-44 years, and middle-aged adults: 45-64 years). We found that: (a) 4.4% of the participants were classified as at-risk for exercise dependence; (b) the men and the two younger groups (i.e., young adults and adults) had higher exercise dependence scores; and (c) age, gender, exercise frequency, and mood state were related to exercise dependence. Our results support previous research on the prevalence of exercise dependence and reveal that adulthood may be the critical age for developing exercise dependence. These findings have practical implication for identifying individuals at-risk for exercise dependence symptoms, and may aid in targeting and guiding the implementation of prevention program for adults.

  17. A Novel Frequency Measurement Method Suitable for a Large Frequency Ratio Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Wei; XUAN Zong-Qiang; YU Jian-Guo; WANG Hai; ZHOU Hui; LI Zhi-Qi

    2004-01-01

    @@ As for the obstacles to direct comparison between superhigh and lower frequencies, we accomplish the accurate comparison between low and microwave frequencies with the 105 ratios of the operating frequencies on the basis of phase comparison between the signals whose frequencies are related by an arbitrary integer. This method is simple and accurate, and will be widely used as a special frequency comparison approach.

  18. A DTI-based model for TMS using the independent impedance method with frequency-dependent tissue parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geeter, N.; Crevecoeur, G.; Dupré, L.; Van Hecke, W.; Leemans, A.

    2012-04-01

    Accurate simulations on detailed realistic head models are necessary to gain a better understanding of the response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Hitherto, head models with simplified geometries and constant isotropic material properties are often used, whereas some biological tissues have anisotropic characteristics which vary naturally with frequency. Moreover, most computational methods do not take the tissue permittivity into account. Therefore, we calculate the electromagnetic behaviour due to TMS in a head model with realistic geometry and where realistic dispersive anisotropic tissue properties are incorporated, based on T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images. This paper studies the impact of tissue anisotropy, permittivity and frequency dependence, using the anisotropic independent impedance method. The results show that anisotropy yields differences up to 32% and 19% of the maximum induced currents and electric field, respectively. Neglecting the permittivity values leads to a decrease of about 72% and 24% of the maximum currents and field, respectively. Implementing the dispersive effects of biological tissues results in a difference of 6% of the maximum currents. The cerebral voxels show limited sensitivity of the induced electric field to changes in conductivity and permittivity, whereas the field varies approximately linearly with frequency. These findings illustrate the importance of including each of the above parameters in the model and confirm the need for accuracy in the applied patient-specific method, which can be used in computer-assisted TMS.

  19. Human Commercial Models' Eye Colour Shows Negative Frequency-Dependent Selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Rodrigues Nogueira Forti

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the eye colour of human commercial models registered in the UK (400 female and 400 male and Brazil (400 female and 400 male to test the hypothesis that model eye colour frequency was the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. The eye colours of the models were classified as: blue, brown or intermediate. Chi-square analyses of data for countries separated by sex showed that in the United Kingdom brown eyes and intermediate colours were significantly more frequent than expected in comparison to the general United Kingdom population (P<0.001. In Brazil, the most frequent eye colour brown was significantly less frequent than expected in comparison to the general Brazilian population. These results support the hypothesis that model eye colour is the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. This could be the result of people using eye colour as a marker of genetic diversity and finding rarer eye colours more attractive because of the potential advantage more genetically diverse offspring that could result from such a choice. Eye colour may be important because in comparison to many other physical traits (e.g., hair colour it is hard to modify, hide or disguise, and it is highly polymorphic.

  20. The Frequency-dependent Damping of Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves in a Sunspot Umbral Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Jess, D. B. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Doorsselaere, T. Van [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Verth, G. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Morton, R. J. [Department of Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering, Northumbria University, Ellison Building, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Fedun, V. [Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Erdélyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Christian, D. J., E-mail: krishna.prasad@qub.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2017-09-20

    High spatial and temporal resolution images of a sunspot, obtained simultaneously in multiple optical and UV wavelengths, are employed to study the propagation and damping characteristics of slow magnetoacoustic waves up to transition region heights. Power spectra are generated from intensity oscillations in sunspot umbra, across multiple atmospheric heights, for frequencies up to a few hundred mHz. It is observed that the power spectra display a power-law dependence over the entire frequency range, with a significant enhancement around 5.5 mHz found for the chromospheric channels. The phase difference spectra reveal a cutoff frequency near 3 mHz, up to which the oscillations are evanescent, while those with higher frequencies propagate upward. The power-law index appears to increase with atmospheric height. Also, shorter damping lengths are observed for oscillations with higher frequencies suggesting frequency-dependent damping. Using the relative amplitudes of the 5.5 mHz (3 minute) oscillations, we estimate the energy flux at different heights, which seems to decay gradually from the photosphere, in agreement with recent numerical simulations. Furthermore, a comparison of power spectra across the umbral radius highlights an enhancement of high-frequency waves near the umbral center, which does not seem to be related to magnetic field inclination angle effects.

  1. Frequency and Temperature Dependence of Electrical Breakdown at 21, 30, and 39GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, H. H.; Döbert, S.; Wilson, I.; Wuensch, W.

    2003-06-01

    A TeV-range e+e- linear collider has emerged as one of the most promising candidates to extend the high energy frontier of experimental elementary particle physics. A high accelerating gradient for such a collider is desirable to limit its overall length. Accelerating gradient is mainly limited by electrical breakdown, and it has been generally assumed that this limit increases with increasing frequency for normal-conducting accelerating structures. Since the choice of frequency has a profound influence on the design of a linear collider, the frequency dependence of breakdown has been measured using six exactly scaled single-cell cavities at 21, 30, and 39GHz. The influence of temperature on breakdown behavior was also investigated. The maximum obtainable surface fields were found to be in the range of 300 to 400 MV/m for copper, with no significant dependence on either frequency or temperature.

  2. Frequency and Temperature Dependence of Electrical Breakdown at 21, 30 and 39 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Hans Heinrich; Wilson, Ian H; Wuensch, Walter

    2003-01-01

    A TeV-range e+e- linear collider has emerged as one of the most promising candidates to extend the high energy frontier of experimental elementary particle physics. A high accelerating gradient for such a collider is desirable to limit its overall length. Accelerating gradient is mainly limited by electrical breakdown, and it has been generally assumed that this limit increases with increasing frequency for normal-conducting accelerating structures. Since the choice of frequency has a profound influence on the design of a linear collider, the frequency dependence of breakdown has been measured using six exactly scaled single-cell cavities at 21, 30, and 39 GHz. The influence of temperature on breakdown behavior was also investigated. The maximum obtainable surface fields were found to be in the range of 300 to 400 MV/m for copper, with no significant dependence on either frequency or temperature.

  3. Spin-dependent tunnelling at infrared frequencies: magnetorefractive effect in magnetic nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovsky, A.B.; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2004-01-01

    We present a brief review of recent experimental and theoretical results on magnetorefractive effect in magnetic metal-insulator nanogranular alloys with tunnel-type magnetoresistance focusing on its relation with high-frequency spin-dependent tunnelling

  4. Spin-dependent tunnelling at infrared frequencies: magnetorefractive effect in magnetic nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, A.B. E-mail: granov@magn.ru; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2004-05-01

    We present a brief review of recent experimental and theoretical results on magnetorefractive effect in magnetic metal-insulator nanogranular alloys with tunnel-type magnetoresistance focusing on its relation with high-frequency spin-dependent tunnelling.

  5. Frequency-dependent transient response of an oscillating electrically actuated droplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash, S; Kumari, N; Garimella, S V

    2012-01-01

    The transient response of a millimeter-sized sessile droplet under electrical actuation is experimentally investigated. Under dc actuation, the droplet spreading rate increases as the applied voltage is increased due to the higher electrical forces induced. At sufficiently high dc voltages, competition between the electrical actuation force, droplet inertia, the retarding surface tension force and contact line friction leads to droplet oscillation. The timescale for the droplet to attain its maximum wetted diameter during step actuation is analyzed. Systematic experiments are conducted over a frequency range of 5–200 Hz and actuation voltages of 40–80 V rms to determine the dependence of droplet oscillation on these parameters. The response of the droplet to different actuation frequencies and voltages is determined in terms of its contact angle and contact radius variation. The frequency of the driving force (equal to twice the frequency of the applied electrical signal) determines the mode of oscillation of the droplet which, together with its resonance characteristics, governs whether the droplet contact angle and contact radius vary in phase or out of phase with each other. In addition to the primary frequency response at the electrical forcing frequency, the droplet oscillation exhibits sub-harmonic oscillation at half of the forcing frequency that is attributed to the parametric nature of the electrical force acting on the triple contact line of the droplet. (paper)

  6. Accurate Determination of the Frequency Response Function of Submerged and Confined Structures by Using PZT-Patches†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Presas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To accurately determine the dynamic response of a structure is of relevant interest in many engineering applications. Particularly, it is of paramount importance to determine the Frequency Response Function (FRF for structures subjected to dynamic loads in order to avoid resonance and fatigue problems that can drastically reduce their useful life. One challenging case is the experimental determination of the FRF of submerged and confined structures, such as hydraulic turbines, which are greatly affected by dynamic problems as reported in many cases in the past. The utilization of classical and calibrated exciters such as instrumented hammers or shakers to determine the FRF in such structures can be very complex due to the confinement of the structure and because their use can disturb the boundary conditions affecting the experimental results. For such cases, Piezoelectric Patches (PZTs, which are very light, thin and small, could be a very good option. Nevertheless, the main drawback of these exciters is that the calibration as dynamic force transducers (relationship voltage/force has not been successfully obtained in the past. Therefore, in this paper, a method to accurately determine the FRF of submerged and confined structures by using PZTs is developed and validated. The method consists of experimentally determining some characteristic parameters that define the FRF, with an uncalibrated PZT exciting the structure. These parameters, which have been experimentally determined, are then introduced in a validated numerical model of the tested structure. In this way, the FRF of the structure can be estimated with good accuracy. With respect to previous studies, where only the natural frequencies and mode shapes were considered, this paper discuss and experimentally proves the best excitation characteristic to obtain also the damping ratios and proposes a procedure to fully determine the FRF. The method proposed here has been validated for the

  7. Accurate Determination of the Frequency Response Function of Submerged and Confined Structures by Using PZT-Patches†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presas, Alexandre; Valentin, David; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Egusquiza, Mònica; Bossio, Matias

    2017-03-22

    To accurately determine the dynamic response of a structure is of relevant interest in many engineering applications. Particularly, it is of paramount importance to determine the Frequency Response Function (FRF) for structures subjected to dynamic loads in order to avoid resonance and fatigue problems that can drastically reduce their useful life. One challenging case is the experimental determination of the FRF of submerged and confined structures, such as hydraulic turbines, which are greatly affected by dynamic problems as reported in many cases in the past. The utilization of classical and calibrated exciters such as instrumented hammers or shakers to determine the FRF in such structures can be very complex due to the confinement of the structure and because their use can disturb the boundary conditions affecting the experimental results. For such cases, Piezoelectric Patches (PZTs), which are very light, thin and small, could be a very good option. Nevertheless, the main drawback of these exciters is that the calibration as dynamic force transducers (relationship voltage/force) has not been successfully obtained in the past. Therefore, in this paper, a method to accurately determine the FRF of submerged and confined structures by using PZTs is developed and validated. The method consists of experimentally determining some characteristic parameters that define the FRF, with an uncalibrated PZT exciting the structure. These parameters, which have been experimentally determined, are then introduced in a validated numerical model of the tested structure. In this way, the FRF of the structure can be estimated with good accuracy. With respect to previous studies, where only the natural frequencies and mode shapes were considered, this paper discuss and experimentally proves the best excitation characteristic to obtain also the damping ratios and proposes a procedure to fully determine the FRF. The method proposed here has been validated for the structure vibrating

  8. Frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in fiber optical parametric amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakarzadeh Dezfuli Nezhad, Hassan; Rottwitt, Karsten; Zakery, A.

    2009-01-01

    Using a numerical model, the frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in FOPAs has been investigated. The model includes fiber loss, pump depletion as well as difference in group velocity among interacting beams.......Using a numerical model, the frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in FOPAs has been investigated. The model includes fiber loss, pump depletion as well as difference in group velocity among interacting beams....

  9. Frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric properties of chicken meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dielectric properties of chicken breast meat were measured with an open-ended coaxial-line probe between 200 MHz and 20 GHz at temperatures ranging from -20 degree C to +25 degree C. At a given temperature, the frequency dependence of the dielectric constant reveals two relaxations while those of th...

  10. Frequency-dependence of the slow force response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lewinski, Dirk; Zhu, Danan; Khafaga, Mounir; Kockskamper, Jens; Maier, Lars S; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Pieske, Burkert

    2008-05-01

    Stretch induces biphasic inotropic effects in mammalian myocardium. A delayed component (slow force response, SFR) has been demonstrated in various species, however, experimental conditions varied and the underlying mechanisms are controversial. The physiological relevance of the SFR is poorly understood. Experiments were performed in ventricular muscle strips from failing human hearts and non-failing rabbit hearts. Upon stretch, twitch force was assessed at basal conditions (1 Hz, 37 degrees C) and after changing stimulation frequency with and without blockade of the Na+/H+-exchanger-1 (NHE1) or reverse-mode Na+/Ca2+-exchange (NCX). Action potential duration (APD) was assessed using floating electrodes. Low stimulation rates (0.2 Hz) potentiated and higher stimulation rates (2 and 3 Hz) reduced the SFR. The extent of SFR inhibition by NHE1 or NCX inhibition was not affected by stimulation rate. APD decreased at 0.2 Hz but was not altered at higher stimulation rates. The data demonstrate frequency-dependence of the SFR with greater positive inotropic effects at lower stimulation rates. Subcellular mechanisms underlying the SFR are not fundamentally affected by stimulation rate. The SFR may have more pronounced physiological effects at lower heart rates.

  11. Equilibrium finite-frequency noise of an interacting mesoscopic capacitor studied in time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Niklas; Splettstoesser, Janine; Helbig, Nicole

    2018-03-01

    We calculate the frequency-dependent equilibrium noise of a mesoscopic capacitor in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The capacitor is modeled as a single-level quantum dot with on-site Coulomb interaction and tunnel coupling to a nearby reservoir. The noise spectra are derived from linear-response conductances via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Thereby, we analyze the performance of a recently derived exchange-correlation potential with time-nonlocal density dependence in the finite-frequency linear-response regime. We compare our TDDFT noise spectra with real-time perturbation theory and find excellent agreement for noise frequencies below the reservoir temperature.

  12. Nitric oxide donors enhance the frequency dependence of dopamine release in nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Henrike; Threlfell, Sarah; Cragg, Stephanie J

    2011-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is critically involved in normal as well as maladaptive motivated behaviors including drug addiction. Whether the striatal neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO) influences DA release in NAc is unknown. We investigated whether exogenous NO modulates DA transmission in NAc core and how this interaction varies depending on the frequency of presynaptic activation. We detected DA with cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes in mouse NAc in slices following stimuli spanning a full range of DA neuron firing frequencies (1-100 Hz). NO donors 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1) or z-1-[N-(3-ammoniopropyl)-N-(n-propyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PAPA/NONOate) enhanced DA release with increasing stimulus frequency. This NO-mediated enhancement of frequency sensitivity of DA release was not prevented by inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), DA transporters, or large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, and did not require glutamatergic or GABAergic input. However, experiments to identify whether frequency-dependent NO effects were mediated via changes in powerful acetylcholine-DA interactions revealed multiple components to NO modulation of DA release. In the presence of a nicotinic receptor antagonist (dihydro-β-erythroidine), NO donors increased DA release in a frequency-independent manner. These data suggest that NO in the NAc can modulate DA release through multiple GC-independent neuronal mechanisms whose net outcome varies depending on the activity in DA neurons and accumbal cholinergic interneurons. In the presence of accumbal acetylcholine, NO promotes the sensitivity of DA release to presynaptic activation, but with reduced acetylcholine input, NO will promote DA release in an activity-independent manner through a direct action on dopaminergic terminals.

  13. On Strong Positive Frequency Dependencies of Quality Factors in Local-Earthquake Seismic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Igor B.; Jhajhria, Atul; Deng, Wubing

    2018-03-01

    Many observations of seismic waves from local earthquakes are interpreted in terms of the frequency-dependent quality factor Q( f ) = Q0 f^{η } , where η is often close to or exceeds one. However, such steep positive frequency dependencies of Q require careful analysis with regard to their physical consistency. In particular, the case of η = 1 corresponds to frequency-independent (elastic) amplitude decays with time and consequently requires no Q-type attenuation mechanisms. For η > 1, several problems with physical meanings of such Q-factors occur. First, contrary to the key premise of seismic attenuation, high-frequency parts of the wavefield are enhanced with increasing propagation times relative to the low-frequency ones. Second, such attenuation cannot be implemented by mechanical models of wave-propagating media. Third, with η > 1, the velocity dispersion associated with such Q(f) occurs over unrealistically short frequency range and has an unexpected oscillatory shape. Cases η = 1 and η > 1 are usually attributed to scattering; however, this scattering must exhibit fortuitous tuning into the observation frequency band, which appears unlikely. The reason for the above problems is that the inferred Q values are affected by the conventional single-station measurement procedure. Both parameters Q 0 and are apparent, i.e., dependent on the selected parameterization and inversion method, and they should not be directly attributed to the subsurface. For η ≈ 1, parameter Q 0 actually describes the frequency-independent amplitude decay in access of some assumed geometric spreading t -α , where α is usually taken equal one. The case η > 1 is not allowed physically and could serve as an indicator of problematic interpretations. Although the case 0 < η < 1 is possible, its parameters Q 0 and may also be biased by the measurement procedure. To avoid such difficulties of Q-based approaches, we recommend measuring and interpreting the amplitude-decay rates

  14. On the role of minority carriers in the frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Paul; Wagemans, W.; Verhoeven, Wouter; van der Heijden, E.H.M.; Kemerink, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we investigate the frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) both in small molecule-based (Alq3) and polymer (PPV derivative) materials, and investigate its thickness dependence. For all devices, we observed a strong decrease in magnetoconductance (MC) with increasing

  15. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ1(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt-lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ωR, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ vr/ωT, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  16. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ 1 (r) cos(kz) cos(ωt−lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ω R , is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ v r /ω T , so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles

  17. Frequency-dependent effects of background noise on subcortical response timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, A; Parbery-Clark, A; Skoe, E; Kraus, N

    2011-12-01

    The addition of background noise to an auditory signal delays brainstem response timing. This effect has been extensively documented using manual peak selection. Peak picking, however, is impractical for large-scale studies of spectrotemporally complex stimuli, and leaves open the question of whether noise-induced delays are frequency-dependent or occur across the frequency spectrum. Here we use an automated, objective method to examine phase shifts between auditory brainstem responses to a speech sound (/da/) presented with and without background noise. We predicted that shifts in neural response timing would also be reflected in frequency-specific phase shifts. Our results indicate that the addition of background noise causes phase shifts across the subcortical response spectrum (70-1000 Hz). However, this noise-induced delay is not uniform such that some frequency bands show greater shifts than others: low-frequency phase shifts (300-500 Hz) are largest during the response to the consonant-vowel formant transition (/d/), while high-frequency shifts (720-1000 Hz) predominate during the response to the steady-state vowel (/a/). Most importantly, phase shifts occurring in specific frequency bands correlate strongly with shifts in the latencies of the predominant peaks in the auditory brainstem response, while phase shifts in other frequency bands do not. This finding confirms the validity of phase shift detection as an objective measure of timing differences and reveals that this method detects noise-induced shifts in timing that may not be captured by traditional peak latency measurements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The frequency dependence of friction in experiment, theory, and observations of low frequency earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A.; Beeler, N. M.; Burgmann, R.; Shelly, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) are small amplitude, short duration events composing tectonic tremor, probably generated by shear slip on asperities downdip of the seismogenic zone. In Parkfield, Shelly and Hardebeck [2010] have identified 88 LFE families, or hypocentral locations, that contain over half a million LFEs since 2001 on a 160-km-long section of the San Andreas fault between 16 and 30 km depth. A number of studies have demonstrated the extreme sensitivity of low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) near Parkfield to stress changes ranging from contingent upon the amplitude and frequency content of the applied stress. We attempt to test this framework by comparing observations of LFEs triggered in response to stresses spanning several orders of magnitude in both frequency and amplitude (e.g. tides, teleseismic surface waves, static stress changes, etc.) to the predicted response of a single degree of freedom slider block model with rate and state dependent strength. The sensitivity of failure time in the friction model as developed in previous studies does not distinguish between shear and normal stresses; laboratory experiments show a more complicated sensitivity of failure time to normal stress change than in the published model. Because the shear and normal tidal stresses at Parkfield have different amplitudes and are not in phase, we have modified the model to include the expected sensitivity to normal stress. Our prior investigations of the response of both regular and low frequency earthquakes to tidal stresses [Thomas et al., 2009; Shelly and Johnson, 2011] are qualitatively consistent with the predictions of the friction model , as both the timing and degree (probability) of correlation are in agreement.

  19. Effect of frequency on amplitude-dependent internal friction in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Naoki; Atsumi, Tomohiro; Nishino, Yoichi

    2006-01-01

    Amplitude-dependent internal friction (ADIF) was measured in a polycrystalline niobium using four modes of flexural vibration from the fundamental to the third-order resonance at room temperature. The ADIF was detected in each vibration mode. The internal-friction versus strain-amplitude curve of the ADIF shifted to a larger strain-amplitude range as frequency increased. The stress-strain curves were derived from the ADIF data, and the microplastic flow stress defined as the stress required to produce a plastic strain of 1 x 10 -9 was read from the stress-strain curves. It was found that the microplastic flow stress was proportional to the frequency

  20. Effect of frequency on amplitude-dependent internal friction in niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, Naoki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: ide@nitech.ac.jp; Atsumi, Tomohiro [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nishino, Yoichi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2006-12-20

    Amplitude-dependent internal friction (ADIF) was measured in a polycrystalline niobium using four modes of flexural vibration from the fundamental to the third-order resonance at room temperature. The ADIF was detected in each vibration mode. The internal-friction versus strain-amplitude curve of the ADIF shifted to a larger strain-amplitude range as frequency increased. The stress-strain curves were derived from the ADIF data, and the microplastic flow stress defined as the stress required to produce a plastic strain of 1 x 10{sup -9} was read from the stress-strain curves. It was found that the microplastic flow stress was proportional to the frequency.

  1. Frequency-dependent changes in amplitude of low-frequency oscillations in depression: A resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Kong, Qingmei; Li, Ke; Su, Yunai; Zeng, Yawei; Zhang, Qinge; Dai, Wenji; Xia, Mingrui; Wang, Gang; Jin, Zhen; Yu, Xin; Si, Tianmei

    2016-02-12

    We conducted this fMRI study to examine whether the alterations in amplitudes of low-frequency oscillation (LFO) of major depressive disorder (MDD) patients were frequency dependent. The LFO amplitudes (as indexed by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation [ALFF] and fractional ALFF [fALFF]) within 4 narrowly-defined frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027Hz, slow-4: 0.027-0.073Hz, slow-3: 0.073-0.198Hz, and slow-2: 0.198-0.25Hz) were computed using resting-state fMRI data of 35 MDD patients and 32 healthy subjects. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on ALFF and fALFF both within the low frequency bands of slow-4 and slow-5 and within all of the four bands. We observed significant main effects of group and frequency on ALFF and fALFF in widely distributed brain regions. Importantly, significant group and frequency interaction effects were observed in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, in a left-sided fashion, the bilateral posterior cingulate and precuneus, during ANOVA both within slow-4 and slow-5 bands and within all the frequency bands. The results suggest that the alterations of LFO amplitudes in specific brain regions in MDD patients could be more sensitively detected in the slow-5 rather than the slow-4 bands. The findings may provide guidance for the frequency choice of future resting-state fMRI studies of MDD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Frequency and temperature dependent mobility of a charged carrier and randomly interrupted strand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Jayannavar, A.M.

    1981-05-01

    Randomly interrupted strand model of a one-dimensional conductor is considered. Exact analytical expression is obtained for the temperature dependent as mobility for a finite segment drawn at random, taking into account the reflecting barriers at the two open ends. The real part of mobility shows a broad resonance as a function of both frequency and tempeature, and vanishes quadratically in the dc limit. The frequency (temperature) maximum shifts to higher values for higher temperatures (frequencies). (author)

  3. Unusual polarity-dependent patterns in a bent-core nematic liquid crystal under low-frequency ac field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ying; Zhou, Meng-jie; Xu, Ming-Ya; Salamon, Péter; Éber, Nándor; Buka, Ágnes

    2015-04-01

    Electric-field-induced patterns of diverse morphology have been observed over a wide frequency range in a recently synthesized bent-core nematic (BCN) liquid crystal. At low frequencies (up to ∼25 Hz), the BCN exhibited unusual polarity-dependent patterns. When the amplitude of the ac field was enhanced, these two time-asymmetrical patterns turned into time-symmetrical prewavylike stripes. At ac frequencies in the middle-frequency range (∼50-3000 Hz), zigzag patterns were detected whose obliqueness varied with the frequency. Finally, if the frequency was increased above 3 kHz, the zigzag pattern was replaced by another, prewavylike pattern, whose threshold voltage depended on the frequency; however, the wave vector did not. For a more complete characterization, material parameters such as elastic constants, dielectric permittivities, and the anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility were also determined.

  4. Frequency-Dependent Altered Functional Connections of Default Mode Network in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjun Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with the progressive dysfunction of cognitive ability. Previous research has indicated that the default mode network (DMN is closely related to cognition and is impaired in Alzheimer’s disease. Because recent studies have shown that different frequency bands represent specific physiological functions, DMN functional connectivity studies of the different frequency bands based on resting state fMRI (RS-fMRI data may provide new insight into AD pathophysiology. In this study, we explored the functional connectivity based on well-defined DMN regions of interest (ROIs from the five frequency bands: slow-5 (0.01–0.027 Hz, slow-4 (0.027–0.073 Hz, slow-3 (0.073–0.198 Hz, slow-2 (0.198–0.25 Hzs and standard low-frequency oscillations (LFO (0.01–0.08 Hz. We found that the altered functional connectivity patterns are mainly in the frequency band of slow-5 and slow-4 and that the decreased connections are long distance, but some relatively short connections are increased. In addition, the altered functional connections of the DMN in AD are frequency dependent and differ between the slow-5 and slow-4 bands. Mini-Mental State Examination scores were significantly correlated with the altered functional connectivity patterns in the slow-5 and slow-4 bands. These results indicate that frequency-dependent functional connectivity changes might provide potential biomarkers for AD pathophysiology.

  5. Study on Frequency Dependency of ON-Resistance and Pulse-Loss Calculation of MOSFETs for Switch Mode Power Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Hideho; Sato, Ryohei; Iwata, Yoshiharu

    Global efforts toward energy conservation, increasing data centers, and the increasing use of IT equipments are leading to a demand in reduced power consumption of equipments, and power efficiency improvement of power supply units is becoming a necessity. MOSFETs are widely used for their low ON-resistances. Power efficiency is designed using time-domain circuit simulators, except for transformer copper-loss, which has frequency dependency which is calculated separately using methods based on skin and proximity effects. As semiconductor technology reduces the ON-resistance of MOSFETs, frequency dependency due to the skin effect or proximity effect is anticipated. In this study, ON-resistance of MOSFETs are measured and frequency dependency is confirmed. Power loss against rectangular current pulse is calculated. The calculation method for transformer copper-loss is expanded to MOSFETs. A frequency function for the resistance model is newly developed and parametric calculation is enabled. Acceleration of calculation is enabled by eliminating summation terms. Using this method, it is shown that the frequency dependent component of the measured MOSFETs increases the dissipation from 11% to 32% at a switching frequency of 100kHz. From above, this paper points out the importance of the frequency dependency of MOSFETs' ON-resistance, provides means of calculating its pulse losses, and improves loss calculation accuracy of SMPSs.

  6. Stimulus-dependent modulation of spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in the rat visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liangming; Liu, Yadong; Gui, Jianjun; Li, Ming; Hu, Dewen

    2014-08-06

    Research on spontaneous low-frequency oscillations is important to reveal underlying regulatory mechanisms in the brain. The mechanism for the stimulus modulation of low-frequency oscillations is not known. Here, we used the intrinsic optical imaging technique to examine stimulus-modulated low-frequency oscillation signals in the rat visual cortex. The stimulation was presented monocularly as a flashing light with different frequencies and intensities. The phases of low-frequency oscillations in different regions tended to be synchronized and the rhythms typically accelerated within a 30-s period after stimulation. These phenomena were confined to visual stimuli with specific flashing frequencies (12.5-17.5 Hz) and intensities (5-10 mA). The acceleration and synchronization induced by the flashing frequency were more marked than those induced by the intensity. These results show that spontaneous low-frequency oscillations can be modulated by parameter-dependent flashing lights and indicate the potential utility of the visual stimulus paradigm in exploring the origin and function of low-frequency oscillations.

  7. Research surface resistance of copper normal and abnormal skin-effects depending on the frequency of electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutovyi, V.A.; Komir, A.I.

    2013-01-01

    The results of the frequency dependence of surface resistance of copper in diffuse and specular reflection of electrons from the conductive surface of the high-frequency resonance of the system depending on the frequency of the electromagnetic field in the normal and anomalous skin effect. Found, the surface resistance of copper is reduced by more than 10 times at the temperature of liquid helium, as compared with a surface resistivity at room temperature, at frequencies f ≤ 173 MHz, for diffuse reflection of conduction electrons from the surface of the conductive layer, and the specular reflection - at frequencies f ≤ 346 MHz

  8. Accurate automatic tuning circuit for bipolar integrated filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heij, Wim J.A.; de Heij, W.J.A.; Hoen, Klaas; Hoen, Klaas; Seevinck, Evert; Seevinck, E.

    1990-01-01

    An accurate automatic tuning circuit for tuning the cutoff frequency and Q-factor of high-frequency bipolar filters is presented. The circuit is based on a voltage controlled quadrature oscillator (VCO). The frequency and the RMS (root mean square) amplitude of the oscillator output signal are

  9. Modeling Site Heterogeneity with Posterior Mean Site Frequency Profiles Accelerates Accurate Phylogenomic Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huai-Chun; Minh, Bui Quang; Susko, Edward; Roger, Andrew J

    2018-03-01

    Proteins have distinct structural and functional constraints at different sites that lead to site-specific preferences for particular amino acid residues as the sequences evolve. Heterogeneity in the amino acid substitution process between sites is not modeled by commonly used empirical amino acid exchange matrices. Such model misspecification can lead to artefacts in phylogenetic estimation such as long-branch attraction. Although sophisticated site-heterogeneous mixture models have been developed to address this problem in both Bayesian and maximum likelihood (ML) frameworks, their formidable computational time and memory usage severely limits their use in large phylogenomic analyses. Here we propose a posterior mean site frequency (PMSF) method as a rapid and efficient approximation to full empirical profile mixture models for ML analysis. The PMSF approach assigns a conditional mean amino acid frequency profile to each site calculated based on a mixture model fitted to the data using a preliminary guide tree. These PMSF profiles can then be used for in-depth tree-searching in place of the full mixture model. Compared with widely used empirical mixture models with $k$ classes, our implementation of PMSF in IQ-TREE (http://www.iqtree.org) speeds up the computation by approximately $k$/1.5-fold and requires a small fraction of the RAM. Furthermore, this speedup allows, for the first time, full nonparametric bootstrap analyses to be conducted under complex site-heterogeneous models on large concatenated data matrices. Our simulations and empirical data analyses demonstrate that PMSF can effectively ameliorate long-branch attraction artefacts. In some empirical and simulation settings PMSF provided more accurate estimates of phylogenies than the mixture models from which they derive.

  10. Influence of Gaussian white noise on the frequency-dependent linear polarizability of doped quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Linear polarizability of quantum dot has been studied. • Quantum dot is doped with a repulsive impurity. • The polarizabilities are frequency-dependent. • Influence of Gaussian white noise has been monitored. • Noise exploited is of additive and multiplicative nature. - Abstract: We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear (α xx and α yy ) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. The dopant impurity potential chosen assumes Gaussian form. The study principally puts emphasis on investigating the role of noise on the polarizability components. In view of this we have exploited Gaussian white noise containing additive and multiplicative characteristics (in Stratonovich sense). The frequency-dependent polarizabilities are studied by exposing the doped dot to a periodically oscillating external electric field of given intensity. The oscillation frequency, confinement potentials, dopant location, and above all, the noise characteristics tune the linear polarizability components in a subtle manner. Whereas the additive noise fails to have any impact on the polarizabilities, the multiplicative noise influences them delicately and gives rise to additional interesting features

  11. Effects of aromaticity in cations and their functional groups on the temperature dependence of low-frequency spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinuma, Shohei; Ramati, Sharon; Wishart, James F.; Shirota, Hideaki

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we investigate the temperature dependence of low-frequency spectra in the frequency range of 0.3-200 cm-1 for ionic liquids (ILs) whose cations possess two systematically different cyclic groups, using femtosecond Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. The target ILs are bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide [NTf2]- salts of 1-cyclohexylmethyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium [CHxmMPyrr]+, 1-cyclohexylmethyl-3-methylimidazolium [CHxmMIm]+, N-cyclohexylmethylpyridinium [CHxmPy]+, 1-benzyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium [BzMPyrr]+, 1-benzyl-3-methylimidazolium [BzMIm]+, and N-benzylpyridinium [BzPy]+ cations. The aim of this study is to better understand the effects of aromaticity in the cations' constituent groups on the temperature-dependent low-frequency spectral features of the ILs. The low-frequency spectra of these ILs are temperature dependent, but the temperature-dependent spectrum of [CHxmMPyrr][NTf2] is different from that of other ILs. While [CHxmMPyrr][NTf2] shows spectral changes with temperature in the low-frequency region below 50 cm-1, the other ILs also show spectral changes in the high-frequency region above 80 cm-1 (above 50 cm-1 in the case of [BzMPyrr][NTf2]). We conclude that the spectral change in the low-frequency region is due to both the cation and anion, while the change in the high-frequency region is attributed to the red shift of the aromatic ring librations. On the basis of the plots of the first moment of the spectra vs. temperature, we found that the first moment of the low-frequency spectrum of the IL whose cation does not have an aromatic ring is less temperature dependent than that of the other ILs. However, the intrinsic first moment, the first moment at 0 K, of the low-frequency spectrum is governed by the absence or presence of a charged aromatic group, while a neutral aromatic group does not have much influence on determining the intrinsic first moment.

  12. Input-dependent frequency modulation of cortical gamma oscillations shapes spatial synchronization and enables phase coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25-80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping ('binding') and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency codes

  13. Real-time correction of tsunami site effect by frequency-dependent tsunami-amplification factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, H.

    2017-12-01

    For tsunami early warning, I developed frequency-dependent tsunami-amplification factor and used it to design a recursive digital filter that can be applicable for real-time correction of tsunami site response. In this study, I assumed that a tsunami waveform at an observing point could be modeled by convolution of source, path and site effects in time domain. Under this assumption, spectral ratio between offshore and the nearby coast can be regarded as site response (i.e. frequency-dependent amplification factor). If the amplification factor can be prepared before tsunamigenic earthquakes, its temporal convolution to offshore tsunami waveform provides tsunami prediction at coast in real time. In this study, tsunami waveforms calculated by tsunami numerical simulations were used to develop frequency-dependent tsunami-amplification factor. Firstly, I performed numerical tsunami simulations based on nonlinear shallow-water theory from many tsuanmigenic earthquake scenarios by varying the seismic magnitudes and locations. The resultant tsunami waveforms at offshore and the nearby coastal observing points were then used in spectral-ratio analysis. An average of the resulted spectral ratios from the tsunamigenic-earthquake scenarios is regarded as frequency-dependent amplification factor. Finally, the estimated amplification factor is used in design of a recursive digital filter that can be applicable in time domain. The above procedure is applied to Miyako bay at the Pacific coast of northeastern Japan. The averaged tsunami-height spectral ratio (i.e. amplification factor) between the location at the center of the bay and the outside show a peak at wave-period of 20 min. A recursive digital filter based on the estimated amplification factor shows good performance in real-time correction of tsunami-height amplification due to the site effect. This study is supported by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) KAKENHI grant 15K16309.

  14. The long-term evolution of multilocus traits under frequency-dependent disruptive selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Doorn, G. Sander; Dieckmann, Ulf

    Frequency-dependent disruptive selection is widely recognized as an important source of genetic variation. Its evolutionary consequences have been extensively studied using phenotypic evolutionary models, based on quantitative genetics, game theory, or adaptive dynamics. However, the genetic

  15. Accurate orbital-dependent correlation and exchange-correlation potentials from non-iterative ab initio dft calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Ireneusz; Lotrich, Victor

    2005-08-01

    A new approximate non-iterative procedure to obtain accurate correlation and exchange-correlation potentials of Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) is presented. By carrying out only one step of the correlated optimized effective potential (OEP) iterations following the standard iterative exchange-only OEP, one can recover accurate correlation potentials corresponding to the orbital-dependent second-order many-body perturbation theory [MBPT(2)] energy functional that are hardly discernible from those obtained by the more expensive, fully iterative procedure. This new 'one-step' OEP-MBPT(2) algorithm reflects the non-iterative, perturbative algorithm of standard, canonical MBPT(2) of ab initio wave function theory, while it allows the correlation potentials to readjust and include the majority of the MBPT(2) correlation effect. It is also flexible in the treatment of exchange and the Hartree-Fock orbitals may be used in lieu of the exchange-only OEP orbitals, when the correlation or exchange-correlation potential is of interest.

  16. GABAergic activities control spike timing- and frequency-dependent long-term depression at hippocampal excitatory synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Nishiyama

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic interneuronal network activities in the hippocampus control a variety of neural functions, including learning and memory, by regulating θ and γ oscillations. How these GABAergic activities at pre- and post-synaptic sites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells differentially contribute to synaptic function and plasticity during their repetitive pre- and post-synaptic spiking at θ and γ oscillations is largely unknown. We show here that activities mediated by postsynaptic GABAARs and presynaptic GABABRs determine, respectively, the spike timing- and frequency-dependence of activity-induced synaptic modifications at Schaffer collateral-CA1 excitatory synapses. We demonstrate that both feedforward and feedback GABAAR-mediated inhibition in the postsynaptic cell controls the spike timing-dependent long-term depression of excitatory inputs (“e-LTD” at the θ frequency. We also show that feedback postsynaptic inhibition specifically causes e-LTD of inputs that induce small postsynaptic currents (<70 pA with LTP timing, thus enforcing the requirement of cooperativity for induction of long-term potentiation at excitatory inputs (“e-LTP”. Furthermore, under spike-timing protocols that induce e-LTP and e-LTD at excitatory synapses, we observed parallel induction of LTP and LTD at inhibitory inputs (“i-LTP” and “i-LTD” to the same postsynaptic cells. Finally, we show that presynaptic GABABR-mediated inhibition plays a major role in the induction of frequency-dependent e-LTD at α and β frequencies. These observations demonstrate the critical influence of GABAergic interneuronal network activities in regulating the spike timing and frequency dependences of long-term synaptic modifications in the hippocampus.

  17. Numerical Study of Frequency-dependent Seismoelectric Coupling in Partially-saturated Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djuraev Ulugbek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The seismoelectric phenomenon associated with propagation of seismic waves in fluid-saturated porous media has been studied for many decades. The method has a great potential to monitor subsurface fluid saturation changes associated with production of hydrocarbons. Frequency of the seismic source has a significant impact on measurement of the seismoelectric effects. In this paper, the effects of seismic wave frequency and water saturation on the seismoelectric response of a partially-saturated porous media is studied numerically. The conversion of seismic wave to electromagnetic wave was modelled by extending the theoretically developed seismoelectric coupling coefficient equation. We assumed constant values of pore radius and zeta-potential of 80 micrometers and 48 microvolts, respectively. Our calculations of the coupling coefficient were conducted at various water saturation values in the frequency range of 10 kHz to 150 kHz. The results show that the seismoelectric coupling is frequency-dependent and decreases exponentially when frequency increases. Similar trend is seen when water saturation is varied at different frequencies. However, when water saturation is less than about 0.6, the effect of frequency is significant. On the other hand, when the water saturation is greater than 0.6, the coupling coefficient shows monotonous trend when water saturation is increased at constant frequency.

  18. Frequency dependent loss analysis and minimization of system losses in switchmode audio power amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamauchi, Akira; Knott, Arnold; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, frequency dependent losses in switch-mode audio power amplifiers are analyzed and a loss model is improved by taking the voltage dependence of the parasitic capacitance of MOSFETs into account. The estimated power losses are compared to the measurement and great accuracy is achieved...

  19. Negative frequency-dependent selection between Pasteuria penetrans and its host Meloidogyne arenaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    In negative frequency-dependant selection (NFDS), parasite genotypes capable of infecting the numerically dominant host genotype are favored, while host genotypes resistant to the dominant parasite genotype are favored, creating a cyclical pattern of resistant genotypes in the host population and, a...

  20. Relaxation oscillations induced by amplitude-dependent frequency in dissipative trapped electron mode turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.; Ware, A.S.; Newman, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    A nonlinear frequency shift in dissipative trapped electron mode turbulence is shown to give rise to a relaxation oscillation in the saturated power density spectrum. A simple non-Markovian closure for the coupled evolution of ion momentum and electron density response is developed to describe the oscillations. From solutions of a nonlinear oscillator model based on the closure, it is found that the oscillation is driven by the growth rate, as modified by the amplitude-dependent frequency shift, with inertia provided by the memory of the growth rate of prior amplitudes. This memory arises from time-history integrals common to statistical closures. The memory associated with a finite time of energy transfer between coupled spectrum components does not sustain the oscillation in the simple model. Solutions of the model agree qualitatively with the time-dependent numerical solutions of the original dissipative trapped electron model, yielding oscillations with the proper phase relationship between the fluctuation energy and the frequency shift, the proper evolution of the wave number spectrum shape and particle flux, and a realistic period

  1. Action Potential Broadening in Capsaicin-Sensitive DRG Neurons from Frequency-Dependent Reduction of Kv3 Current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pin W; Blair, Nathaniel T; Bean, Bruce P

    2017-10-04

    Action potential (AP) shape is a key determinant of cellular electrophysiological behavior. We found that in small-diameter, capsaicin-sensitive dorsal root ganglia neurons corresponding to nociceptors (from rats of either sex), stimulation at frequencies as low as 1 Hz produced progressive broadening of the APs. Stimulation at 10 Hz for 3 s resulted in an increase in AP width by an average of 76 ± 7% at 22°C and by 38 ± 3% at 35°C. AP clamp experiments showed that spike broadening results from frequency-dependent reduction of potassium current during spike repolarization. The major current responsible for frequency-dependent reduction of overall spike-repolarizing potassium current was identified as Kv3 current by its sensitivity to low concentrations of 4-aminopyridine (IC 50 action potentials of small-diameter rat DRG neurons showed spike broadening at frequencies as low as 1 Hz and that spike broadening resulted predominantly from frequency-dependent inactivation of Kv3 channels. Spike width helps to control transmitter release, conduction velocity, and firing patterns and understanding the role of particular potassium channels can help to guide new pharmacological strategies for targeting pain-sensing neurons selectively. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/379705-10$15.00/0.

  2. Frequency-dependant homogenized properties of composite using spectral analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Amor, M; Ben Ghozlen, M H; Lanceleur, P

    2010-01-01

    An inverse procedure is proposed to determine the material constants of multilayered composites using a spectral analysis homogenization method. Recursive process gives interfacial displacement perpendicular to layers in term of deepness. A fast-Fourier transform (FFT) procedure has been used in order to extract the wave numbers propagating in the multilayer. The upper frequency bound of this homogenization domain is estimated. Inside the homogenization domain, we discover a maximum of three planes waves susceptible to propagate in the medium. A consistent algorithm is adopted to develop an inverse procedure for the determination of the materials constants of multidirectional composite. The extracted wave numbers are used as the inputs for the procedure. The outputs are the elastic constants of multidirectional composite. Using this method, the frequency dependent effective elastic constants are obtained and example for [0/90] composites is given.

  3. Estimation of the frequency and magnetic field dependence of the skin depth in Co-rich magnetic microwires from GMI experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcady Zhukov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied giant magnetoimpedance (GMI effect in magnetically soft amorphous Co-rich microwires in the extended frequency range. From obtained experimentally dependences of the GMI ratio on magnetic field at different frequencies we estimated the penetration depth and its dependence on applied magnetic field and frequency.

  4. Accuracy of finite-difference harmonic frequencies in density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuan-Yu; Liu, Jie; Herbert, John M

    2017-07-15

    Analytic Hessians are often viewed as essential for the calculation of accurate harmonic frequencies, but the implementation of analytic second derivatives is nontrivial and solution of the requisite coupled-perturbed equations engenders a sizable memory footprint for large systems, given that these equations are not required for energy and gradient calculations in density functional theory. Here, we benchmark the alternative approach to harmonic frequencies based on finite differences of analytic first derivatives, a procedure that is amenable to large-scale parallelization. Not only for absolute frequencies but also for isotopic and conformer-dependent frequency shifts in flexible molecules, we find that the finite-difference approach exhibits mean errors numbers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Symmetries and invariants of the oscillator and envelope equations with time-dependent frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The single-particle dynamics in a time-dependent focusing field is examined. The existence of the Courant-Snyder invariant, a fundamental concept in accelerator physics, is fundamentally a result of the corresponding symmetry admitted by the harmonic oscillator equation with linear time-dependent frequency. It is demonstrated that the Lie algebra of the symmetry group for the oscillator equation with time-dependent frequency is eight dimensional, and is composed of four independent subalgebras. A detailed analysis of the admitted symmetries reveals a deeper connection between the nonlinear envelope equation and the oscillator equation. A general theorem regarding the symmetries and invariants of the envelope equation, which includes the existence of the Courant-Snyder invariant as a special case, is demonstrated. As an application to accelerator physics, the symmetries of the envelope equation enable a fast numerical algorithm for finding matched solutions without using the conventional iterative Newton’s method, where the envelope equation needs to be numerically integrated once for every iteration, and the Jacobi matrix needs to be calculated for the envelope perturbation.

  6. Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in patients with Wilson's disease: a resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaopeng; Chen, Siyi; Huang, Chang-Bing; Qian, Yinfeng; Yu, Yongqiang

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in patients with Wilson's disease (WD). Resting-state function magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) were employed to measure the amplitude of ALFF in 28 patients with WD and 27 matched normal controls. Slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz) and slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) frequency bands were analyzed. Apart from the observation of atrophy in the cerebellum, basal ganglia, occipital gyrus, frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, and paracentral lobule, we also found widespread differences in ALFF of the two bands in the medial frontal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, insula, basal ganglia, hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus, and thalamus bilaterally. Compared to normal controls, WD patients had increased ALFF in the posterior lobe of the cerebellum, inferior temporal gyrus, brain stem, basal ganglia, and decreased ALFF in the anterior lobe of the cerebellum and medial frontal gyrus. Specifically, we observed that the ALFF abnormalities in the cerebellum and middle frontal gyrus were greater in the slow-5 than in the slow-4 band. Correlation analysis showed consistently positive correlations between urinary copper excretion (Cu), serum ceruloplasmin (CP) and ALFFs in the cerebellum. Our study suggests the accumulation of copper profoundly impaired intrinsic brain activity and the impairments seem to be frequency-dependent. These results provide further insights into the understanding of the pathophysiology of WD.

  7. Influence of Gaussian white noise on the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizability of doped quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguly, Jayanta [Department of Chemistry, Brahmankhanda Basapara High School, Basapara, Birbhum 731215, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Manas, E-mail: pcmg77@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2014-05-07

    We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent first nonlinear (β{sub xxx} and β{sub yyy}) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. We have assumed a Gaussian function to represent the dopant impurity potential. This study primarily addresses the role of noise on the polarizability components. We have invoked Gaussian white noise consisting of additive and multiplicative characteristics (in Stratonovich sense). The doped system has been subjected to an oscillating electric field of given intensity, and the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizabilities are computed. The noise characteristics are manifested in an interesting way in the nonlinear polarizability components. In case of additive noise, the noise strength remains practically ineffective in influencing the optical responses. The situation completely changes with the replacement of additive noise by its multiplicative analog. The replacement enhances the nonlinear optical response dramatically and also causes their maximization at some typical value of noise strength that depends on oscillation frequency.

  8. Frequency-dependent hopping conductivity in a static electric field in a random one-dimensional lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyo, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    The frequency-dependent electrical conductivity is studied in a nearest-neighbor-hopping linear lattice with disordered site energies and barrier heights in the presence of a uniform static electric field, allowing for detailed balance between random rates. Exact expressions are obtained for the conductivity for both high and low frequencies. The results reduce to those obtained by previous authors in the absence of site-energy disorder. However, the latter is found to alter the character of the frequency dependence of the conductivity significantly at low frequencies. In this case the conductivity is expanded as sigma(ω) = sigma 0 +isigma 1 ω-sigma 2 ω 2 -isigma 3 ω 3 +.... We find that sigma 1 is nonvanishing only if both site energies and barrier heights are disordered and that sigma 2 is positive when the fluctuations in site energies are small compared with the thermal energy but becomes negative in the opposite regime. The ac response is found to vanish [i.e., sigma(ω) = 0 for ωnot =0] in the absence of disorder in barrier heights

  9. Frequency Dependencies of the Exchange Spin Wave Reflection Coefficient on a One-Dimensional Magnon Crystal with Complex Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhii O. Reshetniak

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions. It is shown that the frequency dependencies are periodic, points of full transmission and areas, full of reflection. Decreasing exchange parameter value in interface causes the increase of reflectance coefficient. Changing the material parameters we get the necessary intensity value of the reflection coefficient depending on the frequency at a constant value of the external magnetic field.

  10. Evolution of frequency-dependent mate choice: keeping up with fashion trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokko, Hanna; Jennions, Michael D; Houde, Anne

    2007-05-22

    The diversity of sexual traits favoured by females is enormous and, curiously, includes preferences for males with rare or novel phenotypes. We modelled the evolution of a preference for rarity that yielded two surprising results. First, a Fisherian 'sexy son' effect can boost female preferences to a frequency well above that predicted by mutation-selection balance, even if there are significant mortality costs for females. Preferences do not reach fixation, however, as they are subject to frequency-dependent selection: if choosy females are too common, then rare genotypes in one generation become common, and thus unattractive, in the offspring generation. Nevertheless, even at relatively low frequency, preferences maintain polymorphism in male traits. The second unexpected result is that the preferences can evolve to much higher frequencies if choice is hindered, such that females cannot always express their preferences. Our results emphasize the need to consider feedback where preferences determine the dynamics of male genotypes and vice versa. They also highlight the similarity between the arbitrariness of behavioural norms in models of social evolution with punishment (the so-called 'folk theorem') and the diversity of sexual traits that can be preferred simply because deviating from the norm produces unattractive offspring and is, in this sense, 'punished'.

  11. Frequency-dependent springs in the seismic analysis of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyapin, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a two-step algorithm for the seismic analysis of structure resting on the rigid embedded basement. Frequency-domain analysis of SSI is carried out on the second step for a platform model with special 'soil spring' which is complex, frequency-dependent, wave-dependent and non-balanced. Theory is presented to obtain the parameters of the soil spring on the first step of the analysis, performed without structure (only geometry of the basement is used) using well-known SASSI code (Lysmer et al, 1981) or in some other ways. On the second step in the SASSI analysis the soil spring is included in the model as a special finite element. Thus, the first step enables to save the computer resources on structure, the second step-to save resources on soil. Soil spring is the most general form for a SSI linear analysis: conventional springs and dashpots can be easily represented in such a format. Thus, the presented approach enables to study the impact of various factors (such as the embedment depth and soil-structure separation, the off-diagonal stiffness, various formulas for stiffness and damping, etc.) on the soil spring parameters. These parameters can be studied separately from the structure itself. As an example, the study of the horizontal soil mesh size is presented. Lumped soil spring may be used on the second step to obtain structural response spectra. To get stresses complex stiffness may be distributed over the basement slab and embedded walls. The proposed approach may be considered to be the alternative to the impedance method (see ASCE4-98). (authors)

  12. DPOAE generation dependence on primary frequencies ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Teresa; Sisto, Renata; Moleti, Arturo; D'Amato, Luisa; Sanjust, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Two different mechanisms are responsible for the DPOAE generation. The nonlinear distortion wave-fixed mechanism generates the DPOAE Zero-Latency (ZL) component, as a backward traveling wave from the "overlap" region. Linear reflection of the forward DP wave (IDP) generates the DPOAE Long-Latency (LL) component through a place-fixed mechanism. ZL and LL components add up vectorially to generate the DPOAE recorded in the ear canal. The 2f1 - f2 and 2f2 - f1 DPOAE intensity depends on the stimulus level and on the primary frequency ratio r = f2/f1, where f1 and f2 are the primary stimuli frequencies. Here we study the behavior of the ZL and LL DPOAE components as a function of r by both numerical and laboratory experiments, measuring DPAOEs with an equal primary levels (L1 = L2) paradigm in the range [35, 75] dB SPL, with r ranging in [1.1, 1.45]. Numerical simulations of a nonlocal nonlinear model have been performed without cochlear roughness, to suppress the linear reflection mechanism. In this way the model solution at the base represents the DPOAE ZL component, and the solution at the corresponding DPOAE tonotopic place corresponds to the IDP. This technique has been not effectual to study the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE, as a consequence of its generation mechanism. While the 2f1 - f2 generation place is known to be the tonotopic place x(f2), the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE one has to be assumed basal to its corresponding reflection place. That is because ZL components generated in x(f2) cannot significantly pass through their resonant place. Moreover increasing the ratio r, 2f2 - f1 ZL and LL generation place approach each other, because the overlap region of primary tones decreases. Consequently, the distinction between the two places becomes complicated. DPOAEs have been measured in six young normal-hearing subjects. DPOAE ZL and LL components have been separated by a time-frequency filtering method based on the wavelet transform 1. due to their different phase gradient delay

  13. Modeling of frequency-dependent negative differential capacitance in InGaAs/InP photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yidong; Chen, Jun; Xu, Jintong; Li, Xiangyang

    2018-03-01

    The negative differential capacitance (NDC) of p-i-n InGaAs/InP photodetector has been clearly observed, and the small signal model of frequency-dependent NDC is established, based on the accumulation and emission of electrons at the p-InP/i-InGaAs interface. The NDC phenomenon is contributed by the additional capacitance (CT), which is caused by the charging-discharging process in the p-InP/i-InGaAs interface. It is found that the NDC becomes more obvious with decreasing frequency, which is consistent with the conclusion of the experiment. It is proved that the probability of electron capture/escape in the p-i interface is affected by frequency. Therefore, the smaller frequency applied, the higher additional capacitance is obtained.

  14. Achieving Optimal Quantum Acceleration of Frequency Estimation Using Adaptive Coherent Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghiloo, M; Jordan, A N; Murch, K W

    2017-11-03

    Precision measurements of frequency are critical to accurate time keeping and are fundamentally limited by quantum measurement uncertainties. While for time-independent quantum Hamiltonians the uncertainty of any parameter scales at best as 1/T, where T is the duration of the experiment, recent theoretical works have predicted that explicitly time-dependent Hamiltonians can yield a 1/T^{2} scaling of the uncertainty for an oscillation frequency. This quantum acceleration in precision requires coherent control, which is generally adaptive. We experimentally realize this quantum improvement in frequency sensitivity with superconducting circuits, using a single transmon qubit. With optimal control pulses, the theoretically ideal frequency precision scaling is reached for times shorter than the decoherence time. This result demonstrates a fundamental quantum advantage for frequency estimation.

  15. Frequency-dependent electrodeformation of giant phospholipid vesicles in AC electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A model of vesicle electrodeformation is described which obtains a parametrized vesicle shape by minimizing the sum of the membrane bending energy and the energy due to the electric field. Both the vesicle membrane and the aqueous media inside and outside the vesicle are treated as leaky dielectrics, and the vesicle itself is modeled as a nearly spherical shape enclosed within a thin membrane. It is demonstrated (a) that the model achieves a good quantitative agreement with the experimentally determined prolate-to-oblate transition frequencies in the kilohertz range and (b) that the model can explain a phase diagram of shapes of giant phospholipid vesicles with respect to two parameters: the frequency of the applied alternating current electric field and the ratio of the electrical conductivities of the aqueous media inside and outside the vesicle, explored in a recent paper (S. Aranda et al., Biophys J 95:L19–L21, 2008). A possible use of the frequency-dependent shape transitions of phospholipid vesicles in conductometry of microliter samples is discussed. PMID:21886342

  16. Accurate simulation of Raman amplified lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Olesen, Anders Sig; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    A lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper using a Raman amplifier for loss compensation is presented together with a numerical model capable of predicting the shape of individual pulses as well as the overall envelope of more than 100 pulses. The generated pulse envelope consists of 116 pulses wi...

  17. Airborne non-contact and contact broadband ultrasounds for frequency attenuation profile estimation of cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosálbez, J; Wright, W M D; Jiang, W; Carrión, A; Genovés, V; Bosch, I

    2018-08-01

    In this paper, the study of frequency-dependent ultrasonic attenuation in strongly heterogeneous cementitious materials is addressed. To accurately determine the attenuation over a wide frequency range, it is necessary to have suitable excitation techniques. We have analysed two kinds of ultrasound techniques: contact ultrasound and airborne non-contact ultrasound. The mathematical formulation for frequency-dependent attenuation has been established and it has been revealed that each technique may achieve similar results but requires specific different calibration processes. In particular, the airborne non-contact technique suffers high attenuation due to energy losses at the air-material interfaces. Thus, its bandwidth is limited to low frequencies but it does not require physical contact between transducer and specimen. In contrast, the classical contact technique can manage higher frequencies but the measurement depends on the pressure between the transducer and the specimen. Cement specimens have been tested with both techniques and frequency attenuation dependence has been estimated. Similar results were achieved at overlapping bandwidth and it has been demonstrated that the airborne non-contact ultrasound technique could be a viable alternative to the classical contact technique. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Complexity of low-frequency blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations covaries with local connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeffrey S; Zielinski, Brandon A; Nielsen, Jared A; Ferguson, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    Very low-frequency blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fluctuations have emerged as a valuable tool for describing brain anatomy, neuropathology, and development. Such fluctuations exhibit power law frequency dynamics, with largest amplitude at lowest frequencies. The biophysical mechanisms generating such fluctuations are poorly understood. Using publicly available data from 1,019 subjects of age 7-30, we show that BOLD fluctuations exhibit temporal complexity that is linearly related to local connectivity (regional homogeneity), consistently and significantly covarying across subjects and across gray matter regions. This relationship persisted independently of covariance with gray matter density or standard deviation of BOLD signal. During late neurodevelopment, BOLD fluctuations were unchanged with age in association cortex while becoming more random throughout the rest of the brain. These data suggest that local interconnectivity may play a key role in establishing the complexity of low-frequency BOLD fluctuations underlying functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity. Stable low-frequency power dynamics may emerge through segmentation and integration of connectivity during development of distributed large-scale brain networks. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Frequency-dependent heat capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Claus Flensted

    The frequency–dependent heat capacity of super-cooled glycerol near the glass transition is measured using the 3w detection technique. An electrical conducting thin film with a temperature–dependent electrical resistance is deposited on a substrate. The thin film is used simultaneously as a heater...

  20. Contact area affects frequency-dependent responses to vibration in the peripheral vascular and sensorineural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnak, Kristine; Miller, G R; Waugh, Stacey

    2018-01-01

    Repetitive exposure to hand-transmitted vibration is associated with development of peripheral vascular and sensorineural dysfunctions. These disorders and symptoms associated with it are referred to as hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). Although the symptoms of the disorder have been well characterized, the etiology and contribution of various exposure factors to development of the dysfunctions are not well understood. Previous studies performed using a rat-tail model of vibration demonstrated that vascular and peripheral nervous system adverse effects of vibration are frequency-dependent, with vibration frequencies at or near the resonant frequency producing the most severe injury. However, in these investigations, the amplitude of the exposed tissue was greater than amplitude typically noted in human fingers. To determine how contact with vibrating source and amplitude of the biodynamic response of the tissue affects the risk of injury occurring, this study compared the influence of frequency using different levels of restraint to assess how maintaining contact of the tail with vibrating source affects the transmission of vibration. Data demonstrated that for the most part, increasing the contact of the tail with the platform by restraining it with additional straps resulted in an enhancement in transmission of vibration signal and elevation in factors associated with vascular and peripheral nerve injury. In addition, there were also frequency-dependent effects, with exposure at 250 Hz generating greater effects than vibration at 62.5 Hz. These observations are consistent with studies in humans demonstrating that greater contact and exposure to frequencies near the resonant frequency pose the highest risk for generating peripheral vascular and sensorineural dysfunction.

  1. Extended exergy concept to facilitate designing and optimization of frequency-dependent direct energy conversion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijewardane, S.; Goswami, Yogi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Proved exergy method is not adequate to optimize frequency-dependent energy conversion. • Exergy concept is modified to facilitate the thermoeconomic optimization of photocell. • The exergy of arbitrary radiation is used for a practical purpose. • The utility of the concept is illustrated using pragmatic examples. - Abstract: Providing the radiation within the acceptable (responsive) frequency range(s) is a common method to increase the efficiency of the frequency-dependent energy conversion systems, such as photovoltaic and nano-scale rectenna. Appropriately designed auxiliary items such as spectrally selective thermal emitters, optical filters, and lenses are used for this purpose. However any energy conversion method that utilizes auxiliary components to increase the efficiency of a system has to justify the potential cost incurred by those auxiliary components through the economic gain emerging from the increased system efficiency. Therefore much effort should be devoted to design innovative systems, effectively integrating the auxiliary items and to optimize the system with economic considerations. Exergy is the widely used method to design and optimize conventional energy conversion systems. Although the exergy concept is used to analyze photovoltaic systems, it has not been used effectively to design and optimize such systems. In this manuscript, we present a modified exergy method in order to effectively design and economically optimize frequency-dependent energy conversion systems. Also, we illustrate the utility of this concept using examples of thermophotovoltaic, Photovoltaic/Thermal and concentrated solar photovoltaic

  2. Frequency Dependent Non- Thermal Effects of Oscillating Electric Fields in the Microwave Region on the Properties of a Solvated Lysozyme System: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelios Floros

    Full Text Available The use of microwaves in every day's applications raises issues regarding the non thermal biological effects of microwaves. In this work we employ molecular dynamics simulations to advance further the dielectric studies of protein solutions in the case of lysozyme, taking into consideration possible frequency dependent changes in the structural and dynamic properties of the system upon application of electric field in the microwave region. The obtained dielectric spectra are identical with those derived in our previous work using the Fröhlich-Kirkwood approach in the framework of the linear response theory. Noticeable structural changes in the protein have been observed only at frequencies near its absorption maximum. Concerning Cα position fluctuations, different frequencies affected different regions of the protein sequence. Furthermore, the influence of the field on the kinetics of protein-water as well as on the water-water hydrogen bonds in the first hydration shell has been studied; an extension of the Luzar-Chandler kinetic model was deemed necessary for a better fit of the applied field results and for the estimation of more accurate hydrogen bond lifetime values.

  3. Frequency dependence of magnetic ac loss in a Roebel cable made of YBCO on a Ni-W substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, L. S.; Staines, M. P.; Badcock, R. A.; Long, N. J.; Majoros, M.; Collings, E. W.; Sumption, M. D.

    2010-08-01

    We have investigated the frequency dependent contributions to the magnetic ac loss in a 10 strand Roebel cable with 2 mm wide non-insulated strands and a transposition length of 90 mm. This cable is made from 40 mm wide YBCO coated conductor tape manufactured by AMSC and stabilized by electroplating 25 µm thick copper on either side prior to the mechanical punching of the cable strands. The measurements were carried out in both perpendicular and parallel field orientation, at frequencies in the range of 30-200 Hz. While the loss in the perpendicular orientation is predominantly hysteretic in nature, we observe some frequency dependence of the loss when the cable approaches full flux penetration at high field amplitudes. The magnitude is consistent with eddy current losses in the copper stabilization layer. This supports the fact that the inter-strand coupling loss is not significant in this frequency range. In the parallel field orientation, the hysteresis loss in the Ni-W alloy substrate dominates, but we see an unusually strong frequency dependent contribution to the loss which we attribute to intra-strand current loops.

  4. How to include frequency dependent complex permeability Into SPICE models to improve EMI filters design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixdenier, Fabien; Yade, Ousseynou; Martin, Christian; Bréard, Arnaud; Vollaire, Christian

    2018-05-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) filters design is a rather difficult task where engineers have to choose adequate magnetic materials, design the magnetic circuit and choose the size and number of turns. The final design must achieve the attenuation requirements (constraints) and has to be as compact as possible (goal). Alternating current (AC) analysis is a powerful tool to predict global impedance or attenuation of any filter. However, AC analysis are generally performed without taking into account the frequency-dependent complex permeability behaviour of soft magnetic materials. That's why, we developed two frequency-dependent complex permeability models able to be included into SPICE models. After an identification process, the performances of each model are compared to measurements made on a realistic EMI filter prototype in common mode (CM) and differential mode (DM) to see the benefit of the approach. Simulation results are in good agreement with the measured ones especially in the middle frequency range.

  5. Frequency-Dependent Amplitude Panning for the Stereophonic Image Enhancement of Audio Recorded Using Two Closely Spaced Microphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Jun Chun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new frequency-dependent amplitude panning method for stereophonic image enhancement applied to a sound source recorded using two closely spaced omni-directional microphones. The ability to detect the direction of such a sound source is limited due to weak spatial information, such as the inter-channel time difference (ICTD and inter-channel level difference (ICLD. Moreover, when sound sources are recorded in a convolutive or a real room environment, the detection of sources is affected by reverberation effects. Thus, the proposed method first tries to estimate the source direction depending on the frequency using azimuth-frequency analysis. Then, a frequency-dependent amplitude panning technique is proposed to enhance the stereophonic image by modifying the stereophonic law of sines. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, we compare its performance with that of a conventional method based on the beamforming technique in terms of directivity pattern, perceived direction, and quality degradation under three different recording conditions (anechoic, convolutive, and real reverberant. The comparison shows that the proposed method gives us better stereophonic images in a stereo loudspeaker reproduction than the conventional method without any annoying effects.

  6. Frequency dependence of magnetic shielding performance of HTS plates in mixed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitani, Atsushi; Yokono, Takafumi; Yokono, Takafumi

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic shielding performance of the high-Tc superconducting (HTS) plate is investigated numerically. The behavior of the shielding current density in the HTS plate is expressed as the integral-differential equation with a normal component of the current vector potential as a dependent variable. The numerical code for solving the equation has been developed by using the combination of the Newton-Raphson method and the successive substitution method and, by use of the code, damping coefficients and shielding factors are evaluated for the various values of the frequency ω. The results of computations show that the HTS plate has a possibility of shielding the high-frequency magnetic field with ω > or approx. 1 kHz. (author)

  7. Frequency dependence of magnetic shielding performance of HTS plates in mixed states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamitani, Atsushi; Yokono, Takafumi [Yamagata Univ., Yonezawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yokono, Takafumi [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Information Sciences and Electronics

    2000-06-01

    The magnetic shielding performance of the high-Tc superconducting (HTS) plate is investigated numerically. The behavior of the shielding current density in the HTS plate is expressed as the integral-differential equation with a normal component of the current vector potential as a dependent variable. The numerical code for solving the equation has been developed by using the combination of the Newton-Raphson method and the successive substitution method and, by use of the code, damping coefficients and shielding factors are evaluated for the various values of the frequency {omega}. The results of computations show that the HTS plate has a possibility of shielding the high-frequency magnetic field with {omega} > or approx. 1 kHz. (author)

  8. Frequency dependence of anomalous transport in field theory and holography⋆,⋆⋆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megías Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the frequency dependence of anomalous transport coefficients for a relativistic gas of free chiral fermions and for a strongly coupled conformal field theory with holographic dual. We perform the computation by using the Kubo formulae for- malism, and compare with a hydrodynamic calculation of two point functions. Some implications for heavy ion physics are discussed.

  9. Simple and accurate solution for convective-radiative fin with temperature dependent thermal conductivity using double optimal linearization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouaziz, M.N.; Aziz, Abdul

    2010-01-01

    A novel concept of double optimal linearization is introduced and used to obtain a simple and accurate solution for the temperature distribution in a straight rectangular convective-radiative fin with temperature dependent thermal conductivity. The solution is built from the classical solution for a pure convection fin of constant thermal conductivity which appears in terms of hyperbolic functions. When compared with the direct numerical solution, the double optimally linearized solution is found to be accurate within 4% for a range of radiation-conduction and thermal conductivity parameters that are likely to be encountered in practice. The present solution is simple and offers superior accuracy compared with the fairly complex approximate solutions based on the homotopy perturbation method, variational iteration method, and the double series regular perturbation method. The fin efficiency expression resembles the classical result for the constant thermal conductivity convecting fin. The present results are easily usable by the practicing engineers in their thermal design and analysis work involving fins.

  10. Frequency dependence and passive drains in fish-eye lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo-Teruel, O.; Mitchell-Thomas, R. C.; Hao, Y.

    2012-11-01

    The Maxwell fish eye lens has previously been reported as being capable of the much sought after phenomenon of subwavelength imaging. The inclusion of a drain in this system is considered crucial to the imaging ability, although its role is the topic of much debate. This paper provides a numerical investigation into a practical implementation of a drain in such systems, and analyzes the strong frequency dependence of both the Maxwell fish eye lens and an alternative, the Miñano lens. The imaging capability of these types of lens is questioned, and it is supported by simulations involving various configurations of drain arrays. Finally, a discussion of the near-field and evanescent wave contribution is given.

  11. On the frequency dependence of the otoacoustic emission latency in hypoacoustic and normal ears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisto, R.; Moleti, A.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the otoacoustic emission (OAE) latency of adult subjects have been obtained, as a function of frequency, by means of wavelet time-frequency analysis based on the iterative application of filter banks. The results are in agreement with previous OAE latency measurements by Tognola et al. [Hear. Res. 106, 112-122 (1997)], as regards both the latency values and the frequency dependence, and seem to be incompatible with the steep 1/f law that is predicted by scale-invariant full cochlear models. The latency-frequency relationship has been best fitted to a linear function of the cochlear physical distance, using the Greenwood map, and to an exponential function of the cochlear distance, for comparison with derived band ABR latency measurements. Two sets of ears [94 audiometrically normal and 42 impaired with high-frequency (f>3 kHz) hearing loss] have been separately analyzed. Significantly larger average latencies were found in the impaired ears in the mid-frequency range. Theoretical implications of these findings on the transmission of the traveling wave are discussed.

  12. 38 CFR 3.30 - Frequency of payment of improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC). 3.30 Section 3.30 Pensions... Dependency and Indemnity Compensation General § 3.30 Frequency of payment of improved pension and parents' dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC). Payment shall be made as shown in paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d...

  13. Dependence of the colored frequency noise in spin torque oscillators on current and magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Anders; Bonetti, Stefano; Sani, Sohrab R.; Majid Mohseni, S.; Persson, Johan; Chung, Sunjae; Amir Hossein Banuazizi, S.; Iacocca, Ezio; Östling, Mikael; Åkerman, Johan; Gunnar Malm, B.

    2014-03-01

    The nano-scale spin torque oscillator (STO) is a compelling device for on-chip, highly tunable microwave frequency signal generation. Currently, one of the most important challenges for the STO is to increase its longer-time frequency stability by decreasing the 1/f frequency noise, but its high level makes even its measurement impossible using the phase noise mode of spectrum analyzers. Here, we present a custom made time-domain measurement system with 150 MHz measurement bandwidth making possible the investigation of the variation of the 1/f as well as the white frequency noise in a STO over a large set of operating points covering 18-25 GHz. The 1/f level is found to be highly dependent on the oscillation amplitude-frequency non-linearity and the vicinity of unexcited oscillation modes. These findings elucidate the need for a quantitative theoretical treatment of the low-frequency, colored frequency noise in STOs. Based on the results, we suggest that the 1/f frequency noise possibly can be decreased by improving the microstructural quality of the metallic thin films.

  14. Dependence of the colored frequency noise in spin torque oscillators on current and magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, Anders; Sani, Sohrab R.; Chung, Sunjae; Amir Hossein Banuazizi, S.; Östling, Mikael; Gunnar Malm, B.; Bonetti, Stefano; Majid Mohseni, S.; Persson, Johan; Iacocca, Ezio; Åkerman, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The nano-scale spin torque oscillator (STO) is a compelling device for on-chip, highly tunable microwave frequency signal generation. Currently, one of the most important challenges for the STO is to increase its longer-time frequency stability by decreasing the 1/f frequency noise, but its high level makes even its measurement impossible using the phase noise mode of spectrum analyzers. Here, we present a custom made time-domain measurement system with 150 MHz measurement bandwidth making possible the investigation of the variation of the 1/f as well as the white frequency noise in a STO over a large set of operating points covering 18–25 GHz. The 1/f level is found to be highly dependent on the oscillation amplitude-frequency non-linearity and the vicinity of unexcited oscillation modes. These findings elucidate the need for a quantitative theoretical treatment of the low-frequency, colored frequency noise in STOs. Based on the results, we suggest that the 1/f frequency noise possibly can be decreased by improving the microstructural quality of the metallic thin films

  15. Frequency dependent power fluctuations: a feature of the ESR system or physical?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ogawa

    Full Text Available The k-dependence of the received power in high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR conditions, occurring for naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines (NEIALs and for real satellites, is investigated by using the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR, where the data are recorded in eight separate channels using different frequencies. For the real satellites we find large variations of the relative powers from event to event, which is probably due to a different number of pulses catching the satellite over the integration period. However, the large power difference remains unexpected in one case. Over short time scale (< 10 s the relative power difference seems to be highly stable. For most NEIAL events the differences between channels are within noise level. In a few cases variations of the relative power well above both the estimated and expected 1-sigma level occur over a signal preintegrated profile. We thus suggest that the frequency dependence of the power in NEIAL events has its origin in the scattering medium itself as the most plausible explanation.

    Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; plasma waves and instabilities; instruments and techniques

  16. Frequency dependent power fluctuations: a feature of the ESR system or physical?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ogawa

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The k-dependence of the received power in high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR conditions, occurring for naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines (NEIALs and for real satellites, is investigated by using the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR, where the data are recorded in eight separate channels using different frequencies. For the real satellites we find large variations of the relative powers from event to event, which is probably due to a different number of pulses catching the satellite over the integration period. However, the large power difference remains unexpected in one case. Over short time scale (< 10 s the relative power difference seems to be highly stable. For most NEIAL events the differences between channels are within noise level. In a few cases variations of the relative power well above both the estimated and expected 1-sigma level occur over a signal preintegrated profile. We thus suggest that the frequency dependence of the power in NEIAL events has its origin in the scattering medium itself as the most plausible explanation.Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; plasma waves and instabilities; instruments and techniques

  17. Autobiographical Memory Performance in Alzheimer's Disease Depends on Retrieval Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stephan; Mychajliw, Christian; Reichert, Carolin; Melcher, Tobias; Leyhe, Thomas

    2016-04-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory disturbances primarily caused by pathogenic mechanisms affecting medial temporal lobe structures. As proposed by current theories of memory formation, this decrease is mediated by the age of the acquired knowledge. However, they cannot fully explain specific patterns of retrograde amnesia in AD. In the current study we examined an alternative approach and investigated whether the extent and severity of retrograde amnesia in AD is mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval or whether it depends on the mere age of knowledge. We compared recall of autobiographical incidents from three life periods in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), patients with early dementia of Alzheimer type (eDAT), and healthy control (HC) individuals using the Autobiographical Memory Interview. Retrieval frequency was operationalized by a paired comparison analysis. In contrast to HC individuals, recall of autobiographical incidents was impaired in patients with aMCI and eDAT following Ribot's gradient, with a reduced memory loss for remote compared to more recent life events. However, there was a strong effect of retrieval frequency on memory performance with frequently retrieved incidents memorized in more detail than less frequently retrieved episodes. Remote memories were recalled more often than recent ones. These findings suggest that more frequently retrieved autobiographical memories generally become more independent of the hippocampal complex and might thus be better protected against early hippocampal damage related to AD. Hence, the extent of retrograde amnesia in AD appears mainly mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval, which could plausibly explain why cognitive activity can effectively delay the onset of memory decline in AD.

  18. GENERAL APROACH TO MODELING NONLINEAR AMPLITUDE AND FREQUENCY DEPENDENT HYSTERESIS EFFECTS BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Heine

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A detailed description of the rubber parts’ properties is gaining in importance in the current simulation models of multi-body simulation. One application example is a multi-body simulation of the washing machine movement. Inside the washing machine, there are different force transmission elements, which consist completely or partly of rubber. Rubber parts or, generally, elastomers usually have amplitude-dependant and frequency-dependent force transmission properties. Rheological models are used to describe these properties. A method for characterization of the amplitude and frequency dependence of such a rheological model is presented within this paper. Within this method, the used rheological model can be reduced or expanded in order to illustrate various non-linear effects. An original result is given with the automated parameter identification. It is fully implemented in Matlab. Such identified rheological models are intended for subsequent implementation in a multi-body model. This allows a significant enhancement of the overall model quality.

  19. Frequency chirpings in Alfven continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Berk, Herb; Breizman, Boris; Zheng, Linjin

    2017-10-01

    We have used a self-consistent mapping technique to describe both the nonlinear wave-energetic particle resonant interaction and its spatial mode structure that depends upon the resonant energetic particle pressure. At the threshold for the onset of the energetic particle mode (EPM), strong chirping emerges in the lower continuum close to the TAE gap and then, driven by strong continuum damping, chirps rapidly to lower frequencies in the Alfven continuum. An adiabatic theory was developed that accurately replicated the results from the simulation where the nonlinearity was only due to the EPM resonant particles. The results show that the EPM-trapped particles have their action conserved during the time of rapid chirping. This adiabaticity enabled wave trapped particles to be confined within their separatrix, and produce even larger resonant structures, that can produce a large amplitude mode far from linearly predicted frequencies. In the present work we describe the effect of additional MHD nonlinearity to this calculation. We studied how the zonal flow component and its nonlinear feedback to the fundamental frequency and found that the MHD nonlinearity doesn't significantly alter the frequency chirping response that is predicted by the calculation that neglects the MHD nonlinearity.

  20. Filter frequency response of time dependent signal using Laplace transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestakov, Aleksei I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-16

    We analyze the effect a filter has on a time dependent signal x(t). If X(s) is the Laplace transform of x and H (s) is the filter Transfer function, the response in frequency space is X (s) H (s). Consequently, in real space, the response is the convolution (x*h) (t), where hi is the Laplace inverse of H. Effects are analyzed and analytically for functions such as (t/tc)2 e-t/t$_c$, where tc = const. We consider lowpass, highpass and bandpass filters.

  1. Frequency-Dependent Disease Transmission and the Dynamics of the Silene-Ustilago Host-Pathogen System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thrall, P.H.; Biere, A.; Uyenoyama, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Models incorporating density-dependent disease transmission functions generally provide a good fit for airborne and directly transmitted bacterial or viral diseases. However, the transmission dynamics of sexually transmitted and vector-borne diseases are likely to be frequency- rather than density-

  2. Fast, accurate, and robust frequency offset estimation based on modified adaptive Kalman filter in coherent optical communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanfu; Xiang, Qian; Zhang, Qun; Zhou, Zhongqing; Jiang, Wen; He, Qianwen; Yao, Yong

    2017-09-01

    We propose a joint estimation scheme for fast, accurate, and robust frequency offset (FO) estimation along with phase estimation based on modified adaptive Kalman filter (MAKF). The scheme consists of three key modules: extend Kalman filter (EKF), lock detector, and FO cycle slip recovery. The EKF module estimates time-varying phase induced by both FO and laser phase noise. The lock detector module makes decision between acquisition mode and tracking mode and consequently sets the EKF tuning parameter in an adaptive manner. The third module can detect possible cycle slip in the case of large FO and make proper correction. Based on the simulation and experimental results, the proposed MAKF has shown excellent estimation performance featuring high accuracy, fast convergence, as well as the capability of cycle slip recovery.

  3. Frequency-dependent squeeze-amplitude attenuation and squeeze-angle rotation by electromagnetically induced transparency for gravitational-wave interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.; Goda, Keisuke; Corbitt, Thomas; Mavalvala, Nergis

    2006-01-01

    We study the effects of frequency-dependent squeeze-amplitude attenuation and squeeze-angle rotation by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) on gravitational-wave (GW) interferometers. We propose the use of low-pass, bandpass, and high-pass EIT filters, an S-shaped EIT filter, and an intracavity EIT filter to generate frequency-dependent squeezing for injection into the antisymmetric port of GW interferometers. We find that the EIT filters have several advantages over the previous filter designs with regard to optical losses, compactness, and the tunability of the filter linewidth

  4. Dependence of the transference of a reduced eye on frequency of light*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Evans

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In Gaussian optics the transference is a matrix that is a complete representation of the effects of the system on a ray traversing it. Almost all of the familiar optical properties of the system, such asrefractive error and power of the system, can be calculated from the transference. Because of the central importance of the transference it is useful to have some idea of how it depends on the frequencyof light. This paper examines the simplest model eye, the reduced eye. The dependence of the transference is calculated in terms of both frequency andwavelength of light and both dependencies are displayed graphically. The principal matrix logarithms are also calculated and displayed graphically. Chromatic difference in refractive compensation, power and ametropia are obtained for the reduced eye from the transferences.  (S Afr Optom 2011 70(4 149-155

  5. Monitoring cure of composite resins using frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.; Hoff, M. S.; Loos, A. C.; Freeman, W. T., Jr.; Eichinger, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    A nondestructive in situ measurement technique has been developed for monitoring and measuring the cure processing properties of composite resins. Frequency dependent electromagnetic sensors (FDEMS) were used to directly measure resin viscosity during cure. The effects of the cure cycle and resin aging on the viscosity during cure were investigated using the sensor. Viscosity measurements obtained using the sensor are compared with the viscosities calculated by the Loos-Springer cure process model. Good overall agreement was obtained except for the aged resin samples.

  6. Probing the Jet Turnover Frequency Dependence on Mass and Mass Accretion Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerstein, Erica; Gültekin, Kayhan; King, Ashley

    2018-01-01

    We have examined a sample of 15 sub-Eddington supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in a variety of galaxy classifications to further understand the proposed fundamental plane of black hole activity and scaling relations between black hole masses and their radio and X-ray luminosities. This plane describes black holes from stellar-mass to supermassive. The physics probed by these sub-Eddington systems is thought to be a radiatively inefficient, jet-dominated accretion flow. By studying black holes in this regime, we can learn important information on the disk-jet connection for accreting black holes.A key factor in studying the fundamental plane is the turnover frequency — the frequency at which emission transitions from optically thick at lower frequencies to optically thin at higher frequencies. This turnover point can be measured by observing the source in both radio and X-ray. Our project aims to test the dependence of the turnover frequency on mass and mass accretion rate.Radio observations of the sample were obtained using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in the range of 5-40 GHz across four different frequency bands in A configuration to give the highest spatial resolution to focus on the core emission. Our carefully chosen sample of SMBHs with dynamically measured masses consists of two sub-samples: those with approximately constant mass accretion rate (LX/LEdd ~ 10‑7) and those with approximately constant mass (MBH ~ 108 Msun). X-ray data were obtained from archival Chandra observations. To find the turnover frequency, we used Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to fit two power laws to the radio data and the archival X-ray data. The intersection of the radio and X-ray fits is the turnover frequency.We present the results for both subsamples of SMBHs and their relationship between the turnover frequency and X-ray luminosity, which we take to scale with mass accretion rate, and jet power derived from both radio and X-ray properties.

  7. Frequency and temperature dependent dielectric properties of TiO2-V2O5 nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Apurba; Roy, Atanu; De, Sayan; Chatterjee, Souvik; Das, Sachindranath

    2018-03-01

    In this manuscript, we have reported the crystal structure, dielectric response, and transport phenomenon of TiO2-V2O5 nanocomposites. The nanocomposites were synthesized using a sol-gel technique having different molar ratios of Ti:V (10:10, 10:15, and 10:20). The phase composition and the morphology have been studied using X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscope, respectively. The impedance spectroscopy studies of the three samples over a wide range of temperature (50 K-300 K) have been extensively described using the internal barrier layer capacitor model. It is based on the contribution of domain and domain boundary, relaxations of the materials, which are the main crucial factors for the enhancement of the dielectric response. The frequency dependent ac conductivity of the ceramics strongly obeys the well-known Jonscher's power law, and it has been clearly explained using the theory of jump relaxation model. The temperature dependent bulk conductivity is fairly recognized to the variable-range hopping of localized polarons. The co-existence of mixed valence state of Ti ions (Ti3+ and Ti4+) in the sample significantly contributes to the change of dielectric property. The overall study of dielectric response explains that the dielectric constant and the dielectric loss are strongly dependent on temperature and frequency and decrease with an increase of frequency as well as temperature.

  8. Scaling and the frequency dependence of Nyquist plot maxima of the electrical impedance of the human thigh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Carl

    2017-11-30

    To define and elucidate the properties of reduced-variable Nyquist plots. Non-invasive measurements of the electrical impedance of the human thigh. A retrospective analysis of the electrical impedances of 154 normal subjects measured over the past decade shows that 'scaling' of the Nyquist plots for human thigh muscles is a property shared by healthy thigh musculature, irrespective of subject and the length of muscle segment. Here the term scaling signifies the near and sometimes 'perfect' coalescence of the separate X versus R plots into one 'reduced' Nyquist plot by the simple expedient of dividing R and X by X m , the value of X at the reactance maximum. To the extent allowed by noise levels one can say that there is one 'universal' reduced Nyquist plot for the thigh musculature of healthy subjects. There is one feature of the Nyquist curves which is not 'universal', however, namely the frequency f m at which the maximum in X is observed. That is found to vary from 10 to 100 kHz. depending on subject and segment length. Analysis shows, however, that the mean value of 1/f m is an accurately linear function of segment length, though there is a small subject-to-subject random element as well. Also, following the recovery of an otherwise healthy victim of ankle fracture demonstrates the clear superiority of measurements above about 800 kHz, where scaling is not observed, in contrast to measurements below about 400 kHz, where scaling is accurately obeyed. The ubiquity of 'scaling' casts new light on the interpretation of impedance results as they are used in electrical impedance myography and bioelectric impedance analysis.

  9. Similar patterns of frequency-dependent selection on animal personalities emerge in three species of social spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, J L L; Pruitt, J N

    2015-06-01

    Frequency-dependent selection is thought to be a major contributor to the maintenance of phenotypic variation. We tested for frequency-dependent selection on contrasting behavioural strategies, termed here 'personalities', in three species of social spiders, each thought to represent an independent evolutionary origin of sociality. The evolution of sociality in the spider genus Anelosimus is consistently met with the emergence of two temporally stable discrete personality types: an 'aggressive' or 'docile' form. We assessed how the foraging success of each phenotype changes as a function of its representation within a colony. We did this by creating experimental colonies of various compositions (six aggressives, three aggressives and three dociles, one aggressive and five dociles, six dociles), maintaining them in a common garden for 3 weeks, and tracking the mass gained by individuals of either phenotype. We found that both the docile and aggressive phenotypes experienced their greatest mass gain in mixed colonies of mostly docile individuals. However, the performance of both phenotypes decreased as the frequency of the aggressive phenotype increased. Nearly identical patterns of phenotype-specific frequency dependence were recovered in all three species. Naturally occurring colonies of these spiders exhibit mixtures dominated by the docile phenotype, suggesting that these spiders may have evolved mechanisms to maintain the compositions that maximize the success of the colony without compromising the expected reproductive output of either phenotype. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  10. Effect of neutron flux on the frequency dependencies of electrical conductivity of silicon nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huseynov, E.; Garibli, A., E-mail: elchin.huse@yahoo.com [National Nuclear Research Center, Department of Nanotechnology and Radiation Material Science, 1073, Inshaatchilar pr. 4, Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2016-11-01

    It has been reviewed the frequency dependencies of electrical conductivity of nanoparticles affected by neutron flux at different times and initial state, at various constant temperatures such as 100, 200, 300 and 400 K. Measurements have been carried out at each temperature at the different 97 values of frequency in the 1 Hz - 1 MHz range. From interdependence between real and imaginary parts of electrical conductivity it has been determined the type of conductivity. Moreover, in the work it is given the mechanism of electrical conductivity according to the obtained results. (Author)

  11. On the frequency dependence of the magnetic permeability of FeHfO thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, P.J.H.; Rulkens, B.

    1998-01-01

    The frequency dependence of the magnetic permeability as well as of the electrical impedance have been investigated for soft-magnetic granular FeHfO thin films. The impedance measurements indicate that capacitive effects resulting from the inhomogeneous structure of the layers are of no importance

  12. Frequency-dependent local field factors in dielectric liquids by a polarizable force field and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davari, Nazanin; Haghdani, Shokouh; Åstrand, Per-Olof

    2015-01-01

    A force field model for calculating local field factors, i.e. the linear response of the local electric field for example at a nucleus in a molecule with respect to an applied electric field, is discussed. It is based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the polarizability, and thereby it includes two physically distinct terms for describing electronic polarization: changes in atomic charges arising from transfer of charge between the atoms and atomic induced dipole moments. A time dependence is included both for the atomic charges and the atomic dipole moments and if they are assumed to oscillate with the same frequency as the applied electric field, a model for frequency-dependent properties are obtained. Furthermore, if a life-time of excited states are included, a model for the complex frequency-dependent polariability is obtained including also information about excited states and the absorption spectrum. We thus present a model for the frequency-dependent local field factors through the first molecular excitation energy. It is combined with molecular dynamics simulations of liquids where a large set of configurations are sampled and for which local field factors are calculated. We are normally not interested in the average of the local field factor but rather in configurations where it is as high as possible. In electrical insulation, we would like to avoid high local field factors to reduce the risk for electrical breakdown, whereas for example in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high local field factors are desired to give dramatically increased intensities

  13. Frequency-dependent tACS modulation of BOLD signal during rhythmic visual stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yuhui; Sheng, Jingwei; Bandettini, Peter A; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2018-05-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) has emerged as a promising tool for modulating cortical oscillations. In previous electroencephalogram (EEG) studies, tACS has been found to modulate brain oscillatory activity in a frequency-specific manner. However, the spatial distribution and hemodynamic response for this modulation remains poorly understood. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has the advantage of measuring neuronal activity in regions not only below the tACS electrodes but also across the whole brain with high spatial resolution. Here, we measured fMRI signal while applying tACS to modulate rhythmic visual activity. During fMRI acquisition, tACS at different frequencies (4, 8, 16, and 32 Hz) was applied along with visual flicker stimulation at 8 and 16 Hz. We analyzed the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal difference between tACS-ON vs tACS-OFF, and different frequency combinations (e.g., 4 Hz tACS, 8 Hz flicker vs 8 Hz tACS, 8 Hz flicker). We observed significant tACS modulation effects on BOLD responses when the tACS frequency matched the visual flicker frequency or the second harmonic frequency. The main effects were predominantly seen in regions that were activated by the visual task and targeted by the tACS current distribution. These findings bridge different scientific domains of tACS research and demonstrate that fMRI could localize the tACS effect on stimulus-induced brain rhythms, which could lead to a new approach for understanding the high-level cognitive process shaped by the ongoing oscillatory signal. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Temperature dependence of frequency dispersion in III–V metal-oxide-semiconductor C-V and the capture/emission process of border traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vais, Abhitosh, E-mail: Abhitosh.Vais@imec.be; Martens, Koen; DeMeyer, Kristin [Department of Electrical Engineering, KU Leuven, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lin, Han-Chung; Ivanov, Tsvetan; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Dou, Chunmeng [Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Xie, Qi; Maes, Jan [ASM International, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Tang, Fu; Givens, Michael [ASM International, Phoenix, Arizona 85034-7200 (United States); Raskin, Jean-Pierre [Institute of Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics, Universiteé Catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2015-08-03

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the temperature dependence of frequency dispersion observed in capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements of III-V metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices. The dispersion in the accumulation region of the capacitance data is found to change from 4%–9% (per decade frequency) to ∼0% when the temperature is reduced from 300 K to 4 K in a wide range of MOS capacitors with different gate dielectrics and III-V substrates. We show that such significant temperature dependence of C-V frequency dispersion cannot be due to the temperature dependence of channel electrostatics, i.e., carrier density and surface potential. We also show that the temperature dependence of frequency dispersion, and hence, the capture/emission process of border traps can be modeled by a combination of tunneling and a “temperature-activated” process described by a non-radiative multi-phonon model, instead of a widely believed single-step elastic tunneling process.

  15. GENERAL APROACH TO MODELING NONLINEAR AMPLITUDE AND FREQUENCY DEPENDENT HYSTERESIS EFFECTS BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Heine; Markus Plagemann

    2014-01-01

    A detailed description of the rubber parts’ properties is gaining in importance in the current simulation models of multi-body simulation. One application example is a multi-body simulation of the washing machine movement. Inside the washing machine, there are different force transmission elements, which consist completely or partly of rubber. Rubber parts or, generally, elastomers usually have amplitude-dependant and frequency-dependent force transmission properties. Rheological models are u...

  16. Frequency-dependent glycinergic inhibition modulates plasticity in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Tara; Lillis, Kyle P; Zhou, Yu-Dong; White, John A

    2008-07-16

    Previous studies have demonstrated the presence of functional glycine receptors (GlyRs) in hippocampus. In this work, we examine the baseline activity and activity-dependent modulation of GlyRs in region CA1. We find that strychnine-sensitive GlyRs are open in the resting CA1 pyramidal cell, creating a state of tonic inhibition that "shunts" the magnitude of EPSPs evoked by electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collateral inputs. This GlyR-mediated shunting conductance is independent of the presynaptic stimulation rate; however, pairs of presynaptic and postsynaptic action potentials, repeated at frequencies above 5 Hz, reduce the GlyR-mediated conductance and increase peak EPSP magnitudes to levels at least 20% larger than those seen with presynaptic stimulation alone. We refer to this phenomenon as rate-dependent efficacy (RDE). Exogenous GlyR agonists (glycine, taurine) block RDE by preventing the closure of postsynaptic GlyRs. The GlyR antagonist strychnine blocks postsynaptic GlyRs under all conditions, occluding RDE. During RDE, GlyRs are less responsive to local glycine application, suggesting that a reduction in the number or sensitivity of membrane-inserted GlyRs underlies RDE. By extending the RDE induction protocol to include 500 paired presynaptic and postsynaptic spikes, we can induce long-term synaptic depression (LTD). Manipulations that lead to reduced functionality of GlyRs, either pharmacologically or through RDE, also lead to increased LTD. This result suggests that RDE contributes to long-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

  17. Explanation for the temperature dependence of plasma frequencies in SrTiO3 using mixed-polaron theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagles, D.M.; Georgiev, M.; Petrova, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    A theory of mixed polarons is used to interpret the published experimental results of Gervais et al. on temperature-dependent plasma frequencies in Nb-doped SrTiO 3 . For given polaron masses before mixing, the appropriate average mixed-polaron mass at any temperature T depends on two quantities, δ and b, which are measures of the separation between the bottoms of large and nearly small polaron bands before mixing and of a mixing matrix element; δ and b are assumed to have arbitrary linear dependences on T, probably related to a T dependence of the bare mass, and a term quadratic in T is included in δ, determined from the T dependence of large-polaron binding energies. Including a constraint on the ratio δ/|b| at low T from known masses from specific-heat data, satisfactory agreement is obtained with masses determined from plasma frequencies. This gives further support for the theory of mixed polarons in SrTiO 3 in addition to that already published. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. Accurate Classification of Chronic Migraine via Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Todd J.; Chong, Catherine D.; Wu, Teresa; Gaw, Nathan; Fu, Yinlin; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Background The International Classification of Headache Disorders provides criteria for the diagnosis and subclassification of migraine. Since there is no objective gold standard by which to test these diagnostic criteria, the criteria are based on the consensus opinion of content experts. Accurate migraine classifiers consisting of brain structural measures could serve as an objective gold standard by which to test and revise diagnostic criteria. The objectives of this study were to utilize magnetic resonance imaging measures of brain structure for constructing classifiers: 1) that accurately identify individuals as having chronic vs. episodic migraine vs. being a healthy control; and 2) that test the currently used threshold of 15 headache days/month for differentiating chronic migraine from episodic migraine. Methods Study participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging for determination of regional cortical thickness, cortical surface area, and volume. Principal components analysis combined structural measurements into principal components accounting for 85% of variability in brain structure. Models consisting of these principal components were developed to achieve the classification objectives. Ten-fold cross validation assessed classification accuracy within each of the ten runs, with data from 90% of participants randomly selected for classifier development and data from the remaining 10% of participants used to test classification performance. Headache frequency thresholds ranging from 5–15 headache days/month were evaluated to determine the threshold allowing for the most accurate subclassification of individuals into lower and higher frequency subgroups. Results Participants were 66 migraineurs and 54 healthy controls, 75.8% female, with an average age of 36 +/− 11 years. Average classifier accuracies were: a) 68% for migraine (episodic + chronic) vs. healthy controls; b) 67.2% for episodic migraine vs. healthy controls; c) 86.3% for chronic

  19. Frequency-dependent viscoelastic parameters of mouse brain tissue estimated by MR elastography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, E H; Bayly, P V [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St Louis, 1 Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1185, Saint Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Garbow, J R, E-mail: clayton@wustl.edu, E-mail: garbow@wustl.edu, E-mail: pvb@wustl.edu [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Washington University in St Louis, 4525 Scott Avenue, Campus Box 8227, Saint Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2011-04-21

    Viscoelastic properties of mouse brain tissue were estimated non-invasively, in vivo, using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) at 4.7 T to measure the dispersive properties of induced shear waves. Key features of this study include (i) the development and application of a novel MR-compatible actuation system which transmits vibratory motion into the brain through an incisor bar, and (ii) the investigation of the mechanical properties of brain tissue over a 1200 Hz bandwidth from 600-1800 Hz. Displacement fields due to propagating shear waves were measured during continuous, harmonic excitation of the skull. This protocol enabled characterization of the true steady-state patterns of shear wave propagation. Analysis of displacement fields obtained at different frequencies indicates that the viscoelastic properties of mouse brain tissue depend strongly on frequency. The average storage modulus (G') increased from approximately 1.6 to 8 kPa over this range; average loss modulus (G'') increased from approximately 1 to 3 kPa. Both moduli were well approximated by a power-law relationship over this frequency range. MRE may be a valuable addition to studies of disease in murine models, and to pre-clinical evaluations of therapies. Quantitative measurements of the viscoelastic parameters of brain tissue at high frequencies are also valuable for modeling and simulation of traumatic brain injury.

  20. Thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline silicon: importance of grain size and frequency-dependent mean free paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaojie; Alaniz, Joseph E; Jang, Wanyoung; Garay, Javier E; Dames, Chris

    2011-06-08

    The thermal conductivity reduction due to grain boundary scattering is widely interpreted using a scattering length assumed equal to the grain size and independent of the phonon frequency (gray). To assess these assumptions and decouple the contributions of porosity and grain size, five samples of undoped nanocrystalline silicon have been measured with average grain sizes ranging from 550 to 64 nm and porosities from 17% to less than 1%, at temperatures from 310 to 16 K. The samples were prepared using current activated, pressure assisted densification (CAPAD). At low temperature the thermal conductivities of all samples show a T(2) dependence which cannot be explained by any traditional gray model. The measurements are explained over the entire temperature range by a new frequency-dependent model in which the mean free path for grain boundary scattering is inversely proportional to the phonon frequency, which is shown to be consistent with asymptotic analysis of atomistic simulations from the literature. In all cases the recommended boundary scattering length is smaller than the average grain size. These results should prove useful for the integration of nanocrystalline materials in devices such as advanced thermoelectrics.

  1. Pulse frequency dependency of photobiomodulation on the bioenergetic functions of human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Bae; Baik, Ku Youn; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2017-11-21

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy contributes to pain relief, wound healing, and tissue regeneration. The pulsed wave (PW) mode has been reported to be more effective than the continuous wave (CW) mode when applying PBM to many biological systems. However, the reason for the higher effectiveness of PW-PBM is poorly understood. Herein, we suggest using delayed luminescence (DL) as a reporter of mitochondrial activity after PBM treatment. DL originates mainly from mitochondrial electron transport chain systems, which produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The decay time of DL depends on the pulse frequencies of applied light, which correlate with the biological responses of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Using a low-power light whose wavelength is 810 nm and energy density is 38 mJ/cm 2 , we find that a 300-Hz pulse frequency prolonged the DL pattern and enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity. In addition, we analyze mitochondrial morphological changes and their volume density and find evidence supporting mitochondrial physiological changes from PBM treatment. Our data suggest a new methodology for determining the effectiveness of PBM and the specific pulse frequency dependency of PBM in the differentiation of hDPSCs.

  2. Dependence of synchronization frequency of Kuramoto oscillators ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kuramoto oscillators have been proposed earlier as a model for interacting systems that exhibit synchronization. In this article, we study the difference between networks with symmetric and asymmetric distribution of natural frequencies. We first indicate that synchronization frequency of oscillators in a completely connected ...

  3. Frequency dependent capacitance and conductance properties of Schottky diode based on rubrene organic semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barış, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    Al/rubrene/p-Si Schottky diode has been fabricated by forming a rubrene layer on p type Si by using the spin coating method. The frequency dependent capacitance–voltage (C–V–f) and conductance–voltage (G–V–f) characteristics of Al/rubrene/p-Si Schottky diyotes has been investigated in the frequency range of 5 kHz–500 kHz at room temperature. The C–V plots show a peak for each frequency. The capacitance of the device decreased with increasing frequency. The decrease in capacitance results from the presence of interface states. The plots of series resistance–voltage (R s −V) gave a peak in the depletion region at all frequencies. The density of interface states (N ss ) and relaxation time (τ) distribution profiles as a function of applied voltage bias have been determined from the C–V and G–V measurements. The values of the N ss and τ have been calculated in the ranges of 8.37×10 11 –4.85×10 11 eV −1 cm −2 and 5.17×10 −6 –1.02×10 −5 s, respectively

  4. High-Speed Universal Frequency-to-Digital Converter for Quasi-Digital Sensors and Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Y. Yurish

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available New fast, accurate universal integrated frequency-to-digital converter (UFDC-1M-16 is described in the article. It is based on the novel patented modified method of the dependent count and has non-redundant conversion time from 6.25 ms to 6.25 ms for 1 to 0.001 % relative errors respectively, comparable with conversion time for successive-approximation and S-D ADC. The IC can work with different sensors, transducers and encoders, which have frequency, period, duty-cycle, PWM, phase shift, pulse number, etc. output.

  5. Frequency-Modulated Wave Dielectrophoresis of Vesicles And Cells: Periodic U-Turns at the Crossover Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frusawa, Hiroshi

    2018-06-01

    We have formulated the dielectrophoretic force exerted on micro/nanoparticles upon the application of frequency-modulated (FM) electric fields. By adjusting the frequency range of an FM wave to cover the crossover frequency f X in the real part of the Clausius-Mossotti factor, our theory predicts the reversal of the dielectrophoretic force each time the instantaneous frequency periodically traverses f X . In fact, we observed periodic U-turns of vesicles, leukemia cells, and red blood cells that undergo FM wave dielectrophoresis (FM-DEP). It is also suggested by our theory that the video tracking of the U-turns due to FM-DEP is available for the agile and accurate measurement of f X . The FM-DEP method requires a short duration, less than 30 s, while applying the FM wave to observe several U-turns, and the agility in measuring f X is of much use for not only salty cell suspensions but also nanoparticles because the electric-field-induced solvent flow is suppressed as much as possible. The accuracy of f X has been verified using two types of experiment. First, we measured the attractive force exerted on a single vesicle experiencing alternating-current dielectrophoresis (AC-DEP) at various frequencies of sinusoidal electric fields. The frequency dependence of the dielectrophoretic force yields f X as a characteristic frequency at which the force vanishes. Comparing the AC-DEP result of f X with that obtained from the FM-DEP method, both results of f X were found to coincide with each other. Second, we investigated the conductivity dependencies of f X for three kinds of cell by changing the surrounding electrolytes. From the experimental results, we evaluated simultaneously both of the cytoplasmic conductivities and the membrane capacitances using an elaborate theory on the single-shell model of biological cells. While the cytoplasmic conductivities, similar for these cells, were slightly lower than the range of previous reports, the membrane capacitances obtained

  6. Analytical determination of size-dependent natural frequencies of fully clamped rectangular microplates based on the modified couple stress theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askari, Amir R.; Tahani, Masoud [Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents an analytical and size-dependent model for vibrational analysis of fully clamped rectangular microplates. Modified couple stress theory (MCST) and the Kirchhoff plate model are considered, and Hamilton's principle is employed to derive the size dependent equation of motion that accounts for the effect of residual stresses. The natural frequencies of the microplate are extracted analytically by extended Kantorovich method. The present findings are validated with the available results in the literature, and an excellent agreement is observed between them. In addition, a parametric study is conducted to demonstrate the significant effects of couple stress components on the natural frequencies of fully clamped microplates. The ratio of MCST natural frequencies to those obtained with classical theory depends only on the Poisson's ratio of the plate and is independent of the aspect ratio of the plate for cases with no residual stresses.

  7. Analytical determination of size-dependent natural frequencies of fully clamped rectangular microplates based on the modified couple stress theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askari, Amir R.; Tahani, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical and size-dependent model for vibrational analysis of fully clamped rectangular microplates. Modified couple stress theory (MCST) and the Kirchhoff plate model are considered, and Hamilton's principle is employed to derive the size dependent equation of motion that accounts for the effect of residual stresses. The natural frequencies of the microplate are extracted analytically by extended Kantorovich method. The present findings are validated with the available results in the literature, and an excellent agreement is observed between them. In addition, a parametric study is conducted to demonstrate the significant effects of couple stress components on the natural frequencies of fully clamped microplates. The ratio of MCST natural frequencies to those obtained with classical theory depends only on the Poisson's ratio of the plate and is independent of the aspect ratio of the plate for cases with no residual stresses.

  8. Frequency Dependence of Helioseismic Measurements of the Center-to-Limb Effect and Flow-induced Travel-time Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruizhu; Zhao, Junwei

    2018-02-01

    Time–distance helioseismology measures acoustic travel times to infer the structure and flow field of the solar interior; however, both the mean travel times and the travel-time shifts suffer systematic center-to-limb variations, which complicate the interpretation and inversions of the time–distance measurements. In particular, the center-to-limb variation in travel-time shifts (CtoL effect) has a significant impact on the inference of the Sun’s meridional circulation, and needs to be removed from the helioseismic measurements, although the observational properties and the physical cause of the CtoL effect have yet to be investigated. In this study, we measure the CtoL effect in the frequency domain using Doppler-velocity data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and study its properties as a function of disk-centric distance, travel distance, and frequency of acoustic waves. It is found that the CtoL effect has a significant frequency dependence—it reverses sign at a frequency around 5.4 mHz and reaches maximum at around 4.0 mHz before the sign reversal. The tendency of frequency dependence varies with disk-centric distance in a way that both the sign-reversal frequency and the maximum-value frequency decrease closer to the limb. The variation tendency does not change with travel distance, but the variation magnitude is approximately proportional to travel distance. For comparison, the flow-induced travel-time shifts show little frequency dependence. These observational properties provide more clues on the nature of the CtoL effect, and also possibly lead to new ways of effect-removal for a more robust determination of the deep meridional flow.

  9. Frequency Dependent Nudging of Hydrographic Data Into a Numerical Model of the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, K. R.; Wright, D. G.

    2002-12-01

    Nudging is one of the simplest ways of assimilating data into ocean models and it has been used for many years in studies of large-scale ocean circulation. One of its drawbacks is the suppression of eddies when nudging an eddy-permitting ocean model strongly toward an observed seasonal climatology. We propose a straightforward extension of nudging in which the model's climatology, rather than its instantaneous state, is nudged toward the observed seasonal climatology. In effect we propose nudging in specific frequency bands that are centered on the discrete frequencies evident in the observed climatology (e.g. 0, 1/12 and 1/6 cycles per month). This extension of conventional nudging allows the difference between the observed and modeled climatologies arbitrarily to be made small while allowing variations outside the selected frequency bands to evolve freely. We show how the method can be implemented efficiently in complex models using a Kalman filter and also discuss the benefits of spatially smoothing the nudges. We conclude with a demonstration of frequency dependent nudging using a 1/3 degree model of the North Atlantic.

  10. Frequency and amplitude dependences of molding accuracy in ultrasonic nanoimprint technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekaru, Harutaka; Takahashi, Masaharu

    2009-01-01

    We use neither a heater nor ultraviolet lights, and are researching and developing an ultrasonic nanoimprint as a new nano-patterning technology. In our ultrasonic nanoimprint technology, ultrasonic vibration is not used as a heat generator instead of the heater. A mold is connected with an ultrasonic generator, and mold patterns are pushed down and pulled up at a high speed into a thermoplastic. Frictional heat is generated by ultrasonic vibration between mold patterns and thermoplastic patterns formed by an initial contact force. However, because frictional heat occurs locally, the whole mold is not heated. Therefore, a molding material can be comprehensively processed at room temperature. A magnetostriction actuator was built into our ultrasonic nanoimprint system as an ultrasonic generator, and the frequency and amplitude can be changed between dc–10 kHz and 0–4 µm, respectively. First, the ultrasonic nanoimprint was experimented by using this system on polyethylene terephthalate (PET, T g = 69 °C), whose the glass transition temperature (T g ) is comparatively low in engineering plastics, and it was ascertained that the most suitable elastic material for this technique was an ethyl urethane rubber. In addition, we used a changeable frequency of the magnetostriction actuator, and nano-patterns in an electroformed-Ni mold were transferred to a 0.5 mm thick sheet of PET, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polycarbonate (PC), which are typical engineering plastics, under variable molding conditions. The frequency and amplitude dependence of ultrasonic vibration to the molding accuracy were investigated by measuring depth and width of imprinted patterns. As a result, regardless of the molding material, the imprinted depth was changed drastically when the frequency exceeded 5 kHz. On the other hand, when the amplitude of ultrasonic vibration grew, the imprinted depth gradually deepened. Influence of the frequency and amplitude of ultrasonic vibration was not

  11. Calculation and applications of the frequency dependent neutron detector response functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dam, H.; Van Hagen, T.H.J.J. der; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Keijzer, J.

    1994-01-01

    The theoretical basis is presented for the evaluation of the frequency dependent function that enables to calculate the response of a neutron detector to parametric fluctuations ('noise') or oscillations in reactor core. This function describes the 'field view' of a detector and can be calculated with a static transport code under certain conditions which are discussed. Two applications are presented: the response of an ex-core detector to void fraction fluctuations in a BWR and of both in and ex-core detectors to a rotating neutron absorber near or inside a research reactor core. (authors). 7 refs., 4 figs

  12. Brain Stimulation Reward Supports More Consistent and Accurate Rodent Decision-Making than Food Reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Matthew S; Conway, Sineadh M; Roitman, Jamie D

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of decision-making rely on an animal's motivation to decide and its ability to detect differences among various alternatives. Food reinforcement, although commonly used, is associated with problematic confounds, especially satiety. Here, we examined the use of brain stimulation reward (BSR) as an alternative reinforcer in rodent models of decision-making and compared it with the effectiveness of sugar pellets. The discriminability of various BSR frequencies was compared to differing numbers of sugar pellets in separate free-choice tasks. We found that BSR was more discriminable and motivated greater task engagement and more consistent preference for the larger reward. We then investigated whether rats prefer BSR of varying frequencies over sugar pellets. We found that animals showed either a clear preference for sugar reward or no preference between reward modalities, depending on the frequency of the BSR alternative and the size of the sugar reward. Overall, these results suggest that BSR is an effective reinforcer in rodent decision-making tasks, removing food-related confounds and resulting in more accurate, consistent, and reliable metrics of choice.

  13. Studies on frequency dependent electrical and dielectric properties of sintered zinc oxide pellets: effects of Al-doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, S.; Ghosh, A.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-11-01

    Sintered pellets of zinc oxide (ZnO), both undoped and Al-doped are prepared through a chemical process. Dopant concentration of Aluminium in ZnO [Al/Zn in weight percentage (wt%)] is varied from 0 to 3 wt%. After synthesis structural characterisation of the samples are performed with XRD and SEM-EDAX which confirm that all the samples are of ZnO having polycrystalline nature with particle size from 108.6 to 116 nm. Frequency dependent properties like a.c. conductivity, capacitance, impedance and phase angle are measured in the frequency range 10 Hz to 100 kHz as a function of temperature (in the range 25-150 °C). Nature of a.c. conductivity in these samples indicates hopping type of conduction arising from localised defect states. The frequency and temperature dependent properties under study are found to be as per correlated barrier hoping model. Dielectric and impedance properties studied in the samples indicate distributed relaxation, showing decrease of relaxation time with temperature.

  14. Evaluation of spontaneous and radiation-induced micronucleus frequency in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes depending on age and sex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, H. J.; Kang, C. M.; Chung, H. C. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2002-12-15

    The goal of this study was to provide data on the dose-dependent production of MicroNucleus (MN) in human lymphocytes irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays and 50MeV neutron, and to evaluate predictive markers of intrinsic radiosensitivity in individuals for monitoring occupational or environmental radiation exposure. For the dose-response study, heparinized whole blood of 10 healthy volunteers was irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays employing of 0.25-8Gy. The MNs were observed all doses, and the numerical changes according to doses. In dose-response curves fit linear-quadratic form (alpha =0.31{+-}0.049, beta =0.0022{+-}0.0022) for {gamma}-rays, but (alpha=0.99{+-}0.528, beta =0.0093{+-}0.0047) for neutron. Neutrons were than {gamma}-rays effective in producing MN with dose-dependent manner. The frequency of MN varies with dose. The RBE (Relative Biological Effectiveness) for micronuclei was 2.370.17. Further studies were carried out to provide evidence for the existence of individual variations in age-dependent responses to radiation. Spontaneous and radiation-induced MN varies greatly among individuals, and little is known about the molecular mechanisms of this variability. It was shown that the increased level of spontaneous cell with MN was observed with increasing age. The relationship between radiosensitivity and the increased spontaneous level of MN may be in inverse proportion. These studies indicated that the MN assay have a high potential as a rapid, sensitive and accurate method which can be used to monitor a large population exposed to radiation for rapid triage in the case of a large-scale accident.

  15. Evaluation of spontaneous and radiation-induced micronucleus frequency in cultrued human peripheral blood lymphocytes depending on age and sex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, H. J.; Kang, C. M.; Chung, H. C. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2002-07-01

    The goal of this study was to provide data on the dose-dependent production of micronucleus (MN) in human lymphocytes irradiated with {sub 60} Co {gamma} -rays and 50MeV neutron, and to evaluate predictive markers of intrinsic radiosensitivity in individuals for monitoring occupational or environmental radiation exposure. For the dose-response study, heparinized whole blood of 10 healthy volunteers was irradiated with {sub 60} Co {gamma} -rays employing of 0.25-8Gy. The MNs were observed all doses, and the numerical changes according to doses. In dose-response curves fit linear- quadratic form (alpha =0.31{+-}0.049, beta =0.0022{+-}0.0022) for {gamma} -rays, but (alpha =0.99{+-}0.528, beta =0.0093{+-}0.0047) for neutron. Neutrons were than {gamma} -rays effective in producing MN with dose-dependent manner. The frequency of MN varies with dose. The RBE for micronuclei was 2.37{+-}0.17. Further studied are carried out to provide evidence for the existence of individual variations in age-dependent responses to radiation. Spontaneous and radiation-induced MN varies greatly between individuals, and little is known about the molecular mechanisms of this variability. It was shown that the increased level of spontaneous cell with MN was observed with increasing age. The relationship between radiosensitivity and the increased spontaneous level of MN may be in inverse proportion. These studies indicates that the MN assay have a high potential as a rapid, sensitive and accurate method which can be used to monitor a large population exposed to radiation for rapid triage in the case of a large-scale accident.

  16. Local regression type methods applied to the study of geophysics and high frequency financial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, M. C.; Basu, K.

    2014-09-01

    In this work we applied locally weighted scatterplot smoothing techniques (Lowess/Loess) to Geophysical and high frequency financial data. We first analyze and apply this technique to the California earthquake geological data. A spatial analysis was performed to show that the estimation of the earthquake magnitude at a fixed location is very accurate up to the relative error of 0.01%. We also applied the same method to a high frequency data set arising in the financial sector and obtained similar satisfactory results. The application of this approach to the two different data sets demonstrates that the overall method is accurate and efficient, and the Lowess approach is much more desirable than the Loess method. The previous works studied the time series analysis; in this paper our local regression models perform a spatial analysis for the geophysics data providing different information. For the high frequency data, our models estimate the curve of best fit where data are dependent on time.

  17. An analysis of boundary-effects in obtaining the frequency dependent specific heat by effusivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tage Emil; Behrens, Claus

    The frequency dependent specific heat is a significant response function characterizing the glass transition. Contrary to the dielectric response it is not easily measured over many decades. The introduction of the 3-omega method, where the temperature oscillations at a planar oscillatoric heat g...

  18. Frequency dependent capacitance and conductance properties of Schottky diode based on rubrene organic semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barış, Behzad, E-mail: behzadbaris@gmail.com

    2013-10-01

    Al/rubrene/p-Si Schottky diode has been fabricated by forming a rubrene layer on p type Si by using the spin coating method. The frequency dependent capacitance–voltage (C–V–f) and conductance–voltage (G–V–f) characteristics of Al/rubrene/p-Si Schottky diyotes has been investigated in the frequency range of 5 kHz–500 kHz at room temperature. The C–V plots show a peak for each frequency. The capacitance of the device decreased with increasing frequency. The decrease in capacitance results from the presence of interface states. The plots of series resistance–voltage (R{sub s}−V) gave a peak in the depletion region at all frequencies. The density of interface states (N{sub ss}) and relaxation time (τ) distribution profiles as a function of applied voltage bias have been determined from the C–V and G–V measurements. The values of the N{sub ss} and τ have been calculated in the ranges of 8.37×10{sup 11}–4.85×10{sup 11} eV{sup −1} cm{sup −2} and 5.17×10{sup −6}–1.02×10{sup −5} s, respectively.

  19. Frequency Dependence of C-V Characteristics of MOS Capacitors Containing Nanosized High-κ Ta2O5 Dielectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Novkovski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacitance of metal–insulator–Si structures containing high permittivity dielectric exhibits complicated behaviour when voltage and frequency dependencies are studied. From our study on metal (Al, Au, W–Ta2O5/SiO2–Si structures, we identify serial C-R measurement mode to be more convenient for use than the parallel one usually used in characterization of similar structures. Strong frequency dependence that is not due to real variations in the dielectric permittivity of the layers is observed. Very high capacitance at low frequencies is due to the leakage in Ta2O5 layer. We found that the above observation is mainly due to different leakage current mechanisms in the two different layers composing the stack. The effect is highly dependent on the applied voltage, since the leakage currents are strongly nonlinear functions of the electric field in the layers. Additionally, at low frequencies, transition currents influence the measured value of the capacitance. From the capacitance measurements several parameters are extracted, such as capacitance in accumulation, effective dielectric constant, and oxide charges. Extracting parameters of the studied structures by standard methods in the case of high-κ/interfacial layer stacks can lead to substantial errors. Some cases demonstrating these deficiencies of the methods are presented and solutions for obtaining better results are proposed.

  20. Temperature dependence of low-frequency polarized Raman scattering spectra in TlInS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paucar, Raul; Wakita, Kazuki [Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan); Shim, YongGu; Mimura, Kojiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka (Japan); Alekperov, Oktay; Mamedov, Nazim [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2017-06-15

    In this work, we examined phase transitions in the layered ternary thallium chalcogenide TlInS{sub 2} by studying the temperature dependence of polarized Raman spectra with the aid of the Raman confocal microscope system. The Raman spectra were measured over the temperature range of 77-320 K (which includes the range of successive phase transitions) in the low-frequency region of 35-180 cm{sup -1}. The optical phonons that showed strong temperature dependence were identified as interlayer vibrations related to phase transitions, while the phonons that showed weak temperature dependence were identified as intralayer vibrations. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Frequency-dependent electrostatic actuation in microfluidic MEMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.

    2003-09-01

    Electrostatic actuators exhibit fast response times and are easily integrated into microsystems because they can be fabricated with standard IC micromachining processes and materials. Although electrostatic actuators have been used extensively in 'dry' MEMS, they have received less attention in microfluidic systems probably because of challenges such as electrolysis, anodization, and electrode polarization. Here we demonstrate that ac drive signals can be used to prevent electrode polarization, and thus enable electrostatic actuation in many liquids, at potentials low enough to avoid electrochemistry. We measure the frequency response of an interdigitated silicon comb-drive actuator in liquids spanning a decade of dielectric permittivities and four decades of conductivity, and present a simple theory that predicts the characteristic actuation frequency. The analysis demonstrates the importance of the native oxide on silicon actuator response, and suggests that the actuation frequency can be shifted by controlling the thickness of the oxide. For native silicon devices, actuation is predicted at frequencies less than 10 MHz, in electrolytes of ionic strength up to 100 mmol/L, and thus electrostatic actuation may be feasible in many bioMEMS and other microfluidic applications.

  2. Mitigating artifacts in back-projection source imaging with implications for frequency-dependent properties of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingsen; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Luo, Yingdi; Wu, Wenbo; Ni, Sidao

    2012-12-01

    Comparing teleseismic array back-projection source images of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake with results from static and kinematic finite source inversions has revealed little overlap between the regions of high- and low-frequency slip. Motivated by this interesting observation, back-projection studies extended to intermediate frequencies, down to about 0.1 Hz, have suggested that a progressive transition of rupture properties as a function of frequency is observable. Here, by adapting the concept of array response function to non-stationary signals, we demonstrate that the "swimming artifact", a systematic drift resulting from signal non-stationarity, induces significant bias on beamforming back-projection at low frequencies. We introduce a "reference window strategy" into the multitaper-MUSIC back-projection technique and significantly mitigate the "swimming artifact" at high frequencies (1 s to 4 s). At lower frequencies, this modification yields notable, but significantly smaller, artifacts than time-domain stacking. We perform extensive synthetic tests that include a 3D regional velocity model for Japan. We analyze the recordings of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake at the USArray and at the European array at periods from 1 s to 16 s. The migration of the source location as a function of period, regardless of the back-projection methods, has characteristics that are consistent with the expected effect of the "swimming artifact". In particular, the apparent up-dip migration as a function of frequency obtained with the USArray can be explained by the "swimming artifact". This indicates that the most substantial frequency-dependence of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake source occurs at periods longer than 16 s. Thus, low-frequency back-projection needs to be further tested and validated in order to contribute to the characterization of frequency-dependent rupture properties.

  3. Modeling the frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierstorfer, Karl

    2018-01-01

    To find a simple model for the frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of photon-counting detectors in the low flux limit. Formula for the spatial cross-talk, the noise power spectrum and the DQE of a photon-counting detector working at a given threshold are derived. Parameters are probabilities for types of events like single counts in the central pixel, double counts in the central pixel and a neighboring pixel or single count in a neighboring pixel only. These probabilities can be derived in a simple model by extensive use of Monte Carlo techniques: The Monte Carlo x-ray propagation program MOCASSIM is used to simulate the energy deposition from the x-rays in the detector material. A simple charge cloud model using Gaussian clouds of fixed width is used for the propagation of the electric charge generated by the primary interactions. Both stages are combined in a Monte Carlo simulation randomizing the location of impact which finally produces the required probabilities. The parameters of the charge cloud model are fitted to the spectral response to a polychromatic spectrum measured with our prototype detector. Based on the Monte Carlo model, the DQE of photon-counting detectors as a function of spatial frequency is calculated for various pixel sizes, photon energies, and thresholds. The frequency-dependent DQE of a photon-counting detector in the low flux limit can be described with an equation containing only a small set of probabilities as input. Estimates for the probabilities can be derived from a simple model of the detector physics. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Feedforward and feedback frequency-dependent interactions in a large-scale laminar network of the primate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejias, Jorge F; Murray, John D; Kennedy, Henry; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-11-01

    Interactions between top-down and bottom-up processes in the cerebral cortex hold the key to understanding attentional processes, predictive coding, executive control, and a gamut of other brain functions. However, the underlying circuit mechanism remains poorly understood and represents a major challenge in neuroscience. We approached this problem using a large-scale computational model of the primate cortex constrained by new directed and weighted connectivity data. In our model, the interplay between feedforward and feedback signaling depends on the cortical laminar structure and involves complex dynamics across multiple (intralaminar, interlaminar, interareal, and whole cortex) scales. The model was tested by reproducing, as well as providing insights into, a wide range of neurophysiological findings about frequency-dependent interactions between visual cortical areas, including the observation that feedforward pathways are associated with enhanced gamma (30 to 70 Hz) oscillations, whereas feedback projections selectively modulate alpha/low-beta (8 to 15 Hz) oscillations. Furthermore, the model reproduces a functional hierarchy based on frequency-dependent Granger causality analysis of interareal signaling, as reported in recent monkey and human experiments, and suggests a mechanism for the observed context-dependent hierarchy dynamics. Together, this work highlights the necessity of multiscale approaches and provides a modeling platform for studies of large-scale brain circuit dynamics and functions.

  5. Swept frequency acoustic interferometry technique for chemical weapons verification and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.; Lizon, D.C.

    1995-03-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are important for rapid on-site verification and monitoring of chemical munitions, such as artillery shells and bulk containers. Present NDE techniques provide only limited characterizations of such munitions. This paper describes the development of a novel noninvasive technique, swept-frequency acoustic interferometry (SFAI), that significantly enhances the capability of munitions characterizations. The SFAI technique allows very accurate and simultaneous determination of sound velocity and attenuation of chemical agents over a large frequency range inside artillery shells, in addition to determining agent density. The frequency-dependent sound velocity and attenuation can, in principle, provide molecular relaxation properties of the chemical agent. The same instrument also enables a direct fill-level measurement in bulk containers. Industrial and other applications of this general-purpose technique are also discussed.

  6. Dependence of synchronization frequency of Kuramoto oscillators on symmetry of intrinsic frequency in ring network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Arindam; Amritkar, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Kuramoto oscillators have been proposed earlier as a model for interacting systems that exhibit synchronisation. In this article we study the difference between networks with symmetric and asymmetric distribution of natural frequencies. We first indicate that the synchronisation frequency of the oscillators is independent of the natural frequency distribution for a completely connected network. Further we analyse the case of oscillators in a directed ring-network where asymmetry in the natural frequency distribution is seen to shift the synchronisation frequency of the network. We also present an estimate of the shift in the frequencies for slightly asymmetric distributions.

  7. Circularly polarized harmonic generation by intense bicircular laser pulses: electron recollision dynamics and frequency dependent helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Mauger, François; Yuan, Kai-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations for one and two electron cyclic molecules {{{H}}}nq+ exposed to intense bichromatic circularly polarized laser pulses of frequencies {ω }1 and {ω }2, such that {ω }1/{ω }2={n}1/{n}2 (integer) produce circularly polarized high order harmonics with a cut-off recollision maximum energy at and greater than the linear polarization law (in atomic units) {N}m{ω }1={I}p+3.17{U}p, where I p is the ionization potential and {U}p={(2{E}0)}2/4{ω }2 is the ponderomotive energy defined by the field E 0 (intensity I={{cE}}02/8π ) from each pulse and mean frequency ω =({ω }1+{ω }2)/2 . An electron recollision model in a rotating frame at rotating frequency {{Δ }}ω =({ω }1-{ω }2)/2 predicts this simple result as a result of recollision dynamics in a combination of bichromatic circularly polarized pulses. The harmonic helicities and their intensities are shown to depend on compatible symmetries of the net pulse electric fields with that of the molecules.

  8. Frequency-dependent failure mechanisms of nanocrystalline gold interconnect lines under general alternating current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, X. M.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, G. P.

    2014-09-01

    Thermal fatigue failure of metallization interconnect lines subjected to alternating currents (AC) is becoming a severe threat to the long-term reliability of micro/nanodevices with increasing electrical current density/power. Here, thermal fatigue failure behaviors and damage mechanisms of nanocrystalline Au interconnect lines on the silicon glass substrate have been investigated by applying general alternating currents (the pure alternating current coupled with a direct current (DC) component) with different frequencies ranging from 0.05 Hz to 5 kHz. We observed both thermal fatigue damages caused by Joule heating-induced cyclic strain/stress and electromigration (EM) damages caused by the DC component. Besides, the damage formation showed a strong electrically-thermally-mechanically coupled effect and frequency dependence. At lower frequencies, thermal fatigue damages were dominant and the main damage forms were grain coarsening with grain boundary (GB) cracking/voiding and grain thinning. At higher frequencies, EM damages took over and the main damage forms were GB cracking/voiding of smaller grains and hillocks. Furthermore, the healing effect of the reversing current was considered to elucidate damage mechanisms of the nanocrystalline Au lines generated by the general AC. Lastly, a modified model was proposed to predict the lifetime of the nanocrystalline metal interconnect lines, i.e., that was a competing drift velocity-based approach based on the threshold time required for reverse diffusion/healing to occur.

  9. An improved Q estimation approach: the weighted centroid frequency shift method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingnan; Wang, Shangxu; Yang, Dengfeng; Dong, Chunhui; Tao, Yonghui; Zhou, Yatao

    2016-06-01

    Seismic wave propagation in subsurface media suffers from absorption, which can be quantified by the quality factor Q. Accurate estimation of the Q factor is of great importance for the resolution enhancement of seismic data, precise imaging and interpretation, and reservoir prediction and characterization. The centroid frequency shift method (CFS) is currently one of the most commonly used Q estimation methods. However, for seismic data that contain noise, the accuracy and stability of Q extracted using CFS depend on the choice of frequency band. In order to reduce the influence of frequency band choices and obtain Q with greater precision and robustness, we present an improved CFS Q measurement approach—the weighted CFS method (WCFS), which incorporates a Gaussian weighting coefficient into the calculation procedure of the conventional CFS. The basic idea is to enhance the proportion of advantageous frequencies in the amplitude spectrum and reduce the weight of disadvantageous frequencies. In this novel method, we first construct a Gauss function using the centroid frequency and variance of the reference wavelet. Then we employ it as the weighting coefficient for the amplitude spectrum of the original signal. Finally, the conventional CFS is adopted for the weighted amplitude spectrum to extract the Q factor. Numerical tests of noise-free synthetic data demonstrate that the WCFS is feasible and efficient, and produces more accurate results than the conventional CFS. Tests for noisy synthetic data indicate that the new method has better anti-noise capability than the CFS. The application to field vertical seismic profile (VSP) data further demonstrates its validity5.

  10. Ulysses: accurate detection of low-frequency structural variations in large insert-size sequencing libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet-Markowska, Alexandre; Richard, Hugues; Fischer, Gilles; Lafontaine, Ingrid

    2015-03-15

    The detection of structural variations (SVs) in short-range Paired-End (PE) libraries remains challenging because SV breakpoints can involve large dispersed repeated sequences, or carry inherent complexity, hardly resolvable with classical PE sequencing data. In contrast, large insert-size sequencing libraries (Mate-Pair libraries) provide higher physical coverage of the genome and give access to repeat-containing regions. They can thus theoretically overcome previous limitations as they are becoming routinely accessible. Nevertheless, broad insert size distributions and high rates of chimerical sequences are usually associated to this type of libraries, which makes the accurate annotation of SV challenging. Here, we present Ulysses, a tool that achieves drastically higher detection accuracy than existing tools, both on simulated and real mate-pair sequencing datasets from the 1000 Human Genome project. Ulysses achieves high specificity over the complete spectrum of variants by assessing, in a principled manner, the statistical significance of each possible variant (duplications, deletions, translocations, insertions and inversions) against an explicit model for the generation of experimental noise. This statistical model proves particularly useful for the detection of low frequency variants. SV detection performed on a large insert Mate-Pair library from a breast cancer sample revealed a high level of somatic duplications in the tumor and, to a lesser extent, in the blood sample as well. Altogether, these results show that Ulysses is a valuable tool for the characterization of somatic mosaicism in human tissues and in cancer genomes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. THE HYPERFINE STRUCTURE OF THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM OF HDO AND ITS EXTENSION TO THE THz REGION: ACCURATE REST FREQUENCIES AND SPECTROSCOPIC PARAMETERS FOR ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Puzzarini, Cristina [Dipartimento di Chimica “Giacomo Ciamician”, Università di Bologna, Via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Alonso, José Luis [Grupo de Espectroscopía Molecular (GEM), Unidad Asociada CSIC, Edificio Quifima, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Parque Científico UVa, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47005 Valladolid (Spain); Gauss, Jürgen, E-mail: cristina.puzzarini@unibo.it [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-06-10

    The rotational spectrum of the mono-deuterated isotopologue of water, HD{sup 16}O, has been investigated in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave frequency regions, up to 1.6 THz. The Lamb-dip technique has been exploited to obtain sub-Doppler resolution and to resolve the hyperfine (hf) structure due to the deuterium and hydrogen nuclei, thus enabling the accurate determination of the corresponding hf parameters. Their experimental determination has been supported by high-level quantum-chemical calculations. The Lamb-dip measurements have been supplemented by Doppler-limited measurements (weak high-J and high-frequency transitions) in order to extend the predictive capability of the available spectroscopic constants. The possibility of resolving hf splittings in astronomical spectra has been discussed.

  12. Implementation of the frequency dependent line model in a real-time power system simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Iracheta-Cortez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is described the implementation of the frequency-dependent line model (FD-Line in a real-time digital power system simulator. The main goal with such development is to describe a general procedure to incorporate new realistic models of power system components in modern real-time simulators based on the Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP. In this procedure are described, firstly, the steps to obtain the time domain solution of the differential equations that models the electromagnetic behavior in multi-phase transmission lines with frequency dependent parameters. After, the algorithmic solution of the FD-Line model is implemented in Simulink environment, through an S-function programmed in C language, for running off-line simulations of electromagnetic transients. This implementation allows the free assembling of the FD Line model with any element of the Power System Blockset library and also, it can be used to build any network topology. The main advantage of having a power network built in Simulink is that can be executed in real-time by means of the commercial eMEGAsim simulator. Finally, several simulation cases are presented to validate the accuracy and the real-time performance of the FD-Line model.

  13. An analytical model for the determination of resonance frequencies of perforated beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luschi, Luca; Pieri, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we develop closed expressions for the equivalent bending and shear stiffness of beams with regular square perforations, and apply them to the problem of determining the resonance frequencies of slender, regularly perforated clamped–clamped beams, which are of interest in the development of MEMS resonant devices. We prove that, depending on the perforation size, the Euler–Bernoulli equation or the more complex shear equation needs to be used to obtain accurate values for these frequencies. Extensive finite element method simulations are used to validate the proposed model over the full practical range of possible hole sizes. An experimental verification of the model is also presented. (paper)

  14. THE ENERGY DEPENDENCE OF THE CENTROID FREQUENCY AND PHASE LAG OF THE QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN GRS 1915+105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, J. L.; Lu, F. J.; Lu, Y.; Song, L. M.; Zhang, S.; Wang, J. M.; Ding, G. Q.

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of the centroid frequencies and phase lags of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) as functions of photon energy for GRS 1915+105. It is found that the centroid frequencies of the 0.5-10 Hz QPOs and their phase lags are both energy dependent, and there exists an anticorrelation between the QPO frequency and phase lag. These new results challenge the popular QPO models, because none of them can fully explain the observed properties. We suggest that the observed QPO phase lags are partially due to the variation of the QPO frequency with energy, especially for those with frequency higher than 3.5 Hz.

  15. Direction of information flow in large-scale resting-state networks is frequency-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas; van Dellen, Edwin; Yu, Meichen; Carbo, Ellen W S; Douw, Linda; Gouw, Alida A; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W; Stam, Cornelis J

    2016-04-05

    Normal brain function requires interactions between spatially separated, and functionally specialized, macroscopic regions, yet the directionality of these interactions in large-scale functional networks is unknown. Magnetoencephalography was used to determine the directionality of these interactions, where directionality was inferred from time series of beamformer-reconstructed estimates of neuronal activation, using a recently proposed measure of phase transfer entropy. We observed well-organized posterior-to-anterior patterns of information flow in the higher-frequency bands (alpha1, alpha2, and beta band), dominated by regions in the visual cortex and posterior default mode network. Opposite patterns of anterior-to-posterior flow were found in the theta band, involving mainly regions in the frontal lobe that were sending information to a more distributed network. Many strong information senders in the theta band were also frequent receivers in the alpha2 band, and vice versa. Our results provide evidence that large-scale resting-state patterns of information flow in the human brain form frequency-dependent reentry loops that are dominated by flow from parieto-occipital cortex to integrative frontal areas in the higher-frequency bands, which is mirrored by a theta band anterior-to-posterior flow.

  16. Rolling estimations of long range dependence volatility for high frequency S&P500 index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Chin Wen; Pei, Tan Pei

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluates the time-varying long range dependence behaviors of the S&P500 volatility index using the modified rescaled adjusted range (R/S) statistic. For better computational result, a high frequency rolling bipower variation realized volatility estimates are used to avoid possible abrupt jump. The empirical analysis findings allow us to understand better the informationally market efficiency before and after the subprime mortgage crisis.

  17. High frequency modeling of power transformers. Stresses and diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerkan, Eilert

    2005-05-15

    In this thesis a reliable, versatile and rigorous method for high frequency power transformer modeling is searched and established. The purpose is to apply this model to sensitivity analysis of FRA (Frequency Response Analysis) which is a quite new diagnostic method for assessing the mechanical integrity of power transformer windings on-site. The method should be versatile in terms of being able to estimate internal and external over voltages and resonances. Another important aspect is that the method chosen is suitable for real transformer geometries. In order to verify the suitability of the model for real transformers, a specific test-object is used. This is a 20MVA transformer, and details are given in chapter 1.4. The high frequency power transformer model is established from geometrical and constructional information from the manufacturer, together with available material characteristics. All circuit parameters in the lumped circuit representation are calculated based on these data. No empirical modifications need to be performed. Comparison shows capability of reasonable accuracy in the range from 10 khz to 1 MHz utilizing a disc-to-disc representation. A compromise between accuracy of model due to discretization and complexity of the model in a turn-to-turn representation is inevitable. The importance of the iron core is emphasized through a comparison of representations with/without the core included. Frequency-dependent phenomena are accurately represented using an isotropic equivalent for windings and core, even with a coarse mesh for the FEM-model. This is achieved through a frequency-dependent complex permeability representation of the materials. This permeability is deduced from an analytical solution of the frequency-dependent magnetic field inside the conductors and the core. The importance of dielectric losses in a transformer model is also assessed. Since published data on the high frequency properties of press board are limited, some initial

  18. Frequency and temperature dependence of high damping elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are one of the preferred devices for isolating large buildings and structures. In the US, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of high damping rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 and 100% and are expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading conditions. Elastomeric bearings are currently designed to provide a system frequency between 0.4 and 0.8 Hz and expected to operate between -20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. To assure proper performance of isolation bearings, it is necessary to characterize the elastomer's response under expected variations of frequency and temperature. The dynamic response of the elastomer must be characterized within the frequency range that spans the bearing acceptance test frequency, which may be as low as 0.005 Hz, and the design frequency. Similarly, the variation in mechanical characteristics of the elastomer must be determined over the design temperature range, which is between -20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. This paper reports on (1) the capabilities of a testing facility at ANL for testing candidate elastomers, (2) the variation with frequency and temperature of the stiffness and damping of one candidate elastomer, and (3) the effect of these variations on bearing acceptance testing criteria and on the choice of bearing design values for stiffness and damping

  19. Ultrasonic Characterization of Tissues via Backscatter Frequency Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.

    1997-01-01

    , significantly lower mean frequency of ultrasound backscattered from cirrhotic, compared to normal, liver tissue was noted, Studies of benign and malignant liver tumors (hemangiomas and metastases, respectively) indicated differences in frequency content of these tumors, compared to the adjacent normal liver...

  20. AN ACCURATE FLUX DENSITY SCALE FROM 1 TO 50 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perley, R. A.; Butler, B. J.

    2013-01-01

    We develop an absolute flux density scale for centimeter-wavelength astronomy by combining accurate flux density ratios determined by the Very Large Array between the planet Mars and a set of potential calibrators with the Rudy thermophysical emission model of Mars, adjusted to the absolute scale established by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. The radio sources 3C123, 3C196, 3C286, and 3C295 are found to be varying at a level of less than ∼5% per century at all frequencies between 1 and 50 GHz, and hence are suitable as flux density standards. We present polynomial expressions for their spectral flux densities, valid from 1 to 50 GHz, with absolute accuracy estimated at 1%-3% depending on frequency. Of the four sources, 3C286 is the most compact and has the flattest spectral index, making it the most suitable object on which to establish the spectral flux density scale. The sources 3C48, 3C138, 3C147, NGC 7027, NGC 6542, and MWC 349 show significant variability on various timescales. Polynomial coefficients for the spectral flux density are developed for 3C48, 3C138, and 3C147 for each of the 17 observation dates, spanning 1983-2012. The planets Venus, Uranus, and Neptune are included in our observations, and we derive their brightness temperatures over the same frequency range.

  1. Explicit frequency equations of free vibration of a nonlocal Timoshenko beam with surface effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Sheng; Zhang, Yao; Lie, Seng-Tjhen

    2018-02-01

    Considerations of nonlocal elasticity and surface effects in micro- and nanoscale beams are both important for the accurate prediction of natural frequency. In this study, the governing equation of a nonlocal Timoshenko beam with surface effects is established by taking into account three types of boundary conditions: hinged-hinged, clamped-clamped and clamped-hinged ends. For a hinged-hinged beam, an exact and explicit natural frequency equation is obtained. However, for clamped-clamped and clamped-hinged beams, the solutions of corresponding frequency equations must be determined numerically due to their transcendental nature. Hence, the Fredholm integral equation approach coupled with a curve fitting method is employed to derive the approximate fundamental frequency equations, which can predict the frequency values with high accuracy. In short, explicit frequency equations of the Timoshenko beam for three types of boundary conditions are proposed to exhibit directly the dependence of the natural frequency on the nonlocal elasticity, surface elasticity, residual surface stress, shear deformation and rotatory inertia, avoiding the complicated numerical computation.

  2. High accurate time system of the Low Latitude Meridian Circle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Feng; Li, Zhiming

    In order to obtain the high accurate time signal for the Low Latitude Meridian Circle (LLMC), a new GPS accurate time system is developed which include GPS, 1 MC frequency source and self-made clock system. The second signal of GPS is synchronously used in the clock system and information can be collected by a computer automatically. The difficulty of the cancellation of the time keeper can be overcomed by using this system.

  3. Frequency Dependence of Measured Massive MIMO Channel Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveras Martínez, Àlex; Carvalho, Elisabeth De; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum

    2016-01-01

    A multi-user massive MIMO measurement campaign is conducted to study the channel propagation characteristics (e.g. user correlation, sum of eigenvalues and condition number), focusing on the stability over frequencies and the impact of the array aperture. We use 3 arrays with 64 antennas (6m linear...... array, 2m linear array and 25cm by 28cm squared 2D array) serving 8 users holding a handset with 2 antennas. The study of the measurements shows that the propagation characteristics of the channel are stable for all the measured frequencies. We also observe that user proximity and user handgrip...... stabilize the studied properties of the channel across the frequencies, and in such case the larger the aperture of the array the more stable the properties. The number of base station antennas improves the propagation characteristics of the channel and stabilizes the properties in the frequency domain....

  4. Determination of acoustic properties of thin polymer films utilizing the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Sakamoto, Yuhei

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports on a technique to measure the acoustic properties of a thin polymer film utilizing the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of ultrasound reflected back from a system comprising a reflection plate, the film, and a material that covers the film. The frequency components of the echo reflected from the back of the plate, where the film is attached, take their minimum values at the resonant frequency, and from these frequency characteristics, the acoustic impedance, sound velocity, and the density of the film can be determined. We applied this technique to characterize an ion exchange membrane, which has high water absorbability, and successfully determined the acoustic properties of the membrane without getting it wet.

  5. Viscoelastic characterization of compacted pharmaceutical excipient materials by analysis of frequency-dependent mechanical relaxation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, K.; Mousavi, S.; Lundberg, B.; Strømme, M.

    2005-09-01

    A newly developed method for determining the frequency-dependent complex Young's modulus was employed to analyze the mechanical response of compacted microcrystalline cellulose, sorbitol, ethyl cellulose and starch for frequencies up to 20 kHz. A Debye-like relaxation was observed in all the studied pharmaceutical excipient materials and a comparison with corresponding dielectric spectroscopy data was made. The location in frequency of the relaxation peak was shown to correlate to the measured tensile strength of the tablets, and the relaxation was interpreted as the vibrational response of the interparticle hydrogen and van der Waals bindings in the tablets. Further, the measured relaxation strength, holding information about the energy loss involved in the relaxation processes, showed that the weakest material in terms of tensile strength, starch, is the material among the four tested ones that is able to absorb the most energy within its structure when exposed to external perturbations inducing vibrations in the studied frequency range. The results indicate that mechanical relaxation analysis performed over relatively broad frequency ranges should be useful for predicting material properties of importance for the functionality of a material in applications such as, e.g., drug delivery, drug storage and handling, and also for clarifying the origin of hitherto unexplained molecular processes.

  6. Two models of the sound-signal frequency dependence on the animal body size as exemplified by the ground squirrels of Eurasia (mammalia, rodentia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikol'skii, A A

    2017-11-01

    Dependence of the sound-signal frequency on the animal body length was studied in 14 ground squirrel species (genus Spermophilus) of Eurasia. Regression analysis of the total sample yielded a low determination coefficient (R 2 = 26%), because the total sample proved to be heterogeneous in terms of signal frequency within the dimension classes of animals. When the total sample was divided into two groups according to signal frequency, two statistically significant models (regression equations) were obtained in which signal frequency depended on the body size at high determination coefficients (R 2 = 73 and 94% versus 26% for the total sample). Thus, the problem of correlation between animal body size and the frequency of their vocal signals does not have a unique solution.

  7. Frequency-Dependent Streaming Potential of Porous Media—Part 1: Experimental Approaches and Apparatus Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. W. J. Glover

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrokinetic phenomena link fluid flow and electrical flow in porous and fractured media such that a hydraulic flow will generate an electrical current and vice versa. Such a link is likely to be extremely useful, especially in the development of the electroseismic method. However, surprisingly few experimental measurements have been carried out, particularly as a function of frequency because of their difficulty. Here we have considered six different approaches to make laboratory determinations of the frequency-dependent streaming potential coefficient. In each case, we have analyzed the mechanical, electrical, and other technical difficulties involved in each method. We conclude that the electromagnetic drive is currently the only approach that is practicable, while the piezoelectric drive may be useful for low permeability samples and at specified high frequencies. We have used the electro-magnetic drive approach to design, build, and test an apparatus for measuring the streaming potential coefficient of unconsolidated and disaggregated samples such as sands, gravels, and soils with a diameter of 25.4 mm and lengths between 50 mm and 300 mm.

  8. Frequency dependence of the magnetostrictive phenomenon in Metglas® 2605SA1 ribbon: A minor-loop case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. U. Jen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Frequency dependence of magnetostrictive phenomenon of as-cast 2605SA1 ribbon was studied. We applied a sinusoidal sweeping field (H, with a fixed frequency (f, along length (L of the ribbon, and simultaneously recorded the longitudinal magnetostriction (λ∥ and the transverse magnetostriction (λ⊥ as a function of time (t, respectively. f was varied from 0.07 to 122 Hz. In the low-f case (f =0.07 Hz, we observed the frequency-doubling (FD feature in λ∥(t and λ⊥(t curves; i.e., only even harmonic magnetostrictive signals showed up. In the high-f case (f = 122 Hz, we observed the no-frequency-doubling (NFD feature; i.e., both odd and even harmonic magnetostrictive signals showed up. A theory, based on the balance among various torques acting on magnetization, is developed to explain the f dependence of the magnetostriction phenomenon observed. From this theory, we conclude that only when the reflection symmetry of the system is reserved, i.e., when the equivalent easy axis (EEA is perpendicular to L, will λ∥(t and λ⊥(t have the true-frequency-doubling (TFD feature. However, for the as-cast 2605SA1 ribbon, EEA is not perpendicular to L. Thus, strictly speaking, we should observe the NFD feature only. Nevertheless, in the low-f limit, we can show that the FD feature is somewhat allowed under the condition, b/α being close to 1, where b and α are the two parameters used in the theory. From experimental data, this condition is met for as-cast 2605SA1. To make a distinction from TFD, this low-f feature is called close-frequency-doubling (CFD in this paper. In general, the theory explains all the experimental results fairly well.

  9. Frequency dependence and frequency control of microbubble streaming flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2013-02-01

    Steady streaming from oscillating microbubbles is a powerful actuating mechanism in microfluidics, enjoying increased use due to its simplicity of manufacture, ease of integration, low heat generation, and unprecedented control over the flow field and particle transport. As the streaming flow patterns are caused by oscillations of microbubbles in contact with walls of the set-up, an understanding of the bubble dynamics is crucial. Here we experimentally characterize the oscillation modes and the frequency response spectrum of such cylindrical bubbles, driven by a pressure variation resulting from ultrasound in the range of 1 kHz raisebox {-.9ex{stackrel{textstyle <}{˜ }} }f raisebox {-.9ex{stackrel{textstyle <}{˜ }} } 100 kHz. We find that (i) the appearance of 2D streaming flow patterns is governed by the relative amplitudes of bubble azimuthal surface modes (normalized by the volume response), (ii) distinct, robust resonance patterns occur independent of details of the set-up, and (iii) the position and width of the resonance peaks can be understood using an asymptotic theory approach. This theory describes, for the first time, the shape oscillations of a pinned cylindrical bubble at a wall and gives insight into necessary mode couplings that shape the response spectrum. Having thus correlated relative mode strengths and observed flow patterns, we demonstrate that the performance of a bubble micromixer can be optimized by making use of such flow variations when modulating the driving frequency.

  10. Application of the parametric proper generalized decomposition to the frequency-dependent calculation of the impedance of an AC line with rectangular conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sancarlos-González Abel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AC lines of industrial busbar systems are usually built using conductors with rectangular cross sections, where each phase can have several parallel conductors to carry high currents. The current density in a rectangular conductor, under sinusoidal conditions, is not uniform. It depends on the frequency, on the conductor shape, and on the distance between conductors, due to the skin effect and to proximity effects. Contrary to circular conductors, there are not closed analytical formulas for obtaining the frequency-dependent impedance of conductors with rectangular cross-section. It is necessary to resort to numerical simulations to obtain the resistance and the inductance of the phases, one for each desired frequency and also for each distance between the phases’ conductors. On the contrary, the use of the parametric proper generalized decomposition (PGD allows to obtain the frequency-dependent impedance of an AC line for a wide range of frequencies and distances between the phases’ conductors by solving a single simulation in a 4D domain (spatial coordinates x and y, the frequency and the separation between conductors. In this way, a general “virtual chart” solution is obtained, which contains the solution for any frequency and for any separation of the conductors, and stores it in a compact separated representations form, which can be easily embedded on a more general software for the design of electrical installations. The approach presented in this work for rectangular conductors can be easily extended to conductors with an arbitrary shape.

  11. Application of the parametric proper generalized decomposition to the frequency-dependent calculation of the impedance of an AC line with rectangular conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancarlos-González, Abel; Pineda-Sanchez, Manuel; Puche-Panadero, Ruben; Sapena-Bano, Angel; Riera-Guasp, Martin; Martinez-Roman, Javier; Perez-Cruz, Juan; Roger-Folch, Jose

    2017-12-01

    AC lines of industrial busbar systems are usually built using conductors with rectangular cross sections, where each phase can have several parallel conductors to carry high currents. The current density in a rectangular conductor, under sinusoidal conditions, is not uniform. It depends on the frequency, on the conductor shape, and on the distance between conductors, due to the skin effect and to proximity effects. Contrary to circular conductors, there are not closed analytical formulas for obtaining the frequency-dependent impedance of conductors with rectangular cross-section. It is necessary to resort to numerical simulations to obtain the resistance and the inductance of the phases, one for each desired frequency and also for each distance between the phases' conductors. On the contrary, the use of the parametric proper generalized decomposition (PGD) allows to obtain the frequency-dependent impedance of an AC line for a wide range of frequencies and distances between the phases' conductors by solving a single simulation in a 4D domain (spatial coordinates x and y, the frequency and the separation between conductors). In this way, a general "virtual chart" solution is obtained, which contains the solution for any frequency and for any separation of the conductors, and stores it in a compact separated representations form, which can be easily embedded on a more general software for the design of electrical installations. The approach presented in this work for rectangular conductors can be easily extended to conductors with an arbitrary shape.

  12. Reliability of mechanisms with periodic random modal frequencies using an extreme value-based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, Gordon J.; Zhang, Xufang; Son, Young Kap; Pandey, Mahesh D.

    2016-01-01

    Resonance in a dynamic system is to be avoided since it often leads to impaired performance, overstressing, fatigue fracture and adverse human reactions. Thus, it is necessary to know the modal frequencies and ensure they do not coincide with any applied periodic loadings. For a rotating planar mechanism, the coefficients in the mass and stiffness matrices are periodically varying, and if the underlying geometry and material properties are treated as random variables then the modal frequencies are both position-dependent and probabilistic. The avoidance of resonance is now a complex problem. Herein, free vibration analysis helps determine ranges of modal frequencies that in turn, identify the running speeds of the mechanism to be avoided. This paper presents an efficient and accurate sample-based approach to determine probabilistic minimum and maximum extremes of the fundamental frequencies and the angular positions of their occurrence. Then, given critical lower and upper frequency constraints it is straightforward to determine reliability in terms of probability of exceedance. The novelty of the proposed approach is that the original expensive and implicit mechanistic model is replaced by an explicit meta-model that captures the tolerances of the design variables over the entire range of angular positions: position-dependent eigenvalues can be found easily and quickly. Extreme-value statistics of the modal frequencies and extreme-value statistics of the angular positions are readily computed through MCS. Limit-state surfaces that connect the frequencies to the design variables may be easily constructed. Error analysis identifies three errors and the paper presents ways to control them so the methodology can be sufficiently accurate. A numerical example of a flexible four-bar linkage shows the proposed methodology has engineering applications. The impact of the proposed methodology is two-fold: it presents a safe-side analysis based on free vibration methods to

  13. Thermal-Diffusivity-Based Frequency References in Standard CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kashmiri, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, a lot of research has been devoted to the realization of accurate integrated frequency references. A thermal-diffusivity-based (TD) frequency reference provides an alternative method of on-chip frequency generation in standard CMOS technology. A frequency-locked loop locks the

  14. Design Dependent Cutoff Frequency of Nanotransistors Near the Ultimate Performance Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordrostami, Zoheir; Sheikhi, M. Hossein; Zarifkar, Abbas

    2012-12-01

    We have studied the effect of different structural designs of double gate MOSFETs (DG-MOSFETs) and carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) on the cutoff frequency (fT). The effects of metallic contacts with Schottky barriers, gate work function, dual material gate (DMG), halo doped channel and lightly doped drain and source (LDDS) architectures on the fT have been investigated for DG-MOSFETs and CNTFETs and the design dependent fT for both types of transistors has been studied for the first time. The simulations are based on the Schrödinger-Poisson solvers developed for each nanotransistor separately. The ballistic limit has been studied as the ultimate performance limit of the DG-MOSFETs and CNTFETs. The results of this paper, for the first time, show how some designations used for modification of short channel effects or current-voltage characteristics affect the fT. The results revealed that the cutoff frequencies of both types of the transistors exhibit the same behavior with changing design parameters. We have shown that the Schottky barriers, parasitic capacitances and halo doping reduce the fT and have proposed the DMG and LDDS artchitectures as ways to increase the fT for DG-MOSFETs and CNTFETs for the first time.

  15. Frequency-dependent photothermal measurement of transverse thermal diffusivity of organic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brill, J. W.; Shahi, Maryam; Yao, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Payne, Marcia M.; Anthony, J. E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Edberg, Jesper; Crispin, Xavier [Department of Science and Technology, Organic Electronics, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping (Sweden)

    2015-12-21

    We have used a photothermal technique, in which chopped light heats the front surface of a small (∼1 mm{sup 2}) sample and the chopping frequency dependence of thermal radiation from the back surface is measured with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled infrared detector. In our system, the sample is placed directly in front of the detector within its dewar. Because the detector is also sensitive to some of the incident light, which leaks around or through the sample, measurements are made for the detector signal that is in quadrature with the chopped light. Results are presented for layered crystals of semiconducting 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pn) and for papers of cellulose nanofibrils coated with semiconducting poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (NFC-PEDOT). For NFC-PEDOT, we have found that the transverse diffusivity, smaller than the in-plane value, varies inversely with thickness, suggesting that texturing of the papers varies with thickness. For TIPS-pn, we have found that the interlayer diffusivity is an order of magnitude larger than the in-plane value, consistent with previous estimates, suggesting that low-frequency optical phonons, presumably associated with librations in the TIPS side groups, carry most of the heat.

  16. Frequency and temperature dependence behaviour of impedance, modulus and conductivity of BaBi4Ti4O15 Aurivillius ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmaya Badapanda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report the dielectric, impedance, modulus and conductivity study of BaBi4Ti4O15 ceramic synthesized by solid state reaction. X-ray diffraction (XRD pattern showed orthorhombic structure with space group A21am confirming it to be an m = 4 member of the Aurivillius oxide. The frequency dependence dielectric study shows that the value of dielectric constant is high at lower frequencies and decreases with increase in frequency. Impedance spectroscopy analyses reveal a non-Debye relaxation phenomenon since relaxation frequency moves towards the positive side with increase in temperature. The shift in impedance peaks towards higher frequency side indicates conduction in material and favouring of the long rangemotion of mobile charge carriers. The Nyquist plot from complex impedance spectrum shows only one semicircular arc representing the grain effect in the electrical conduction. The modulus mechanism indicates the non-Debye type of conductivity relaxation in the material, which is supported by impedance data. Relaxation times extracted using imaginary part of complex impedance (Z′′ and modulus (M′′ were also found to follow Arrhenius law. The frequency dependent AC conductivity at different temperatures indicates that the conduction process is thermally activated. The variation of DC conductivity exhibits a negative temperature coefficient of resistance behaviour.

  17. Ecological genetics of the Bromus tectorum (Poaceae) - Ustilago Bullata (Ustilaginaceae): A role for frequency dependent selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan E. Meyer; David L. Nelson; Suzette Clement; Alisa Ramakrishnan

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary processes that maintain genetic diversity in plants are likely to include selection imposed by pathogens. Negative frequency-dependent selection is a mechanism for maintenance of resistance polymorphism in plant - pathogen interactions. We explored whether such selection operates in the Bromus tectorum - Ustilago bullata pathosystem. Gene-for-gene...

  18. Advancement in the Understanding of the Field and Frequency Dependent Microwave Surface Resistance of Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, M. [Fermilab; Aderhold, S. [Fermilab; Chandrasekaran, S. K. [Fermilab; Checchin, M. [Fermilab; Grassellino, A. [Fermilab; Melnychuk, O. [Fermilab; Posen, S. [Fermilab; Romanenko, A. [Fermilab; Sergatskov, D. A. [Fermilab

    2017-07-24

    The radio-frequency surface resistance of niobium resonators is incredibly reduced when nitrogen impurities are dissolved as interstitial in the material, conferring ultra-high Q-factors at medium values of accelerating field. This effect has been observed in both high and low temperature nitrogen treatments. As a matter of fact, the peculiar anti Q-slope observed in nitrogen doped cavities, i.e. the decreasing of the Q-factor with the increasing of the radio-frequency field, come from the decreasing of the BCS surface resistance component as a function of the field. Such peculiar behavior has been considered consequence of the interstitial nitrogen present in the niobium lattice after the doping treatment. The study here presented show the field dependence of the BCS surface resistance of cavities with different resonant frequencies, such as: 650 MHz, 1.3 GHz, 2.6 GHz and 3.9 GHz, and processed with different state-of-the-art surface treatments. These findings show for the first time that the anti Q-slope might be seen at high frequency even for clean Niobium cavities, revealing useful suggestion on the physics underneath the anti Q-slope effect.

  19. Frequency dependent characteristics of solar impulsive radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, T.K.; Das Gupta, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was made of the impulsive radio bursts observed in the frequency range 0.245 to 35 GHz. Important results obtained are: (i) Simple type 1 bursts with intensities 0 to 10 f.u. and simple type 2 bursts with intensities 10 to 500 f.u. are predominant in the frequency ranges 1.415 to 4.995 GHz and 4.995 to 8.8 GHz, respectively; (ii) With maxima around 2.7 GHz and 4 GHz for the first and second types respectively, the durations of the radio bursts decrease gradually both towards lower and higher frequencies; (iii) As regards occurrences, the first type dominates in the southern solar hemisphere peaking around 8.8 GHz, whereas the second type favours the north with no well-defined maximum in any frequency; (iv) Both types prefer the eastern hemisphere, the peak occurrences being around 8.8 GHz and 5 GHz for the two successive types, respectively; (c) The spectra of impulsive radio bursts are generally of the inverted U-type with the maximum emission intensity between 5 and 15 GHz. (author)

  20. The evolution of social learning rules: payoff-biased and frequency-dependent biased transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendal, Jeremy; Giraldeau, Luc-Alain; Laland, Kevin

    2009-09-21

    Humans and other animals do not use social learning indiscriminately, rather, natural selection has favoured the evolution of social learning rules that make selective use of social learning to acquire relevant information in a changing environment. We present a gene-culture coevolutionary analysis of a small selection of such rules (unbiased social learning, payoff-biased social learning and frequency-dependent biased social learning, including conformism and anti-conformism) in a population of asocial learners where the environment is subject to a constant probability of change to a novel state. We define conditions under which each rule evolves to a genetically polymorphic equilibrium. We find that payoff-biased social learning may evolve under high levels of environmental variation if the fitness benefit associated with the acquired behaviour is either high or low but not of intermediate value. In contrast, both conformist and anti-conformist biases can become fixed when environment variation is low, whereupon the mean fitness in the population is higher than for a population of asocial learners. Our examination of the population dynamics reveals stable limit cycles under conformist and anti-conformist biases and some highly complex dynamics including chaos. Anti-conformists can out-compete conformists when conditions favour a low equilibrium frequency of the learned behaviour. We conclude that evolution, punctuated by the repeated successful invasion of different social learning rules, should continuously favour a reduction in the equilibrium frequency of asocial learning, and propose that, among competing social learning rules, the dominant rule will be the one that can persist with the lowest frequency of asocial learning.

  1. Increased excitability of spinal pain reflexes and altered frequency-dependent modulation in the dopamine D3-receptor knockout mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Benjamin E; Baran, Christine A; Brewer, Kori L; Clemens, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    Frequency-dependent modulation and dopamine (DA) receptors strongly modulate neural circuits in the spinal cord. Of the five known DA receptor subtypes, the D3 receptor has the highest affinity to DA, and D3-mediated actions are mainly inhibitory. Using an animal model of spinal sensorimotor dysfunction, the D3 receptor knockout mouse (D3KO), we investigated the physiological consequences of D3 receptor dysfunction on pain-associated signaling pathways in the spinal cord, the initial integration site for the processing of pain signaling. In the D3KO spinal cord, inhibitory actions of DA on the proprioceptive monosynaptic stretch reflex are converted from depression to facilitation, but its effects on longer-latency and pain-associated reflex responses and the effects of FM have not been studied. Using behavioral approaches in vivo, we found that D3KO animals exhibit reduced paw withdrawal latencies to thermal pain stimulation (Hargreaves' test) over wild type (WT) controls. Electrophysiological and pharmacological approaches in the isolated spinal cord in vitro showed that constant current stimulation of dorsal roots at a pain-associated frequency was associated with a significant reduction in the frequency-dependent modulation of longer-latency reflex (LLRs) responses but not monosynaptic stretch reflexes (MSRs) in D3KO. Application of the D1 and D2 receptor agonists and the voltage-gated calcium-channel ligand, pregabalin, but not DA, was able to restore the frequency-dependent modulation of the LLR in D3KO to WT levels. Thus we demonstrate that nociception-associated LLRs and proprioceptive MSRs are differentially modulated by frequency, dopaminergics and the Ca(2+) channel ligand, pregabalin. Our data suggest a role for the DA D3 receptor in pain modulation and identify the D3KO as a possible model for increased nociception. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Is the colour dimorphism in Dactylorhiza sambucina maintained by differential seed viability instead of frequency-dependent selection?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jersáková, Jana; Kindlmann, Pavel; Renner, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 41, - (2006), s. 61-76 ISSN 0015-5551 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB6141302 Keywords : Dactylorhiza * flower colour polymorphism * frequency-dependent selection * pollinator discrimination * rewardless flowers * seed viability Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.033, year: 2005

  3. Multiplicity dependence of matrix-induced frequency shifts for atomic transitions of the group 12 metals in rare gas solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laursen, S.L.; Cartland, H.E.

    1991-01-01

    Atomic resonances of the group 12 metal atoms, Hg, Cd, and Zn, undergo frequency shifts from the gas phase atomic line when trapped in rare gas matrices of Ar, Kr, and Xe at 12 K. As expected, the shifts are approximately linear in polarizability of the rare gas, but the slope of this line depends on whether the transition in question is 1 P 1 left-arrow 1 S 0 or 3 P 1 left-arrow 1 S 0 . Thus the matrix-induced frequency shift is dependent on the singlet or triplet nature of the excited state as well as on the matrix material. This dependence on multiplicity is discussed in terms of interactions between the excited-state atomic orbitals and the matrix. The results are compared to matrix studies of other metals and to related gas-phase work on diatomic van der Waals complexes of group 12 metals with rare gases

  4. Mutual Information in Frequency and Its Application to Measure Cross-Frequency Coupling in Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malladi, Rakesh; Johnson, Don H.; Kalamangalam, Giridhar P.; Tandon, Nitin; Aazhang, Behnaam

    2018-06-01

    We define a metric, mutual information in frequency (MI-in-frequency), to detect and quantify the statistical dependence between different frequency components in the data, referred to as cross-frequency coupling and apply it to electrophysiological recordings from the brain to infer cross-frequency coupling. The current metrics used to quantify the cross-frequency coupling in neuroscience cannot detect if two frequency components in non-Gaussian brain recordings are statistically independent or not. Our MI-in-frequency metric, based on Shannon's mutual information between the Cramer's representation of stochastic processes, overcomes this shortcoming and can detect statistical dependence in frequency between non-Gaussian signals. We then describe two data-driven estimators of MI-in-frequency: one based on kernel density estimation and the other based on the nearest neighbor algorithm and validate their performance on simulated data. We then use MI-in-frequency to estimate mutual information between two data streams that are dependent across time, without making any parametric model assumptions. Finally, we use the MI-in- frequency metric to investigate the cross-frequency coupling in seizure onset zone from electrocorticographic recordings during seizures. The inferred cross-frequency coupling characteristics are essential to optimize the spatial and spectral parameters of electrical stimulation based treatments of epilepsy.

  5. High-frequency homogenization of zero frequency stop band photonic and phononic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Antonakakis, Tryfon; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    We present an accurate methodology for representing the physics of waves, for periodic structures, through effective properties for a replacement bulk medium: This is valid even for media with zero frequency stop-bands and where high frequency phenomena dominate. Since the work of Lord Rayleigh in 1892, low frequency (or quasi-static) behaviour has been neatly encapsulated in effective anisotropic media. However such classical homogenization theories break down in the high-frequency or stop band regime. Higher frequency phenomena are of significant importance in photonics (transverse magnetic waves propagating in infinite conducting parallel fibers), phononics (anti-plane shear waves propagating in isotropic elastic materials with inclusions), and platonics (flexural waves propagating in thin-elastic plates with holes). Fortunately, the recently proposed high-frequency homogenization (HFH) theory is only constrained by the knowledge of standing waves in order to asymptotically reconstruct dispersion curves an...

  6. Dependence of exponents on text length versus finite-size scaling for word-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Álvaro; Font-Clos, Francesc

    2017-08-01

    Some authors have recently argued that a finite-size scaling law for the text-length dependence of word-frequency distributions cannot be conceptually valid. Here we give solid quantitative evidence for the validity of this scaling law, using both careful statistical tests and analytical arguments based on the generalized central-limit theorem applied to the moments of the distribution (and obtaining a novel derivation of Heaps' law as a by-product). We also find that the picture of word-frequency distributions with power-law exponents that decrease with text length [X. Yan and P. Minnhagen, Physica A 444, 828 (2016), 10.1016/j.physa.2015.10.082] does not stand with rigorous statistical analysis. Instead, we show that the distributions are perfectly described by power-law tails with stable exponents, whose values are close to 2, in agreement with the classical Zipf's law. Some misconceptions about scaling are also clarified.

  7. LEAP: An Innovative Direction Dependent Ionospheric Calibration Scheme for Low Frequency Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioja, María J.; Dodson, Richard; Franzen, Thomas M. O.

    2018-05-01

    The ambitious scientific goals of the SKA require a matching capability for calibration of atmospheric propagation errors, which contaminate the observed signals. We demonstrate a scheme for correcting the direction-dependent ionospheric and instrumental phase effects at the low frequencies and with the wide fields of view planned for SKA-Low. It leverages bandwidth smearing, to filter-out signals from off-axis directions, allowing the measurement of the direction-dependent antenna-based gains in the visibility domain; by doing this towards multiple directions it is possible to calibrate across wide fields of view. This strategy removes the need for a global sky model, therefore all directions are independent. We use MWA results at 88 and 154 MHz under various weather conditions to characterise the performance and applicability of the technique. We conclude that this method is suitable to measure and correct for temporal fluctuations and direction-dependent spatial ionospheric phase distortions on a wide range of scales: both larger and smaller than the array size. The latter are the most intractable and pose a major challenge for future instruments. Moreover this scheme is an embarrassingly parallel process, as multiple directions can be processed independently and simultaneously. This is an important consideration for the SKA, where the current planned architecture is one of compute-islands with limited interconnects. Current implementation of the algorithm and on-going developments are discussed.

  8. Frequency Dependence of Electrical Parameters of an Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Composite Based Humidity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan Akram

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study highlights the interdependence of ambient humidity levels on the electrical parameters of organic-inorganic hybrid composite based humidity sensor at varied AC frequencies of input signal. Starting from the bottom, the layer stack of the fabricated humidity sensor was 200-nm silver (Ag thin film and 4 μm spun-coated PEPC+NiPC+Cu2O active layer. Silver thin films were deposited by thermal evaporator on well cleaned microscopic glass slides, which served as a substrate. Conventional optical lithography procedure was adapted to define pairs of silver-silver surface electrodes with two sorts of configurations, i.e., interdigitated and rectangular. Humidity-sensitive layers of organic-inorganic composite were then spun-cast upon the channel between the silver electrodes. The changes in relative humidity levels induced variation in capacitance and impedance of the sensors. These variations in electrical parameters of sensors were also found to be highly dependent upon frequency of input AC signal. Our findings reveal that the organic-inorganic composite shows higher humidity sensitivity at smaller orders of frequency. This finding is in accordance with the established fact that organic semiconductors-based devices are not applicable for high frequency applications due to their lower charge carrier mobility values. Two distinct geometries of semiconducting medium between the silver electrodes were investigated to optimize the sensing parameters of the humidity sensor. Furthermore, the effect of temperature change on the resistance of organic composite has also been studied.

  9. Intrinsic and extrinsic permeability of ferromagnetic thin films and multilayers for frequency dependence: comparison between theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthault, A.; Durbin, F.; Russat, J.

    1992-01-01

    Soft ferromagnetic thin films are attractive materials for read/write head applications because they exhibit a high magnetic permeability in the hundred MHz range. By contrast, due to their low electrical resistivity, their processability at higher frequency is somewhat limited. Using Maxwell equations and the geometry of the processed material, we have developed a theoretical model of the frequency-dependent magnetic permeability useful for multilayers design. We have distinguished different cases: - extrinsic (measured) vs intrinsic permeability in magnetic thin films and magnetic-insulator multilayers, - intrinsic vs extrinsic permeability in magnetic thin films, computes by the Newton iterative method. Using the well-know Landau-Lifshitz model for high frequency permeability, we have compared experimental and theoretical results. (orig.)

  10. Versatile mid-infrared frequency-comb referenced sub-Doppler spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambetta, A.; Vicentini, E.; Coluccelli, N.; Wang, Y.; Fernandez, T. T.; Maddaloni, P.; De Natale, P.; Castrillo, A.; Gianfrani, L.; Laporta, P.; Galzerano, G.

    2018-04-01

    We present a mid-IR high-precision spectrometer capable of performing accurate Doppler-free measurements with absolute calibration of the optical axis and high signal-to-noise ratio. The system is based on a widely tunable mid-IR offset-free frequency comb and a Quantum-Cascade-Laser (QCL). The QCL emission frequency is offset locked to one of the comb teeth to provide absolute-frequency calibration, spectral-narrowing, and accurate fine frequency tuning. Both the comb repetition frequency and QCL-comb offset frequency can be modulated to provide, respectively, slow- and fast-frequency-calibrated scanning capabilities. The characterisation of the spectrometer is demonstrated by recording sub-Doppler saturated absorption features of the CHF3 molecule at around 8.6 μm with a maximum signal-to-noise ratio of ˜7 × 103 in 10 s integration time, frequency-resolution of 160 kHz, and accuracy of less than 10 kHz.

  11. Versatile mid-infrared frequency-comb referenced sub-Doppler spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gambetta

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a mid-IR high-precision spectrometer capable of performing accurate Doppler-free measurements with absolute calibration of the optical axis and high signal-to-noise ratio. The system is based on a widely tunable mid-IR offset-free frequency comb and a Quantum-Cascade-Laser (QCL. The QCL emission frequency is offset locked to one of the comb teeth to provide absolute-frequency calibration, spectral-narrowing, and accurate fine frequency tuning. Both the comb repetition frequency and QCL-comb offset frequency can be modulated to provide, respectively, slow- and fast-frequency-calibrated scanning capabilities. The characterisation of the spectrometer is demonstrated by recording sub-Doppler saturated absorption features of the CHF3 molecule at around 8.6 μm with a maximum signal-to-noise ratio of ∼7 × 103 in 10 s integration time, frequency-resolution of 160 kHz, and accuracy of less than 10 kHz.

  12. Accurate calculation of Green functions on the d-dimensional hypercubic lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loh, Yen Lee

    2011-01-01

    We write the Green function of the d-dimensional hypercubic lattice in a piecewise form covering the entire real frequency axis. Each piece is a single integral involving modified Bessel functions of the first and second kinds. The smoothness of the integrand allows both real and imaginary parts of the Green function to be computed quickly and accurately for any dimension d and any real frequency, and the computational time scales only linearly with d.

  13. pH imaging of mouse kidneys in vivo using a frequency-dependent paraCEST agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunkou; Zhang, Shanrong; Soesbe, Todd C.; Yu, Jing; Vinogradov, Elena; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Sherry, A. Dean

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study explored the feasibility of using a pH responsive paraCEST agent to image the pH gradient in kidneys of healthy mice. Methods CEST signals were acquired on an Agilent 9.4 T small animal MRI system using a steady-state gradient echo pulse sequence after a bolus injection of agent. The magnetic field inhomogeneity across each kidney was corrected using the WASSR method and pH maps were calculated by measuring the frequency of water exchange signal arising from the agent. Results Dynamic CEST studies demonstrated that the agent was readily detectable in kidneys only between 4 to 12 min post-injection. The CEST images showed a higher signal intensity in the pelvis and calyx regions and lower signal intensity in the medulla and cortex regions. The pH maps reflected tissue pH values spanning from 6.0 to 7.5 in kidneys of healthy mice. Conclusion This study demonstrated that pH maps of the kidney can be imaged in vivo by measuring the pH-dependent chemical shift of a single water exchange CEST peak without prior knowledge of the agent concentration in vivo. The results demonstrate the potential of using a simple frequency-dependent paraCEST agent for mapping tissue pH in vivo. PMID:26173637

  14. Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in Internet gaming disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao eLin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies have revealed that the task-related functional brain activities are impaired in Internet gaming disorder (IGD subjects. However, little is known about the alternations in spontaneous brain activities about them. Recent studies have proposed that the brain activities of different frequency ranges are generated by different nervous activities and have different physiological and psychological functions. Thus, in this study, we set to explore the spontaneous brain activities in IGD subjects by measuring the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF, to investigate band-specific changes of resting-state fALFF. We subdivided the frequency range into five bands based on literatures. Comparing to healthy controls, the IGD group showed decreased fALFF values in the cerebellum posterior lobe and increased fALFF values in superior temporal gyrus. Significant interactions between frequency bands and groups were found in the cerebellum, the anterior cingulate, the lingual gyrus, the middle temporal gyrus and the middle frontal gyrus. Those brain regions are proved related to the executive function and decision-making. These results revealed the changed spontaneous brain activity of IGD, which contributed to understanding the underlying pathophysiology of IGD.

  15. Investigation of the temperature and frequency dependence of the surface resistance of superconducting Nb-resonators between 12 and 18 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.

    1978-08-01

    Up to now, all measurements on superconducting niobium cavities are restricted to the frequency range below 12 GHz. This paper reports on the investigation of the temperature and frequency dependence of the surface resistance of superconducting niobium between 12 and 18 GHz. Beside the study of TM modes which are important for accelerators, TE modes have been measured also to be able to separate between different loss mechanisms. The dimensions D = L = 40 mm are choosen so that the cavity is operated in higher order modes. Thereby the fabrication, especially of the coupling, and the handling of the cavity is simplified. We use a fixed magnetic hole coupling. Because the cavity was fabricated in a flanged and in a welded model, the influence of a joint could also be studied. After subtracting the residual resistance Rsub(res) the measured values obtained by the newly installed RF set-up fit in temperature and frequency dependence the superconducting surface resistance Rsub(s1) in the framework of the BCS-theory. The gap parameter Δ/kTsub(c) determined from the temperature dependence lies between 1.94 and 1.98. The frequency dependence of Rsub(s1) shows with Rsub(s1) approximately f 1 . 62 the for Nb expected shape. The highest Q 0 in the flanged cavity was 1.7 x 10 9 (f 0 = 13.260 GHz) and in the welded one 1.8 X 10 9 (f 0 = 13.310 GHz), measured in each case in a TE mode at T = 1.3 K. The residual resistance increases with f 2 and stronger and is especially high in the flanged cavity in modes with currents across the joint. (orig.) 891 WBU [de

  16. Dependence of synchronization frequency of Kuramoto oscillators ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Department of Theoretical Physics, Physical Research Laboratory, ... on the sine of the phase difference between the oscillators and hence, ... we study the change in synchronization frequency as the symmetry is changed under the limit of.

  17. Transient stability analysis in electric power systems with frequency dependent loads; Analise de estabilidade transitoria em sistemas eletricos de potencia com cargas dependentes da frequencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, Luis F. Costa; Borelli, Jose Renato; Bretas, Newton G. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica

    1997-12-31

    The power system models normally used to transient stability analysis are very simplified. Damping effects such as frequency dependent loads are neglected. In order to incorporate these effects in the analysis, a frequency dependent load model is proposed, and it is shown the important influence that it causes in the critical clearing times for stability analysis beyond the first swing. this load model require the network structure preservation and the knowledge of frequency of non-generator buses. In this work, an efficient method to estimate the frequencies of non-generator buses was developed. (author) 11 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.; e-mail: ngbretas at sel.eesc.sc.usp.br

  18. Non-zero intercept frequency : an accurate method to determine the integral temperature of li-ion batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raijmakers, L.H.J.; Danilov, D.L.; van Lammeren, J.; Lammers, T.; Bergveld, H.J.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2016-01-01

    A new impedance-based approach is introduced in which the integral battery temperature is related to other frequencies than the recently developed zero-intercept frequency (ZIF). The advantage of the proposed non-zero-intercept frequency (NZIF) method is that measurement interferences, resulting

  19. Frequency-Dependent Streaming Potential of Porous Media—Part 2: Experimental Measurement of Unconsolidated Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. W. J. Glover

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequency-dependent streaming potential coefficient measurements have been made upon Ottawa sand and glass bead packs using a new apparatus that is based on an electromagnetic drive. The apparatus operates in the range 1 Hz to 1 kHz with samples of 25.4 mm diameter up to 150 mm long. The results have been analysed using theoretical models that are either (i based upon vibrational mechanics, (ii treat the geological material as a bundle of capillary tubes, or (iii treat the material as a porous medium. The best fit was provided by the Pride model and its simplification, which is satisfying as this model was conceived for porous media rather than capillary tube bundles. Values for the transition frequency were derived from each of the models for each sample and were found to be in good agreement with those expected from the independently measured effective pore radius of each material. The fit to the Pride model for all four samples was also found to be consistent with the independently measured steady-state permeability, while the value of the streaming potential coefficient in the low-frequency limit was found to be in good agreement with other steady-state streaming potential coefficient data.

  20. In Vivo and In Silico Investigation Into Mechanisms of Frequency Dependence of Repolarization Alternans in Human Ventricular Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Orini, Michele; Hanson, Ben; Hayward, Martin; Taggart, Peter; Lambiase, Pier D; Burrage, Kevin; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2016-01-22

    Repolarization alternans (RA) are associated with arrhythmogenesis. Animal studies have revealed potential mechanisms, but human-focused studies are needed. RA generation and frequency dependence may be determined by cell-to-cell variability in protein expression, which is regulated by genetic and external factors. To characterize in vivo RA in human and to investigate in silico using human models, the ionic mechanisms underlying the frequency-dependent differences in RA behavior identified in vivo. In vivo electrograms were acquired at 240 sites covering the epicardium of 41 patients at 6 cycle lengths (600-350 ms). In silico investigations were conducted using a population of biophysically detailed human models incorporating variability in protein expression and calibrated using in vivo recordings. Both in silico and in vivo, 2 types of RA were identified, with Fork- and Eye-type restitution curves, based on RA persistence or disappearance, respectively, at fast pacing rates. In silico simulations show that RA are strongly correlated with fluctuations in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium, because of strong release and weak reuptake. Large L-type calcium current conductance is responsible for RA disappearance at fast frequencies in Eye-type (30% larger in Eye-type versus Fork-type; Psilico, 2 types of RA are identified, with RA persistence/disappearance as frequency increases. In silico, L-type calcium current and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger current determine RA human cell-to-cell differences through intracellular and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium regulation. © 2015 The Authors.

  1. Frequency dependent steering with backward leaky waves via photonic crystal interface layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colak, Evrim; Caglayan, Humeyra; Cakmak, Atilla O; Villa, Alessandro D; Capolino, Filippo; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2009-06-08

    A Photonic Crystal (PC) with a surface defect layer (made of dimers) is studied in the microwave regime. The dispersion diagram is obtained with the Plane Wave Expansion Method. The dispersion diagram reveals that the dimer-layer supports a surface mode with negative slope. Two facts are noted: First, a guided (bounded) wave is present, propagating along the surface of the dimer-layer. Second, above the light line, the fast traveling mode couple to the propagating spectra and as a result a directive (narrow beam) radiation with backward characteristics is observed and measured. In this leaky mode regime, symmetrical radiation patterns with respect to the normal to the PC surface are attained. Beam steering is observed and measured in a 70 degrees angular range when frequency ranges in the 11.88-13.69 GHz interval. Thus, a PC based surface wave structure that acts as a frequency dependent leaky wave antenna is presented. Angular radiation pattern measurements are in agreement with those obtained via numerical simulations that employ the Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD). Finally, the backward radiation characteristics that in turn suggest the existence of a backward leaky mode in the dimer-layer are experimentally verified using a halved dimer-layer structure.

  2. Advantages of frequency-domain modeling in dynamic-susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance cerebral blood flow quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jean J; Smith, Michael R; Frayne, Richard

    2005-03-01

    In dynamic-susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, the cerebral blood flow (CBF) is estimated from the tissue residue function obtained through deconvolution of the contrast concentration functions. However, the reliability of CBF estimates obtained by deconvolution is sensitive to various distortions including high-frequency noise amplification. The frequency-domain Fourier transform-based and the time-domain singular-value decomposition-based (SVD) algorithms both have biases introduced into their CBF estimates when noise stability criteria are applied or when contrast recirculation is present. The recovery of the desired signal components from amid these distortions by modeling the residue function in the frequency domain is demonstrated. The basic advantages and applicability of the frequency-domain modeling concept are explored through a simple frequency-domain Lorentzian model (FDLM); with results compared to standard SVD-based approaches. The performance of the FDLM method is model dependent, well representing residue functions in the exponential family while less accurately representing other functions. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Phenomenological model to fit complex permittivity data of water from radio to optical frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubitidze, Fridon; Osterberg, Ulf

    2007-04-01

    A general factorized form of the dielectric function together with a fractional model-based parameter estimation method is used to provide an accurate analytical formula for the complex refractive index in water for the frequency range 10(8)-10(16)Hz . The analytical formula is derived using a combination of a microscopic frequency-dependent rational function for adjusting zeros and poles of the dielectric dispersion together with the macroscopic statistical Fermi-Dirac distribution to provide a description of both the real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity for water. The Fermi-Dirac distribution allows us to model the dramatic reduction in the imaginary part of the permittivity in the visible window of the water spectrum.

  4. Structural, magnetic characterization (dependencies of coercivity and loss with the frequency) of magnetic cores based in Finemet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinalde, M.; Infante, P.; Domínguez, L.; Blanco, J. M.; del Val, J. J.; Chizhik, A.; González, J.

    2017-12-01

    We report changes of coercivity, induced magnetic anisotropy, magneto-optical domain structure and frequency dependencies of coercivity and energy loss (up to 10 MHz) associated with the structural modifications produced by thermal treatments under applied magnetic field (field annealing) in toroidal wound cores of Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si15.5B7 amorphous alloy. The thermal treatment (535 °C, 1 h) leads to the typical nanocrystalline structure of α-Fe(Si) nanograins (60-65% relative volume, 10-20 nm average grain size embedded in a residual amorphous matrix, while the magnetic field with the possibility to be applied in two directions to the toroidal core axis, that is in transverse (which is equivalent to the transverse direction of the ribbon) or longitudinal (equivalent to the longitudinal direction of the ribbon), develops a macroscopic uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the transverse (around 245 J/m3) or longitudinal (around 85 J/m3) direction of the ribbon, respectively. It is remarkable the quasi-unhysteretic character of the cores with these two kinds of field annealing as comparing with that of the as-quenched one. Magneto-optical study by Kerr-effect of the ribbons provides useful information on the domain structure of the surface in agreement with the direction and intensity of the induced magnetic anisotropy. This induced uniaxial magnetic anisotropy plays a very important role on the Hc(f) and EL(f) curves, (f: frequency), being drastic the presence and direction of the induced magnetic anisotropy. In addition, these frequency dependencies show a significant change at the frequency around 100 Hz.

  5. Contact resistance measurement structures for high frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Deepu; Pijper, Ralf M.T.; Tiemeijer, Luuk F.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the interfacial contact impedance offered by the device at its operating frequency range is crucial for accurate modelling and understanding of the device. In this article, a novel modified TLM test-structure has been devised to extract interfacial contact parameters at frequencies upto

  6. Evolution of learned strategy choice in a frequency-dependent game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsnelson, Edith; Motro, Uzi; Feldman, Marcus W; Lotem, Arnon

    2012-03-22

    In frequency-dependent games, strategy choice may be innate or learned. While experimental evidence in the producer-scrounger game suggests that learned strategy choice may be common, a recent theoretical analysis demonstrated that learning by only some individuals prevents learning from evolving in others. Here, however, we model learning explicitly, and demonstrate that learning can easily evolve in the whole population. We used an agent-based evolutionary simulation of the producer-scrounger game to test the success of two general learning rules for strategy choice. We found that learning was eventually acquired by all individuals under a sufficient degree of environmental fluctuation, and when players were phenotypically asymmetric. In the absence of sufficient environmental change or phenotypic asymmetries, the correct target for learning seems to be confounded by game dynamics, and innate strategy choice is likely to be fixed in the population. The results demonstrate that under biologically plausible conditions, learning can easily evolve in the whole population and that phenotypic asymmetry is important for the evolution of learned strategy choice, especially in a stable or mildly changing environment.

  7. Frequency of vaginal conditional-pathogenic microflora dependency from age in conditions of normocenosis and disbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gruzevsky, A. A.; Zyablitsev, S. V.; Chernobrivtsev, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Gruzevsky A. A., Zyablitsev S. V., Chernobrivtsev P. A. Frequency of vaginal conditional-pathogenic microflora dependency from age in conditions of normocenosis and disbiosis. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2017;7(2):509-522. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.399315 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/4360 The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Education parametric evaluation. Part B item 1223 (...

  8. Time-domain representation of frequency dependent inertial forces on offshore structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2013-01-01

    dependence is then approximated by a rational function, corresponding to a set of ordinary differential equations in the time domain. The MacCamy-Fuchs solution leads to a representation of the inertial force coefficient as a complex function with argument mainly corresponding to a 'phase lead', in contrast...... history of the inertial force is determined by processing the stable part of the transformation by a forward time integration, followed by an integration in the negative time-direction to obtain the final inertial force time history. The differential equations of the local inertial force at a cross......The inertial wave force on a vertical cylinder decreases with decreasing wave length, when the wave length is less than about six times the diameter of the diameter of the cylinder. In structures with a largediameter component like mono-towers the resonance frequency of the structure is typically...

  9. Frequency-dependent changes in local intrinsic oscillations in chronic primary insomnia: A study of the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the resting state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fuqing; Huang, Suhua; Zhuang, Ying; Gao, Lei; Gong, Honghan

    2017-01-01

    New neuroimaging techniques have led to significant advancements in our understanding of cerebral mechanisms of primary insomnia. However, the neuronal low-frequency oscillation remains largely uncharacterized in chronic primary insomnia (CPI). In this study, the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF), a data-driven method based on resting-state functional MRI, was used to examine local intrinsic activity in 27 patients with CPI and 27 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls. We examined neural activity in two frequency bands, slow-4 (between 0.027 and 0.073 Hz) and slow-5 (0.010-0.027 Hz), because blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fluctuations in different low-frequency bands may present different neurophysiological manifestations that pertain to a spatiotemporal organization. The ALFF associated with the primary disease effect was widely distributed in the cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL), dorsal and ventral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, somatosensory cortex, and several default-mode sub-regions. Several brain regions (i.e., the right cerebellum, anterior lobe, and left putamen) exhibited an interaction between the frequency band and patient group. In the slow-5 band, increased ALFF of the right postcentral gyrus/inferior parietal lobule (PoCG/IPL) was enhanced in association with the sleep quality (ρ = 0.414, P  = 0.044) and anxiety index (ρ = 0.406, P  = 0.049) of the CPI patients. These findings suggest that during chronic insomnia, the intrinsic functional plasticity primarily responds to the hyperarousal state, which is the loss of inhibition in sensory-informational processing. Our findings regarding an abnormal sensory input and intrinsic processing mechanism might provide novel insight into the pathophysiology of CPI. Furthermore, the frequency factor should be taken into consideration when exploring ALFF-related clinical manifestations.

  10. Electrothermal frequency references in standard CMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Kashmiri, S Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    This book describes an alternative method of accurate on-chip frequency generation in standard CMOS IC processes. This method exploits the thermal-diffusivity of silicon, the rate at which heat diffuses through a silicon substrate.  This is the first book describing thermal-diffusivity-based frequency references, including the complete theoretical methodology supported by practical realizations that prove the feasibility of the method.  Coverage also includes several circuit and system-level solutions for the analog electronic circuit design challenges faced.   ·         Surveys the state-of-the-art in all-silicon frequency references; ·         Examines the thermal properties of silicon as a solution for the challenge of on-chip accurate frequency generation; ·         Uses simplified modeling approaches that allow an electronics engineer easily to simulate the electrothermal elements; ·         Follows a top-down methodology in circuit design, in which system-level des...

  11. Automatic estimation of pressure-dependent rate coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Joshua W; Goldsmith, C Franklin; Green, William H

    2012-01-21

    A general framework is presented for accurately and efficiently estimating the phenomenological pressure-dependent rate coefficients for reaction networks of arbitrary size and complexity using only high-pressure-limit information. Two aspects of this framework are discussed in detail. First, two methods of estimating the density of states of the species in the network are presented, including a new method based on characteristic functional group frequencies. Second, three methods of simplifying the full master equation model of the network to a single set of phenomenological rates are discussed, including a new method based on the reservoir state and pseudo-steady state approximations. Both sets of methods are evaluated in the context of the chemically-activated reaction of acetyl with oxygen. All three simplifications of the master equation are usually accurate, but each fails in certain situations, which are discussed. The new methods usually provide good accuracy at a computational cost appropriate for automated reaction mechanism generation.

  12. Automatic estimation of pressure-dependent rate coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Joshua W.; Goldsmith, C. Franklin; Green, William H.

    2012-01-01

    A general framework is presented for accurately and efficiently estimating the phenomenological pressure-dependent rate coefficients for reaction networks of arbitrary size and complexity using only high-pressure-limit information. Two aspects of this framework are discussed in detail. First, two methods of estimating the density of states of the species in the network are presented, including a new method based on characteristic functional group frequencies. Second, three methods of simplifying the full master equation model of the network to a single set of phenomenological rates are discussed, including a new method based on the reservoir state and pseudo-steady state approximations. Both sets of methods are evaluated in the context of the chemically-activated reaction of acetyl with oxygen. All three simplifications of the master equation are usually accurate, but each fails in certain situations, which are discussed. The new methods usually provide good accuracy at a computational cost appropriate for automated reaction mechanism generation. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  13. The impact of attention on judgments of frequency and duration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell Winkler

    Full Text Available Previous studies that examined human judgments of frequency and duration found an asymmetrical relationship: While frequency judgments were quite accurate and independent of stimulus duration, duration judgments were highly dependent upon stimulus frequency. A potential explanation for these findings is that the asymmetry is moderated by the amount of attention directed to the stimuli. In the current experiment, participants' attention was manipulated in two ways: (a intrinsically, by varying the type and arousal potential of the stimuli (names, low-arousal and high-arousal pictures, and (b extrinsically, by varying the physical effort participants expended during the stimulus presentation (by lifting a dumbbell vs. relaxing the arm. Participants processed stimuli with varying presentation frequencies and durations and were subsequently asked to estimate the frequency and duration of each stimulus. Sensitivity to duration increased for pictures in general, especially when processed under physical effort. A large effect of stimulus frequency on duration judgments was obtained for all experimental conditions, but a similar large effect of presentation duration on frequency judgments emerged only in the conditions that could be expected to draw high amounts of attention to the stimuli: when pictures were judged under high physical effort. Almost no difference in the mutual impact of frequency and duration was obtained for low-arousal or high-arousal pictures. The mechanisms underlying the simultaneous processing of frequency and duration are discussed with respect to existing models derived from animal research. Options for the extension of such models to human processing of frequency and duration are suggested.

  14. The impact of attention on judgments of frequency and duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Isabell; Glauer, Madlen; Betsch, Tilmann; Sedlmeier, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies that examined human judgments of frequency and duration found an asymmetrical relationship: While frequency judgments were quite accurate and independent of stimulus duration, duration judgments were highly dependent upon stimulus frequency. A potential explanation for these findings is that the asymmetry is moderated by the amount of attention directed to the stimuli. In the current experiment, participants' attention was manipulated in two ways: (a) intrinsically, by varying the type and arousal potential of the stimuli (names, low-arousal and high-arousal pictures), and (b) extrinsically, by varying the physical effort participants expended during the stimulus presentation (by lifting a dumbbell vs. relaxing the arm). Participants processed stimuli with varying presentation frequencies and durations and were subsequently asked to estimate the frequency and duration of each stimulus. Sensitivity to duration increased for pictures in general, especially when processed under physical effort. A large effect of stimulus frequency on duration judgments was obtained for all experimental conditions, but a similar large effect of presentation duration on frequency judgments emerged only in the conditions that could be expected to draw high amounts of attention to the stimuli: when pictures were judged under high physical effort. Almost no difference in the mutual impact of frequency and duration was obtained for low-arousal or high-arousal pictures. The mechanisms underlying the simultaneous processing of frequency and duration are discussed with respect to existing models derived from animal research. Options for the extension of such models to human processing of frequency and duration are suggested.

  15. Encoding, storage and judgment of experienced frequency and duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilmann Betsch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines conditions that do or do not lead to accurate judgments of frequency (JOF and judgments of duration (JOD. In three experiments, duration and frequency of visually presented stimuli are varied orthogonally in a within-subjects design. Experiment 1 reveals an asymmetric judgment pattern. JOFs reflected actual presentation frequency quite accurately and were unbiased by exposure duration. Conversely, JODs were almost insensitive to actual exposure duration and were systematically biased by presentation frequency. We show, however, that a tendency towards a symmetric judgment pattern can be obtained by manipulating encoding conditions. Sustaining attention during encoding (Experiment 2 or enhancing richness of the encoded stimuli (Experiment 3 increases judgment sensitivity in JOD and yields biases in both directions (JOF biased by exposure duration, JOD biased by presentation frequency. The implications of these findings for underlying memory mechanisms are discussed.

  16. A new possibility for production of sub-picosecond x-ray pulses using a time dependent radio frequency orbit deflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A.

    2015-10-21

    It is shown that two radio frequency deflecting cavities with slightly different frequencies can be used to produce time-dependent orbit deflection to a few special electron bunches circulating in a synchrotron without affecting the majority of the electron bunches. These special bunches produce an x-ray pulse in which transverse position or angle, or both, are correlated with time. The x-ray pulse is then shortened, either with an asymmetrically cut crystal that acts as a pulse compressor, or with an angular aperture such as a narrow slit positioned downstream. The implementation of this technique creates a highly flexible environment for synchrotrons in which users of most beamlines will be able to easily select between the x-rays originated by the standard electron bunches and the short x-ray pulses originated by the special electron bunches carrying a time-dependent transverse correlation.

  17. A New Possibility for Production of Sub-picosecond X-ray Pulses using a Time Dependent Radio Frequency Orbit Deflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    It is shown that two radio frequency deflecting cavities with slightly different frequencies can be used to produce time-dependent orbit deflection to a few special electron bunches while keeping the majority of the electron bunches unaffected. These special bunches produce an x-ray pulse in which transverse position or angle, or both, are correlated with time. The x-ray pulses are then shortened, either with an asymmetrically cut crystal that acts as a pulse compressor, or with an angular aperture such as a narrow slit positioned downstream. The implementation of this technique creates a highly flexible environment for synchrotrons in which users of most beamlines will be able to easily select between the x-rays originated by the standard electron bunches and the short x-ray pulses originated by the special electron bunches carrying a time-dependent transverse correlation.

  18. Power-line Interference Removal from ECG in Case of Power-line Frequency Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor Stoyanov

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The original version of the most successful approach for power-line (PL interference removal from ECG, called subtraction procedure, is based on linear segment detection in the signal and hardware synchronised analogue-to-digital conversion to cope with the PL frequency variations. However, this is not feasible for battery supplied devices and some computer-aided ECG systems. Recent improvements of the procedure apply software measurement of the frequency variations that allow a re-sampling of the contaminated signal with the rated PL frequency followed by interference removal and back re-sampling for restoration of the original time intervals. This study deals with a more accurate software frequency measurement and introduces a notch filtration as alternative to the procedure when no linear segments are encountered for long time, e.g. in cases of ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia. The result obtained with large PL frequency variations demonstrate very small errors, usually in the range of ± 20 μV for the subtraction procedure and ± 60 μV for the notch filtration, the last values strongly depending on the frequency contents of the QRS complexes.

  19. Power system frequency estimation based on an orthogonal decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Men-Shen

    2018-06-01

    In recent years, several frequency estimation techniques have been proposed by which to estimate the frequency variations in power systems. In order to properly identify power quality issues under asynchronously-sampled signals that are contaminated with noise, flicker, and harmonic and inter-harmonic components, a good frequency estimator that is able to estimate the frequency as well as the rate of frequency changes precisely is needed. However, accurately estimating the fundamental frequency becomes a very difficult task without a priori information about the sampling frequency. In this paper, a better frequency evaluation scheme for power systems is proposed. This method employs a reconstruction technique in combination with orthogonal filters, which may maintain the required frequency characteristics of the orthogonal filters and improve the overall efficiency of power system monitoring through two-stage sliding discrete Fourier transforms. The results showed that this method can accurately estimate the power system frequency under different conditions, including asynchronously sampled signals contaminated by noise, flicker, and harmonic and inter-harmonic components. The proposed approach also provides high computational efficiency.

  20. Auto-correlation of velocity-fluctuations and frequency-dependent diffusion constant for hot electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, M.D.; Nag, B.R.

    1981-01-01

    A method has been developed for determining the auto-correlation functions of the fluctuations in the transverse and the parallel components of hot carrier-velocity in a semiconductor by Monte Carlo simulation. The functions for electrons in InSb are determined by this method for applied electric fields of 50 V/cm, 75 V/cm, and 100 V/cm. With increasing value of the time interval the transverse auto-correlation function fall nearly exponentially to zero, but the parallel function falls sharply to a negative peak, then rises to positive values and finally becomes zero. The interval beyond which the auto-correlation function is zero and the correlation time are also evaluated. The correlation time is found to be approximately 1.6 times the relaxation time calculated from the chord mobility. The effect of the flight sampling time on the value of variance of the displacement, is investigated in terms of the low frequency diffusion constants, determined from the variation of the correlation functions. It is found that the diffusion constants become independent of the sampling time if it is of the order of one hundred times the relaxation time. The frequency-dependent diffusion constants are calculated from the correlation functions. The transverse diffusion constant falls monotonically with frequency for all the field strengths studied. The parallel diffusion constant has similar variation for the lower fields (50 V/cm and 75 V/cm) but it has a peak at about 44 GHz for the field of 100 V/cm. (orig.)

  1. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and heat capacity of bulk and thin film materials using frequency-dependent transient thermoreflectance method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zhu, Jie; Tian, Miao; Gu, Xiaokun; Schmidt, Aaron; Yang, Ronggui

    2013-03-01

    The increasing interest in the extraordinary thermal properties of nanostructures has led to the development of various measurement techniques. Transient thermoreflectance method has emerged as a reliable measurement technique for thermal conductivity of thin films. In this method, the determination of thermal conductivity usually relies much on the accuracy of heat capacity input. For new nanoscale materials with unknown or less-understood thermal properties, it is either questionable to assume bulk heat capacity for nanostructures or difficult to obtain the bulk form of those materials for a conventional heat capacity measurement. In this paper, we describe a technique for simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity κ and volumetric heat capacity C of both bulk and thin film materials using frequency-dependent time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) signals. The heat transfer model is analyzed first to find how different combinations of κ and C determine the frequency-dependent TDTR signals. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity is then demonstrated with bulk Si and thin film SiO2 samples using frequency-dependent TDTR measurement. This method is further testified by measuring both thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of novel hybrid organic-inorganic thin films fabricated using the atomic∕molecular layer deposition. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and heat capacity can significantly shorten the development∕discovery cycle of novel materials.

  2. Accurate 3D Mapping Algorithm for Flexible Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saed Asaly

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the problem of performing an accurate 3D mapping of a flexible antenna surface. Consider a high-gain satellite flexible antenna; even a submillimeter change in the antenna surface may lead to a considerable loss in the antenna gain. Using a robotic subreflector, such changes can be compensated for. Yet, in order to perform such tuning, an accurate 3D mapping of the main antenna is required. This paper presents a general method for performing an accurate 3D mapping of marked surfaces such as satellite dish antennas. Motivated by the novel technology for nanosatellites with flexible high-gain antennas, we propose a new accurate mapping framework which requires a small-sized monocamera and known patterns on the antenna surface. The experimental result shows that the presented mapping method can detect changes up to 0.1-millimeter accuracy, while the camera is located 1 meter away from the dish, allowing an RF antenna optimization for Ka and Ku frequencies. Such optimization process can improve the gain of the flexible antennas and allow an adaptive beam shaping. The presented method is currently being implemented on a nanosatellite which is scheduled to be launched at the end of 2018.

  3. Frequency-Dependent Modulation of Regional Synchrony in the Human Brain by Eyes Open and Eyes Closed Resting-States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Shuqin; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Yijun; Zhu, Huaiqiu; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The eyes-open (EO) and eyes-closed (EC) states have differential effects on BOLD-fMRI signal dynamics, affecting both the BOLD oscillation frequency of a single voxel and the regional homogeneity (ReHo) of several neighboring voxels. To explore how the two resting-states modulate the local synchrony through different frequency bands, we decomposed the time series of each voxel into several components that fell into distinct frequency bands. The ReHo in each of the bands was calculated and compared between the EO and EC conditions. The cross-voxel correlations between the mean frequency and the overall ReHo of each voxel's original BOLD series in different brain areas were also calculated and compared between the two states. Compared with the EC state, ReHo decreased with EO in a wide frequency band of 0.01-0.25 Hz in the bilateral thalamus, sensorimotor network, and superior temporal gyrus, while ReHo increased significantly in the band of 0-0.01 Hz in the primary visual cortex, and in a higher frequency band of 0.02-0.1 Hz in the higher order visual areas. The cross-voxel correlations between the frequency and overall ReHo were negative in all the brain areas but varied from region to region. These correlations were stronger with EO in the visual network and the default mode network. Our results suggested that different frequency bands of ReHo showed different sensitivity to the modulation of EO-EC states. The better spatial consistency between the frequency and overall ReHo maps indicated that the brain might adopt a stricter frequency-dependent configuration with EO than with EC.

  4. Strain-dependent partial slip on rock fractures under seismic-frequency torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltiel, Seth; Bonner, Brian P.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2017-05-01

    Measurements of nonlinear modulus and attenuation of fractures provide the opportunity to probe their mechanical state. We have adapted a low-frequency torsional apparatus to explore the seismic signature of fractures under low normal stress, simulating low effective stress environments such as shallow or high pore pressure reservoirs. We report strain-dependent modulus and attenuation for fractured samples of Duperow dolomite (a carbon sequestration target reservoir in Montana), Blue Canyon Dome rhyolite (a geothermal analog reservoir in New Mexico), and Montello granite (a deep basement disposal analog from Wisconsin). We use a simple single effective asperity partial slip model to fit our measured stress-strain curves and solve for the friction coefficient, contact radius, and full slip condition. These observations have the potential to develop into new field techniques for measuring differences in frictional properties during reservoir engineering manipulations and estimate the stress conditions where reservoir fractures and faults begin to fully slip.

  5. On the profile of frequency and voltage dependent interface states and series resistance in MIS structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doekme, Ilbilge [Science Education Department, Faculty of Kirsehir Education, Gazi University, Kirsehir (Turkey)]. E-mail: ilbilgedokme@gazi.edu.tr; Altindal, Semsettin [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Gazi University, 06500, Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-30

    The variation in the capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/{omega}-V) characteristics of Au/SiO{sub 2}/n-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure have been systematically investigated as a function of frequencies in the frequency range 0.5 kHz-10 MHz at room temperature. In addition, the forward and reverse bias current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of this structure were measured at room temperature. The high value of ideality factor was attributed to the high density of interface states localized at Si/SiO{sub 2} interface and interfacial oxide layer. The density of interface states (N{sub ss}) and the series resistance (R{sub ss}) were calculated from I-V and C-V measurements using different methods and the effect of them on C-V and G/{omega}-V characteristics were deeply researched. At the same energy position near the top of valance band, the calculated N{sub ss} values, obtained without taking into account the series resistance of the devices almost one order of magnitude larger than N{sub ss} values obtained by taking into account R{sub ss} values. It is found that the C-V and G/{omega}-V curves exhibit a peak at low frequencies and the peak values of C and G/{omega} decrease with increasing frequency. Also, the plots of R {sub s} as a function of bias give two peaks in the certain voltage range at low frequencies. These observations indicate that at low frequencies, the charges at interface states can easily follow an AC signal and the number of them increases with decreasing frequency. The I-V, C-V and G/{omega}-V characteristics of the MIS structure are affected not only with R {sub s} but also N {sub ss}. Experimental results show that both the R{sub s} and C{sub o} values should be taken into account in determining frequency-dependent electrical characteristics.

  6. Time and frequency-dependent modulation of local field potential synchronization by deep brain stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clinton B McCracken

    Full Text Available High-frequency electrical stimulation of specific brain structures, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS, is an effective treatment for movement disorders, but mechanisms of action remain unclear. We examined the time-dependent effects of DBS applied to the entopeduncular nucleus (EP, the rat homolog of the internal globus pallidus, a target used for treatment of both dystonia and Parkinson's disease (PD. We performed simultaneous multi-site local field potential (LFP recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats to assess the effects of high-frequency (HF, 130 Hz; clinically effective, low-frequency (LF, 15 Hz; ineffective and sham DBS delivered to EP. LFP activity was recorded from dorsal striatum (STR, ventroanterior thalamus (VA, primary motor cortex (M1, and the stimulation site in EP. Spontaneous and acute stimulation-induced LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed at baseline, and after 30, 60, and 90 minutes of stimulation. HF EP DBS produced widespread alterations in spontaneous and stimulus-induced LFP oscillations, with some effects similar across regions and others occurring in a region- and frequency band-specific manner. Many of these changes evolved over time. HF EP DBS produced an initial transient reduction in power in the low beta band in M1 and STR; however, phase synchronization between these regions in the low beta band was markedly suppressed at all time points. DBS also enhanced low gamma synchronization throughout the circuit. With sustained stimulation, there were significant reductions in low beta synchronization between M1-VA and STR-VA, and increases in power within regions in the faster frequency bands. HF DBS also suppressed the ability of acute EP stimulation to induce beta oscillations in all regions along the circuit. This dynamic pattern of synchronizing and desynchronizing effects of EP DBS suggests a complex modulation of activity along cortico-BG-thalamic circuits underlying the therapeutic

  7. Storage Free Smart Energy Management for Frequency Control in a Diesel-PV-Fuel Cell-Based Hybrid AC Microgrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, P C; Mishra, S

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a novel, smart energy management scheme for a microgrid, consisting of a diesel generator and power electronic converter interfaced renewable energy-based generators, such as photovoltaic (PV) and fuel cell, for frequency regulation without any storage. In the proposed strategy, output of the PV is controlled in coordination with other generators using neurofuzzy controller, either only for transient frequency regulation or for both transient and steady-state frequency regulation, depending on the load demand, thereby eliminating the huge storage requirements. The option of demand response control is also explored along with the generation control. For accurate and quick tracking of maximum power point and its associated reserve power from the PV generator, this paper also proposes a novel adaptive-predictor-corrector-based tracking mechanism.

  8. An Accurate Transmitting Power Control Method in Wireless Communication Transceivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Naikang; Wen, Zhiping; Hou, Xunping; Bi, Bo

    2018-01-01

    Power control circuits are widely used in transceivers aiming at stabilizing the transmitted signal power to a specified value, thereby reducing power consumption and interference to other frequency bands. In order to overcome the shortcomings of traditional modes of power control, this paper proposes an accurate signal power detection method by multiplexing the receiver and realizes transmitting power control in the digital domain. The simulation results show that this novel digital power control approach has advantages of small delay, high precision and simplified design procedure. The proposed method is applicable to transceivers working at large frequency dynamic range, and has good engineering practicability.

  9. Frequency-Dependent Blanking with Digital Linear Chirp Waveform Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Andrews, John M. [General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Wideband radar systems, especially those that operate at lower frequencies such as VHF and UHF, are often restricted from transmitting within or across specific frequency bands in order to prevent interference to other spectrum users. Herein we describe techniques for notching the transmitted spectrum of a generated and transmitted radar waveform. The notches are fully programmable as to their location, and techniques are given that control the characteristics of the notches.

  10. Investigation of power and frequency for 3D conformal MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy with a dual frequency multi-element transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'djin, William Apoutou; Burtnyk, Mathieu; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Transurethral ultrasound therapy uses real-time magnetic resonance (MR) temperature feedback to enable the 3D control of thermal therapy accurately in a region within the prostate. Previous canine studies showed the feasibility of this method in vivo. The aim of this study was to reduce the procedure time, while maintaining targeting accuracy, by investigating new combinations of treatment parameters. Simulations and validation experiments in gel phantoms were used, with a collection of nine 3D realistic target prostate boundaries obtained from previous preclinical studies, where multi-slice MR images were acquired with the transurethral device in place. Acoustic power and rotation rate were varied based on temperature feedback at the prostate boundary. Maximum acoustic power and rotation rate were optimised interdependently, as a function of prostate radius and transducer operating frequency. The concept of dual frequency transducers was studied, using the fundamental frequency or the third harmonic component depending on the prostate radius. Numerical modelling enabled assessment of the effects of several acoustic parameters on treatment outcomes. The range of treatable prostate radii extended with increasing power, and tended to narrow with decreasing frequency. Reducing the frequency from 8 MHz to 4 MHz or increasing the surface acoustic power from 10 to 20 W/cm(2) led to treatment times shorter by up to 50% under appropriate conditions. A dual frequency configuration of 4/12 MHz with 20 W/cm(2) ultrasound intensity exposure can treat entire prostates up to 40 cm(3) in volume within 30 min. The interdependence between power and frequency may, however, require integrating multi-parametric functions in the controller for future optimisations.

  11. A General Model of Negative Frequency Dependent Selection Explains Global Patterns of Human ABO Polymorphism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando A Villanea

    Full Text Available The ABO locus in humans is characterized by elevated heterozygosity and very similar allele frequencies among populations scattered across the globe. Using knowledge of ABO protein function, we generated a simple model of asymmetric negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift to explain the maintenance of ABO polymorphism and its loss in human populations. In our models, regardless of the strength of selection, models with large effective population sizes result in ABO allele frequencies that closely match those observed in most continental populations. Populations must be moderately small to fall out of equilibrium and lose either the A or B allele (N(e ≤ 50 and much smaller (N(e ≤ 25 for the complete loss of diversity, which nearly always involved the fixation of the O allele. A pattern of low heterozygosity at the ABO locus where loss of polymorphism occurs in our model is consistent with small populations, such as Native American populations. This study provides a general evolutionary model to explain the observed global patterns of polymorphism at the ABO locus and the pattern of allele loss in small populations. Moreover, these results inform the range of population sizes associated with the recent human colonization of the Americas.

  12. Precision Teaching, Frequency-Building, and Ballet Dancing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokke, Gunn E. H.; Lokke, Jon A.; Arntzen, Erick

    2008-01-01

    This article reports the effectiveness of a brief intervention aimed at achieving fluency in basic ballet moves in a 9-year-old Norwegian girl by use of frequency-building and Precision Teaching procedures. One nonfluent ballet move was pinpointed, and instructional and training procedures designed to increase the frequency of accurate responding…

  13. Spatial heterogeneity, frequency-dependent selection and polymorphism in host-parasite interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tellier Aurélien

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic and pathology analysis has revealed enormous diversity in genes involved in disease, including those encoding host resistance and parasite effectors (also known in plant pathology as avirulence genes. It has been proposed that such variation may persist when an organism exists in a spatially structured metapopulation, following the geographic mosaic of coevolution. Here, we study gene-for-gene relationships governing the outcome of plant-parasite interactions in a spatially structured system and, in particular, investigate the population genetic processes which maintain balanced polymorphism in both species. Results Following previous theory on the effect of heterogeneous environments on maintenance of polymorphism, we analysed a model with two demes in which the demes have different environments and are coupled by gene flow. Environmental variation is manifested by different coefficients of natural selection, the costs to the host of resistance and to the parasite of virulence, the cost to the host of being diseased and the cost to an avirulent parasite of unsuccessfully attacking a resistant host. We show that migration generates negative direct frequency-dependent selection, a condition for maintenance of stable polymorphism in each deme. Balanced polymorphism occurs preferentially if there is heterogeneity for costs of resistance and virulence alleles among populations and to a lesser extent if there is variation in the cost to the host of being diseased. We show that the four fitness costs control the natural frequency of oscillation of host resistance and parasite avirulence alleles. If demes have different costs, their frequencies of oscillation differ and when coupled by gene flow, there is amplitude death of the oscillations in each deme. Numerical simulations show that for a multiple deme island model, costs of resistance and virulence need not to be present in each deme for stable polymorphism to occur

  14. Repetition rate multiplication of frequency comb using all-pass fiber resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lijun; Yang, Honglei; Zhang, Hongyuan; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan, E-mail: liyan@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instruments, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-09-15

    We propose a stable method for repetition rate multiplication of a 250-MHz Er-fiber frequency comb by a phase-locked all-pass fiber ring resonator, whose phase-locking configuration is simple. The optical path length of the fiber ring resonator is automatically controlled to be accurately an odd multiple of half of the original cavity length using an electronical phase-locking unit with an optical delay line. As for shorter cavity length of the comb, high-order odd multiple is preferable. Because the power loss depends only on the net-attenuation of the fiber ring resonator, the energetic efficiency of the proposed method is high. The input and output optical spectrums show that the spectral width of the frequency comb is clearly preserved. Besides, experimental results show less pulse intensity fluctuation and 35 dB suppression ratio of side-modes while providing a good long-term and short-term frequency stability. Higher-order repetition rate multiplication to several GHz can be obtained by using several fiber ring resonators in cascade configuration.

  15. Repetition rate multiplication of frequency comb using all-pass fiber resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Lijun; Yang, Honglei; Zhang, Hongyuan; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a stable method for repetition rate multiplication of a 250-MHz Er-fiber frequency comb by a phase-locked all-pass fiber ring resonator, whose phase-locking configuration is simple. The optical path length of the fiber ring resonator is automatically controlled to be accurately an odd multiple of half of the original cavity length using an electronical phase-locking unit with an optical delay line. As for shorter cavity length of the comb, high-order odd multiple is preferable. Because the power loss depends only on the net-attenuation of the fiber ring resonator, the energetic efficiency of the proposed method is high. The input and output optical spectrums show that the spectral width of the frequency comb is clearly preserved. Besides, experimental results show less pulse intensity fluctuation and 35 dB suppression ratio of side-modes while providing a good long-term and short-term frequency stability. Higher-order repetition rate multiplication to several GHz can be obtained by using several fiber ring resonators in cascade configuration.

  16. Forskolin suppresses delayed-rectifier K+ currents and enhances spike frequency-dependent adaptation of sympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel-Chavez, Luis I; Acosta-Gómez, Eduardo I; Morales-Avalos, Mario; Castro, Elena; Cruzblanca, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    In signal transduction research natural or synthetic molecules are commonly used to target a great variety of signaling proteins. For instance, forskolin, a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase, has been widely used in cellular preparations to increase the intracellular cAMP level. However, it has been shown that forskolin directly inhibits some cloned K+ channels, which in excitable cells set up the resting membrane potential, the shape of action potential and regulate repetitive firing. Despite the growing evidence indicating that K+ channels are blocked by forskolin, there are no studies yet assessing the impact of this mechanism of action on neuron excitability and firing patterns. In sympathetic neurons, we find that forskolin and its derivative 1,9-Dideoxyforskolin, reversibly suppress the delayed rectifier K+ current (IKV). Besides, forskolin reduced the spike afterhyperpolarization and enhanced the spike frequency-dependent adaptation. Given that IKV is mostly generated by Kv2.1 channels, HEK-293 cells were transfected with cDNA encoding for the Kv2.1 α subunit, to characterize the mechanism of forskolin action. Both drugs reversible suppressed the Kv2.1-mediated K+ currents. Forskolin inhibited Kv2.1 currents and IKV with an IC50 of ~32 μM and ~24 µM, respectively. Besides, the drug induced an apparent current inactivation and slowed-down current deactivation. We suggest that forskolin reduces the excitability of sympathetic neurons by enhancing the spike frequency-dependent adaptation, partially through a direct block of their native Kv2.1 channels.

  17. Fabricating off-diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear and nonlinear polarizabilities of doped quantum dots by Gaussian white noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Surajit; Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2015-01-01

    We make a rigorous exploration of the profiles of off-diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear (α xy , α yx ), first nonlinear (β xyy , β yxx ), and second nonlinear (γ xxyy , γ yyxx ) polarizabilities of quantum dots driven by Gaussian white noise. The quantum dot is doped with repulsive Gaussian impurity. Noise has been applied additively and multiplicatively to the system. An external oscillatory electric field has also been applied to the system. Gradual variations of external frequency, dopant location, and noise strength give rise to interesting features of polarizability components. The observations reveal intricate interplay between noise strength and dopant location which designs the polarizability profiles. Moreover, the mode of application of noise also modulates the polarizability components. Interestingly, in case of additive noise the noise strength has no role on polarizabilities whereas multiplicative noise invites greater delicacy in them. The said interplay provides a rather involved framework to attain stable, enhanced, and often maximized output of linear and nonlinear polarizabilities. - Highlights: • Linear and nonlinear polarizabilities of quantum dot are studied. • The polarizability components are off-diagonal and frequency-dependent. • Quantum dot is doped with a repulsive impurity. • Doped system is subject to Gaussian white noise. • Mode of noise application affects polarizabilities

  18. Biomimetic Approach for Accurate, Real-Time Aerodynamic Coefficients, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerodynamic and structural reliability and efficiency depends critically on the ability to accurately assess the aerodynamic loads and moments for each lifting...

  19. Modeling time-dependent corrosion fatigue crack propagation in 7000 series aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Mark E.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue experiments were conducted with the susceptible S-L orientation of AA7075-T651, immersed in acidified and inhibited NaCl solution, to provide a basis for incorporating environmental effects into fatigue crack propagation life prediction codes such as NASA FLAGRO. This environment enhances da/dN by five to ten-fold compared to fatigue in moist air. Time-based crack growth rates from quasi-static load experiments are an order of magnitude too small for accurate linear superposition prediction of da/dN for loading frequencies above 0.001 Hz. Alternate methods of establishing da/dt, based on rising-load or ripple-load-enhanced crack tip strain rate, do not increase da/dt and do not improve linear superposition. Corrosion fatigue is characterized by two regimes of frequency dependence; da/dN is proportional to f(exp -1) below 0.001 Hz and to F(exp 0) to F(exp -0.1) for higher frequencies. Da/dN increases mildly both with increasing hold-time at K(sub max) and with increasing rise-time for a range of loading waveforms. The mild time-dependence is due to cycle-time-dependent corrosion fatigue growth. This behavior is identical for S-L nd L-T crack orientations. The frequency response of environmental fatigue in several 7000 series alloys is variable and depends on undefined compositional or microstructural variables. Speculative explanations are based on the effect of Mg on occluded crack chemistry and embritting hydrogen uptake, or on variable hydrogen diffusion in the crack tip process zone. Cracking in the 7075/NaCl system is adequately described for life prediction by linear superposition for prolonged load-cycle periods, and by a time-dependent upper bound relationship between da/dN and delta K for moderate loading times.

  20. A direct method for soil-structure interaction analysis based on frequency-dependent soil masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danisch, R.; Delinic, K.; Marti, J.; Trbojevic, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    In a soil-structure interaction analysis, the soil, as a subsystem of the global vibrating system, exerts a strong influence on the response of the nuclear reactor building to the earthquake excitation. The volume of resources required for dealing with the soil have led to a number of different types of frequency-domain solutions, most of them based on the impedance function approach. These procedures require coupling the soil to the lumped-mass finite-element model of the reactor building. In most practical cases, the global vibrating system is analysed in the time domain (i.e. modal time history, linear or non-linear direct time-integration). Hence, it follows that the frequency domain solution for soil must be converted to an 'equivalent' soil model in the time domain. Over the past three decades, different approaches have been developed and used for earthquake analysis of nuclear power plants. In some cases, difficulties experienced in modelling the soil have affected the methods of global analysis, thus leading to approaches like the substructuring technique, e.g. 3-step method. In the practical applications, the limitations of each specific method must be taken into account in order to avoid unrealistic results. The aim of this paper is to present the recent development on an equivalent SDOF system for soil including frequency-dependent soil masses. The method will be compared with the classical 3-step method. (author)

  1. Attenuation measurements of ultrasound in a kaolin-water slurry. A linear dependence upon frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, M.S.; Mai, J.L.; Good, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The attenuation of ultrasound through a kaolin-water slurry was measured for frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 MHz. The maximum concentration of the slurry was for a weight percentage of 44% (or a volume fraction of 0.24). The goal of these measurements was to assess the feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation to determine the concentration of a slurry of known composition. The measurements were obtained by consecutively adding kaolin to the slurry and measuring the attenuation at each concentration. After reaching a maximum concentration a dilution technique was used, in which an amount of slurry was removed and water was added, to obtain the attenuation as a function of the concentration. The dilution technique was the more effective method to obtain calibration data. These measurements were carried out using two transducers, having a center frequency of 2.25 MHz, separated by 0.1016m (4.0 in.). The maximum attenuation measured in these experiments was about 100Np/m, but the experimental apparatus has the capability of measuring a larger attenuation if the distance between the two transducers is decreased. For a given frequency, the data show that ln V/V 0 depends linearly upon the volume fraction (V is the received voltage for the slurry and V 0 is that obtained for water). This indicated that each particle acts independently in attenuating ultrasound. 12 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Novel structural flexibility identification in narrow frequency bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Moon, F L

    2012-01-01

    A ‘Sub-PolyMAX’ method is proposed in this paper not only for estimating modal parameters, but also for identifying structural flexibility by processing the impact test data in narrow frequency bands. The traditional PolyMAX method obtains denominator polynomial coefficients by minimizing the least square (LS) errors of frequency response function (FRF) estimates over the whole frequency range, but FRF peaks in different structural modes may have different levels of magnitude, which leads to the modal parameters identified for the modes with small FRF peaks being inaccurate. In contrast, the proposed Sub-PolyMAX method implements the LS solver in each subspace of the whole frequency range separately; thus the results identified from a narrow frequency band are not affected by FRF data in other frequency bands. In performing structural identification in narrow frequency bands, not in the whole frequency space, the proposed method has the following merits: (1) it produces accurate modal parameters, even for the modes with very small FRF peaks; (2) it significantly reduces computation cost by reducing the number of frequency lines and the model order in each LS implementation; (3) it accurately identifies structural flexibility from impact test data, from which structural deflection under any static load can be predicted. Numerical and laboratory examples are investigated to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. (paper)

  3. Frequency Response Analysis of an Actively Lubricated Rotor/Tilting-Pad Bearing System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    lubrication. The second approach based on the equivalent dynamic coefficients leads to more accurate results since it includes the frequency dependence of the active hydraulic forces. Theoretical and experimental results reveal the feasibility of reducing resonance peaks by using the active lubricated tilting...... into the model by using two different approaches: (a) linearized active oil film forces and the assumption that the hydrodynamic forces and the active hydraulic forces can be decoupled; (b) equivalent dynamic coefficients of the active oil film and the solution of the modified Reynolds' equation for the active...... their operational range by attenuating resonance peaks and reducing vibration problems....

  4. Towards Accurate Prediction of Unbalance Response, Oil Whirl and Oil Whip of Flexible Rotors Supported by Hydrodynamic Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Eling

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Journal bearings are used to support rotors in a wide range of applications. In order to ensure reliable operation, accurate analyses of these rotor-bearing systems are crucial. Coupled analysis of the rotor and the journal bearing is essential in the case that the rotor is flexible. The accuracy of prediction of the model at hand depends on its comprehensiveness. In this study, we construct three bearing models of increasing modeling comprehensiveness and use these to predict the response of two different rotor-bearing systems. The main goal is to evaluate the correlation with measurement data as a function of modeling comprehensiveness: 1D versus 2D pressure prediction, distributed versus lumped thermal model, Newtonian versus non-Newtonian fluid description and non-mass-conservative versus mass-conservative cavitation description. We conclude that all three models predict the existence of critical speeds and whirl for both rotor-bearing systems. However, the two more comprehensive models in general show better correlation with measurement data in terms of frequency and amplitude. Furthermore, we conclude that a thermal network model comprising temperature predictions of the bearing surroundings is essential to obtain accurate predictions. The results of this study aid in developing accurate and computationally-efficient models of flexible rotors supported by plain journal bearings.

  5. A Novel HBT Frequency Doubler Design for Millimeter-Wave Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Krozer, Viktor; Vidkjær, Jens

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we presents a novel HBT frequency doubler design for millimeter-wave application. A HBT frequency doubler theory is described which leads to accurate design equations for optimal performance. The developed theory shows that an optimal HBT frequency doubler can be achieved using a no...

  6. Evaluation of frequency-dependent ultrasound attenuation in transparent medium using focused shadowgraph technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Yukina; Kudo, Nobuki

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic fields of a short-pulsed ultrasound propagating through a transparent medium with ultrasound attenuation were visualized by the focused shadowgraph technique. A brightness waveform and its spatial integrations were derived from a visualized field image and compared with a pressure waveform measured by a membrane hydrophone. The experimental results showed that first-order integration of the brightness wave has good agreement with the pressure waveforms. Frequency-dependent attenuation of the pulse propagating through castor oil was derived from brightness and pressure waveforms, and attenuation coefficients determined from focused shadowgraphy and hydrophone techniques showed good agreement. The results suggest the usefulness of the shadowgraph technique not only for the visualization of ultrasound fields but also for noncontact estimation of rough pressure waveforms and correct ultrasound attenuation.

  7. Frequency and Temperature Dependent Dielectric Properties of Free-standing Strontium Titanate Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalberth, Mark J.; Stauber, Renaud E.; Anderson, Britt; Price, John C.; Rogers, Charles T.

    1998-03-01

    We will report on the frequency and temperature dependence of the complex dielectric function of free-standing strontium titanate (STO) films. STO is an incipient ferroelectric with electric-field tunable dielectric properties of utility in microwave electronics. The films are grown epitaxially via pulsed laser deposition on a variety of substrates, including lanthanum aluminate (LAO), neodymium gallate (NGO), and STO. An initial film of yttrium barium cuprate (YBCO) is grown on the substrate, followed by deposition of the STO layer. Following deposition, the sacrificial YBCO layer is chemically etched away in dilute nitric acid, leaving the substrate and a released, free-standing STO film. Coplanar capacitor structures fabricated on the released films allow us to measure the dielectric response. We observe a peak dielectric function in excess of 5000 at 35K, change in dielectric constant of over a factor of 8 for 10Volt/micron electric fields, and temperature dependence above 50K that is very similar to bulk material. The dielectric loss shows two peaks, each with a thermally activated behavior, apparently arising from two types of polar defects. We will discuss the correlation between dielectric properties, growth conditions, and strain in the free-standing STO films.

  8. Towards an Accurate Stress Dependant Time & Frequency Domain VE Response Model for Bituminous Binders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldekidan, M.F.; Huurman, M.; Pronk, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Linear viscoelastic properties of bituminous binders for short loading times are analyzed using dynamic mechanical analysis methods. Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR) test with parallel plate (PP) configuration is widely used for this purpose. Due to the complex stress distribution over the

  9. Real-time and high accuracy frequency measurements for intermediate frequency narrowband signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Meng, Xiaofeng; Nie, Jing; Lin, Liwei

    2018-01-01

    Real-time and accurate measurements of intermediate frequency signals based on microprocessors are difficult due to the computational complexity and limited time constraints. In this paper, a fast and precise methodology based on the sigma-delta modulator is designed and implemented by first generating the twiddle factors using the designed recursive scheme. This scheme requires zero times of multiplications and only half amounts of addition operations by using the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and the combination of the Rife algorithm and Fourier coefficient interpolation as compared with conventional methods such as DFT and Fast Fourier Transform. Experimentally, when the sampling frequency is 10 MHz, the real-time frequency measurements with intermediate frequency and narrowband signals have a measurement mean squared error of ±2.4 Hz. Furthermore, a single measurement of the whole system only requires approximately 0.3 s to achieve fast iteration, high precision, and less calculation time.

  10. Frequency and voltage dependent profile of dielectric properties, electric modulus and ac electrical conductivity in the PrBaCoO nanofiber capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Demirezen

    Full Text Available In this study, praseodymium barium cobalt oxide nanofiber interfacial layer was sandwiched between Au and n-Si. Frequency and voltage dependence of ε′, ε′, tanδ, electric modulus (M′ and M″ and σac of PrBaCoO nanofiber capacitor have been investigated by using impedance spectroscopy method. The obtained experimental results show that the values of ε′, ε′, tanδ, M′, M″ and σac of the PrBaCoO nanofiber capacitor are strongly dependent on frequency of applied bias voltage. The values of ε′, ε″ and tanδ show a steep decrease with increasing frequency for each forward bias voltage, whereas the values of σac and the electric modulus increase with increasing frequency. The high dispersion in ε′ and ε″ values at low frequencies may be attributed to the Maxwell–Wagner and space charge polarization. The high values of ε′ may be due to the interfacial effects within the material, PrBaCoO nanofibers interfacial layer and electron effect. The values of M′ and M″ reach a maximum constant value corresponding to M∞ ≈ 1/ε∞ due to the relaxation process at high frequencies, but both the values of M′ and M″ approach almost to zero at low frequencies. The changes in the dielectric and electrical properties with frequency can be also attributed to the existence of Nss and Rs of the capacitors. As a result, the change in the ε′, ε″, tanδ, M′, M″ and ac electric conductivity (σac is a result of restructuring and reordering of charges at the PrBaCoO/n-Si interface under an external electric field or voltage and interface polarization. Keywords: Thin films, Electrical properties, Interface/interphase

  11. Monitoring Voltage-Dependent Charge Displacement of Shaker B-IR K+ Ion Channels Using Radio Frequency Interrogation

    OpenAIRE

    Dharia, Sameera; Rabbitt, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Here we introduce a new technique that probes voltage-dependent charge displacements of excitable membrane-bound proteins using extracellularly applied radio frequency (RF, 500 kHz) electric fields. Xenopus oocytes were used as a model cell for these experiments, and were injected with cRNA encoding Shaker B-IR (ShB-IR) K(+) ion channels to express large densities of this protein in the oocyte membranes. Two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) was applied to command whole-cell membrane potential a...

  12. Planck intermediate results. XXII. Frequency dependence of thermal emission from Galactic dust in intensity and polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, J. F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.

    2015-01-01

    )% from 353 to 70 GHz. We discuss this result within the context of existing dust models. The decrease in p could indicate differences in polarization efficiency among components of interstellar dust (e.g., carbon versus silicate grains). Our observational results provide inputs to quantify and optimize......Planck has mapped the intensity and polarization of the sky at microwave frequencies with unprecedented sensitivity. We use these data to characterize the frequency dependence of dust emission. We make use of the Planck 353 GHz I, Q, and U Stokes maps as dust templates, and cross-correlate them...... of the cosmic microwave background. We use a mask that focuses our analysis on the diffuse interstellar medium at intermediate Galactic latitudes. We determine the spectral indices of dust emission in intensity and polarization between 100 and 353 GHz, for each sky patch. Both indices are found to be remarkably...

  13. Accurate Rapid Lifetime Determination on Time-Gated FLIM Microscopy with Optical Sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Susana F; Domingues, José Paulo; Morgado, António Miguel

    2018-01-01

    Time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a powerful technique to assess the biochemistry of cells and tissues. When applied to living thick samples, it is hampered by the lack of optical sectioning and the need of acquiring many images for an accurate measurement of fluorescence lifetimes. Here, we report on the use of processing techniques to overcome these limitations, minimizing the acquisition time, while providing optical sectioning. We evaluated the application of the HiLo and the rapid lifetime determination (RLD) techniques for accurate measurement of fluorescence lifetimes with optical sectioning. HiLo provides optical sectioning by combining the high-frequency content from a standard image, obtained with uniform illumination, with the low-frequency content of a second image, acquired using structured illumination. Our results show that HiLo produces optical sectioning on thick samples without degrading the accuracy of the measured lifetimes. We also show that instrument response function (IRF) deconvolution can be applied with the RLD technique on HiLo images, improving greatly the accuracy of the measured lifetimes. These results open the possibility of using the RLD technique with pulsed diode laser sources to determine accurately fluorescence lifetimes in the subnanosecond range on thick multilayer samples, providing that offline processing is allowed.

  14. Very Long Baseline Interferometry: Dependencies on Frequency Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothnagel, Axel; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2018-04-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a differential technique observing radiation of compact extra-galactic radio sources with pairs of radio telescopes. For these observations, the frequency standards at the telescopes need to have very high stability. In this article we discuss why this is, and we investigate exactly how precise the frequency standards need to be. Four areas where good clock performance is needed are considered: coherence, geodetic parameter estimation, correlator synchronization, and UT1 determination. We show that in order to ensure the highest accuracy of VLBI, stability similar to that of a hydrogen maser is needed for time-scales up to a few hours. In the article, we are considering both traditional VLBI where extra-galactic radio sources are observed, as well as observation of man-made artificial radio sources emitted by satellites or spacecrafts.

  15. Forskolin suppresses delayed-rectifier K+ currents and enhances spike frequency-dependent adaptation of sympathetic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis I Angel-Chavez

    Full Text Available In signal transduction research natural or synthetic molecules are commonly used to target a great variety of signaling proteins. For instance, forskolin, a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase, has been widely used in cellular preparations to increase the intracellular cAMP level. However, it has been shown that forskolin directly inhibits some cloned K+ channels, which in excitable cells set up the resting membrane potential, the shape of action potential and regulate repetitive firing. Despite the growing evidence indicating that K+ channels are blocked by forskolin, there are no studies yet assessing the impact of this mechanism of action on neuron excitability and firing patterns. In sympathetic neurons, we find that forskolin and its derivative 1,9-Dideoxyforskolin, reversibly suppress the delayed rectifier K+ current (IKV. Besides, forskolin reduced the spike afterhyperpolarization and enhanced the spike frequency-dependent adaptation. Given that IKV is mostly generated by Kv2.1 channels, HEK-293 cells were transfected with cDNA encoding for the Kv2.1 α subunit, to characterize the mechanism of forskolin action. Both drugs reversible suppressed the Kv2.1-mediated K+ currents. Forskolin inhibited Kv2.1 currents and IKV with an IC50 of ~32 μM and ~24 µM, respectively. Besides, the drug induced an apparent current inactivation and slowed-down current deactivation. We suggest that forskolin reduces the excitability of sympathetic neurons by enhancing the spike frequency-dependent adaptation, partially through a direct block of their native Kv2.1 channels.

  16. Distance measurement using frequency scanning interferometry with mode-hoped laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhat, M.; Sobee, M.; Hussein, H. M.; Terra, O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, frequency scanning interferometry is implemented to measure distances up to 5 m absolutely. The setup consists of a Michelson interferometer, an external cavity tunable diode laser, and an ultra-low expansion (ULE) Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity to measure the frequency scanning range. The distance is measured by acquiring simultaneously the interference fringes from, the Michelson and the FP interferometers, while scanning the laser frequency. An online fringe processing technique is developed to calculate the distance from the fringe ratio while removing the parts result from the laser mode-hops without significantly affecting the measurement accuracy. This fringe processing method enables accurate distance measurements up to 5 m with measurements repeatability ±3.9×10-6 L. An accurate translation stage is used to find the FP cavity free-spectral-range and therefore allow accurate measurement. Finally, the setup is applied for the short distance calibration of a laser distance meter (LDM).

  17. Atomic spectroscopy and highly accurate measurement: determination of fundamental constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwob, C.

    2006-12-01

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author concerning highly accurate atomic spectroscopy applied for the determination of fundamental constants. A pure optical frequency measurement of the 2S-12D 2-photon transitions in atomic hydrogen and deuterium has been performed. The experimental setting-up is described as well as the data analysis. Optimized values for the Rydberg constant and Lamb shifts have been deduced (R = 109737.31568516 (84) cm -1 ). An experiment devoted to the determination of the fine structure constant with an aimed relative uncertainty of 10 -9 began in 1999. This experiment is based on the fact that Bloch oscillations in a frequency chirped optical lattice are a powerful tool to transfer coherently many photon momenta to the atoms. We have used this method to measure accurately the ratio h/m(Rb). The measured value of the fine structure constant is α -1 = 137.03599884 (91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.7*10 -9 . The future and perspectives of this experiment are presented. This document presented before an academic board will allow his author to manage research work and particularly to tutor thesis students. (A.C.)

  18. Probing phase- and frequency-dependent characteristics of cortical interneurons using combined transcranial alternating current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Sara J; Thirugnanasambandam, Nivethida

    2017-06-01

    Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and peripheral stimulation combined with TMS can be used to study cortical interneuronal circuitry. By combining these procedures with concurrent transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), Guerra and colleagues recently showed that different cortical interneuronal populations are differentially modulated by the phase and frequency of tACS-imposed oscillations (Guerra A, Pogosyan A, Nowak M, Tan H, Ferreri F, Di Lazzaro V, Brown P. Cerebral Cortex 26: 3977-2990, 2016). This work suggests that different cortical interneuronal populations can be characterized by their phase and frequency dependency. Here we discuss how combining TMS and tACS can reveal the frequency at which cortical interneuronal populations oscillate, the neuronal origins of behaviorally relevant cortical oscillations, and how entraining cortical oscillations could potentially treat brain disorders. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. A Robust Motion Artifact Detection Algorithm for Accurate Detection of Heart Rates From Photoplethysmographic Signals Using Time-Frequency Spectral Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Duy; Salehizadeh, S M A; Noh, Yeonsik; Chong, Jo Woon; Cho, Chae Ho; McManus, Dave; Darling, Chad E; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H

    2017-09-01

    Motion and noise artifacts (MNAs) impose limits on the usability of the photoplethysmogram (PPG), particularly in the context of ambulatory monitoring. MNAs can distort PPG, causing erroneous estimation of physiological parameters such as heart rate (HR) and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). In this study, we present a novel approach, "TifMA," based on using the time-frequency spectrum of PPG to first detect the MNA-corrupted data and next discard the nonusable part of the corrupted data. The term "nonusable" refers to segments of PPG data from which the HR signal cannot be recovered accurately. Two sequential classification procedures were included in the TifMA algorithm. The first classifier distinguishes between MNA-corrupted and MNA-free PPG data. Once a segment of data is deemed MNA-corrupted, the next classifier determines whether the HR can be recovered from the corrupted segment or not. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used to build a decision boundary for the first classification task using data segments from a training dataset. Features from time-frequency spectra of PPG were extracted to build the detection model. Five datasets were considered for evaluating TifMA performance: (1) and (2) were laboratory-controlled PPG recordings from forehead and finger pulse oximeter sensors with subjects making random movements, (3) and (4) were actual patient PPG recordings from UMass Memorial Medical Center with random free movements and (5) was a laboratory-controlled PPG recording dataset measured at the forehead while the subjects ran on a treadmill. The first dataset was used to analyze the noise sensitivity of the algorithm. Datasets 2-4 were used to evaluate the MNA detection phase of the algorithm. The results from the first phase of the algorithm (MNA detection) were compared to results from three existing MNA detection algorithms: the Hjorth, kurtosis-Shannon entropy, and time-domain variability-SVM approaches. This last is an approach

  20. Controlling the high frequency response of H{sub 2} by ultra-short tailored laser pulses: A time-dependent configuration interaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schönborn, Jan Boyke; Saalfrank, Peter; Klamroth, Tillmann, E-mail: klamroth@uni-potsdam.de [Institut für Chemie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2016-01-28

    We combine the stochastic pulse optimization (SPO) scheme with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles method in order to control the high frequency response of a simple molecular model system to a tailored femtosecond laser pulse. For this purpose, we use H{sub 2} treated in the fixed nuclei approximation. The SPO scheme, as similar genetic algorithms, is especially suited to control highly non-linear processes, which we consider here in the context of high harmonic generation. Here, we will demonstrate that SPO can be used to realize a “non-harmonic” response of H{sub 2} to a laser pulse. Specifically, we will show how adding low intensity side frequencies to the dominant carrier frequency of the laser pulse and stochastically optimizing their contribution can create a high-frequency spectral signal of significant intensity, not harmonic to the carrier frequency. At the same time, it is possible to suppress the harmonic signals in the same spectral region, although the carrier frequency is kept dominant during the optimization.

  1. Temperature dependence of bulk viscosity in water using acoustic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, M J; Parker, N G; Povey, M J W

    2011-01-01

    Despite its fundamental role in the dynamics of compressible fluids, bulk viscosity has received little experimental attention and there remains a paucity of measured data. Acoustic spectroscopy provides a robust and accurate approach to measuring this parameter. Working from the Navier-Stokes model of a compressible fluid one can show that the bulk viscosity makes a significant and measurable contribution to the frequency-squared acoustic attenuation. Here we employ this methodology to determine the bulk viscosity of Millipore water over a temperature range of 7 to 50 0 C. The measured attenuation spectra are consistent with the theoretical predictions, while the bulk viscosity of water is found to be approximately three times larger than its shear counterpart, reinforcing its significance in acoustic propagation. Moreover, our results demonstrate that this technique can be readily and generally applied to fluids to accurately determine their temperature dependent bulk viscosities.

  2. Electronic transport coefficients in plasmas using an effective energy-dependent electron-ion collision-frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, G.; Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Decoster, A.; Videau, L.

    2017-10-01

    We present a model to calculate the electrical and thermal electronic conductivities in plasmas using the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach coupled with the Kramers approximation. The divergence in photon energy at low values is eliminated using a regularization scheme with an effective energy-dependent electron-ion collision-frequency. Doing so, we interpolate smoothly between the Drude-like and the Spitzer-like regularizations. The model still satisfies the well-known sum rule over the electrical conductivity. Such kind of approximation is also naturally extended to the average-atom model. A particular attention is paid to the Lorenz number. Its nondegenerate and degenerate limits are given and the transition towards the Drude-like limit is proved in the Kramers approximation.

  3. Dimensional analysis and prediction of dielectrophoretic crossover frequency of spherical particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Kai Yeh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The manipulation of biological cells and micrometer-scale particles using dielectrophoresis (DEP is an indispensable technique for lab-on-a-chip systems for many biological and colloidal science applications. However, existing models, including the dipole model and numerical simulations based on Maxwell stress tensor (MST, cannot achieve high accuracy and high computation efficiency at the same time. The dipole model is widely used and provides adequate predictions on the crossover frequency of submicron particles, but cannot predict the crossover frequency for larger particles accurately; on the other hand, the MST method offers high accuracy for a wide variety of particle sizes and shapes, but is time-consuming and may lack predictive understanding of the interplay between key parameters. Here we present a mathematical model, using dimensional analysis and the Buckingham pi theorem, that permits high accuracy and efficiency in predicting the crossover frequency of spherical particles. The curve fitting and calculation are performed using commercial packages OriginLab and MATLAB, respectively. In addition, through this model we also can predict the conditions in which no crossover frequency exists. Also, we propose a pair of dimensionless parameters, forming a functional relation, that provide physical insights into the dependency of the crossover frequency on five key parameters. The model is verified under several scenarios using comprehensive MST simulations by COMSOL Multiphysics software (COMSOL, Inc. and some published experimental data.

  4. Laser generated ultrasound sources using polymer nanocomposites for high frequency metrology

    KAUST Repository

    Rajagopal, Srinath

    2017-11-22

    Accurate characterization of ultrasound fields generated by diagnostic and therapeutic transducers is critical for patient safety. This requires hydrophones calibrated to a traceable standard and currently the upper calibration frequency range available to the user community is limited to a frequency of 40 MHz. However, the increasing use of high frequencies for both imaging and therapy necessitates calibrations to frequencies well beyond this range. For this to be possible, a source of high amplitude, broadband, quasi-planar and stable ultrasound fields is required. This is difficult to achieve using conventional piezoelectric sources, but laser generated ultrasound is a promising technique in this regard. In this study, various polymer-carbon nanotube nanocomposites (PNC) were fabricated and tested for their suitability for such an application by varying the polymer type, carbon nanotubes weight content in the polymer, and PNC thickness. A broadband hydrophone was used to measure the peak pressure and bandwidth of the laser generated ultrasound pulse. Peak-positive pressures of up to 8 MPa and −6dB bandwidths of up to 40 MHz were recorded. There is a nonlinear dependence of the peak pressure on the laser fluence and the bandwidth scales inversely proportionally to the peak pressure. The high-pressure plane waves generated from this preliminary investigation has demonstrated that laser generated ultrasound sources are a promising technique for high frequency calibration of hydrophones.

  5. Automatic analysis of ciliary beat frequency using optical flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figl, Michael; Lechner, Manuel; Werther, Tobias; Horak, Fritz; Hummel, Johann; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) can be a useful parameter for diagnosis of several diseases, as e.g. primary ciliary dyskinesia. (PCD). CBF computation is usually done using manual evaluation of high speed video sequences, a tedious, observer dependent, and not very accurate procedure. We used the OpenCV's pyramidal implementation of the Lukas-Kanade algorithm for optical flow computation and applied this to certain objects to follow the movements. The objects were chosen by their contrast applying the corner detection by Shi and Tomasi. Discrimination between background/noise and cilia by a frequency histogram allowed to compute the CBF. Frequency analysis was done using the Fourier transform in matlab. The correct number of Fourier summands was found by the slope in an approximation curve. The method showed to be usable to distinguish between healthy and diseased samples. However there remain difficulties in automatically identifying the cilia, and also in finding enough high contrast cilia in the image. Furthermore the some of the higher contrast cilia are lost (and sometimes found) by the method, an easy way to distinguish the correct sub-path of a point's path have yet to be found in the case where the slope methods doesn't work.

  6. Modified Dual Second-order Generalized Integrator FLL for Frequency Estimation Under Various Grid Abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpeshkumar Rohitbhai Patil

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Proper synchronization of Distributed Generator with grid and its performance in grid-connected mode relies on fast and precise estimation of phase and amplitude of the fundamental component of grid voltage. However, the accuracy with which the frequency is estimated is dependent on the type of grid voltage abnormalities and structure of the phase-locked loop or frequency locked loop control schemes. Among various control schemes, second-order generalized integrator based frequency- locked loop (SOGI-FLL is reported to have the most promising performance. It tracks the frequency of grid voltage accurately even when grid voltage is characterized by sag, swell, harmonics, imbalance, frequency variations etc. However, estimated frequency contains low frequency oscillations in case when sensed grid-voltage has a dc offset. This paper presents a modified dual second-order generalized integrator frequency-locked loop (MDSOGI-FLL for three-phase systems to cope with the non-ideal three-phase grid voltages having all type of abnormalities including the dc offset. The complexity in control scheme is almost the same as the standard dual SOGI-FLL, but the performance is enhanced. Simulation results show that the proposed MDSOGI-FLL is effective under all abnormal grid voltage conditions. The results are validated experimentally to justify the superior performance of MDSOGI-FLL under adverse conditions.

  7. Fishing site mapping using local knowledge provides accurate and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accurate fishing ground maps are necessary for fisheries monitoring. In Velondriake locally managed marine area (LMMA) we observed that the nomenclature of shared fishing sites (FS) is villages dependent. Additionally, the level of illiteracy makes data collection more complicated, leading to data collectors improvising ...

  8. Microscopic theoretical study of frequency dependent dielectric constant of heavy fermion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadangi, Keshab Chandra; Rout, G. C.

    2017-05-01

    The dielectric polarization and the dielectric constant plays a vital role in the deciding the properties of the Heavy Fermion Systems. In the present communication we consider the periodic Anderson's Model which consists of conduction electron kinetic energy, localized f-electron kinetic energy and the hybridization between the conduction and localized electrons, besides the Coulomb correlation energy. We calculate dielectric polarization which involves two particle Green's functions which are calculated by using Zubarev's Green's function technique. Using the equations of motion of the fermion electron operators. Finally, the temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant is calculated from the dielectric polarization function. The charge susceptibility and dielectric constant are computed numerically for different physical parameters like the position (Ef) of the f-electron level with respect to fermi level, the strength of the hybridization (V) between the conduction and localized f-electrons, Coulomb correlation potential temperature and optical phonon wave vector (q). The results will be discussed in a reference to the experimental observations of the dielectric constants.

  9. RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF THE FREQUENCY BREAK BETWEEN FLUID AND KINETIC SCALES IN THE SOLAR WIND FLUCTUATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L., E-mail: roberto.bruno@iaps.inaf.it [INAF-IAPS Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the radial dependence of the spectral break separating the inertial from the dissipation range in power density spectra of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations, between 0.42 and 5.3 AU, during radial alignments between MESSENGER and WIND for the inner heliosphere and between WIND and ULYSSES for the outer heliosphere. We found that the spectral break moves to higher and higher frequencies as the heliocentric distance decreases. The radial dependence of the corresponding wavenumber is of the kind κ {sub b} ∼ R {sup –1.08}, in good agreement with that of the wavenumber derived from the linear resonance condition for proton cyclotron damping. These results support conclusions from previous studies which suggest that a cyclotron-resonant dissipation mechanism must participate in the spectral cascade together with other possible kinetic noncyclotron-resonant mechanisms.

  10. Frequency Analysis of Wing-Rotor System Considering Flexibility in Capsule Based on High-Accurate Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiayang; Zhu, Ming; Zhao, Meijuan; Wu, Zhe

    2018-05-01

    Based on a typical wing-rotor thrust model on the airship, the dynamic influence of the gyroscopic effects from the tip rotor acting on the overall coupled system has been analyzed. Meanwhile, the flexibility at the capsule boundary has been studied, as well. Hamilton's principle is employed to derive the general governing equations and the numerical Rayleigh-Ritz method is finally chosen in actual frequency computations. A new set of shape functions are put forward and verified which take most of the couplings among dimensions into account. The parameter studies are also conducted to make deep investigations. The results demonstrate that the inherent frequencies are significantly affected by the rotor speed and the flexible capsule condition. When rotor revolves, the modal shapes have reached into complex states and the components of each mode will change with the increment of rotor speed. The flexibility will also greatly reduce the entire frequencies compared with the rigid case. It is also demonstrated that the inherent property will be significantly affected by the mounting geometry, rotor inertia, the structural stiffness, and rotor speed.

  11. Frequency-Dependent FDTD Algorithm Using Newmark’s Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the characteristics of the polarizability in frequency domain of three common models of dispersive media, the relation between the polarization vector and electric field intensity is converted into a time domain differential equation of second order with the polarization vector by using the conversion from frequency to time domain. Newmark βγ difference method is employed to solve this equation. The electric field intensity to polarizability recursion is derived, and the electric flux to electric field intensity recursion is obtained by constitutive relation. Then FDTD iterative computation in time domain of electric and magnetic field components in dispersive medium is completed. By analyzing the solution stability of the above differential equation using central difference method, it is proved that this method has more advantages in the selection of time step. Theoretical analyses and numerical results demonstrate that this method is a general algorithm and it has advantages of higher accuracy and stability over the algorithms based on central difference method.

  12. Development of one-energy group, two-dimensional, frequency dependent detector adjoint function based on the nodal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khericha, Soli T.

    2000-01-01

    One-energy group, two-dimensional computer code was developed to calculate the response of a detector to a vibrating absorber in a reactor core. A concept of local/global components, based on the frequency dependent detector adjoint function, and a nodalization technique were utilized. The frequency dependent detector adjoint functions presented by complex equations were expanded into real and imaginary parts. In the nodalization technique, the flux is expanded into polynomials about the center point of each node. The phase angle and the magnitude of the one-energy group detector adjoint function were calculated for a detector located in the center of a 200x200 cm reactor using a two-dimensional nodalization technique, the computer code EXTERMINATOR, and the analytical solution. The purpose of this research was to investigate the applicability of a polynomial nodal model technique to the calculations of the real and the imaginary parts of the detector adjoint function for one-energy group two-dimensional polynomial nodal model technique. From the results as discussed earlier, it is concluded that the nodal model technique can be used to calculate the detector adjoint function and the phase angle. Using the computer code developed for nodal model technique, the magnitude of one energy group frequency dependent detector adjoint function and the phase angle were calculated for the detector located in the center of a 200x200 cm homogenous reactor. The real part of the detector adjoint function was compared with the results obtained from the EXTERMINATOR computer code as well as the analytical solution based on a double sine series expansion using the classical Green's Function solution. The values were found to be less than 1% greater at 20 cm away from the source region and about 3% greater closer to the source compared to the values obtained from the analytical solution and the EXTERMINATOR code. The currents at the node interface matched within 1% of the average

  13. Frequency Response Analysis of an Actively Lubricated Rotor/Tilting-Pad Bearing System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    2005-01-01

    for the active lubrication. The second approach, based on the equivalent dynamic coefficients, leads to more accurate results because it includes the frequency dependence of the active hydraulic forces. Theoretical and experimental results reveal the feasibility of reducing resonance peaks by using the active...... into the model by using two different approaches: (a) linearized active oil film forces and the assumption that the hydrodynamic forces and the active hydraulic forces can be decoupled, and (b) equivalent dynamic coefficients of the active oil film and the solution of the modified Reynolds equation...... of increasing their operational range by attenuating resonance peaks and reducing vibration problems....

  14. Global Application of TaiWan Ionospheric Model to Single-Frequency GPS Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macalalad, E.; Tsai, L. C.; Wu, J.

    2012-04-01

    Ionospheric delay is one the major sources of error in GPS positioning and navigation. This error in both pseudorange and phase ranges vary depending on the location of observation, local time, season, solar cycle and geomagnetic activity. For single-frequency receivers, this delay is usually removed using ionospheric models. Two of them are the Klobuchar, or broadcast, model and the global ionosphere map (GIM) provided by the International GNSS Service (IGS). In this paper, a three dimensional ionospheric electron (ne) density model derived from FormoSat3/COSMIC GPS Radio Occultation measurements, called the TaiWan Ionosphere Model, is used. It was used to calculate the slant total electron content (STEC) between receiver and GPS satellites to correct the pseudorange single-frequency observations. The corrected pseudorange for every epoch was used to determine a more accurate position of the receiver. Observations were made in July 2, 2011(Kp index = 0-2) in five randomly selected sites across the globe, four of which are IGS stations (station ID: cnmr, coso, irkj and morp) while the other is a low-cost single-frequency receiver located in Chungli City, Taiwan (ID: isls). It was illustrated that TEC maps generated using TWIM exhibited a detailed structure of the ionosphere, whereas Klobuchar and GIM only provided the basic diurnal and geographic features of the ionosphere. Also, it was shown that for single-frequency static point positioning TWIM provides more accurate and more precise positioning than the Klobuchar and GIM models for all stations. The average %error of the corrections made by Klobuchar, GIM and TWIM in DRMS are 3.88%, 0.78% and 17.45%, respectively. While the average %error in VRMS for Klobuchar, GIM and TWIM are 53.55%, 62.09%, 66.02%, respectively. This shows the capability of TWIM to provide a good global 3-dimensional ionospheric model.

  15. Structural health monitoring in composite materials using frequency response methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Seth S.; Spearing, S. Mark; Atalla, Mauro J.; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Soutis, Constantinos

    2001-08-01

    Cost effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials in structural applications. Non-destructive evaluation techniques (e.g. ultrasound, radiography, infra-red imaging) are available for use during standard repair and maintenance cycles, however by comparison to the techniques used for metals these are relatively expensive and time consuming. This paper presents part of an experimental and analytical survey of candidate methods for the detection of damage in composite materials. The experimental results are presented for the application of modal analysis techniques applied to rectangular laminated graphite/epoxy specimens containing representative damage modes, including delamination, transverse ply cracks and through-holes. Changes in natural frequencies and modes were then found using a scanning laser vibrometer, and 2-D finite element models were created for comparison with the experimental results. The models accurately predicted the response of the specimems at low frequencies, but the local excitation and coalescence of higher frequency modes make mode-dependent damage detection difficult and most likely impractical for structural applications. The frequency response method was found to be reliable for detecting even small amounts of damage in a simple composite structure, however the potentially important information about damage type, size, location and orientation were lost using this method since several combinations of these variables can yield identical response signatures.

  16. Accurate multiplicity scaling in isotopically conjugate reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golokhvastov, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    The generation of accurate scaling of mutiplicity distributions is presented. The distributions of π - mesons (negative particles) and π + mesons in different nucleon-nucleon interactions (PP, NP and NN) are described by the same universal function Ψ(z) and the same energy dependence of the scale parameter which determines the stretching factor for the unit function Ψ(z) to obtain the desired multiplicity distribution. 29 refs.; 6 figs

  17. Trade-offs between microbial growth phases lead to frequency-dependent and non-transitive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhart, Michael; Adkar, Bharat V; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2018-02-14

    Mutations in a microbial population can increase the frequency of a genotype not only by increasing its exponential growth rate, but also by decreasing its lag time or adjusting the yield (resource efficiency). The contribution of multiple life-history traits to selection is a critical question for evolutionary biology as we seek to predict the evolutionary fates of mutations. Here we use a model of microbial growth to show that there are two distinct components of selection corresponding to the growth and lag phases, while the yield modulates their relative importance. The model predicts rich population dynamics when there are trade-offs between phases: multiple strains can coexist or exhibit bistability due to frequency-dependent selection, and strains can engage in rock-paper-scissors interactions due to non-transitive selection. We characterize the environmental conditions and patterns of traits necessary to realize these phenomena, which we show to be readily accessible to experiments. Our results provide a theoretical framework for analysing high-throughput measurements of microbial growth traits, especially interpreting the pleiotropy and correlations between traits across mutants. This work also highlights the need for more comprehensive measurements of selection in simple microbial systems, where the concept of an ordinary fitness landscape breaks down. © 2018 The Author(s).

  18. Repair-dependent cell radiation survival and transformation: an integrated theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, John C

    2014-01-01

    The repair-dependent model of cell radiation survival is extended to include radiation-induced transformations. The probability of transformation is presumed to scale with the number of potentially lethal damages that are repaired in a surviving cell or the interactions of such damages. The theory predicts that at doses corresponding to high survival, the transformation frequency is the sum of simple polynomial functions of dose; linear, quadratic, etc, essentially as described in widely used linear-quadratic expressions. At high doses, corresponding to low survival, the ratio of transformed to surviving cells asymptotically approaches an upper limit. The low dose fundamental- and high dose plateau domains are separated by a downwardly concave transition region. Published transformation data for mammalian cells show the high-dose plateaus predicted by the repair-dependent model for both ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. For the neoplastic transformation experiments that were analyzed, the data can be fit with only the repair-dependent quadratic function. At low doses, the transformation frequency is strictly quadratic, but becomes sigmodial over a wider range of doses. Inclusion of data from the transition region in a traditional linear-quadratic analysis of neoplastic transformation frequency data can exaggerate the magnitude of, or create the appearance of, a linear component. Quantitative analysis of survival and transformation data shows good agreement for ultraviolet radiation; the shapes of the transformation components can be predicted from survival data. For ionizing radiations, both neutrons and x-rays, survival data overestimate the transforming ability for low to moderate doses. The presumed cause of this difference is that, unlike UV photons, a single x-ray or neutron may generate more than one lethal damage in a cell, so the distribution of such damages in the population is not accurately described by Poisson statistics. However, the complete

  19. Emotion regulation and substance use frequency in women with substance dependence and borderline personality disorder receiving dialectical behavior therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Seth R; Perepletchikova, Francheska; Holtzman, Kevin; Sinha, Rajita

    2011-01-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) identifies emotion dysregulation as central to the dangerous impulsivity of borderline personality disorder (BPD) including substance use disorders, and DBT targets improved emotion regulation as a primary mechanism of change. However, improved emotion regulation with DBT and associations between such improvement and behavioral outcomes such as substance use has not been previously reported. Thus, the goal of this study was to assess for improvement in emotion regulation and to examine the relationship between improvements in the emotion regulation and substance use problems following DBT treatment. Emotion regulation as assessed by the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, depressed mood as assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory, and their associations with substance use frequency were investigated in 27 women with substance dependence and BPD receiving 20 weeks of DBT in an academic community outpatient substance abuse treatment program. Results indicated improved emotion regulation, improved mood, and decreased substance use frequency. Further, emotion regulation improvement, but not improved mood, explained the variance of decreased substance use frequency. This is the first study to demonstrate improved emotion regulation in BPD patients treated with DBT and to show that improved emotion regulation can account for increased behavioral control in BPD patients. SIGNIFICANCE AND FUTURE RESEARCH: Emotion regulation assessment is recommended for future studies to further clarify the etiology and maintenance of disorders associated with emotional dysregulation such as BPD and substance dependence and to further explore emotion regulation as a potential mechanism of change for clinical interventions.

  20. Microstructural, electrical and frequency-dependent properties of Au/p-Cu2ZnSnS4/n-GaN heterojunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal Reddy, V; Janardhanam, V; Won, Jonghan; Choi, Chel-Jong

    2017-08-01

    An Au/Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 (CZTS)/n-GaN heterojunction (HJ) is fabricated with a CZTS interlayer and probed its chemical states, structural, electrical and frequency-dependent characteristics by XPS, TEM, I-V and C-V measurements. XPS and TEM results confirmed that the CZTS films are formed on the n-GaN surface. The band gap of deposited CZTS film is found to be 1.55eV. The electrical properties of HJ correlated with the Au/n-GaN Schottky junction (SJ). The Au/CZTS/n-GaN HJ reveals a good rectification nature with high barrier height (0.82eV) compared to the Au/n-GaN SJ (0.69eV), which suggests the barrier height is influenced by the CZTS interlayer. The barrier height values assessed by I-V, Cheung's and Norde functions are closely matched with one other, thus the methods used here are reliable and valid. The extracted interface state density (N SS ) of Au/CZTS/n-GaN HJ is lower compared to the Au/n-GaN SJ that suggests the CZTS interlayer plays an important role in the reduction of N SS . Moreover, the capacitance-frequency (C-f) and conductance-frequency (G-f) characteristics of SJ and HJ are measured in the range of 1kHz-1MHz, and found that the capacitance and conductance strappingly dependent on frequency. It is found that the N SS estimated from C-f and G-f characteristics is lower compared to those estimated from I-V characteristics. Analysis confirmed that Poole-Frenkel emission dominates the reverse leakage current in both SJ and HJ, probably related to the structural defects and trap levels in the CZTS interlayer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fast and accurate computation of projected two-point functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasshorn Gebhardt, Henry S.; Jeong, Donghui

    2018-01-01

    We present the two-point function from the fast and accurate spherical Bessel transformation (2-FAST) algorithm1Our code is available at https://github.com/hsgg/twoFAST. for a fast and accurate computation of integrals involving one or two spherical Bessel functions. These types of integrals occur when projecting the galaxy power spectrum P (k ) onto the configuration space, ξℓν(r ), or spherical harmonic space, Cℓ(χ ,χ'). First, we employ the FFTLog transformation of the power spectrum to divide the calculation into P (k )-dependent coefficients and P (k )-independent integrations of basis functions multiplied by spherical Bessel functions. We find analytical expressions for the latter integrals in terms of special functions, for which recursion provides a fast and accurate evaluation. The algorithm, therefore, circumvents direct integration of highly oscillating spherical Bessel functions.

  2. Monitoring voltage-dependent charge displacement of Shaker B-IR K+ ion channels using radio frequency interrogation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera Dharia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Here we introduce a new technique that probes voltage-dependent charge displacements of excitable membrane-bound proteins using extracellularly applied radio frequency (RF, 500 kHz electric fields. Xenopus oocytes were used as a model cell for these experiments, and were injected with cRNA encoding Shaker B-IR (ShB-IR K(+ ion channels to express large densities of this protein in the oocyte membranes. Two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC was applied to command whole-cell membrane potential and to measure channel-dependent membrane currents. Simultaneously, RF electric fields were applied to perturb the membrane potential about the TEVC level and to measure voltage-dependent RF displacement currents. ShB-IR expressing oocytes showed significantly larger changes in RF displacement currents upon membrane depolarization than control oocytes. Voltage-dependent changes in RF displacement currents further increased in ShB-IR expressing oocytes after ∼120 µM Cu(2+ addition to the external bath. Cu(2+ is known to bind to the ShB-IR ion channel and inhibit Shaker K(+ conductance, indicating that changes in the RF displacement current reported here were associated with RF vibration of the Cu(2+-linked mobile domain of the ShB-IR protein. Results demonstrate the use of extracellular RF electrodes to interrogate voltage-dependent movement of charged mobile protein domains--capabilities that might enable detection of small changes in charge distribution associated with integral membrane protein conformation and/or drug-protein interactions.

  3. Monitoring voltage-dependent charge displacement of Shaker B-IR K+ ion channels using radio frequency interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharia, Sameera; Rabbitt, Richard D

    2011-02-28

    Here we introduce a new technique that probes voltage-dependent charge displacements of excitable membrane-bound proteins using extracellularly applied radio frequency (RF, 500 kHz) electric fields. Xenopus oocytes were used as a model cell for these experiments, and were injected with cRNA encoding Shaker B-IR (ShB-IR) K(+) ion channels to express large densities of this protein in the oocyte membranes. Two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) was applied to command whole-cell membrane potential and to measure channel-dependent membrane currents. Simultaneously, RF electric fields were applied to perturb the membrane potential about the TEVC level and to measure voltage-dependent RF displacement currents. ShB-IR expressing oocytes showed significantly larger changes in RF displacement currents upon membrane depolarization than control oocytes. Voltage-dependent changes in RF displacement currents further increased in ShB-IR expressing oocytes after ∼120 µM Cu(2+) addition to the external bath. Cu(2+) is known to bind to the ShB-IR ion channel and inhibit Shaker K(+) conductance, indicating that changes in the RF displacement current reported here were associated with RF vibration of the Cu(2+)-linked mobile domain of the ShB-IR protein. Results demonstrate the use of extracellular RF electrodes to interrogate voltage-dependent movement of charged mobile protein domains--capabilities that might enable detection of small changes in charge distribution associated with integral membrane protein conformation and/or drug-protein interactions.

  4. Characterization of Fibre-Direction Dependent Damping of Glass-Fibre Composites at Low Temperatures and Low Frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliem, Mathias; Høgsberg, Jan Becker; Dannemann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the characterization of the fibre-direction dependent damping capability of glass fibre reinforced plastics (GFRP) to be used in electrical power transmission pylons. A fibre-direction dependent damping analysis of unidirectional (UD) GFRP samples was carried out using...... a Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) for five different fibre orientations (0˚ | 30˚ | 45˚ | 60˚ and 90˚) and two different matrix systems (epoxy and a vinyl ester resin). Based on the dynamic characteristics the damping performance of the various composite materials was studied at three temperatures (-10˚C......, 0˚C and 10˚C) and three vibration frequencies (1 Hz, 10 Hz and 30 Hz). It was observed that the loss factor of Glass Fibre Reinforced Vinyl-Ester (GF-VE) was in general slightly higher compared to the Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy (GF-EP). The loss factor increased slightly with temperature, while...

  5. Towards a frequency-dependent discrete maximum principle for the implicit Monte Carlo equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollaber, Allan B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Larsen, Edward W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Densmore, Jeffery D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-15

    It has long been known that temperature solutions of the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) equations can exceed the external boundary temperatures, a so-called violation of the 'maximum principle.' Previous attempts at prescribing a maximum value of the time-step size {Delta}{sub t} that is sufficient to eliminate these violations have recommended a {Delta}{sub t} that is typically too small to be used in practice and that appeared to be much too conservative when compared to numerical solutions of the IMC equations for practical problems. In this paper, we derive a new estimator for the maximum time-step size that includes the spatial-grid size {Delta}{sub x}. This explicitly demonstrates that the effect of coarsening {Delta}{sub x} is to reduce the limitation on {Delta}{sub t}, which helps explain the overly conservative nature of the earlier, grid-independent results. We demonstrate that our new time-step restriction is a much more accurate means of predicting violations of the maximum principle. We discuss how the implications of the new, grid-dependent timestep restriction can impact IMC solution algorithms.

  6. Towards a frequency-dependent discrete maximum principle for the implicit Monte Carlo equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollaber, Allan B.; Larsen, Edward W.; Densmore, Jeffery D.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that temperature solutions of the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) equations can exceed the external boundary temperatures, a so-called violation of the 'maximum principle'. Previous attempts at prescribing a maximum value of the time-step size Δ t that is sufficient to eliminate these violations have recommended a Δ t that is typically too small to be used in practice and that appeared to be much too conservative when compared to numerical solutions of the IMC equations for practical problems. In this paper, we derive a new estimator for the maximum time-step size that includes the spatial-grid size Δ x . This explicitly demonstrates that the effect of coarsening Δ x is to reduce the limitation on Δ t , which helps explain the overly conservative nature of the earlier, grid-independent results. We demonstrate that our new time-step restriction is a much more accurate means of predicting violations of the maximum principle. We discuss how the implications of the new, grid-dependent time-step restriction can impact IMC solution algorithms. (author)

  7. Broad bandwidth frequency domain instrument for quantitative tissue optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Tuan H.; Coquoz, Olivier; Fishkin, Joshua B.; Anderson, Eric; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) optical properties of turbid media, e.g., tissue, can be accurately quantified noninvasively using methods based on diffuse reflectance or transmittance, such as frequency domain photon migration (FDPM). Factors which govern the accuracy and sensitivity of FDPM-measured optical properties include instrument performance, the light propagation model, and fitting algorithms used to calculate optical properties from measured data. In this article, we characterize instrument, model, and fitting uncertaintics of an FDPM system designed for clinical use and investigate how each of these factors affects the quantification of NIR absorption (μ a ) and reduced scattering (μ s ' ) parameters in tissue phantoms. The instrument is based on a 500 MHz, multiwavelength platform that sweeps through 201 discrete frequencies in as little as 675 ms. Phase and amplitude of intensity modulated light launched into tissue, i.e., diffuse photon density waves (PDW), are measured with an accuracy of ±0.30 degree sign and ±3.5%, while phase and amplitude precision are ±0.025 degree sign and ±0.20%, respectively. At this level of instrument uncertainty, simultaneous fitting of frequency-dependent phase and amplitude nonlinear model functions derived from a photon diffusion approximation provides an accurate and robust strategy for determining optical properties from FDPM data, especially for media with high absorption. In an optical property range that is characteristic of most human tissues in the NIR (5x10 -3 a -2 mm -1 , 0.5 s ' -1 ), we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that the multifrequency, simultaneous-fit approach allows μ a and μ s ' to be quantified with an accuracy of ±5% and ±3%, respectively. Although exceptionally high levels of precision can be obtained using this approach ( a and μ s ' . (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  8. Communication: Quantitative multi-site frequency maps for amide I vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reppert, Mike [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Tokmakoff, Andrei, E-mail: tokmakoff@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    An accurate method for predicting the amide I vibrational spectrum of a given protein structure has been sought for many years. Significant progress has been made recently by sampling structures from molecular dynamics simulations and mapping local electrostatic variables onto the frequencies of individual amide bonds. Agreement with experiment, however, has remained largely qualitative. Previously, we used dipeptide fragments and isotope-labeled constructs of the protein G mimic NuG2b as experimental standards for developing and testing amide I frequency maps. Here, we combine these datasets to test different frequency-map models and develop a novel method to produce an optimized four-site potential (4P) map based on the CHARMM27 force field. Together with a charge correction for glycine residues, the optimized map accurately describes both experimental datasets, with average frequency errors of 2–3 cm{sup −1}. This 4P map is shown to be convertible to a three-site field map which provides equivalent performance, highlighting the viability of both field- and potential-based maps for amide I spectral modeling. The use of multiple sampling points for local electrostatics is found to be essential for accurate map performance.

  9. Frequency Adaptive Repetitive Control of Grid-Tied Three-Phase PV Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Keliang; Yang, Yongheng; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive control offers an accurate current control scheme for grid-tied converters to feed high quality sinusoidal current into the grid. However, with grid frequency being treated as a constant value, conventional repetitive controller fail to produce high quality feeding current in the prese......Repetitive control offers an accurate current control scheme for grid-tied converters to feed high quality sinusoidal current into the grid. However, with grid frequency being treated as a constant value, conventional repetitive controller fail to produce high quality feeding current...

  10. Characterizing the attenuation of coaxial and rectangular microwave-frequency waveguides at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurpiers, Philipp; Walter, Theodore; Magnard, Paul; Salathe, Yves; Wallraff, Andreas [ETH Zuerich, Department of Physics, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2017-12-15

    Low-loss waveguides are required for quantum communication at distances beyond the chip-scale for any low-temperature solid-state implementation of quantum information processors. We measure and analyze the attenuation constant of commercially available microwave-frequency waveguides down to millikelvin temperatures and single photon levels. More specifically, we characterize the frequency-dependent loss of a range of coaxial and rectangular microwave waveguides down to 0.005 dB/m using a resonant-cavity technique. We study the loss tangent and relative permittivity of commonly used dielectric waveguide materials by measurements of the internal quality factors and their comparison with established loss models. The results of our characterization are relevant for accurately predicting the signal levels at the input of cryogenic devices, for reducing the loss in any detection chain, and for estimating the heat load induced by signal dissipation in cryogenic systems. (orig.)

  11. Quantitative Surface Chirality Detection with Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy: Twin Polarization Angle Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Feng; Xu, Yanyan; Guo, Yuan; Liu, Shi-lin; Wang, Hongfei

    2009-01-01

    Here we report a novel twin polarization angle (TPA) approach in the quantitative chirality detection with the surface sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS). Generally, the achiral contribution dominates the surface SFG-VS signal, and the pure chiral signal is usually two or three orders of magnitude smaller. Therefore, it has been difficult to make quantitative detection and analysis of the chiral contributions to the surface SFG-VS signal. In the TPA method, by varying together the polarization angles of the incoming visible light and the sum frequency signal at fixed s or p polarization of the incoming infrared beam, the polarization dependent SFG signal can give not only direct signature of the chiral contribution in the total SFG-VS signal, but also the accurate measurement of the chiral and achiral components in the surface SFG signal. The general description of the TPA method is presented and the experiment test of the TPA approach is also presented for the SFG-VS from the S- and R-limonene chiral liquid surfaces. The most accurate degree of chiral excess values thus obtained for the 2878 cm -1 spectral peak of the S- and R-limonene liquid surfaces are (23.7±0.4)% and (25.4±1.3)%, respectively.

  12. RareVar: A Framework for Detecting Low-Frequency Single-Nucleotide Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yangyang; Xuei, Xiaoling; Li, Lang; Nakshatri, Harikrishna; Edenberg, Howard J; Liu, Yunlong

    2017-07-01

    Accurate identification of low-frequency somatic point mutations in tumor samples has important clinical utilities. Although high-throughput sequencing technology enables capturing such variants while sequencing primary tumor samples, our ability for accurate detection is compromised when the variant frequency is close to the sequencer error rate. Most current experimental and bioinformatic strategies target mutations with ≥5% allele frequency, which limits our ability to understand the cancer etiology and tumor evolution. We present an experimental and computational modeling framework, RareVar, to reliably identify low-frequency single-nucleotide variants from high-throughput sequencing data under standard experimental protocols. RareVar protocol includes a benchmark design by pooling DNAs from already sequenced individuals at various concentrations to target variants at desired frequencies, 0.5%-3% in our case. By applying a generalized, linear model-based, position-specific error model, followed by machine-learning-based variant calibration, our approach outperforms existing methods. Our method can be applied on most capture and sequencing platforms without modifying the experimental protocol.

  13. Frequency to Voltage Converter Analog Front-End Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos; Raines, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The frequency to voltage converter analog front end evaluation prototype (F2V AFE) is an evaluation board designed for comparison of different methods of accurately extracting the frequency of a sinusoidal input signal. A configurable input stage is routed to one or several of five separate, configurable filtering circuits, and then to a configurable output stage. Amplifier selection and gain, filter corner frequencies, and comparator hysteresis and voltage reference are all easily configurable through the use of jumpers and potentiometers.

  14. Low-frequency dilatational wave propagation through unsaturated porous media containing two immiscible fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, W.-C.; Sposito, G.; Majer, E.

    2007-02-01

    An analytical theory is presented for the low-frequency behavior of dilatational waves propagating through a homogeneous elastic porous medium containing two immiscible fluids. The theory is based on the Berryman-Thigpen-Chin (BTC) model, in which capillary pressure effects are neglected. We show that the BTC model equations in the frequency domain can be transformed, at sufficiently low frequencies, into a dissipative wave equation (telegraph equation) and a propagating wave equation in the time domain. These partial differential equations describe two independent modes of dilatational wave motion that are analogous to the Biot fast and slow compressional waves in a single-fluid system. The equations can be solved analytically under a variety of initial and boundary conditions. The stipulation of 'low frequency' underlying the derivation of our equations in the time domain is shown to require that the excitation frequency of wave motions be much smaller than a critical frequency. This frequency is shown to be the inverse of an intrinsic time scale that depends on an effective kinematic shear viscosity of the interstitial fluids and the intrinsic permeability of the porous medium. Numerical calculations indicate that the critical frequency in both unconsolidated and consolidated materials containing water and a nonaqueous phase liquid ranges typically from kHz to MHz. Thus engineering problems involving the dynamic response of an unsaturated porous medium to low excitation frequencies (e.g. seismic wave stimulation) should be accurately modeled by our equations after suitable initial and boundary conditions are imposed.

  15. Turbulence growth and its dependency of wake vortices on excitation frequency by local body-force around two-dimensional hump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakeno, Aiko; Abe, Yoshiaki; Nonomura, Taku; Kawai, Soshi; Fujii, Kozo

    2017-11-01

    We investigated details of wake vortex dynamics to cause turbulence increase and early flow-reattachment under excitation forcing by a plasma actuator setting around a 2D hump numerically. The local body-force was homogeneous in the spanwise direction and bursting temporally. That actuation generates two-dimensional roll vortices and other turbulence motions such like three-dimensional rib structure in downstream. These dynamics depended on the excitation frequency. We tried to discuss multi-scaled vortices separately with considering the temporal phaseaveraged statistics of the excitation frequency and others, those are related to roll vortices and others with rib structure between rolls. It was found that the maximum value of non-periodic fluctuation in downstream correlated with flow-reattachment performance more than that of periodic fluctuation of roll vortices. The amplitude becomes large around separation position in early reattachment cases. The spacial growth rates of peak values in the wall-normal direction are same for high frequency cases, K-H instability modes, however not true for low frequency cases. In high frequency cases, amplitude in the early state of separation plays a significant rule to increase it in downstream. Strategic Programs for Innovative Research of the High Performance Computing Initiative (No. hp120296,hp130001,hp140207, hp150219) Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research(B) (No. 15K21677) by the MEXT.

  16. High frequency energy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotlar, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    High-frequency (> 100 MHz) energy measurements present special problems to the experimenter. Environment or available electronics often limit the applicability of a given detector type. The physical properties of many detectors are frequency dependent and in some cases, the physical effect employed can be frequency dependent. State-of-the-art measurements generally involve a detection scheme in association with high-speed electronics and a method of data recording. Events can be single or repetitive shot requiring real time, sampling, or digitizing data recording. Potential modification of the pulse by the detector and the associated electronics should not be overlooked. This presentation will review typical applications, methods of choosing a detector, and high-speed detectors. Special considerations and limitations of some applications and devices will be described

  17. Fractional amplitude analysis of low frequency fluctuation in alcohol dependent individuals: a resting state functional MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Dingfang; Cheng Jun; Wu Hanbin; Xu Liangzhou; Liu Jinhuan; Zhao Yilin; Lin Xue; Liu Changsheng; Qiu Li

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore brain activity features during the resting state in alcohol dependent individuals, and study the relationship between the brain activity features and alcohol dependent individuals' clinical symptoms. Methods: Twenty-four alcohol dependent individuals and 22 healthy control subjects, well matched in gender, age, education and handedness, were enrolled as the alcohol dependent group and control group respectively. A GE 3.0 T MR scanner was used to acquire all the subjects' resting state data. DPARSF software was used to process resting functional MRI data, and then the whole brain fractional amplitudes of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF) data were acquired. Two-sample t test statistical analysis was made to access fALFF difference between the two groups. Results: In comparison with the control group, the alcohol dependent group showed reduced fALFF in bilateral medial prefrontal gyrus, right inferior occipital gyrus, left precuneus,left inferior temporal gyrus, and left posterior lobe of cerebellum (0.64-1.69 vs. 0.87-1.78, t=-4.23- -2.79, P<0.05). fALFF was increased in the alcohol dependent group at the anterior cingulate,bilateral inferior frontal gyrus,right middle frontal gyrus,bilateral insular lobe,bilateral dorsal thalamus (0.86-1.82 vs. 0.76-1.58, t=3.56-3.96, P<0.05). Conclusion: Alcohol dependent individuals had abnormal activity at the bilateral prefrontal lobe,anterior cingulate, bilateral dorsal thalamus, bilateral insular lobe, left posterior lobe of cerebellum et al, during the resting state, and these abnormal activities might be related with clinical manifestation and pathophysiology. (authors)

  18. Impurity strength and impurity domain modulated frequency-dependent linear and second non-linear response properties of doped quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Nirmal Kumar [Department of Physics, Suri Vidyasagar College, Suri, Birbhum 731 101, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Manas [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2011-08-15

    We explore the pattern of frequency-dependent linear and second non-linear optical responses of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots harmonically confined in two dimensions. The dopant impurity potential chosen assumes a Gaussian form and it is doped into an on-center location. The quantum dot is subject to a periodically oscillating external electric field. For some fixed values of transverse magnetic field strength ({omega}{sub c}) and harmonic confinement potential ({omega}{sub 0}), the influence of impurity strength (V{sub 0}) and impurity domain ({xi}) on the diagonal components of the frequency-dependent linear ({alpha}{sub xx} and {alpha}{sub yy}) and second non-linear ({gamma}{sub xxxx} and {gamma}{sub yyyy}) responses of the dot are computed through a linear variational route. The investigations reveal that the optical responses undergo enhancement with increase in both V{sub 0} and {xi} values. However, in the limitingly small dopant strength regime one observes a drop in the optical responses with increase in V{sub 0}. A time-average rate of energy transfer to the system is often invoked to support the findings. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Spin dynamics and frequency dependence of magnetic damping study in soft ferromagnetic FeTaC film with a stripe domain structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samantaray, B., E-mail: iitg.biswanath@gmail.com; Ranganathan, R.; Mandal, P. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700 064 (India); Singh, Akhilesh K.; Perumal, A. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati - 781039 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and low magnetic damping are the key factors for the free layer magnetization switching by spin transfer torque technique in magnetic tunnel junction devices. The magnetization precessional dynamics in soft ferromagnetic FeTaC thin film with a stripe domain structure was explored in broad band frequency range by employing micro-strip ferromagnetic resonance technique. The polar angle variation of resonance field and linewidth at different frequencies have been analyzed numerically using Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation by taking into account the total free energy density of the film. The numerically estimated parameters Landé g-factor, PMA constant, and effective magnetization are found to be 2.1, 2 × 10{sup 5} erg/cm{sup 3} and 7145 Oe, respectively. The frequency dependence of Gilbert damping parameter (α) is evaluated by considering both intrinsic and extrinsic effects into the total linewidth analysis. The value of α is found to be 0.006 at 10 GHz and it increases monotonically with decreasing precessional frequency.

  20. A note on the physical interpretation of frequency dependent boundary conditions in a digital waveguide mesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escolano-Carrasco, José; Jacobsen, Finn

    2007-01-01

    Digital waveguide mesh (DWM) is a popular method for time domain modelling of sound fields. DWM consists of a recursive digital filter structure where a D'Alembert solution of the wave equation is propagated. One of the attractive characteristics of this method is related to the simplicity...... model of the boundary does not agree with the behaviour of a locally reacting surface, and this can give rise to contradictions in the physical interpretation of the reflected sound field. This paper analyses the behaviour of frequency dependent boundary conditions in DWM in order to obtain a physical...

  1. Nonmonotonic low frequency losses in HTSCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, H; Gerber, A; Milner, A

    2007-01-01

    A calorimetric technique has been used in order to study ac-field dissipation in ceramic BSCCO samples at low frequencies between 0.05 and 250 Hz, at temperatures from 65 to 90 K. In contrast to previous studies, where ac losses have been reported with a linear dependence on magnetic field frequency, we find a nonmonotonic function presenting various maxima. Frequencies corresponding to local maxima of dissipation depend on the temperature and the amplitude of the ac magnetic field. Flux creep is argued to be responsible for this behaviour. A simple model connecting the characteristic vortex relaxation times (flux creep) and the location of dissipation maxima versus frequency is proposed

  2. Frequency dependence of the radiative decay rate of excitons in self-assembled quantum dots: Experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren; Johansen, Jeppe; Kristensen, Philip Trøst

    2009-01-01

    We analyze time-resolved spontaneous emission from excitons confined in self-assembled InAs quantum dots placed at various distances to a semiconductor-air interface. The modification of the local density of optical states due to the proximity of the interface enables unambiguous determination...... furthermore discuss three models of quantum dot strain and compare the measured wave-function overlap to these models. The observed frequency dependence of the wave-function overlap can be understood qualitatively in terms of the different compressibility of electrons and holes originating from...

  3. Frequency-dependent solvent friction and torsional damping in liquid 1,2-difluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhail, Richard A.; Monroe, Frances C.

    1991-04-01

    We have used Raman spectroscopy to study the torsional dynamics, rotational dynamics, and conformational solvation energy of liquid 1,2-difluoroethane. From the Raman intensities, we obtain Δ H(g-t) = -2.4±0.1 kcal/mol, indicating strong dipolar solvation of the gauche conformer. We analyze the Raman linewidths of the CCF bending bands to obtain the zero-frequency torsional damping coefficient or well friction for the gauche conformer, and from the linewidth of the torsion band we obtain the friction evaluated at the torsional frequency. The zero-frequency well friction shows deviations from hydrodynamic behavior reminiscent of those observed for barrier friction, whereas the high-frequency friction is considerably smaller in magnitude and independent of temperature and viscosity. The zero-frequency torsional friction correlates linearly with the rotational friction. It is argued that the small amplitude of the torsional fluctuations emphasizes the short distance, or high wavevector components of the solvent friction. Dielectric friction apparently does not contribute to the torsional friction at the observed frequencies.

  4. Structural and frequency dependencies of a.c. and dielectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    6Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams ... conductivity and its frequency exponents were interpreted in terms of correlated barrier hopping ... cations in high-electron-mobility and heterostructure bipolar.

  5. Ultrasound breast imaging using frequency domain reverse time migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, O.; Zuberi, M. A. H.; Pratt, R. G.; Duric, N.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ultrasonography reconstruction techniques, such as B-mode, are based on a simple wave propagation model derived from a high frequency approximation. Therefore, to minimize model mismatch, the central frequency of the input pulse is typically chosen between 3 and 15 megahertz. Despite the increase in theoretical resolution, operating at higher frequencies comes at the cost of lower signal-to-noise ratio. This ultimately degrades the image contrast and overall quality at higher imaging depths. To address this issue, we investigate a reflection imaging technique, known as reverse time migration, which uses a more accurate propagation model for reconstruction. We present preliminary simulation results as well as physical phantom image reconstructions obtained using data acquired with a breast imaging ultrasound tomography prototype. The original reconstructions are filtered to remove low-wavenumber artifacts that arise due to the inclusion of the direct arrivals. We demonstrate the advantage of using an accurate sound speed model in the reverse time migration process. We also explain how the increase in computational complexity can be mitigated using a frequency domain approach and a parallel computing platform.

  6. Frequency and Wavevector Dependence of the Atomic Level Stress-Stress Correlation Function in a Model Supercooled Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, Valentin A.; Morris, James R.; Egami, Takeshi

    2012-02-01

    Temporal and spatial correlations among the local atomic level shear stresses were studied for a model liquid iron by molecular dynamics simulation [PRL 106,115703]. Integration over time and space of the shear stress correlation function F(r,t) yields viscosity via Green-Kubo relation. The stress correlation function in time and space F(r,t) was Fourier transformed to study the dependence on frequency, E, and wave vector, Q. The results, F(Q,E), showed damped shear stress waves propagating in the liquid for small Q at high and low temperatures. We also observed additional diffuse feature that appears as temperature is reduced below crossover temperature of potential energy landscape at relatively low frequencies at small Q. We suggest that this additional feature might be related to dynamic heterogeneity and boson peaks. We also discuss a relation between the time-scale of the stress-stress correlation function and the alpha-relaxation time of the intermediate self-scattering function S(Q,E).

  7. The driving frequency effects on the atmospheric pressure corona jet plasmas from low frequency to radio frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dan Bee; Jung, H.; Gweon, B.; Rhee, J. K.; Choe, W.; Moon, S. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Lately, the atmospheric pressure jet type corona plasma, which has been typically driven by dc to low frequency (LF: several tens of kHz), is often generated by using radio frequency of 13.56 MHz. Yet, the relationship between the plasma and its driving frequency has seldom been investigated. Hence, in this study, dependence of the atmospheric pressure corona plasma characteristics on the driving frequency was explored experimentally from LF to rf (5 kHz-13.56 MHz). The plasmas generated by the driving frequency under 2 MHz were cylindrical shape of several tens of millimeters long while the 13.56 MHz plasma is spherical and a few millimeters long. As the driving frequency was increased, the plasma length became shortened. At the lower driving frequencies (below 2 MHz), the plasmas existed as positive streamer and negative glow for each half period of the applied voltage, but the discharge was more continuous in time for the 13.56 MHz plasma. It was inferred from the measured I-V curves that the higher driving frequency induced higher discharge currents, and the gas temperature was increased as the driving frequency was increased.

  8. Clinical accuracy data presented as natural frequencies improve dentists' caries diagnostic inference: Evidence from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadanovsky, Paulo; Santos, Ana Paula Pires Dos; Lira-Junior, Ronaldo; Oliveira, Branca Heloisa de

    2018-01-01

    The authors assessed whether dentists' diagnostic inferences differ when test accuracy information is communicated using natural frequencies versus conditional probabilities. A parallel, randomized controlled trial with dentists was carried out in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The dentists received a question on the probability of a patient having interproximal caries, given a positive bite-wing radiograph. This question was asked using information that was formulated into either natural frequencies or conditional probabilities. Only 14 (13.9%) of the dentists gave the correct answer; 13 in the natural frequencies group, and 1 in the conditional probabilities group (P natural frequencies group and none in the conditional probabilities group (P = .005). Representing diagnostic test accuracy in natural frequencies substantially helped dentists make diagnostic inferences. Nearly twice as many dentists overestimated the presence of interproximal caries when given information in conditional probabilities. Our study findings show information shared using natural frequencies may be more accurately interpreted by dentists than that based on conditional probabilities. Patients will probably receive different standards of care depending on the format in which dentists receive diagnostic test accuracy information. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sub-populations of alcohol-dependent patients: differences in psychological functioning between high- and low-frequency alcohol consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltunen, A J; Koechling, U M; Voltaire-Carlsson, A; Borg, S

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the processes underlying relapse to drinking using objective biological validation of self-reported recent alcohol consumption, using the ratio of 5-hydroxytryptophol to 5-hydroxyindol-3-ylacetic acid (5-HTOL/5-HIAA), a new biological marker to detect single episodes of drinking, in a sample of 38 male alcohol-dependent patients (DSM-III-R) who were assessed prospectively in terms of their clinical symptomatology over a 6-month treatment period. Results showed that nearly all patients obtained positive 5-HTOL/5-HIAA samples during the course of treatment. However, upon closer inspection, results revealed a bimodal distribution for alcohol intake with high and low frequency of consumption episodes. Results showed that high frequency consumers obtained higher ratings of clinical symptoms as measured by the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale (CPRS) and by the St Göran's Semi-structured Interview (SGSI) compared to low frequency alcohol consumers on symptoms of inner tension, lack of initiative, risk of relapse (as rated by therapists and as rated by patients themselves), dysphoria, negative craving for alcohol, and positive craving for alcohol. The present results provided evidence for the existence of two sub-populations of alcoholics, those who have frequent lapses and those who have low frequency of sporadic lapses. Further, these two sub-populations were shown to differ with respect to overall psychological functioning, and craving for alcohol. In conclusion, the present findings have important treatment implications in that reliable identification of patients' consumption patterns using biological markers would allow for the design of individually tailored treatment needs.

  10. Building a good initial model for full-waveform inversion using frequency shift filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanchao; Wang, Shangxu; Yuan, Sanyi; Lian, Shijie

    2018-05-01

    Accurate initial model or available low-frequency data is an important factor in the success of full waveform inversion (FWI). The low-frequency helps determine the kinematical relevant components, low-wavenumber of the velocity model, which are in turn needed to avoid FWI trap in local minima or cycle-skipping. However, in the field, acquiring data that common point of low- and high-frequency signal, then utilize the high-frequency data to obtain the low-wavenumber velocity model. It is well known that the instantaneous amplitude envelope of a wavelet is invariant under frequency shift. This means that resolution is constant for a given frequency bandwidth, and independent of the actual values of the frequencies. Based on this property, we develop a frequency shift filter (FSF) to build the relationship between low- and high-frequency information with a constant frequency bandwidth. After that, we can use the high-frequency information to get a plausible recovery of the low-wavenumber velocity model. Numerical results using synthetic data from the Marmousi and layer model demonstrate that our proposed envelope misfit function based on the frequency shift filter can build an initial model with more accurate long-wavelength components, when low-frequency signals are absent in recorded data.

  11. Memory for past public events depends on retrieval frequency but not memory age in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stephan; Mychajliw, Christian; Hautzinger, Martin; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Saur, Ralf; Leyhe, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by retrograde memory deficits primarily caused by dysfunction of the hippocampal complex. Unresolved questions exist concerning the time course of hippocampal involvement in conscious recollection of declarative knowledge, as reports of temporal gradients of retrograde amnesia have been inconclusive. The aim of this study was to examine whether the extent and severity of retrograde amnesia is mediated by retrieval frequency or, in contrast, whether it depends on the age of the memory according to the assumptions of the main current theories of memory formation. We compared recall of past public events in patients with AD and healthy control (HC) individuals using the Historic Events Test (HET). The HET assesses knowledge about famous public events of the past 60 years divided into four time segments and consists of subjective memory rating, dating accuracy, and contextual memory tasks. Although memory for public events was impaired in AD patients, there was a strong effect of retrieval frequency across all time segments and both groups. As AD and HC groups derived similar benefits from greater retrieval frequency, cortical structures other than the hippocampal complex may mediate memory retrieval. These findings suggest that more frequently retrieved events and facts become more independent of the hippocampal complex and thus better protected against early damage of AD. This could explain why cognitive activity may delay the onset of memory decline in persons who develop AD.

  12. Perceptron learning rule derived from spike-frequency adaptation and spike-time-dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Prashanth; Liu, Shih-Chii; Hahnloser, Richard H R

    2010-03-09

    It is widely believed that sensory and motor processing in the brain is based on simple computational primitives rooted in cellular and synaptic physiology. However, many gaps remain in our understanding of the connections between neural computations and biophysical properties of neurons. Here, we show that synaptic spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP) combined with spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) in a single neuron together approximate the well-known perceptron learning rule. Our calculations and integrate-and-fire simulations reveal that delayed inputs to a neuron endowed with STDP and SFA precisely instruct neural responses to earlier arriving inputs. We demonstrate this mechanism on a developmental example of auditory map formation guided by visual inputs, as observed in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX) of barn owls. The interplay of SFA and STDP in model ICX neurons precisely transfers the tuning curve from the visual modality onto the auditory modality, demonstrating a useful computation for multimodal and sensory-guided processing.

  13. Similarity of Symbol Frequency Distributions with Heavy Tails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gerlach

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the similarity between symbolic sequences is a traditional problem in information theory which requires comparing the frequencies of symbols in different sequences. In numerous modern applications, ranging from DNA over music to texts, the distribution of symbol frequencies is characterized by heavy-tailed distributions (e.g., Zipf’s law. The large number of low-frequency symbols in these distributions poses major difficulties to the estimation of the similarity between sequences; e.g., they hinder an accurate finite-size estimation of entropies. Here, we show analytically how the systematic (bias and statistical (fluctuations errors in these estimations depend on the sample size N and on the exponent γ of the heavy-tailed distribution. Our results are valid for the Shannon entropy (α=1, its corresponding similarity measures (e.g., the Jensen-Shanon divergence, and also for measures based on the generalized entropy of order α. For small α’s, including α=1, the errors decay slower than the 1/N decay observed in short-tailed distributions. For α larger than a critical value α^{*}=1+1/γ≤2, the 1/N decay is recovered. We show the practical significance of our results by quantifying the evolution of the English language over the last two centuries using a complete α spectrum of measures. We find that frequent words change more slowly than less frequent words and that α=2 provides the most robust measure to quantify language change.

  14. Accurate Laser Measurements of the Water Vapor Self-Continuum Absorption in Four Near Infrared Atmospheric Windows. a Test of the MT_CKD Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campargue, Alain; Kassi, Samir; Mondelain, Didier; Romanini, Daniele; Lechevallier, Loïc; Vasilchenko, Semyon

    2017-06-01

    The semi empirical MT_CKD model of the absorption continuum of water vapor is widely used in atmospheric radiative transfer codes of the atmosphere of Earth and exoplanets but lacks of experimental validation in the atmospheric windows. Recent laboratory measurements by Fourier transform Spectroscopy have led to self-continuum cross-sections much larger than the MT_CKD values in the near infrared transparency windows. In the present work, we report on accurate water vapor absorption continuum measurements by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Optical-Feedback-Cavity Enhanced Laser Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) at selected spectral points of the transparency windows centered around 4.0, 2.1 and 1.25 μm. The temperature dependence of the absorption continuum at 4.38 μm and 3.32 μm is measured in the 23-39 °C range. The self-continuum water vapor absorption is derived either from the baseline variation of spectra recorded for a series of pressure values over a small spectral interval or from baseline monitoring at fixed laser frequency, during pressure ramps. In order to avoid possible bias approaching the water saturation pressure, the maximum pressure value was limited to about 16 Torr, corresponding to a 75% humidity rate. After subtraction of the local water monomer lines contribution, self-continuum cross-sections, C_{S}, were determined with a few % accuracy from the pressure squared dependence of the spectra base line level. Together with our previous CRDS and OF-CEAS measurements in the 2.1 and 1.6 μm windows, the derived water vapor self-continuum provides a unique set of water vapor self-continuum cross-sections for a test of the MT_CKD model in four transparency windows. Although showing some important deviations of the absolute values (up to a factor of 4 at the center of the 2.1 μm window), our accurate measurements validate the overall frequency dependence of the MT_CKD2.8 model.

  15. On variation of word frequencies in Russian literary texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargin, Vladislav

    2016-03-01

    We study the variation of word frequencies in Russian literary texts. Our findings indicate that the standard deviation of a word's frequency across texts depends on its average frequency according to a power law with exponent 1/2 volatility (that is, higher "burstiness"). A latent factor model has been estimated to investigate the structure of the word frequency distribution. The findings suggest that the dependence of a word's frequency volatility on its average frequency can be explained by the asymmetry in the distribution of latent factors.

  16. Digital timing: sampling frequency, anti-aliasing filter and signal interpolation filter dependence on timing resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sanghee; Grazioso, Ron; Zhang Nan; Aykac, Mehmet; Schmand, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    The main focus of our study is to investigate how the performance of digital timing methods is affected by sampling rate, anti-aliasing and signal interpolation filters. We used the Nyquist sampling theorem to address some basic questions such as what will be the minimum sampling frequencies? How accurate will the signal interpolation be? How do we validate the timing measurements? The preferred sampling rate would be as low as possible, considering the high cost and power consumption of high-speed analog-to-digital converters. However, when the sampling rate is too low, due to the aliasing effect, some artifacts are produced in the timing resolution estimations; the shape of the timing profile is distorted and the FWHM values of the profile fluctuate as the source location changes. Anti-aliasing filters are required in this case to avoid the artifacts, but the timing is degraded as a result. When the sampling rate is marginally over the Nyquist rate, a proper signal interpolation is important. A sharp roll-off (higher order) filter is required to separate the baseband signal from its replicates to avoid the aliasing, but in return the computation will be higher. We demonstrated the analysis through a digital timing study using fast LSO scintillation crystals as used in time-of-flight PET scanners. From the study, we observed that there is no significant timing resolution degradation down to 1.3 Ghz sampling frequency, and the computation requirement for the signal interpolation is reasonably low. A so-called sliding test is proposed as a validation tool checking constant timing resolution behavior of a given timing pick-off method regardless of the source location change. Lastly, the performance comparison for several digital timing methods is also shown.

  17. Sex-dependent alterations in resting-state cerebral blood flow, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and their coupling relationship in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaomei; Wang, Di; Zhou, Yujing; Zhuo, Chuanjun; Qin, Wen; Zhu, Jiajia; Yu, Chunshui

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate sex-dependent alterations in resting-state relative cerebral blood flow, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and relative cerebral blood flow-amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations coupling in patients with schizophrenia. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and three-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling imaging were performed to obtain resting-state amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and relative cerebral blood flow in 95 schizophrenia patients and 99 healthy controls. Sex differences in relative cerebral blood flow and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations were compared in both groups. Diagnostic group differences in relative cerebral blood flow, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and relative cerebral blood flow-amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations coupling were compared in male and female subjects, respectively. In both healthy controls and schizophrenia patients, the males had higher relative cerebral blood flow in anterior brain regions and lower relative cerebral blood flow in posterior brain regions than did the females. Compared with multiple regions exhibiting sex differences in relative cerebral blood flow, only the left middle frontal gyrus had a significant sex difference in amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations. In the females, schizophrenia patients exhibited increased relative cerebral blood flow and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the basal ganglia, thalamus and hippocampus and reduced relative cerebral blood flow and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the frontal, parietal and occipital regions compared with those of healthy controls. However, there were fewer brain regions with diagnostic group differences in the males than in the females. Brain regions with diagnostic group differences in relative cerebral blood flow and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations only partially overlapped. Only the female patients exhibited increased relative cerebral

  18. Increasing the productivity of glycopeptides analysis by using higher-energy collision dissociation-accurate mass-product-dependent electron transfer dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Julian; Dutta, Sucharita; Hemenway, Eric; Viner, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Currently, glycans are attracting attention from the scientific community as potential biomarkers or as posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of therapeutic proteins. However, structural characterization of glycoproteins and glycopeptides remains analytically challenging. Here, we report on the implementation of a novel acquisition strategy termed higher-energy collision dissociation-accurate mass-product-dependent electron transfer dissociation (HCD-PD-ETD) on a hybrid linear ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer. This acquisition strategy uses the complementary fragmentations of ETD and HCD for glycopeptides analysis in an intelligent fashion. Furthermore, the approach minimizes user input for optimizing instrumental parameters and enables straightforward detection of glycopeptides. ETD spectra are only acquired when glycan oxonium ions from MS/MS HCD are detected. The advantage of this approach is that it streamlines data analysis and improves dynamic range and duty cycle. Here, we present the benefits of HCD-PD-ETD relative to the traditional alternating HCD/ETD for a trainer set containing twelve-protein mixture with two glycoproteins: human serotransferrin, ovalbumin and contaminations of two other: bovine alpha 1 acid glycoprotein (bAGP) and bovine fetuin.

  19. An improved method for estimating the frequency correlation function

    KAUST Repository

    Chelli, Ali; Pä tzold, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    For time-invariant frequency-selective channels, the transfer function is a superposition of waves having different propagation delays and path gains. In order to estimate the frequency correlation function (FCF) of such channels, the frequency averaging technique can be utilized. The obtained FCF can be expressed as a sum of auto-terms (ATs) and cross-terms (CTs). The ATs are caused by the autocorrelation of individual path components. The CTs are due to the cross-correlation of different path components. These CTs have no physical meaning and leads to an estimation error. We propose a new estimation method aiming to improve the estimation accuracy of the FCF of a band-limited transfer function. The basic idea behind the proposed method is to introduce a kernel function aiming to reduce the CT effect, while preserving the ATs. In this way, we can improve the estimation of the FCF. The performance of the proposed method and the frequency averaging technique is analyzed using a synthetically generated transfer function. We show that the proposed method is more accurate than the frequency averaging technique. The accurate estimation of the FCF is crucial for the system design. In fact, we can determine the coherence bandwidth from the FCF. The exact knowledge of the coherence bandwidth is beneficial in both the design as well as optimization of frequency interleaving and pilot arrangement schemes. © 2012 IEEE.

  20. An improved method for estimating the frequency correlation function

    KAUST Repository

    Chelli, Ali

    2012-04-01

    For time-invariant frequency-selective channels, the transfer function is a superposition of waves having different propagation delays and path gains. In order to estimate the frequency correlation function (FCF) of such channels, the frequency averaging technique can be utilized. The obtained FCF can be expressed as a sum of auto-terms (ATs) and cross-terms (CTs). The ATs are caused by the autocorrelation of individual path components. The CTs are due to the cross-correlation of different path components. These CTs have no physical meaning and leads to an estimation error. We propose a new estimation method aiming to improve the estimation accuracy of the FCF of a band-limited transfer function. The basic idea behind the proposed method is to introduce a kernel function aiming to reduce the CT effect, while preserving the ATs. In this way, we can improve the estimation of the FCF. The performance of the proposed method and the frequency averaging technique is analyzed using a synthetically generated transfer function. We show that the proposed method is more accurate than the frequency averaging technique. The accurate estimation of the FCF is crucial for the system design. In fact, we can determine the coherence bandwidth from the FCF. The exact knowledge of the coherence bandwidth is beneficial in both the design as well as optimization of frequency interleaving and pilot arrangement schemes. © 2012 IEEE.

  1. Sibling genes as environment: Sibling dopamine genotypes and adolescent health support frequency dependent selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Emily; Conley, Dalton; Siegal, Mark L

    2015-11-01

    While research consistently suggests siblings matter for individual outcomes, it remains unclear why. At the same time, studies of genetic effects on health typically correlate variants of a gene with the average level of behavioral or health measures, ignoring more complicated genetic dynamics. Using National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data, we investigate whether sibling genes moderate individual genetic expression. We compare twin variation in health-related absences and self-rated health by genetic differences at three locations related to dopamine regulation and transport to test sibship-level cross-person gene-gene interactions. Results suggest effects of variation at these genetic locations are moderated by sibling genes. Although the mechanism remains unclear, this evidence is consistent with frequency dependent selection and suggests much genetic research may violate the stable unit treatment value assumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Can Low Frequency Measurements Be Good Enough? - A Statistical Assessment of Citizen Hydrology Streamflow Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, J. C.; Rutten, M.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrologic data has traditionally been collected with permanent installations of sophisticated and relatively accurate but expensive monitoring equipment at limited numbers of sites. Consequently, the spatial coverage of the data is limited and costs are high. Achieving adequate maintenance of sophisticated monitoring equipment often exceeds local technical and resource capacity, and permanently deployed monitoring equipment is susceptible to vandalism, theft, and other hazards. Rather than using expensive, vulnerable installations at a few points, SmartPhones4Water (S4W), a form of Citizen Hydrology, leverages widely available mobile technology to gather hydrologic data at many sites in a manner that is repeatable and scalable. However, there is currently a limited understanding of the impact of decreased observational frequency on the accuracy of key streamflow statistics like minimum flow, maximum flow, and runoff. As a first step towards evaluating the tradeoffs between traditional continuous monitoring approaches and emerging Citizen Hydrology methods, we randomly selected 50 active U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow gauges in California. We used historical 15 minute flow data from 01/01/2008 through 12/31/2014 to develop minimum flow, maximum flow, and runoff values (7 year total) for each gauge. In order to mimic lower frequency Citizen Hydrology observations, we developed a bootstrap randomized subsampling with replacement procedure. We calculated the same statistics, along with their respective distributions, from 50 subsample iterations with four different subsampling intervals (i.e. daily, three day, weekly, and monthly). Based on our results we conclude that, depending on the types of questions being asked, and the watershed characteristics, Citizen Hydrology streamflow measurements can provide useful and accurate information. Depending on watershed characteristics, minimum flows were reasonably estimated with subsample intervals ranging from

  3. Analysis of frequency-dependent series resistance and interface states of In/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si (MIS) structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkan Selcuk, A. [Department of Nuclear Electronics and Instrumentation, Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center, 06983 Saray, Ankara (Turkey); Tugluoglu, N. [Department of Nuclear Electronics and Instrumentation, Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center, 06983 Saray, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ntuglu@taek.gov.tr; Karadeniz, S.; Bilge Ocak, S. [Department of Nuclear Electronics and Instrumentation, Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center, 06983 Saray, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-11-15

    In this work, the investigation of the interface state density and series resistance from capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/{omega}-V) characteristics in In/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures with thin interfacial insulator layer have been reported. The thickness of SiO{sub 2} film obtained from the measurement of the oxide capacitance corrected for series resistance in the strong accumulation region is 220 A. The forward and reverse bias C-V and G/{omega}-V characteristics of MIS structures have been studied at the frequency range 30 kHz-1 MHz at room temperature. The frequency dispersion in capacitance and conductance can be interpreted in terms of the series resistance (R{sub s}) and interface state density (D{sub it}) values. Both the series resistance R{sub s} and density of interface states D{sub it} are strongly frequency-dependent and decrease with increasing frequency. The distribution profile of R{sub s}-V gives a peak at low frequencies in the depletion region and disappears with increasing frequency. Experimental results show that the interfacial polarization contributes to the improvement of the dielectric properties of In/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si MIS structures. The interface state density value of In/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si MIS diode calculated at strong accumulation region is 1.11x10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} at 1 MHz. It is found that the calculated value of D{sub it} ({approx}10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2}) is not high enough to pin the Fermi level of the Si substrate disrupting the device operation.

  4. Spatial frequency-dependent feedback of visual cortical area 21a modulating functional orientation column maps in areas 17 and 18 of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Luoxiu; Chen, Xin; Shou, Tiande

    2004-02-20

    The feedback effect of activity of area 21a on orientation maps of areas 17 and 18 was investigated in cats using intrinsic signal optical imaging. A spatial frequency-dependent decrease in response amplitude of orientation maps to grating stimuli was observed in areas 17 and 18 when area 21a was inactivated by local injection of GABA, or by a lesion induced by liquid nitrogen freezing. The decrease in response amplitude of orientation maps of areas 17 and 18 after the area 21a inactivation paralleled the normal response without the inactivation. Application in area 21a of bicuculline, a GABAa receptor antagonist caused an increase in response amplitude of orientation maps of area 17. The results indicate a positive feedback from high-order visual cortical area 21a to lower-order areas underlying a spatial frequency-dependent mechanism.

  5. Rapid Active Power Control of Photovoltaic Systems for Grid Frequency Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoke, Anderson; Shirazi, Mariko; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Muljadi, Eduard; Maksimovic, Dragan

    2017-01-01

    As deployment of power electronic coupled generation such as photovoltaic (PV) systems increases, grid operators have shown increasing interest in calling on inverter-coupled generation to help mitigate frequency contingency events by rapidly surging active power into the grid. When responding to contingency events, the faster the active power is provided, the more effective it may be for arresting the frequency event. This paper proposes a predictive PV inverter control method for very fast and accurate control of active power. This rapid active power control method will increase the effectiveness of various higher-level controls designed to mitigate grid frequency contingency events, including fast power-frequency droop, inertia emulation, and fast frequency response, without the need for energy storage. The rapid active power control method, coupled with a maximum power point estimation method, is implemented in a prototype PV inverter connected to a PV array. The prototype inverter's response to various frequency events is experimentally confirmed to be fast (beginning within 2 line cycles and completing within 4.5 line cycles of a severe test event) and accurate (below 2% steady-state error).

  6. Mental models accurately predict emotion transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Mark A; Tamir, Diana I

    2017-06-06

    Successful social interactions depend on people's ability to predict others' future actions and emotions. People possess many mechanisms for perceiving others' current emotional states, but how might they use this information to predict others' future states? We hypothesized that people might capitalize on an overlooked aspect of affective experience: current emotions predict future emotions. By attending to regularities in emotion transitions, perceivers might develop accurate mental models of others' emotional dynamics. People could then use these mental models of emotion transitions to predict others' future emotions from currently observable emotions. To test this hypothesis, studies 1-3 used data from three extant experience-sampling datasets to establish the actual rates of emotional transitions. We then collected three parallel datasets in which participants rated the transition likelihoods between the same set of emotions. Participants' ratings of emotion transitions predicted others' experienced transitional likelihoods with high accuracy. Study 4 demonstrated that four conceptual dimensions of mental state representation-valence, social impact, rationality, and human mind-inform participants' mental models. Study 5 used 2 million emotion reports on the Experience Project to replicate both of these findings: again people reported accurate models of emotion transitions, and these models were informed by the same four conceptual dimensions. Importantly, neither these conceptual dimensions nor holistic similarity could fully explain participants' accuracy, suggesting that their mental models contain accurate information about emotion dynamics above and beyond what might be predicted by static emotion knowledge alone.

  7. Mental models accurately predict emotion transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Mark A.; Tamir, Diana I.

    2017-01-01

    Successful social interactions depend on people’s ability to predict others’ future actions and emotions. People possess many mechanisms for perceiving others’ current emotional states, but how might they use this information to predict others’ future states? We hypothesized that people might capitalize on an overlooked aspect of affective experience: current emotions predict future emotions. By attending to regularities in emotion transitions, perceivers might develop accurate mental models of others’ emotional dynamics. People could then use these mental models of emotion transitions to predict others’ future emotions from currently observable emotions. To test this hypothesis, studies 1–3 used data from three extant experience-sampling datasets to establish the actual rates of emotional transitions. We then collected three parallel datasets in which participants rated the transition likelihoods between the same set of emotions. Participants’ ratings of emotion transitions predicted others’ experienced transitional likelihoods with high accuracy. Study 4 demonstrated that four conceptual dimensions of mental state representation—valence, social impact, rationality, and human mind—inform participants’ mental models. Study 5 used 2 million emotion reports on the Experience Project to replicate both of these findings: again people reported accurate models of emotion transitions, and these models were informed by the same four conceptual dimensions. Importantly, neither these conceptual dimensions nor holistic similarity could fully explain participants’ accuracy, suggesting that their mental models contain accurate information about emotion dynamics above and beyond what might be predicted by static emotion knowledge alone. PMID:28533373

  8. Information content in frequency-dependent, multi-offset GPR data for layered media reconstruction using full-wave inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coster, Albéric; Phuong Tran, Anh; Lambot, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    Water lost through leaks can represent high percentages of the total production in water supply systems and constitutes an important issue. Leak detection can be tackled with various techniques such as the ground-penetrating radar (GPR). Based on this technology, various procedures have been elaborated to characterize a leak and its evolution. In this study, we focus on a new full-wave radar modelling approach for near-field conditions, which takes into account the antenna effects as well as the interactions between the antenna(s) and the medium through frequency-dependent global transmission and reflection coefficients. This approach is applied to layered media for which 3-D Green's functions can be calculated. The model allows for a quantitative estimation of the properties of multilayered media by using full-wave inversion. This method, however, proves to be limited to provide users with an on-demand assessment as it is generally computationally demanding and time consuming, depending on the medium configuration as well as the number of unknown parameters to retrieve. In that respect, we propose two leads in order to enhance the parameter retrieval step. The first one consists in analyzing the impact of the reduction of the number of frequencies on the information content. For both numerical and laboratory experiments, this operation has been achieved by investigating the response surface topography of objective functions arising from the comparison between measured and modelled data. The second one involves the numerical implementation of multistatic antenna configurations with constant and variable offsets in the model. These two kinds of analyses are then combined in numerical experiments to observe the conjugated effect of the number of frequencies and the offset configuration. To perform the numerical analyses, synthetic Green's functions were simulated for different multilayered medium configurations. The results show that an antenna offset increase leads

  9. Laser generated ultrasound sources using polymer nanocomposites for high frequency metrology

    KAUST Repository

    Rajagopal, Srinath

    2017-11-22

    Accurate characterisation of ultrasound fields generated by diagnostic and therapeutic transducers is critical for patient safety. This requires hydrophones calibrated to a traceable standard. The existing implementation of the primary standard at the National Measurement Institutes, e.g., NPL and PTB, can provide accurate calibration to a maximum frequency of 40MHz. However, the increasing use of high frequencies for both imaging and therapy necessitates calibrations to frequencies well beyond this range. For this to be possible, a source of high amplitude, broadband, quasi-planar and stable ultrasound fields is required. This is difficult to achieve using conventional piezoelectric sources, but laser generated ultrasound is a promising technique in this regard. In this study various polymer-carbon nanotube nanocomposites (PNC) were fabricated and tested for their suitability for such an application.

  10. Pronounced low-frequency vibrational thermal transport in C60 fullerite realized through pressure-dependent molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2017-12-01

    Fullerene condensed-matter solids can possess thermal conductivities below their minimum glassy limit while theorized to be stiffer than diamond when crystallized under pressure. These seemingly disparate extremes in thermal and mechanical properties raise questions into the pressure dependence on the thermal conductivity of C60 fullerite crystals, and how the spectral contributions to vibrational thermal conductivity changes under applied pressure. To answer these questions, we investigate the effect of strain on the thermal conductivity of C60 fullerite crystals via pressure-dependent molecular dynamics simulations under the Green-Kubo formalism. We show that the thermal conductivity increases rapidly with compressive strain, which demonstrates a power-law relationship similar to their stress-strain relationship for the C60 crystals. Calculations of the density of states for the crystals under compressive strains reveal that the librational modes characteristic in the unstrained case are diminished due to densification of the molecular crystal. Over a large compression range (0-20 GPa), the Leibfried-Schlömann equation is shown to adequately describe the pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, suggesting that low-frequency intermolecular vibrations dictate heat flow in the C60 crystals. A spectral decomposition of the thermal conductivity supports this hypothesis.

  11. Novel Simplified Model for Asynchronous Machine with Consideration of Frequency Characteristic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changchun Cai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency characteristic of electric equipment should be considered in the digital simulation of power systems. The traditional asynchronous machine third-order transient model excludes not only the stator transient but also the frequency characteristics, thus decreasing the application sphere of the model and resulting in a large error under some special conditions. Based on the physical equivalent circuit and Park model for asynchronous machines, this study proposes a novel asynchronous third-order transient machine model with consideration of the frequency characteristic. In the new definitions of variables, the voltages behind the reactance are redefined as the linear equation of flux linkage. In this way, the rotor voltage equation is not associated with the derivative terms of frequency. However, the derivative terms of frequency should not always be ignored in the application of the traditional third-order transient model. Compared with the traditional third-order transient model, the novel simplified third-order transient model with consideration of the frequency characteristic is more accurate without increasing the order and complexity. Simulation results show that the novel third-order transient model for the asynchronous machine is suitable and effective and is more accurate than the widely used traditional simplified third-order transient model under some special conditions with drastic frequency fluctuations.

  12. On the low frequency characteristics of head-related transfer function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Bosun

    2009-01-01

    A method to correct the measured head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) at low frequency was proposed. By analyzing the HRTFs from the spherical head model at low frequency, it is proved that below the frequency of 400 Hz, magnitude of HRTF is nearly constant and the phase is a linear function of frequency both for the far and near field. Therefore, if the HRTFs above 400 Hz are accurately measured by experiment, it is able to correct the HRTFs at low frequency by the theoretical model. The results of calculation and subjective experiment show that the feasibility of the proposed method.

  13. Frequency of 5+/4+ drinks as a screener for drug use and drug-use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Deborah A; Compton, Wilson M; Grant, Bridget F

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to test the ability of a question on frequency of drinking 5+ (for men) or 4+ (for women) drinks to screen for drug use and drug-use disorders (DUDs) in a general population sample. Using data collected in 2001-2002 from a representative U.S. adult population sample (N= 43,093), including a subsample of those with past-year emergency-department use (n = 8,525), past-year frequency of drinking 5+/4+ drinks was evaluated as a screener for drug use and DUDs for four categories of illicit drugs. Sensitivities and specificities of the 5+/4+ drinks screener were 72.4% and 76.6% for any drug dependence, 71.9% and 77.3% for any DUD, and 63.3% and 78.9% for any drug use in the general population. Sensitivities and specificities were higher for marijuana and cocaine/crack and lowest for illicit prescription drugs. Optimal screening cut-points were once a month or more for cocaine/crack dependence, either once or more a month or seven or more times a year for cocaine/crack DUDs, seven or more times a year for cocaine/crack use, and once or more a year for the other drug use and DUD measures. Sensitivity and specificity were similar among adults who had visited an emergency department in the past year, and the optimal screening cutpoints were identical. Past-year frequency of drinking 5+/4+ drinks was quite accurate as a screener for past-year marijuana and cocaine/crack use and DUDs, but it was less accurate for illicit prescription drug use and DUDs. Its drug-screening potential can be thought of as "added value" from an item already likely to be asked in the interest of detecting problem drinking. Future work may consider using the alcohol consumption screener as a starting point, with follow-up questions to assess illicit drug use among those who screen positive.

  14. The effects of high-frequency oscillations in hippocampal electrical activities on the classification of epileptiform events using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Alan W. L.; Jahromi, Shokrollah S.; Khosravani, Houman; Carlen, Peter L.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2006-03-01

    The existence of hippocampal high-frequency electrical activities (greater than 100 Hz) during the progression of seizure episodes in both human and animal experimental models of epilepsy has been well documented (Bragin A, Engel J, Wilson C L, Fried I and Buzsáki G 1999 Hippocampus 9 137-42 Khosravani H, Pinnegar C R, Mitchell J R, Bardakjian B L, Federico P and Carlen P L 2005 Epilepsia 46 1-10). However, this information has not been studied between successive seizure episodes or utilized in the application of seizure classification. In this study, we examine the dynamical changes of an in vitro low Mg2+ rat hippocampal slice model of epilepsy at different frequency bands using wavelet transforms and artificial neural networks. By dividing the time-frequency spectrum of each seizure-like event (SLE) into frequency bins, we can analyze their burst-to-burst variations within individual SLEs as well as between successive SLE episodes. Wavelet energy and wavelet entropy are estimated for intracellular and extracellular electrical recordings using sufficiently high sampling rates (10 kHz). We demonstrate that the activities of high-frequency oscillations in the 100-400 Hz range increase as the slice approaches SLE onsets and in later episodes of SLEs. Utilizing the time-dependent relationship between different frequency bands, we can achieve frequency-dependent state classification. We demonstrate that activities in the frequency range 100-400 Hz are critical for the accurate classification of the different states of electrographic seizure-like episodes (containing interictal, preictal and ictal states) in brain slices undergoing recurrent spontaneous SLEs. While preictal activities can be classified with an average accuracy of 77.4 ± 6.7% utilizing the frequency spectrum in the range 0-400 Hz, we can also achieve a similar level of accuracy by using a nonlinear relationship between 100-400 Hz and <4 Hz frequency bands only.

  15. An Estimation Method for number of carrier frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Peng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method that utilizes AR model power spectrum estimation based on Burg algorithm to estimate the number of carrier frequency in single pulse. In the modern electronic and information warfare, the pulse signal form of radar is complex and changeable, among which single pulse with multi-carrier frequencies is the most typical one, such as the frequency shift keying (FSK signal, the frequency shift keying with linear frequency (FSK-LFM hybrid modulation signal and the frequency shift keying with bi-phase shift keying (FSK-BPSK hybrid modulation signal. In view of this kind of single pulse which has multi-carrier frequencies, this paper adopts a method which transforms the complex signal into AR model, then takes power spectrum based on Burg algorithm to show the effect. Experimental results show that the estimation method still can determine the number of carrier frequencies accurately even when the signal noise ratio (SNR is very low.

  16. Importance of frequency dependent magnetoresistance measurements in analysing the intrinsicality of magnetodielectric effect: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Hari Mohan; Saxena, Shailendra K.; Mishra, Vikash; Kumar, Rajesh; Sagdeo, P. R.

    2017-08-01

    Magnetodielectric (MD) materials have attracted considerable attention due to their intriguing physics and potential future applications. However, the intrinsicality of the MD effect is always a major concern in such materials as the MD effect may arise also due to the MR (magnetoresistance) effect. In the present case study, we report an experimental approach to analyse and separate the intrinsic and MR dominated contributions of the MD phenomenon. For this purpose, polycrystalline samples of LaGa1-xAxO3 (A = Mn/Fe) have been prepared by solid state reaction method. The purity of their structural phase (orthorhombic) has been validated by refining the X-ray diffraction data. The RTMD (room temperature MD) response has been recorded over a frequency range of 20 Hz to 10 MHz. In order to analyse the intrinsicality of the MD effect, FDMR (frequency dependent MR) by means of IS (impedance spectroscopy) and dc MR measurements in four probe geometry have been carried out at RT. A significant RTMD effect has been observed in selected Mn/Fe doped LaGaO3 (LGO) compositions. The mechanism of MR free/intrinsic MD effect, observed in Mn/Fe doped LGO, has been understood speculatively in terms of modified cell volume associated with the reorientation/retransformation of spin-coupled Mn/Fe orbitals due to the application of magnetic field. The present analysis suggests that in order to justify the intrinsic/resistive origin of the MD phenomenon, FDMR measurements are more useful than measuring only dc MR or analysing the trends of magnetic field dependent change in the dielectric constant and tanδ. On the basis of the present case study, we propose that IS (FDMR) alone can be used as an effective experimental tool to detect and analyse the resistive and intrinsic parts contributing to the MD phenomenon.

  17. Precise Aperture-Dependent Motion Compensation with Frequency Domain Fast Back-Projection Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Precise azimuth-variant motion compensation (MOCO is an essential and difficult task for high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR imagery. In conventional post-filtering approaches, residual azimuth-variant motion errors are generally compensated through a set of spatial post-filters, where the coarse-focused image is segmented into overlapped blocks concerning the azimuth-dependent residual errors. However, image domain post-filtering approaches, such as precise topography- and aperture-dependent motion compensation algorithm (PTA, have difficulty of robustness in declining, when strong motion errors are involved in the coarse-focused image. In this case, in order to capture the complete motion blurring function within each image block, both the block size and the overlapped part need necessary extension leading to degeneration of efficiency and robustness inevitably. Herein, a frequency domain fast back-projection algorithm (FDFBPA is introduced to deal with strong azimuth-variant motion errors. FDFBPA disposes of the azimuth-variant motion errors based on a precise azimuth spectrum expression in the azimuth wavenumber domain. First, a wavenumber domain sub-aperture processing strategy is introduced to accelerate computation. After that, the azimuth wavenumber spectrum is partitioned into a set of wavenumber blocks, and each block is formed into a sub-aperture coarse resolution image via the back-projection integral. Then, the sub-aperture images are straightforwardly fused together in azimuth wavenumber domain to obtain a full resolution image. Moreover, chirp-Z transform (CZT is also introduced to implement the sub-aperture back-projection integral, increasing the efficiency of the algorithm. By disusing the image domain post-filtering strategy, robustness of the proposed algorithm is improved. Both simulation and real-measured data experiments demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposal.

  18. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Barnard, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α 2 ≃ 2α 1

  19. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyunjo, E-mail: hjjeong@wku.ac.kr [Division of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing [School of Traffic and Transportation Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410075 (China); Barnard, Dan [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α{sub 2} ≃ 2α{sub 1}.

  20. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Barnard, Dan; Li, Xiongbing

    2015-09-01

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α2 ≃ 2α1.

  1. Low-threshold mechanoreceptors play a frequency-dependent dual role in subjective ratings of mechanical allodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löken, Line S; Duff, Eugene P; Tracey, Irene

    2017-12-01

    In the setting of injury, myelinated primary afferent fibers that normally signal light touch are thought to switch modality and instead signal pain. In the absence of injury, touch is perceived as more intense when firing rates of Aβ afferents increase. However, it is not known if varying the firing rates of Aβ afferents have any consequence to the perception of dynamic mechanical allodynia (DMA). We hypothesized that, in the setting of injury, the unpleasantness of DMA would be intensified as the firing rates of Aβ afferents increase. Using a stimulus-response protocol established in normal skin, where an increase in brush velocity results in an increase of Aβ afferent firing rates, we tested if brush velocity modulated the unpleasantness of capsaicin-induced DMA. We analyzed how changes in estimated low-threshold mechanoreceptor firing activity influenced perception and brain activity (functional MRI) of DMA. Brushing on normal skin was perceived as pleasant, but brushing on sensitized skin produced both painful and pleasant sensations. Surprisingly, there was an inverse relationship between Aβ firing rates and unpleasantness such that brush stimuli that produced low firing rates were most painful and those that elicited high firing rates were rated as pleasant. Concurrently to this, we found increased cortical activity in response to low Aβ firing rates in regions previously implicated in pain processing during brushing of sensitized skin, but not normal skin. We suggest that Aβ signals do not merely switch modality to signal pain during injury. Instead, they exert a high- and low-frequency-dependent dual role in the injured state, with respectively both pleasant and unpleasant consequences. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We suggest that Aβ signals do not simply switch modality to signal pain during injury but play a frequency-dependent and dual role in the injured state with both pleasant and unpleasant consequences. These results provide a framework to resolve the

  2. Critical frequencies of the ionospheric F1 and F2 layers during the last four solar cycles: Sunspot group type dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiǧit, Erdal; Kilcik, Ali; Elias, Ana Georgina; Dönmez, Burçin; Ozguc, Atila; Yurchshyn, Vasyl; Rozelot, Jean-Pierre

    2018-06-01

    The long term solar activity dependencies of ionospheric F1 and F2 regions' critical frequencies (f0F1 and f0F2) are analyzed for the last four solar cycles (1976-2015). We show that the ionospheric F1 and F2 regions have different solar activity dependencies in terms of the sunspot group (SG) numbers: F1 region critical frequency (f0F1) peaks at the same time with the small SG numbers, while the f0F2 reaches its maximum at the same time with the large SG numbers, especially during the solar cycle 23. The observed differences in the sensitivity of ionospheric critical frequencies to sunspot group (SG) numbers provide a new insight into the solar activity effects on the ionosphere and space weather. While the F1 layer is influenced by the slow solar wind, which is largely associated with small SGs, the ionospheric F2 layer is more sensitive to Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and fast solar winds, which are mainly produced by large SGs and coronal holes. The SG numbers maximize during of peak of the solar cycle and the number of coronal holes peaks during the sunspot declining phase. During solar minimum there are relatively less large SGs, hence reduced CME and flare activity. These results provide a new perspective for assessing how the different regions of the ionosphere respond to space weather effects.

  3. Polarized Line Formation in Arbitrary Strength Magnetic Fields Angle-averaged and Angle-dependent Partial Frequency Redistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampoorna, M.; Nagendra, K. N. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560 034 (India); Stenflo, J. O., E-mail: sampoorna@iiap.res.in, E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in, E-mail: stenflo@astro.phys.ethz.ch [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere leave their fingerprints in the polarized spectrum of the Sun via the Hanle and Zeeman effects. While the Hanle and Zeeman effects dominate, respectively, in the weak and strong field regimes, both these effects jointly operate in the intermediate field strength regime. Therefore, it is necessary to solve the polarized line transfer equation, including the combined influence of Hanle and Zeeman effects. Furthermore, it is required to take into account the effects of partial frequency redistribution (PRD) in scattering when dealing with strong chromospheric lines with broad damping wings. In this paper, we present a numerical method to solve the problem of polarized PRD line formation in magnetic fields of arbitrary strength and orientation. This numerical method is based on the concept of operator perturbation. For our studies, we consider a two-level atom model without hyperfine structure and lower-level polarization. We compare the PRD idealization of angle-averaged Hanle–Zeeman redistribution matrices with the full treatment of angle-dependent PRD, to indicate when the idealized treatment is inadequate and what kind of polarization effects are specific to angle-dependent PRD. Because the angle-dependent treatment is presently computationally prohibitive when applied to realistic model atmospheres, we present the computed emergent Stokes profiles for a range of magnetic fields, with the assumption of an isothermal one-dimensional medium.

  4. Frequency Dependent Losses in Transmission Cable Conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Holbøll, Joachim; Guðmundsdóttir, Unnur Stella

    2011-01-01

    , such as thermal conditions in and around the cable, as well as the heat generated in conductors, screens, armours etc., taking into account proximity and skin effects. The work performed and presented in this paper is concerned with an improved determination of the losses generated in the conductor, by means...... of better calculation of the AC resistance of transmission cable conductors, in particular regarding higher frequencies. In this way, also losses under harmonics can be covered. Furthermore, the model is suitable for modelling of transient attenuation in high voltage cables. The AC resistance is calculated...... based on the current density distribution in different conductor designs by means of the Finite Element Method (FEM). The obtained results and methods are compared to available standards (IEC publication 60287-1-1)....

  5. The many places of frequency: evidence for a novel locus of the lexical frequency effect in word production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobel, Mark; Finkbeiner, Matthew; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2008-03-01

    The effect of lexical frequency on language-processing tasks is exceptionally reliable. For example, pictures with higher frequency names are named faster and more accurately than those with lower frequency names. Experiments with normal participants and patients strongly suggest that this production effect arises at the level of lexical access. Further work has suggested that within lexical access this effect arises at the level of lexical representations. Here we present patient E.C. who shows an effect of lexical frequency on his nonword error rate. The best explanation of his performance is that there is an additional locus of frequency at the interface of lexical and segmental representational levels. We confirm this hypothesis by showing that only computational models with frequency at this new locus can produce a similar error pattern to that of patient E.C. Finally, in an analysis of a large group of Italian patients, we show that there exist patients who replicate E.C.'s pattern of results and others who show the complementary pattern of frequency effects on semantic error rates. Our results combined with previous findings suggest that frequency plays a role throughout the process of lexical access.

  6. Linear response at the 4-component relativistic density-functional level: application to the frequency-dependent dipole polarizability of Hg, AuH and PtH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salek, Pawel; Helgaker, Trygve; Saue, Trond

    2005-01-01

    We report the implementation and application of linear response density-functional theory (DFT) based on the 4-component relativistic Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian. The theory is cast in the language of second quantization and is based on the quasienergy formalism (Floquet theory), replacing the initial state dependence of the Runge-Gross theorem by periodic boundary conditions. Contradictions in causality and symmetry of the time arguments are thereby avoided and the exchange-correlation potential and kernel can be expressed as functional derivatives of the quasienergy. We critically review the derivation of the quasienergy analogues of the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem and the Kohn-Sham formalism and discuss the nature of the quasienergy exchange-correlation functional. Structure is imposed on the response equations in terms of Hermiticity and time-reversal symmetry. It is observed that functionals of spin and current densities, corresponding to time-antisymmetric operators, contribute to frequency-dependent and not static electric properties. Physically, this follows from the fact that only a time-dependent electric field creates a magnetic field. It is furthermore observed that hybrid functionals enhance spin polarization since only exact exchange contributes to anti-Hermitian trial vectors. We apply 4-component relativistic linear response DFT to the calculation of the frequency-dependent polarizability of the isoelectronic series Hg, AuH and PtH 2 . Unlike for the molecules, the effect of electron correlation on the polarizability of the mercury atom is very large, about 25%. We observe a remarkable performance of the local-density approximation (LDA) functional in reproducing the experimental frequency-dependent polarizability of this atom, clearly superior to that of the BLYP and B3LYP functionals. This allows us to extract Cauchy moments (S(-4) = 382.82 and S(-6) = 6090.89 a.u.) that we believe are superior to experiment since we go to higher order in the Cauchy

  7. Frequency-dependent complex modulus at the glass transition in Pd40Ni10Cu30P20 bulk amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.L.; Li, Y.; Feng, Y.P.; Carter, W.C.

    2003-01-01

    We report frequency-dependent measurements of the dynamic elastic modulus of a Pd 40 Cu 30 Ni 10 P 20 bulk amorphous phase near its glass transition temperature. The storage and loss moduli exhibit a structural relaxation similar to those observed by other characterization techniques. Parameters obtained by fitting to the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation and the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts model exhibit similar behaviors to those other methods

  8. Memory for frequency of hearing popular songs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, J R; Zechmeister, E B; Shaughnessy, J J

    1988-01-01

    In two experiments college students were asked to provide situational frequency estimates of 10-s excerpts from rock songs. In both experiments familiarity of the musical selections heard one, two, three, or four times was varied. In Experiment 2 the nature of instructions given to subjects prior to presentation of the musical excerpts was also manipulated. Across both experiments subjects' estimates were less accurate for unfamiliar than for familiar rock music. In Experiment 2 instructions to remember frequency, as well as general memory instructions, resulted in better memory for presentation frequency than did instructions to "ignore" music while working on math problems. Memory for situational frequency was also related to knowledge of rock music as defined by subjects' ability to identify the titles and artists of the presented songs. The present pattern of results with popular music is viewed as similar to that obtained in experiments investigating memory for frequency of verbal stimuli. Although providing support for an automatic processing view of frequency encoding, the results also implicate meaningful elaboration of stimuli as an important determinant of memory for frequency of events.

  9. Immersion angle dependence of the resonant-frequency shift of the quartz crystal microbalance in a liquid: effects of longitudinal wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Minoru; Kobirata, Satoshi; Aizawa, Hideo; Kurosawa, Shigeru

    2007-06-19

    We investigated the effects of the longitudinal wave on the immersion angle dependence of the resonant-frequency shift, deltaF, of the quartz crystal microbalance, QCM. In order to study exactly the effects, we employed the three types of cells: normal cell, cell with the glass beads and cell with sponge. The longitudinal wave exists in the normal cell. On the other hand, both the cell with the glass beads and the cell with sponge eliminate the longitudinal wave. As results, we have found that the tendencies of deltaF are the same in the three types of cells. That is, we conclude that the longitudinal wave does not have effects on the immersion angle dependence of deltaF.

  10. Spurious results from Fourier analysis of data with closely spaced frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loumos, G.L.; Deeming, T.J.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown how erroneous results can occur using some period-finding methods, such as Fourier analysis, on data containing closely spaced frequencies. The frequency spacing accurately resolvable with data of length T is increased from the standard value of about 1/T quoted in the literature to approximately 1.5/T. (Auth.)

  11. Spectral element method for elastic and acoustic waves in frequency domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Linlin; Zhou, Yuanguo; Wang, Jia-Min; Zhuang, Mingwei [Institute of Electromagnetics and Acoustics, and Department of Electronic Science, Xiamen, 361005 (China); Liu, Na, E-mail: liuna@xmu.edu.cn [Institute of Electromagnetics and Acoustics, and Department of Electronic Science, Xiamen, 361005 (China); Liu, Qing Huo, E-mail: qhliu@duke.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Numerical techniques in time domain are widespread in seismic and acoustic modeling. In some applications, however, frequency-domain techniques can be advantageous over the time-domain approach when narrow band results are desired, especially if multiple sources can be handled more conveniently in the frequency domain. Moreover, the medium attenuation effects can be more accurately and conveniently modeled in the frequency domain. In this paper, we present a spectral-element method (SEM) in frequency domain to simulate elastic and acoustic waves in anisotropic, heterogeneous, and lossy media. The SEM is based upon the finite-element framework and has exponential convergence because of the use of GLL basis functions. The anisotropic perfectly matched layer is employed to truncate the boundary for unbounded problems. Compared with the conventional finite-element method, the number of unknowns in the SEM is significantly reduced, and higher order accuracy is obtained due to its spectral accuracy. To account for the acoustic-solid interaction, the domain decomposition method (DDM) based upon the discontinuous Galerkin spectral-element method is proposed. Numerical experiments show the proposed method can be an efficient alternative for accurate calculation of elastic and acoustic waves in frequency domain.

  12. Planck early results. VI. The High Frequency Instrument data processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colley, J.-M.; Bartlett, J.G.; Bucher, M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the processing of the 336 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (HFI) which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 295 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545...... and 857 GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.9 to 4.4′. The white noise level is around 1.5 μK degree or less in the 3 main CMB channels (100-217 GHz). The photometric accuracy is better than 2% at frequencies between 100 and 353 GHz and around 7% at the two highest frequencies. The maps created...... by the HFI Data Processing Centre reach our goals in terms of sensitivity, resolution, and photometric accuracy. They are already sufficiently accurate and well-characterised to allow scientific analyses which are presented in an accompanying series of early papers. At this stage, HFI data appears...

  13. Towards a scalable and accurate quantum approach for describing vibrations of molecule–metal interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Benoit

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical framework for the computation of anharmonic vibrational frequencies for large systems, with a particular focus on determining adsorbate frequencies from first principles. We give a detailed account of our local implementation of the vibrational self-consistent field approach and its correlation corrections. We show that our approach is both robust, accurate and can be easily deployed on computational grids in order to provide an efficient computational tool. We also present results on the vibrational spectrum of hydrogen fluoride on pyrene, on the thiophene molecule in the gas phase, and on small neutral gold clusters.

  14. Feasibility of automotive radar at frequencies beyond 100 GHz

    OpenAIRE

    Köhler, Mike; Hasch, Jürgen; Blöcher, Hans Ludwig; Schmidt, Lorenz-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Radar sensors are used widely in modern driver assistance systems. Available sensors nowadays often operate in the 77 GHz band and can accurately provide distance, velocity, and angle information about remote objects. Increasing the operation frequency allows improving the angular resolution and accuracy. In this paper, the technical feasibility to move the operation frequency beyond 100 GHz is discussed, by investigating dielectric properties of radome materials, the attenuation of rain and ...

  15. The nitrogen acceptor in 2H-Polytype synthetic MoS2. Frequency and temperature dependent ESR analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenaers, Ben; Stesmans, Andre; Afanas'ev, Valery V.

    2017-01-01

    In extending on recent electron spin resonance (ESR) work which has revealed the N acceptor (N substituting for S site) in 2H-polytype bulk synthetic MoS 2 , the dopant is extensively analyzed in terms of its frequency, temperature (T), and magnetic field B angular dependent ESR spectral characteristics. For B parallel c-axis, the multi-frequency analysis confirms the ESR spectrum as being composed of a 14 N hyperfine (hf) triplet with hf splitting constant A parallel = 14.7 ± 0.2 G (B parallel c-axis) and making up ∼74% of the total spectrum intensity, superimposed on a central line centered at about equal g-value [g parallel = 2.032(2)]. The presence of the latter signal, points to some non-uniformity in dopant distribution, that is, clustering, with about ∼26% of the total N response not originating from N incorporated in the preferred ''isolated'' dopant configuration. Angular dependent measurements reveal distinct anisotropy of the hf matrix, whereas ESR probing over a wide T-range exposes drastic signal broadening with increasing T above ∼150 K. Detailed study of the N acceptor signal intensity versus T at Q-band reveals an activation energy E a = 50 ± 10 meV, herewith consolidating the value reported initially. Besides unveiling the S-site substitutional N impurity as an appropriate p-type dopant for MoS 2 , the total of the ESR work establishes a basic frame of the N acceptor ESR characteristics, giving way for further in-depth theoretical perusal. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Multiple frequency ECH (MFECH) in SM-1 and STM-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazar, N.; Barter, J.; Dandl, R.; DiVergilio, W.; Quon, B.; Wuerker, R.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma properties were studied in a simple mirror (SM-1) and a five-cell axisymmetric tandem mirror (STM-1) using multiple frequency ECH. The cold plasma properties depend predominantly on total power but the efficiency for producing the diamagnetic ring plasma depends critically on heating with multiple frequencies. The effects of frequency separation of the heating sources will be demonstrated. Noise fluctuations in the axial current are suppressed with increasing ring-β, but the observed frequency spectrum are not well understood. Annulus β in the multiple mirror is also dependent on MFECH. Plans for and experiments in the new facility will be described

  17. Frequencies of inaudible high-frequency sounds differentially affect brain activity: positive and negative hypersonic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariko Fukushima

    Full Text Available The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10-13 Hz of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG, which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC. When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect, while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect. These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC.

  18. Frequencies of inaudible high-frequency sounds differentially affect brain activity: positive and negative hypersonic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Ariko; Yagi, Reiko; Kawai, Norie; Honda, Manabu; Nishina, Emi; Oohashi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs) above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz) activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz) of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz) to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10-13 Hz) of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG), which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC). When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect), while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect). These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC.

  19. Can blind persons accurately assess body size from the voice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanski, Katarzyna; Oleszkiewicz, Anna; Sorokowska, Agnieszka

    2016-04-01

    Vocal tract resonances provide reliable information about a speaker's body size that human listeners use for biosocial judgements as well as speech recognition. Although humans can accurately assess men's relative body size from the voice alone, how this ability is acquired remains unknown. In this study, we test the prediction that accurate voice-based size estimation is possible without prior audiovisual experience linking low frequencies to large bodies. Ninety-one healthy congenitally or early blind, late blind and sighted adults (aged 20-65) participated in the study. On the basis of vowel sounds alone, participants assessed the relative body sizes of male pairs of varying heights. Accuracy of voice-based body size assessments significantly exceeded chance and did not differ among participants who were sighted, or congenitally blind or who had lost their sight later in life. Accuracy increased significantly with relative differences in physical height between men, suggesting that both blind and sighted participants used reliable vocal cues to size (i.e. vocal tract resonances). Our findings demonstrate that prior visual experience is not necessary for accurate body size estimation. This capacity, integral to both nonverbal communication and speech perception, may be present at birth or may generalize from broader cross-modal correspondences. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. How accurately can 21cm tomography constrain cosmology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yi; Tegmark, Max; McQuinn, Matthew; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Zahn, Oliver

    2008-07-01

    There is growing interest in using 3-dimensional neutral hydrogen mapping with the redshifted 21 cm line as a cosmological probe. However, its utility depends on many assumptions. To aid experimental planning and design, we quantify how the precision with which cosmological parameters can be measured depends on a broad range of assumptions, focusing on the 21 cm signal from 6noise, to uncertainties in the reionization history, and to the level of contamination from astrophysical foregrounds. We derive simple analytic estimates for how various assumptions affect an experiment’s sensitivity, and we find that the modeling of reionization is the most important, followed by the array layout. We present an accurate yet robust method for measuring cosmological parameters that exploits the fact that the ionization power spectra are rather smooth functions that can be accurately fit by 7 phenomenological parameters. We find that for future experiments, marginalizing over these nuisance parameters may provide constraints almost as tight on the cosmology as if 21 cm tomography measured the matter power spectrum directly. A future square kilometer array optimized for 21 cm tomography could improve the sensitivity to spatial curvature and neutrino masses by up to 2 orders of magnitude, to ΔΩk≈0.0002 and Δmν≈0.007eV, and give a 4σ detection of the spectral index running predicted by the simplest inflation models.

  1. Investigation of a frequency dependent transfer function and its application to control rod localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garis, N.S.; Pazsit, I.

    1997-02-01

    Control rod vibrations can be detected via the fluctuations they generate in the neutron flux, i.e. the neutron noise. In a previous paper, a neural network-based algorithm for locating a vibrating control rod from the measured neutron noise was developed. The transfer function used for the core model was based on the so called power-reactor approximation resulting in a simple, real-valued solution which means that the phase delay of the signal propagation is neglected. In the present work a more realistic transfer function is used, without the approximations of the previous model. The transfer function is calculated from the Fourier transformed diffusion equation with a complex, frequency dependent buckling leading to a complex solution. In physical terms, this means that the phase delay of the signal propagation is accounted for. Using such a complex core model, the present paper investigates the effectiveness of applying neural networks for control rod localisation. 7 refs, 4 figs

  2. Computational fluid dynamics and frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method coupling for the interaction between microwaves and plasma in rocket plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinefuchi, K.; Funaki, I.; Shimada, T.; Abe, T.

    2012-01-01

    Under certain conditions during rocket flights, ionized exhaust plumes from solid rocket motors may interfere with radio frequency transmissions. To understand the relevant physical processes involved in this phenomenon and establish a prediction process for in-flight attenuation levels, we attempted to measure microwave attenuation caused by rocket exhaust plumes in a sea-level static firing test for a full-scale solid propellant rocket motor. The microwave attenuation level was calculated by a coupling simulation of the inviscid-frozen-flow computational fluid dynamics of an exhaust plume and detailed analysis of microwave transmissions by applying a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method with the Drude dispersion model. The calculated microwave attenuation level agreed well with the experimental results, except in the case of interference downstream the Mach disk in the exhaust plume. It was concluded that the coupling estimation method based on the physics of the frozen plasma flow with Drude dispersion would be suitable for actual flight conditions, although the mixing and afterburning in the plume should be considered depending on the flow condition.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics and frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method coupling for the interaction between microwaves and plasma in rocket plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinefuchi, K. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Funaki, I.; Shimada, T.; Abe, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    Under certain conditions during rocket flights, ionized exhaust plumes from solid rocket motors may interfere with radio frequency transmissions. To understand the relevant physical processes involved in this phenomenon and establish a prediction process for in-flight attenuation levels, we attempted to measure microwave attenuation caused by rocket exhaust plumes in a sea-level static firing test for a full-scale solid propellant rocket motor. The microwave attenuation level was calculated by a coupling simulation of the inviscid-frozen-flow computational fluid dynamics of an exhaust plume and detailed analysis of microwave transmissions by applying a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method with the Drude dispersion model. The calculated microwave attenuation level agreed well with the experimental results, except in the case of interference downstream the Mach disk in the exhaust plume. It was concluded that the coupling estimation method based on the physics of the frozen plasma flow with Drude dispersion would be suitable for actual flight conditions, although the mixing and afterburning in the plume should be considered depending on the flow condition.

  4. Implementation of PLL and FLL trackers for signals with high harmonic content and low sampling frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathe, Laszlo; Iov, Florin; Sera, Dezso

    2014-01-01

    The accurate tracking of phase, frequency, and amplitude of different frequency components from a measured signal is an essential requirement for many digitally controlled equipment. The accurate and robust tracking of a frequency component from a complex signal was successfully applied for example...... in: grid connected inverters, sensorless motor control for rotor position estimation, grid voltage monitoring for ac-dc converters etc. Usually, the design of such trackers is done in continuous time domain. The discretization introduces errors which change the performance, especially when the input...... signal is rich in harmonics and the sampling frequency is close to the tracked frequency component. In this paper different discretization methods and implementation issues, such as Tustin, Backward-Forward Euler, are discussed and compared. A special case is analyzed, when the input signal is reach...

  5. Multivariate hydrological frequency analysis for extreme events using Archimedean copula. Case study: Lower Tunjuelo River basin (Colombia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Wilmar

    2017-04-01

    By analyzing the spatial and temporal variability of extreme precipitation events we can prevent or reduce the threat and risk. Many water resources projects require joint probability distributions of random variables such as precipitation intensity and duration, which can not be independent with each other. The problem of defining a probability model for observations of several dependent variables is greatly simplified by the joint distribution in terms of their marginal by taking copulas. This document presents a general framework set frequency analysis bivariate and multivariate using Archimedean copulas for extreme events of hydroclimatological nature such as severe storms. This analysis was conducted in the lower Tunjuelo River basin in Colombia for precipitation events. The results obtained show that for a joint study of the intensity-duration-frequency, IDF curves can be obtained through copulas and thus establish more accurate and reliable information from design storms and associated risks. It shows how the use of copulas greatly simplifies the study of multivariate distributions that introduce the concept of joint return period used to represent the needs of hydrological designs properly in frequency analysis.

  6. Precipitation Depth-Duration-Frequency Analysis for the Nevada National Security Site and Surrounding Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Li [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States). Division of Hydrologic Sciences; Miller, Julianne J. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States). Division of Hydrologic Sciences

    2016-08-01

    Accurate precipitation frequency data are important for Environmental Management Soils Activities on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are important for environmental assessments performed for regulatory closure of Soils Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Sites, as well as engineering mitigation designs and post-closure monitoring strategies to assess and minimize potential contaminant migration from Soils CAU Sites. Although the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Atlas 14 (Bonnin et al., 2011) provides precipitation frequency data for the NNSS area, the NNSS-specific observed precipitation data were not consistent with the NOAA Atlas 14 predicted data. This is primarily due to the NOAA Atlas 14 products being produced from analyses without including the approximately 30 NNSS precipitation gage records, several of which approach or exceed 50 year of record. Therefore, a study of precipitation frequency that incorporated the NNSS precipitation gage records into the NOAA Atlas 14 dataset, was performed specifically for the NNSS to derive more accurate site-specific precipitation data products. Precipitation frequency information, such as the depth-duration-frequency (DDF) relationships, are required to generate synthetic standard design storm hydrographs and assess actual precipitation events. In this study, the actual long-term NNSS precipitation gage records, some of which are the longest gage records in southern and central Nevada, were analyzed to allow for more accurate precipitation DDF estimates to be developed for the NNSS. Gridded maps of precipitation frequency for the NNSS and surrounding areas were then produced.

  7. Admittance of multiterminal quantum Hall conductors at kilohertz frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández, C.; Consejo, C.; Chaubet, C.; Degiovanni, P.

    2014-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the low frequency admittance of quantum Hall conductors in the [100 Hz, 1 MHz] frequency range. We show that the frequency dependence of the admittance of the sample strongly depends on the topology of the contacts connections. Our experimental results are well explained within the Christen and Büttiker approach for finite frequency transport in quantum Hall edge channels taking into account the influence of the coaxial cables capacitance. In the Hall bar geometry, we demonstrate that there exists a configuration in which the cable capacitance does not influence the admittance measurement of the sample. In this case, we measure the electrochemical capacitance of the sample and observe its dependence on the filling factor

  8. Admittance of multiterminal quantum Hall conductors at kilohertz frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, C. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Militar Nueva Granada, Carrera 11 101-80 Bogotá D.C. (Colombia); Consejo, C.; Chaubet, C., E-mail: christophe.chaubet@univ-montp2.fr [Université Montpellier 2, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR5221, F-34095 Montpellier, France and CNRS, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR5221, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Degiovanni, P. [Université de Lyon, Fédération de Physique Andrée Marie Ampère, CNRS, Laboratoire de Physique de l' Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 allée d' Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2014-03-28

    We present an experimental study of the low frequency admittance of quantum Hall conductors in the [100 Hz, 1 MHz] frequency range. We show that the frequency dependence of the admittance of the sample strongly depends on the topology of the contacts connections. Our experimental results are well explained within the Christen and Büttiker approach for finite frequency transport in quantum Hall edge channels taking into account the influence of the coaxial cables capacitance. In the Hall bar geometry, we demonstrate that there exists a configuration in which the cable capacitance does not influence the admittance measurement of the sample. In this case, we measure the electrochemical capacitance of the sample and observe its dependence on the filling factor.

  9. Ion–Cyclotron Resonance Frequency Interval Dependence on the O ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The frequency intervals in which O VI ions get in resonance with ion–cyclotron waves are calculated using the kinetic model, for the latest six values found in literature on O VI ion number densities in the 1.5–3 region of the NPCH. It is found that the common resonance interval is 1.5 kHz to 3 kHz.

  10. Exponential Frequency Spectrum in Magnetized Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pace, D. C.; Shi, M.; Maggs, J. E.; Morales, G. J.; Carter, T. A.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of a magnetized plasma with a controlled electron temperature gradient show the development of a broadband spectrum of density and temperature fluctuations having an exponential frequency dependence at frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency. The origin of the exponential frequency behavior is traced to temporal pulses of Lorentzian shape. Similar exponential frequency spectra are also found in limiter-edge plasma turbulence associated with blob transport. This finding suggests a universal feature of magnetized plasma turbulence leading to nondiffusive, cross-field transport, namely, the presence of Lorentzian shaped pulses

  11. Non-linear frequency and amplitude modulation of a nano-contact spin torque oscillator

    OpenAIRE

    Muduli, P. K.; Pogoryelov, Ye.; Bonetti, S.; Consolo, G.; Mancoff, Fred; Åkerman, Johan

    2009-01-01

    We study the current controlled modulation of a nano-contact spin torque oscillator. Three principally different cases of frequency non-linearity ($d^{2}f/dI^{2}_{dc}$ being zero, positive, and negative) are investigated. Standard non-linear frequency modulation theory is able to accurately describe the frequency shifts during modulation. However, the power of the modulated sidebands only agrees with calculations based on a recent theory of combined non-linear frequency and amplitude modulation.

  12. High-frequency response and the possibilities of frequency-tunable narrow-band terahertz amplification in resonant tunneling nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapaev, V. V.; Kopaev, Yu. V.; Savinov, S. A.; Murzin, V. N.

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of the high-frequency response of single- and double-well resonant tunneling structures in a dc electric field are investigated on the basis of the numerical solution of a time-dependent Schrödinger equation with open boundary conditions. The frequency dependence of the real part of high frequency conductivity (high-frequency response) in In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As/AlAs/InP structures is analyzed in detail for various values of the dc voltage V dc in the negative differential resistance (NDR) region. It is shown that double-well three-barrier structures are promising for the design of terahertz-band oscillators. The presence of two resonant states with close energies in such structures leads to a resonant (in frequency) response whose frequency is determined by the energy difference between these levels and can be controlled by varying the parameters of the structure. It is shown that, in principle, such structures admit narrow-band amplification, tuning of the amplification frequency, and a fine control of the amplification (oscillation) frequency in a wide range of terahertz frequencies by varying a dc electric voltage applied to the structure. Starting from a certain width of the central intermediate barrier in double-well structures, one can observe a collapse of resonances, where the structure behaves like a single-well system. This phenomenon imposes a lower limit on the oscillation frequency in three-barrier resonant tunneling structures.

  13. A software sampling frequency adaptive algorithm for reducing spectral leakage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Li-dong; WANG Fei

    2006-01-01

    Spectral leakage caused by synchronous error in a nonsynchronous sampling system is an important cause that reduces the accuracy of spectral analysis and harmonic measurement.This paper presents a software sampling frequency adaptive algorithm that can obtain the actual signal frequency more accurately,and then adjusts sampling interval base on the frequency calculated by software algorithm and modifies sampling frequency adaptively.It can reduce synchronous error and impact of spectral leakage;thereby improving the accuracy of spectral analysis and harmonic measurement for power system signal where frequency changes slowly.This algorithm has high precision just like the simulations show,and it can be a practical method in power system harmonic analysis since it can be implemented easily.

  14. Accurate Predictions of Mean Geomagnetic Dipole Excursion and Reversal Frequencies, Mean Paleomagnetic Field Intensity, and the Radius of Earth's Core Using McLeod's Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.; Conrad, Joy

    1996-01-01

    The geomagnetic spatial power spectrum R(sub n)(r) is the mean square magnetic induction represented by degree n spherical harmonic coefficients of the internal scalar potential averaged over the geocentric sphere of radius r. McLeod's Rule for the magnetic field generated by Earth's core geodynamo says that the expected core surface power spectrum (R(sub nc)(c)) is inversely proportional to (2n + 1) for 1 less than n less than or equal to N(sub E). McLeod's Rule is verified by locating Earth's core with main field models of Magsat data; the estimated core radius of 3485 kn is close to the seismologic value for c of 3480 km. McLeod's Rule and similar forms are then calibrated with the model values of R(sub n) for 3 less than or = n less than or = 12. Extrapolation to the degree 1 dipole predicts the expectation value of Earth's dipole moment to be about 5.89 x 10(exp 22) Am(exp 2)rms (74.5% of the 1980 value) and the expected geomagnetic intensity to be about 35.6 (mu)T rms at Earth's surface. Archeo- and paleomagnetic field intensity data show these and related predictions to be reasonably accurate. The probability distribution chi(exp 2) with 2n+1 degrees of freedom is assigned to (2n + 1)R(sub nc)/(R(sub nc). Extending this to the dipole implies that an exceptionally weak absolute dipole moment (less than or = 20% of the 1980 value) will exist during 2.5% of geologic time. The mean duration for such major geomagnetic dipole power excursions, one quarter of which feature durable axial dipole reversal, is estimated from the modern dipole power time-scale and the statistical model of excursions. The resulting mean excursion duration of 2767 years forces us to predict an average of 9.04 excursions per million years, 2.26 axial dipole reversals per million years, and a mean reversal duration of 5533 years. Paleomagnetic data show these predictions to be quite accurate. McLeod's Rule led to accurate predictions of Earth's core radius, mean paleomagnetic field

  15. An accurate and portable solid state neutron rem meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oakes, T.M. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Bellinger, S.L. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS (United States); Miller, W.H. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Missouri University Research Reactor, Columbia, MO (United States); Myers, E.R. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States); Fronk, R.G.; Cooper, B.W [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS (United States); Sobering, T.J. [Electronics Design Laboratory, Kansas State University, KS (United States); Scott, P.R. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States); Ugorowski, P.; McGregor, D.S; Shultis, J.K. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS (United States); Caruso, A.N., E-mail: carusoan@umkc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2013-08-11

    Accurately resolving the ambient neutron dose equivalent spanning the thermal to 15 MeV energy range with a single configuration and lightweight instrument is desirable. This paper presents the design of a portable, high intrinsic efficiency, and accurate neutron rem meter whose energy-dependent response is electronically adjusted to a chosen neutron dose equivalent standard. The instrument may be classified as a moderating type neutron spectrometer, based on an adaptation to the classical Bonner sphere and position sensitive long counter, which, simultaneously counts thermalized neutrons by high thermal efficiency solid state neutron detectors. The use of multiple detectors and moderator arranged along an axis of symmetry (e.g., long axis of a cylinder) with known neutron-slowing properties allows for the construction of a linear combination of responses that approximate the ambient neutron dose equivalent. Variations on the detector configuration are investigated via Monte Carlo N-Particle simulations to minimize the total instrument mass while maintaining acceptable response accuracy—a dose error less than 15% for bare {sup 252}Cf, bare AmBe, an epi-thermal and mixed monoenergetic sources is found at less than 4.5 kg moderator mass in all studied cases. A comparison of the energy dependent dose equivalent response and resultant energy dependent dose equivalent error of the present dosimeter to commercially-available portable rem meters and the prior art are presented. Finally, the present design is assessed by comparison of the simulated output resulting from applications of several known neutron sources and dose rates.

  16. Damage detection in multi-span beams based on the analysis of frequency changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillich, G R; Ntakpe, J L; Praisach, Z I; Mimis, M C; Abdel Wahab, M

    2017-01-01

    Crack identification in multi-span beams is performed to determine whether the structure is healthy or not. Among all crack identification methods, these based on measured natural frequency changes present the advantage of simplicity and easy to use in practical engineering. To accurately identify the cracks characteristics for multi-span beam structure, a mathematical model is established, which can predict frequency changes for any boundary conditions, the intermediate supports being hinges. This relation is based on the modal strain energy concept. Since frequency changes are relative small, to obtain natural frequencies with high resolution, a signal processing algorithm based on superposing of numerous spectra is also proposed, which overcomes the disadvantage of Fast Fourier Transform in the aspect of frequency resolution. Based on above-mentioned mathematical model and signal processing algorithm, the method of identifying cracks on multi-span beams is presented. To verify the accuracy of this identification method, experimental examples are conducted on a two-span structure. The results demonstrate that the method proposed in this paper can accurately identify the crack position and depth. (paper)

  17. High frequency source localization in a shallow ocean sound channel using frequency difference matched field processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthmann, Brian M; Song, H C; Dowling, David R

    2015-12-01

    Matched field processing (MFP) is an established technique for source localization in known multipath acoustic environments. Unfortunately, in many situations, particularly those involving high frequency signals, imperfect knowledge of the actual propagation environment prevents accurate propagation modeling and source localization via MFP fails. For beamforming applications, this actual-to-model mismatch problem was mitigated through a frequency downshift, made possible by a nonlinear array-signal-processing technique called frequency difference beamforming [Abadi, Song, and Dowling (2012). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 3018-3029]. Here, this technique is extended to conventional (Bartlett) MFP using simulations and measurements from the 2011 Kauai Acoustic Communications MURI experiment (KAM11) to produce ambiguity surfaces at frequencies well below the signal bandwidth where the detrimental effects of mismatch are reduced. Both the simulation and experimental results suggest that frequency difference MFP can be more robust against environmental mismatch than conventional MFP. In particular, signals of frequency 11.2 kHz-32.8 kHz were broadcast 3 km through a 106-m-deep shallow ocean sound channel to a sparse 16-element vertical receiving array. Frequency difference MFP unambiguously localized the source in several experimental data sets with average peak-to-side-lobe ratio of 0.9 dB, average absolute-value range error of 170 m, and average absolute-value depth error of 10 m.

  18. Frequency-dependent brain regional homogeneity alterations in patients with mild cognitive impairment during working memory state relative to resting state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyun eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported working memory deficits in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. However, previous studies investigating the neural mechanisms of MCI have primarily focused on brain activity alterations during working memory tasks. No study to date has compared brain network alterations in the working memory state between MCI patients and normal control subjects. Therefore, using the index of regional homogeneity (ReHo, we explored brain network impairments in MCI patients during a working memory task relative to the resting state, and identified frequency-dependent effects in separate frequency bands.Our results indicate that, in MCI patients, ReHo is altered in the posterior cingulate cortex in the slow-3 band (0.073–0.198 Hz, and in the bottom of the right occipital lobe and part of the right cerebellum, the right thalamus, a diffusing region in the bilateral prefrontal cortex, the left and right parietal-occipital regions, and the right angular gyrus in the slow-5 band (0.01–0.027 Hz. Furthermore, in normal controls, the value of ReHo in clusters belonging to the default mode network decreased, while the value of ReHo in clusters belonging to the attentional network increased during the task state. However, this pattern was reversed in MCI patients, and was associated with decreased working memory performance. In addition, we identified altered functional connectivity of the abovementioned regions with other parts of the brain in MCI patients.This is the first study to compare frequency-dependent alterations of ReHo in MCI patients between resting and working memory states. The results provide a new perspective regarding the neural mechanisms of working memory deficits in MCI patients, and extend our knowledge of altered brain patterns in resting and task-evoked states.

  19. Long distance measurement with a femtosecond laser based frequency comb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, N.; Cui, M.; Zeitouny, M. G.; Urbach, H. P.; van den Berg, S. A.

    2017-11-01

    Recent advances in the field of ultra-short pulse lasers have led to the development of reliable sources of carrier envelope phase stabilized femtosecond pulses. The pulse train generated by such a source has a frequency spectrum that consists of discrete, regularly spaced lines known as a frequency comb. In this case both the frequency repetition and the carrier-envelope-offset frequency are referenced to a frequency standard, like an atomic clock. As a result the accuracy of the frequency standard is transferred to the optical domain, with the frequency comb as transfer oscillator. These unique properties allow the frequency comb to be applied as a versatile tool, not only for time and frequency metrology, but also in fundamental physics, high-precision spectroscopy, and laser noise characterization. The pulse-to-pulse phase relationship of the light emitted by the frequency comb has opened up new directions for long range highly accurate distance measurement.

  20. A Sub-Hertz, Low-Frequency Vibration Isolation Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Gerardo, G.; Farr, William H.; Sannibale, Virginio

    2011-01-01

    One of the major technical problems deep-space optical communication (DSOC) systems need to solve is the isolation of the optical terminal from vibrations produced by the spacecraft navigational control system and by the moving parts of onboard instruments. Even under these vibration perturbations, the DSOC transceivers (telescopes) need to be pointed l000 fs of times more accurately than an RF communication system (parabolic antennas). Mechanical resonators have been extensively used to provide vibration isolation for groundbased, airborne, and spaceborne payloads. The effectiveness of these isolation systems is determined mainly by the ability of designing a mechanical oscillator with the lowest possible resonant frequency. The Low-Frequency Vibration Isolation Platform (LFVIP), developed during this effort, aims to reduce the resonant frequency of the mechanical oscillators into the sub-Hertz region in order to maximize the passive isolation afforded by the 40 dB/decade roll-off response of the resonator. The LFVIP also provides tip/tilt functionality for acquisition and tracking of a beacon signal. An active control system is used for platform positioning and for dampening of the mechanical oscillator. The basic idea in the design of the isolation platform is to use a passive isolation strut with an approximately equal to 100-mHz resonance frequency. This will extend the isolation range to lower frequencies. The harmonic oscillator is a second-order lowpass filter for mechanical disturbances. The resonance quality depends on the dissipation mechanisms, which are mainly hysteretic because of the low resonant frequency and the absence of any viscous medium. The LFVIP system is configured using the well-established Stewart Platform, which consists of a top platform connected to a base with six extensible struts (see figure). The struts are attached to the base and to the platform via universal joints, which permit the extension and contraction of the struts. The

  1. Detection of superparamagnetic particles in soils developed on basalts using frequency- and amplitude-dependent magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, H.; Petrovsky, E.; Kapicka, A.

    2016-12-01

    In rock, soil and environmental studies dealing with magnetic methods, the frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility (κFD%) is parameter generally accepted as a tool for identification of ultrafine superparamagnetic (SP) particles. This parameter became an indicator of pedogenic magnetic fraction (increased pedogenesis). Despite the number of studies using this parameter, knowledge about threshold values of κFD% is not clear enough and this parameter may be misinterpreted. Moreover, in strongly magnetic soils, magnetic signal of the SP (mostly pedogenic) minerals may be masked by dominant lithological signal, carried by coarse-grain mineral fraction; therefore, influence of pedogenesis is hard to detect. The aim of this contribution is to compare results in determination of ultrafine SP magnetic particles in soils determined using different instruments: (a) Bartington MS2B dual-frequency meter, and (b) more sensitive AGICO Kappameter MFK1-FA. The values of the κFD % obtained by the Bartington MS2B varied from 0.9 to 5.8% (mass-specific magnetic susceptibility from 119 to 1533 × 10-8 m3/kg) while the AGICO MFK1-FA varied from 3.7 to 8.2% (mass-specific magnetic susceptibility from 295 to 1843 × 10-8 m3/kg). Although both instruments suggest significant portion of SP magnetic particles, the results can't be interpreted using the generally accepted threshold values based on Bartington data. However, our results suggest that relation between the mass-specific magnetic susceptibility and κFD% along whole soil profile may serve as suitable tool in discriminating between lithogenic and pedogenic control of magnetic fraction in the soil profile. Moreover, we propose new concept of identification of SP particles, based on field-dependent magnetic susceptibility. Its behaviour shows distinct features with significant change at amplitudes of about 100 A/m. Below this value, susceptibility decreases with increasing amplitude, reflecting saturation of magnetization due

  2. Super-resolution imaging based on the temperature-dependent electron-phonon collision frequency effect of metal thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chenliang; Wei, Jingsong; Xiao, Mufei

    2018-05-01

    We herein propose a far-field super-resolution imaging with metal thin films based on the temperature-dependent electron-phonon collision frequency effect. In the proposed method, neither fluorescence labeling nor any special properties are required for the samples. The 100 nm lands and 200 nm grooves on the Blu-ray disk substrates were clearly resolved and imaged through a laser scanning microscope of wavelength 405 nm. The spot size was approximately 0.80 μm , and the imaging resolution of 1/8 of the laser spot size was experimentally obtained. This work can be applied to the far-field super-resolution imaging of samples with neither fluorescence labeling nor any special properties.

  3. Big data integration shows Australian bush-fire frequency is increasing significantly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Ritaban; Das, Aruneema; Aryal, Jagannath

    2016-02-01

    Increasing Australian bush-fire frequencies over the last decade has indicated a major climatic change in coming future. Understanding such climatic change for Australian bush-fire is limited and there is an urgent need of scientific research, which is capable enough to contribute to Australian society. Frequency of bush-fire carries information on spatial, temporal and climatic aspects of bush-fire events and provides contextual information to model various climate data for accurately predicting future bush-fire hot spots. In this study, we develop an ensemble method based on a two-layered machine learning model to establish relationship between fire incidence and climatic data. In a 336 week data trial, we demonstrate that the model provides highly accurate bush-fire incidence hot-spot estimation (91% global accuracy) from the weekly climatic surfaces. Our analysis also indicates that Australian weekly bush-fire frequencies increased by 40% over the last 5 years, particularly during summer months, implicating a serious climatic shift.

  4. Prestress Force Identification for Externally Prestressed Concrete Beam Based on Frequency Equation and Measured Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luning Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A prestress force identification method for externally prestressed concrete uniform beam based on the frequency equation and the measured frequencies is developed. For the purpose of the prestress force identification accuracy, we first look for the appropriate method to solve the free vibration equation of externally prestressed concrete beam and then combine the measured frequencies with frequency equation to identify the prestress force. To obtain the exact solution of the free vibration equation of multispan externally prestressed concrete beam, an analytical model of externally prestressed concrete beam is set up based on the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory and the function relation between prestress variation and vibration displacement is built. The multispan externally prestressed concrete beam is taken as the multiple single-span beams which must meet the bending moment and rotation angle boundary conditions, the free vibration equation is solved using sublevel simultaneous method and the semi-analytical solution of the free vibration equation which considered the influence of prestress on section rigidity and beam length is obtained. Taking simply supported concrete beam and two-span concrete beam with external tendons as examples, frequency function curves are obtained with the measured frequencies into it and the prestress force can be identified using the abscissa of the crosspoint of frequency functions. Identification value of the prestress force is in good agreement with the test results. The method can accurately identify prestress force of externally prestressed concrete beam and trace the trend of effective prestress force.

  5. Sheath impedance effects in very high frequency plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzenbach, W.; Howling, A.A.; Fivaz, M.; Brunner, S.; Hollenstein, C.

    1995-05-01

    The frequency dependence (13.56 MHz to 70 MHz) of the ion energy distribution at the ground electrode was measured by mass spectrometry in a symmetrical capacitive argon discharge. Reduced sheath impedance at Very High Frequency allows high levels of plasma power and substrate ion flux whilst maintaining low levels of ion energy and electrode voltage. The lower limit of ion bombardment energy is fixed by the sheath floating potential at high frequency, in contrast to low frequencies where only the rf voltage amplitude is determinant. The capacitive sheaths are thinner at high frequencies which accentuates the high frequency reduction in sheath impedance. It is argued that the frequency dependence of sheath impedance is responsible for the principal characteristics of Very High Frequency plasmas. The measurements are summarised by simple physical descriptions and compared with a Particle-In-Cell simulation. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  6. Calculation of Leakage Inductance for High Frequency Transformers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouyang, Ziwei; Jun, Zhang; Hurley, William Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Frequency dependent leakage inductance is often observed. High frequency eddy current effects cause a reduction in leakage inductance. The proximity effect between adjacent layers is responsible for the reduction of leakage inductance. This paper gives a detailed analysis of high frequency leakag...

  7. Multivariate Frequency-Severity Regression Models in Insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward W. Frees

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In insurance and related industries including healthcare, it is common to have several outcome measures that the analyst wishes to understand using explanatory variables. For example, in automobile insurance, an accident may result in payments for damage to one’s own vehicle, damage to another party’s vehicle, or personal injury. It is also common to be interested in the frequency of accidents in addition to the severity of the claim amounts. This paper synthesizes and extends the literature on multivariate frequency-severity regression modeling with a focus on insurance industry applications. Regression models for understanding the distribution of each outcome continue to be developed yet there now exists a solid body of literature for the marginal outcomes. This paper contributes to this body of literature by focusing on the use of a copula for modeling the dependence among these outcomes; a major advantage of this tool is that it preserves the body of work established for marginal models. We illustrate this approach using data from the Wisconsin Local Government Property Insurance Fund. This fund offers insurance protection for (i property; (ii motor vehicle; and (iii contractors’ equipment claims. In addition to several claim types and frequency-severity components, outcomes can be further categorized by time and space, requiring complex dependency modeling. We find significant dependencies for these data; specifically, we find that dependencies among lines are stronger than the dependencies between the frequency and average severity within each line.

  8. RSEM: accurate transcript quantification from RNA-Seq data with or without a reference genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewey Colin N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-Seq is revolutionizing the way transcript abundances are measured. A key challenge in transcript quantification from RNA-Seq data is the handling of reads that map to multiple genes or isoforms. This issue is particularly important for quantification with de novo transcriptome assemblies in the absence of sequenced genomes, as it is difficult to determine which transcripts are isoforms of the same gene. A second significant issue is the design of RNA-Seq experiments, in terms of the number of reads, read length, and whether reads come from one or both ends of cDNA fragments. Results We present RSEM, an user-friendly software package for quantifying gene and isoform abundances from single-end or paired-end RNA-Seq data. RSEM outputs abundance estimates, 95% credibility intervals, and visualization files and can also simulate RNA-Seq data. In contrast to other existing tools, the software does not require a reference genome. Thus, in combination with a de novo transcriptome assembler, RSEM enables accurate transcript quantification for species without sequenced genomes. On simulated and real data sets, RSEM has superior or comparable performance to quantification methods that rely on a reference genome. Taking advantage of RSEM's ability to effectively use ambiguously-mapping reads, we show that accurate gene-level abundance estimates are best obtained with large numbers of short single-end reads. On the other hand, estimates of the relative frequencies of isoforms within single genes may be improved through the use of paired-end reads, depending on the number of possible splice forms for each gene. Conclusions RSEM is an accurate and user-friendly software tool for quantifying transcript abundances from RNA-Seq data. As it does not rely on the existence of a reference genome, it is particularly useful for quantification with de novo transcriptome assemblies. In addition, RSEM has enabled valuable guidance for cost

  9. Accurate and approximate thermal rate constants for polyatomic chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    In favourable cases it is possible to calculate thermal rate constants for polyatomic reactions to high accuracy from first principles. Here, we discuss the use of flux correlation functions combined with the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach to efficiently calculate cumulative reaction probabilities and thermal rate constants for polyatomic chemical reactions. Three isotopic variants of the H 2 + CH 3 → CH 4 + H reaction are used to illustrate the theory. There is good agreement with experimental results although the experimental rates generally are larger than the calculated ones, which are believed to be at least as accurate as the experimental rates. Approximations allowing evaluation of the thermal rate constant above 400 K are treated. It is also noted that for the treated reactions, transition state theory (TST) gives accurate rate constants above 500 K. TST theory also gives accurate results for kinetic isotope effects in cases where the mass of the transfered atom is unchanged. Due to neglect of tunnelling, TST however fails below 400 K if the mass of the transferred atom changes between the isotopic reactions

  10. Automatic traveltime picking using local time-frequency maps

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The arrival times of distinct and sufficiently concentrated signals can be computed using Fourier transforms. In real seis- mograms, however, signals are far from distinct. We use local time-frequency maps of the seismograms and its frequency derivatives to obtain frequency-dependent (instantaneous) traveltimes. A smooth division is utilized to control the resolution of the instantaneous traveltimes to allow for a trade-off between resolution and stability. We average these traveltimes over the frequency band which is data-dependent. The resulting traveltime attribute is used to isolate different signals in seismic traces. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this automatic method for picking arrivals by applying it on synthetic and real data. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  11. Accurate Vehicle Location System Using RFID, an Internet of Things Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsloo, Jaco; Malekian, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Modern infrastructure, such as dense urban areas and underground tunnels, can effectively block all GPS signals, which implies that effective position triangulation will not be achieved. The main problem that is addressed in this project is the design and implementation of an accurate vehicle location system using radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology in combination with GPS and the Global system for Mobile communication (GSM) technology, in order to provide a solution to the limitation discussed above. In essence, autonomous vehicle tracking will be facilitated with the use of RFID technology where GPS signals are non-existent. The design of the system and the results are reflected in this paper. An extensive literature study was done on the field known as the Internet of Things, as well as various topics that covered the integration of independent technology in order to address a specific challenge. The proposed system is then designed and implemented. An RFID transponder was successfully designed and a read range of approximately 31 cm was obtained in the low frequency communication range (125 kHz to 134 kHz). The proposed system was designed, implemented, and field tested and it was found that a vehicle could be accurately located and tracked. It is also found that the antenna size of both the RFID reader unit and RFID transponder plays a critical role in the maximum communication range that can be achieved. PMID:27271638

  12. Accurate Vehicle Location System Using RFID, an Internet of Things Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsloo, Jaco; Malekian, Reza

    2016-06-04

    Modern infrastructure, such as dense urban areas and underground tunnels, can effectively block all GPS signals, which implies that effective position triangulation will not be achieved. The main problem that is addressed in this project is the design and implementation of an accurate vehicle location system using radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology in combination with GPS and the Global system for Mobile communication (GSM) technology, in order to provide a solution to the limitation discussed above. In essence, autonomous vehicle tracking will be facilitated with the use of RFID technology where GPS signals are non-existent. The design of the system and the results are reflected in this paper. An extensive literature study was done on the field known as the Internet of Things, as well as various topics that covered the integration of independent technology in order to address a specific challenge. The proposed system is then designed and implemented. An RFID transponder was successfully designed and a read range of approximately 31 cm was obtained in the low frequency communication range (125 kHz to 134 kHz). The proposed system was designed, implemented, and field tested and it was found that a vehicle could be accurately located and tracked. It is also found that the antenna size of both the RFID reader unit and RFID transponder plays a critical role in the maximum communication range that can be achieved.

  13. Accurate Vehicle Location System Using RFID, an Internet of Things Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaco Prinsloo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern infrastructure, such as dense urban areas and underground tunnels, can effectively block all GPS signals, which implies that effective position triangulation will not be achieved. The main problem that is addressed in this project is the design and implementation of an accurate vehicle location system using radio-frequency identification (RFID technology in combination with GPS and the Global system for Mobile communication (GSM technology, in order to provide a solution to the limitation discussed above. In essence, autonomous vehicle tracking will be facilitated with the use of RFID technology where GPS signals are non-existent. The design of the system and the results are reflected in this paper. An extensive literature study was done on the field known as the Internet of Things, as well as various topics that covered the integration of independent technology in order to address a specific challenge. The proposed system is then designed and implemented. An RFID transponder was successfully designed and a read range of approximately 31 cm was obtained in the low frequency communication range (125 kHz to 134 kHz. The proposed system was designed, implemented, and field tested and it was found that a vehicle could be accurately located and tracked. It is also found that the antenna size of both the RFID reader unit and RFID transponder plays a critical role in the maximum communication range that can be achieved.

  14. Frequency Response of Graphene Electrolyte-Gated Field-Effect Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Mackin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This work develops the first frequency-dependent small-signal model for graphene electrolyte-gated field-effect transistors (EGFETs. Graphene EGFETs are microfabricated to measure intrinsic voltage gain, frequency response, and to develop a frequency-dependent small-signal model. The transfer function of the graphene EGFET small-signal model is found to contain a unique pole due to a resistive element, which stems from electrolyte gating. Intrinsic voltage gain, cutoff frequency, and transition frequency for the microfabricated graphene EGFETs are approximately 3.1 V/V, 1.9 kHz, and 6.9 kHz, respectively. This work marks a critical step in the development of high-speed chemical and biological sensors using graphene EGFETs.

  15. A quantum accurate waveform synthesizer as a voltage reference for an electronic primary thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollarolo, Alessio; Benz, Samuel; Rogalla, Horst; Dresselhaus, Paul

    2014-03-01

    We are using a quantum voltage noise source (QVNS) for use as an intrinsically accurate voltage reference for a new type of electronic temperature standard. In Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) the noise of a resistor is used to measure temperature or Boltzmann's constant k, because the Nyquist equation =4kTR Δf shows that the power spectral density is proportional to k, temperature T, resistance R and measurement bandwidth Δf . The QVNS is a digital to analog converter used to synthesize a voltage waveform that resembles pseudo-random noise comparable in amplitude to the resistor noise. The signal generated is a frequency comb of harmonics tones that are equally spaced in frequency, all having identical amplitudes but random phases. The QVNS is an array superconducting Josephson junctions that are biased with a pulsed waveform clocked at 10 GHz. The accuracy of the voltage waveform derives from the identical voltage pulses produced by each junction that are perfectly quantized because their time-integrals are always equal to flux quantum h/2 e. The time-dependent output voltage waveform is determined by the number of pulses and their density in time. The measurement electronics exploits cross-correlation techniques to reduce the uncorrelated measurement noise so as to reveal the resistor noise, both of which are on the order of 2 nV/ √Hz. With this technique we have measured k with an uncertainty of about one part in 105, which we hope to improve by another order of magnitude with further research.

  16. High frequency characterization of Galfenol minor flux density loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Weng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first measurement of ring-shaped Galfenol’s high frequency-dependent minor flux density loops. The frequencies of applied AC magnetic field are 1k, 5k, 10k, 50k, 100k, 200k, 300k, 500 kHz. The measurements show that the cycle area between the flux density and magnetic field curves increase with increasing frequency. High frequency-dependent characterization, including coercivity, specific power loss, residual induction, and maximum relative permeability are discussed. Minor loops for different max induction are also measured and discussed at the same frequency 100 kHz. Minor loops with the same max induction 0.05 T for different frequencies 50, 100, 200, 300, 400 kHz are measured and specific power loss are discussed.

  17. Frequency and voltage dependence dielectric properties, ac electrical conductivity and electric modulus profiles in Al/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-PVA/p-Si structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilkan, Çiğdem, E-mail: cigdembilkan@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, The University of Çankırı Karatekin, 18100 Çankırı (Turkey); Azizian-Kalandaragh, Yashar [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, The University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Altındal, Şemsettin [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, The University of Gazi, 06500 Ankara (Turkey); Shokrani-Havigh, Roya [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, The University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    In this research a simple microwave-assisted method have been used for preparation of cobalt oxide nanostructures. The as-prepared sample has been investigated by UV–vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On the other hand, frequency and voltage dependence of both the real and imaginary parts of dielectric constants (ε′, ε″) and electric modulus (M′ and M″), loss tangent (tanδ), and ac electrical conductivity (σ{sub ac}) values of Al/Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-PVA/p-Si structures were obtained in the wide range of frequency and voltage using capacitance (C) and conductance (G/ω) data at room temperature. The values of ε′, ε″ and tanδ were found to decrease with increasing frequency almost for each applied bias voltage, but the changes in these parameters become more effective in the depletion region at low frequencies due to the charges at surface states and their relaxation time and polarization effect. While the value of σ is almost constant at low frequency, increases almost as exponentially at high frequency which are corresponding to σ{sub dc} and σ{sub ac}, respectively. The M′ and M″ have low values at low frequencies region and then an increase with frequency due to short-range mobility of charge carriers. While the value of M′ increase with increasing frequency, the value of M″ shows two peak and the peaks positions shifts to higher frequency with increasing applied voltage due to the decrease of the polarization and N{sub ss} effects with increasing frequency.

  18. Tapering the sky response for angular power spectrum estimation from low-frequency radio-interferometric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Samir; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Roy, Nirupam; Ghosh, Abhik; Ali, Sk Saiyad

    2016-06-11

    It is important to correctly subtract point sources from radio-interferometric data in order to measure the power spectrum of diffuse radiation like the Galactic synchrotron or the Epoch of Reionization 21-cm signal. It is computationally very expensive and challenging to image a very large area and accurately subtract all the point sources from the image. The problem is particularly severe at the sidelobes and the outer parts of the main lobe where the antenna response is highly frequency dependent and the calibration also differs from that of the phase centre. Here, we show that it is possible to overcome this problem by tapering the sky response. Using simulated 150 MHz observations, we demonstrate that it is possible to suppress the contribution due to point sources from the outer parts by using the Tapered Gridded Estimator to measure the angular power spectrum C ℓ of the sky signal. We also show from the simulation that this method can self-consistently compute the noise bias and accurately subtract it to provide an unbiased estimation of C ℓ .

  19. Can temporal fine structure represent the fundamental frequency of unresolved harmonics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxenham, Andrew J; Micheyl, Christophe; Keebler, Michael V

    2009-04-01

    At least two modes of pitch perception exist: in one, the fundamental frequency (F0) of harmonic complex tones is estimated using the temporal fine structure (TFS) of individual low-order resolved harmonics; in the other, F0 is derived from the temporal envelope of high-order unresolved harmonics that interact in the auditory periphery. Pitch is typically more accurate in the former than in the latter mode. Another possibility is that pitch can sometimes be coded via the TFS from unresolved harmonics. A recent study supporting this third possibility [Moore et al. (2006a). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 480-490] based its conclusion on a condition where phase interaction effects (implying unresolved harmonics) accompanied accurate F0 discrimination (implying TFS processing). The present study tests whether these results were influenced by audible distortion products. Experiment 1 replicated the original results, obtained using a low-level background noise. However, experiments 2-4 found no evidence for the use of TFS cues with unresolved harmonics when the background noise level was raised, or the stimulus level was lowered, to render distortion inaudible. Experiment 5 measured the presence and phase dependence of audible distortion products. The results provide no evidence that TFS cues are used to code the F0 of unresolved harmonics.

  20. Structural Health Monitoring Based on Combined Structural Global and Local Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilin Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a parameter estimation method for Structural Health Monitoring based on the combined measured structural global frequencies and structural local frequencies. First, the global test is experimented to obtain the low order modes which can reflect the global information of the structure. Secondly, the mass is added on the member of structure to increase the local dynamic characteristic and to make the member have local primary frequency, which belongs to structural local frequency and is sensitive to local parameters. Then the parameters of the structure can be optimized accurately using the combined structural global frequencies and structural local frequencies. The effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed method are verified by the experiment of a space truss.

  1. DEEP WIDEBAND SINGLE POINTINGS AND MOSAICS IN RADIO INTERFEROMETRY: HOW ACCURATELY DO WE RECONSTRUCT INTENSITIES AND SPECTRAL INDICES OF FAINT SOURCES?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, U.; Bhatnagar, S.; Owen, F. N., E-mail: rurvashi@nrao.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM-87801 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Many deep wideband wide-field radio interferometric surveys are being designed to accurately measure intensities, spectral indices, and polarization properties of faint source populations. In this paper, we compare various wideband imaging methods to evaluate the accuracy to which intensities and spectral indices of sources close to the confusion limit can be reconstructed. We simulated a wideband single-pointing (C-array, L-Band (1–2 GHz)) and 46-pointing mosaic (D-array, C-Band (4–8 GHz)) JVLA observation using a realistic brightness distribution ranging from 1 μ Jy to 100 mJy and time-, frequency-, polarization-, and direction-dependent instrumental effects. The main results from these comparisons are (a) errors in the reconstructed intensities and spectral indices are larger for weaker sources even in the absence of simulated noise, (b) errors are systematically lower for joint reconstruction methods (such as Multi-Term Multi-Frequency-Synthesis (MT-MFS)) along with A-Projection for accurate primary beam correction, and (c) use of MT-MFS for image reconstruction eliminates Clean-bias (which is present otherwise). Auxiliary tests include solutions for deficiencies of data partitioning methods (e.g., the use of masks to remove clean bias and hybrid methods to remove sidelobes from sources left un-deconvolved), the effect of sources not at pixel centers, and the consequences of various other numerical approximations within software implementations. This paper also demonstrates the level of detail at which such simulations must be done in order to reflect reality, enable one to systematically identify specific reasons for every trend that is observed, and to estimate scientifically defensible imaging performance metrics and the associated computational complexity of the algorithms/analysis procedures.

  2. Time-frequency analysis of band-limited EEG with BMFLC and Kalman filter for BCI applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Time-Frequency analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) during different mental tasks received significant attention. As EEG is non-stationary, time-frequency analysis is essential to analyze brain states during different mental tasks. Further, the time-frequency information of EEG signal can be used as a feature for classification in brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. Methods To accurately model the EEG, band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC), a linear combination of truncated multiple Fourier series models is employed. A state-space model for BMFLC in combination with Kalman filter/smoother is developed to obtain accurate adaptive estimation. By virtue of construction, BMFLC with Kalman filter/smoother provides accurate time-frequency decomposition of the bandlimited signal. Results The proposed method is computationally fast and is suitable for real-time BCI applications. To evaluate the proposed algorithm, a comparison with short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) for both synthesized and real EEG data is performed in this paper. The proposed method is applied to BCI Competition data IV for ERD detection in comparison with existing methods. Conclusions Results show that the proposed algorithm can provide optimal time-frequency resolution as compared to STFT and CWT. For ERD detection, BMFLC-KF outperforms STFT and BMFLC-KS in real-time applicability with low computational requirement. PMID:24274109

  3. Multifrequency Excitation Method for Rapid and Accurate Dynamic Test of Micromachined Gyroscope Chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Deng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel multifrequency excitation (MFE method is proposed to realize rapid and accurate dynamic testing of micromachined gyroscope chips. Compared with the traditional sweep-frequency excitation (SFE method, the computational time for testing one chip under four modes at a 1-Hz frequency resolution and 600-Hz bandwidth was dramatically reduced from 10 min to 6 s. A multifrequency signal with an equal amplitude and initial linear-phase-difference distribution was generated to ensure test repeatability and accuracy. The current test system based on LabVIEW using the SFE method was modified to use the MFE method without any hardware changes. The experimental results verified that the MFE method can be an ideal solution for large-scale dynamic testing of gyroscope chips and gyroscopes.

  4. Optical frequency divider with division uncertainty at the 10-21 level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yao; Yanyi Jiang; Hongfu Yu; Zhiyi Bi; Longsheng Ma

    2016-01-01

    Optical clocks with unprecedented accuracy of 10-18 promise innovations in many research areas.heir applications rely to a large extent on the ability of precisely converting the frequency from one optical clock to another,or particularly to the frequencies in the iber telecom band for long-distance transmission.his report demonstrates a low-noise,high-precision optical frequency divider,which realizes accurate optical frequency conversion and enables precise measurement of optical frequency ratios.By measuring against the frequency ratio between the fundamental and the second harmonic of a 1064-nm laser instead of a second copy of the same system,we demonstrate that the optical frequency divider has a fractional frequency division instability of 6×10-19 at 1 s and a fractional frequency division uncertainty of 1.4×10-21.he remarkable numbers can support frequency division of the best optical clocks in the world without frequency-conversion-caused degradation of their performance.

  5. Parkinsonian rest tremor can be detected accurately based on neuronal oscillations recorded from the subthalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, J; Schoffelen, J M; Schnitzler, A; van Gerven, M A J

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the possibility of tremor detection based on deep brain activity. We re-analyzed recordings of local field potentials (LFPs) from the subthalamic nucleus in 10 PD patients (12 body sides) with spontaneously fluctuating rest tremor. Power in several frequency bands was estimated and used as input to Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) which classified short data segments as either tremor-free rest or rest tremor. HMMs were compared to direct threshold application to individual power features. Applying a threshold directly to band-limited power was insufficient for tremor detection (mean area under the curve [AUC] of receiver operating characteristic: 0.64, STD: 0.19). Multi-feature HMMs, in contrast, allowed for accurate detection (mean AUC: 0.82, STD: 0.15), using four power features obtained from a single contact pair. Within-patient training yielded better accuracy than across-patient training (0.84vs. 0.78, p=0.03), yet tremor could often be detected accurately with either approach. High frequency oscillations (>200Hz) were the best performing individual feature. LFP-based markers of tremor are robust enough to allow for accurate tremor detection in short data segments, provided that appropriate statistical models are used. LFP-based markers of tremor could be useful control signals for closed-loop deep brain stimulation. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatial frequency information modulates response inhibition and decision-making processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Jahfari

    Full Text Available We interact with the world through the assessment of available, but sometimes imperfect, sensory information. However, little is known about how variance in the quality of sensory information affects the regulation of controlled actions. In a series of three experiments, comprising a total of seven behavioral studies, we examined how different types of spatial frequency information affect underlying processes of response inhibition and selection. Participants underwent a stop-signal task, a two choice speed/accuracy balance experiment, and a variant of both these tasks where prior information was given about the nature of stimuli. In all experiments, stimuli were either intact, or contained only high-, or low- spatial frequencies. Overall, drift diffusion model analysis showed a decreased rate of information processing when spatial frequencies were removed, whereas the criterion for information accumulation was lowered. When spatial frequency information was intact, the cost of response inhibition increased (longer SSRT, while a correct response was produced faster (shorter reaction times and with more certainty (decreased errors. When we manipulated the motivation to respond with a deadline (i.e., be fast or accurate, removal of spatial frequency information slowed response times only when instructions emphasized accuracy. However, the slowing of response times did not improve error rates, when compared to fast instruction trials. These behavioral studies suggest that the removal of spatial frequency information differentially affects the speed of response initiation, inhibition, and the efficiency to balance fast or accurate responses. More generally, the present results indicate a task-independent influence of basic sensory information on strategic adjustments in action control.

  7. Effects of Frequency Dependence of the External Quantum Efficiency of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, Sandheep; Aranda, Clara; Boix, Pablo P; Anta, Juan A; Bisquert, Juan; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà

    2018-06-07

    Perovskite solar cells are known to show very long response time scales, on the order of milliseconds to seconds. This generates considerable doubt over the validity of the measured external quantum efficiency (EQE) and consequently the estimation of the short-circuit current density. We observe a variation as high as 10% in the values of the EQE of perovskite solar cells for different optical chopper frequencies between 10 and 500 Hz, indicating a need to establish well-defined protocols of EQE measurement. We also corroborate these values and obtain new insights regarding the working mechanisms of perovskite solar cells from intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy measurements, identifying the evolution of the EQE over a range of frequencies, displaying a singular reduction at very low frequencies. This reduction in EQE is ascribed to additional resistive contributions hindering charge extraction in the perovskite solar cell at short-circuit conditions, which are delayed because of the concomitant large low-frequency capacitance.

  8. Speed-dependent Voigt lineshape parameter database from dual frequency comb measurements up to 1305 K. Part I: Pure H2O absorption, 6801-7188 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Paul J.; Cich, Matthew J.; Yang, Jinyu; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Swann, William C.; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R.; Drouin, Brian J.; Rieker, Gregory B.

    2018-05-01

    We measure speed-dependent Voigt lineshape parameters with temperature-dependence exponents for several hundred spectroscopic features of pure water spanning 6801-7188 cm-1. The parameters are extracted from broad bandwidth, high-resolution dual frequency comb absorption spectra with multispectrum fitting techniques. The data encompass 25 spectra ranging from 296 K to 1305 K and 1 to 17 Torr of pure water vapor. We present the extracted parameters, compare them to published data, and present speed-dependence, self-shift, and self-broadening temperature-dependent parameters for the first time. Lineshape data is extracted using a quadratic speed-dependent Voigt profile and a single self-broadening power law temperature-dependence exponent over the entire temperature range. The results represent an important step toward a new high-temperature database using advanced lineshape profiles.

  9. Mode of ATM-dependent suppression of chromosome translocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, Motohiro, E-mail: motoyama@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Suzuki, Keiji; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We addressed how ATM suppresses frequency of chromosome translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses translocation frequency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM and DNA-PKcs function in a common pathway to suppress translocation. -- Abstract: It is well documented that deficiency in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein leads to elevated frequency of chromosome translocation, however, it remains poorly understood how ATM suppresses translocation frequency. In the present study, we addressed the mechanism of ATM-dependent suppression of translocation frequency. To know frequency of translocation events in a whole genome at once, we performed centromere/telomere FISH and scored dicentric chromosomes, because dicentric and translocation occur with equal frequency and by identical mechanism. By centromere/telomere FISH analysis, we confirmed that chemical inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of ATM causes 2 to 2.5-fold increase in dicentric frequency at first mitosis after 2 Gy of gamma-irradiation in G0/G1. The FISH analysis revealed that ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses dicentric frequency, since RNAi-mediated knockdown of p53 elevated dicentric frequency by 1.5-fold. We found ATM also suppresses dicentric occurrence independently of its checkpoint role, as ATM inhibitor showed additional effect on dicentric frequency in the context of p53 depletion and Chk1/2 inactivation. Epistasis analysis using chemical inhibitors revealed that ATM kinase functions in the same pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to suppress dicentric frequency. From the results in the present study, we conclude that ATM minimizes translocation frequency through its commitment to G1 checkpoint and DNA double-strand break repair pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-PKcs.

  10. A model explaining synchronization of neuron bioelectric frequency under weak alternating low frequency magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moral, A. del, E-mail: delmoral@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Departamento de Física de Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Magnetobiología, Departamento de Anatomía e Histología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Madrid (Spain); Azanza, María J., E-mail: mjazanza@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Magnetobiología, Departamento de Anatomía e Histología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    A biomagnetic-electrical model is presented that explains rather well the experimentally observed synchronization of the bioelectric potential firing rate (“frequency”), f, of single unit neurons of Helix aspersa mollusc under the application of extremely low frequency (ELF) weak alternating (AC) magnetic fields (MF). The proposed model incorporates to our widely experimentally tested model of superdiamagnetism (SD) and Ca{sup 2+} Coulomb explosion (CE) from lipid (LP) bilayer membrane (SD–CE model), the electrical quadrupolar long range interaction between the bilayer LP membranes of synchronized neuron pairs, not considered before. The quadrupolar interaction is capable of explaining well the observed synchronization. Actual extension of our SD–CE-model shows that the neuron firing frequency field, B, dependence becomes not modified, but the bioelectric frequency is decreased and its spontaneous temperature, T, dependence is modified. A comparison of the model with synchronization experimental results of pair of neurons under weak (B{sub 0}≅0.2–15 mT) AC-MF of frequency f{sub M}=50 Hz is reported. From the deduced size of synchronized LP clusters under B, is suggested the formation of small neuron networks via the membrane lipid correlation. - Highlights: • Neuron pair synchronization under low frequency alternating (AC) magnetic field (MF). • Superdiamagnetism and Ca{sup 2+} Coulomb explosion for AC MF effect in synchronized frequency. • Membrane lipid electrical quadrupolar pair interaction as synchronization mechamism. • Good agreement of model with electrophysiological experiments on mollusc Helix neurons.

  11. A model explaining synchronization of neuron bioelectric frequency under weak alternating low frequency magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moral, A. del; Azanza, María J.

    2015-01-01

    A biomagnetic-electrical model is presented that explains rather well the experimentally observed synchronization of the bioelectric potential firing rate (“frequency”), f, of single unit neurons of Helix aspersa mollusc under the application of extremely low frequency (ELF) weak alternating (AC) magnetic fields (MF). The proposed model incorporates to our widely experimentally tested model of superdiamagnetism (SD) and Ca 2+ Coulomb explosion (CE) from lipid (LP) bilayer membrane (SD–CE model), the electrical quadrupolar long range interaction between the bilayer LP membranes of synchronized neuron pairs, not considered before. The quadrupolar interaction is capable of explaining well the observed synchronization. Actual extension of our SD–CE-model shows that the neuron firing frequency field, B, dependence becomes not modified, but the bioelectric frequency is decreased and its spontaneous temperature, T, dependence is modified. A comparison of the model with synchronization experimental results of pair of neurons under weak (B 0 ≅0.2–15 mT) AC-MF of frequency f M =50 Hz is reported. From the deduced size of synchronized LP clusters under B, is suggested the formation of small neuron networks via the membrane lipid correlation. - Highlights: • Neuron pair synchronization under low frequency alternating (AC) magnetic field (MF). • Superdiamagnetism and Ca 2+ Coulomb explosion for AC MF effect in synchronized frequency. • Membrane lipid electrical quadrupolar pair interaction as synchronization mechamism. • Good agreement of model with electrophysiological experiments on mollusc Helix neurons

  12. Mercury Trapped Ion Frequency Standard for Ultra-Stable Reference Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Hamell, Robert L. (Inventor); Tucker, Blake C. (Inventor); Larsen, Kameron (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An atomic clock including an ion trap assembly, a C-field coil positioned for generating a first magnetic field in the interrogation region of the ion trap assembly, a compensation coil positioned for generating a second magnetic field in the interrogation region, wherein the combination of the first and second magnetic fields produces an ion number-dependent