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Sample records for accumbens mglur5-homer2-pi3k signaling

  1. mGluR5 stimulating Homer–PIKE formation initiates icariin induced cardiomyogenesis of mouse embryonic stem cells by activating reactive oxygen species

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    Zhou, Limin; Huang, Yujie; Zhang, Yingying [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, No. 866, Yu Hang Tang Road, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhao, Qingwei [The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, No. 79, Qing Chun Road, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Zheng, Bei; Lou, Yijia [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, No. 866, Yu Hang Tang Road, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhu, Danyan, E-mail: zdyzxb@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, No. 866, Yu Hang Tang Road, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2013-06-10

    Icariin (ICA) has been reported to facilitate cardiac differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells; however, the mechanism by which ICA induced cardiomyogenesis has not been fully elucidated yet. Here, an underlying signaling network including metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), Homer, phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Enhancer (PIKE), phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) was investigated in ICA induced cardiomyogenesis. Our results showed that the co-expression of mGluR5 together with α-actinin or Troponin T in embryoid bodies (EBs) treated with ICA was elevated to 10.86% and 9.62%, compared with the case in the control (4.04% and 3.45%, respectively). Exposure of EBs to ICA for 2 h remarkably increased the dimeric form of mGluR5, which was inhibited by small interfering RNA targeting mGluR5 (si-mGluR5). Moreover, the extracellular glutamate concentration in ICA treatment medium was elevated to 28.9±3.5 μM. Furthermore, the activation of mGluR5 by ICA triggered the formation of Homer–PIKE complex and activated PI3K, stimulating ROS generation and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Knockdown of mGluR5 or inhibition of PI3K by LY294002 blocked ICA induced cardiomyogenesis via repressing mGluR5 pathway, reducing ROS and NF-κB activation. These results revealed that the inducible mechanisms of ICA were related to activate mGluR5 pathway. -- Highlights: • ICA increased mGluR5 expression in cardiac differentiation of ES cells. • ICA enhanced the glutamate level and the receptor mGluR5 dimerization, stimulating the formation of Homer–PIKE complex. • Knockdown of mGluR5 or inhibition of PI3K by LY294002 inhibited ICA induced ROS generation and NF-κB nuclear translocation.

  2. Inactivation of the Class II PI3K-C2β Potentiates Insulin Signaling and Sensitivity

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    Samira Alliouachene

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the class I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks, the organismal roles of the kinase activity of the class II PI3Ks are less clear. Here, we report that class II PI3K-C2β kinase-dead mice are viable and healthy but display an unanticipated enhanced insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, as well as protection against high-fat-diet-induced liver steatosis. Despite having a broad tissue distribution, systemic PI3K-C2β inhibition selectively enhances insulin signaling only in metabolic tissues. In a primary hepatocyte model, basal PI3P lipid levels are reduced by 60% upon PI3K-C2β inhibition. This results in an expansion of the very early APPL1-positive endosomal compartment and altered insulin receptor trafficking, correlating with an amplification of insulin-induced, class I PI3K-dependent Akt signaling, without impacting MAPK activity. These data reveal PI3K-C2β as a critical regulator of endosomal trafficking, specifically in insulin signaling, and identify PI3K-C2β as a potential drug target for insulin sensitization.

  3. AKT-independent PI3-K signaling in cancer – emerging role for SGK3

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    Bruhn MA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Maressa A Bruhn,1,6 Richard B Pearson,1–4 Ross D Hannan,1–5 Karen E Sheppard1–3 1Division of Cancer Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 2Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; 5School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 6School of Biological Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, Australia Abstract: The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K signaling pathway plays an important role in a wide variety of fundamental cellular processes, largely mediated via protein kinase B/v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (PKB/AKT signaling. Given the crucial role of PI3-K/AKT signaling in regulating processes such as cell growth, proliferation, and survival, it is not surprising that components of this pathway are frequently dysregulated in cancer, making the AKT kinase family members important therapeutic targets. The large number of clinical trials currently evaluating PI3-K pathway inhibitors as a therapeutic strategy further emphasizes this. The serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase (SGK family is made up of three isoforms, SGK1, 2, and 3, that are PI3-K-dependent, serine/threonine kinases, with similar substrate specificity to AKT. Consequently, the SGK family also regulates similar cell processes to the AKT kinases, including cell proliferation and survival. Importantly, there is emerging evidence demonstrating that SGK3 plays a critical role in AKT-independent oncogenic signaling. This review will focus on the role of SGK3 as a key effector of AKT-independent PI3-K oncogenic signaling. Keywords: SGK3, AKT, PI3-kinase, mTOR, cancer

  4. Differential Effects of Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase (PI4K and 3-Kinase (PI3K Inhibitors on Stomatal Responses to Environmental Signals

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    Koh Iba

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Specific cellular components including products of phosphatidylinositol (PI metabolism play an important role as signaling molecules in stomatal responses to environmental signals. In this study, pharmacological inhibitors of a set of cellular components, including PI4-kinase (PI4K and PI3K, were used to investigate stomatal closure in response to CO2, darkness, and abscisic acid (ABA. Treatment with PAO, a specific inhibitor of PI4K, specifically inhibited the stomatal response to CO2 compared with that to darkness and ABA. In contrast, treatment with LY294002, a PI3K-specific inhibitor, specifically inhibited the stomatal response to darkness compared with that to CO2 and ABA. The specific inhibitory effects of PAO and LY294002 were also observed as changes in the spatial density of dot-like structures labeled by green fluorescent protein-tagged PATROL1, a protein that controls stomatal aperture possibly via regulation of H+-ATPase amount in guard cell plasma membranes. Our results suggest an important role for PI4K and PI3K in the CO2 and darkness signal transduction pathways, respectively, that mediate PATROL1 dynamics.

  5. Photoactivation of GLUT4 translocation promotes glucose uptake via PI3-K/Akt2 signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

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    Lei Huang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a hallmark of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Dysfunction of PI-3K/Akt signaling was involved in insulin resistance. Glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 is a key factor for glucose uptake in muscle and adipose tissues, which is closely regulated by PI-3K/Akt signaling in response to insulin treatment. Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI has been shown to regulate various physiological processes and induce the synthesis or release of multiple molecules such as growth factors, which (especially red and near infrared light is mainly through the activation of mitochondrial respiratory chain and the initiation of intracellular signaling pathways. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether LPLI could promote glucose uptake through activation of PI-3K/Akt/GLUT4 signaling in 3T3L-1 adipocytes. In this study, we investigated how LPLI promoted glucose uptake through activation of PI-3K/Akt/GLUT4 signaling pathway. Here, we showed that GLUT4 was localized to the Golgi apparatus and translocated from cytoplasm to cytomembrane upon LPLI treatment in 3T3L-1 adipocytes, which enhanced glucose uptake. Moreover, we found that glucose uptake was mediated by the PI3-K/Akt2 signaling, but not Akt1 upon LPLI treatment with Akt isoforms gene silence and PI3-K/Akt inhibitors. Collectively, our results indicate that PI3-K/Akt2/GLUT4 signaling act as the key regulators for improvement of glucose uptake under LPLI treatment in 3T3L-1 adipocytes. More importantly, our findings suggest that activation of PI3-K/Akt2/GLUT4 signaling by LPLI may provide guidance in practical applications for promotion of glucose uptake in insulin-resistant adipose tissue.

  6. AKT-independent PI3-K signaling in cancer – emerging role for SGK3

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    Bruhn, Maressa A; Pearson, Richard B; Hannan, Ross D; Sheppard, Karen E

    2013-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) signaling pathway plays an important role in a wide variety of fundamental cellular processes, largely mediated via protein kinase B/v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (PKB/AKT) signaling. Given the crucial role of PI3-K/AKT signaling in regulating processes such as cell growth, proliferation, and survival, it is not surprising that components of this pathway are frequently dysregulated in cancer, making the AKT kinase family members important therapeutic targets. The large number of clinical trials currently evaluating PI3-K pathway inhibitors as a therapeutic strategy further emphasizes this. The serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase (SGK) family is made up of three isoforms, SGK1, 2, and 3, that are PI3-K-dependent, serine/threonine kinases, with similar substrate specificity to AKT. Consequently, the SGK family also regulates similar cell processes to the AKT kinases, including cell proliferation and survival. Importantly, there is emerging evidence demonstrating that SGK3 plays a critical role in AKT-independent oncogenic signaling. This review will focus on the role of SGK3 as a key effector of AKT-independent PI3-K oncogenic signaling

  7. PI3K/AKT signaling inhibits NOTCH1 lysosome-mediated degradation.

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    Platonova, Natalia; Manzo, Teresa; Mirandola, Leonardo; Colombo, Michela; Calzavara, Elisabetta; Vigolo, Emilia; Cermisoni, Greta Chiara; De Simone, Daria; Garavelli, Silvia; Cecchinato, Valentina; Lazzari, Elisa; Neri, Antonino; Chiaramonte, Raffaella

    2015-06-06

    The pathways of NOTCH and PI3K/AKT are dysregulated in about 60% and 48% of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients, respectively. In this context, they interact and cooperate in controlling tumor cell biology. Here, we propose a novel mechanism by which the PI3K/AKT pathway regulates NOTCH1 in T-ALL, starting from the evidence that the inhibition of PI3K/AKT signaling induced by treatment with LY294002 or transient transfection with a dominant negative AKT mutant downregulates NOTCH1 protein levels and activity, without affecting NOTCH1 transcription. We showed that the withdrawal of PI3K/AKT signaling was associated to NOTCH1 phosphorylation in tyrosine residues and monoubiquitination of NOTCH1 detected by Ubiquitin capture assay. Co-immunoprecipitation assay and colocalization analysis further showed that the E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl interacts and monoubiquitinates NOTCH1, activating its lysosomal degradation. These results suggest that the degradation of NOTCH1 could represent a mechanism of control by which NOTCH1 receptors are actively removed from the cell surface. This mechanism is finely regulated by the PI3K/AKT pathway in physiological conditions. In pathological conditions characterized by PI3K/AKT hyperactivation, such as T-ALL, the excessive AKT signaling could lead to NOTCH1 signaling dysregulation. Therefore, a therapeutic strategy directed to PI3K/AKT in T-ALL could contemporaneously inhibit the dysregulated NOTCH1 signaling. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Homer2 deletion alters dendritic spine morphology but not alcohol-associated adaptations in GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens

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    Natalie S McGuier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Repeated exposure to ethanol followed by withdrawal leads to the alterations in glutamatergic signaling and impaired synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc in both clinical and preclinical models of ethanol exposure. Homer2 is a member of a family of postsynaptic density (PSD scaffolding proteins that functions in part to cluster NMDA signaling complexes in the PSD, and has been shown to be critically important for plasticity in multiple models of drug and alcohol abuse. Here we used Homer2 KO mice and a chronic intermittent intraperitoneal (IP ethanol injection model to investigate a potential role for the protein in ethanol-induced adaptations in dendritic spine morphology and PSD protein expression. While deletion of Homer2 was associated with increased density of long spines on medium spiny neurons of the NAc core of saline treated mice, ethanol exposure had no effect on dendritic spine morphology in either wild-type (WT or Homer2 KO mice. Western blot analysis of tissue samples from the NAc enriched for PSD proteins revealed a main effect of ethanol treatment on the expression of GluN2B, but there was no effect of genotype or treatment on the expression other glutamate receptor subunits or PSD95. These data indicate that the global deletion of Homer2 leads to aberrant regulation of dendritic spine morphology in the NAc core that is associated with an increased density of long, thin spines. Unexpectedly, intermittent IP ethanol did not affect spine morphology in either WT or KO mice. Together these data implicate Homer2 in the formation of long, thin spines and further supports its role in neuronal structure.

  9. PI3K/Akt signaling mediated Hexokinase-2 expression inhibits cell apoptosis and promotes tumor growth in pediatric osteosarcoma

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    Zhuo, Baobiao; Li, Yuan; Li, Zhengwei; Qin, Haihui; Sun, Qingzeng; Zhang, Fengfei; Shen, Yang; Shi, Yingchun [Department of Surgery, The Children' s Hospital of Xuzhou, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province 221006 (China); Wang, Rong, E-mail: wangrong2008163@163.com [Department of Ultrasonography, Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province 221006 (China)

    2015-08-21

    Accumulating evidence has shown that PI3K/Akt pathway is frequently hyperactivated in osteosarcoma (OS) and contributes to tumor initiation and progression. Altered phenotype of glucose metabolism is a key hallmark of cancer cells including OS. However, the relationship between PI3K/Akt pathway and glucose metabolism in OS remains largely unexplored. In this study, we showed that elevated Hexokinase-2 (HK2) expression, which catalyzes the first essential step of glucose metabolism by conversion of glucose into glucose-6-phosphate, was induced by activated PI3K/Akt signaling. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that HK2 was overexpressed in 83.3% (25/30) specimens detected and was closely correlated with Ki67, a cell proliferation index. Silencing of endogenous HK2 resulted in decreased aerobic glycolysis as demonstrated by reduced glucose consumption and lactate production. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling also suppressed aerobic glycolysis and this effect can be reversed by reintroduction of HK2. Furthermore, knockdown of HK2 led to increased cell apoptosis and reduced ability of colony formation; meanwhile, these effects were blocked by 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), a glycolysis inhibitor through its actions on hexokinase, indicating that HK2 functions in cell apoptosis and growth were mediated by altered aerobic glycolysis. Taken together, our study reveals a novel relationship between PI3K/Akt signaling and aerobic glycolysis and indicates that PI3K/Akt/HK2 might be potential therapeutic approaches for OS. - Highlights: • PI3K/Akt signaling contributes to elevated expression of HK2 in osteosarcoma. • HK2 inhibits cell apoptosis and promotes tumor growth through enhanced Warburg effect. • Inhibition of glycolysis blocks the oncogenic activity of HK2.

  10. Norcantharidin inhibits tumor growth and vasculogenic mimicry of human gallbladder carcinomas by suppression of the PI3-K/MMPs/Ln-5γ2 signaling pathway

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    Zhang, Jing-Tao; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Wen-Zhong; Ge, Chun-Yan; Liu, Zhong-Yan; Zhao, Ze-Ming; Lu, Xing-Sui; Fan, Yue-Zu

    2014-01-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) is a novel tumor blood supply in some highly aggressive malignant tumors. Recently, we reported VM existed in gallbladder carcinomas (GBCs) and the formation of the special passage through the activation of the PI3K/MMPs/Ln-5γ2 signaling pathway. GBC is a highly aggressive malignant tumor with disappointing treatments and a poor prognosis. Norcantharidin (NCTD) has shown to have multiple antitumor activities against GBCs, etc; however the exact mechanism is not thoroughly elucidated. In this study, we firstly investigated the anti-VM activity of NCTD as a VM inhibitor for GBCs and its underlying mechanisms. In vitro and in vivo experiments to determine the effects of NCTD on proliferation, invasion, migration, VM formation, hemodynamic and tumor growth of GBC-SD cells and xenografts were respectively done by proliferation, invasion, migration assays, H&E staining and CD31-PAS double stainings, optic/electron microscopy, tumor assay, and dynamic micro-MRA. Further, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, Western blotting and RT-PCR were respectively used to examine expression of VM signaling-related markers PI3-K, MMP-2, MT1-MMP and Ln-5γ2 in GBC-SD cells and xenografts in vitro and in vivo. After treatment with NCTD, proliferation, invasion, migration of GBC-SD cells were inhibited; GBC-SD cells and xenografts were unable to form VM-like structures; tumor center-VM region of the xenografts exhibited a decreased signal in intensity; then cell or xenograft growth was inhibited. Whereas all of untreated GBC-SD cells and xenografts formed VM-like structures with the same conditions; the xenograft center-VM region exhibited a gradually increased signal; and facilitated cell or xenograft growth. Furthermore, expression of MMP-2 and MT1-MMP products from sections/supernates of 3-D matrices and the xenografts, and expression of PI3-K, MMP-2, MM1-MMP and Ln-5γ2 proteins/mRNAs of the xenografts were all decreased in NCTD or TIMP-2 group; (all P

  11. PI-103 and Quercetin Attenuate PI3K-AKT Signaling Pathway in T- Cell Lymphoma Exposed to Hydrogen Peroxide.

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    Akhilendra Kumar Maurya

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT pathway has been considered as major drug target site due to its frequent activation in cancer. AKT regulates the activity of various targets to promote tumorigenesis and metastasis. Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS has been linked to oxidative stress and regulation of signaling pathways for metabolic adaptation of tumor microenvironment. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in this context is used as ROS source for oxidative stress preconditioning. Antioxidants are commonly considered to be beneficial to reduce detrimental effects of ROS and are recommended as dietary supplements. Quercetin, a ubiquitous bioactive flavonoid is a dietary component which has attracted much of interest due to its potential health-promoting effects. Present study is aimed to analyze PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in H2O2 exposed Dalton's lymphoma ascite (DLA cells. Further, regulation of PI3K-AKT pathway by quercetin as well as PI-103, an inhibitor of PI3K was analyzed. Exposure of H2O2 (1mM H2O2 for 30min to DLA cells caused ROS accumulation and resulted in increased phosphorylation of PI3K and downstream proteins PDK1 and AKT (Ser-473 and Thr-308, cell survival factors BAD and ERK1/2, as well as TNFR1. However, level of tumor suppressor PTEN was declined. Both PI-103 & quercetin suppressed the enhanced level of ROS and significantly down-regulated phosphorylation of AKT, PDK1, BAD and level of TNFR1 as well as increased the level of PTEN in H2O2 induced lymphoma cells. The overall result suggests that quercetin and PI3K inhibitor PI-103 attenuate PI3K-AKT pathway in a similar mechanism.

  12. The Role of PI3K/Akt/mTOR Signaling in Gastric Carcinoma

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    Matsuoka, Tasuku; Yashiro, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is one of the key signaling pathways induced by various receptor-tyrosine kinases. Accumulating evidence shows that this pathway is an important promoter of cell growth, metabolism, survival, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy. Genetic alterations in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in gastric carcinoma have often been demonstrated. Many kinds of molecular targeting therapies are currently undergoing clinical testing in patients with solid tumors. However, with the exception of the ErbB2-targeting antibody, targeting agents, including PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors, have not been approved for treatment of patients with gastric carcinoma. This review summarizes the current knowledge on PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in the pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma and the possible therapeutic targets for gastric carcinoma. Improved knowledge of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in gastric carcinoma will be useful in understanding the mechanisms of tumor development and for identifying ideal targets of anticancer therapy for gastric carcinoma

  13. The Role of PI3K/Akt/mTOR Signaling in Gastric Carcinoma

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    Matsuoka, Tasuku [Department of Surgical Oncology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Yashiro, Masakazu, E-mail: m9312510@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Surgical Oncology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Oncology Institute of Geriatrics and Medical Science, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan)

    2014-07-07

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is one of the key signaling pathways induced by various receptor-tyrosine kinases. Accumulating evidence shows that this pathway is an important promoter of cell growth, metabolism, survival, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy. Genetic alterations in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in gastric carcinoma have often been demonstrated. Many kinds of molecular targeting therapies are currently undergoing clinical testing in patients with solid tumors. However, with the exception of the ErbB2-targeting antibody, targeting agents, including PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors, have not been approved for treatment of patients with gastric carcinoma. This review summarizes the current knowledge on PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in the pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma and the possible therapeutic targets for gastric carcinoma. Improved knowledge of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in gastric carcinoma will be useful in understanding the mechanisms of tumor development and for identifying ideal targets of anticancer therapy for gastric carcinoma.

  14. Tissue kallikrein protects neurons from hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced cell injury through Homer1b/c.

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    Su, Jingjing; Tang, Yuping; Zhou, Houguang; Liu, Ling; Dong, Qiang

    2012-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that human tissue kallikrein (TK) gene delivery protects against mouse cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury through bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) activation. We have also reported that exogenous TK administration can suppress glutamate- or acidosis-induced neurotoxicity through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway. To further explore the neuroprotection mechanisms of TK, in the present study we performed immunoprecipitation analysis and identified a scaffolding protein Homer1b/c using MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that TK reduces cell injury induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) through activating Homer1b/c. We found that TK increased the expression of Homer1b/c in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, TK facilitated the translocation of Homer1b/c to the plasma membrane under OGD/R condition by confocal microscope assays. We also observed that overexpression of Homer1b/c showed the neuroprotection against OGD/R-induced cell injury by enhancing cell survival, reducing LDH release, caspase-3 activity and cell apoptosis. However, the knockdown of Homer1b/c by small interfering RNA showed the opposite effects, indicating that Homer1b/c had protective effects against OGD/R-induced neuronal injury. More interestingly, TK exerted its much more significantly neuroprotective effects after Homer1b/c overexpression, whereas it exerted its reduced effects after Homer1b/c knockdown. In addition, TK pretreatment increased the phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 and Akt-GSK3β through Homer1b/c activation. The beneficial effects of Homer1b/c were abolished by the ERK1/2 or PI3K antagonist. Therefore, we propose novel signaling mechanisms involved in the anti-hypoxic function of TK through activation of Homer1b/c-ERK1/2 and Homer1b/c-PI3K-Akt signaling pathways. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A PKC-MARCKS-PI3K regulatory module links Ca2+ and PIP3 signals at the leading edge of polarized macrophages.

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    Brian P Ziemba

    Full Text Available The leukocyte chemosensory pathway detects attractant gradients and directs cell migration to sites of inflammation, infection, tissue damage, and carcinogenesis. Previous studies have revealed that local Ca2+ and PIP3 signals at the leading edge of polarized leukocytes play central roles in positive feedback loop essential to cell polarization and chemotaxis. These prior studies showed that stimulation of the leading edge Ca2+ signal can strongly activate PI3K, thereby triggering a larger PIP3 signal, but did not elucidate the mechanistic link between Ca2+ and PIP3 signaling. A hypothesis explaining this link emerged, postulating that Ca2+-activated PKC displaces the MARCKS protein from plasma membrane PIP2, thereby releasing sequestered PIP2 to serve as the target and substrate lipid of PI3K in PIP3 production. In vitro single molecule studies of the reconstituted pathway on lipid bilayers demonstrated the feasibility of this PKC-MARCKS-PI3K regulatory module linking Ca2+ and PIP3 signals in the reconstituted system. The present study tests the model predictions in live macrophages by quantifying the effects of: (a two pathway activators-PDGF and ATP that stimulate chemoreceptors and Ca2+ influx, respectively; and (b three pathway inhibitors-wortmannin, EGTA, and Go6976 that inhibit PI3K, Ca2+ influx, and PKC, respectively; on (c four leading edge activity sensors-AKT-PH-mRFP, CKAR, MARCKSp-mRFP, and leading edge area that report on PIP3 density, PKC activity, MARCKS membrane binding, and leading edge expansion/contraction, respectively. The results provide additional evidence that PKC and PI3K are both essential elements of the leading edge positive feedback loop, and strongly support the existence of a PKC-MARCKS-PI3K regulatory module linking the leading edge Ca2+ and PIP3 signals. As predicted, activators stimulate leading edge PKC activity, displacement of MARCKS from the leading edge membrane and increased leading edge PIP3 levels, while

  16. A PKC-MARCKS-PI3K regulatory module links Ca2+ and PIP3 signals at the leading edge of polarized macrophages.

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    Ziemba, Brian P; Falke, Joseph J

    2018-01-01

    The leukocyte chemosensory pathway detects attractant gradients and directs cell migration to sites of inflammation, infection, tissue damage, and carcinogenesis. Previous studies have revealed that local Ca2+ and PIP3 signals at the leading edge of polarized leukocytes play central roles in positive feedback loop essential to cell polarization and chemotaxis. These prior studies showed that stimulation of the leading edge Ca2+ signal can strongly activate PI3K, thereby triggering a larger PIP3 signal, but did not elucidate the mechanistic link between Ca2+ and PIP3 signaling. A hypothesis explaining this link emerged, postulating that Ca2+-activated PKC displaces the MARCKS protein from plasma membrane PIP2, thereby releasing sequestered PIP2 to serve as the target and substrate lipid of PI3K in PIP3 production. In vitro single molecule studies of the reconstituted pathway on lipid bilayers demonstrated the feasibility of this PKC-MARCKS-PI3K regulatory module linking Ca2+ and PIP3 signals in the reconstituted system. The present study tests the model predictions in live macrophages by quantifying the effects of: (a) two pathway activators-PDGF and ATP that stimulate chemoreceptors and Ca2+ influx, respectively; and (b) three pathway inhibitors-wortmannin, EGTA, and Go6976 that inhibit PI3K, Ca2+ influx, and PKC, respectively; on (c) four leading edge activity sensors-AKT-PH-mRFP, CKAR, MARCKSp-mRFP, and leading edge area that report on PIP3 density, PKC activity, MARCKS membrane binding, and leading edge expansion/contraction, respectively. The results provide additional evidence that PKC and PI3K are both essential elements of the leading edge positive feedback loop, and strongly support the existence of a PKC-MARCKS-PI3K regulatory module linking the leading edge Ca2+ and PIP3 signals. As predicted, activators stimulate leading edge PKC activity, displacement of MARCKS from the leading edge membrane and increased leading edge PIP3 levels, while inhibitors

  17. Activation of mGluR5 induces spike afterdepolarization and enhanced excitability in medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens by modulating persistent Na+ currents

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    D’Ascenzo, Marcello; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Fellin, Tommaso; Azzena, Gian Battista; Haydon, Philip; Grassi, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    The involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptors type 5 (mGluR5) in drug-induced behaviours is well-established but limited information is available on their functional roles in addiction-relevant brain areas like the nucleus accumbens (NAc). This study demonstrates that pharmacological and synaptic activation of mGluR5 increases the spike discharge of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the NAc. This effect was associated with the appearance of a slow afterdepolarization (ADP) which, in voltage-clamp experiments, was recorded as a slowly inactivating inward current. Pharmacological studies showed that ADP was elicited by mGluR5 stimulation via G-protein-dependent activation of phospholipase C and elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels. Both ADP and spike aftercurrents were significantly inhibited by the Na+ channel-blocker, tetrodotoxin (TTX). Moreover, the selective blockade of persistent Na+ currents (INaP), achieved by NAc slice pre-incubation with 20 nm TTX or 10 μm riluzole, significantly reduced the ADP amplitude, indicating that this type of Na+ current is responsible for the mGluR5-dependent ADP. mGluR5 activation also produced significant increases in INaP, and the pharmacological blockade of this current prevented the mGluR5-induced enhancement of spike discharge. Collectively, these data suggest that mGluR5 activation upregulates INaP in MSNs of the NAc, thereby inducing an ADP that results in enhanced MSN excitability. Activation of mGluR5 will significantly alter spike firing in MSNs in vivo, and this effect could be an important mechanism by which these receptors mediate certain aspects of drug-induced behaviours. PMID:19433572

  18. Cocaine alters Homer1 natural antisense transcript in the nucleus accumbens.

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    Sartor, Gregory C; Powell, Samuel K; Velmeshev, Dmitry; Lin, David Y; Magistri, Marco; Wiedner, Hannah J; Malvezzi, Andrea M; Andrade, Nadja S; Faghihi, Mohammad A; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2017-12-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are an abundant class of long noncoding RNAs that have recently been shown to be key regulators of chromatin dynamics and gene expression in nervous system development and neurological disorders. However, it is currently unclear if NAT-based mechanisms also play a role in drug-induced neuroadaptations. Aberrant regulation of gene expression is one critical factor underlying the long-lasting behavioral abnormalities that characterize substance use disorder, and it is possible that some drug-induced transcriptional responses are mediated, in part, by perturbations in NAT activity. To test this hypothesis, we used an automated algorithm that mines the NCBI AceView transcriptomics database to identify NAT overlapping genes linked to addiction. We found that 22% of the genes examined contain NATs and that expression of Homer1 natural antisense transcript (Homer1-AS) was altered in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of mice 2h and 10days following repeated cocaine administration. In in vitro studies, depletion of Homer1-AS lead to an increase in the corresponding sense gene expression, indicating a potential regulatory mechanisms of Homer1 expression by its corresponding antisense transcript. Future in vivo studies are needed to definitely determine a role for Homer1-AS in cocaine-induced behavioral and molecular adaptations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Biphasic activation of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk1/2 signaling pathways in bovine herpesvirus type 1 infection of MDBK cells

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    Zhu Liqian

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many viruses have been known to control key cellular signaling pathways to facilitate the virus infection. The possible involvement of signaling pathways in bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1 infection is unknown. This study indicated that infection of MDBK cells with BoHV-1 induced an early-stage transient and a late-stage sustained activation of both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt and mitogen activated protein kinases/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (MAPK/Erk1/2 signaling pathways. Analysis with the stimulation of UV-irradiated virus indicated that the virus binding and/or entry process was enough to trigger the early phase activations, while the late phase activations were viral protein expression dependent. Biphasic activation of both pathways was suppressed by the selective inhibitor, Ly294002 for PI3K and U0126 for MAPK kinase (MEK1/2, respectively. Furthermore, treatment of MDBK cells with Ly294002 caused a 1.5-log reduction in virus titer, while U0126 had little effect on the virus production. In addition, the inhibition effect of Ly294002 mainly occurred at the post-entry stage of the virus replication cycle. This revealed for the first time that BoHV-1 actively induced both PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk1/2 signaling pathways, and the activation of PI3K was important for fully efficient replication, especially for the post-entry stage.

  20. Elevated CaMKIIα and Hyperphosphorylation of Homer Mediate Circuit Dysfunction in a Fragile X Syndrome Mouse Model

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    Weirui Guo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 function, as a result of disrupted scaffolding with its binding partner Homer, contributes to the pathophysiology of fragile X syndrome, a common inherited form of intellectual disability and autism caused by mutations in Fmr1. How loss of Fmr1 disrupts mGluR5-Homer scaffolds is unknown, and little is known about the dynamic regulation of mGluR5-Homer scaffolds in wild-type neurons. Here, we demonstrate that brief (minutes-long elevations in neural activity cause CaMKIIα-mediated phosphorylation of long Homer proteins and dissociation from mGluR5 at synapses. In Fmr1 knockout (KO cortex, Homers are hyperphosphorylated as a result of elevated CaMKIIα protein. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of CaMKIIα or replacement of Homers with dephosphomimetics restores mGluR5-Homer scaffolds and multiple Fmr1 KO phenotypes, including circuit hyperexcitability and/or seizures. This work links translational control of an FMRP target mRNA, CaMKIIα, to the molecular-, cellular-, and circuit-level brain dysfunction in a complex neurodevelopmental disorder.

  1. PI3K-GSK3 signalling regulates mammalian axon regeneration by inducing the expression of Smad1

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    Saijilafu; Hur, Eun-Mi; Liu, Chang-Mei; Jiao, Zhongxian; Xu, Wen-Lin; Zhou, Feng-Quan

    2013-10-01

    In contrast to neurons in the central nervous system, mature neurons in the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS) can regenerate axons after injury, in part, by enhancing intrinsic growth competence. However, the signalling pathways that enhance the growth potential and induce spontaneous axon regeneration remain poorly understood. Here we reveal that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signalling is activated in response to peripheral axotomy and that PI3K pathway is required for sensory axon regeneration. Moreover, we show that glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), rather than mammalian target of rapamycin, mediates PI3K-dependent augmentation of the growth potential in the PNS. Furthermore, we show that PI3K-GSK3 signal is conveyed by the induction of a transcription factor Smad1 and that acute depletion of Smad1 in adult mice prevents axon regeneration in vivo. Together, these results suggest PI3K-GSK3-Smad1 signalling as a central module for promoting sensory axon regeneration in the mammalian nervous system.

  2. Cosmosiin Increases ADAM10 Expression via Mechanisms Involving 5’UTR and PI3K Signaling

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    Zhuo Min

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The α-secretase “a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein” (ADAM10 is involved in the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP. Upregulation of ADAM10 precludes the generation of neurotoxic β-amyloid protein (Aβ and represents a plausible therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. In this study, we explored compounds that can potentially promote the expression of ADAM10. Therefore, we performed high-throughput small-molecule screening in SH-SY5Y (human neuroblastoma cells that stably express a luciferase reporter gene driven by the ADAM10 promoter, including a portion of its 5’-untranslated region (5’UTR. This has led to the discovery of cosmosiin (apigenin 7-O-β-glucoside. Here, we report that in human cell lines (SH-SY5Y and HEK293, cosmosiin proportionally increased the levels of the immature and mature forms of the ADAM10 protein without altering its mRNA level. This effect was attenuated by translation inhibitors or by deleting the 5’UTR of ADAM10, suggesting that a translational mechanism was responsible for the increased levels of ADAM10. Luciferase deletion assays revealed that the first 144 nucleotides of the 5’UTR were necessary for mediating the cosmosiin-induced enhancement of ADAM10 expression in SH-SY5Y cells. Cosmosiin failed to increase the levels of the ADAM10 protein in murine cells, which lack native expression of the ADAM10 transcript containing the identified 5’UTR element. The potential signaling pathway may involve phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K because pharmacological inhibition of PI3K attenuated the effect of cosmosiin on the expression of the ADAM10 protein. Finally, cosmosiin attenuated Aβ generation because the levels of Aβ40/42 in HEK-APP cells were significantly reduced after cosmosiin treatment. Collectively, we found that the first 144 nucleotides of the ADAM10 5’UTR, and PI3K signaling, are involved in cosmosiin-induced enhancement of the expression

  3. Association between PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway and hepatic fibrosis

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    WU Changhui

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase-B (AkT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR/70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K, PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K, is an important signaling pathway in the life activities of cells, and it plays an important role in promoting the growth, proliferation, invasion, and anti-apoptosis of cells and promoting angiogenesis. It was clarified that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway is involved in regulating the activities of hepatic stellate cell(HSC, thus influencing the development and progression of hepatic fibrosis. Analysis demonstrated that blocking any target of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway can inhibit the activation and proliferation of HSC, promote the apoptosis of HSC, inhibit the extracellular matrix secretion from HSC, and delay the progression of hepatic fibrosis. Blocking the pathway is expected to be a treatment strategy for hepatic fibrosis.

  4. [TLR2 modulates Staphylococcus aureus-induced inflammatory response and autophagy in macrophages through PI3K signaling pathway].

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    Li, Shuai; Fang, Lei; Wang, Jiong; Liu, Rongyu

    2017-09-01

    Objective To investigate the molecular mechanisms of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) taking part in inflammatory response in Staphylococcus aureus (SA)-induced asthma. Methods We established the cell inflammatory response model through stimulating mouse RAW264.7 macrophages with SA. The TLR2, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), nuclear factor κBp65 (NF-κBp65), phospho-NF-κBp65, beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B) were detected by Western blot analysis after treatment with TLR2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) and 3-methyladenine (3-MA), and the tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were determined by ELISA. In addition, the number of autolysosomes was observed by the laser scanning confocal microscope. Results SA-stimulated macrophages activated various signaling pathways including TLR2. TLR2 siRNA markedly repressed the expressions of PI3K, phospho-NF-κBp65, the autophagy protein beclin-1 and LC3B as well as the number of autolysosomes and the production of TNF- and IL-6. We also demonstrated that 3-MA had the same effect on autophagy and inflammation as TLR2 siRNA did. Conclusion TLR2 modulates SA-induced inflammatory response and autophagy in macrophages through PI3K signaling pathway.

  5. The effect of Liuwei Dihuang decoction on PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in liver of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats with insulin resistance.

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    Dai, Bing; Wu, Qinxuan; Zeng, Chengxi; Zhang, Jiani; Cao, Luting; Xiao, Zizeng; Yang, Menglin

    2016-11-04

    Liuwei Dihaung decoction (LWDHT) is a well-known classic traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of six herbs including Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch.(family: Scrophulariaceae), Cornus officinalis Sieb.(family: Cornaceae), Dioscorea opposite Thunb.(family: Dioscoreaceae), Alisma orientale(G. Samuelsson) Juz (family: Alismataceae), Poria cocos (Schw.) Wolf (family: Polyporaceae) and Paeonia suffruticosa Andrews (family: Paeoniaceae). It has been used in the treatment of many types of diseases with signs of deficiency of Yin in the kidneys in China clinically. This study is aimed at investigating the effect of Liuwei dihuang decoction on PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in liver of T2DM rats with insulin resistance. T2DM model was induced in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats by high sugar and high fat diets combined with small dose of streptozocin (STZ) injection. The successful T2DM rats were randomly allocated three group--vehicle group, positive control group and Liuwei Dihuang decoction group. After 12-weeks treatment with distilled water, rosiglitazone and LWDHT by intragastric administration respectively, the rats were put to death in batches. The variance of fasting blood glucose (FBG) and fasting insulin (FINS) in serum were determined, the pathological changes of each rats' liver were observed by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, the expression of insulin receptor substrate 2(IRS2), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinas B (Akt) involving the canonical PI3K/Akt signaling pathway were detected by Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR (RT-PCR), and the expression level of IRS2, PI3K, Akt protein and phosphorylated IRS2, PI3K, Akt protein were evaluated by Western Blot. All the data were analyzed by SPSS 17.0. Four weeks of treatment with LWDHT could significantly decrease the level of FBG and FINS in serum, improve the cellular morphology of liver, kidney, pancreas tissue, and the expression of IRS2, PI3K, Akt mRNA and phosphorylated IRS2, PI3K, Akt

  6. PI3K: A Crucial Piece in the RAS Signaling Puzzle.

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    Krygowska, Agata Adelajda; Castellano, Esther

    2018-06-01

    RAS proteins are key signaling switches essential for control of proliferation, differentiation, and survival of eukaryotic cells. RAS proteins are mutated in 30% of human cancers. In addition, mutations in upstream or downstream signaling components also contribute to oncogenic activation of the pathway. RAS proteins exert their functions through activation of several signaling pathways and dissecting the contributions of these effectors in normal cells and in cancer is an ongoing challenge. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge about how RAS regulates type I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), one of the main RAS effectors. RAS signaling through PI3K is necessary for normal lymphatic vasculature development and for RAS-induced transformation in vitro and in vivo, especially in lung cancer, where it is essential for tumor initiation and necessary for tumor maintenance. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  7. Study on the relationship between PI3K/AKT signaling pathway and apoptosis in cartilage tissue of rats with osteoarthritis

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    Xiao-Yan Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the relationship between PI3K/AKT signaling pathway and apoptosis in cartilage tissue of rats with osteoarthritis (OA. Methods: The clean male Wistar rats were selected as experimental animals and randomly divided into OA model group and control group. The OA model was established by intra-articular injection of papain solution and L-cysteine. Fourth weeks and eighth weeks after model establishment, the expression of PI3K/AKT signaling molecules, inflammatory mediators, apoptosis marker molecules and autophagy marker molecules in articular cartilage were determined. Results: p-PI3K and p-AKT expression in articular cartilage of OA group were significantly lower than those of control group; IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, IL-18, eIF4E, Bax, Caspase-3, mTOR, Beclin1, Atg5 and Atg7 expression in articular cartilage of OA group were significantly higher than those of control group and negatively correlated with p-PI3K and p-AKT expression while Bcl-2 expression in articular cartilage of OA group was significantly lower than that of control group and positively correlated with p-PI3K and p-AKT expression. Conclusion: The inhibition of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in cartilage tissue of OA rat model can promote chondrocyte apoptosis and autophagy.

  8. Protective Effects of Fisetin Against 6-OHDA-Induced Apoptosis by Activation of PI3K-Akt Signaling in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells.

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    Watanabe, Ryoko; Kurose, Takumi; Morishige, Yuta; Fujimori, Ko

    2018-02-01

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. 3,3',4',7-Tetrahydroxyflavone (fisetin), a plant flavonoid has a variety of physiological effects such as antioxidant activity. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of fisetin against 6-OHDA-induced cell death in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. 6-OHDA-mediated cell toxicity was reduced in a fisetin concentration-dependent manner. 6-OHDA-mediated elevation of the expression of the oxidative stress-related genes such as hemeoxygenase-1, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1, NF-E2-related factor 2, and γ-glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier was suppressed by fisetin. Fisetin also lowered the ratio of the proapoptotic Bax protein and the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein in SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, fisetin effectively suppressed 6-OHDA-mediated activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, which leads to the cell death, while, 6-OHDA-induced caspase-3/7 activity was lowered. Furthermore, fisetin activated the PI3K-Akt signaling, which inhibits the caspase cascade, and fisetin-mediated inhibition of 6-OHDA-induced cell death was negated by the co-treatment with an Akt inhibitor. These results indicate that fisetin protects 6-OHDA-induced cell death by activating PI3K-Akt signaling in human neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. This is the first report that the PI3K-Akt signaling is involved in the fisetin-protected ROS-mediated neuronal cell death.

  9. A postsynaptic PI3K-cII dependent signaling controller for presynaptic homeostatic plasticity

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    Hauswirth, Anna G; Ford, Kevin J; Wang, Tingting; Fetter, Richard D; Tong, Amy

    2018-01-01

    Presynaptic homeostatic plasticity stabilizes information transfer at synaptic connections in organisms ranging from insect to human. By analogy with principles of engineering and control theory, the molecular implementation of PHP is thought to require postsynaptic signaling modules that encode homeostatic sensors, a set point, and a controller that regulates transsynaptic negative feedback. The molecular basis for these postsynaptic, homeostatic signaling elements remains unknown. Here, an electrophysiology-based screen of the Drosophila kinome and phosphatome defines a postsynaptic signaling platform that includes a required function for PI3K-cII, PI3K-cIII and the small GTPase Rab11 during the rapid and sustained expression of PHP. We present evidence that PI3K-cII localizes to Golgi-derived, clathrin-positive vesicles and is necessary to generate an endosomal pool of PI(3)P that recruits Rab11 to recycling endosomal membranes. A morphologically distinct subdivision of this platform concentrates postsynaptically where we propose it functions as a homeostatic controller for retrograde, trans-synaptic signaling. PMID:29303480

  10. Kaempferol Inhibits Angiogenesis by Suppressing HIF-1α and VEGFR2 Activation via ERK/p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathways in Endothelial Cells.

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    Kim, Gi Dae

    2017-12-01

    Kaempferol has been shown to inhibit vascular formation in endothelial cells. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we evaluated whether kaempferol exerts antiangiogenic effects by targeting extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways in endothelial cells. Endothelial cells were treated with various concentrations of kaempferol for 24 h. Cell viability was determined by the 3- (4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay; vascular formation was analyzed by tube formation, wound healing, and mouse aortic ring assays. Activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), ERK/p38 MAPK, and PI3K/Akt/mTOR was analyzed by Western blotting. Kaempferol significantly inhibited cell migration and tube formation in endothelial cells, and suppressed microvessel sprouting in the mouse aortic ring assay. Moreover, kaempferol suppressed the activation of HIF-1α, VEGFR2, and other markers of ERK/p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways in endothelial cells. These results suggest that kaempferol inhibits angiogenesis by suppressing HIF-1α and VEGFR2 activation via ERK/p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in endothelial cells.

  11. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 in macrophages by catalase: role of NF-kappaB and PI3K signaling pathways.

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    Jang, Byeong-Churl; Kim, Do-Hyun; Park, Jong-Wook; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Kim, Sang-Pyo; Song, Dae-Kyu; Park, Jong-Gu; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Mun, Kyo-Chul; Baek, Won-Ki; Suh, Min-Ho; Hla, Timothy; Suh, Seong-Il

    2004-04-02

    Induction of COX-2 by catalase in smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and neuronal cells has been previously reported. However, the mechanism by which catalase up-regulates COX-2 remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of catalase on induction of COX-2 in macrophages. The addition of catalase into Raw 264.7 macrophages induced COX-2 expression that was correlated with increased COX-2 transcription and mRNA stability. Catalase also induced activation of NF-kappaB, PI3K, ERKs, p38s, or JNKs. Catalase-induced COX-2 expression was abrogated by treatment of MG-132 (a NF-kappaB inhibitor) or LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor), but not by treatment of PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor), SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor), or SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor). Moreover, inhibition of PI3K by LY294002 caused partial decrease of catalase-induced COX-2 transcription and steady-state COX-2 transcript levels, but not COX-2 mRNA stability. Together, these results suggest that catalase induces the expression of COX-2 in Raw 264.7 macrophages, and the induction is related with activation of NF-kappaB transcription factor and PI3K signaling pathway.

  12. PI 3-kinase signalling in platelets: the significance of synergistic, autocrine stimulation.

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    Selheim, F; Holmsen, H; Vassbotn, F S

    2000-03-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI 3Ks) play a key role in regulation of intracellular signalling and cellular function, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, chemotaxis, membrane trafficking and platelet activation. The PI 3Ks are grouped into three classes on the basis on their structure and in vitro substrate specificity. Class I are activated by a variety of agonists which mediate their effect through tyrosine kinase-linked or G-protein-linked receptors. In vivo class I PI 3Ks seem to preferentially phosphorylate the D3 hydroxyls of the inositol moiety of PtdIns(4,5)P2 to produce PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. However, class II PI 3Ks preferentially phosphorylate the D3 hydroxyl of PtdIns and PtdIns(4)P to produce PtdIns(3)P and PtdIns(3,4)P2, respectively. The late accumulation of PtdIns(3,4)P2 has been suggested to play an important role in irreversible platelet aggregation. In human platelets the class II PI 3K isoform HsC2-PI 3K is activated in an integrin alpha IIb beta 3 + fibrinogen-dependent manner. Class III PI 3Ks phosphorylate PtdIns to produce PtdIns(3)P, which play a crucial role in vesicular trafficking. Recent work has suggested that crosstalk between individual receptors and their downstream signal pathways play a central role in PI 3K signalling responses. In this review, we will concentrate on recent advances regarding the regulation of platelet PI 3Ks.

  13. Activation of PI3K/Akt signaling by n-terminal SH2 domain mutants of the p85α regulatory subunit of PI3K is enhanced by deletion of its c-terminal SH2 domain.

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    Hofmann, Bianca T; Jücker, Manfred

    2012-10-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) is frequently activated in human cancer cells due to gain of function mutations in the catalytic (p110) and the regulatory (p85) subunits. The regulatory subunit consists of an SH3 domain and two SH2 domains. An oncogenic form of p85α named p65 lacking the c-terminal SH2 domain (cSH2) has been cloned from an irradiation-induced murine thymic lymphoma and transgenic mice expressing p65 in T lymphocytes develop a lymphoproliferative disorder. We have recently detected a c-terminal truncated form of p85α named p76α in a human lymphoma cell line lacking most of the cSH2 domain due to a frame shift mutation. Here, we report that the deletion of the cSH2 domain enhances the activating effects of the n-terminal SH2 domain (nSH2) mutants K379E and R340E on the PI3K/Akt pathway and micro tumor formation in a focus assay. Further analysis revealed that this transforming effect is mediated by activation of the catalytic PI3K isoform p110α and downstream signaling through mTOR. Our data further support a mechanistic model in which mutations of the cSH2 domain of p85α can abrogate its negative regulatory function on PI3K activity via the nSH2 domain of p85α. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. PI3K-AKT signaling pathway is involved in hypoxia/thermal-induced immunosuppression of small abalone Haliotis diversicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yulong; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Guodong; Lin, Shi; Zeng, Xinyang; Wang, Yilei; Zhang, Ziping

    2016-12-01

    The PI3K-AKT signal pathway has been found to be involved in many important physiological and pathological processes of the innate immune system of vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, the AKT (HdAKT) and PI3K (HdPI3K) gene of small abalone Haliotis diversicolor were cloned and characterized for the important status of PI3K and AKT protein in PI3K-AKT signaling pathway. The full length cDNAs of HdAKT and HdPI3K are 2126 bp and 6052 bp respectively, encoding proteins of 479 amino acids and 1097 amino acids, respectively. The mRNA expression level of fourteen genes in the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway were detected by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that all these fourteen genes were ubiquitously expressed in seven selected tissues. Meanwhile, HdAKT was expressed in haemocytes with the highest expression level (p abalone. The mRNA expression of these genes in gills, haemocytes and hepatopancreas was significantly down-regulated after the Vibrio parahaemolyticus stimulation with environment stimulation (thermal, hypoxia and thermal & hypoxia). These results indicate that the dual/multiple stresses defeat the immune system and lead to immunosuppression in abalone. PI3K-AKT signaling pathway may be involved in hypoxia/thermal-induced immunosuppression of small abalone Haliotis diversicolor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Somatic stem cell differentiation is regulated by PI3K/Tor signaling in response to local cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoyel, Marc; Hillion, Kenzo-Hugo; Margolis, Shally R; Bach, Erika A

    2016-11-01

    Stem cells reside in niches that provide signals to maintain self-renewal, and differentiation is viewed as a passive process that depends on loss of access to these signals. Here, we demonstrate that the differentiation of somatic cyst stem cells (CySCs) in the Drosophila testis is actively promoted by PI3K/Tor signaling, as CySCs lacking PI3K/Tor activity cannot differentiate properly. We find that an insulin peptide produced by somatic cells immediately outside of the stem cell niche acts locally to promote somatic differentiation through Insulin-like receptor (InR) activation. These results indicate that there is a local 'differentiation' niche that upregulates PI3K/Tor signaling in the early daughters of CySCs. Finally, we demonstrate that CySCs secrete the Dilp-binding protein ImpL2, the Drosophila homolog of IGFBP7, into the stem cell niche, which blocks InR activation in CySCs. Thus, we show that somatic cell differentiation is controlled by PI3K/Tor signaling downstream of InR and that the local production of positive and negative InR signals regulates the differentiation niche. These results support a model in which leaving the stem cell niche and initiating differentiation are actively induced by signaling. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Dietary Lycium barbarum Polysaccharide Induces Nrf2/ARE Pathway and Ameliorates Insulin Resistance Induced by High-Fat via Activation of PI3K/AKT Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP, an antioxidant from wolfberry, displays the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects on experimental models of insulin resistance in vivo. However, the effective mechanism of LBP on high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance is still unknown. The objective of the study was to investigate the mechanism involved in LBP-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/AKT/Nrf2 axis against high-fat-induced insulin resistance. HepG2 cells were incubated with LBP for 12 hrs in the presence of palmitate. C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented with LBP for 24 weeks. We analyzed the expression of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK, and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β involved in insulin signaling pathway in vivo and in vitro. First, LBP significantly induced phosphorylation of Nrf2 through PI3K/AKT signaling. Second, LBP obviously increased detoxification and antioxidant enzymes expression and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS levels via PI3K/AKT/Nrf2 axis. Third, LBP also regulated phosphorylation levels of GSK3β and JNK through PI3K/AKT signaling. Finally, LBP significantly reversed glycolytic and gluconeogenic genes expression via the activation of Nrf2-mediated cytoprotective effects. In summary, LBP is novel antioxidant against insulin resistance induced by high-fat diet via activation of PI3K/AKT/Nrf2 pathway.

  17. Curcumin inhibits urothelial tumor development by suppressing IGF2 and IGF2-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Binqiang; Zhao, Yingmei; Liang, Tao; Ye, Xuxiao; Li, Zuowei; Yan, Dongliang; Fu, Qiang; Li, Yonghui

    2017-08-01

    We have previously reported that curcumin inhibits urothelial tumor development in a rat bladder carcinogenesis model. In this study, we report that curcumin inhibits urothelial tumor development by suppressing IGF2 and IGF2-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Curcumin inhibits IGF2 expression at the transcriptional level and decreases the phosphorylation levels of IGF1R and IRS-1 in bladder cancer cells and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced urothelial tumor tissue. Ectopic expression of IGF2 and IGF1R, but not IGF1, in bladder cancer cells restored this process, suggesting that IGF2 is a target of curcumin. Moreover, introduction of constitutively active AKT1 abolished the inhibitory effect of curcumin on cell proliferation, migration, and restored the phosphorylation levels of 4E-BP1 and S6K1, suggesting that curcumin functions via suppressing IGF2-mediated AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. In summary, our results reveal that suppressing IGF2 and IGF2-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway is one of the mechanisms of action of curcumin. Our findings suggest a new therapeutic strategy against human bladder cancer caused by aberrant activation of IGF2, which are useful for translational application of curcumin.

  18. Reversal of alcohol dependence-induced deficits in cue-guided behavior via mGluR2/3 signaling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Jacqueline M; Lench, Daniel H; Chandler, L Judson

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders are associated with deficits in adaptive behavior. While some behavioral impairments that are associated with alcohol use disorders may predate exposure to drugs of abuse, others may result directly from exposure to drugs of abuse, including alcohol. Identifying a causal role for how alcohol exposure leads to these impairments will enable further investigation of the neurobiological mechanisms by which it acts to dysregulate adaptive behavior. In the present study, we examined the effects of chronic intermittent ethanol exposure (CIE) on the use of reward-paired cues to guide consummatory behaviors in a mouse model, and further, how manipulations of mGluR2/3 signaling-known to be dysregulated after chronic alcohol exposure-may alter the expression of this behavior. Adult male C57B/6J mice were trained to self-administer 10 % ethanol and exposed to CIE via vapor inhalation. After CIE exposure, mice were trained in a Pavlovian task wherein a cue (tone) was paired with the delivery of a 10 % sucrose unconditioned stimulus. The use of the reward-paired cue to guide licking behavior was determined across training. The effect of systemic mGluR2/3 manipulation on discrimination between cue-on and cue-off intervals was assessed by administration of the mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 or the antagonist LY341495 prior to a testing session. Exposure to CIE resulted in reductions in discrimination between cue-on and cue-off intervals, with CIE-exposed mice exhibiting significantly lower consummatory behavior during reward-paired cues than air controls. In addition, systemic administration of an mGluR2/3 agonist restored the use of reward-paired cues in CIE-exposed animals without impacting behavior in air controls. Conversely, administration of an mGluR2/3 antagonist mimicked the effects of CIE on cue-guided licking behavior, indicating that mGluR2/3 signaling can bidirectionally regulate the ability to use reward-paired cues to guide behavior. Together

  19. ApoA-I/SR-BI modulates S1P/S1PR2-mediated inflammation through the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in HUVECs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kun; Lu, Yan-Ju; Mo, Zhong-Cheng; -Liu, Xing; Tang, Zhen-Li; Jiang, Yue; Peng, Xiao-Shan; Li, Li; Zhang, Qing-Hai; Yi, Guang-Hui

    2017-05-01

    Endothelial dysfunction plays a vital role during the initial stage of atherosclerosis. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induces vascular endothelial injury and vessel wall inflammation. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) exerts numerous vasoprotective effects by binding to diverse S1P receptors (S1PRs; S1PR1-5). A number of studies have shown that in endothelial cells (ECs), S1PR2 acts as a pro-atherosclerotic mediator by stimulating vessel wall inflammation through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Scavenger receptor class B member I (SR-BI), a high-affinity receptor for apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I)/high-density lipoprotein (HDL), inhibits nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) translocation and decreases the plasma levels of inflammatory mediators via the PI3K/Akt pathway. We hypothesized that the inflammatory effects of S1P/S1PR2 on ECs may be regulated by apoA-I/SR-BI. The results showed that ox-LDL, a pro-inflammatory factor, augmented the S1PR2 level in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, S1P/S1PR2 signaling influenced the levels of inflammatory factors, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-10, aggravating inflammation in HUVECs. Moreover, the pro-inflammatory effects induced by S1P/S1PR2 were attenuated by SR-BI overexpression and enhanced by an SR-BI inhibitor, BLT-1. Further experiments showed that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway was involved in this process. Taken together, these results demonstrate that apoA-I/SR-BI negatively regulates S1P/S1PR2-mediated inflammation in HUVECs by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  20. Signaling via class IA Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K in human, breast-derived cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronique Juvin

    Full Text Available We have addressed the differential roles of class I Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K in human breast-derived MCF10a (and iso-genetic derivatives and MDA-MB 231 and 468 cells. Class I PI3Ks are heterodimers of p110 catalytic (α, β, δ and γ and p50-101 regulatory subunits and make the signaling lipid, phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5P3 that can activate effectors, eg protein kinase B (PKB, and responses, eg migration. The PtdIns(3,4,5P3-3-phosphatase and tumour-suppressor, PTEN inhibits this pathway. p110α, but not other p110s, has a number of onco-mutant variants that are commonly found in cancers. mRNA-seq data shows that MCF10a cells express p110β>>α>δ with undetectable p110γ. Despite this, EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of PKB depended upon p110α-, but not β- or δ- activity. EGF-stimulated chemokinesis, but not chemotaxis, was also dependent upon p110α, but not β- or δ- activity. In the presence of single, endogenous alleles of onco-mutant p110α (H1047R or E545K, basal, but not EGF-stimulated, phosphorylation of PKB was increased and the effect of EGF was fully reversed by p110α inhibitors. Cells expressing either onco-mutant displayed higher basal motility and EGF-stimulated chemokinesis.This latter effect was, however, only partially-sensitive to PI3K inhibitors. In PTEN(-/- cells, basal and EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of PKB was substantially increased, but the p110-dependency was variable between cell types. In MDA-MB 468s phosphorylation of PKB was significantly dependent on p110β, but not α- or δ- activity; in PTEN(-/- MCF10a it remained, like the parental cells, p110α-dependent. Surprisingly, loss of PTEN suppressed basal motility and EGF-stimulated chemokinesis. These results indicate that; p110α is required for EGF signaling to PKB and chemokinesis, but not chemotaxis; onco-mutant alleles of p110α augment signaling in the absence of EGF and may increase motility, in part, via acutely

  1. Reciprocal feedback regulation of PI3K and androgen receptor signaling in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Brett S; Chapinski, Caren; Wongvipat, John; Hieronymus, Haley; Chen, Yu; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Arora, Vivek K; Le, Carl; Koutcher, Jason; Scher, Howard; Scardino, Peter T; Rosen, Neal; Sawyers, Charles L

    2011-05-17

    Prostate cancer is characterized by its dependence on androgen receptor (AR) and frequent activation of PI3K signaling. We find that AR transcriptional output is decreased in human and murine tumors with PTEN deletion and that PI3K pathway inhibition activates AR signaling by relieving feedback inhibition of HER kinases. Similarly, AR inhibition activates AKT signaling by reducing levels of the AKT phosphatase PHLPP. Thus, these two oncogenic pathways cross-regulate each other by reciprocal feedback. Inhibition of one activates the other, thereby maintaining tumor cell survival. However, combined pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K and AR signaling caused near-complete prostate cancer regressions in a Pten-deficient murine prostate cancer model and in human prostate cancer xenografts, indicating that both pathways coordinately support survival. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Observation of $\\pi^- K^+$ and $\\pi^+ K^-$ atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva, B; The PS212 collaboration; Allkofer, Y.; Amsler, C.; Anania, A.; Aogaki, S.; Benelli, A.; Brekhovskikh, V.; Cechak, T.; Chiba, M.; Chliapnikov, P.; Doskarova, P.; Drijard, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dumitriu, D.; Fluerasu, D.; Gorin, A.; Gorchakov, O.; Gritsay, K.; Guaraldo, C.; Gugiu, M.; Hansroul, M.; Hons, Z.; Horikawa, S.; Iwashita, Y.; Karpukhin, V.; Kluson, J.; Kobayashi, M.; Kruglov, V.; Kruglova, L.; Kulikov, A.; Kulish, E.; Kuptsov, A.; Lamberto, A.; Lanaro, A.; Lednicky, R.; Marinas, C.; Martincik, J.; Nikitin, M.; Okada, K.; Olchevskii, V.; Pentia, M.; Penzo, A.; Plo, M.; Prusa, P.; Rappazzo, G.; Vidal, A.Romero; Ryazantsev, A.; Rykalin, V.; Saborido, J.; Sidorov, A.; Smolik, J.; Takeutchi, F.; Tauscher, L.; Trojek, T.; Trusov, S.; Urban, T.; Vrba, T.; Yazkov, V.; Yoshimura, Y.; Zhabitsky, M.; Zrelov, P.

    2016-01-01

    The observation of hydrogen-like $\\pi K$ atoms, consisting of $\\pi^- K^+$ or $\\pi^+ K^-$ mesons, is presented. The atoms have been produced by 24 GeV/$c$ protons from the CERN PS accelerator, interacting with platinum or nickel foil targets. The breakup (ionisation) of $\\pi K$ atoms in the same targets yields characteristic $\\pi K$ pairs, called ``atomic pairs'', with small relative momenta in the pair centre-of-mass system. The upgraded DIRAC experiment has observed $349\\pm62$ such atomic $\\pi K$ pairs, corresponding to a signal of 5.6 standard deviations.

  3. PI3K/PKB signaling in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus tick embryo cell line BME26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, L.; Fabres, A.; Logullo, C.; Esteves, E.; Daffre, S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Ticks are obligatory blood-sucking arthropods and important vectors of both human and animal diseases. In order to study the insulin triggered pathway and its possible roles during embryogenesis we are using a culture of embryonic Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) micro plus cells (BME26). Besides its metabolic role, insulin signaling pathway (ISP) is widely described as crucial for vertebrate and invertebrate embryogenesis and development. In such cascade Phosphatidylinositol 3-OH Kinase (PI3K) is hierarchically located upstream Protein Kinase B (PKB). Exogenous insulin is able to increase the expression level of PI3K's regulatory sub unity (p85), as determined by Real Time RT-PCR. In the presence of PI3K inhibitors (Wortmannin or LY294002) these effects were reversed. This correlates well with the activation of PKB by phosphorylation, as it appears to be PI3K-dependent. Additionally, PI3K inhibition increased the expression level of two insulin-regulated downstream targets from glycogen metabolism (GSK3b) and gluneogenesis (PEPCK) pathways. GSK3b inhibition by phosphorylation diminished in cells treated with PI3K inhibitors. These results strongly suggest the presence of an insulin sensitive PI3K-PKB axis in BME26 cells. The further study of PI3K and PKB activity in egg homogenates during embryogenesis may help us to understand the role of ISP for R. micro plus development

  4. Effect of saw palmetto extract on PI3K cell signaling transduction in human glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Hui, Lv; Yuqin, Che; Jie, Li; Shuai, Hou; Tiezhu, Zhou; Wei, Wang

    2014-08-01

    Saw palmetto extract can induce the apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of saw palmetto extract on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling transduction pathway in human glioma U87 and U251 cell lines. Suspensions of U87 and U251 cells in a logarithmic growth phase were seeded into six-well plates at a density of 10 4 cells/well. In the experimental group, 1 μl/ml saw palmetto extract was added, while the control group was cultured without a drug for 24 h. The expression levels of PI3K, B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) and p53 were evaluated through western blot analysis. In the experimental group, the U87 and U251 cells exhibited a lower expression level of PI3K protein as compared with the control group (t=6.849; Psaw palmetto extract induces glioma cell growth arrest and apoptosis via decreasing PI3K/Akt signal transduction.

  5. PI3K/Akt1 signalling specifies foregut precursors by generating regionalized extra-cellular matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villegas, S Nahuel; Rothová, Michaela; Barrios-Llerena, Martin E

    2013-01-01

    -to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Akt1 transduced this activity via modifications to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and appropriate ECM could itself induce anterior endodermal identity in the absence of PI3K signalling. PI3K/Akt1-modified ECM contained low levels of Fibronectin (Fn1) and we found that Fn1 dose was key...... to specifying anterior endodermal identity in vivo and in vitro. Thus, localized PI3K activity affects ECM composition and ECM in turn patterns the endoderm. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00806.001....

  6. PI3K/Akt is involved in brown adipogenesis mediated by growth differentiation factor-5 in association with activation of the Smad pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinoi, Eiichi; Iezaki, Takashi; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Takumi; Odaka, Yoshiaki; Ozaki, Kakeru; Yoneda, Yukio, E-mail: yyoneda@p.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Akt is preferentially phosphorylated in BAT and sWAT of aP2-GDF5 mice. • PI3K/Akt signaling is involved in GDF5-induced brown adipogenesis. • PI3K/Akt signaling regulates GDF5-induced Smad5 phosphorylation. - Abstract: We have previously demonstrated promotion by growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF5) of brown adipogenesis for systemic energy expenditure through a mechanism relevant to activating the bone morphological protein (BMP) receptor/mothers against decapentaplegic homolog (Smad)/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) pathway. Here, we show the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway in brown adipogenesis mediated by GDF5. Overexpression of GDF5 in cells expressing adipocyte protein-2 markedly accelerated the phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 and Akt in white and brown adipose tissues. In brown adipose tissue from heterozygous GDF5{sup Rgsc451} mutant mice expressing a dominant-negative (DN) GDF5 under obesogenic conditions, the basal phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 and Akt was significantly attenuated. Exposure to GDF5 not only promoted the phosphorylation of both Smad1/5/8 and Akt in cultured brown pre-adipocytes, but also up-regulated Pgc1a and uncoupling protein-1 expression in a manner sensitive to the PI3K/Akt inhibitor Ly294002 as well as retroviral infection with DN-Akt. GDF5 drastically promoted BMP-responsive luciferase reporter activity in a Ly294002-sensitive fashion. Both Ly294002 and DN-Akt markedly inhibited phosphorylation of Smad5 in the nuclei of brown pre-adipocytes. These results suggest that PI3K/Akt signals play a role in the GDF5-mediated brown adipogenesis through a mechanism related to activation of the Smad pathway.

  7. Reduced juvenile long-term depression in tuberous sclerosis complex is mitigated in adults by compensatory recruitment of mGluR5 and Erk signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyatt B Potter

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is a multisystem genetic disease that manifests with mental retardation, tumor formation, autism, and epilepsy. Heightened signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway is involved in TSC pathology, however it remains unclear how other signaling pathways are perturbed and contribute to disease symptoms. Reduced long-term depression (LTD was recently reported in TSC mutant mice. We find that although reduced LTD is a feature of the juvenile mutant hippocampus, heightened expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and constitutively activated Erk signaling in the adult hippocampus drives wild-type levels of LTD. Increased mGluR5 and Erk results in a novel mTOR-independent LTD in CA1 hippocampus of adult mice, and contributes to the development of epileptiform bursting activity in the TSC2(+/- CA3 region of the hippocampus. Inhibition of mGluR5 or Erk signaling restores appropriate mTOR-dependence to LTD, and significantly reduces epileptiform bursting in TSC2(+/- hippocampal slices. We also report that adult TSC2(+/- mice exhibit a subtle perseverative behavioral phenotype that is eliminated by mGluR5 antagonism. These findings highlight the potential of modulating the mGluR5-Erk pathway in a developmental stage-specific manner to treat TSC.

  8. PI3K/PKB signaling in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus tick embryo cell line BME26

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, L.; Fabres, A.; Logullo, C. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Biociencias e Biotecnologia. Lab. de Quimica e Funcao de Proteinas e Peptideos (LQFPP)]. E-mail: leoabreu@uenf.br; Esteves, E.; Daffre, S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Bioquimica

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Ticks are obligatory blood-sucking arthropods and important vectors of both human and animal diseases. In order to study the insulin triggered pathway and its possible roles during embryogenesis we are using a culture of embryonic Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) micro plus cells (BME26). Besides its metabolic role, insulin signaling pathway (ISP) is widely described as crucial for vertebrate and invertebrate embryogenesis and development. In such cascade Phosphatidylinositol 3-OH Kinase (PI3K) is hierarchically located upstream Protein Kinase B (PKB). Exogenous insulin is able to increase the expression level of PI3K's regulatory sub unity (p85), as determined by Real Time RT-PCR. In the presence of PI3K inhibitors (Wortmannin or LY294002) these effects were reversed. This correlates well with the activation of PKB by phosphorylation, as it appears to be PI3K-dependent. Additionally, PI3K inhibition increased the expression level of two insulin-regulated downstream targets from glycogen metabolism (GSK3b) and gluneogenesis (PEPCK) pathways. GSK3b inhibition by phosphorylation diminished in cells treated with PI3K inhibitors. These results strongly suggest the presence of an insulin sensitive PI3K-PKB axis in BME26 cells. The further study of PI3K and PKB activity in egg homogenates during embryogenesis may help us to understand the role of ISP for R. micro plus development.

  9. Homer2 protein regulates plasma membrane Ca²⁺-ATPase-mediated Ca²⁺ signaling in mouse parotid gland acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Mi; Lee, Jiae; Jo, Hae; Park, Soonhong; Chang, Inik; Muallem, Shmuel; Shin, Dong Min

    2014-09-05

    Homer proteins are scaffold molecules with a domain structure consisting of an N-terminal Ena/VASP homology 1 protein-binding domain and a C-terminal leucine zipper/coiled-coil domain. The Ena/VASP homology 1 domain recognizes proline-rich motifs and binds multiple Ca(2+)-signaling proteins, including G protein-coupled receptors, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors, ryanodine receptors, and transient receptor potential channels. However, their role in Ca(2+) signaling in nonexcitable cells is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the role of Homer2 on Ca(2+) signaling in parotid gland acinar cells using Homer2-deficient (Homer2(-/-)) mice. Homer2 is localized at the apical pole in acinar cells. Deletion of Homer2 did not affect inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor localization or channel activity and did not affect the expression and activity of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pumps. In contrast, Homer2 deletion markedly increased expression of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) pumps, in particular PMCA4, at the apical pole. Accordingly, Homer2 deficiency increased Ca(2+) extrusion by acinar cells. These findings were supported by co-immunoprecipitation of Homer2 and PMCA in wild-type parotid cells and transfected human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. We identified a Homer-binding PPXXF-like motif in the N terminus of PMCA that is required for interaction with Homer2. Mutation of the PPXXF-like motif did not affect the interaction of PMCA with Homer1 but inhibited its interaction with Homer2 and increased Ca(2+) clearance by PMCA. These findings reveal an important regulation of PMCA by Homer2 that has a central role on PMCA-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in parotid acinar cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Receptor for advanced glycation end products inhibits proliferation in osteoblast through suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guofeng; Xu, Jingren; Li, Zengchun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► RAGE overexpression suppresses cell proliferation in MC3T3-E1 cells. ► RAGE overexpression decreases Wnt/β-catenin signaling. ► RAGE overexpression decreases ERK and PI3K signaling. ► Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes PI3K signaling restored by RAGE blockade. ► Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes ERK signaling restored by RAGE blockade. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a crucial role in bone metabolism. However, the role of RAGE in the control of osteoblast proliferation is not yet evaluated. In the present study, we demonstrate that RAGE overexpression inhibits osteoblast proliferation in vitro. The negative regulation of RAGE on cell proliferation results from suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, and is restored by RAGE neutralizing antibody. Prevention of Wnt signaling using Sfrp1 or DKK1 rescues RAGE-decreased PI3K and ERK signaling and cell proliferation, indicating that the altered cell growth in RAGE overexpressing cells is in part secondary to alterations in Wnt signaling. Consistently, RAGE overexpression inhibits the expression of Wnt targets cyclin D1 and c-myc, which is partially reversed by RAGE blockade. Overall, these results suggest that RAGE inhibits osteoblast proliferation via suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, which provides novel mechanisms by which RAGE regulates osteoblast growth.

  11. Dapper1 attenuates hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis by activating PI3K/Akt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Jian-Ren; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Leng, Wei-Ling; Lei, Xiao-Tian; Liang, Zi-Wen

    2017-05-15

    Studies have shown that hepatic insulin resistance, a disorder of glucose and lipid metabolism, plays a vital role in type 2 diabetes (T2D). To clarify the function of Dapper1 in glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver, we investigated the relationships between Dapper1 and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)- and Ca 2+ -mediated activation of PI3K/Akt. We observed a reduction in hepatic Dapper1 in db/db (mice that are homozygous for a spontaneous diabetes mutation) and HFD-induced diabetic mice with T2D. Hepatic overexpression of Dapper1 improved hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and fatty liver. It also increased Akt (pAkt) signaling and repressed both gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. Conversely, Ad-shDapper1-induced knockdown of hepatic Dapper1 promoted gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. Furthermore, Dapper1 activated PI3K p110α/Akt in an insulin-independent manner by inducing ATP production and secretion in vitro. Blockade of P2 ATP receptors, the downstream phospholipase C (PLC), or the inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R all reduced the Dapper1-induced increase in cytosolic free calcium and Dapper1-mediated PI3K/Akt activation, as did removal of calcium in the medium. In conclusion, Dapper1 attenuates hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis in T2D. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Amentoflavone protects dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease model mice through PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Qin; Qin, Liyue; Huang, Fei; Wang, Xiaoshuang; Yang, Liu; Shi, Hailian; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Beibei; Chen, Ziyu; Wu, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis are suggested to be actively involved in the pathogenesis of PD. In the present study, the neuroprotective effect of amentoflavone (AF), a naturally occurring biflavonoid from Selaginella tamariscina, was examined in PD models both in vitro and in vivo. On SH-SY5Y cells, AF treatment dose-dependently reduced 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP + )-induced nuclear condensation and loss of cell viability without obvious cytotoxicity. It inhibited the activation of caspase-3 and p21 but increased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Further study disclosed that AF enhanced the phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt and ERK1/2 down-regulated by MPP + in SH-SY5Y cells, the effect of which could be blocked by LY294002, the inhibitor of PI3K. Consistently, AF alleviated the behavioral deterioration in pole and traction tests and rescued the loss of dopaminergic neurons in SNpc and fibers in striatum in methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induced mice. It also could enhance the activation of PI3K and Akt as well as Bcl-2/Bax ratio in SN. Moreover, AF alleviated gliosis as well as the gene expression levels of IL-1β and iNOS in SN. Collectively, these results suggested that AF protected dopaminergic neurons against MPTP/MPP + -induced neurotoxicity, which might be mediated through activation of PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling pathways in dopaminergic neurons and attenuation of neuroinflammation. - Highlights: • AF protected dopaminergic neurons against MPTP/MPP + -induced neurotoxicity. • AF modulated PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling pathways. • AF could alleviate neuroinflammation in SN.

  13. Amentoflavone protects dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease model mice through PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Qin; Qin, Liyue; Huang, Fei, E-mail: Fei_H@hotmail.com; Wang, Xiaoshuang; Yang, Liu; Shi, Hailian; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Beibei; Chen, Ziyu; Wu, Xiaojun, E-mail: xiaojunwu320@126.com

    2017-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis are suggested to be actively involved in the pathogenesis of PD. In the present study, the neuroprotective effect of amentoflavone (AF), a naturally occurring biflavonoid from Selaginella tamariscina, was examined in PD models both in vitro and in vivo. On SH-SY5Y cells, AF treatment dose-dependently reduced 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP{sup +})-induced nuclear condensation and loss of cell viability without obvious cytotoxicity. It inhibited the activation of caspase-3 and p21 but increased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Further study disclosed that AF enhanced the phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt and ERK1/2 down-regulated by MPP{sup +} in SH-SY5Y cells, the effect of which could be blocked by LY294002, the inhibitor of PI3K. Consistently, AF alleviated the behavioral deterioration in pole and traction tests and rescued the loss of dopaminergic neurons in SNpc and fibers in striatum in methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induced mice. It also could enhance the activation of PI3K and Akt as well as Bcl-2/Bax ratio in SN. Moreover, AF alleviated gliosis as well as the gene expression levels of IL-1β and iNOS in SN. Collectively, these results suggested that AF protected dopaminergic neurons against MPTP/MPP{sup +}-induced neurotoxicity, which might be mediated through activation of PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling pathways in dopaminergic neurons and attenuation of neuroinflammation. - Highlights: • AF protected dopaminergic neurons against MPTP/MPP{sup +}-induced neurotoxicity. • AF modulated PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling pathways. • AF could alleviate neuroinflammation in SN.

  14. Nontranscriptional activation of PI3K/Akt signaling mediates hypotensive effect following activation of estrogen receptor β in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Kay LH

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen acts on the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, where sympathetic premotor neurons are located, to elicit vasodepressor effects via an estrogen receptor (ERβ-dependent mechanism. We investigated in the present study nontranscriptional mechanism on cardiovascular effects following activation of ERβ in the RVLM, and delineated the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/serine/threonine kinase (Akt signaling pathway in the effects. Methods In male Sprague–Dawley rats maintained under propofol anesthesia, changes in arterial pressure, heart rate and sympathetic neurogenic vasomotor tone were examined after microinjection bilaterally into RVLM of 17β-estradiol (E2β or a selective ERα or ERβ agonist. Involvement of ER subtypes and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in the induced cardiovascular effects were studied using pharmacological tools of antagonists or inhibitors, gene manipulation with antisense oligonucleotide (ASON or adenovirus-mediated gene transfection. Results Similar to E2β (1 pmol, microinjection of ERβ agonist, diarylpropionitrile (DPN, 1, 2 or 5 pmol, into bilateral RVLM evoked dose-dependent hypotension and reduction in sympathetic neurogenic vasomotor tone. These vasodepressive effects of DPN (2 pmol were inhibited by ERβ antagonist, R,R-tetrahydrochrysene (50 pmol, ASON against ERβ mRNA (250 pmol, PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (5 pmol, or Akt inhibitor (250 pmol, but not by ERα inhibitor, methyl-piperidino-pyrazole (1 nmol, or transcription inhibitor, actinomycin D (5 or 10 nmol. Gene transfer by microinjection into bilateral RVLM of adenovirus encoding phosphatase and tensin homologues deleted on chromosome 10 (5 × 108 pfu reversed the vasodepressive effects of DPN. Conclusions Our results indicate that vasodepressive effects following activation of ERβ in RVLM are mediated by nongenomic activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This study provides new insight in the

  15. Regulation of dendritic cell function by insulin/IGF-1/PI3K/Akt signaling through klotho expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Nguyen Thi; Hoang, Nguyen Huy; Nhung, Vu Phuong; Duong, Nguyen Thuy; Ha, Nguyen Hai; Hai, Nong Van

    2017-06-01

    Insulin or insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) promotes the activation of phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling in immune cells including dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells for naive T cells. Klotho, an anti-aging protein, participates in the regulation of the PI3K/Akt signaling, thus the Ca 2+ -dependent migration is reduced in klotho-deficient DCs. The present study explored the effects of insulin/IGF-1 on DC function through klotho expression. To this end, the mouse bone marrow cells were isolated and cultured with GM-CSF to attain bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs). Cells were treated with insulin or IGF-1 and followed by stimulating with lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α formation was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Phagocytosis was analyzed by FITC-dextran uptake assay. The expression of klotho was determined by quantitative PCR, immunoprecipitation and western blotting. As a result, treatment of the cells with insulin/IGF-1 resulted in reducing the klotho expression as well as LPS-stimulated TNF-α release and increasing the FITC-dextran uptake but unaltering reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in BMDCs. The effects were abolished by using pharmacological inhibition of PI3K/Akt with LY294002 and paralleled by transfecting DCs with klotho siRNA. In conclusion, the regulation of klotho sensitive DC function by IGF-1 or insulin is mediated through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in BMDCs.

  16. Chaetominine reduces MRP1-mediated drug resistance via inhibiting PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 signaling pathway in K562/Adr human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jingyun; Wei, Xing [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center for Biomanufacturing Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai (China); Lu, Yanhua, E-mail: luyanhua@ecust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center for Biomanufacturing Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai (China)

    2016-05-13

    Drug resistance limits leukemia treatment and chaetominine, a cytotoxic alkaloid that promotes apoptosis in a K562 human leukemia cell line via the mitochondrial pathway was studied with respect to chemoresistance in a K562/Adr human resistant leukemia cell line. Cytotoxicity assays indicated that K562/Adr resistance to adriamycin (ADR) did not occur in the presence of chaetominine and that chaetominine increased chemosensitivity of K562/Adr to ADR. Data show that chaetominine enhanced ADR-induced apoptosis and intracellular ADR accumulation in K562/Adr cells. Accordingly, chaetominine induced apoptosis by upregulating ROS, pro-apoptotic Bax and downregulating anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. RT-PCR and western-blot confirmed that chaetominine suppressed highly expressed MRP1 at mRNA and protein levels. But little obvious alternation of another drug transporter MDR1 mRNA was observed. Furthermore, inhibition of MRP1 by chaetominine relied on inhibiting Akt phosphorylation and nuclear Nrf2. In summary, chaetominine strongly reverses drug resistance by interfering with the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 signaling, resulting in reduction of MRP1-mediated drug efflux and induction of Bax/Bcl-2-dependent apoptosis in an ADR-resistant K562/Adr leukemia cell line. - Highlights: • Chaetominine enhanced chemosensitivity of ADR against K562/Adr cells. • Chaetominine increased intracellular ADR levels via inhibiting MRP1. • Chaetominine induced apoptosis of K562/Adr cells through upregulation of ROS and modulation of Bax/Bcl-2. • Inhibition of MRP1 and Nrf2 by chaetominine treatment was correlative with blockade of PI3K/Akt signaling.

  17. Effect of Qufengtongluo Decoction on PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway in the Kidney of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Rat (GK Rat with Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jun Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Qufengtongluo (QFTL decoction is an effective treatment for diabetic nephropathy (DN. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we try to investigate whether QFTL decoction acts via inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Twenty-four GK rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: blank group, sham-operated group, and QFTL group. After model establishment, rats in QFTL group were given QFTL decoction by gavage, while the rest were given pure water. During the 8-week intervention, 24 hr urinal protein was measured every 2-3 weeks. After intervention, kidneys were removed for pathological smear, quantitative real-time PCR, and western blotting to detect expression levels of p-PI3K, p-Akt, PTEN, TGF-β, PI3K mRNA, Akt mRNA, PTEN mRNA, and TGF-β mRNA. QFTL group showed a slighter degree of renal fibrosis in Masson and PASM staining and a greater reduction of 24 hr urinal protein than blank group. Compared to blank group, expression levels of p-PI3K, p-Akt, PI3K mRNA, and Akt mRNA were lower in QFTL group, while expression levels of PTEN and PTEN mRNA were higher. Besides, TGF-β was downregulated by QFTL decoction. In conclusion, this study suggests that QFTL decoction might inhibit PI3K/Akt signaling pathway via activating PTEN and inhibiting TGF-β.

  18. Anti-Cancer Effect of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1 Inhibition in Human Glioma U87 Cells: Involvement of PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system, and emerging evidence suggests a role of mGluRs in the biology of cancer. Previous studies showed that mGluR1 was a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer and melanoma, but its role in human glioma has not been determined. Methods: In the present study, we investigated the effects of mGluR1 inhibition in human glioma U87 cells using specific targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA or selective antagonists Riluzole and BAY36-7620. The anti-cancer effects of mGluR1 inhibition were measured by cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, TUNEL staining, cell cycle assay, cell invasion and migration assays in vitro, and also examined in a U87 xenograft model in vivo. Results: Inhibition of mGluR1 significantly decreased the cell viability but increased the LDH release in a dose-dependent fashion in U87 cells. These effects were accompanied with the induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. In addition, the results of Matrigel invasion and cell tracking assays showed that inhibition of mGluR1 apparently attenuated cell invasion and migration in U87 cells. All these anti-cancer effects were ablated by the mGluR1 agonist L-quisqualic acid. The results of western blot analysis showed that mGluR1 inhibition overtly decreased the phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, mTOR and P70S6K, indicating the mitigated activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Moreover, the anti-tumor activity of mGluR1 inhibition in vivo was also demonstrated in a U87 xenograft glioma model in athymic nude mice. Conclusion: The remarkable efficiency of mGluR1 inhibition to induce cell death in U87 cells may find therapeutic application for the treatment of glioma patients.

  19. Receptor for advanced glycation end products inhibits proliferation in osteoblast through suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guofeng [Department of Emergency Surgery, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China); Xu, Jingren [Department of Traditional Chinese Orthopaedics, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China); Li, Zengchun, E-mail: lizc.2007@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Emergency Surgery, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression suppresses cell proliferation in MC3T3-E1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression decreases Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression decreases ERK and PI3K signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes PI3K signaling restored by RAGE blockade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes ERK signaling restored by RAGE blockade. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a crucial role in bone metabolism. However, the role of RAGE in the control of osteoblast proliferation is not yet evaluated. In the present study, we demonstrate that RAGE overexpression inhibits osteoblast proliferation in vitro. The negative regulation of RAGE on cell proliferation results from suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, and is restored by RAGE neutralizing antibody. Prevention of Wnt signaling using Sfrp1 or DKK1 rescues RAGE-decreased PI3K and ERK signaling and cell proliferation, indicating that the altered cell growth in RAGE overexpressing cells is in part secondary to alterations in Wnt signaling. Consistently, RAGE overexpression inhibits the expression of Wnt targets cyclin D1 and c-myc, which is partially reversed by RAGE blockade. Overall, these results suggest that RAGE inhibits osteoblast proliferation via suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, which provides novel mechanisms by which RAGE regulates osteoblast growth.

  20. Novel cytoprotective mechanism of anti-parkinsonian drug deprenyl: PI3K and Nrf2-derived induction of antioxidative proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Chiharu; Sato, Hiromi; Imamura, Keiko; Takeshima, Takao; Nakashima, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    Neuroprotection has received considerable attention as a strategy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Deprenyl (Selegiline) is a promising candidate for neuroprotection; however, its cytoprotective mechanism has not been fully clarified. Here, we report a novel cytoprotective mechanism of deprenyl involving PI3K and Nrf2-mediated induction of oxidative stress-related proteins. Deprenyl increased the expression of HO-1, PrxI, TrxI, TrxRxI, γGCS, and p62/A170 in SH-SY5Y cells. Deprenyl also induced the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and increased the binding activity of Nrf2 to the enhancer region of human genomic HO-1. The Nrf2-mediated induction of antioxidative molecules was controlled by PI3K. Indeed, furthermore, neurotrophin receptor TrkB was identified as an upstream signal for PI3K-Nrf2 activation by deprenyl. These results suggest that the cytoprotective effect of deprenyl is, in part, dependent on Nrf2-mediated induction of antioxidative proteins, suggesting that activation of the PI3K-Nrf2 system may be a useful therapeutic strategy for PD

  1. Neuroprotective capabilities of TSA against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Hui; Gao, Qiang; Jia, Zhen; Zhang, Ze-Wei

    2015-02-01

    Hundreds of previous studies demonstrated the cytoprotective effect of trichostatin-A (TSA), a kind of histone deacetylases inhibitors (HDACIs), against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion insult. Meanwhile, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) is a well-known, important signaling pathway that mediates neuroprotection. However, it should be remains unclear whether the neuroprotective capabilities of TSA against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion is mediated by activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Five groups rats (n = 12 each), with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) except sham group, were used to investigate the neuroprotective effect of certain concentration (0.05 mg/kg) of TSA, and whether the neuroprotective effect of TSA is associated with activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway through using of wortmannin (0.25 mg/kg). TSA significantly increased the expression of p-Akt protein, reduced infarct volume, and attenuated neurological deficit in rats with transient MCAO, wortmannin weakened such effect of TSA dramatically. TSA could significantly decrease the neurological deficit scores and reduce the cerebral infarct volume during cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, which was achieved partly by activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway via upgrading of p-Akt protein.

  2. The Effect of Tianmai Xiaoke Pian on Insulin Resistance through PI3-K/AKT Signal Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the clinical setting, given the potential adverse effects of thiazolidinediones and biguanides, we often have difficulty in treatment that no other insulin sensitizers are available for use in type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM patients. Tianmai Xiaoke Pian (TMXKP is a traditional Chinese medicine tablet, which is comprised of chromium picolinate, Tianhuafen, Maidong, and Wuweizi. To understand its mechanism of action on insulin resistance, TMXKP (50 mg/kg orally was tested in T2DM rats (induced by a high-fat diet and streptozotocin. Eight weeks later, fasting blood glucose (FBG and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT were performed. Area under the curve (AUC and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR were calculated, and PI3-K/AKT signal pathway-related genes and proteins were tested by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and western blot analysis in muscle, adipose, and liver tissues, respectively. TMXKP significantly reduced FBG, OGTT, AUC, and HOMA-IR in diabetic rats P<0.05. Furthermore, we also observed that TMXKP could significantly decrease IRS-1, IRS-2, PI3-K p85α, and AKT2 gene expression and also IRS-1, IRS-2, PI3-K, AKT2, and p-AKT2 protein expression levels P<0.05 in diabetic rats. These findings confirm that TMXKP can alleviate insulin resistance in T2DM rats through the PI3K/AKT pathway. Thus TMXKP appears to be a promising insulin sensitizer.

  3. CCL5 promotes VEGF-dependent angiogenesis by down-regulating miR-200b through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in human chondrosarcoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guan-Ting; Chen, Hsien-Te; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Tan, Tzu-Wei; Fong, Yi-Chin; Chen, Po-Chen; Yang, Wei-Hung; Wang, Shih-Wei; Chen, Jui-Chieh; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary malignant bone cancer, with potential for local invasion and distant metastasis. Chemokine CCL5 (formerly RANTES) of the CC-chemokine family plays a crucial role in metastasis. Angiogenesis is essential for the cancer metastasis. However, correlation of CCL5 with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma is still unknown. CCL5-mediated VEGF expression was assessed by qPCR, ELISA, and Western blotting. CCL5-induced angiogenesis was examined by migration and tube formation in endothelial progenitor cells in vitro. CCL5 increased VEGF expression and also promoted chondrosarcoma conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Stimulation of chondrosarcoma with CCL5 augmented PI3K and Akt phosphorylation, while PI3K and Akt inhibitor or siRNA abolished CCL5-induced VEGF expression and angiogenesis. We also demonstrated CCL5 inhibiting miR-200b expression and miR-200b mimic reversing the CCL5-enhanced VEGF expression and angiogenesis. Moreover, in chondrosarcoma patients showed the positive correlation between CCL5 and VEGF; negative correlation between CCL5 and miR-200b. Taken together, results demonstrate CCL5 promoting VEGF-dependent angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells by down-regulating miR-200b through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:25301739

  4. Non-genomic actions of retinoic acid induce pi3k signaling pathway and phosphorylation of nuclear proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Laserna Mendieta, Emilio J.; Masiá, Susana; Barettino, Domingo

    2007-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the active form of vitamin A, induces neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y to differentiate. In addition to its classical transcriptional actions regulating the expression of specific genes, RA acts in an extra-genomic way, modulating the activity of relevant signalling cascades. In particular, RA treatment of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells results in activation of phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway, and this activation is required for RA-induced differentiation (...

  5. Neurotrophin Promotes Neurite Outgrowth by Inhibiting Rif GTPase Activation Downstream of MAPKs and PI3K Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoxia; Yan, Huijuan; Li, Jiayi; Wu, Shuang; Wang, Junyu; Fan, Lifei

    2017-01-13

    Members of the well-known semaphorin family of proteins can induce both repulsive and attractive signaling in neural network formation and their cytoskeletal effects are mediated in part by small guanosine 5'-triphosphatase (GTPases). The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular role of Rif GTPase in the neurotrophin-induced neurite outgrowth. By using PC12 cells which are known to cease dividing and begin to show neurite outgrowth responding to nerve growth factor (NGF), we found that semaphorin 6A was as effective as nerve growth factor at stimulating neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, and that its neurotrophic effect was transmitted through signaling by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). We further found that neurotrophin-induced neurite formation in PC12 cells could be partially mediated by inhibition of Rif GTPase activity downstream of MAPKs and PI3K signaling. In conclusion, we newly identified Rif as a regulator of the cytoskeletal rearrangement mediated by semaphorins.

  6. AKTivation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway by KSHV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aadra P Bhatt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As an obligate intracellular parasite, the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV relies on host cell machinery to meet its needs for survival, viral replication, production, and dissemination of progeny virions. KSHV is a ɣ-herpesvirus that is associated with three different malignancies: Kaposi sarcoma (KS, and two B cell lymphoproliferative disorders, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD. KSHV viral proteins modulate cellular phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway, which is a ubiquitous pathway that also controls B lymphocyte proliferation and development. We review the mechanisms by which KSHV manipulates the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, with a specific focus on B cells.

  7. Minoxidil sulfate induced the increase in blood-brain tumor barrier permeability through ROS/RhoA/PI3K/PKB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan-ting; Xue, Yi-xue; Wang, Yan-feng; Wang, Jin-hui; Chen, Xia; ShangGuan, Qian-ru; Lian, Yan; Zhong, Lei; Meng, Ying-nan

    2013-12-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel (KATP channel) activator, minoxidil sulfate (MS), can selectively increase the permeability of the blood-tumor barrier (BTB); however, the mechanism by which this occurs is still under investigation. Using a rat brain glioma (C6) model, we first examined the expression levels of occludin and claudin-5 at different time points after intracarotid infusion of MS (30 μg/kg/min) by western blotting. Compared to MS treatment for 0 min group, the protein expression levels of occludin and claudin-5 in brain tumor tissue of rats showed no changes within 1 h and began to decrease significantly after 2 h of MS infusion. Based on these findings, we then used an in vitro BTB model and selective inhibitors of diverse signaling pathways to investigate whether reactive oxygen species (ROS)/RhoA/PI3K/PKB pathway play a key role in the process of the increase of BTB permeability induced by MS. The inhibitor of ROS or RhoA or PI3K or PKB significantly attenuated the expression of tight junction (TJ) protein and the increase of the BTB permeability after 2 h of MS treatment. In addition, the significant increases in RhoA activity and PKB phosphorylation after MS administration were observed, which were partly inhibited by N-2-mercaptopropionyl glycine (MPG) or C3 exoenzyme or LY294002 pretreatment. The present study indicates that the activation of signaling cascades involving ROS/RhoA/PI3K/PKB in BTB was required for the increase of BTB permeability induced by MS. Taken together, all of these results suggested that MS might increase BTB permeability in a time-dependent manner by down-regulating TJ protein expression and this effect could be related to ROS/RhoA/PI3K/PKB signal pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Central GLP-2 enhances hepatic insulin sensitivity via activating PI3K signaling in POMC neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xuemei; Zhou, Fuguo; Li, Xiaojie; Chang, Benny; Li, Depei; Wang, Yi; Tong, Qingchun; Xu, Yong; Fukuda, Makoto; Zhao, Jean J.; Li, Defa; Burrin, Douglas G.; Chan, Lawrence; Guan, Xinfu

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1/2) are co-produced and highlighted as key modulators to improve glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity after bariatric surgery. However, it is unknown if CNS GLP-2 plays any physiological role in the control of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. We show that mice lacking GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R) in POMC neurons display glucose intolerance and hepatic insulin resistance. GLP-2R activation in POMC neurons is required for GLP-2 to enhance insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose production (HGP) and gluconeogenesis. GLP-2 directly modulates excitability of POMC neurons in GLP-2R- and PI3K-dependent manners. GLP-2 initiates GLP-2R-p85α interaction and facilitates PI3K-Akt-dependent FoxO1 nuclear exclusion in POMC neurons. Central GLP-2 suppresses basal HGP and enhances insulin sensitivity, which are abolished in POMC-p110α KO mice. Thus, CNS GLP-2 plays a key physiological role in the control of hepatic glucose production through activating PI3K-dependent modulation of membrane excitability and nuclear transcription of POMC neurons in the brain. PMID:23823479

  9. Central GLP-2 enhances hepatic insulin sensitivity via activating PI3K signaling in POMC neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xuemei; Zhou, Fuguo; Li, Xiaojie; Chang, Benny; Li, Depei; Wang, Yi; Tong, Qingchun; Xu, Yong; Fukuda, Makoto; Zhao, Jean J; Li, Defa; Burrin, Douglas G; Chan, Lawrence; Guan, Xinfu

    2013-07-02

    Glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1/GLP-2) are coproduced and highlighted as key modulators to improve glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity after bariatric surgery. However, it is unknown if CNS GLP-2 plays any physiological role in the control of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. We show that mice lacking GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R) in POMC neurons display glucose intolerance and hepatic insulin resistance. GLP-2R activation in POMC neurons is required for GLP-2 to enhance insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose production (HGP) and gluconeogenesis. GLP-2 directly modulates excitability of POMC neurons in GLP-2R- and PI3K-dependent manners. GLP-2 initiates GLP-2R-p85α interaction and facilitates PI3K-Akt-dependent FoxO1 nuclear exclusion in POMC neurons. Central GLP-2 suppresses basal HGP and enhances insulin sensitivity, which are abolished in POMC-p110α KO mice. Thus, CNS GLP-2 plays a key physiological role in the control of HGP through activating PI3K-dependent modulation of membrane excitability and nuclear transcription of POMC neurons in the brain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cyclic mechanical strain maintains Nanog expression through PI3K/Akt signaling in mouse embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Rie; Akimoto, Takayuki; Hong, Zhang; Ushida, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical strain has been reported to affect the proliferation/differentiation of many cell types; however, the effects of mechanotransduction on self-renewal as well as pluripotency of embryonic stem (ES) cells remains unknown. To investigate the effects of mechanical strain on mouse ES cell fate, we examined the expression of Nanog, which is an essential regulator of self-renewal and pluripotency as well as Nanog-associated intracellular signaling during uniaxial cyclic mechanical strain. The mouse ES cell line, CCE was plated onto elastic membranes, and we applied 10% strain at 0.17 Hz. The expression of Nanog was reduced during ES cell differentiation in response to the withdrawal of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF); however, two days of cyclic mechanical strain attenuated this reduction of Nanog expression. On the other hand, the cyclic mechanical strain promoted PI3K-Akt signaling, which is reported as an upstream of Nanog transcription. The cyclic mechanical strain-induced Akt phosphorylation was blunted by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Furthermore, cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, also inhibited the mechanical strain-induced increase in phospho-Akt. These findings imply that mechanical force plays a role in regulating Nanog expression in ES cells through the actin cytoskeleton-PI3K-Akt signaling. -- Highlights: ► The expression of Nanog, which is an essential regulator of “stemness” was reduced during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. ► Cyclic mechanical strain attenuated the reduction of Nanog expression. ► Cyclic mechanical strain promoted PI3K-Akt signaling and mechanical strain-induced Akt phosphorylation was blunted by the PI3K inhibitor and an inhibitor of actin polymerization.

  11. Viral-mediated knockdown of mGluR7 in the nucleus accumbens mediates excessive alcohol drinking and increased ethanol-elicited conditioned place preference in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahi, Amine

    2013-10-01

    Whether metabotropic glutamate 7 (mGluR7) -activation enhances or diminishes the reinforcing properties of psychostimulants remains unclear. We have previously shown that systemic mGluR7 activation reduced alcohol consumption and preference as well as locomotor-stimulating and rewarding properties of ethanol. In this study, we further examined the contribution of mGluR7 on the effect of ethanol within the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), a neural target for many drugs of abuse. Using short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing lentiviral vectors (LV) to alter locally the activity of mGluR7 in male rats, we have shown that blocking mGluR7 expression increased ethanol consumption and preference in a two-bottle choice drinking paradigm with no effect either on saccharin or on quinine used for taste discrimination. In addition, mGluR7 knockdown increases preference for environments previously paired with low doses of ethanol in the conditioned place preference (CPP) test, as it shifted the dose-response curve for ethanol CPP to the left, indicating alterations in the rewarding effects of alcohol. More importantly, mGluR7 blockade in the dorsal striatum (DS) neither affected ethanol consumption nor ethanol-elicited CPP. These results show that levels of mGluR7 in the NAcc regulate responsiveness to alcohol. Taken together, these findings clearly demonstrate that mGluR7 signaling within the NAcc is a key modulator of functional responses to ethanol and offer an important target for regulating the addictive effects of alcohol.

  12. Distinctive and selective route of PI3K/PKCα-PKCδ/RhoA-Rac1 signaling in osteoclastic cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Mi Yeong; Lee, Kyunghee; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-12-05

    Cell migration during specialized stages of osteoclast precursors, mononuclear preosteoclasts, and multinucleated mature osteoclasts remain uncertain. M-CSF- and osteopontin-induced osteoclastic cell migration was inhibited by function-blocking monoclonal antibodies specific to the integrin αv and β3 subunits, suggesting that integrin αvβ3 mediates migratory signaling induced by M-CSF and osteopontin. M-CSF and osteopontin stimulation was shown to regulate two branched signaling processes, PI3K/PKCα/RhoA axis and PI3K/PKCδ/Rac1 axis. Interestingly, inactivation of RhoA or Rac1 blocked preosteoclast and mature osteoclast migration but not osteoclast precursor migration in a transwell-based cell migration assay. Moreover, the inhibitory effect on preosteoclast and mature osteoclast migration induced by Rac1 inactivation was more effective than that by RhoA inactivation. Collectively, our findings suggest that osteoclast precursor migration depends on PI3K/PKCα-PKCδ signaling mediated via integrin αvβ3 bypassing RhoA and Rac1, whereas preosteoclast and mature osteoclast migration relies on PI3K/PKCα-PKCδ/RhoA-Rac1 axis signaling mediated via integrin αvβ3 with increased dependency on PKCδ/Rac1 signaling route as differentiation progresses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ursolic acid increases glucose uptake through the PI3K signaling pathway in adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghan He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ursolic acid (UA, a triterpenoid compound, is reported to have a glucose-lowering effect. However, the mechanisms are not fully understood. Adipose tissue is one of peripheral tissues that collectively control the circulating glucose levels. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to determine the effect and further the mechanism of action of UA in adipocytes. METHODS AND RESULTS: The 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were induced to differentiate and treated with different concentrations of UA. NBD-fluorescent glucose was used as the tracer to measure glucose uptake and Western blotting used to determine the expression and activity of proteins involved in glucose transport. It was found that 2.5, 5 and 10 µM of UA promoted glucose uptake in a dose-dependent manner (17%, 29% and 35%, respectively. 10 µM UA-induced glucose uptake with insulin stimulation was completely blocked by the phosphatidylinositol (PI 3-kinase (PI3K inhibitor wortmannin (1 µM, but not by SB203580 (10 µM, the inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, or compound C (2.5 µM, the inhibitor of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK inhibitor. Furthermore, the downstream protein activities of the PI3K pathway, phosphoinositide-dependent kinase (PDK and phosphoinositide-dependent serine/threoninekinase (AKT were increased by 10 µM of UA in the presence of insulin. Interestingly, the activity of AS160 and protein kinase C (PKC and the expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 were stimulated by 10 µM of UA under either the basal or insulin-stimulated status. Moreover, the translocation of GLUT4 from cytoplasm to cell membrane was increased by UA but decreased when the PI3K inhibitor was applied. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that UA stimulates glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes through the PI3K pathway, providing important information regarding the mechanism of action of UA for its anti-diabetic effect.

  14. Truncated ALK derived from chromosomal translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35) binds to the SH3 domain of p85-PI3K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgar, Doris; Leisser, Christina; Maier, Susanne; Strasser, Stephan; Rüger, Beate; Dettke, Markus; Khorchide, Maya; Simonitsch, Ingrid; Cerni, Christa; Krupitza, Georg

    2005-02-15

    The chromosomal translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35) is associated with "Anaplastic large cell lymphomas" (ALCL), a Non Hodgkin Lymphoma occurring in childhood. The fusion of the tyrosine kinase gene-ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) on chromosome 2p23 to the NPM (nucleophosmin/B23) gene on chromosome 5q35 results in a 80 kDa chimeric protein, which activates the "survival" kinase PI3K. However, the binding mechanism between truncated ALK and PI3K is poorly understood. Therefore, we attempted to elucidate the molecular interaction between ALK and the regulatory p85 subunit of PI3K. Here we provide evidence that the truncated ALK homodimer binds to the SH3 domain of p85. This finding may be useful for the development of a new target-specific intervention.

  15. Abnormal Wnt and PI3Kinase signaling in the malformed intestine of lama5 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léa Ritié

    Full Text Available Laminins are major constituents of basement membranes and are essential for tissue homeostasis. Laminin-511 is highly expressed in the intestine and its absence causes severe malformation of the intestine and embryonic lethality. To understand the mechanistic role of laminin-511 in tissue homeostasis, we used RNA profiling of embryonic intestinal tissue of lama5 knockout mice and identified a lama5 specific gene expression signature. By combining cell culture experiments with mediated knockdown approaches, we provide a mechanistic link between laminin α5 gene deficiency and the physiological phenotype. We show that laminin α5 plays a crucial role in both epithelial and mesenchymal cell behavior by inhibiting Wnt and activating PI3K signaling. We conclude that conflicting signals are elicited in the absence of lama5, which alter cell adhesion, migration as well as epithelial and muscle differentiation. Conversely, adhesion to laminin-511 may serve as a potent regulator of known interconnected PI3K/Akt and Wnt signaling pathways. Thus deregulated adhesion to laminin-511 may be instrumental in diseases such as human pathologies of the gut where laminin-511 is abnormally expressed as it is shown here.

  16. RIP2 Is a Critical Regulator for NLRs Signaling and MHC Antigen Presentation but Not for MAPK and PI3K/Akt Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao Man; Chen, Wen Qin; Hu, Yi Wei; Cao, Lu; Nie, Pin; Chang, Ming Xian

    2018-01-01

    RIP2 is an adaptor protein which is essential for the activation of NF-κB and NOD1- and NOD2-dependent signaling. Although NOD-RIP2 axis conservatively existed in the teleost, the function of RIP2 was only reported in zebrafish, goldfish, and rainbow trout in vitro . Very little is known about the role and mechanisms of piscine NOD-RIP2 axis in vivo . Our previous study showed the protective role of zebrafish NOD1 in larval survival through CD44a-mediated activation of PI3K-Akt signaling. In this study, we examined whether RIP2 was required for larval survival with or without pathogen infection, and determined the signaling pathways modulated by RIP2. Based on our previous report and the present study, our data demonstrated that NOD1-RIP2 axis was important for larval survival in the early ontogenesis. Similar to NOD1, RIP2 deficiency significantly affected immune system processes. The significantly enriched pathways were mainly involved in immune system, such as "Antigen processing and presentation" and "NOD-like receptor signaling pathway" and so on. Furthermore, both transcriptome analysis and qRT-PCR revealed that RIP2 was a critical regulator for expression of NLRs (NOD-like receptors) and those genes involved in MHC antigen presentation. Different from NOD1, the present study showed that NOD1, but not RIP2 deficiency significantly impaired protein levels of MAPK pathways. Although RIP2 deficiency also significantly impaired the expression of CD44a, the downstream signaling of CD44a-Lck-PI3K-Akt pathway remained unchanged. Collectively, our works highlight the similarity and discrepancy of NOD1 and RIP2 in the regulation of immune signaling pathways in the zebrafish early ontogenesis, and confirm the crucial role of RIP2 in NLRs signaling and MHC antigen presentation, but not for MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways.

  17. NMDA-induced potentiation of mGluR5 is mediated by activation of protein phosphatase 2B/calcineurin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagarsamy, Sudar; Saugstad, Julie; Warren, Lee; Mansuy, Isabelle M.; Gereau, Robert W.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors potentiates responses to activation of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR5 by reversing PKC-mediated desensitization of this receptor. NMDA-induced reversal of mGluR5 desensitization is dependent on activation of protein phosphatases. However, the specific protein phosphatase involved and the precise mechanism by which NMDA receptor activation reduces mGluR desensitization are not known. We have performed a series of molecular, biochemical, and genetic studies to show that NMDA-induced regulation of mGluR5 is dependent on activation of calcium-dependent protein phosphatase 2B/calcineurin (PP2B/CaN). Furthermore, we report that purified calcineurin directly dephosphorylates the C-terminal tail of mGluR5 at sites that are phosphorylated by PKC. Finally, immunoprecipitation and GST fusion protein pull-down experiments reveal that calcineurin interacts with mGluR5, suggesting that these proteins could be colocalized in a signaling complex. Taken together with previous studies, these data suggest that activation of NMDA receptors leads to activation of calcineurin and that calcineurin modulates mGluR5 function by directly dephosphorylating mGluR5 at PKC sites that are involved in desensitization of this receptor. 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. PMID:16005030

  18. Francisella subverts innate immune signaling: Focus on PI3K/Akt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas John Cremer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular bacterial pathogens exploit host cells as a part of their lifecycle, and they do so by manipulating host cell signaling events. Many such bacteria are known to produce effector proteins that promote cell invasion, alter membrane trafficking and disrupt signaling cascades. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of signaling pathways involved in host cell responses to Francisella tularensis, a facultative Gram-negative intracellular pathogen that causes tularemia. We highlight several key pathways that are targeted by Francisella, with a focus on the PI3K/Akt pathway. Lastly, we discuss the emerging role of microRNAs, specifically miR-155, as a key regulator of host signaling and defense.

  19. Netrin-1 induces the migration of Schwann cells via p38 MAPK and PI3K-Akt signaling pathway mediated by the UNC5B receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Jianwei [General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, No. 154, Anshan Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300052 (China); Tianjin Institute of Orthopedics in Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, No. 155, Munan Road, Tianjin 300050 (China); Sun, Xiaolei; Ma, Jianxiong [Tianjin Institute of Orthopedics in Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, No. 155, Munan Road, Tianjin 300050 (China); Ma, Xinlong, E-mail: gengxiao502@163.com [General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, No. 154, Anshan Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300052 (China); Tianjin Institute of Orthopedics in Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, No. 155, Munan Road, Tianjin 300050 (China); Zhang, Yang; Li, Fengbo; Li, Yanjun; Zhao, Zhihu [Tianjin Institute of Orthopedics in Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, No. 155, Munan Road, Tianjin 300050 (China)

    2015-08-14

    Schwann cells (SCs) play an essentially supportive role in the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve system (PNS). As Netrin-1 is crucial for the normal development of nervous system (NS) and can direct the process of damaged PNS regeneration, our study was designed to determine the role of Netrin-1 in RSC96 Schwann cells (an immortalized rat Schwann cell line) proliferation and migration. Our studies demonstrated that Netrin-1 had no effect on RSC96 cells proliferation, while significantly promoted RSC96 cells migration. The Netrin-1-induced RSC96 cells migration was significantly attenuated by inhibition of p38 and PI3K through pretreatment with SB203580 and LY294002 respectively, but not inhibition of MEK1/2 and JNK by U0126-EtOH and SP600125 individually. Treatment with Netrin-1 enhanced the phosphorylation of p38 and Akt. QRT-PCR indicated that Netrin-1 and only its receptors Unc5a, Unc5b and Neogenin were expressed in RSC96 cells, among which Unc5b expressed the most. And UNC5B protein was significantly increased after stimulated by Netrin-1. In conclusion, we show here that Netrin-1-enhanced SCs migration is mediated by activating p38 MAPK and PI3K-Akt signal cascades via receptor UNC5B, which suggests that Netrin-1 could serve as a new therapeutic strategy and has potential application value for PNS regeneration. - Highlights: • Netrin-1 attracts RSC96 Schwann cells migration in a dose dependent manner. • Netrin-1 induced Schwann cells migration is p38 and PI3K-Akt signaling dependent. • UNC5B may be dominant receptor mediating Netrin-1′ effect on RSC96 cells motility. • Netrin-1 may promote peripheral nerve repair by enhancing Schwann cells motility.

  20. Cyclic mechanical strain maintains Nanog expression through PI3K/Akt signaling in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Rie [Division of Regenerative Medical Engineering, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Akimoto, Takayuki, E-mail: akimoto@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Regenerative Medical Engineering, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 513 Waseda-tsurumaki, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Hong, Zhang [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 513 Waseda-tsurumaki, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Ushida, Takashi [Division of Regenerative Medical Engineering, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Mechanical strain has been reported to affect the proliferation/differentiation of many cell types; however, the effects of mechanotransduction on self-renewal as well as pluripotency of embryonic stem (ES) cells remains unknown. To investigate the effects of mechanical strain on mouse ES cell fate, we examined the expression of Nanog, which is an essential regulator of self-renewal and pluripotency as well as Nanog-associated intracellular signaling during uniaxial cyclic mechanical strain. The mouse ES cell line, CCE was plated onto elastic membranes, and we applied 10% strain at 0.17 Hz. The expression of Nanog was reduced during ES cell differentiation in response to the withdrawal of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF); however, two days of cyclic mechanical strain attenuated this reduction of Nanog expression. On the other hand, the cyclic mechanical strain promoted PI3K-Akt signaling, which is reported as an upstream of Nanog transcription. The cyclic mechanical strain-induced Akt phosphorylation was blunted by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Furthermore, cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, also inhibited the mechanical strain-induced increase in phospho-Akt. These findings imply that mechanical force plays a role in regulating Nanog expression in ES cells through the actin cytoskeleton-PI3K-Akt signaling. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of Nanog, which is an essential regulator of 'stemness' was reduced during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclic mechanical strain attenuated the reduction of Nanog expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclic mechanical strain promoted PI3K-Akt signaling and mechanical strain-induced Akt phosphorylation was blunted by the PI3K inhibitor and an inhibitor of actin polymerization.

  1. BDE-99 (2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether) triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colorectal cancer cells via PI3K/Akt/Snail signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Ruan, Xin-Jian; Zhang, Hong-Yan

    2015-01-01

    The gut is in direct contact with BDE-99 (2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether), one of the most abundant PBDE congeners in the environment and in human tissues. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of BDE-99 on colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. The effects of BDE-99 on cell proliferation were measured by CCK-8 assay in the CRC cell line HCT-116. Wound healing and transwell migration/invasion assays were used to test the migration and invasion of CRC cells. Factors related to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were measured by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis for mRNA and protein levels, respectively. BDE-99 was found to increase migration and invasion and trigger EMT in HCT-116 cells; EMT was characterized by cells acquiring mesenchymal spindle-like morphology and by increased expression of N-cadherin with a concomitant decrease in E-cadherin. BDE-99 treatment also increased the protein and mRNA levels of the transcription factor Snail, but not Slug, Twist, and ZEB1. Knockdown of Snail by siRNA significantly attenuated BDE-99-induced EMT in HCT-116 cells, suggesting that Snail plays a crucial role in BDE-99-induced EMT. The PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 completely blocked BDE-99-induced Snail and invasion of HCT-116 cells. Our results revealed that BDE-99 can trigger the EMT of colon cancer cells via the PI3K/AKT/Snail signaling pathway. This study provides new insight into the tumorigenesis and metastasis of CRC stimulated by BDE-99 and possibly other PBDE congeners.

  2. Omentin-1 Stimulates Human Osteoblast Proliferation through PI3K/Akt Signal Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Shan Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been presumed that adipokines deriving from adipose tissue may play important roles in bone metabolism. Omentin-1, a novel adipokine, which is selectively expressed in visceral adipose tissue, has been reported to stimulate proliferation and inhibit differentiation of mouse osteoblast. However, little information refers to the effect of omentin-1 on human osteoblast (hOB proliferation. The current study examined the potential effects of omentin-1 on proliferation in hOB and the signal pathway involved. Omentin-1 promoted hOB proliferation in a dose-dependent manner as determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Western blot analysis revealed that omentin-1 induced activation of Akt (phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase downstream effector and such effect was impeded by transfection of hOB with Akt-siRNA. Furthermore, LY294002 (a selective PI3K inhibitor and HIMO (a selective Akt inhibitor abolished the omentin-1-induced hOB proliferation. These findings indicate that omentin-1 induces hOB proliferation via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and suggest that osteoblast is a direct target of omentin-1.

  3. High basal Wnt signaling is further induced by PI3K/mTor inhibition but sensitive to cSRC inhibition in mammary carcinoma cell lines with HER2/3 overexpression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmermans-Sprang, Elpetra P. M.; Gracanin, Ana; Mol, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated basal, ligand-independent, Wnt signaling in some canine breast cancer cells is not caused by classical mutations in APC, β-Catenin or GSK3β but, at least partially, by enhanced LEF1 expression. We examined the expression and function of EGFR/HER-regulated pathways on the ligand-independent Wnt signaling. Twelve canine mammary tumor cell lines with previously reported differential basal Wnt activity were used. The expression levels of genes related to EGF-signaling were analyzed by cluster analysis. Cell lines with a combined overexpression of EGF-related genes and enhanced basal Wnt activity were treated with PI3K/mTor or cSRC inhibitors or transfected with a construct expressing wild-type PTEN. Subsequently, effects were measured on Wnt activity, cell proliferation, gene expression and protein level. High basal Wnt/LEF1 activity was associated with overexpression of HER2/3, ID1, ID2, RAC1 and HSP90 together with low to absent cMET and PTEN mRNA expression, suggesting a connection between Wnt- and HER-signaling pathways. Inhibition of the HER-regulated PI3K/mTor pathway using the dual PI3K/mTor inhibitor BEZ235 or the mTor inhibitor Everolimus® resulted in reduced cell proliferation. In the cell line with high basal Wnt activity, however, an unexpected further increased Wnt activity was found that could be greatly reduced after inhibition of the HER-regulated cSRC activity. Inhibition of the PI3K/mTor pathway was associated with enhanced expression of β-Catenin, Axin2, MUC1, cMET, EGFR and HER2 and a somewhat increased β-Catenin protein content, whereas cSRC inhibition was associated with slightly enhanced HER3 and SLUG mRNA expression. A high protein expression of HER3 was found only in a cell line with high basal Wnt activity. High basal Wnt activity in some mammary cancer cell lines is associated with overexpression of HER-receptor related genes and HER3 protein, and the absence of PTEN. Inhibition of the PI3K/mTor pathway further stimulated

  4. Involvement of IGF-1 and MEOX2 in PI3K/Akt1/2 and ERK1/2 pathways mediated proliferation and differentiation of perivascular adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ping; Kong, Feng; Wang, Jue; Lu, Qinghua; Xu, Haijia; Qi, Tonggang; Meng, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Perivascular adipocyte (PVAC) proliferation and differentiation were closely involved in cardiovascular disease. We aimed to investigate whether phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways enhance PVAC functions activated by insulin-like growth factor 1(IGF-1) and suppressed by mesenchyme homeobox 2 (MEOX2). In this study, PVACs from primary culture were cultured and induced to differentiate. Cell viability assays demonstrated that IGF-1 promoted PVAC proliferation and differentiation. However MEOX2 counteracted these IGF-1-mediated actions. Flow Cytometry revealed that IGF-1 increased S phase cells and decreased apoptosis; however, MEOX2 decreased S phase cells, increased G0–G1 phase cells, and promoted apoptosis. During PVAC proliferation and differentiation, IGF-1 activated PI3K/Akt1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, upregulated the expression of these signaling proteins and FAS, and increased PVAC lipid content. In contrast, MEOX2 constrained the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt1/2 protein, down-regulated these signaling molecules and FAS, and decreased PVAC lipid content. Instead, MEOX2 knockdown enhanced the ERK1/2 and Akt1/2 phosphorylation, augmented the expression of these signaling molecules and FAS, and increased PVAC lipid content. Our findings suggested that PI3K/Akt1/2 and ERK1/2 activation mediated by IGF-1 is essential for PVAC proliferation and differentiation, and MEOX2 is a promising therapeutic gene to intervene in the signaling pathways and inhibit PVAC functions. - Highlights: • IGF-1 activated PI3K/Akt2 and ERK1/2 pathways to mediate PVAC proliferation and differentiation. • The expression of ERK1, ERK 2, PI3K, Akt1 and Akt2 showed different change trends between PVAC proliferation and differentiation. • MEOX2 effectively expressed in PVAC, increased early and late cellular apoptosis, and inhibited its proliferation. • MEOX2 depressed PVAC differentiation and FAS expression

  5. Involvement of IGF-1 and MEOX2 in PI3K/Akt1/2 and ERK1/2 pathways mediated proliferation and differentiation of perivascular adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ping, E-mail: lping@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Cardiology, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, No. 247, Beiyuan Road, Shandong, Jinan 250033 (China); Kong, Feng; Wang, Jue [Central Laboratory, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Shandong, Jinan 250033 (China); Lu, Qinghua [Department of Cardiology, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, No. 247, Beiyuan Road, Shandong, Jinan 250033 (China); Xu, Haijia [Department of Cardiology, Wendeng Central Hospital of Weihai City, Shandong, Weihai 264400 (China); Qi, Tonggang [Central Laboratory, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Shandong, Jinan 250033 (China); Meng, Juan [Department of Cardiology, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, No. 247, Beiyuan Road, Shandong, Jinan 250033 (China)

    2015-02-01

    Perivascular adipocyte (PVAC) proliferation and differentiation were closely involved in cardiovascular disease. We aimed to investigate whether phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways enhance PVAC functions activated by insulin-like growth factor 1(IGF-1) and suppressed by mesenchyme homeobox 2 (MEOX2). In this study, PVACs from primary culture were cultured and induced to differentiate. Cell viability assays demonstrated that IGF-1 promoted PVAC proliferation and differentiation. However MEOX2 counteracted these IGF-1-mediated actions. Flow Cytometry revealed that IGF-1 increased S phase cells and decreased apoptosis; however, MEOX2 decreased S phase cells, increased G0–G1 phase cells, and promoted apoptosis. During PVAC proliferation and differentiation, IGF-1 activated PI3K/Akt1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, upregulated the expression of these signaling proteins and FAS, and increased PVAC lipid content. In contrast, MEOX2 constrained the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt1/2 protein, down-regulated these signaling molecules and FAS, and decreased PVAC lipid content. Instead, MEOX2 knockdown enhanced the ERK1/2 and Akt1/2 phosphorylation, augmented the expression of these signaling molecules and FAS, and increased PVAC lipid content. Our findings suggested that PI3K/Akt1/2 and ERK1/2 activation mediated by IGF-1 is essential for PVAC proliferation and differentiation, and MEOX2 is a promising therapeutic gene to intervene in the signaling pathways and inhibit PVAC functions. - Highlights: • IGF-1 activated PI3K/Akt2 and ERK1/2 pathways to mediate PVAC proliferation and differentiation. • The expression of ERK1, ERK 2, PI3K, Akt1 and Akt2 showed different change trends between PVAC proliferation and differentiation. • MEOX2 effectively expressed in PVAC, increased early and late cellular apoptosis, and inhibited its proliferation. • MEOX2 depressed PVAC differentiation and FAS expression

  6. Reactive oxygen species mediate Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through PI3K/AKT-dependent activation of GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Fan, Jia; Kim, Dong-Hern; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi, Xianglin

    2013-01-01

    Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens that primarily target the lungs. Cr(VI) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules involved in Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis have not been extensively studied. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to Cr(VI) at nanomolar concentrations (10–100 nM) for 3 months not only induced cell transformation, but also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of Cr(VI)-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) increased levels of intracellular ROS and antiapoptotic proteins. Transfection with catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevented Cr(VI)-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion, migration, and xenograft tumors. While chronic Cr(VI) exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, transfection with catalase or SOD markedly inhibited Cr(VI)-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the Cr(VI)-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. In particular, Cr(VI) suppressed autophagy of epithelial cells under nutrition deprivation. Furthermore, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, mTOR, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with Cr(VI)-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that ROS is a key mediator of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through the activation of PI3K/AKT-dependent GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling and the promotion of cell survival mechanisms via the inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy. - Highlights: • Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. • ROS play an important role in Cr(VI)-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. • PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling involved in Cr

  7. Reactive oxygen species mediate Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through PI3K/AKT-dependent activation of GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Fan, Jia; Kim, Dong-Hern; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biosciences, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens that primarily target the lungs. Cr(VI) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules involved in Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis have not been extensively studied. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to Cr(VI) at nanomolar concentrations (10–100 nM) for 3 months not only induced cell transformation, but also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of Cr(VI)-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) increased levels of intracellular ROS and antiapoptotic proteins. Transfection with catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevented Cr(VI)-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion, migration, and xenograft tumors. While chronic Cr(VI) exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, transfection with catalase or SOD markedly inhibited Cr(VI)-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the Cr(VI)-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. In particular, Cr(VI) suppressed autophagy of epithelial cells under nutrition deprivation. Furthermore, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, mTOR, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with Cr(VI)-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that ROS is a key mediator of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through the activation of PI3K/AKT-dependent GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling and the promotion of cell survival mechanisms via the inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy. - Highlights: • Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. • ROS play an important role in Cr(VI)-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. • PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling involved in Cr

  8. Fucoxanthin prevents H2O2-induced neuronal apoptosis via concurrently activating the PI3-K/Akt cascade and inhibiting the ERK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie; Lin, Jia-Jia; Yu, Rui; He, Shan; Wang, Qin-Wen; Cui, Wei; Zhang, Jin-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Background : As a natural carotenoid abundant in chloroplasts of edible brown algae, fucoxanthin possesses various health benefits, including anti-oxidative activity in particular. Objective : In the present study, we studied whether fucoxanthin protected against hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 )-induced neuronal apoptosis. Design : The neuroprotective effects of fucoxanthin on H 2 O 2 -induced toxicity were studied in both SH-SY5Y cells and primary cerebellar granule neurons. Results : Fucoxanthin significantly protected against H 2 O 2 -induced neuronal apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species. H 2 O 2 treatment led to the reduced activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K)/Akt cascade and the increased activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, fucoxanthin significantly restored the altered activities of PI3-K/Akt and ERK pathways induced by H 2 O 2 . Both specific inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) significantly protected against H 2 O 2 -induced neuronal death. Furthermore, the neuroprotective effects of fucoxanthin against H 2 O 2 -induced neuronal death were abolished by specific PI3-K inhibitors. Conclusions : Our data strongly revealed that fucoxanthin protected against H 2 O 2 -induced neurotoxicity via concurrently activating the PI3-K/Akt cascade and inhibiting the ERK pathway, providing support for the use of fucoxanthin to treat neurodegenerative disorders induced by oxidative stress.

  9. 20(S-Protopanaxadiol-Induced Apoptosis in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cell Line through the Inhibition of PI3K/AKT/mTOR Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available 20(S-Protopanaxadiol (PPD is one of the major active metabolites of ginseng. It has been reported that 20(S-PPD shows a broad spectrum of antitumor effects. Our research study aims were to investigate whether apoptosis of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells could be induced by 20(S-PPD by targeting the Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Protein kinase B/Mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway in vitro and in vivo. Cell cycle analysis was performed by Propidium Iodide (PI staining. To overexpress and knock down the expression of mTOR, pcDNA3.1-mTOR and mTOR small interfering RNA (siRNA transient transfection assays were used, respectively. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT-test and Annexin V /PI double-staining after transfection. The antitumor effect in vivo was determined by the nude mice xenograft assay. After 24 h of incubation, treatment with 20(S-PPD could upregulate phosphorylated-Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (p-PTEN expression and downregulate PI3K/AKT/mTOR-pathway protein expression. Moreover, G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in MCF-7 cells could be induced by 20(S-PPD treatment at high concentrations. Furthermore, overexpression or knockdown of mTOR could inhibit or promote the apoptotic effects of 20(S-PPD. In addition, tumor volumes were partially reduced by 20(S-PPD at 100 mg/kg in a MCF-7 xenograft model. Immunohistochemical staining indicated a close relationship between the inhibition of tumor growth and the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal pathway. PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway-mediated apoptosis may be one of the potential mechanisms of 20(S-PPD treatment.

  10. Si Shen Wan Regulates Phospholipase Cγ-1 and PI3K/Akt Signal in Colonic Mucosa from Rats with Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan-yong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study explored the feasible pathway of Si Shen Wan (SSW in inhibiting apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs by observing activation of phospholipase Cγ-1 (PLC-γ1 and PI3K/Akt signal in colonic mucosa from rats with colitis. Experimental colitis was induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS in the Sprague-Dawley rats. After SSW was administrated for 7 days after TNBS infusion, western blot showed an increment in levels of PI3K, p-Akt, and IL-23 and a decrement in levels of PLC-γ1 and HSP70 in colonic mucosal injury induced by TNBS. Meanwhile, assessments by ELISA revealed an increment in concentrations of IL-2, IL-6, and IL-17 and a reduction in level of TGF-β after TNBS challenge. Impressively, treatment with SSW for 7 days significantly attenuated the expressions of PI3K and p-Akt and the secretion of IL-2, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-23 and promoted the activation of PLC-γ1, HSP70, and TGF-β. Our previous studies had demonstrated that SSW restored colonic mucosal ulcers by inhibiting apoptosis of IECs. The present study demonstrated that the effect of SSW on inhibiting apoptosis of IECs was realized probably by activation of PLC-γ1 and suppression of PI3K/Akt signal pathway.

  11. First observation of the decays $\\overline{B}^0 \\to D^+ K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ and $B^- \\to D^0 K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    First observations of the Cabibbo suppressed decays $\\bar{B}^0\\to D^+K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $B^-\\to D^0K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ are reported using 35~pb$^{-1}$ of data collected with the LHCb detector. Their branching fractions are measured with respect to the corresponding Cabibbo favored decays, from which we obtain ${\\cal{B}}(\\bar{B}^0\\to D^+K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)/{\\cal{B}}(\\bar{B}^0\\to D^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)=(5.9\\pm1.1\\pm0.5)\\times10^{-2}$ and ${\\cal{B}}(B^-\\to D^0K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)/{\\cal{B}}(B^-\\to D^0\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)=(9.4\\pm1.3\\pm0.9)\\times10^{-2}$, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The $B^-\\to D^0K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decay is particularly interesting, as it can be used in a similar way to $B^-\\to D^0K^-$ to measure the CKM phase $\\gamma$.

  12. Effects of Ursodeoxycholic Acid and Insulin on Palmitate-Induced ROS Production and Down-Regulation of PI3K/Akt Signaling Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Kunihiro; Tatsumi, Yasuaki; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Goto, Hidemi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Wakusawa, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    In obese and diabetic patients, plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels are often elevated and may play a causal role in insulin resistance and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We have previously shown that ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has antioxidative activity through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling-mediated glutathione production. In this study, we investigated the effects of UDCA on insulin response by analyzing intracellular ROS and the activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in HepG2 cells treated with palmitate. The level of ROS was quantified using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H 2 DCFDA), and the activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway was determined by Western blotting assay using appropriate antibodies. The intracellular ROS levels were increased by palmitate but were reduced by treatment with UDCA and insulin. Furthermore, insulin significantly stimulated the phosphorylation of Akt. When the cells were pre-treated with palmitate, insulin-induced Akt-phosphorylation was markedly inhibited. However, when the cells were treated with palmitate and UDCA, the effects of insulin were partially restored. UDCA may have protective effects against palmitate-induced decreases in responsiveness to insulin.

  13. Observation of B+ -> J/psi 3 pi(+)2 pi(-) and B+ -> psi (2S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-) decays

    OpenAIRE

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M. H.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A. Jr; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The decays B+-> J/psi 3 pi(+)2 pi(-) and B+ -> psi(2S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-) are observed for the first time using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment in proton- proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The branching fractions relative to that of B+ -> psi(2S)K+ are measured to be B(B+-> J/psi 3 pi(+)2 pi(-))/B(B+ -> psi (2S)K+) = (1.88 +/- 0.17 +/- 0.09)x10(-2). B(B+ -> psi(2S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-))/B(B+ -> psi (2...

  14. Paeonia lactiflora Pall. protects against ANIT-induced cholestasis by activating Nrf2 via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma X

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiao Ma,1,2 Yan-ling Zhao,2 Yun Zhu,3 Zhe Chen,1,2 Jia-bo Wang,4 Rui-yu Li,1,4 Chang Chen,1,2 Shi-zhang Wei,1,2 Jian-yu Li,3 Bing Liu,5 Rui-lin Wang,3 Yong-gang Li,3 Li-fu Wang,3 Xiao-he Xiao4 1Pharmacy College, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmacy, 302 Military Hospital of People’s Liberation Army, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Integrative Medical Center, 302 Military Hospital of People’s Liberation Army, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 4China Military Institute of Chinese Medicine, 302 Military Hospital of People’s Liberation Army, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 5School of Chinese Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Background: Paeonia lactiflora Pall. (PLP, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has been used for hepatic disease treatment over thousands of years. In our previous study, PLP was shown to demonstrate therapeutic effect on hepatitis with severe cholestasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidative effect of PLP on alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT-induced cholestasis by activating NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Materials and methods: Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS was performed to identify the main compounds present in PLP. The mechanism of action of PLP and its therapeutic effect on cholestasis, induced by ANIT, were further investigated. Serum indices such as total bilirubin (TBIL, direct bilirubin (DBIL, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT, and total bile acid (TBA were measured, and histopathology of liver was also performed to determine the efficacy of treatment with PLP. Moreover, in order to illustrate the underlying signaling pathway, liver glutathione (GSH content and mRNA or protein levels of glutamate

  15. Isoorientin induces apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in HepG2 cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Li; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Haifang; Xiao, Chunxia; Wang, Yutang; Liu, Xuebo

    2012-01-01

    Isoorientin (ISO) is a flavonoid compound that can be extracted from several plant species, such as Phyllostachys pubescens, Patrinia, and Drosophyllum lusitanicum; however, its biological activity remains poorly understood. The present study investigated the effects and putative mechanism of apoptosis induced by ISO in human hepatoblastoma cancer (HepG2) cells. The results showed that ISO induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner in HepG2 cells, but no toxicity in human liver cells (HL-7702) and buffalo rat liver cells (BRL-3A) treated with ISO at the indicated concentrations. ISO-induced cell death included apoptosis which characterized by the appearance of nuclear shrinkage, the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and DNA fragmentation. ISO significantly (p < 0.01) increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), increased the release of cytochrome c, activated caspase-3, and enhanced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). In addition, ISO effectively inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt and increased FoxO4 expression. The PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 enhanced the apoptosis-inducing effect of ISO. However, LY294002 markedly quenched ROS and NO generation and diminished the protein expression of heme peroxidase enzyme (HO-1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Furthermore, the addition of a ROS inhibitor (N-acetyl cysteine, NAC) or iNOS inhibitor (N-[3-(aminomethyl) benzyl] acetamidine, dihydrochloride, 1400W) significantly diminished the apoptosis induced by ISO and also blocked the phosphorylation of Akt. These results demonstrated for the first time that ISO induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells and indicate that this apoptosis might be mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and has no toxicity in normal liver cells, suggesting that ISO may have good potential as a therapeutic and chemopreventive agent for liver cancer. Highlights:

  16. The role of the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway in the developmental competence of bovine oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Mamede Andrade

    Full Text Available The ovarian follicle encloses oocytes in a microenvironment throughout their growth and acquisition of competence. Evidence suggests a dynamic interplay among follicular cells and oocytes, since they are constantly exchanging "messages". We dissected bovine ovarian follicles and recovered follicular cells (FCs-granulosa and cumulus cells and cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs to investigate whether the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway impacted oocyte quality. Following follicle rupture, COCs were individually selected for in vitro cultures to track the follicular cells based on oocyte competence to reach the blastocyst stage after parthenogenetic activation. Levels of PI3K-Akt signaling pathway components in FCs correlated with oocyte competence. This pathway is upregulated in FCs from follicles with high-quality oocytes that are able to reach the blastocyst stage, as indicated by decreased levels of PTEN and increased levels of the PTEN regulators bta-miR-494 and bta-miR-20a. Using PI3K-Akt responsive genes, we showed decreased FOXO3a levels and BAX levels in lower quality groups, indicating changes in cell cycle progression, oxidative response and apoptosis. Based on these results, the measurement of levels of PI3K-Akt pathway components in FCs from ovarian follicles carrying oocytes with distinct developmental competences is a useful tool to identify putative molecular pathways involved in the acquisition of oocyte competence.

  17. Puerarin protects differentiated PC12 cells from H₂O₂-induced apoptosis through the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Huang, Wei-Dong; Lv, Xue-Ying; Yang, Yun-Mei

    2012-05-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated as a major mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. ROS (reactive oxygen species) can cause cell death via apoptosis. NGF (nerve growth factor) differentiated rat PC12 cells have been extensively used to study the differentiation and apoptosis of neurons. This study has investigated the protective effects of puerarin in H2O2-induced apoptosis of differentiated PC12 cells, and the possible molecular mechanisms involved. Differentiated PC12 cells were incubated with 700 μM H2O2 in the absence or presence of different doses of puerarin (4, 8 and 16 μM). Apoptosis was assessed by MTS [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium] assay, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling) analysis and Annexin V-PI (propidium iodide) double staining flow cytometry. Protein levels of phospho-Akt and phospho-BAD (Bcl-2/Bcl-XL-antagonist, causing cell death) were assayed by Western blotting. After stimulation with H2O2 for 18 h, the viability of differentiated PC12 cells decreased significantly and a large number of cells underwent apoptosis. Differentiated PC12 cells were rescued from H2O2-induced apoptosis at different concentrations of puerarin in a dose-dependent manner. This was through increased production of phospho-Akt and phospho-BAD, an effect that could be reversed by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase). The results suggest that puerarin may have neuroprotective effect through activation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, and first successful monkey imaging studies of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) PET radiotracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Terence G; Krause, Stephen; Ryan, Christine; Bonnefous, Celine; Govek, Steve; Seiders, T Jon; Cosford, Nicholas D P; Roppe, Jeffrey; Kamenecka, Ted; Patel, Shil; Gibson, Raymond E; Sanabria, Sandra; Riffel, Kerry; Eng, Waisi; King, Christopher; Yang, Xiaoqing; Green, Mitchell D; O'Malley, Stacey S; Hargreaves, Richard; Burns, H Donald

    2005-06-15

    Three metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) PET tracers have been labeled with either carbon-11 or fluorine-18 and their in vitro and in vivo behavior in rhesus monkey has been characterized. Each of these tracers share the common features of high affinity for mGluR5 (0.08-0.23 nM vs. rat mGluR5) and moderate lipophilicity (log P 2.8-3.4). Compound 1b was synthesized using a Suzuki or Stille coupling reaction with [11C]MeI. Compounds 2b and 3b were synthesized by a SNAr reaction using a 3-chlorobenzonitrile precursor. Autoradiographic studies in rhesus monkey brain slices using 2b and 3b showed specific binding in cortex, caudate, putamen, amygdala, hippocampus, most thalamic nuclei, and lower binding in the cerebellum. PET imaging studies in monkey showed that all three tracers readily enter the brain and provide an mGluR5-specific signal in all gray matter regions, including the cerebellum. The specific signal observed in the cerebellum was confirmed by the autoradiographic studies and saturation binding experiments that showed tracer binding in the cerebellum of rhesus monkeys. In vitro metabolism studies using the unlabeled compounds showed that 1a, 2a, and 3a are metabolized slower by human liver microsomes than by monkey liver microsomes. In vivo metabolism studies showed 3b to be long-lived in rhesus plasma with only one other more polar metabolite observed. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Cold stress-induced brain injury regulates TRPV1 channels and the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Liu, Yunen; Jin, Hongxu; Cong, Peifang; Zhang, Yubiao; Tong, Changci; Shi, Xiuyun; Liu, Xuelei; Tong, Zhou; Shi, Lin; Hou, Mingxiao

    2017-09-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel that interacts with several intracellular proteins in vivo, including calmodulin and Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase/Protein Kinase B (PI3K/Akt). TRPV1 activation has been reported to exert neuroprotective effects. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of cold stress on the mouse brain and the underlying mechanisms of TRPV1 involvement. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cold stress (4°C for 8h per day for 2weeks). The behavioral deficits of the mice were then measured using the Morris water maze. Expression levels of brain injury-related proteins and mRNA were measured by western blot, immunofluorescence or RT-PCR analysis. The mice displayed behavioral deficits, inflammation and changes in brain injury markers following cold stress. As expected, upregulated TRPV1 expression levels and changes in PI3K/Akt expression were found. The TRPV1 inhibitor reduced the levels of brain injury-related proteins and inflammation. These data suggest that cold stress can induce brain injury, possibly through TRPV1 activation and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Suppression of inflammation by inhibition of TRPV1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway may be helpful to prevent cold stress-induced brain injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Protective Effect of Tempol on Acute Kidney Injury Through PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gensheng Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Tempol is a protective antioxidant against ischemic injury in many animal models. The molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2 is a master transcription factor during oxidative stress, which is enhanced by activation of protein kinase C (PKC pathway. Another factor, tubular epithelial apoptosis, is mediated by activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (PKB, Akt signaling pathway during renal ischemic injury. We tested the hypothesis that tempol activates PKC or PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 pathways to transcribe many genes that coordinate endogenous antioxidant defense. Methods: The right renal pedicle was clamped for 45 minutes and the left kidney was removed to study renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury in C57BL/6 mice. The response was assessed from serum parameters, renal morphology and renal expression of PKC, phosphorylated-PKC (p-PKC, Nrf2, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, Akt, phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt, pro-caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-3 in groups of sham and I/R mice given vehicle, or tempol (50 or 100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection. Results: The serum malondialdehyde (MDA, marker of reactive oxygen species doubled and the BUN and creatinine increased 5- to 10-fold after I/R injury. Tempol (50 or 100 mg/kg prevented the increases in MDA but only tempol (50 mg/kg lessened the increases in BUN and creatinine and moderated the acute tubular necrosis. I/R did not change expression of PKC or p-PKC but reduced renal expression of Nrf2, p-Akt, HO-1 and pro-caspase-3 and increased cleaved caspase-3. Tempol (50 mg/kg prevented these changes produced by I/R whereas tempol (100 mg/kg had lesser or inconsistent effects. Conclusion: Tempol (50 mg/kg prevents lipid peroxidation and attenuates renal damage after I/R injury. The beneficial pathway apparently is not dependent on upregulation or phosphorylation of PKC, at lower tempol doses, does implicate upregulation of Akt with

  1. Abrogating endocrine resistance by targeting ERα and PI3K in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Emily M.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Miller, Todd W.

    2012-01-01

    Antiestrogen therapies targeting estrogen receptor α (ER) signaling are a mainstay for patients with ER+ breast cancer. While many cancers exhibit resistance to antiestrogen therapies, a large body of clinical and experimental evidence indicates that hyperactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway promotes antiestrogen resistance. In addition, continued ligand-independent ER signaling in the setting of estrogen deprivation may contribute to resistance to endocrine therapy. PI3K activates several proteins which promote cell cycle progression and survival. In ER+ breast cancer cells, PI3K promotes ligand-dependent and -independent ER transcriptional activity. Models of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer often remain sensitive to estrogen stimulation and PI3K inhibition, suggesting that clinical trials with combinations of drugs targeting both the PI3K and ER pathways are warranted. Herein, we review recent findings on the roles of PI3K and ER in antiestrogen resistance, and clinical trials testing drug combinations which target both pathways. We also discuss the need for clinical investigation of ER downregulators in combination with PI3K inhibitors.

  2. Expression of factors and key components associated with the PI3K signaling pathway in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Gao, Junyi; Du, Zhenhua; Zhang, Xuequn; Yang, Fei; Gao, Wei

    2018-04-01

    The pathophysiology of colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been fully elucidated. The dysregulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway frequently contributes to the tumorigenesis and progression of human cancer. The aim of the present study was to explore the expression and clinical significance of a number of associated factors and key components of the PI3K signaling pathway, including phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit α (p110α), phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt) Ser473, p-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) Ser2448, cyclin D1, cyclin dependent kinase (CDK)4, RELA proto-oncogene, nuclear factor-κβ subunit (p65), Ras and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in human CRC. The expression of target proteins was detected using immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 65 CRC cases and 15 colonic adenoma cases. The association between the expression of target proteins and clinical pathological parameters was analyzed using a χ 2 test. IHC results revealed that the expression of all target proteins was significantly increased in CRC tissues compared with in colonic adenoma tissues (P0.05). Cyclin D1, CDK4 and Ras were revealed to be expressed significantly higher in poorly differentiated CRC compared with moderately differentiated CRC (Pcancer tissues with lymph node metastasis compared with cancer tissues without lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). These results suggest that the target proteins may all participate in the tumorigenesis of CRC. Furthermore, cyclin D1, CDK4, Ras, p65 and ERK1/2 may be important in the progression of CRC. The results of the present study may provide novel predictive factors and therapeutic targets for CRC.

  3. Colon Cancer Tumorigenesis Initiated by the H1047R Mutant PI3K.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E Yueh

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K signaling pathway is critical for multiple important cellular functions, and is one of the most commonly altered pathways in human cancers. We previously developed a mouse model in which colon cancers were initiated by a dominant active PI3K p110-p85 fusion protein. In that model, well-differentiated mucinous adenocarcinomas developed within the colon and initiated through a non-canonical mechanism that is not dependent on WNT signaling. To assess the potential relevance of PI3K mutations in human cancers, we sought to determine if one of the common mutations in the human disease could also initiate similar colon cancers. Mice were generated expressing the Pik3caH1047R mutation, the analog of one of three human hotspot mutations in this gene. Mice expressing a constitutively active PI3K, as a result of this mutation, develop invasive adenocarcinomas strikingly similar to invasive adenocarcinomas found in human colon cancers. These tumors form without a polypoid intermediary and also lack nuclear CTNNB1 (β-catenin, indicating a non-canonical mechanism of tumor initiation mediated by the PI3K pathway. These cancers are sensitive to dual PI3K/mTOR inhibition indicating dependence on the PI3K pathway. The tumor tissue remaining after treatment demonstrated reduction in cellular proliferation and inhibition of PI3K signaling.

  4. Cryptotanshinone exhibits therapeutical effects on cerebral stroke through the PI3K/AKT‑eNOS signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weixin; Qiu, Weihong; Lu, Ailan

    2017-12-01

    Cerebral stroke is a kind of acute cerebrovascular disease with high incidence, morbidity and disability. Treatments against various types of cerebral stroke are limited at preventive measurements due to the lack of effective therapeutic method. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of cryptotanshinone (CPT) on cerebral stroke, and investigate the possible mechanism involved in order to develop a novel therapy against stoke. The phosphoinositide 3‑kinase membrane translocation of cerebral stroke rats pretreated with CPT at various concentrations were measured, as well as the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Additionally, the expression level of B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2), Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) and vascular endothelial growth factor were also assessed using western blotting and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, biochemical tests were used to measure the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) in both the cerebral cortex and peripheral blood. As a result, CPT‑pretreated rats presented declined phosphoinositide 3‑kinase (PI3K) and AKT expression levels, indicating that the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was inhibited. Increased Bcl‑2 and NO levels in both the cerebral cortex and peripheral blood demonstrated the anti‑apoptosis and blood vessel protection effect of CPT. Furthermore, increased SOD activity and declined MDA levels demonstrated suppressed lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, CPT exhibited a protective effect against cerebral stroke through inhibition of the PI3K/AKT‑eNOS signaling pathway. These results suggested the potential of CPT as a promising agent in the treatment of cerebral stroke.

  5. Skin Aging-Dependent Activation of the PI3K Signaling Pathway via Downregulation of PTEN Increases Intracellular ROS in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Mi Noh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS play a major role in both chronological aging and photoaging. ROS induce skin aging through their damaging effect on cellular constituents. However, the origins of ROS have not been fully elucidated. We investigated that ROS generation of replicative senescent fibroblasts is generated by the modulation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3 metabolism. Reduction of the PTEN protein, which dephosphorylates PIP3, was responsible for maintaining a high level of PIP3 in replicative cells and consequently mediated the activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway. Increased ROS production was blocked by inhibition of PI3K or protein kinase C (PKC or by NADPH oxidase activating in replicative senescent cells. These data indicate that the signal pathway to ROS generation in replicative aged skin cells can be stimulated by reduced PTEN level. Our results provide new insights into skin aging-associated modification of the PI3K/NADPH oxidase signaling pathway and its relationship with a skin aging-dependent increase of ROS in human dermal fibroblasts.

  6. The role of the PI3K-Akt signal transduction pathway in Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus infection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Wei; Yang Yi; Weng Qingbei; Lin Tiehao; Yuan Meijin; Yang Kai; Pang Yi

    2009-01-01

    Many viruses activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway, thereby modulating diverse downstream signaling pathways associated with antiapoptosis, proliferation, cell cycling, protein synthesis and glucose metabolism, in order to augment their replication. To date, the role of the PI3K-Akt pathway in Baculovirus replication has not been defined. In the present study, we demonstrate that infection of Sf9 cells with Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) elevated cellular Akt phosphorylation at 1 h post-infection. The maximum Akt phosphorylation occurred at 6 h post-infection and remained unchanged until 18 h post-infection. The PI3K-specific inhibitor, LY294002, suppressed Akt phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that AcMNPV-induced Akt phosphorylation is PI3K-dependent. The inhibition of PI3K-Akt activation by LY294002 significantly reduced the viral yield, including a reduction in budded viruses and occlusion bodies. The virus production was reduced only when the inhibitor was added within 24 h of infection, implying that activation of PI3K occurred early in infection. Correspondingly, both viral DNA replication and late (VP39) and very late (POLH) viral protein expression were impaired by LY294002 treatment; LY294002 had no effect on immediate-early (IE1) and early-late (GP64) protein expression. These results demonstrate that the PI3K-Akt pathway is required for efficient Baculovirus replication.

  7. Arctigenin Increases Hemeoxygenase-1 Gene Expression by Modulating PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathway in Rat Primary Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yeon-Hui; Park, Jin-Sun; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, we found that the natural compound arctigenin inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in rat primary astrocytes. Since hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays a critical role as an antioxidant defense factor in the brain, we examined the effect of arctigenin on HO-1 expression in rat primary astrocytes. We found that arctigenin increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels. Arctigenin also increases the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2/c-Jun to the antioxidant response element (ARE) on HO-1 promoter. In addition, arctigenin increased ARE-mediated transcriptional activities in rat primary astrocytes. Further mechanistic studies revealed that arctigenin increased the phosphorylation of AKT, a downstream substrate of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Treatment of cells with a PI3K-specific inhibitor, LY294002, suppressed the HO-1 expression, Nrf2 DNA binding and ARE-mediated transcriptional activities in arctigenin-treated astrocyte cells. The results collectively suggest that PI3K/AKT signaling pathway is at least partly involved in HO-1 expression by arctigenin via modulation of Nrf2/ARE axis in rat primary astrocytes.

  8. microRNA 126 inhibits the transition of endothelial progenitor cells to mesenchymal cells via the PIK3R2-PI3K/Akt signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Zhang, Zongqi; Zhang, David Y; Zhu, Jianbing; Zhang, Tiantian; Wang, Changqian

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are capable of proliferating and differentiating into mature endothelial cells, and they have been considered as potential candidates for coronary heart disease therapy. However, the transition of EPCs to mesenchymal cells is not fully understood. This study aimed to explore the role of microRNA 126 (miR-126) in the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) induced by transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1). EndMT of rat bone marrow-derived EPCs was induced by TGFβ1 (5 ng/mL) for 7 days. miR-126 expression was depressed in the process of EPC EndMT. The luciferase reporter assay showed that the PI3K regulatory subunit p85 beta (PIK3R2) was a direct target of miR-126 in EPCs. Overexpression of miR-126 by a lentiviral vector (lenti-miR-126) was found to downregulate the mRNA expression of mesenchymal cell markers (α-SMA, sm22-a, and myocardin) and to maintain the mRNA expression of progenitor cell markers (CD34, CD133). In the cellular process of EndMT, there was an increase in the protein expression of PIK3R2 and the nuclear transcription factors FoxO3 and Smad4; PI3K and phosphor-Akt expression decreased, a change that was reversed markedly by overexpression of miR-126. Furthermore, knockdown of PIK3R2 gene expression level showed reversed morphological changes of the EPCs treated with TGFβ1, thereby giving the evidence that PIK3R2 is the target gene of miR-126 during EndMT process. These results show that miR-126 targets PIK3R2 to inhibit EPC EndMT and that this process involves regulation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. miR-126 has the potential to be used as a biomarker for the early diagnosis of intimal hyperplasia in cardiovascular disease and can even be a therapeutic tool for treating cardiovascular diseases mediated by the EndMT process.

  9. Search for direct CP violating charge asymmetries in $K^\\pm\\to\\pi^\\pm\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K^\\pm\\to\\pi^\\pm\\pi^0\\pi^0$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Batley, J Richard; Kalmus, George Ernest; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Slater, M W; Wotton, S A; Arcidiacono, R; Bocquet, G; Cabibbo, Nicola; Ceccucci, A; Cundy, Donald C; Falaleev, V; Fidecaro, Maria; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Kubischta, Werner; Norton, A; Maier, A; Patel, M; Peters, A; Balev, S; Frabetti, P L; Goudzovski, E; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, V D; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Madigozhin, D T; Marinova, E; Molokanova, N A; Polenkevich, I; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Stoynev, S; Zinchenko, A I; Monnier, E; Swallow, E; Winston, R; Rubin, P; Walker, A; Baldini, W; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Dalpiaz, P; Damiani, C; Fiorini, M; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savrié, M; Scarpa, M; Wahle, H; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Celeghini, E; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Martelli, F; Ruggiero, G; Veltri, M; Behler, M; Eppard, K; Kleinknecht, K; Marouelli, P; Masetti, L; Moosbrugger, U; Morales-Morales, C; Renk, B; Wache, M; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Coward, D; Dabrowski, A; Fonseca-Martin, T; Shieh, M; Szleper, M; Velasco, M; Wood, M D; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Nappi, A; Pepé, M; Petrucci, M C; Piccini, M; Raggi, M; Valdata-Nappi, M; Cerri, C; Collazuol, G; Costantini, F; Di Lella, L; Doble, N; Fantechi, R; Fiorini, L; Giudici, S; Lamanna, G; Mannelli, I; Michetti, A; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Bloch-Devaux, B; Cheshkov, C; Chèze, J B; De Beer, M; Derré, J; Marel, Gérard; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; Bifani, S; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Clemencic, M; Goy-Lopez, S; Marchetto, F; Dibon, Heinz; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, G; Widhalm, L

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the direct CP violating charge asymmetries of the Dalitz plot linear slopes $A_g=(g^+-g^-)/(g^++g^-)$ in $K^\\pm\\to\\pi^\\pm\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K^\\pm\\to\\pi^\\pm\\pi^0\\pi^0$ decays by the NA48/2 experiment at CERN SPS is presented. A new technique of asymmetry measurement involving simultaneous $K^+$ and $K^-$ beams and a large data sample collected allowed a result of an unprecedented precision. The charge asymmetries were measured to be $A^c_g=(-1.5\\pm2.1)\\times10^{-4}$ with $3.11\\times 10^9$ $K^{\\pm}\\to\\pi^\\pm\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays, and $A^n_g=(1.8\\pm1.8)\\times10^{-4}$ with $9.13\\times 10^7$ $K^{\\pm}\\to\\pi^\\pm\\pi^0\\pi^0$ decays. The precision of the results is limited mainly by the size of the data sample.

  10. The ShcA SH2 domain engages a 14-3-3/PI3'K signaling complex and promotes breast cancer cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursini-Siegel, J; Hardy, W R; Zheng, Y; Ling, C; Zuo, D; Zhang, C; Podmore, L; Pawson, T; Muller, W J

    2012-11-29

    The ShcA adapter protein transmits activating signals downstream of receptor and cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases through the establishment of phosphotyrosine-dependent complexes. In this regard, ShcA possesses both a phosphotyrosine-binding domain (PTB) and Src homology 2 domain (SH2), which bind phosphotyrosine residues in a sequence-specific manner. Although the majority of receptor tyrosine kinases expressed in breast cancer cells bind the PTB domain, very little is known regarding the biological importance of SH2-driven ShcA signaling during mammary tumorigenesis. To address this, we employed transgenic mice expressing a mutant ShcA allele harboring a non-functional SH2 domain (ShcR397K) under the transcriptional control of the endogenous ShcA promoter. Using transplantation approaches, we demonstrate that SH2-dependent ShcA signaling within the mammary epithelial compartment is essential for breast tumor outgrowth, survival and the development of lung metastases. We further show that the ShcA SH2 domain activates the AKT pathway, potentially through a novel SH2-mediated complex between ShcA, 14-3-3ζ and the p85 regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3') kinase. This study is the first to demonstrate that the SH2 domain of ShcA is critical for tumor survival during mammary tumorigenesis.

  11. Down-Regulation of Homer1b/c Protects Against Chemically Induced Seizures Through Inhibition of mTOR Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Cao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Homer is a family of post synaptic density proteins functionally and physically attached to target proteins at proline-rich sequences. Reducing Homer1b/c expression has been shown in previous studies to be protective against excitotoxic insults, implicating Homer1b/c in the physiological regulation of aberrant neuronal excitability. Methods: To test the efficacy of a Homer1b/c reducing therapy for disorders with a detrimental hyperexcitability profile in mice, we used small interfere RNA (siRNA to decrease endogenous Homer1b/c expression in mouse hippocampus. The baseline motor and cognitive behavior was measured by sensorimotor tests, Morris water maze and elevated plus maze tasks. The anti-epileptic effects of Homer1b/c knockdown were determined in two chemically induced seizure models induced by Picrotoxin (PTX or pentylenetetrazole (PTZ administration. Results: The results of sensorimotor tests, Morris water maze and elevated plus maze tasks showed that Homer1b/c reduction had no effect on baseline motor or cognitive behavior. In two chemically induced seizure models, mice with reduced Homerb/c protein had less severe seizures than control mice. Total Homer1b/c protein levels and seizure severity were highly correlated, such that those mice with the most severe seizures also had the highest levels of Homer1b/c. In addition, the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and its target protein S6 was significantly inhibited in Homer1b/c down-regulated mice. Homer1b/c knockdown-induced inhibition of mTOR pathway was partially ablated by the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 agonist CHPG. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that endogenous Homer1b/c is integral for regulating neuronal hyperexcitability in adult animals and suggest that reduction of Homer1b/c could protect against chemically induced seizures through inhibition mTOR pathway.

  12. Convergent evidence for mGluR5 in synaptic and neuroinflammatory pathways implicated in ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zantomio, Daniela; Chana, Gursharan; Laskaris, Liliana; Testa, Renee; Everall, Ian; Pantelis, Christos; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2015-05-01

    The pathogenesis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), a serious neurodevelopmental disorder, is poorly understood. We review evidence for alterations in glutamatergic signalling in the aetiology of ASD, with a focus on the metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 (mGluR5). mGluR5 signalling is important for synapse formation, neuroplasticity and long term potentiation as well as neuroprotection and has been shown to have a regulatory role in neuroinflammation. Evidence for neuroinflammation in ASD is supported by increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and increased number and activation of microglia in postmortem dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). mGlur5 signalling has also been shown to downregulate microglial activation. Therefore, we focus on mGluR5 as a potential unifying explanation for synapse alteration and neuroinflammation seen in ASD. Data from mGluR5 knockout mouse models, and syndromic and non syndromic forms of ASD are discussed in relation to how alterations in mGluR5 are associated with ASD symptoms. This review supports altered mGluR5 functioning as a convergent point in ASD pathogenesis and indicates more research is warranted into mGluR5 as a potential therapeutic target. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Observation of $B^+\\rightarrow J/\\psi 3\\pi^+ 2\\pi^-$ and $B^+\\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\pi^+\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, V.V.; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, P H; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-02-06

    The decays $B^+\\rightarrow J/\\psi 3\\pi^+ 2\\pi^-$ and $B^+\\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\pi^+\\pi^+\\pi^-$ are observed for the first time using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3.0fb^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The branching fractions relative to that of $B^+ \\rightarrow \\psi(2S)K^+$ are measured to be \\begin{eqnarray*} \\frac {\\mathcal{B}\\left( B^+\\rightarrow J/\\psi 3\\pi^+ 2\\pi^- \\right)} {\\mathcal{B}\\left( B^+ \\rightarrow \\psi(2S)K^+ \\right)} & = & \\left( 1.88\\pm0.17\\pm0.09\\right)\\times10^{-2}, \\\\ \\frac {\\mathcal{B}\\left( B^+\\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\pi^+\\pi^+\\pi^- \\right)} {\\mathcal{B}\\left( B^+ \\rightarrow \\psi(2S)K^+ \\right) } & = & \\left( 3.04\\pm0.50\\pm0.26\\right)\\times10^{-2}, \\end{eqnarray*} where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic.

  14. Arctigenin, a Natural Lignan Compound, Induces Apoptotic Death of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells via Suppression of PI3-K/Akt Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoxin; Zeng, Leping; Huang, Jufang; Zhou, Hui; Liu, Yubin

    2015-04-28

    In this study, we explored the cytotoxic effects of arctigenin, a natural lignan compound, on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and check the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/Akt signaling. HCC cells were treated with different concentrations of arctigenin and cell viability and apoptosis were assessed. Manipulating Akt signaling was used to determine its role in the action of arctigenin. Arctigenin significantly inhibited the viability of HCC cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Arctigenin induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-9 and -3. Overexpression of a constitutively active Akt mutant blocked arctigenin-induced apoptosis. Combinational treatment with arctigenin and the PI3-K inhibitor LY294002 significantly enhanced apoptosis. Arctigenin reduced the expression of Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, and survivin and the phosphorylation of mTOR and S6K, which were significantly reversed by overexpression of constitutively active Akt. This is the first report about the anticancer activity of arctigenin in HCC cells, which is mediated by inactivation of PI3-K/Akt signaling. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Improved Measurements of Neutral B Decay Branching Fractions to K0s pi+ pi- and the Charge Asymmetry of B0 -> K*+ pi-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-08-26

    The authors analyze the decay B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. A maximum likelihood fit finds the following branching fractions: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (43.0 {+-} 2.3 {+-} 2.3) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} f{sub 0}({yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})K{sup 0}) = (5.5 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (11.0 {+-} 1.5 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -6}. For these results, the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third (if present) is due to the effect of interference from other resonances. They also measure the CP-violating charge asymmetry in the decay B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Alpha}{sub K*{pi}} = -0.11 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.05.

  16. Alterations in mGluR5 expression and signaling in Lewy body disease and in transgenic models of alpha-synucleinopathy--implications for excitotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana L Price

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB and Parkinson's Disease (PD are neurodegenerative disorders of the aging population characterized by the abnormal accumulation of alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn. Previous studies have suggested that excitotoxicity may contribute to neurodegeneration in these disorders, however the underlying mechanisms and their relationship to alpha-syn remain unclear. For this study we proposed that accumulation of alpha-syn might result in alterations in metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR, particularly mGluR5 which has been linked to deficits in murine models of PD. In this context, levels of mGluR5 were analyzed in the brains of PD and DLB human cases and alpha-syn transgenic (tg mice and compared to age-matched, unimpaired controls, we report a 40% increase in the levels of mGluR5 and beta-arrestin immunoreactivity in the frontal cortex, hippocampus and putamen in DLB cases and in the putamen in PD cases. In the hippocampus, mGluR5 was more abundant in the CA3 region and co-localized with alpha-syn aggregates. Similarly, in the hippocampus and basal ganglia of alpha-syn tg mice, levels of mGluR5 were increased and mGluR5 and alpha-syn were co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated, suggesting that alpha-syn interferes with mGluR5 trafficking. The increased levels of mGluR5 were accompanied by a concomitant increase in the activation of downstream signaling components including ERK, Elk-1 and CREB. Consistent with the increased accumulation of alpha-syn and alterations in mGluR5 in cognitive- and motor-associated brain regions, these mice displayed impaired performance in the water maze and pole test, these behavioral alterations were reversed with the mGluR5 antagonist, MPEP. Taken together the results from study suggest that mGluR5 may directly interact with alpha-syn resulting in its over activation and that this over activation may contribute to excitotoxic cell death in select neuronal regions. These results highlight the

  17. Liraglutide Exerts Antidiabetic Effect via PTP1B and PI3K/Akt2 Signaling Pathway in Skeletal Muscle of KKAy Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Ji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Liraglutide (a glucagon-like peptide 1 analog was used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM which could produce glucose-dependent insulin secretion. Aim. The aim was to investigate whether liraglutide could improve myofibril and mitochondria injury in skeletal muscle and the mechanisms in diabetic KKAy mice. Method. We divided the male KKAy mice into 2 groups: liraglutide group (250 μg/kg/day liraglutide subcutaneous injection and model group; meanwhile, the male C57BL/6J mice were considered as the control. After 6 weeks, the ultrastructure of skeletal muscle was observed by electron microscope. The gene expressions of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4 were determined by real-time PCR. The protein levels of the above molecules and phospho-Akt2 (p-Akt2 were measured by Western blot. Results. Liraglutide significantly ameliorated the injury of mitochondria by increasing the number (+441% and the area (+113% of mitochondria and mitochondrial area/100 µm2 (+396% in skeletal muscle of KKAy mice. The results of real-time PCR and Western blot showed that liraglutide downregulated PTP1B while it upregulated PI3K and GLUT4 (P<0.01. The protein level of p-Akt2/Akt2 was also increased (P<0.01. Conclusion. These results revealed that liraglutide could improve myofibril and mitochondria injury in skeletal muscle against T2DM via PTP1B and PI3K/Akt2 signaling pathway.

  18. Transmembrane collagen XVII modulates integrin dependent keratinocyte migration via PI3K/Rac1 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Löffek

    Full Text Available The hemidesmosomal transmembrane component collagen XVII (ColXVII plays an important role in the anchorage of the epidermis to the underlying basement membrane. However, this adhesion protein seems to be also involved in the regulation of keratinocyte migration, since its expression in these cells is strongly elevated during reepithelialization of acute wounds and in the invasive front of squamous cell carcinoma, while its absence in ColXVII-deficient keratinocytes leads to altered cell motility. Using a genetic model of murine Col17a1⁻/⁻ keratinocytes we elucidated ColXVII mediated signaling pathways in cell adhesion and migration. Col17a1⁻/⁻ keratinocytes exhibited increased spreading on laminin 332 and accelerated, but less directed cell motility. These effects were accompanied by increased expression of the integrin subunits β4 and β1. The migratory phenotype, as evidenced by formation of multiple unstable lamellipodia, was associated with enhanced phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K activity. Dissection of the signaling pathway uncovered enhanced phosphorylation of the β4 integrin subunit and the focal adhesion kinase (FAK as activators of PI3K. This resulted in elevated Rac1 activity as a downstream consequence. These results provide mechanistic evidence that ColXVII coordinates keratinocyte adhesion and directed motility by interfering integrin dependent PI3K activation and by stabilizing lamellipodia at the leading edge of reepithelializing wounds and in invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

  19. PI3K class II α regulates δ-opioid receptor export from the trans-Golgi network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwarski, Daniel J; Darr, Marlena; Telmer, Cheryl A; Bruchez, Marcel P; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A

    2017-08-01

    The interplay between signaling and trafficking by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has focused mainly on endocytic trafficking. Whether and how surface delivery of newly synthesized GPCRs is regulated by extracellular signals is less understood. Here we define a signaling-regulated checkpoint at the trans -Golgi network (TGN) that controls the surface delivery of the delta opioid receptor (δR). In PC12 cells, inhibition of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) activity blocked export of newly synthesized δR from the Golgi and delivery to the cell surface, similar to treatment with nerve growth factor (NGF). Depletion of class II phosphoinositide-3 kinase α (PI3K C2A), but not inhibition of class I PI3K, blocked δR export to comparable levels and attenuated δR-mediated cAMP inhibition. NGF treatment displaced PI3K C2A from the Golgi and optogenetic recruitment of the PI3K C2A kinase domain to the TGN-induced δR export downstream of NGF. Of importance, PI3K C2A expression promotes export of endogenous δR in primary trigeminal ganglion neurons. Taken together, our results identify PI3K C2A as being required and sufficient for δR export and surface delivery in neuronal cells and suggest that it could be a key modulator of a novel Golgi export checkpoint that coordinates GPCR delivery to the surface. © 2017 Shiwarski et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  20. mGluR5 ablation in cortical glutamatergic neurons increases novelty-induced locomotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris P Jew

    Full Text Available The group I metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 has been implicated in the pathology of various neurological disorders including schizophrenia, ADHD, and autism. mGluR5-dependent synaptic plasticity has been described at a variety of neural connections and its signaling has been implicated in several behaviors. These behaviors include locomotor reactivity to novel environment, sensorimotor gating, anxiety, and cognition. mGluR5 is expressed in glutamatergic neurons, inhibitory neurons, and glia in various brain regions. In this study, we show that deleting mGluR5 expression only in principal cortical neurons leads to defective cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R dependent synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex. These cortical glutamatergic mGluR5 knockout mice exhibit increased novelty-induced locomotion, and their locomotion can be further enhanced by treatment with the psychostimulant methylphenidate. Despite a modest reduction in repetitive behaviors, cortical glutamatergic mGluR5 knockout mice are normal in sensorimotor gating, anxiety, motor balance/learning and fear conditioning behaviors. These results show that mGluR5 signaling in cortical glutamatergic neurons is required for precisely modulating locomotor reactivity to a novel environment but not for sensorimotor gating, anxiety, motor coordination, several forms of learning or social interactions.

  1. PI3KC2{alpha}, a class II PI3K, is required for dynamin-independent internalization pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Claudia; Malmberg, Emily Kim; Salcini, Anna Elisabetta

    2010-01-01

    as fluid-phase endocytosis. Our data suggest a general role for PI3KC2a in regulating physiologically relevant dynamin-independent internalization pathways by recruiting early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1) to vesicular compartments, a step required for the intracellular trafficking of vesicles generated...... screen using a cell line expressing a diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR, officially known as HBEGF) anchored to GPI (DTR-GPI), which internalizes diphtheria toxin (DT, officially known as DTX) in a dynamin-independent manner, identified PI3KC2a, a class II phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), as a specific...... regulator of dynamin-independent DT internalization. We found that the internalization of several proteins that enter the cell through dynamin-independent pathways led to a relocalization of PI3KC2a to cargo-positive vesicles. Furthermore, downregulation of PI3KC2a impaired internalization of CD59 as well...

  2. Inhibition of phospholipaseD2 increases hypoxia-induced human colon cancer cell apoptosis through inactivating of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maoxi; Fu, Zhongxue; Wu, Xingye; Du, Kunli; Zhang, Shouru; Zeng, Li

    2016-05-01

    Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumor, and is a direct stress that triggers apoptosis in many human cell types. As one of solid cancer, hypoxia exists in the whole course of colon cancer occurrence and progression. Our previous studies shown that hypoxia induce high expression of phospholipase D2 (PLD2) and survivin in colon cancer cells. However, the correlation between PLD2 and survivin in hypoxic colon cancer cells remains unknown. In this study, we observed significantly elevated PLD2 and survivin expression levels in colon cancer tissues and cells. This is a positive correlation between of them, and co-expression of PLD2 and survivin has a positive correlation with the clinicpatholic features including tumor size, TNM stage, and lymph node metastasis. We also found that hypoxia induced the activity of PLD increased significant mainly caused by PLD2 in colon cancer cells. However, inhibition the activity of PLD2 induced by hypoxia promotes the apoptosis of human colon cancer cells, as well as decreased the expression of apoptosis markers including survivin and bcl2. Moreover, the pharmacological inhibition of PI3K/AKT supported the hypothesis that promotes the apoptosis of hypoxic colon cancer cells by PLD2 activity inhibition may through inactivation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Furthermore, interference the PLD2 gene expression leaded to the apoptosis of hypoxic colon cancer cells increased and also decreased the expression level of survivin and bcl2 may through inactivation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. These results indicated that PLD2 play antiapoptotic role in colon cancer under hypoxic conditions, inhibition of the activity, or interference of PLD2 gene expression will benefit for the treatment of colon cancer patients.

  3. Alteration of cellular behavior and response to PI3K pathway inhibition by culture in 3D collagen gels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Fallica

    Full Text Available Most investigations into cancer cell drug response are performed with cells cultured on flat (2D tissue culture plastic. Emerging research has shown that the presence of a three-dimensional (3D extracellular matrix (ECM is critical for normal cell behavior including migration, adhesion, signaling, proliferation and apoptosis. In this study we investigate differences between cancer cell signaling in 2D culture and a 3D ECM, employing real-time, live cell tracking to directly observe U2OS human osteosarcoma and MCF7 human breast cancer cells embedded in type 1 collagen gels. The activation of the important PI3K signaling pathway under these different growth conditions is studied, and the response to inhibition of both PI3K and mTOR with PI103 investigated. Cells grown in 3D gels show reduced proliferation and migration as well as reduced PI3K pathway activation when compared to cells grown in 2D. Our results quantitatively demonstrate that a collagen ECM can protect U2OS cells from PI103. Overall, our data suggests that 3D gels may provide a better medium for investigation of anti-cancer drugs than 2D monolayers, therefore allowing better understanding of cellular response and behavior in native like environments.

  4. Up-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling by 17β-estradiol through activation of estrogen receptor-α, but not estrogen receptor-β, and stimulates cell growth in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young-Rae; Park, Jinny; Yu, Hong-Nu; Kim, Jong-Suk; Youn, Hyun Jo; Jung, Sung Hoo

    2005-01-01

    Estrogen stimulates cell proliferation in breast cancer. The biological effects of estrogen are mediated through two intracellular receptors, estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and estrogen receptor-β (ERβ). However, the role of ERs in the proliferative action of estrogen is not well established. Recently, it has been known that ER activates phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K) through binding with the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K. Therefore, possible mechanisms may include ER-mediated phosphoinositide metabolism with subsequent formation of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP 3 ), which is generated from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate via PI3K activation. The present study demonstrates that 17β-estradiol (E2) up-regulates PI3K in an ERα-dependent manner, but not ERβ, and stimulates cell growth in breast cancer cells. In order to study this phenomenon, we have treated ERα-positive MCF-7 cells and ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with 10 nM E2. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with E2 resulted in a marked increase in PI3K (p85) expression, which paralleled an increase in phospho-Akt (Ser-473) and PIP 3 level. These observations also correlated with an increased activity to E2-induced cell proliferation. However, these effects of E2 on breast cancer cells were not observed in the MDA-MB-231 cell line, indicating that the E2-mediated up-regulation of PI3K/Akt pathway is ERα-dependent. These results suggest that estrogen activates PI3K/Akt signaling through ERα-dependent mechanism in MCF-7 cells

  5. Zinc promotes proliferation and activation of myogenic cells via the PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Kazuya, E-mail: asuno10k@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, Yosuke, E-mail: cynagata@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Wada, Eiji, E-mail: gacchu1@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Zammit, Peter S., E-mail: peter.zammit@kcl.ac.uk [Randall Division of Cell and Molecular Biophysics, King' s College London, London SE1 1UL (United Kingdom); Shiozuka, Masataka, E-mail: cmuscle@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Matsuda, Ryoichi, E-mail: cmatsuda@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells named muscle satellite cells are normally quiescent but are activated in response to various stimuli, such as injury and overload. Activated satellite cells enter the cell cycle and proliferate to produce a large number of myogenic progenitor cells, and these cells then differentiate and fuse to form myofibers. Zinc is one of the essential elements in the human body, and has multiple roles, including cell growth and DNA synthesis. However, the role of zinc in myogenic cells is not well understood, and is the focus of this study. We first examined the effects of zinc on differentiation of murine C2C12 myoblasts and found that zinc promoted proliferation, with an increased number of cells incorporating EdU, but inhibited differentiation with reduced myogenin expression and myotube formation. Furthermore, we used the C2C12 reserve cell model of myogenic quiescence to investigate the role of zinc on activation of myogenic cells. The number of reserve cells incorporating BrdU was increased by zinc in a dose dependent manner, with the number dramatically further increased using a combination of zinc and insulin. Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) are downstream of insulin signaling, and both were phosphorylated after zinc treatment. The zinc/insulin combination-induced activation involved the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and ERK cascade. We conclude that zinc promotes activation and proliferation of myogenic cells, and this activation requires phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt and ERK as part of the signaling cascade. - Highlights: • Zinc has roles for promoting proliferation and inhibition differentiation of C2C12. • Zinc promotes activation of reserve cells. • Insulin and zinc synergize activation of reserve cells. • PI3K/Akt and ERK cascade affect zinc/insulin-mediated activation of reserve cells.

  6. Camptothecin inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB-induced proliferation of rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eun-Seok [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Division of Life Science, College of Health and Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Chungju, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shin-il [College of Pharmacy Medical Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Kyu-dong [Hazardous Substances Analysis Division, Gwangju Regional Food and Drug Administration, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi-Yea [Department of Nursing Kyungbok University, Pocheon (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Hwan-Soo; Hong, Jin-Tae [College of Pharmacy Medical Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hwa-Sup [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Division of Life Science, College of Health and Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Chungju, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bokyung [Department of Physiology, Konkuk Medical School, Konkuk University, Chungju, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Yeo-Pyo, E-mail: ypyun@chungbuk.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy Medical Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in arterial wall is a major cause of vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty. In this study, we investigated not only the inhibitory effects of camptothecin (CPT) on PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation, but also its molecular mechanism of this inhibition. CPT significantly inhibited proliferation with IC50 value of 0.58 μM and the DNA synthesis of PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner (0.52 μM ) without any cytotoxicity. CPT induced the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Also, CPT decreased the expressions of G0/G1-specific regulatory proteins including cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2, cyclin D1 and PCNA in PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs. Pre-incubation of VSMCs with CPT significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced Akt activation, whereas CPT did not affect PDGF-receptor beta phosphorylation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation and phospholipase C (PLC)-γ1 phosphorylation in PDGF-BB signaling pathway. Our data showed that CPT pre-treatment inhibited VSMC proliferation, and that the inhibitory effect of CPT was enhanced by LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, on PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation. In addition, inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway by LY294002 significantly enhanced the suppression of PCNA expression and Akt activation by CPT. These results suggest that the anti-proliferative activity of CPT is mediated in part by downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. - Highlights: ► CPT inhibits proliferation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMC without cytotoxicity. ► CPT arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1 phase by downregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK2. ► CPT significantly attenuates Akt phosphorylation in PDGF-BB signaling pathway. ► LY294002 enhanced the inhibitory effect of CPT on VSMC proliferation. ► Thus, CPT is mediated by downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  7. Camptothecin inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB-induced proliferation of rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Eun-Seok; Kang, Shin-il; Yoo, Kyu-dong; Lee, Mi-Yea; Yoo, Hwan-Soo; Hong, Jin-Tae; Shin, Hwa-Sup; Kim, Bokyung; Yun, Yeo-Pyo

    2013-01-01

    The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in arterial wall is a major cause of vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty. In this study, we investigated not only the inhibitory effects of camptothecin (CPT) on PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation, but also its molecular mechanism of this inhibition. CPT significantly inhibited proliferation with IC50 value of 0.58 μM and the DNA synthesis of PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner (0.52 μM ) without any cytotoxicity. CPT induced the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Also, CPT decreased the expressions of G0/G1-specific regulatory proteins including cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2, cyclin D1 and PCNA in PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs. Pre-incubation of VSMCs with CPT significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced Akt activation, whereas CPT did not affect PDGF-receptor beta phosphorylation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation and phospholipase C (PLC)-γ1 phosphorylation in PDGF-BB signaling pathway. Our data showed that CPT pre-treatment inhibited VSMC proliferation, and that the inhibitory effect of CPT was enhanced by LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, on PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation. In addition, inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway by LY294002 significantly enhanced the suppression of PCNA expression and Akt activation by CPT. These results suggest that the anti-proliferative activity of CPT is mediated in part by downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. - Highlights: ► CPT inhibits proliferation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMC without cytotoxicity. ► CPT arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1 phase by downregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK2. ► CPT significantly attenuates Akt phosphorylation in PDGF-BB signaling pathway. ► LY294002 enhanced the inhibitory effect of CPT on VSMC proliferation. ► Thus, CPT is mediated by downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

  8. Search for two-photon production of resonances decaying into K anti K and K anti K. pi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althoff, M; Braunschweig, W; Kirschfink, F J; Martyn, H U; Rosskamp, R; Siebke, H; Wallraff, W; Eisenmann, J; Fischer, H M; Hartmann, H

    1985-11-01

    An analysis of the production of Ksub(s)/sup 0/Ksub(s)/sup 0/ and Ksup(+-)Ksub (s)/sup 0/..pi..sup(-+) by two quasi-real photons is presented. The cross section for ..gamma gamma..->K/sup 0/ anti K/sup 0/, which is given for the ..gamma gamma.. invariant mass range from K anti K threshold to 2.5 GeV, is dominated by the f'(1,525) resonance and an enhancement near the K anti K threshold. Upper limits on the product of the two-photon width times the branching ratio into K anti K pairs are given for THETA(1,700), h(2,030), and zeta(2,220). For exclusive two-photon production of Ksup(+-)Ksub(s)/sup 0/..pi..-+ no significant signal was observed. Upper limits are given on the cross section of ..gamma gamma..->K/sup +/ anti K/sup 0/..pi../sup -/ or K/sup -/K/sup 0/..pi../sup +/ between 1.4 and 3.2 GeV and on the product of the ..gamma gamma.. width times the branching ratio into the Kanti K..pi.. final states for the etasub(c)(2,980) and the iota(1,440), yielding GAMMA(..gamma gamma..->iota(1,440)) . BR(iota(1,440)-> K anti K..pi..) < 2.2keV at 95% C.L.

  9. Prolonged activation of S6K1 does not suppress IRS or PI-3 kinase signaling during muscle cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKenzie Matthew G

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myogenesis in C2C12 cells requires the activation of the PI3K/mTOR signaling pathways. Since mTOR signaling can feedback through S6K1 to inhibit the activation of PI3K, the aim of this work was to assess whether feedback from S6K1 played a role in myogenesis and determine whether siRNA mediated knockdown of S6K1 would lead to an increased rate of myotube formation. Results S6K1 activity increased in a linear fashion following plating and was more than 3-fold higher after Day 3 of differentiation (subconfluent = 11.09 ± 3.05, Day 3 = 29.34 ± 3.58. IRS-1 levels tended to increase upon serum withdrawal but decreased approximately 2-fold (subconfluent = 0.88 ± 0.10, Day 3 = 0.42 ± 0.06 3 days following differentiation whereas IRS-2 protein remained stable. IRS-1 associated p85 was significantly reduced upon serum withdrawal (subconfluent = 0.86 ± 0.07, Day 0 = 0.31 ± 0.05, remaining low through day 1. IRS-2 associated p85 decreased following serum withdrawal (subconfluent = 0.96 ± 0.05, Day 1 = 0.56 ± 0.08 and remained suppressed up to Day 3 following differentiation (0.56 ± 0.05. Phospho-tyrosine associated p85 increased significantly from subconfluent to Day 0 and remained elevated throughout differentiation. siRNA directed against S6K1 and S6K2 did not result in changes in IRS-1 levels after either 48 or 96 hrs. Furthermore, neither 48 nor 96 hrs of S6K1 knockdown caused a change in myotube formation. Conclusions Even though S6K1 activity increases throughout muscle cell differentiation and IRS-1 levels decrease over this period, siRNA suggests that S6K1 is not mediating the decrease in IRS-1. The decrease in IRS-1/2 associated p85 together with the increase in phospho-tyrosine associated p85 suggests that PI3K associates primarily with scaffolds other than IRS-1/2 during muscle cell differentiation.

  10. A Cross-Species Study of PI3K Protein-Protein Interactions Reveals the Direct Interaction of P85 and SHP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Yang, Xuemei; Begley, Michael J.; Kulkarni, Meghana; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Turke, Alexa B.; Lauriol, Jessica; Yuan, Min; Qi, Jie; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Hong, Pengyu; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Perrimon, Norbert; Asara, John M.

    2016-02-01

    Using a series of immunoprecipitation (IP) - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments and reciprocal BLAST, we conducted a fly-human cross-species comparison of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) interactome in a drosophila S2R+ cell line and several NSCLC and human multiple myeloma cell lines to identify conserved interacting proteins to PI3K, a critical signaling regulator of the AKT pathway. Using H929 human cancer cells and drosophila S2R+ cells, our data revealed an unexpected direct binding of Corkscrew, the drosophila ortholog of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase type II (SHP2) to the Pi3k21B (p60) regulatory subunit of PI3K (p50/p85 human ortholog) but no association with Pi3k92e, the human ortholog of the p110 catalytic subunit. The p85-SHP2 association was validated in human cell lines, and formed a ternary regulatory complex with GRB2-associated-binding protein 2 (GAB2). Validation experiments with knockdown of GAB2 and Far-Western blots proved the direct interaction of SHP2 with p85, independent of adaptor proteins and transfected FLAG-p85 provided evidence that SHP2 binding on p85 occurred on the SH2 domains. A disruption of the SHP2-p85 complex took place after insulin/IGF1 stimulation or imatinib treatment, suggesting that the direct SHP2-p85 interaction was both independent of AKT activation and positively regulates the ERK signaling pathway.

  11. mGluR5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølck, Christina; Harpsøe, Kasper; Gloriam, David E

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1992, mGluR5 has attracted significant attention and been linked to several neurological and psychiatric diseases. Ligand development was initially focused on the orthosteric binding pocket, but lack of subtype selective ligands changed the focus to the transmembrane...... allosteric binding pocket. This strategy has resulted in several drug candidates in clinical testing. In the present article we explore the orthosteric and allosteric binding pockets in terms of structure and ligand recognition across the mGluR subtypes and groups, and discuss the clinical potential...... of ligands targeting these pockets. We have performed binding mode analyses of non- and group-selective orthosteric ligands based on molecular docking in mGluR crystal structures and models. For the analysis of the allosteric binding pocket we have combined data from all mGluR5-mutagenesis studies...

  12. Quantitative analysis of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling using live-cell total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Heath E; Haugh, Jason M

    2013-12-02

    This unit focuses on the use of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and image analysis methods to study the dynamics of signal transduction mediated by class I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) in mammalian cells. The first four protocols cover live-cell imaging experiments, image acquisition parameters, and basic image processing and segmentation. These methods are generally applicable to live-cell TIRF experiments. The remaining protocols outline more advanced image analysis methods, which were developed in our laboratory for the purpose of characterizing the spatiotemporal dynamics of PI3K signaling. These methods may be extended to analyze other cellular processes monitored using fluorescent biosensors. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Synergistic effects of targeted PI3K signaling inhibition and chemotherapy in liposarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Guo

    Full Text Available While liposarcoma is the second most common soft tissue malignant tumor, the molecular pathogenesis in this malignancy is poorly understood. Our goal was therefore to expand the understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive liposarcoma and identify therapeutically-susceptible genetic alterations. We studied a cohort of high-grade liposarcomas and benign lipomas across multiple disease sites, as well as two liposarcoma cell lines, using multiplexed mutational analysis. Nucleic acids extracted from diagnostic patient tissue were simultaneously interrogated for 150 common mutations across 15 essential cancer genes using a clinically-validated platform for cancer genotyping. Western blot analysis was implemented to detect activation of downstream pathways. Liposarcoma cell lines were used to determine the effects of PI3K targeted drug treatment with or without chemotherapy. We identified mutations in the PIK3CA gene in 4 of 18 human liposarcoma patients (22%. No PIK3CA mutations were identified in benign lipomas. Western blot analysis confirmed downstream activation of AKT in both PIK3CA mutant and non-mutant liposarcoma samples. PI-103, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, effectively inhibited the activation of the PI3K/AKT in liposarcoma cell lines and induced apoptosis. Importantly, combination with PI-103 treatment strongly synergized the growth-inhibitory effects of the chemotherapy drugs doxorubicin and cisplatin in liposarcoma cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway is an important cancer mechanism in liposarcoma. Targeting the PI3K/AKT/pathway with small molecule inhibitors in combination with chemotherapy could be exploited as a novel strategy in the treatment of liposarcoma.

  14. Lauric Acid Stimulates Mammary Gland Development of Pubertal Mice through Activation of GPR84 and PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yingying; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Fenglin; Ai, Wei; Zhu, Xiaotong; Shu, Gang; Wang, Lina; Gao, Ping; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang; Liang, Xingwei; Jiang, Qingyan; Wang, Songbo

    2017-01-11

    It has been demonstrated that dietary fat affects pubertal mammary gland development. However, the role of lauric acid (LA) in this process remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the effects of LA on mammary gland development in pubertal mice and to explore the underlying mechanism. In vitro, 100 μM LA significantly promoted proliferation of mouse mammary epithelial cell line HC11 by regulating expression of proliferative markers (cyclin D1/3, p21, PCNA). Meanwhile, LA activated the G protein-coupled receptor 84 (GPR84) and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. In agreement, dietary 1% LA enhanced mammary duct development, increased the expression of GPR84 and cyclin D1, and activated PI3K/Akt in mammary gland of pubertal mice. Furthermore, knockdown of GPR84 or inhibition of PI3K/Akt totally abolished the promotion of HC11 proliferation induced by LA. These results showed that LA stimulated mammary gland development of pubertal mice through activation of GPR84 and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  15. DUAL INHIBITION OF PI3K/AKT AND mTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER CELLS BY A DIETARY FLAVONOID FISETIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naghma; Afaq, Farrukh; Khusro, Fatima H.; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Suh, Yewseok; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most commonly occurring malignancies. It has been reported that mTOR is phosphorylated in lung cancer and its activation was more frequent in tumors with over-expression of PI3K/Akt. Therefore, dual inhibitors of PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling could be valuable agents for treating lung cancer. In the present study, we show that fisetin, a dietary tetrahydroxyflavone inhibits cell-growth with the concomitant suppression of PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Using autodock 4, we found that fisetin physically interacts with the mTOR complex at two sites. Fisetin treatment was also found to reduce the formation of A549 cell colonies in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with fisetin caused decrease in the protein expression of PI3K (p85 and p110), inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, p70S6K1, eIF-4E and 4E-BP1. Fisetin-treated cells also exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of the constituents of mTOR signaling complex like Rictor, Raptor, GβL and PRAS40. There was increase in the phosphorylation of AMPKα and decrease in the phosphorylation of TSC2 on treatment of cells with fisetin. We also found that treatment of cells with mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and mTOR-siRNA caused decrease in phosphorylation of mTOR and its target proteins which were further downregulated on treatment with fisetin, suggesting that these effects are mediated in part, through mTOR signaling. Our results show that fisetin suppressed PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling in NSCLC cells and thus, could be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent against human lung cancer. PMID:21618507

  16. Inhibitors of pan PI3K signaling synergize with BRAF or MEK inhibitors to prevent BRAF-mutant melanoma cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eSweetlove

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BRAF and MEK inhibitors have improved outcomes for patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma, but their efficacy is limited by both intrinsic and acquired resistance. Activation of the PI3K pathway can mediate resistance to these agents, providing a strong rationale for combination therapy in melanoma. Here, a panel of 9 low passage human metastatic melanoma cell lines with BRAF mutations were tested in cell proliferation and protein expression assays for sensitivity to inhibitors of MEK (selumetinib and BRAF (vemurafenib as single agents and in combination with inhibitors of pan-PI3K (ZSTK474, pan-PI3K/mTOR (BEZ235, individual PI3K isoforms (p110α, A66; p110β, TGX-221; p110γ, AS-252424; p110δ, idelalisib, or mTORC1/2 (KU-0063794. Selumetinib and vemurafenib potently inhibited cell proliferation in all cell lines, especially in those that expressed low levels of pAKT. ZSTK474 and BEZ235 also inhibited cell proliferation in all cell lines and enhanced the antitumor activity of selumetinib and vemurafenib in the majority of lines by either interacting synergistically or additively to increase potency or by inducing cytotoxicity by significantly increasing the magnitude of cell growth inhibition. Furthermore, ZSTK474 or BEZ235 combined with selumetinib to produce robust inhibition of pERK, pAKT and pS6 expression and synergistic inhibition of NZM20 tumor growth. The inhibitors of individual PI3K isoforms or mTORC1/2 were less effective at inhibiting cell proliferation either as single agents or in combination with selumetinib or vemurafenib, although KU-0063794 synergistically interacted with vemurafenib and increased the magnitude of cell growth inhibition with selumetinib or vemurafenib in certain cell lines. Overall, these results suggest that the sensitivity of BRAF-mutant melanoma cells to BRAF or MEK inhibitors is at least partly mediated by activation of the PI3K pathway and can be enhanced by combined inhibition of the BRAF/MEK and PI3K

  17. A phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) pathway promotes Kv7.1 channel surface expression by inhibiting Nedd4-2 protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Nybo; Krzystanek, Katarzyna; Petersen, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial cell polarization involves several kinase signaling cascades that eventually divide the surface membrane into an apical and a basolateral part. One kinase, which is activated during the polarization process, is phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). In MDCK cells, the basolateral potassium...... channel Kv7.1 requires PI3K activity for surface-expression during the polarization process. Here, we demonstrate that Kv7.1 surface expression requires tonic PI3K activity as PI3K inhibition triggers endocytosis of these channels in polarized MDCK. Pharmacological inhibition of SGK1 gave similar results...... as PI3K inhibition, whereas overexpression of constitutively active SGK1 overruled it, suggesting that SGK1 is the primary downstream target of PI3K in this process. Furthermore, knockdown of the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2 overruled PI3K inhibition, whereas a Nedd4-2 interaction-deficient Kv7.1 mutant...

  18. PI3 kinase is involved in cocaine behavioral sensitization and its reversal with brain area specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiuwu; Mi Jing; Wetsel, William C.; Davidson, Colin; Xiong Xieying; Chen Qiang; Ellinwood, Everett H.; Lee, Tong H.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is an important signaling molecule involved in cell differentiation, proliferation, survival, and phagocytosis, and may participate in various brain functions. To determine whether it is also involved in cocaine sensitization, we measured the p85α/p110 PI3K activity in the nuclear accumbens (NAc) shell, NAc core, and prefrontal cortex (PFC) following establishment of cocaine sensitization and its subsequent reversal. Naive rats were rank-ordered and split into either daily cocaine or saline pretreatment group based on their locomotor responses to an acute cocaine injection (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.). These two groups were then injected with cocaine (40 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline for 4 consecutive days followed by 9-day withdrawal. Cocaine sensitization was subsequently reversed by 5 daily injections of the D 1 /D 2 agonist pergolide (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.) in combination with the 5-HT 3 antagonist ondansetron (0.2 mg/kg, s.c., 3.5 h after pergolide injection). After another 9-day withdrawal, behavioral cocaine sensitization and its reversal were confirmed with an acute cocaine challenge (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.), and animals were sacrificed the next day for measurement of p85α/p110 PI3K activity. Cocaine-sensitized animals exhibited increased PI3K activity in the NAc shell, and this increase was reversed by combined pergolide/ondansetron treatment, which also reversed behavioral sensitization. In the NAc core and PFC, cocaine sensitization decreased and increased the PI3K activity, respectively. These changes, in contrast to that in the NAc shell, were not normalized following the reversal of cocaine-sensitization. Interestingly, daily injections of pergolide alone in saline-pretreated animals induced PI3K changes that were similar to the cocaine sensitization-associated changes in the NAc core and PFC but not the NAc shell; furthermore, these changes in saline-pretreated animals were prevented by ondansetron given 3.5 h after pergolide. The present

  19. MGluR5 mediates the interaction between late-LTP, network activity, and learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Bikbaev

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal synaptic plasticity and learning are strongly regulated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs and particularly by mGluR5. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying mGluR5-modulation of these phenomena. Prolonged pharmacological blockade of mGluR5 with MPEP produced a profound impairment of spatial memory. Effects were associated with 1 a reduction of mGluR1a-expression in the dentate gyrus; 2 impaired dentate gyrus LTP; 3 enhanced CA1-LTP and 4 suppressed theta (5-10 Hz and gamma (30-100 Hz oscillations in the dentate gyrus. Allosteric potentiation of mGluR1 after mGluR5 blockade significantly ameliorated dentate gyrus LTP, as well as suppression of gamma oscillatory activity. CA3-lesioning prevented MPEP effects on CA1-LTP, suggesting that plasticity levels in CA1 are driven by mGluR5-dependent synaptic and network activity in the dentate gyrus. These data support the hypothesis that prolonged mGluR5-inactivation causes altered hippocampal LTP levels and network activity, which is mediated in part by impaired mGluR1-expression in the dentate gyrus. The consequence is impairment of long-term learning.

  20. microRNA 126 inhibits the transition of endothelial progenitor cells to mesenchymal cells via the PIK3R2-PI3K/Akt signalling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Zhang

    Full Text Available AIMS: Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs are capable of proliferating and differentiating into mature endothelial cells, and they have been considered as potential candidates for coronary heart disease therapy. However, the transition of EPCs to mesenchymal cells is not fully understood. This study aimed to explore the role of microRNA 126 (miR-126 in the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT induced by transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1. METHODS AND RESULTS: EndMT of rat bone marrow-derived EPCs was induced by TGFβ1 (5 ng/mL for 7 days. miR-126 expression was depressed in the process of EPC EndMT. The luciferase reporter assay showed that the PI3K regulatory subunit p85 beta (PIK3R2 was a direct target of miR-126 in EPCs. Overexpression of miR-126 by a lentiviral vector (lenti-miR-126 was found to downregulate the mRNA expression of mesenchymal cell markers (α-SMA, sm22-a, and myocardin and to maintain the mRNA expression of progenitor cell markers (CD34, CD133. In the cellular process of EndMT, there was an increase in the protein expression of PIK3R2 and the nuclear transcription factors FoxO3 and Smad4; PI3K and phosphor-Akt expression decreased, a change that was reversed markedly by overexpression of miR-126. Furthermore, knockdown of PIK3R2 gene expression level showed reversed morphological changes of the EPCs treated with TGFβ1, thereby giving the evidence that PIK3R2 is the target gene of miR-126 during EndMT process. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that miR-126 targets PIK3R2 to inhibit EPC EndMT and that this process involves regulation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. miR-126 has the potential to be used as a biomarker for the early diagnosis of intimal hyperplasia in cardiovascular disease and can even be a therapeutic tool for treating cardiovascular diseases mediated by the EndMT process.

  1. Dynamic Changes in Striatal mGluR1 But Not mGluR5 during Pathological Progression of Parkinson's Disease in Human Alpha-Synuclein A53T Transgenic Rats: A Multi-PET Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Kawamura, Kazunori; Furutsuka, Kenji; Nengaki, Nobuki; Shimoda, Yoko; Shiomi, Satoshi; Takei, Makoto; Hashimoto, Hiroki; Yui, Joji; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Hatori, Akiko; Xie, Lin; Kumata, Katsushi; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2016-01-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a prevalent degenerative disorder affecting the CNS that is primarily characterized by resting tremor and movement deficits. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes 1 and 5 (mGluR1 and mGluR5, respectively) are important targets for investigation in several CNS disorders. In the present study, we investigated the in vivo roles of mGluR1 and mGluR5 in chronic PD pathology by performing longitudinal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in A53T transgenic (A53T-Tg) rats expressing an abnormal human α-synuclein (ASN) gene. A53T-Tg rats showed a dramatic decline in general motor activities with age, along with abnormal ASN aggregation and striatal neuron degeneration. In longitudinal PET imaging, striatal nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND) values for [(11)C]ITDM (N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino) pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-N-methyl-4-[(11)C]methylbenzamide), a selective PET ligand for mGluR1, temporarily increased before PD symptom onset and dramatically decreased afterward with age. However, striatal BPND values for (E)-[(11)C]ABP688 [3-(6-methylpyridin-2-ylethynyl)-cyclohex-2-enone-(E)-O-[(11)C]methyloxime], a specific PET ligand for mGluR5, remained constant during experimental terms. The dynamic changes in striatal mGluR1 BPND values also showed a high correlation in pathological decreases in general motor activities. Furthermore, declines in mGluR1 BPND values were correlated with decreases in BPND values for [(18)F]FE-PE2I [(E)-N-(3-iodoprop-2E-enyl)-2β-carbo-[(18)F]fluoroethoxy-3β-(4-methylphenyl) nortropane], a specific PET ligand for the dopamine transporter, a biomarker for dopaminergic neurons. In conclusion, our results have demonstrated for the first time that dynamic changes occur in mGluR1, but not mGluR5, that accompany pathological progression in a PD animal model. Synaptic signaling by glutamate, the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, is modulated by group I metabotropic glutamate

  2. IL2-dependent phosphorylation of 40S ribosomal protein S6 is controlled by PI-3K/mTOR signalling in CTLL2 cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tuháčková, Zdena; Šloncová, Eva; Vojtěchová, Martina; Sovová, Vlasta

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2004), s. 601-605 ISSN 1107-3756 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/00/0269 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : MTOR /PI3-K signalling, p70 S 6 kinase, interleukin Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.190, year: 2004

  3. PI3K-Akt signaling activates mTOR-mediated epileptogenesis in organotypic hippocampal culture model of posttraumatic epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny; Dryer, Alexandra M.; Saponjian, Yero; Mahoney, Mark M.; Pimentel, Corrin A.; Lucini, Corrina A.; Usenovic, Marija; Staley, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    mTOR is activated in epilepsy, but the mechanisms of mTOR activation in post-traumatic epileptogenesis are unknown. It is also not clear whether mTOR inhibition has an antiepileptogenic, or merely anti-convulsive effect. The rat hippocampal organotypic culture model of post-traumatic epilepsy was used to study the effects of long term (four weeks) inhibition of signaling pathways that interact with mTOR. Ictal activity was quantified by measurement of lactate production and electrical recordings, and cell death was quantified with LDH release measurements and Nissl-stained neuron counts. Lactate and LDH measurements were well-correlated with electrographic activity and neuron counts, respectively. Inhibition of PI3K and Akt prevented activation of mTOR, and was as effective as inhibition of mTOR in reducing ictal activity and cell death. A dual inhibitor of PI3K and mTOR, NVP-BEZ235, was also effective. Inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin reduced axon sprouting. Late start of rapamycin treatment was effective in reducing epileptic activity and cell death, while early termination of rapamycin treatment did not result in increased epileptic activity or cell death. The conclusions of the study are: (1), the organotypic hippocampal culture model of posttraumatic epilepsy comprises a rapid assay of antiepileptogenic and neuroprotective activities and, in this model (2), mTOR activation depends on PI3K-Akt signaling, and (3) transient inhibition of mTOR has sustained effects on epilepsy. PMID:23699517

  4. MicroRNA Dysregulation in Liver and Pancreas of CMP-Neu5Ac Hydroxylase Null Mice Disrupts Insulin/PI3K-AKT Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deug-Nam Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase (Cmah-null mice fed with a high-fat diet develop fasting hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and ultimately develop characteristics of type 2 diabetes. The precise metabolic role of the Cmah gene remains poorly understood. This study was designed to investigate the molecular mechanisms through which microRNAs (miRNAs regulate type 2 diabetes. Expression profiles of miRNAs in Cmah-null mouse livers were compared to those of control mouse livers. Liver miFinder miRNA PCR arrays (n=6 showed that eight miRNA genes were differentially expressed between the two groups. Compared with controls, seven miRNAs were upregulated and one miRNA was downregulated in Cmah-null mice. Specifically, miR-155-5p, miR-425-5p, miR-15a-5p, miR-503-5p, miR-16-5p, miR-29a-3p, and miR-29b-3p were significantly upregulated in the liver and pancreas of Cmah-null mice. These target miRNAs are closely associated with dysregulation of insulin/PI3K-AKT signaling, suggesting that the Cmah-null mice could be a useful model for studying diabetes.

  5. ANTITUMOR AND APOPTOTIC EFFECTS OF CUCURBITACIN A IN A-549 LUNG CARCINOMA CELLS IS MEDIATED VIA G2/M CELL CYCLE ARREST AND M-TOR/PI3K/AKT SIGNALLING PATHWAY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Dong; Liu, Yan; Su, Yuan; Xiong, Xian-Zhi; Shang, Dan; Xu, Juan-Juan; Liu, Hong-Ju

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to demonstrate the antitumor potential of cucurbitacin A on A-549 NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer cells). The effects of Cucurbitacin A on apoptotic induction, cell physic, cell cycle failure and m-TOR/PI3K/Akt signalling pathway were also investigated in the present study. MTT assay and clonogenic assay were carried out to study effects of this compound on cell cytotoxicity and colony forming tendency in A-549 cells. Moreover, phase and fluorescence microscopic techniques were used to examine the effects on cell morphology and induction of apoptosis. The effects on cell cycle phase distribution were investigated by flow cytometry and effects on m-TOR/PI3K/Akt signalling proteins were assessed by western blot analysis. Results showed that cucurbitacin A induced dose-dependent cytotoxic effects along with suppressing the colony forming tendency in these cells. Cucurbitacin A also induced morphological changes in these cells featuring chromatin condensation, cell shrinkage and apoptotic body formation. G2/M phase cell cycle collapse was also induced by Cucurbitacin A along with inhibition of expression levels of m-TOR/PI3K/Akt proteins. In conclusion, cucurbitacin A inhibits cancer growth in A-549 NSCLC cells by inducing apoptosis, targeting m-TOR/PI3K/Akt signalling pathway and G2/M cell cycle.

  6. nm23 regulates decidualization through the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathways in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Fu, Li-Juan; Liu, Xue-Qing; Hu, Zhuo-Ying; Jiang, Yu; Gao, Ru-Fei; Feng, Qian; Lan, Xi; Geng, Yan-Qing; Chen, Xue-Mei; He, Jun-Lin; Wang, Ying-Xiong; Ding, Yu-Bin

    2016-10-01

    Does nm23 have functional significance in decidualization in mice and humans? nm23 affects decidualization via the phosphoinositide 3 kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K-Akt-mTOR) signaling pathways in mouse endometrial stromal cells (ESCs; mESCs) and human ESCs. The function of nm23 in suppressing metastasis has been demonstrated in a variety of cancer types. nm23 also participates in the control of DNA replication and cell proliferation and differentiation. We first analyzed the expression profile of nm23 in mice during early pregnancy (n = 6/group), pseudopregnancy (n = 6/group) and artificial decidualization (n = 6/group) and in humans during the menstrual cycle phases and the first trimester. We then used primary cultured mESCs and a human ESC line, T-HESC, to explore the hormonal regulation of nm23 and the roles of nm23 in in vitro decidualization, and as a possible mediator of downstream PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathways. We evaluated the dynamic expression of nm23 in mice and humans using immunohistochemistry, western blot and real-time quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Regulation of nm23 by steroid hormones was investigated in isolated primary mESCs and T-HESCs by western blot. The effect of nm23 knockdown (using siRNA) on ESC proliferation was analyzed by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine staining (EdU) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein (PCNA) expression. The influence of nm23 expression on the differentiation of ESCs was determined by RT-qPCR using the mouse differentiation markers decidual/trophoblast PRL-related protein (dtprp, also named prl8a2) and prolactin family 3 subfamily c member 1 (prl3c1) and the human differentiation markers insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) and prolactin (PRL). The effects of nm23 siRNA (si-nm23) and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 on the downstream effects of nm23 on the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway were estimated by western blot. NM23-M1 was specifically expressed in the decidual zone

  7. Involvement of IGF-1 and MEOX2 in PI3K/Akt1/2 and ERK1/2 pathways mediated proliferation and differentiation of perivascular adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Kong, Feng; Wang, Jue; Lu, Qinghua; Xu, Haijia; Qi, Tonggang; Meng, Juan

    2015-02-01

    Perivascular adipocyte (PVAC) proliferation and differentiation were closely involved in cardiovascular disease. We aimed to investigate whether phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways enhance PVAC functions activated by insulin-like growth factor 1(IGF-1) and suppressed by mesenchyme homeobox 2 (MEOX2). In this study, PVACs from primary culture were cultured and induced to differentiate. Cell viability assays demonstrated that IGF-1 promoted PVAC proliferation and differentiation. However MEOX2 counteracted these IGF-1-mediated actions. Flow Cytometry revealed that IGF-1 increased S phase cells and decreased apoptosis; however, MEOX2 decreased S phase cells, increased G0-G1 phase cells, and promoted apoptosis. During PVAC proliferation and differentiation, IGF-1 activated PI3K/Akt1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, upregulated the expression of these signaling proteins and FAS, and increased PVAC lipid content. In contrast, MEOX2 constrained the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt1/2 protein, down-regulated these signaling molecules and FAS, and decreased PVAC lipid content. Instead, MEOX2 knockdown enhanced the ERK1/2 and Akt1/2 phosphorylation, augmented the expression of these signaling molecules and FAS, and increased PVAC lipid content. Our findings suggested that PI3K/Akt1/2 and ERK1/2 activation mediated by IGF-1 is essential for PVAC proliferation and differentiation, and MEOX2 is a promising therapeutic gene to intervene in the signaling pathways and inhibit PVAC functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Observation of photon polarization in $B^\\pm \\to K^\\pm\\pi^\\mp\\pi^\\pm\\gamma$ decays

    CERN Multimedia

    Veneziano, G

    2014-01-01

    A study of the flavor-changing neutral current radiative $B^{\\pm} \\to K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp}\\pi^{\\pm}\\gamma$ decays performed using data collected in proton-proton collisions with the LHCb detector at $7$ and $8\\,$TeV center-of-mass energies is presented. In this sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3\\,\\text{fb}^{-1}$, nearly $14\\,000$ signal events are reconstructed and selected, containing all possible intermediate resonances with a $K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp}\\pi^{\\pm}$ final state in the $[1.1, 1.9]$\\,GeV/$c^{2}$ mass range. The distribution of the angle of the photon direction with respect to the plane defined by the final-state hadrons in their rest frame is studied in intervals of $K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp}\\pi^{\\pm}$ mass and the asymmetry between the number of signal events found on each side of the plane is obtained. The first direct observation of the photon polarization in the $b \\to s\\gamma$ transition is reported with a significance of $5.2\\,\\sigma$.

  9. Nuclear and nucleolar localization signals and their targeting function in phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase PI4K230

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuk, Annamaria; Friedlaender, Elza; Vereb, Gyoergy; Lisboa, Duarte; Bagossi, Peter; Toth, Gabor; Gergely, Pal; Vereb, Gyoergy

    2008-01-01

    PI4K230, an isoform of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, known primarily as a cytoplasmic membrane-bound enzyme, was detected recently also in the nucleolus of several cells. Here we provide mechanistic insight on the targeting function of its putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences using molecular modeling, digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells and binding to various importins. The synthetic sequence 916 NFNHIHKRIRRVADKYLSG 934 comprising a putative monopartite NLS (NLS1), targeted covalently bound fluorescent BSA to the nucleoplasm via classical importin α/β mechanism employing importins α1 and α3 but not α5. This transport was inhibited by wheat germ agglutinin and GTPγS. The sequence 1414 SKKTNRGSQLHKYYMKRRTL 1433 , a putative bipartite NLS (NLS2) proved ineffective in nuclear targeting if conjugated to fluorescently labeled BSA. Nonetheless, NLS2 or either of its basic clusters directed to the nucleolus soybean trypsin inhibitor that can pass the nuclear pore complex passively; moreover, an expressed 58 kDa fragment of PI4K230 (AA1166-1667) comprising NLS2 was also imported into the nucleus by import factors of reticulocyte lysate or by importin α1/β or α3/β complexes and localized to the nucleolus. We conclude that the putative bipartite NLS itself is a nucleolar targeting signal, and for nuclear import PI4K230 requires a larger sequence around it or, alternatively, the monopartite NLS

  10. Niacin activates the PI3K/Akt cascade via PKC- and EGFR-transactivation-dependent pathways through hydroxyl-carboxylic acid receptor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawang Sun

    Full Text Available Niacin has been demonstrated to activate a PI3K/Akt signaling cascade to prevent brain damage after stroke and UV-induced skin damage; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms for HCA2-induced Akt activation remain to be elucidated. Using CHO-K1 cells stably expressing HCA2 and A431 cells, a human epidermoid cell line with high levels of endogenous expression of functional HCA2 receptors, we first demonstrated that niacin induced a robust Akt phosphorylation at both Thr308 and Ser473 in a time-dependent fashion, with a maximal activation at 5 min and a subsequent reduction to baseline by 30 min through HCA2, and that the activation was significantly blocked by pertussis toxin. The HCA2-mediated activation of Akt was also significantly inhibited by the PKC inhibitors GF109203x and Go6983 in both cell lines, by the PDGFR-selective inhibitor tyrphostin A9 in CHO-HCA2 cells and by the MMP inhibitor GM6001 and EGFR-specific inhibitor AG1478 in A431 cells. These results suggest that the PKC pathway and PDGFR/EGFR transactivation pathway play important roles in HCA2-mediated Akt activation. Further investigation indicated that PI3K and the Gβγ subunit were likely to play an essential role in HCA2-induced Akt activation. Moreover, Immunobloting analyses using an antibody that recognizes p70S6K1 phosphorylated at Thr389 showed that niacin evoked p70S6K1 activation via the PI3K/Akt pathway. The results of our study provide new insight into the signaling pathways involved in HCA2 activation.

  11. Long-Lasting Impairment of mGluR5-Activated Intracellular Pathways in the Striatum After Withdrawal of Cocaine Self-Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Hanne Mette; Crouzin, Nadine; Moreno, Estefanía; Raivio, Noora; Fuentes, Silvia; McCormick, Peter J.; Vignes, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cocaine addiction continues to be a major heath concern, and despite public health intervention there is a lack of efficient pharmacological treatment options. A newly identified potential target are the group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, with allosteric modulators showing particular promise. Methods: We evaluated the capacity of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors to induce functional responses in ex vivo striatal slices from rats with (1) acute cocaine self-administration, (2) chronic cocaine self-administration, and (3) 60 days cocaine self-administration withdrawal by Western blot and extracellular recordings of synaptic transmission. Results: We found that striatal group I metabotropic glutamate receptors are the principal mediator of the mGluR1/5 agonist (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine-induced cAMP responsive-element binding protein phosphorylation. Both acute and chronic cocaine self-administration blunted group I metabotropic glutamate receptor effects on cAMP responsive-element binding protein phosphorylation in the striatum, which correlated with the capacity to induce long-term depression, an effect that was maintained 60 days after chronic cocaine self-administration withdrawal. In the nucleus accumbens, the principal brain region mediating the rewarding effects of drugs, chronic cocaine self-administration blunted group I metabotropic glutamate receptor stimulation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 and cAMP responsive-element binding protein. Interestingly, the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist/inverse-agonist, 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride, led to a specific increase in cAMP responsive-element binding protein phosphorylation after chronic cocaine self-administration, specifically in the nucleus accumbens, but not in the striatum. Conclusions: Prolonged cocaine self-administration, through withdrawal, leads to a blunting of group I metabotropic glutamate receptor

  12. Camel Milk Ameliorates 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Renal Injury in Rats: Targeting MAPKs, NF-κB and PI3K/Akt/eNOS Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany H. Arab

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The clinical utility of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU is limited by its nephrotoxicity. Camel milk (CM has previously displayed beneficial effects in toxicant-induced nephropathies. The current study aimed to investigate the potential of CM to attenuate 5-FU-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Methods: Renal tissues were studied in terms of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. The levels of renal injury markers, inflammatory cytokines along with NOX-1, Nrf-2 and HO-1 were assessed by ELISA. The expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, NF-κBp65, p53, Bax and PCNA were detected by Immunohistochemistry. To gain an insight into the molecular signaling mechanisms, we determined the effect of CM on MAPKs, NF-κB and PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathways by Western blotting. Results: CM lowered 5-FU-triggered increase of creatinine, BUN, Kim-1 and NGAL renal injury biomarkers and attenuated the histopathological aberrations. It suppressed oxidative stress and augmented renal antioxidant armory (GSH, SOD, GPx, TAC with restoration of NOX-1, Nrf-2 and HO-1 levels. CM also suppressed renal inflammation as indicated by inhibition of MPO, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-18 and MCP-1 proinflammatory mediators and downregulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression with boosting of IL-10. Regarding MAPKs signaling, CM suppressed the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, JNK1/2 and ERK1/2 and inhibited NF-κB activation. For apoptosis, CM downregulated p53, Bax, CytC and caspase-3 proapoptotic signals with enhancement of Bcl-2 and PCNA. It also enhanced PI3K p110α, phospho-Akt and phospho-eNOS levels with augmentation of renal NO, favoring cell survival. Equally important, CM preconditioning enhanced 5-FU cytotoxicity in MCF-7, HepG-2, HCT-116 and PC-3 cells, thus, justifying their concomitant use. Conclusion: The current findings pinpoint, for the first time, the marked renoprotective effects of CM that were mediated via ROS scavenging, suppression of MAPKs and NF-κB along with activation of PI3K

  13. GRP1 PH Domain, Like AKT1 PH Domain, Possesses a Sentry Glutamate Residue Essential for Specific Targeting to Plasma Membrane PI(3,4,5)P3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, Carissa; Landgraf, Kyle E.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    During the appearance of the signaling lipid PI(3,4,5)P3, an important subset of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains target signaling proteins to the plasma membrane. To ensure proper pathway regulation, such PI(3,4,5)P3-specific PH domains must exclude the more prevalant, constitutive plasma membrane lipid PI(4,5)P2 and bind the rare PI(3,4,5)P3 target lipid with sufficiently high affinity. Our previous study of the E17K mutant of protein kinase B (AKT1) PH domain, together with evidence from Carpten et al (1), revealed that the native AKT1 E17 residue serves as a sentry glutamate that excludes PI(4,5)P2, thereby playing an essential role in specific PI(3,4,5)P3 targeting (2). The sentry glutamate hypothesis proposes that an analogous sentry glutamate residue is a widespread feature of PI(3,4,5)P3-specific PH domains, and that charge reversal mutation at the sentry glutamate position will yield both increased PI(4,5)P2 affinity and constitutive plasma membrane targeting. To test this hypothesis the present study investigates the E345 residue, a putative sentry glutamate, of General Receptor for Phosphoinositides 1 (GRP1) PH domain. The results show that incorporation of the E345K charge reversal mutation into GRP1 PH domain enhances PI(4,5)P2 affinity 8-fold and yields constitutive plasma membrane targeting in cells, reminiscent of the effects of the E17K mutation in AKT1 PH domain. Hydrolysis of plasma membrane PI(4,5)P2 releases E345K GRP1 PH domain into the cytoplasm and the efficiency of this release increases when target Arf6 binding is disrupted. Overall, the findings provide strong support for the sentry glutamate hypothesis and suggest that the GRP1 E345K mutation will be linked to changes in cell physiology and human pathologies, as demonstrated for AKT1 E17K (1, 3). Analysis of available PH domain structures suggests that a lone glutamate residue (or, in some cases an aspartate) is a common, perhaps ubiquitous, feature of PI(3,4,5)P3-specific binding

  14. IGF-1 protects SH-SY5Y cells against MPP+-induced apoptosis via PI3K/PDK-1/Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chanyang; Park, Seungjoon

    2018-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 is a well-known anti-apoptotic pro-survival factor and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway is linked to cell survival induced by IGF-1. It is also reported that Akt signaling is modulated by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1). In the current study, we investigated whether the anti-apoptotic effect of IGF-1 in SH-SY5Y cells exposed to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP + ) is associated with the activity of PI3K/PDK1/Akt pathway. Treatment of cells with IGF-1 inhibited MPP + -induced apoptotic cell death. IGF-1-induced activation of Akt and the protective effect of IGF-1 on MPP + -induced apoptosis were abolished by chemical inhibition of PDK1 (GSK2334470) or PI3K (LY294002). The phosphorylated levels of Akt and PDK1 were significantly suppressed after MPP + exposure, while IGF-1 treatment completely restored MPP+-induced reductions in phosphorylation. IGF-1 protected cells from MPP + insult by suppressing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and malondialdehyde levels and increasing superoxide dismutase activity. Mitochondrial ROS levels were also increased during MPP + exposure, which were attenuated by IGF-1 treatment. In addition, IGF-1-treated cells showed increased activities of succinate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase, stabilization of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, increased ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax, prevention of cytochrome c release and inhibition of caspase-3 activation with PARP cleavage. Furthermore, the protective effects of IGF-1 on oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction were attenuated when cells were preincubated with GSK2334470 or LY294002. Our data suggest that IGF-1 protects SH-SY5Y cells against MPP + -associated oxidative stress by preserving mitochondrial integrity and inhibiting mitochondrial apoptotic cascades via the activation of PI3K/PDK1/Akt pathway. © 2018 The authors.

  15. Gelidium elegans Extract Ameliorates Type 2 Diabetes via Regulation of MAPK and PI3K/Akt Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jia; Kim, Kui-Jin; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2018-01-06

    Gelidium elegans , a red alga native to the Asia Pacific region, contains biologically active polyphenols. We conducted a molecular biological study of the anti-diabetic effect of Gelidium elegans extract (GEE) in C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice. Mice that had been administered GEE had significantly lower body mass, water consumption, and fasting blood glucose than db/db controls. Moreover, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), an indicator of the glycemic status of people with diabetes, was significantly lower in mice that had been administered GEE. We also found that 200 mg/kg/day GEE upregulates the insulin signaling pathway by activating insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and increasing the expression of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4). In parallel, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity was lower in GEE-treated groups. In summary, these findings indicate that GEE regulates glucose metabolism by activating the insulin signaling pathway and downregulating the MAPK signaling pathway.

  16. Valsartan regulates the interaction of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and endothelial nitric oxide synthase via Src/PI3K/Akt signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kuo-Hui; Tsai, Jin-Yi; Kou, Yu Ru; Chiang, An-Na; Hsiao, Sheng-Huang; Wu, Yuh-Lin; Hou, Hsin-Han; Pan, Ching-Chian; Shyue, Song-Kun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2009-06-01

    Valsartan, a selective angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker, has beneficial effects in the cardiovascular system in part by its increase of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, yet the mechanisms are unclear. We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect in endothelial cells (ECs). NO production was examined by Griess reagent assay, DAF-2 DA fluorescence staining and cGMP ELISA kits. Protein interaction was determined by western blotting and immunoprecipitation. Treating bovine or human aortic ECs with valsartan increased NO production, as evidenced by elevated level of stable NO metabolites and intracellular cGMP. Valsartan increased the phosphorylation but not the protein level of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Inhibition of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt and Src pathways by specific inhibitors suppressed valsartan-induced NO release. In addition, valsartan increased the tyrosine residue phosphorylation of AT1R, which was attenuated by inhibition of Src but not PI3K activities. Valsartan also suppressed the interaction of eNOS and AT1R, which was blocked by Src or PI3K inhibition. Valsartan-induced NO production in ECs is mediated through Src/PI3K/Akt-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS. Valsartan-induced AT1R phosphorylation depends on Src but not PI3K, whereas valsartan-induced suppression of AT1R-eNOS interaction depends on Src/PI3K/Akt signalling. These results indicate a novel vasoprotective mechanism of valsartan in upregulating NO production in ECs.

  17. Endosomal sorting of VAMP3 is regulated by PI4K2A

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jovic, M.; Kean, M. J.; Dubánková, Anna; Bouřa, Evžen; Gingras, A. C.; Brill, J. A.; Balla, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 127, č. 17 (2014), s. 3745-3756 ISSN 0021-9533 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : PI4K2A * VAMP3 * PtdIns4P * vesicle fusion * sorting * SNARE Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.432, year: 2014

  18. Glucose-induced lipid deposition in goose primary hepatocytes is dependent on the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chunchun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously we showed that fatty liver formation in overfed geese was accompanied by PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway activation and changes in plasma glucose concentrations. Here, we show that glucose acts in goose hepatocellular lipid metabolism through the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. We observed that glucose increased lipogenesis, decreased fatty acid oxidation and increased very low density lipoprotein triglyceride (VLDL-TG assembly and secretion. Co-treatment with glucose and inhibitors of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway (LY294002, rapamycin, NVP-BEZ235 decreased the levels of factors involved in lipogenesis and increased the levels of factors involved in fatty acid oxidation and VLDL-TG assembly and secretion. These findings show that inhibition of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway decreased glucose-induced lipogenesis, inhibited the downregulation of fatty acid oxidation by glucose and increased the upregulation of VLDL-TG assembly and secretion by glucose. The results presented herein provide further support for the role of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway in lipid metabolism as we showed that in goose primary hepatocytes, glucose acts through the PI3K-Akt-mTOR-dependent pathway to stimulate lipid deposition by increasing lipogenesis and decreasing fatty acid oxidation and VLDL-TG assembly and secretion.

  19. Effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on the axonal outgrowth through activation of PI3K/AKT signaling in primary cortical neurons followed oxygen-glucose deprivation injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transplantation with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs improves the survival of neurons and axonal outgrowth after stroke remains undetermined. Here, we investigated whether PI3K/AKT signaling pathway is involved in these therapeutic effects of BMSCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (1 BMSCs and cortical neurons were derived from Sprague-Dawley rats. The injured neurons were induced by Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation (OGD, and then were respectively co-cultured for 48 hours with BMSCs at different densities (5×10(3, 5×10(5/ml in transwell co-culture system. The average length of axon and expression of GAP-43 were examined to assess the effect of BMSCs on axonal outgrowth after the damage of neurons induced by OGD. (2 The injured neurons were cultured with a conditioned medium (CM of BMSCs cultured for 24 hours in neurobasal medium. During the process, we further identified whether PI3K/AKT signaling pathway is involved through the adjunction of LY294002 (a specific phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K inhibitor. Two hours later, the expression of pAKT (phosphorylated AKT and AKT were analyzed by Western blotting. The length of axons, the expression of GAP-43 and the survival of neurons were measured at 48 hours. RESULTS: Both BMSCs and CM from BMSCs inreased the axonal length and GAP-43 expression in OGD-injured cortical neurons. There was no difference between the effects of BMSCs of 5×10(5/ml and of 5×10(3/ml on axonal outgrowth. Expression of pAKT enhanced significantly at 2 hours and the neuron survival increased at 48 hours after the injured neurons cultured with the CM, respectively. These effects of CM were prevented by inhibitor LY294002. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: BMSCs promote axonal outgrowth and the survival of neurons against the damage from OGD in vitro by the paracrine effects through PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  20. Determination of weak phases $\\phi_2$ and $\\phi_3$ from $B \\to \\pi\\pi,K\\pi$ in the pQCD method future directions

    CERN Document Server

    Keum, Yu Y

    2003-01-01

    We look at methods to determine the weak phases $\\phi_2$ and $\\phi_3$ from $B \\to \\pi\\pi$ and $K\\pi$ decays within the perturbative QCD approach. We obtain quite interesting bounds on $\\phi_2$ and $\\phi_3$ from experimental measurement in B-factory: $55^o \\leq \\phi_2 \\leq 100^o$ and $51^o \\leq \\phi_3 \\leq 129^o$. Specially we predict the possibility of large direct CP violation effect in $B^0 \\to \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-} (23\\pm7 %)$ decay.

  1. Crocin prevents retinal ischaemia/reperfusion injury-induced apoptosis in retinal ganglion cells through the PI3K/AKT signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yun; Chen, Li; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Wen-Bo; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Xin-Guang

    2013-02-01

    Crocin is a pharmacologically active component of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) and has been reported to be useful in the treatment of neuronal damage. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of crocin on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after retinal ischaemia/reperfusion (IR) injury, and our results show that crocin acts through the PI3K/AKT signalling pathway. Retinal IR injury was induced by raising the intraocular pressure of Sprague-Dawley rats to 110 mmHg for 60 min. The neuroprotective effect of crocin was determined by quantifying the surviving RGCs and apoptotic RGCs following IR injury by means of retrograde labelling and TUNEL staining, respectively. The phosphorylated AKT protein level was determined by western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. To determine the extent to which the PI3K/AKT pathway contributes to the neuroprotective effect of crocin, experiments were also performed using the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Compared with the IR + vehicle group, crocin (50 mg/kg) treatment enhanced RGC survival by approximately 36% and decreased RGC apoptosis by 44% after retinal IR injury. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the PI3K/AKT pathway was activated by crocin in the ganglion cell layer after retinal IR injury. Intravitreal injection of LY294002 blocked the neuroprotective effect of crocin on IR-induced RGC death. In conclusion, crocin prevents retinal IR-induced apoptosis of RGCs by activating the PI3K/AKT signalling pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Icariin stimulates angiogenesis by activating the MEK/ERK- and PI3K/Akt/eNOS-dependent signal pathways in human endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Byung-Hee; Kim, Jong-Dai; Kim, Chun-Ki; Kim, Jung Huan; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Han-Soo; Dong, Mi-Sook; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Kwon, Young-Geun; Kim, Young-Myeong

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the molecular effect and signal pathway of icariin, a major flavonoid of Epimedium koreanum Nakai, on angiogenesis. Icariin stimulated in vitro endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tubulogenesis, which are typical phenomena of angiogenesis, as well as increased in vivo angiogenesis. Icariin activated the angiogenic signal modulators, ERK, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and increased NO production, without affecting VEGF expression, indicating that icariin may directly stimulate angiogenesis. Icariin-induced ERK activation and angiogenic events were significantly inhibited by the MEK inhibitor PD98059, without affecting Akt and eNOS phosphorylation. The PI3K inhibitor Wortmannin suppressed icariin-mediated angiogenesis and Akt and eNOS activation without affecting ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, the NOS inhibitor NMA partially reduced the angiogenic activity of icariin. These results suggest that icariin stimulated angiogenesis by activating the MEK/ERK- and PI3K/Akt/eNOS-dependent signal pathways and may be a useful drug for angiogenic therapy

  3. PRMT8 Controls the Pluripotency and Mesodermal Fate of Human Embryonic Stem Cells By Enhancing the PI3K/AKT/SOX2 Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ho-Chang; Park, Soon-Jung; Choi, Jong-Jin; Go, Young-Hyun; Hong, Soon-Ki; Kwon, Ok-Seon; Shin, Joong-Gon; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Lee, Mi-Ok; Lee, Su-Jae; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2017-09-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) supplementation is critical to maintain the pluripotency of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) through activation of PI3K/AKT, rather than MEK/ERK pathway. Thus, elaborate molecular mechanisms that preserve PI3K/AKT signaling upon bFGF stimulation may exist in hPSCs. Protein arginine methyltransferase 8 (PRMT8) was expressed and then its level gradually decreased during spontaneous differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). PRMT8 loss- or gain-of-function studies demonstrated that PRMT8 contributed to longer maintenance of hESC pluripotency, even under bFGF-deprived conditions. Direct interaction of membrane-localized PRMT8 with p85, a regulatory subunit of PI3K, was associated with accumulation of phosphoinositol 3-phosphate and consequently high AKT activity. Furthermore, the SOX2 induction, which was controlled by the PRMT8/PI3K/AKT axis, was linked to mesodermal lineage differentiation. Thus, we propose that PRMT8 in hESCs plays an important role not only in maintaining pluripotency but also in controlling mesodermal differentiation through bFGF signaling toward the PI3K/AKT/SOX2 axis. Stem Cells 2017;35:2037-2049. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  4. Study of the following decays: K{sub l,s} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -}; Etude des desintegrations K{sub l,s} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogan, J

    2001-12-01

    The study of the K{sub L,S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -} decay modes in the NA48 experiment at CERN is presented in this thesis. Using the full data samples collected in 1998 and 1999, 1285 {+-} 37 events K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -} have been extracted over a background of 41 events. The measured branching ratio is: BR(K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -})=[3,16{+-}0,09(stat.){+-}0,16(syst.)] x 10{sup -7}. Concerning the K{sub S} mode, a signal of 768 {+-} 28 candidates has been observed over a negligible background. The obtained branching ratio is: BR(K{sub S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -})=[4,28{+-}0,18(stat.){+-}0,26(syst.)] x 10{sup -5}. Both results are in very good agreement with the values predicted by phenomenological models where the processes K{sub L,S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -} are described in terms of inner Bremsstrahlung and direct emission contributions. In the K{sub L} mode, the presence of two components with opposed CP states leads to a large asymmetry A in the distribution of the angle {phi} between the decay planes of the two pions and the two electrons. The detailed analysis of the K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -} mode ends up to a non-zero value of the asymmetry with more than 4 standard deviations: A(K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -})=[13,8{+-}2,8(stat.){+-}2,3(syst.)]%. This result is a clear manifestation of CP violation in this channel. The large value of this asymmetry, in excellent agreement with theoretical prediction, accounts for CP violation in the K{sup 0}-K-bar{sup 0} mixing. Furthermore, it was verified that in the K{sub S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -} mode which is dominated by the inner Bremsstrahlung component, the asymmetry is compatible with zero: A(K{sub S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -})=[-0,8{+-}3,6(stat.){+-}1,2(syst.)]%. (author)

  5. Synergistic Interactions with PI3K Inhibition that Induce Apoptosis. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activating mutations involving the PI3K pathway occur frequently in human cancers. However, PI3K inhibitors primarily induce cell cycle arrest, leaving a significant reservoir of tumor cells that may acquire or exhibit resistance. We searched for genes that are required for the survival of PI3K mutant cancer cells in the presence of PI3K inhibition by conducting a genome scale shRNA-based apoptosis screen in a PIK3CA mutant human breast cancer cell. We identified 5 genes (PIM2, ZAK, TACC1, ZFR, ZNF565) whose suppression induced cell death upon PI3K inhibition.

  6. NVP-BEZ235 overcomes gefitinib-acquired resistance by down-regulating PI3K/AKT/ mTOR phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun ZH

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zhihua Sun,2,* Qiuhui li,1,* Sheng Zhang,1 Jing Chen,1 Lili Huang,3 Jinghua Ren,1 Yu Chang,1 Yichen Liang,1 Gang Wu1 1Cancer Center, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 2Oncology department, Xiangyang central Hospital, Xiangyang, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 3Radiation Oncology Department, Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai, Guangdong, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Patients harboring activating mutations in epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR are particularly sensitive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. However, most patients develop an acquired resistance after a period of about 10 months. This study focuses on the therapeutic effect of NVP-BEZ235, a dual inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol- 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/mTOR, in gefitinib-resistant non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: H1975 cell line was validated as a gefitinib-resistant cell model by the nucleotide-sequence analysis. We used the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay to detect the growth of H1975 cell line in vitro. H1975 cells' migration was detected by the migration assay. Xenograft models were used to investigate the growth of gefitinib-resistant non-small cell lung cancer in vivo. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis were used to investigate the level of PI3K/protein kinase B(AKT/mTOR signaling pathway proteins. Results: We show that NVP-BEZ235 effectively inhibited the growth of H1975 cells in vivo as well as in vitro. Similarly, H1975 cell migration was reduced by NVP-BEZ235. Further experiments revealed that NVP-BEZ235 attenuated the phosphorylation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway proteins. Conclusion: Taken together, we suggest that NVP-BEZ235 inhibits gefitinib-resistant tumor growth by downregulating PI3K

  7. PI3K-Akt signaling activates mTOR-mediated epileptogenesis in organotypic hippocampal culture model of post-traumatic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny; Dryer, Alexandra M; Saponjian, Yero; Mahoney, Mark M; Pimentel, Corrin A; Lucini, Corrina A; Usenovic, Marija; Staley, Kevin J

    2013-05-22

    mTOR is activated in epilepsy, but the mechanisms of mTOR activation in post-traumatic epileptogenesis are unknown. It is also not clear whether mTOR inhibition has an anti-epileptogenic, or merely anticonvulsive effect. The rat hippocampal organotypic culture model of post-traumatic epilepsy was used to study the effects of long-term (four weeks) inhibition of signaling pathways that interact with mTOR. Ictal activity was quantified by measurement of lactate production and electrical recordings, and cell death was quantified with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release measurements and Nissl-stained neuron counts. Lactate and LDH measurements were well correlated with electrographic activity and neuron counts, respectively. Inhibition of PI3K and Akt prevented activation of mTOR, and was as effective as inhibition of mTOR in reducing ictal activity and cell death. A dual inhibitor of PI3K and mTOR, NVP-BEZ235, was also effective. Inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin reduced axon sprouting. Late start of rapamycin treatment was effective in reducing epileptic activity and cell death, while early termination of rapamycin treatment did not result in increased epileptic activity or cell death. The conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) the organotypic hippocampal culture model of post-traumatic epilepsy comprises a rapid assay of anti-epileptogenic and neuroprotective activities and, in this model (2) mTOR activation depends on PI3K-Akt signaling, and (3) transient inhibition of mTOR has sustained effects on epilepsy.

  8. Fisetin, a dietary flavonoid induces apoptosis via modulating the MAPK and PI3K/Akt signalling pathways in human osteosarcoma (U-2 OS cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Ming Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human osteosarcoma is the most prevalent primary malignant bone tumor with high frequency of invasion and metastasis. Strong resistance coupled with toxicity of the currently available chemotherapeutic drugs poses challenge in treatment. The study aimed to investigate if fisetin, a dietary flavonoid induced apoptosis in human osteosarcoma (U-2 OS cells. Fisetin at 20-100 µM effectively reduced the viability of OS cells, and induced apoptosis by significantly inducing the expression of caspases (Caspases- 3,-8 and -9 and pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax and Bad with subsequent down-regulation of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2. While fisetin inhibited PI3K/Akt pathway and ERK1/2, it caused enhanced expressions of p-JNK, p-c-Jun and p-p38. Fisetin-induced ROS generation and decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential would have also contributed to rise in apoptotic cell counts. The observations suggest that fisetin was able to effectively induce apoptosis of U-2 OS cells through ROS generation and modulation of MAPK and PI3K/Akt signalling cascades.

  9. Involvement of PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway and Its Downstream Intracellular Targets in the Antidepressant-Like Effect of Creatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Mauricio P; Budni, Josiane; Ludka, Fabiana K; Pazini, Francis L; Rosa, Julia Macedo; Oliveira, Ágatha; Lopes, Mark W; Tasca, Carla I; Leal, Rodrigo B; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2016-07-01

    Creatine has been proposed to exert beneficial effects in the management of depression, but the cell signaling pathways implicated in its antidepressant effects are not well established. This study investigated the involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and its downstream intracellular targets in the antidepressant-like effect of creatine. The acute treatment of mice with creatine (1 mg/kg, po) increased the Akt and P70S6K phosphorylation, and HO-1, GPx and PSD95 immunocontents. The pretreatment of mice with LY294002 (10 nmol/mouse, icv, PI3K inhibitor), wortmannin (0.1 μg/mouse, icv, PI3K inhibitor), ZnPP (10 μg/mouse, icv, HO-1 inhibitor), or rapamycin (0.2 nmol/mouse, icv, mTOR inhibitor) prevented the antidepressant-like effect of creatine (1 mg/kg, po) in the TST. In addition, the administration of subeffective dose of either the selective GSK3 inhibitor AR-A014418 (0.01 μg/mouse, icv), the nonselective GSK3 inhibitor lithium chloride (10 mg/kg, po), or the HO-1 inductor CoPP (0.01 μg/mouse, icv), in combination with a subeffective dose of creatine (0.01 mg/kg, po) reduced the immobility time in the TST as compared with either drug alone. No treatment caused significant changes in the locomotor activity of mice. These results indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of creatine in the TST depends on the activation of Akt, Nrf2/HO-1, GPx, and mTOR, and GSK3 inhibition.

  10. PI3K inhibitors as new cancer therapeutics: implications for clinical trial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massacesi C

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cristian Massacesi,1 Emmanuelle Di Tomaso,2 Patrick Urban,3 Caroline Germa,4 Cornelia Quadt,5 Lucia Trandafir,1 Paola Aimone,3 Nathalie Fretault,1 Bharani Dharan,4 Ranjana Tavorath,4 Samit Hirawat4 1Novartis Oncology, Paris, France; 2Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research Inc, Cambridge, MA, USA; 3Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 4Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 5Novartis Pharmaceuticals KK, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: The PI3K–AKT–mTOR pathway is frequently activated in cancer. PI3K inhibitors, including the pan-PI3K inhibitor buparlisib (BKM120 and the PI3Kα-selective inhibitor alpelisib (BYL719, currently in clinical development by Novartis Oncology, may therefore be effective as anticancer agents. Early clinical studies with PI3K inhibitors have demonstrated preliminary antitumor activity and acceptable safety profiles. However, a number of unanswered questions regarding PI3K inhibition in cancer remain, including: what is the best approach for different tumor types, and which biomarkers will accurately identify the patient populations most likely to benefit from specific PI3K inhibitors? This review summarizes the strategies being employed by Novartis Oncology to help maximize the benefits of clinical studies with buparlisib and alpelisib, including stratification according to PI3K pathway activation status, selective enrollment/target enrichment (where patients with PI3K pathway-activated tumors are specifically recruited, nonselective enrollment with mandatory tissue collection, and enrollment of patients who have progressed on previous targeted agents, such as mTOR inhibitors or endocrine therapy. An overview of Novartis-sponsored and Novartis-supported trials that are utilizing these approaches in a range of cancer types, including breast cancer, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, lymphoma, and glioblastoma multiforme, is also described. Keywords: PI3K

  11. Study of the $K^{+}K^{-} \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{0}$ final state in antiproton annihilation at rest in gaseous hydrogen at NTP with the OBELIX spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Nichitiu, F; Balestra, F; Bertin, A; Bonomi, G; Botta, E; Bressani, Tullio; Bruschi, M; Bussa, M P; Busso, L; Calvo, D; Capponi, M; Cerello, P G; Cicalò, C; Costa, S; D'Isep, D; De Castro, S; De Galco, A; Denisov, O; Donzella, A; Feliciello, A; Filippi, A; Filippini, V; Fontana, A; Galli, D; Garfagnini, R; Giacobbe, B; Gianotti, P; Gorchakov, O E; Grasso, A; Guaraldo, C; Iazzi, F; Lanaro, A; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Lucherini, V; Maggiora, A; Marcello, S; Marconi, U; Masoni, A; Massa, I; Mauro, S; Minetti, B; Mirfakhraee, N; Montagna, P; Panzarasa, A; Panzieri, D; Petrascu, C; Piccinini, M; Poli, M; Prakhov, S N; Puddu, G; Rosca, A; Rotondi, A; Rozhdestvensky, A M; Salvini, P; Semprini-Cesari, N; Spighi, R; Tessaro, S; Tosello, F; Tretyak, V I; Usai, G L; Vagnoni, V M; Vecchi, S; Venturelli, L; Villa, M; Vitale, A; Zenoni, A; Zoccoli, A

    2002-01-01

    A spin-parity analysis of a sample of pp to K/sup +/K/sup -/ pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/ annihilation events taken at rest in gaseous H/sub 2/ at NTP is reported. The invariant mass spectrum of the K/sup +/K/sup -/ pi /sup 0/ system shows the presence of the E/t resonance pattern at 1.42 GeV. The analysis of this signal confirms the results obtained by the OBELIX Collaboration in previous works, namely: the existence of two pseudoscalar states at 1.413+or-0.002 and 1.460+or-0.012 GeV with widths 0.051+or-0.004 and 0.120+or-0.015 GeV, respectively. The pp system in the /sup 3/P/sub 1/ wave shows also a signal corresponding to the axial vector f/sub 1/ (1420) decaying to K*K with mass 1.420+or-0.003 GeV and width 0.061+or-0.005 GeV. A study of the incoherent phase space background shows that its origin is mostly due to the reflection of a resonant state in the K/sup +/K /sup -/ pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ system. The isobar decomposition of this resonant state is mainly f/sub 0/(1370)( pi pi )/sub S/, its parame...

  12. Investigation of $K_{L,S} \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}e^{+}e^{-}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, A; Arcidiacono, R; Barr, G; Becker, H G; Bevan, A; Biino, C; Bizzeti, A; Bocquet, G; Calvetti, M; Cartiglia, N; Casali, R; Ceccucci, Augusto; Cenci, P; Cerri, C; Cheshkov, C; Chollet, J C; Chèze, J B; Cirilli, M; Clemencic, M; Cogan, J; Collazuol, G; Contalbrigo, M; Costantini, F; Cundy, Donald C; Dalpiaz, Pietro; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Doble, Niels T; Dosanjh, R S; Duclos, J; Eppard, M; Falaleev, V P; Fantechi, R; Fayard, Louis; Fischer, G; Formica, A; Fox, H; Frabetti, P L; Gaponenko, A N; Gatignon, L; Gershon, T J; Gianoli, A; Giudici, Sergio; Gonidec, A; Gorini, B; Govi, G; Grafström, P; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Graziani, G; Hay, B; Holder, M; Holtz, K; Iacopini, E; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Imbergamo, E; Jeitler, Manfred; Kalmus, George Ernest; Kalter, A; Kekelidze, V D; Khristov, P Z; Kleinknecht, K; Knowles, I; Koch, U; Kubischta, Werner; Köpke, L; Lazzeroni, C; Lenti, M; Lopes da Silva, P; Lubrano, P; Luitz, S; Madigozhin, D T; Maier, A; Mannelli, I; Marchetto, F; Markytan, Manfred; Marouelli, P; Marras, D; Martin, V; Martini, M; Masetti, L; Mazzucato, E; Menichetti, E; Mestvirishvili, A; Mikulec, I; Munday, D J; Nappi, A; Nassalski, J P; Needham, M D; Neuhofer, Günther; Norton, A; Ocariz, J; Olaiya, E; Palestini, S; Panzer-Steindel, B; Parker, M A; Pellmann, I A; Pepé, M; Pernicka, Manfred; Peters, A; Petrucci, F; Peyaud, B; Piccini, M; Pierazzini, G M; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Rondio, Ewa; Sacco, R; Savrié, M; Schmidt, S; Schué, Yu; Schönharting, V; Sozzi, M; Szleper, M; Tatishvili, G T; Taureg, Hans; Taurok, Anton; Turlay, René; Unal, G; Vallage, B; Velasco, M; Veltri, M; Wahl, H; Walker, A; Wanke, R; White, T O; Widhalm, L; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winhart, A; Wislicki, W; Wittgen, M; Wotton, S A; Wronka, S; Zinchenko, A I; Ziolkowski, M

    2003-01-01

    The K_L -> pi+pi-e+e- and K_S -> pi+pi-e+e- decay modes have been studied in detail using the NA48 detector at CERN SPS. Based on the data collected during the 1998 and 1999 run periods, a sample of 1162 K_L -> pi+pi-e+e- candidates has been observed with an expected background level of 36.9 events, yielding the branching ratio measurement BR(K_L -> pi+pi-e+e-)=(3.08+-0.20)x10^-7. The distribution of events in the sin\\phicos\\phi variable, where \\phi is the angle between the pi+pi- and the e+e- decay planes in the kaon centre of mass, is found to exhibit a large CP-violating asymmetry with the value A_\\phi(14.2+-3.6)%. For the K_S -> pi+pi-e+e- decay channel, 621 candidates have been identified in the 1999 data sample with an estimated background contribution of 0.7 event. The corresponding branching ratio has been determined to be BR(K_S -> pi+pi-e+e-)=(4.71+-0.32)x10^-5. The combined value of this measurement with the published 1998 result id BR(K_S -> pi+pi-e+e-)=4.69+-0.30)x10^-5. No asymmetry is observed ...

  13. Heat Stress-Induced PI3K/mTORC2-Dependent AKT Signaling Is a Central Mediator of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Survival to Thermal Ablation Induced Heat Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Thompson

    Full Text Available Thermal ablative therapies are important treatment options in the multidisciplinary care of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, but lesions larger than 2-3 cm are plagued with high local recurrence rates and overall survival of these patients remains poor. Currently no adjuvant therapies exist to prevent local HCC recurrence in patients undergoing thermal ablation. The molecular mechanisms mediating HCC resistance to thermal ablation induced heat stress and local recurrence remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that the HCC cells with a poor prognostic hepatic stem cell subtype (Subtype HS are more resistant to heat stress than HCC cells with a better prognostic hepatocyte subtype (Subtype HC. Moreover, sublethal heat stress rapidly induces phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR dependent-protein kinase B (AKT survival signaling in HCC cells in vitro and at the tumor ablation margin in vivo. Conversely, inhibition of PI3K/mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2-dependent AKT phosphorylation or direct inhibition of AKT function both enhance HCC cell killing and decrease HCC cell survival to sublethal heat stress in both poor and better prognostic HCC subtypes while mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1-inhibition has no impact. Finally, we showed that AKT isoforms 1, 2 and 3 are differentially upregulated in primary human HCCs and that overexpression of AKT correlates with worse tumor biology and pathologic features (AKT3 and prognosis (AKT1. Together these findings define a novel molecular mechanism whereby heat stress induces PI3K/mTORC2-dependent AKT survival signaling in HCC cells and provide a mechanistic rationale for adjuvant AKT inhibition in combination with thermal ablation as a strategy to enhance HCC cell killing and prevent local recurrence, particularly at the ablation margin.

  14. Analysis of the D+ --> K- pi+ e+ nu_e decay channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /Bari U.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    Using 347.5 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II electron-positron collider, 244 x 10{sup 3} signal events for the D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} decay channel are analyzed. This decay mode is dominated by the {bar K}*(892){sup 0} contribution. We determine the {bar K}*(892){sup 0} parameters: m{sub K*(892){sup 0}} = (895.4{+-}0.2{+-}0.2) MeV/c{sup 2}, {Lambda}{sub K*(892){sup 0}}{sup 0} = (46.5{+-}0.3{+-}0.2) MeV/c{sup 2} and the Blatt-Weisskopf parameter r{sub BW} = 2.1{+-}0.5{+-}0.5 (GeV/c){sup -1} where the first uncertainty comes from statistics and the second from systematic uncertainties. We also measure the parameters defining the corresponding hadronic form factors at q{sup 2} = 0 (r{sub V} = V(0)/A{sub 1}(0) = 1.463{+-}0.017{+-}0.031, r{sup 2} = A{sub 2}(0)/A{sub 1}(0) = 0.801{+-}0.020{+-}0.020) and the value of the axial-vector pole mass parameterizing the q{sup 2} variation of A{sub 1} and A{sub 2}: m{sub A} = (2.63{+-}0.10{+-}0.13) GeV/c{sup 2}. The S-wave fraction is equal to (5.79{+-}0.16{+-}0.15)%. Other signal components correspond to fractions below 1%. Using the D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} channel as a normalization, we measure the D{sup +} semileptonic branching fraction: {Beta}(D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}) = (4.00 {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -2} where the third uncertainty comes from external inputs. We then obtain the value of the hadronic form factor A{sub 1} at q{sup 2} = 0: A{sub 1}(0) = 0.6200 {+-} 0.0056 {+-} 0.0065 {+-} 0.0071. Fixing the P-wave parameters we measure the phase of the S-wave for several values of the K{pi} mass. These results confirm those obtained with K{pi} production at small momentum transfer in fixed target experiments.

  15. HS-173, a Novel PI3K Inhibitor, Attenuates the Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells in Liver Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Mi Kwon; Ryu, Ye-Lim; Jung, Kyung Hee; Lee, Hyunseung; Lee, Hee Seung; Yan, Hong Hua; Park, Heon Joo; Ryu, Ji-Kan; Suh, Jun–Kyu; Hong, Sungwoo; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the primary source of matrix components in liver disease such as fibrosis. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in HSCs has been shown to induce fibrogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the anti-fibrotic activity of a novel imidazopyridine analogue (HS-173) in human HSCs as well as mouse liver fibrosis. HS-173 strongly suppressed the growth and proliferation of HSCs and induced the arrest at the G2/M phase and apoptosis in HSCs. Furthermore, it reduced the expression of extracellular matrix components such as collagen type I, which was confirmed by an in vivo study. We also observed that HS-173 blocked the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, HS-173 suppressed fibrotic responses such as cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by blocking PI3K/Akt signaling. Therefore, we suggest that this compound may be an effective therapeutic agent for ameliorating liver fibrosis through the inhibition of PI3K signaling. PMID:24326778

  16. Gelidium elegans Extract Ameliorates Type 2 Diabetes via Regulation of MAPK and PI3K/Akt Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Choi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gelidium elegans, a red alga native to the Asia Pacific region, contains biologically active polyphenols. We conducted a molecular biological study of the anti-diabetic effect of Gelidium elegans extract (GEE in C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice. Mice that had been administered GEE had significantly lower body mass, water consumption, and fasting blood glucose than db/db controls. Moreover, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, an indicator of the glycemic status of people with diabetes, was significantly lower in mice that had been administered GEE. We also found that 200 mg/kg/day GEE upregulates the insulin signaling pathway by activating insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, and increasing the expression of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4. In parallel, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activity was lower in GEE-treated groups. In summary, these findings indicate that GEE regulates glucose metabolism by activating the insulin signaling pathway and downregulating the MAPK signaling pathway.

  17. Insulin and the PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathway Regulate Ribonuclease 7 Expression in the Human Urinary Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Tad; Becknell, Brian; Easterling, Robert S.; Ingraham, Susan E.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Schwaderer, Andrew; Hains, David S.; Li, Birong; Cohen, Ariel; Metheny, Jackie; Trindandapani, Susheela; Spencer, John David

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease associated with a deficiency of insulin production or action. Diabetic patients have an increased susceptibility to infection with the urinary tract being the most common site of infection. Recent studies suggest that Ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7) is a potent antimicrobial peptide that plays an important role in protecting the urinary tract from bacterial insult. The impact of diabetes on RNase 7 expression and function are unknown. Here, we investigate the effects of insulin on RNase 7. Using human urine specimens, we measured urinary RNase 7 concentrations in healthy control patients and insulin-deficient type 1 diabetics before and after starting insulin therapy. Compared to controls, diabetic patients had suppressed urinary RNase 7 concentrations, which increased with insulin. Using primary human urothelial cells, we explored the mechanisms by which insulin induces RNase 7. Insulin induces RNase 7 production via the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway (PI3K/AKT) to shield urothelial cells from uropathogenic E. coli. In contrast, we show that uropathogenic E. coli suppresses PI3K/AKT and RNase 7. Together, these results indicate that insulin and PI3K/AKT signaling are essential for RNase 7 expression. They also suggest that increased infection risks in diabetic patients may be secondary to suppressed RNase 7 production. These data may provide unique insight into novel UTI therapeutic strategies in at risk populations. PMID:27401534

  18. Src homology domain 2-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) binds and dephosphorylates G(alpha)-interacting, vesicle-associated protein (GIV)/Girdin and attenuates the GIV-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Yash; Pavlova, Yelena; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2011-09-16

    GIV (Gα-interacting vesicle-associated protein, also known as Girdin) is a bona fide enhancer of PI3K-Akt signals during a diverse set of biological processes, e.g. wound healing, macrophage chemotaxis, tumor angiogenesis, and cancer invasion/metastasis. We recently demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation of GIV by receptor and non-receptor-tyrosine kinases is a key step that is required for GIV to directly bind and enhance PI3K activity. Here we report the discovery that Src homology 2-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) is the major protein-tyrosine phosphatase that targets two critical phosphotyrosines within GIV and antagonizes phospho-GIV-dependent PI3K enhancement in mammalian cells. Using phosphorylation-dephosphorylation assays, we demonstrate that SHP-1 is the major and specific protein-tyrosine phosphatase that catalyzes the dephosphorylation of tyrosine-phosphorylated GIV in vitro and inhibits ligand-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of GIV downstream of both growth factor receptors and GPCRs in cells. In vitro binding and co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate that SHP-1 and GIV interact directly and constitutively and that this interaction occurs between the SH2 domain of SHP-1 and the C terminus of GIV. Overexpression of SHP-1 inhibits tyrosine phosphorylation of GIV and formation of phospho-GIV-PI3K complexes, and specifically suppresses GIV-dependent activation of Akt. Consistently, depletion of SHP-1 enhances peak tyrosine phosphorylation of GIV, which coincides with an increase in peak Akt activity. We conclude that SHP-1 antagonizes the action of receptor and non-receptor-tyrosine kinases on GIV and down-regulates the phospho-GIV-PI3K-Akt axis of signaling.

  19. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Attenuates Brain Injury Induced by Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Inhibits Microvascular Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Via the PI3K/Akt/GSK3β Signaling Pathway in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyan Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB is prone to inducing brain injury during open heart surgery. A hydrogen-rich solution (HRS can prevent oxidation and apoptosis, and inhibit inflammation. This study investigated effects of HRS on brain injury induced by CPB and regulatory mechanisms of the PI3K/Akt/GSK3β signaling pathway. Methods: A rat CPB model and an in vitro cell hypoxia model were established. After HRS treatment, Rat behavior was measured using neurological deficit score; Evans blue (EB was used to assess permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB; HE staining was used to observe pathological changes; Inflammatory factors and brain injury markers were detected by ELISA; the PI3K/Akt/GSK3β pathway-related proteins and apoptosis were assessed by western blot, immunohistochemistry and qRT –PCR analyses of brain tissue and neurons. Results: After CPB, brain tissue anatomy was disordered, and cell structure was abnormal. Brain tissue EB content increased. There was an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, an increase in expression of Bax and caspase-3, a decrease in expression of Bcl2, and increases in levels of Akt, GSK3β, P-Akt, and P-GSK3β in brain tissue. HRS treatment attenuated the inflammatory reaction ,brain tissue EB content was significantly reduced and significantly decreased expression levels of Bax, caspase-3, Akt, GSK3β, P-Akt, and P-GSK3β in the brain. After adding the PI3K signaling pathway inhibitor, LY294002, to rat cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs, HRS could reduce activated Akt expression and downstream regulatory gene phosphorylation of GSK3β expression, and inhibit CMEC apoptosis. Conclusion: The PI3K/Akt/GSK3β signaling pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of CPB-induced brain injury. HRS can reduce CPB-induced brain injury and inhibit CMEC apoptosis through the PI3K/Akt/GSK3β signaling pathway.

  20. Study of CP violation in B--/+ -> Dh(-/+) (h = K,pi) with the modes D -> K--/+pi(+/-)pi(0), D -> pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) and D -> K+K-pi(0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Tolk, S.

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of the decays of B--/+ -> DK -/+ and B--/+ -> D pi(-/+) is presented in which the D meson is reconstructed in the three-body final states K--/+pi(+/-)pi(0), pi(+)pi(-)pi(0) and K+K-pi(0). Using data from LHCb corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1) of pp collisions,

  1. Evidence for the decay $B_c^+ \\rightarrow J/\\psi 3\\pi^+ 2\\pi^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Callot, Olivier; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Caponio, Francesco; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coca, Cornelia; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Esen, Sevda; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Hafkenscheid, Tom; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jezabek, Marek; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Ian; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manzali, Matteo; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Roberts, Douglas; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Oksana; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Sidorov, Fedor; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spinella, Franco; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the decay $B_c+\\rightarrow J/\\psi 3\\pi^+2\\pi^-$ using proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3fb$^{-1}$, collected with the LHCb detector. A signal yield of $32\\pm8$ decays is found with a significance of 4.5 standard deviations. The ratio of the branching fraction of the $B_c^+\\rightarrow J/\\psi 3\\pi^+ 2\\pi^-$ decay to that of the $B_c^+ \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\pi^+$ decay is measured to be $$ \\frac{Br (B_c^+ \\rightarrow J/\\psi 3\\pi^+2\\pi^)}{Br (B_c^+ \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\pi^+)} = 1.74\\pm0.44\\pm0.24, $$ where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  2. Triiodothyronine increases mRNA and protein leptin levels in short time in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by PI3K pathway activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriane de Oliveira

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to examine the effects of thyroid hormone (TH, more precisely triiodothyronine (T3, on the modulation of leptin mRNA expression and the involvement of the phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K signaling pathway in adipocytes, 3T3-L1, cell culture. We examined the involvement of this pathway in mediating TH effects by treating 3T3-L1 adipocytes with physiological (P=10nM or supraphysiological (SI=100 nM T3 dose during one hour (short time, in the absence or the presence of PI3K inhibitor (LY294002. The absence of any treatment was considered the control group (C. RT-qPCR was used for mRNA expression analyzes. For data analyzes ANOVA complemented with Tukey's test was used at 5% significance. T3 increased leptin mRNA expression in P (2.26 ± 0.36, p 0.001. These results demonstrate that the activation of the PI3K signaling pathway has a role in TH-mediated direct and indirect leptin gene expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

  3. Effects of rehabilitation training on apoptosis of nerve cells and the recovery of neural and motor functions in rats with ischemic stroke through the PI3K/Akt and Nrf2/ARE signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Shan; Shen, Min; Wen, Xin; Han, Xin-Rui; Wu, Jun-Chang; Tang, Gao-Zhuo; Wu, Dong-Mei; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Yuan-Lin

    2017-09-01

    This study was designed in order to investigate the effects between rehabilitation training on the apoptosis of nerve cells and the recovery of neural and motor functions of rats with ischemic stroke by way of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2/antioxidant responsive element (Nrf2/ARE) signaling pathways. In total, 110 healthy adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were selected in order to take part in this study. Ninety SD rats were used in order to establish the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), among which 80 rats were randomly assigned as part of the natural recovery, natural recovery+Rp-PI3K (the rats injected with PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002), rehabilitation training, and rehabilitation training+Rp-PI3K groups. Meanwhile, 20 rats were selected as part of the sham operation group. The neural and motor functions of these rats were evaluated using a balance beam test and the Bederson score. The mRNA expressions of PI3K, Akt, Nrf2 and HO-1 were measured using an RT-qPCR. The protein expressions of PI3K, p-PI3K, Akt, p-Akt, Nrf2 and HO-1 were also detected by using western blotting and the immunohistochemistry process. The cell cycle and cell apoptosis were detected by using a flow cytometry and TUNEL assay. The sham operation group exhibited lower neural and motor function scores than other groups. At the 7, 14, and 21 d marks of this study, the neural and motor function scores were increased in the natural recovery, natural recovery+Rp-PI3K, and rehabilitation training+Rp-PI3K groups in comparison with the rehabilitation training group but found to be decreased in the natural recovery group in comparison with the natural recovery+Rp-PI3K group. In comparison with the sham operation group, expressions of PI3K, Nrf2 and HO-1, and proportions of p-PI3K/PI3K and p-Akt/Akt were all higher in the natural recovery, rehabilitation training, and rehabilitation training+Rp-PI3K groups. Same trends were

  4. Layered double hydroxide nanoparticles promote self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells through the PI3K signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Youjun; Zhu, Rongrong; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Wenrui; Sun, Xiaoyu; Wu, Xianzheng; Cheng, Liming; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Shilong

    2015-06-01

    have shown promising applications in directing the stem cell fate. Herein, we investigated the cellular effects of layered double hydroxide nanoparticles (LDH NPs) on mouse ESCs (mESCs) and the associated molecular mechanisms. Mg-Al-LDH NPs with an average diameter of ~100 nm were prepared by hydrothermal methods. To determine the influences of LDH NPs on mESCs, cellular cytotoxicity, self-renewal, differentiation potential, and the possible signaling pathways were explored. Evaluation of cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase release, ROS generation and apoptosis demonstrated the low cytotoxicity of LDH NPs. The alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of pluripotency genes in mESCs were examined, which indicated that exposure to LDH NPs could support self-renewal and inhibit spontaneous differentiation of mESCs under feeder-free culture conditions. The self-renewal promotion was further proved to be independent of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Furthermore, cells treated with LDH NPs maintained the potential to differentiate into all three germ layers both in vitro and in vivo through formation of embryoid bodies and teratomas. In addition, we observed that LDH NPs initiated the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, while treatment with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 could block the effects of LDH NPs on mESCs. The results confirmed that the promotion of self-renewal by LDH NPs was associated with activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Altogether, our studies identified a new role of LDH NPs in maintaining self-renewal of mouse ES cells which could potentially be applied in stem cell research. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02339d

  5. PI3K/Akt/GSK3β induced CREB activation ameliorates arsenic mediated alterations in NMDA receptors and associated signaling in rat hippocampus: Neuroprotective role of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Pranay; Dhuriya, Yogesh K; Kumar, Vivek; Srivastava, Akriti; Gupta, Richa; Shukla, Rajendra K; Yadav, Rajesh S; Dwivedi, Hari N; Pant, Aditya B; Khanna, Vinay K

    2018-04-30

    Protective efficacy of curcumin in arsenic induced NMDA receptor dysfunctions and PI3K/Akt/ GSK3β signalling in hippocampus has been investigated in vivo and in vitro. Exposure to sodium arsenite (in vivo - 20 mg/kg, body weight p.o. for 28 days; in vitro - 10 μM for 24 h) and curcumin (in vivo - 100 mg/kg body weight p.o. for 28 days; in vitro - 20 μM for 24 h) was carried out alone or simultaneously. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated sodium arsenite induced alterations in the levels of NMDA receptors, its receptor subunits and synaptic proteins - pCaMKIIα, PSD-95 and SynGAP both in vivo and in vitro. Decreased levels of BDNF, pAkt, pERK1/2, pGSK3β and pCREB on sodium arsenite exposure were also protected by curcumin. Curcumin was found to decrease sodium arsenite induced changes in hippocampus by modulating PI3K/Akt/GSK3β neuronal survival pathway, known to regulate various cellular events. Treatment of hippocampal cultures with pharmacological inhibitors for ERK1/2, GSK3β and Akt individually inhibited levels of CREB and proteins associated with PI3K/Akt/GSK3β pathway. Simultaneous treatment with curcumin was found to improve sodium arsenite induced learning and memory deficits in rats assessed by water maze and Y-maze. The results provide evidence that curcumin exercises its neuroprotective effect involving PI3K/Akt pathway which may affect NMDA receptors and downstream signalling through TrKβ and BDNF in arsenic induced cognitive deficits in hippocampus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Apelin-13 upregulates Egr-1 expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells through the PI3K/Akt and PKC signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi-Feng [Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou 121001 (China); Yu, Hong-Wei [Department of Cardiology, Jinzhou Central Hospital, Jinzhou 121001 (China); Sun, Li-Li [Department of Ophthalmology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou 121001 (China); You, Lu; Tao, Gui-Zhou [Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou 121001 (China); Qu, Bao-Ze, E-mail: qubaoze1971@hotmail.com [Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou 121001 (China)

    2015-12-25

    Previous studies have shown that Apelin-13 upregulates early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1) via the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Apelin-13 induces proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) as well as the upregulation of osteopontin (OPN) via the upregulation of Egr-1. This study was designed to further explore the activity of Apelin-13 in VSMCs by investigating members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, in particular Jun kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38). We also examined whether the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) and protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways were involved in the regulation of Egr-1 by Apelin-13. We treated rat aortic VSMCs with Apelin-13 and examined the expression of JNK, p-JNK, P38, and p-P38 to investigate whether Apelin-13-mediated increases in Egr-1 occurred through the JNK and P38 signaling pathways. We then pretreated VSMCs with the Gi protein inhibitor pertussis toxin (PTX) and the Gq inhibitor YM254890, added Apelin-13 and looked for changes in Egr-1 expression. Finally, we pretreated with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and the PKC inhibitor GF109203X, and treated with Apelin-13. Our results showed that JNK and P38 did not participate in Apelin-13-mediated increase in Egr-1. Instead, Apelin-13 upregulation of Egr-1 was mediated by a PTX-sensitive Gi protein. Apelin-13 did increase ERK phosphorylation through the PI3K/Akt and PKC signaling pathways, resulting in changes in Egr-1 expression. These data provide important targets for future studies to modulate vascular remodeling. - Highlights: • Apelin-13 mediates Egr-1 upregulation in vascular smooth muscle cells via ERK1/2. • The underlying mechanisms are unknown, but exclude Jnk or p38 pathway activation. • Apelin-13 binds to Gi, activating the PI3K/Akt and PKC signaling cascades. • Consequent ERK phosphorylation results in increased Egr-1

  7. Apelin-13 upregulates Egr-1 expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells through the PI3K/Akt and PKC signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qi-Feng; Yu, Hong-Wei; Sun, Li-Li; You, Lu; Tao, Gui-Zhou; Qu, Bao-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Apelin-13 upregulates early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1) via the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Apelin-13 induces proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) as well as the upregulation of osteopontin (OPN) via the upregulation of Egr-1. This study was designed to further explore the activity of Apelin-13 in VSMCs by investigating members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, in particular Jun kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38). We also examined whether the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) and protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways were involved in the regulation of Egr-1 by Apelin-13. We treated rat aortic VSMCs with Apelin-13 and examined the expression of JNK, p-JNK, P38, and p-P38 to investigate whether Apelin-13-mediated increases in Egr-1 occurred through the JNK and P38 signaling pathways. We then pretreated VSMCs with the Gi protein inhibitor pertussis toxin (PTX) and the Gq inhibitor YM254890, added Apelin-13 and looked for changes in Egr-1 expression. Finally, we pretreated with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and the PKC inhibitor GF109203X, and treated with Apelin-13. Our results showed that JNK and P38 did not participate in Apelin-13-mediated increase in Egr-1. Instead, Apelin-13 upregulation of Egr-1 was mediated by a PTX-sensitive Gi protein. Apelin-13 did increase ERK phosphorylation through the PI3K/Akt and PKC signaling pathways, resulting in changes in Egr-1 expression. These data provide important targets for future studies to modulate vascular remodeling. - Highlights: • Apelin-13 mediates Egr-1 upregulation in vascular smooth muscle cells via ERK1/2. • The underlying mechanisms are unknown, but exclude Jnk or p38 pathway activation. • Apelin-13 binds to Gi, activating the PI3K/Akt and PKC signaling cascades. • Consequent ERK phosphorylation results in increased Egr-1

  8. Activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway mediates bone morphogenetic protein 2-induced invasion of pancreatic cancer cells Panc-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiong; Liao, Jie; Lu, YeBin; Duan, XiaoHui; Sun, WeiJia

    2011-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) signaling has an emerging role in pancreatic cancer. However, because of the multiple effects of different BMPs, no final conclusions have been made as to the role of BMPs in pancreatic cancer. In our studies, we have focused on bone morphogenetic protein 2(BMP-2) because it induces an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and accelerates invasion in the human pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1. It has been reported that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway mediates invasion of gastric and colon cancer cells, which is unrevealed in pancreatic cancer cells. The objective of our study was to investigate whether BMP-2 mediated invasion might pass through the PI3K/Akt pathway. Our results show that expression of phosphorylation of Akt was increased by treatment with BMP-2, but not Noggin, a BMP-2 antagonist. Then pretreatment of Panc-1 cells with LY294002, an inhibitor of the PI3K/AKT pathway, significantly inhibited BMP-2-induced EMT and invasiveness. The data suggest that BMP-2 accelerates invasion of panc-1 cells via the PI3K/AKT pathway in panc-1 cells, which gives clues to searching new therapy targets in advanced pancreatic cancer.

  9. The GRP1 PH domain, like the AKT1 PH domain, possesses a sentry glutamate residue essential for specific targeting to plasma membrane PI(3,4,5)P(3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, Carissa; Landgraf, Kyle E; Falke, Joseph J

    2011-11-15

    During the appearance of the signaling lipid PI(3,4,5)P(3), an important subset of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains target signaling proteins to the plasma membrane. To ensure proper pathway regulation, such PI(3,4,5)P(3)-specific PH domains must exclude the more prevalant, constitutive plasma membrane lipid PI(4,5)P(2) and bind the rare PI(3,4,5)P(3) target lipid with sufficiently high affinity. Our previous study of the E17K mutant of the protein kinase B (AKT1) PH domain, together with evidence from Carpten et al. [Carpten, J. D., et al. (2007) Nature 448, 439-444], revealed that the native AKT1 E17 residue serves as a sentry glutamate that excludes PI(4,5)P(2), thereby playing an essential role in specific PI(3,4,5)P(3) targeting [Landgraf, K. E., et al. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 12260-12269]. The sentry glutamate hypothesis proposes that an analogous sentry glutamate residue is a widespread feature of PI(3,4,5)P(3)-specific PH domains, and that charge reversal mutation at the sentry glutamate position will yield both increased PI(4,5)P(2) affinity and constitutive plasma membrane targeting. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the E345 residue, a putative sentry glutamate, of the general receptor for phosphoinositides 1 (GRP1) PH domain. The results show that incorporation of the E345K charge reversal mutation into the GRP1 PH domain enhances PI(4,5)P(2) affinity 8-fold and yields constitutive plasma membrane targeting in cells, reminiscent of the effects of the E17K mutation in the AKT1 PH domain. Hydrolysis of plasma membrane PI(4,5)P(2) releases the E345K GRP1 PH domain into the cytoplasm, and the efficiency of this release increases when Arf6 binding is disrupted. Overall, the findings provide strong support for the sentry glutamate hypothesis and suggest that the GRP1 E345K mutation will be linked to changes in cell physiology and human pathologies, as demonstrated for AKT1 E17K [Carpten, J. D., et al. (2007) Nature 448, 439-444; Lindhurst, M. J., et al

  10. Neurodevelopmental Expression Profile of Dimeric and Monomeric Group 1 mGluRs: Relevance to Schizophrenia Pathogenesis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Jeremy S; Fernandez, Francesca; Matosin, Natalie; Andrews, Jessica L; Huang, Xu-Feng; Ooi, Lezanne; Newell, Kelly A

    2016-10-10

    Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1/mGluR5) play an integral role in neurodevelopment and are implicated in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. mGluR1 and mGluR5 are expressed as homodimers, which is important for their functionality and pharmacology. We examined the protein expression of dimeric and monomeric mGluR1α and mGluR5 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus throughout development (juvenile/adolescence/adulthood) and in the perinatal phencyclidine (PCP) model of schizophrenia. Under control conditions, mGluR1α dimer expression increased between juvenile and adolescence (209-328%), while monomeric levels remained consistent. Dimeric mGluR5 was steadily expressed across all time points; monomeric mGluR5 was present in juveniles, dramatically declining at adolescence and adulthood (-97-99%). The mGluR regulators, Homer 1b/c and Norbin, significantly increased with age in the PFC and hippocampus. Perinatal PCP treatment significantly increased juvenile dimeric mGluR5 levels in the PFC and hippocampus (37-50%) but decreased hippocampal mGluR1α (-50-56%). Perinatal PCP treatment also reduced mGluR1α dimer levels in the PFC at adulthood (-31%). These results suggest that Group 1 mGluRs have distinct dimeric and monomeric neurodevelopmental patterns, which may impact their pharmacological profiles at specific ages. Perinatal PCP treatment disrupted the early expression of Group 1 mGluRs which may underlie neurodevelopmental alterations observed in this model.

  11. First observation of the rare $B^{+}\\to D^{+} K^{+} \\pi^{-}$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Fabianska, Maria; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-03-03

    The $B^{+}\\to D^{+} K^{+} \\pi^{-}$ decay is observed in a data sample corresponding to $3.0\\,{\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data recorded by the LHCb experiment during 2011 and 2012. The signal significance is $8\\,\\sigma$ and the branching fraction is measured to be ${\\cal B}\\left(B^{+}\\to D^{+} K^{+} \\pi^{-}\\right) = (5.31 \\pm 0.90 \\pm 0.48 \\pm 0.35)\\times 10^{-6}$, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic and due to the normalisation mode $B^{+}\\to D^{-} K^{+} \\pi^{+}$, respectively. The Dalitz plot appears to be dominated by broad structures. Angular distributions are exploited to search for quasi-two-body contributions from $B^{+}\\to D^{*}_{2}(2460)^{0}K^{+}$ and $B^{+}\\to D^{+} K^{*}(892)^{0}$ decays. No significant signals are observed and upper limits are set on their branching fractions.

  12. Targeting Glutamatergic Signaling and the PI3 Kinase Pathway to Halt Melanoma Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Rosenberg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Our group has previously reported that the majority of human melanomas (>60% express the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (GRM1 and that the glutamate release inhibitor riluzole, a drug currently used to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, can induce apoptosis in GRM1-expressing melanoma cells. Our group previously reported that in vitro riluzole treatment reduces cell growth in three-dimensional (3D soft agar colony assays by 80% in cells with wildtype phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K pathway activation. However, melanoma cell lines harboring constitutive activating mutations of the PI3K pathway (PTEN and NRAS mutations showed only a 35% to 40% decrease in colony formation in soft agar in the presence of riluzole. In this study, we have continued our preclinical studies of riluzole and its effect on melanoma cells alone and in combination with inhibitors of the PI3 kinase pathway: the AKT inhibitor, API-2, and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin. We modeled these combinatorial therapies on various melanoma cell lines in 3D and 2D systems and in vivo. Riluzole combined with mTOR inhibition is more effective at halting melanoma anchorage-independent growth and xenograft tumor progression than either agent alone. PI3K signaling changes associated with this combinatorial treatment shows that 3D (nanoculture modeling of cell signaling more closely resembles in vivo signaling than monolayer models. Riluzole combined with mTOR inhibition is effective at halting tumor cell progression independent of BRAF mutational status. This makes this combinatorial therapy a potentially viable alternative for metastatic melanoma patients who are BRAF WT and are therefore ineligible for vemurafenib therapy.

  13. Smad, PI3K/Akt, and Wnt-dependent signaling pathways are involved in BMP-4-induced ESC self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Young; Lim, Hyun Woo; Lee, Sang Hun; Han, Ho Jae

    2009-08-01

    It is known that bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) has a diverse effect on ESCs. However, its precise mechanism in mouse ESCs is not fully understood. We evaluated the effect of BMP-4 on ESC proliferation and its related signal cascades in this study. BMP-4 significantly increased the level of [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation in time- (> or =8 hours) and dose- (> or =10 ng/ml) dependent manners. Additionally, BMP-4 increased cyclin D1 and decreased p27(kip1) expression values in a time-dependent manner. The increases in BMP-4-induced [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and cyclin D1 expression were inhibited by the BMP-4 receptor antagonist noggin. BMP-4 increased Wnt1 expression. Wnt1 expression was attenuated by Smad4 small interfering RNA (siRNA), and BMP-4-induced cyclin D1 expression was inhibited by Smad4 and Wnt1 siRNAs. BMP-4 also activated beta-catenin, which was blocked by Smad4 and Wnt1 siRNAs. In addition, BMP-4 induced Akt phosphorylation. BMP-4-induced beta-catenin activation and cyclin D1 expression were attenuated by phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) siRNA and Akt inhibitor. Additionally, downregulation of Smad4, Wnt1, and PI3K expression by siRNA decreased the levels of pluripotency marker mRNAs of ESCs, including Oct4, Sox2, and FoxD3. Our results suggested that BMP-4-induced [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation was significantly attenuated by Smad4, Wnt1, and PI3K knockdown. In conclusion, BMP-4 contributed to the maintenance of cell proliferation and the pluripotent state by Smad, PI3K/Akt, and Wnt1/beta-catenin in mouse ESCs.

  14. Smad4 sensitizes colorectal cancer to 5-fluorouracil through cell cycle arrest by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt/CDC2/survivin cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binhao; Leng, Chao; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Zhanguo; Dou, Lei; Luo, Xin; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), a cell cycle-specific antimetabolite, is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents for colorectal cancer (CRC). Yet, resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy is still an obstacle to the treatment of this malignancy. Mutation or loss of Smad4 in CRC is pivotal for chemoresistance. However, the mechanism by which Smad4 regulates the chemosensitivity of CRC remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of Smad4 in the chemosensitivity of CRC to 5-FU, and whether Smad4-regulated cell cycle arrest is involved in 5-FU chemoresistance. We used Smad4-expressing CT26 and Smad4-null SW620 cell lines as experimental models, by knockdown or transgenic overexpression. Cells or tumors were treated with 5-FU to determine chemosensitivity by cell growth, tumorigenicity assay and a mouse model. Cell cycle distribution was examined with flow cytometric analysis, and cell cycle-related proteins were examined by western blotting. Smad4 deficiency in CT26 and SW620 cells induced chemoresistance to 5-FU both in vitro and in vivo. Smad4 deficiency attenuated G1 or G2 cell cycle arrest by activating the PI3K/Akt/CDC2/survivin pathway. The PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, reversed the activation of the Akt/CDC2/survivin cascade in the Smad4-deficient cells, while it had little effect on cells with high Smad4 expression. In conclusion, we discovered a novel mechanism mediated by Smad4 to trigger 5-FU chemosensitivity through cell cycle arrest by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt/CDC2/survivin cascade. The present study also implies that LY294002 has potential therapeutic value to reverse the chemosensitivity of CRC with low Smad4 expression.

  15. {delta}-Opioid receptor-stimulated Akt signaling in neuroblastoma x glioma (NG108-15) hybrid cells involves receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated PI3K activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, Anika; Ammer, Hermann [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmacy Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich Koeniginstrasse 16 80539 Muenchen Federal Republic of Germany (Germany); Eisinger, Daniela A., E-mail: eisinger@pharmtox.vetmed.uni-muenchen.de [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmacy Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich Koeniginstrasse 16 80539 Muenchen Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    {delta}-Opioid receptor (DOR) agonists possess cytoprotective properties, an effect associated with activation of the 'pro-survival' kinase Akt. Here we delineate the signal transduction pathway by which opioids induce Akt activation in neuroblastoma x glioma (NG108-15) hybrid cells. Exposure of the cells to both [D-Pen{sup 2,5}]enkephalin and etorphine resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in Akt activity, as measured by means of an activation-specific antibody recognizing phosphoserine-473. DOR-mediated Akt signaling is blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone and involves inhibitory G{sub i/o} proteins, because pre-treatment with pertussis toxin, but not over-expression of the G{sub q/11} scavengers EBP50 and GRK2-K220R, prevented this effect. Further studies with Wortmannin and LY294002 revealed that phophoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) plays a central role in opioid-induced Akt activation. Opioids stimulate Akt activity through transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), because pre-treatment of the cells with inhibitors for neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinases (AG879) and the insulin-like growth factor receptor IGF-1 (AG1024), but not over-expression of the G{beta}{gamma} scavenger phosducin, abolished this effect. Activated Akt translocates to the nuclear membrane, where it promotes GSK3 phosphorylation and prevents caspase-3 cleavage, two key events mediating inhibition of cell apoptosis and enhancement of cell survival. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in NG108-15 hybrid cells DOR agonists possess cytoprotective properties mediated by activation of the RTK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  16. δ-Opioid receptor-stimulated Akt signaling in neuroblastoma x glioma (NG108-15) hybrid cells involves receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated PI3K activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiss, Anika; Ammer, Hermann; Eisinger, Daniela A.

    2009-01-01

    δ-Opioid receptor (DOR) agonists possess cytoprotective properties, an effect associated with activation of the 'pro-survival' kinase Akt. Here we delineate the signal transduction pathway by which opioids induce Akt activation in neuroblastoma x glioma (NG108-15) hybrid cells. Exposure of the cells to both [D-Pen 2,5 ]enkephalin and etorphine resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in Akt activity, as measured by means of an activation-specific antibody recognizing phosphoserine-473. DOR-mediated Akt signaling is blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone and involves inhibitory G i/o proteins, because pre-treatment with pertussis toxin, but not over-expression of the G q/11 scavengers EBP50 and GRK2-K220R, prevented this effect. Further studies with Wortmannin and LY294002 revealed that phophoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) plays a central role in opioid-induced Akt activation. Opioids stimulate Akt activity through transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), because pre-treatment of the cells with inhibitors for neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinases (AG879) and the insulin-like growth factor receptor IGF-1 (AG1024), but not over-expression of the Gβγ scavenger phosducin, abolished this effect. Activated Akt translocates to the nuclear membrane, where it promotes GSK3 phosphorylation and prevents caspase-3 cleavage, two key events mediating inhibition of cell apoptosis and enhancement of cell survival. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in NG108-15 hybrid cells DOR agonists possess cytoprotective properties mediated by activation of the RTK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  17. Ion channel regulation by phosphoinositides analyzed with VSPs – PI(4,5P2 affinity, phosphoinositide selectivity, and PI(4,5P2 pool accessibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eRjasanow

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The activity of many proteins depends on the phosphoinositide (PI content of the membrane. E.g., dynamic changes of the concentration of PI(4,5P2 are cellular signals that regulate ion channels. The susceptibility of a channel to such dynamics depends on its affinity for PI(4,5P2. Yet, measuring affinities for endogenous PIs has not been possible directly, but has relied largely on the response to soluble analogs, which may not quantitatively reflect binding to native lipids.Voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs turn over PI(4,5P2 to PI(4P when activated by depolarization. In combination with voltage-clamp electrophysiology VSPs are useful tools for rapid and reversible depletion of PI(4,5P2. Because cellular PI(4,5P2 is resynthesized rapidly, steady state PI(4,5P2 changes with the degree of VSP activation and thus depends on membrane potential.Here we show that titration of endogenous PI(4,5P2 with Ci-VSP allows for the quantification of relative PI(4,5P2 affinities of ion channels. The sensitivity of inward rectifier and voltage-gated K+ channels to Ci-VSP allowed for comparison of PI(4,5P2 affinities within and across channel subfamilies and detected changes of affinity in mutant channels. The results also reveal that VSPs are useful only for PI effectors with high binding specificity among PI isoforms, because PI(4,5P2 depletion occurs at constant overall PI level. Thus, Kir6.2, a channel activated by PI(4,5P2 and PI(4P was insensitive to VSP.Surprisingly, despite comparable PI(4,5P2 affinity as determined by Ci-VSP, the Kv7 and Kir channel families strongly differed in their sensitivity to receptor-mediated depletion of PI(4,5P2. While Kv7 members were highly sensitive to activation of PLC by Gq-coupled receptors, Kir channels were insensitive even when PI(4,5P2 affinity was lowered by mutation. We hypothesize that different channels may be associated with distinct pools of PI(4,5P2 that differ in their accessibility to PLC and VSPs.

  18. DNA Synthesis during Endomitosis Is Stimulated by Insulin via the PI3K/Akt and TOR Signaling Pathways in the Silk Gland Cells of Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaofeng Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Silk gland cells undergo multiple endomitotic cell cycles during silkworm larval ontogeny. Our previous study demonstrated that feeding is required for continued endomitosis in the silk gland cells of silkworm larvae. Furthermore, the insulin signaling pathway is closely related to nutritional signals. To investigate whether the insulin signaling pathway is involved in endomitosis in silk gland cells, in this study, we initially analyzed the effects of bovine insulin on DNA synthesis in endomitotic silk gland cells using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU labeling technology, and found that bovine insulin can stimulate DNA synthesis. Insulin signal transduction is mainly mediated via phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt, the target of rapamycin (TOR and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathways in vertebrates. We ascertained that these three pathways are involved in DNA synthesis in endomitotic silk gland cells using specific inhibitors against each pathway. Moreover, we investigated whether these three pathways are involved in insulin-stimulated DNA synthesis in endomitotic silk gland cells, and found that the PI3K/Akt and TOR pathways, but not the ERK pathway, are involved in this process. These results provide an important theoretical foundation for the further investigations of the mechanism underlying efficient endomitosis in silk gland cells.

  19. Ghrelin promotes human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cell proliferation through PI3K/Akt/mTOR/P70S6K and ERK signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Yao, Jianfeng; Huang, Rongfu; Wang, Yueqin; Jia, Min; Huang, Yan

    2018-04-06

    Ghrelin is a gastric acyl-peptide that plays an important role in cell proliferation. In the present study, we explored the role of ghrelin in A549 cell proliferation and the possible molecular mechanisms. We found that ghrelin promotes A549 cell proliferation, knockdown of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) attenuated A549 cell proliferation caused by ghrelin. Ghrelin induced the rapid phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, ERK, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and P70S6K. PI3K inhibitor (LY 294002), ERK inhibitor (PD98059) and mTOR inhibitor (Rapamycin) inhibited ghrelin-induced A549 cell proliferation. Moreover, GHSR siRNA inhibited phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, ERK, mTOR and P70S6K induced by ghrelin. Akt and mTOR/P70S6K phosphorylation was inhibited by LY 294002 but not by PD98059. These results indicate that ghrelin promotes A549 cell proliferation via GHSR-dependent PI3K/Akt/mTOR/P70S6K and ERK signaling pathways. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel PI3K/Akt Inhibitors Screened by the Cytoprotective Function of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Baek

    2011-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt pathway regulates various stress-related cellular responses such as cell survival, cell proliferation, metabolism and protein synthesis. Many cancer cell types display the activation of this pathway, and compounds inhibiting this cell survival pathway have been extensively evaluated as anti-cancer agents. In addition to cancers, several human viruses, such as HTLV, HPV, HCV and HIV-1, also modulate this pathway, presumably in order to extend the life span of the infected target cells for productive viral replication. The expression of HIV-1 Tat protein exhibited the cytoprotective effect in macrophages and a human microglial cell line by inhibiting the negative regulator of this pathway, PTEN. This cytoprotective effect of HIV-1 appears to contribute to the long-term survival and persistent HIV-1 production in human macrophage reservoirs. In this study we exploited the PI3K/Akt dependent cytoprotective effect of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. We screened a collection of compounds known to modulate inflammation, and identified three novel compounds: Lancemaside A, Compound K and Arctigenin that abolished the cytoprotective phenotype of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. All three compounds antagonized the kinase activity of Akt. Further detailed signaling studies revealed that each of these three compounds targeted different steps of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Arctigenin regulates the upstream PI3K enzyme from converting PIP2 to PIP3. Lancemaside A1 inhibited the movement of Akt to the plasma membrane, a critical step for Akt activation. Compound K inhibited Akt phosphorylation. This study supports that Tat-expressing CHME5 cells are an effective model system for screening novel PI3K/Akt inhibitors. PMID:21765914

  1. Novel PI3K/Akt inhibitors screened by the cytoprotective function of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Kim

    Full Text Available The PI3K/Akt pathway regulates various stress-related cellular responses such as cell survival, cell proliferation, metabolism and protein synthesis. Many cancer cell types display the activation of this pathway, and compounds inhibiting this cell survival pathway have been extensively evaluated as anti-cancer agents. In addition to cancers, several human viruses, such as HTLV, HPV, HCV and HIV-1, also modulate this pathway, presumably in order to extend the life span of the infected target cells for productive viral replication. The expression of HIV-1 Tat protein exhibited the cytoprotective effect in macrophages and a human microglial cell line by inhibiting the negative regulator of this pathway, PTEN. This cytoprotective effect of HIV-1 appears to contribute to the long-term survival and persistent HIV-1 production in human macrophage reservoirs. In this study we exploited the PI3K/Akt dependent cytoprotective effect of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. We screened a collection of compounds known to modulate inflammation, and identified three novel compounds: Lancemaside A, Compound K and Arctigenin that abolished the cytoprotective phenotype of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. All three compounds antagonized the kinase activity of Akt. Further detailed signaling studies revealed that each of these three compounds targeted different steps of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Arctigenin regulates the upstream PI3K enzyme from converting PIP2 to PIP3. Lancemaside A1 inhibited the movement of Akt to the plasma membrane, a critical step for Akt activation. Compound K inhibited Akt phosphorylation. This study supports that Tat-expressing CHME5 cells are an effective model system for screening novel PI3K/Akt inhibitors.

  2. Roquin Suppresses the PI3K-mTOR Signaling Pathway to Inhibit T Helper Cell Differentiation and Conversion of Treg to Tfr Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, Katharina; Hu, Desheng; Guimaraes, Joao C; Alterauge, Dominik; Edelmann, Stephanie; Raj, Timsse; Kranich, Jan; Behrens, Gesine; Heiseke, Alexander; Floess, Stefan; Klein, Juliane; Maiser, Andreas; Marschall, Susan; Hrabĕ de Angelis, Martin; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Calkhoven, Cornelis F; Noessner, Elfriede; Brocker, Thomas; Huehn, Jochen; Krug, Anne B; Zavolan, Mihaela; Baumjohann, Dirk; Heissmeyer, Vigo

    2017-12-19

    Roquin proteins preclude spontaneous T cell activation and aberrant differentiation of T follicular helper (Tfh) or T helper 17 (Th17) cells. Here we showed that deletion of Roquin-encoding alleles specifically in regulatory T (Treg) cells also caused the activation of conventional T cells. Roquin-deficient Treg cells downregulated CD25, acquired a follicular Treg (Tfr) cell phenotype, and suppressed germinal center reactions but could not protect from colitis. Roquin inhibited the PI3K-mTOR signaling pathway by upregulation of Pten through interfering with miR-17∼92 binding to an overlapping cis-element in the Pten 3' UTR, and downregulated the Foxo1-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch. Loss of Roquin enhanced Akt-mTOR signaling and protein synthesis, whereas inhibition of PI3K or mTOR in Roquin-deficient T cells corrected enhanced Tfh and Th17 or reduced iTreg cell differentiation. Thereby, Roquin-mediated control of PI3K-mTOR signaling prevents autoimmunity by restraining activation and differentiation of conventional T cells and specialization of Treg cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of somatic PI3K pathway and ERBB family mutations on pathological complete response (pCR) in HER2-positive breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant HER2-targeted therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, Sinead

    2017-07-27

    The Cancer Genome Atlas analysis revealed that somatic EGFR, receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (ERBB2), Erb-B2 receptor tyrosine kinase 3 (ERBB3) and Erb-B2 receptor tyrosine kinase 4 (ERBB4) gene mutations (ERBB family mutations) occur alone or co-occur with somatic mutations in the gene encoding the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) catalytic subunit (PIK3CA) in 19% of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancers. Because ERBB family mutations can activate the PI3K\\/AKT pathway and likely have similar canonical signalling effects to PI3K pathway mutations, we investigated their combined impact on response to neoadjuvant HER2-targeted therapies.

  4. BIG1, a brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein regulates neurite development via PI3K-AKT and ERK signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C; Li, C; Li, D; Wang, Y; Shao, W; You, Y; Peng, J; Zhang, X; Lu, L; Shen, X

    2013-12-19

    The elongation of neuron is highly dependent on membrane trafficking. Brefeldin A (BFA)-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein 1 (BIG1) functions in the membrane trafficking between the Golgi apparatus and the plasma membrane. BFA, an uncompetitive inhibitor of BIG1 can inhibit neurite outgrowth and polarity development. In this study, we aimed to define the possible role of BIG1 in neurite development and to further investigate the potential mechanism. By immunostaining, we found that BIG1 was extensively colocalized with synaptophysin, a marker for synaptic vesicles in soma and partly in neurites. The amount of both protein and mRNA of BIG1 were up-regulated during rat brain development. BIG1 depletion significantly decreased the neurite length and inhibited the phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase B (AKT). Inhibition of BIG1 guanine nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) activity by BFA or overexpression of the dominant-negative BIG1 reduced PI3K and AKT phosphorylation, indicating regulatory effects of BIG1 on PI3K-AKT signaling pathway is dependent on its GEF activity. BIG1 siRNA or BFA treatment also significantly reduced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Overexpression of wild-type BIG1 significantly increased ERK phosphorylation, but the dominant-negative BIG1 had no effect on ERK phosphorylation, indicating the involvement of BIG1 in ERK signaling regulation may not be dependent on its GEF activity. Our result identified a novel function of BIG1 in neurite development. The newly recognized function integrates the function of BIG1 in membrane trafficking with the activation of PI3K-AKT and ERK signaling pathways which are critical in neurite development. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. In vivo PTH provokes apical NHE3 and NaPi2 redistribution and Na-K-ATPase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y; Norian, J M; Magyar, C E

    1999-01-01

    and to determine whether the same cellular signals drive the changes in apical and basolateral transporters. PTH-(1-34) (20 U), which couples to adenylate cyclase (AC), phospholipase C (PLC), and phospholipase A2 (PLA2), or [Nle8,18,Tyr34]PTH-(3-34) (10 U), which couples to PLC and PLA2 but not AC, were given....../diuresis and NHE3 and NaPi2 internalization, and that Na-K-ATPase inhibition is not secondary to depressed apical Na+ transport....

  6. Toll-like receptor 4 promotes angiogenesis in pancreatic cancer via PI3K/AKT signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yunliang; Wu, Congshan; Ma, Jianxia; Yang, Yu; Man, Xiaohua; Wu, Hongyu; Li, Shude

    2016-01-01

    Deregulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is closely associated with the progression of various types of cancers, but its role in pancreatic carcinogenesis is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the role of TLR4 in the angiogenesis of pancreatic cancer and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The culture supernatant (conditioned medium) of PANC-1 cells after appropriate treatment was used for the treatment of HUVECs. The proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVECs were assessed by MTT, Transwell and Matrigel, respectively. In pancreatic cancer tissues, TLR4, VEGF and CD31 were upregulated as determined by immunohistochemistry and the expression of TLR4 and VEGF was positively correlated with microvessel density as detected by CD31 staining. Activation of TLR4 signaling by LPS in PANC-1 cells resulted in increased VEGF and phosphorylation of AKT, which were abolished by TLR4 silencing with siRNA and PI3K/AKT signaling inhibitor LY294002. The conditioned medium from PANC-1 cells treated with LY294002 or transfected with TRL4 siRNA reduced the proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVECs. In contrast, the conditioned medium from PANC-1 cells treated with LPS stimulated the proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVECs, which was however significantly inhibited by pretreatment of PANC-1 cells with LY294002 or transfection with TRL4 siRNA. Our findings suggest TLR4 may promote angiogenesis in pancreatic cancer by activating the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway to induce VEGF expression.

  7. Toll-like receptor 4 promotes angiogenesis in pancreatic cancer via PI3K/AKT signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yunliang; Wu, Congshan [Department of Gastroenterology, Lianyungang Ganyu People’s Hospital, Ganyu, Jiangsu (China); Ma, Jianxia, E-mail: yz_mjx@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Yang, Yu [Department of Gastroenterology, Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Man, Xiaohua; Wu, Hongyu; Li, Shude [Department of Gastroenterology, Changhai Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-10-01

    Deregulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is closely associated with the progression of various types of cancers, but its role in pancreatic carcinogenesis is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the role of TLR4 in the angiogenesis of pancreatic cancer and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The culture supernatant (conditioned medium) of PANC-1 cells after appropriate treatment was used for the treatment of HUVECs. The proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVECs were assessed by MTT, Transwell and Matrigel, respectively. In pancreatic cancer tissues, TLR4, VEGF and CD31 were upregulated as determined by immunohistochemistry and the expression of TLR4 and VEGF was positively correlated with microvessel density as detected by CD31 staining. Activation of TLR4 signaling by LPS in PANC-1 cells resulted in increased VEGF and phosphorylation of AKT, which were abolished by TLR4 silencing with siRNA and PI3K/AKT signaling inhibitor LY294002. The conditioned medium from PANC-1 cells treated with LY294002 or transfected with TRL4 siRNA reduced the proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVECs. In contrast, the conditioned medium from PANC-1 cells treated with LPS stimulated the proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVECs, which was however significantly inhibited by pretreatment of PANC-1 cells with LY294002 or transfection with TRL4 siRNA. Our findings suggest TLR4 may promote angiogenesis in pancreatic cancer by activating the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway to induce VEGF expression.

  8. Observation of the decay $B_c^+ \\rightarrow J/\\psi K^+ K^- \\pi^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Cheung, S -F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; 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Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The decay $B_c^+ \\rightarrow J/\\psi K^+ K^- \\pi^+$ is observed for the first time, using proton-proton collisions collected with the LHCb detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$. A signal yield of 78$\\pm$14 decays is reported with a significance of 6.2 standard deviations. The ratio of the branching fraction of $B_c^+ \\rightarrow J/\\psi K^+ K^- \\pi^+$ decays to that of $B_c^+ \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\pi^+$ decays is measured to be $0.53\\pm 0.10\\pm0.05$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  9. Measurement of partial widths and search for direct CP violation in D0 meson decays to K-K+ and pi-pi+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerri, C; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; 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    2005-04-01

    We present a measurement of relative partial widths and decay rate CP asymmetries in K-K+ and pi(-)pi(+) decays of D0 mesons produced in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV. We use a sample of 2x10(5) D(*+)-->D0pi(+) (and charge conjugate) decays with the D0 decaying to K-pi(+), K-K+, and pi(-)pi(+), corresponding to 123 pb(-1) of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No significant direct CP violation is observed. We measure Gamma(D0-->K-K+)/Gamma(D0-->K-pi(+))=0.0992+/-0.0011+/-0.0012, Gamma(D0-->pi(-)pi(+))/Gamma(D0-->K-pi(+))=0.035 94+/-0.000 54+/-0.000 40, A(CP)(K-K+)=(2.0+/-1.2+/-0.6)%, and A(CP)(pi(-)pi(+))=(1.0+/-1.3+/-0.6)%, where, in all cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  10. Epidermal growth factor induces HCCR expression via PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zekuan; Zhang, Guoxin; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Jiakai; Yang, Yang; Shi, Ruihua; Hao, Bo; Zhang, Zhihong; Huang, Zuhu; Kim, Jin W

    2010-01-01

    Human cervical cancer oncoprotein 1 (HCCR-1), reported as a negative regulator of p53, is over-expressed in a variety of human cancers. However, it is yet unknown whether HCCR-1 plays any role in pancreatic cancer development. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of epidermal growth factor on the expression of HCCR in pancreatic cancer cells, and to explore if PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway mediated this expression. A polyclonal antibody against HCCR protein was raised by immunizing Balb/c mice with the purified recombinant protein pMBPc-HCCR. Tissue samples were constructed on a tissue chip, and the expression of HCCR was investigated by immunohistochemistry assay and Western blotting. Pancreatic cell line, PANC-1 cells were stably transfected with plasmids containing sense-HCCR-1 fragment and HCCR siRNA fragment. MTT and transwell assay were used to investigate the proliferation and invasion of stable tansfectants. The specific inhibitor of PI3K and mTOR was used to see if PI3K/mTOR signal transduction was involved in the induction of HCCR gene expression. A Luciferase assay was used to see if Akt can enhance the HCCR promoter activity. HCCR was up-regulated in pancreatic tumor tissues (mean Allred score 4.51 ± 1.549 vs. 2.87 ± 2.193, P < 0.01), especially with high expression in poorly differentiated pancreatic cancer. The growth of cells decreased in HCCR-1 siRNA transfected cells compared with vector transfectants. The number of invasion cells was significantly lower in HCCR-1 siRNA transfected cells (24.4 ± 9.9) than that in vector transfectants (49.1 ± 15.4). Treatment of PANC-1 cells with epidermal growth factor increased HCCR protein level in a dose- and time-dependent manner. However, application of LY294002 and rapamycin caused a dramatic reduction of epidermal growth factor-induced HCCR expression. Over-expression of exogenous constitutively active Akt increased the HCCR promoter activity; in contrast, dominant negative Akt decreased

  11. Opposing effects of PI3K/Akt and Smad-dependent signaling pathways in NAG-1-induced glioblastoma cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Zhang

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID activated gene-1 (NAG-1 is a divergent member of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β superfamily. NAG-1 plays remarkable multifunctional roles in controlling diverse physiological and pathological processes including cancer. Like other TGF-β family members, NAG-1 can play dual roles during cancer development and progression by negatively or positively modulating cancer cell behaviors. In glioblastoma brain tumors, NAG-1 appears to act as a tumor suppressor gene; however, the precise underlying mechanisms have not been well elucidated. In the present study, we discovered that overexpression of NAG-1 induced apoptosis in U87 MG, U118 MG, U251 MG, and T98G cell lines via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway, but not in A172 and LN-229 cell lines. NAG-1 could induce the phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt and Smad2/3 in all six tested glioblastoma cell lines, except Smad3 phosphorylation in A172 and LN-229 cell lines. In fact, Smad3 expression and its phosphorylation were almost undetectable in A172 and LN-229 cells. The PI3K inhibitors promoted NAG-1-induced glioblastoma cell apoptosis, while siRNAs to Smad2 and Smad3 decreased the apoptosis rate. NAG-1 also stimulated the direct interaction between Akt and Smad3 in glioblastoma cells. Elevating the level of Smad3 restored the sensitivity to NAG-1-induced apoptosis in A172 and LN-229 cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that PI3K/Akt and Smad-dependent signaling pathways display opposing effects in NAG-1-induced glioblastoma cell apoptosis.

  12. New insights into Notch1 regulation of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR1 signaling axis: targeted therapy of γ-secretase inhibitor resistant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Eric C; Taub, Jeffrey W; Matherly, Larry H

    2014-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is characterized as a high-risk stratified disease associated with frequent relapse, chemotherapy resistance, and a poorer prognostic outlook than B-precursor ALL. Many of the challenges in treating T-ALL reflect the lack of prognostic cytogenetic or molecular abnormalities on which to base therapy, including targeted therapy. Notch1 activating mutations were identified in more than 50% of T-ALL cases and can be therapeutically targeted with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs). Mutant Notch1 can activate cMyc and PI3K-AKT-mTOR1 signaling in T-ALL. In T-ALLs with wild-type phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), Notch1 transcriptionally represses PTEN, an effect reversible by GSIs. Notch1 also promotes growth factor receptor (IGF1R and IL7Rα) signaling to PI3K-AKT. Loss of PTEN is common in primary T-ALLs due to mutation or posttranslational inactivation and results in chronic activation of PI3K-AKT-mTOR1 signaling, GSI-resistance, and repression of p53-mediated apoptosis. Notch1 itself might regulate posttranslational inactivation of PTEN. PP2A is activated by Notch1 in PTEN-null T-ALL cells, and GSIs reduce PP2A activity and increase phosphorylation of AKT, AMPK, and p70S6K. This review focuses on the central role of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR1 signaling in T-ALL, including its regulation by Notch1 and potential therapeutic interventions, with emphasis on GSI-resistant T-ALL. © 2013.

  13. iTRAQ proteomics analysis reveals that PI3K is highly associated with bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Liu, Zhongjie; Yu, Xujiao; Lai, Luying; Li, Haobo; Liu, Zipeng; Li, Le; Jiang, Shan; Xia, Zhengyuan; Xu, Shi-yuan

    2016-02-01

    Bupivacaine, a commonly used local anesthetic, has potential neurotoxicity through diverse signaling pathways. However, the key mechanism of bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity remains unclear. Cultured human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were treated (bupivacaine) or untreated (control) with bupivacaine for 24 h. Compared to the control group, bupivacaine significantly increased cyto-inhibition, cellular reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, mitochondrial injury, apoptosis (increased TUNEL-positive cells, cleaved caspase 3, and Bcl-2/Bax), and activated autophagy (enhanced LC3II/LC3I ratio). To explore changes in protein expression and intercommunication among the pathways involved in bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity, an 8-plex iTRAQ proteomic technique and bioinformatics analysis were performed. Compared to the control group, 241 differentially expressed proteins were identified, of which, 145 were up-regulated and 96 were down-regulated. Bioinformatics analysis of the cross-talk between the significant proteins with altered expression in bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity indicated that phosphatidyl-3-kinase (PI3K) was the most frequently targeted protein in each of the interactions. We further confirmed these results by determining the downstream targets of the identified signaling pathways (PI3K, Akt, FoxO1, Erk, and JNK). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that PI3K may play a central role in contacting and regulating the signaling pathways that contribute to bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Branching Ratio Measurements of B ---> J/psi eta K and B+- ---> D0 K+- with D0 ---> pi+ pi- pi0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Qinglin; /Colorado State U.

    2006-03-08

    Results are presented for the decays of B {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K and B{sup {+-}} {yields} DK{sup {+-}}, respectively, with experimental data collected with BABAR detector at PEP-II, located at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). With 90 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, we obtained branching fractions of {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sup {+-}}) = [10.8 {+-} 2.3(stat) {+-} 2.4(syst)] x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sub S}{sup 0}) = [8.4 {+-} 2.6(stat) {+-} 2.7(syst)] x 10{sup -5}; and we set an upper limit of {Beta}[B{sup {+-}} {yields} X(3872)K{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sup {+-}}] < 7.7 x 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. The branching fraction of decay chain {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} DK{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}) = [5.5 {+-} 1.0(stat) {+-} 0.7(syst)] x 10{sup -6} with 229 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events at {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, here D represents the neutral D meson. The decay rate asymmetry is A = 0.02 {+-} 0.16(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) for this full decay chain. This decay can be used to extract the unitarity angle {gamma}, a weak CP violation phase, through the interference of decay production of D{sup 0} and {bar D}{sup 0} to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}.

  15. Silibinin inhibits migration and invasion of the rhabdoid tumor G401 cell line via inactivation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yumei; Zhang, Chunmei; Cai, Danfeng; Chen, Congde; Mu, Dongmei

    2017-12-01

    Rhabdoid tumors, which tend to occur prior to the age of 2 years, are one of the most aggressive malignancies and have a poor prognosis due to the frequency of metastasis. Silibinin, a natural extract, has been approved as a potential tumor suppressor in various studies, however, whether or not it also exerts its antitumor capacity in rhabdoid tumors, particularly with regards to tumor migration and invasion, is unclear. The rhabdoid tumor G401 cell line was used in the present in vitro study. An MTT assay was used to assess the cytotoxicity of silibinin on G401 cells, cell migration was studied using a wound healing assay and a Transwell migration assay, and cell invasion was determined using a Transwell invasion assay. The underlying mechanism in silibinin inhibited cell migration and invasion was investigated by western blot analysis and further confirmed using a specific inhibitor. Experimental results demonstrated that high doses of silibinin suppressed cell viability, and that low doses of silibinin inhibited cell migration and invasion without affecting cell proliferation. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) signaling pathway was involved in the silibinin-induced inhibition of metastasis. Silibinin inactivated the PI3K/Akt pathway, and inhibited cell migration and invasion, an effect that was further enhanced when LY294002, a classic PI3K inhibitor, was used concurrently. In general, silibinin inhibits migration and invasion of the rhabdoid tumor G401 cell line via inactivation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and may be a potential chemotherapeutic drug to combat rhabdoid tumors in the future.

  16. Suppressing the formation of lipid raft-associated Rac1/PI3K/Akt signaling complexes by curcumin inhibits SDF-1α-induced invasion of human esophageal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng-Liang; Lu, Yao-Cheng; Chen, Hung-Yi; Lee, Chuan-Chun; Chung, Jing-Gung; Chen, Shih-Shun

    2014-05-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) is a ligand for C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), which contributes to the metastasis of cancer cells by promoting cell migration. Here, we show that the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis can significantly increase invasion of esophageal carcinoma (EC) cells. We accomplished this by examining the effects of CXCR4 knockdown as well as treatment with a CXCR4-neutralizing antibody and the CXCR4-specific inhibitor AMD3100. Curcumin suppressed SDF-1α-induced cell invasion and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) promoter activity, cell surface localization of CXCR4 at lipid rafts, and lipid raft-associated ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) p85α/Akt signaling. Curcumin inhibited SDF-1α-induced cell invasion by suppressing the Rac1-PI3K signaling complex at lipid rafts but did not abrogate lipid raft formation. We further demonstrate that the attenuation of lipid raft-associated Rac1 activity by curcumin was critical for the inhibition of SDF-1α-induced PI3K/Akt/NF-κB activation, cell surface localization of CXCR4 at lipid rafts, MMP-2 promoter activity, and cell invasion. Collectively, our results indicate that curcumin inhibits SDF-1α-induced EC cell invasion by suppressing the formation of the lipid raft-associated Rac1-PI3K-Akt signaling complex, the localization of CXCR4 with lipid rafts at the cell surface, and MMP-2 promoter activity, likely through the inhibition of Rac1 activity. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. PDGF Promotes the Warburg Effect in Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells via Activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR/HIF-1α Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunbin Xiao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The enhanced proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs is a central pathological component in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. Both the Warburg effect and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF are involved in the proliferation of PASMCs. However, the mechanism underlying the crosstalk between the Warburg effect and PDGF during PASMC proliferation is still unknown. We hypothesized that PDGF promotes the Warburg effect via activating the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K signaling pathway and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α in proliferative PASMCs. Methods: PASMCs were derived from pulmonary arteries of SD rats; cell viability, the presence of metabolites, and metabolic enzyme activities assay were determined by MTT assays, kit assays and western blot analysis, respectively. Results: PDGF promoted PASMC proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied by an enhanced Warburg effect. Treatment with PDGFR antagonists, Warburg effect inhibitor and PDK1 inhibitor significantly inhibited PI3K signaling activation, HIF-1α expression and PASMC proliferation induced by PDGF, respectively. Furthermore, treatment with PI3K signaling pathway inhibitors remarkably suppressed PDGF-induced PASMC proliferation and the Warburg effect. Conclusion: microplate reader (Biotek, Winooski The Warburg effect plays a critical role in PDGF-induced PASMC proliferation and is mediated by activation of the PI3K signaling pathway and HIF-1α.

  18. PI3K inhibition to overcome endocrine resistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Niamh M; Gleeson, Jack P; Hennessy, Bryan T; Morris, Patrick G

    2018-01-01

    Activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) pathway is a critical step in oncogenesis and plays a role in the development of treatment resistance for both estrogen receptor (ER) positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancers. Hence, there have been efforts to therapeutically inhibit this pathway. Areas covered: Several inhibitors of PI3K are now progressing through clinical trials with varying degrees of efficacy and toxicity to date. Numerous unresolved questions remain concerning the optimal isoform selectivity of PI3K inhibitors and use of predictive biomarkers. This review examines the most important PI3K inhibitors in ER positive breast cancer to date, with a particular focus on their role in overcoming endocrine therapy resistance and the possible use of PIK3CA mutations as a predictive biomarker. Expert opinion: We discuss some of the emerging challenges and questions encountered during the development of PI3K inhibitors from preclinical to phase III studies, including other novel biomarkers and future combinations to overcome endocrine resistance.

  19. CXCR3 chemokine receptor-induced chemotaxis in human airway epithelial cells: role of p38 MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabuddin, Syed; Ji, Rong; Wang, Ping; Brailoiu, Eugene; Dun, Na; Yang, Yi; Aksoy, Mark O; Kelsen, Steven G

    2006-07-01

    Human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) constitutively express the CXC chemokine receptor CXCR3, which regulates epithelial cell movement. In diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma, characterized by denudation of the epithelial lining, epithelial cell migration may contribute to airway repair and reconstitution. This study compared the potency and efficacy of three CXCR3 ligands, I-TAC/CXCL11, IP-10/CXCL10, and Mig/CXCL9, as inducers of chemotaxis in HAEC and examined the underlying signaling pathways involved. Studies were performed in cultured HAEC from normal subjects and the 16-HBE cell line. In normal HAEC, the efficacy of I-TAC-induced chemotaxis was 349 +/- 88% (mean +/- SE) of the medium control and approximately one-half the response to epidermal growth factor, a highly potent chemoattractant. In normal HAEC, Mig, IP-10, and I-TAC induced chemotaxis with similar potency and a rank order of efficacy of I-TAC = IP-10 > Mig. Preincubation with pertussis toxin completely blocked CXCR3-induced migration. Of interest, intracellular [Ca(2+)] did not rise in response to I-TAC, IP-10, or Mig. I-TAC induced a rapid phosphorylation (5-10 min) of two of the three MAPKs, i.e., p38 and ERK1/2. Pretreatment of HAEC with the p38 inhibitor SB 20358 or the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin dose-dependently inhibited the chemotactic response to I-TAC. In contrast, the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 had no effect on chemotaxis. These data indicate that in HAEC, CXCR3-mediated chemotaxis involves a G protein, which activates both the p38 MAPK and PI3K pathways in a calcium-independent fashion.

  20. The Role of Insulin/IGF-1/PI3K/Akt/GSK3β Signaling in Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Dementia, a condition that frequently afflicts patients in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD, results in decreased quality of life and survival time. Nevertheless, the pathological mechanisms underlying Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD are not completely understood. The symptoms characteristic of PDD may be the result of functional and structural deficiencies. The present study implicates the accumulation of Lewy bodies in the cortex and limbic system as a potent trigger in the development of PDD. In addition, significant Alzheimer-type pathologies, including amyloid-β (Aβ plaques and NFTs, are observed in almost half of PDD patients. Interestingly, links between PDD pathogenesis and the mechanisms underlying the development of insulin resistance have begun to emerge. Furthermore, previous studies have demonstrated that insulin treatment reduces amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD, and normalizes the production and functionality of dopamine and ameliorates motor impairments in 6-OHDA-induced rat PD models. GSK3β, a downstream substrate of PI3K/Akt signaling following induction by insulin and IGF-1, exerts an influence on AD and PD physiopathology. The genetic overexpression of GSK3β in cortex and hippocampus results in signs of neurodegeneration and spatial learning deficits in in vivo models (Lucas et al., 2001, whereas its inhibition results in improvements in cognitive impairment in these rodents, including AD and PD. Accordingly, insulin- or IGF-1-activated PI3K/Akt/GSK3β signaling may be involved in PDD pathogenesis, at least in the pathology of PD-type + AD-type.

  1. Observation of the decay $\\overline{B}_s^0 \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) K^+ \\pi^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Sterpka, Christopher Francis; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang

    2015-07-30

    The decay $\\overline{B}_s^0 \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) K^+ \\pi^-$ is observed using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3.0fb^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb experiment in $pp$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The branching fraction relative to the $B^0\\rightarrow \\psi(2S) K^+ \\pi^-$ decay mode is measured to be \\begin{equation} \\frac{{\\cal B}(\\overline{B}^0_s \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) K^+ \\pi^-)}{{\\cal B}(B^0 \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) K^+ \\pi^-)} = 5.38 \\pm 0.36 (stat) \\pm 0.22 (syst) \\pm 0.31 \\, (f_s/f_d ) \\, \\%,\

  2. Metallothionein-III protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress by increasing expression of heme oxygenase-1 in a PI3K and ERK/Nrf2-dependent manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Han, Eun Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-01-01

    The zinc-binding protein metallothionein-III (MT-III) is associated with resistance to neuronal injury. However, the underlying mechanism for its effects is unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that MT-III prevents the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells challenged with the Parkinson's disease-related neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) by a mechanism that involves phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK kinase/NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) dependent induction of the stress response protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with MT-III significantly reduced 6-OHDA-induced generation of ROS, caspase-3 activation, and subsequent cell death. Also, MT-III up-regulates HO-1 expression and this expression confers neuroprotection against oxidative injury induced by 6-OHDA. Moreover, MT-III induces Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of MT-III-induced HO-1 expression, and PI3K and ERK1/2 activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and neuroprotection. Taken together, these results suggest that the PI3K and ERK/Nrf2 signaling pathway controls the intracellular levels of ROS by regulating the expression of the antioxidant enzyme HO-1

  3. Search for the suppressed decays $B^{+}\\rightarrow K^{+}K^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $B^{+}\\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}K^{-}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Su{á}rez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; D{é}l{é}age, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; F{ä}rber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; Garc{í}a Pardi{ñ}as, Juli{á}n; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gian{ì}, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier G{ö}ran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, V.V.; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa G{á}ndara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Gr{ü}nberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; G{ö}bel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adl{è}ne; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Leflat, Alexander; Lefran{ç}ois, Jacques; Lef{è}vre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean Fran{ç}ois; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, J{ö}rg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, Andr{é}; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mord{à}, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; M{ü}ller, Dominik; M{ü}ller, Janine; M{ü}ller, Katharina; M{ü}ller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, C{é}dric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh T{â}m; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; V{á}zquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-02-10

    A search is made for the highly-suppressed B meson decays $B^{+}\\rightarrow K^{+}K^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $B^{+}\\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}K^{-}$ using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 $fb^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. No evidence is found for the decays, and upper limits at 90\\% confidence level are determined to be $\\mathcal{B}(B^{+}\\rightarrow K^{+}K^{+}\\pi^{-}) < 1.1\\times 10^{-8}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(B^{+}\\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}K^{-}) < 4.6\\times 10^{-8}$.

  4. Cross Sections for the Reactions e+e to K+ K- pi+pi-, K+ K- pi0pi0, and K+ K- K+ K- Measured Using Initial-State Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Palano, A.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Bari /Bari U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-19

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}-{gamma}, K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, and K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}{gamma}, where the photon is radiated from the initial state. About 84000, 8000, and 4200 fully reconstructed events, respectively, are selected from 454 fb{sup -1} of BABAR data. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy, so that the K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} data can be compared with direct measurements of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} reaction. No direct measurements exist for the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} or e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -} reactions, and we present an update of our previous result with doubled statistics. Studying the structure of these events, we find contributions from a number of intermediate states, and extract their cross sections. In particular, we perform a more detailed study of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{pi}{gamma} reaction, and confirm the presence of the Y (2175) resonance in the {phi}(1020)f{sub 0}(980) and K{sup +}K{sup -} f{sub 0}(980) modes. In the charmonium region, we observe the J/{psi} in all three final states and in several intermediate states, as well as the {phi}(2S) in some modes, and measure the corresponding branching fractions.

  5. TRIM24 promotes glioma progression and enhances chemoresistance through activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L-H; Yin, A-A; Cheng, J-X; Huang, H-Y; Li, X-M; Zhang, Y-Q; Han, N; Zhang, X

    2015-01-29

    The tripartite motif protein TRIM24 (tripartite motif-containing 24) has been found to play distinct roles in tumor development and progression, according to different tumor contexts. However, it remains elusive whether TRIM24 plays a role in malignant gliomas that are the most common and deadly primary brain tumors in adults. We report here that TRIM24 expression is positively correlated with glioma malignancy and is negatively associated with prognosis of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma, which is the most malignant form of gliomas but displays highly heterogeneous clinical outcome. The multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrates the independent predictive value of TRIM24 expression level for overall and progression-free survival. Knockdown of TRIM24 suppresses cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, clone formation and in vivo tumor development, whereas overexpression of TRIM24 promotes cell growth. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, real-time reverse transcription-PCR and mutation analyses demonstrate that TRIM24 binds to the PIK3CA promoter via its PHD-Bromo domain to activate the transcription of PIK3CA gene, thus enhancing phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling. The pan-PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and small interfering RNA targeting PIK3CA both abrogate the growth-promoting effect of TRIM24. Moreover, TRIM24 regulates the expression of DNA repair enzyme O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) through PI3K/Akt/nuclear factor-κB signaling transduction and enhances resistance to temozolomide, the standard chemotherapeutic agent for glioblastoma. Finally, glioblastoma patients with low TRIM24 expression benefit from chemotherapy, whereas those with high TRIM24 expression do not have such benefit. Our results suggest that TRIM24 might serve as a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target for the management of malignant gliomas.

  6. Effects of endoplasmic reticulum stress on the autophagy, apoptosis, and chemotherapy resistance of human breast cancer cells by regulating the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jia-Teng; Yu, Jian; Wang, Hai-Jun; Shi, Yu; Zhao, Tie-Suo; He, Bao-Xia; Qiao, Bin; Feng, Zhi-Wei

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, although chemotherapy is an established therapy for breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer remain poorly understood. This study aims to explore the effects of endoplasmic reticulum stress on autophagy, apoptosis, and chemotherapy resistance in human breast cancer cells by regulating PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was performed to detect the cell viability of six human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, ZR-75-30, T47D, MDA-MB-435s, MDA-MB-453, and MDA-MB-231) treated with tunicamycin (5 µM), after which MCF-7 cells were selected for further experiment. Then, MCF-7 cells were divided into the control (without any treatment), tunicamycin (8 µ), BEZ235 (5 µ), and tunicamycin + BEZ235 groups. Cell viability of each group was testified by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Western blotting was applied to determine the expressions of endoplasmic reticulum stress and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway-related proteins and autophagy- and apoptosis-related proteins. Monodansylcadaverine and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining were used for determination of cell autophagy and apoptosis. Furthermore, MCF-7 cells were divided into the control (without any treatment), tunicamycin (5 µM), cisplatin (16 µM), cisplatin (16 µM) + BEZ235 (5 µM), tunicamycin (5 µM) + cisplatin (16 µM), and tunicamycin (5 µM) + cisplatin (16 µM) + BEZ235 groups. Cell viability and apoptosis were also evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining. In MCF-7 cells treated with tunicamycin, cell viability decreased significantly, but PEAK, eIF2, and CHOP were upregulated markedly and p-PI3K, p-AKT, and p-MTOR were downregulated in dose- and time-dependent manners. In the tunicamycin

  7. Search for the suppressed decays B+ -> K+K+pi(-) and B+ -> pi(+)pi K-+(-)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M. H.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A. Jr; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; BEACH, LA; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R.B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Romeu, J. Arnau; Artamonov, AY; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S; Back, Jaap Willem; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Be, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.O.; van Beuzekom, MG; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, D.E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, R. J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, J. R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Perez, D. H. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Cheung, T.F.S.; Chobanova, V.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogonilf, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; COOK, AM; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Sobral, C. M. Costa; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, Paolo; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoffl, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suarez, A. Dosil; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Deleage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, Martin A.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, SIdi Ould; Esen, S.; Evans, Helen M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Fazzini, D.; FERGUSON, D; Fernandez Albor, V.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Furfaro, E.; Farber, CR; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E. G; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Cazon, B. R. Gruberg; Gruenberg, O.; Gushchin, EM; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Gobel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hal, S.; Hamilton, D.B.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, Christine J.; Hatch, M.; He, J. J.; Head, T.; Heister, J. A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, Lee; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; HILL, D; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, Jestinah M. Mahachie; Johnson, D; Jones, Jonathan C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T. J.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, N. S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, Vladimir Leonidovich; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Lefevre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, Haibin; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X. R.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, Kate; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, Paolo; Marks, J. D.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, Linda M.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli'q, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Moreno-Monroy, Ana I.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. -B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, Volker; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Otto, A.; Owen, Randall P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, Anthony W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A. D.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, P. E.; Price, Daniel J.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, S. W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, Andreas S.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, Eliane R.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Gonzalez-Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone Doolaard, [No Value; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, I. T.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza, Thomas G. D’; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, Sherin S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, Ian S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, E.; Tilburg, Jeroen J H C; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Veithuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; VIEIRA, DF; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, Tishan; Wilson, F. Perry; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y; Xing, Zhe; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.-L.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; Collaboration, Lhcb

    2017-01-01

    A search is made for the highly-suppressed B meson decays B+ -> K+K+pi(-) and B+ -> pi(+)pi K-+(-) using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1) collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. No evidence is found

  8. PI3K-GLUT4 Signal Pathway Associated with Effects of EX-B3 Electroacupuncture on Hyperglycemia and Insulin Resistance of T2DM Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Yan Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To explore electroacupuncture’s (EA’s effects on fasting blood glucose (FBG and insulin resistance of type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM model rats and give a possible explanation for the effects. Method. It takes high fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 30 mg/kg for model preparation. Model rats were randomly divided into T2DM Model group, EA weiwanxiashu (EX-B3 group, and sham EA group (n=12/group. EA (2 Hz continuous wave, 2 mA, 20 min/day, 6 days/week, 4 weeks was applied as intervention. FBG, area under curve (AUC of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR, pancreatic B cell function index (HOMA-B, skeletal muscle phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K, glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4, and membrane GLUT4 protein expression were measured. Results. EA weiwanxiashu (EX-B3 can greatly upregulate model rat’s significantly reduced skeletal muscle PI3K (Y607 and membrane GLUT4 protein expression (P<0.01, effectively reducing model rats’ FBG and AUC of OGTT (P<0.01. The effects are far superior to sham EA group. Conclusion. EA weiwanxiashu (EX-B3 can upregulate skeletal muscle phosphorylated PI3K protein expression, to stimulate membrane translocation of GLUT4 and thereby increase skeletal muscle glucose intake to treat T2DM.

  9. PI3K/AKT and ERK regulate retinoic acid-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Jingbo [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Qiao, Lan; Josifi, Erlena; Tiao, Joshua R. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Chung, Dai H., E-mail: dai.chung@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Retinoic acid (RA) induces neuroblastoma cells differentiation, which is accompanied by G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA resulted in neuroblastoma cell survival and inhibition of DNA fragmentation; this is regulated by PI3K pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA activates PI3K and ERK1/2 pathway; PI3K pathway mediates RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of p21 is necessary for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. -- Abstract: Neuroblastoma, the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in infants and children, is characterized by a high rate of spontaneous remissions in infancy. Retinoic acid (RA) has been known to induce neuroblastoma differentiation; however, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that are responsible for RA-mediated neuroblastoma cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we sought to determine the cell signaling processes involved in RA-induced cellular differentiation. Upon RA administration, human neuroblastoma cell lines, SK-N-SH and BE(2)-C, demonstrated neurite extensions, which is an indicator of neuronal cell differentiation. Moreover, cell cycle arrest occurred in G1/G0 phase. The protein levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21 and p27{sup Kip}, which inhibit cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle progression at G1/S phase, increased after RA treatment. Interestingly, RA promoted cell survival during the differentiation process, hence suggesting a potential mechanism for neuroblastoma resistance to RA therapy. Importantly, we found that the PI3K/AKT pathway is required for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Our results elucidated the molecular mechanism of RA-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation, which may be important for developing novel therapeutic strategy against poorly differentiated neuroblastoma.

  10. Metastatic function of BMP-2 in gastric cancer cells: The role of PI3K/AKT, MAPK, the NF-{kappa}B pathway, and MMP-9 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Myoung Hee [Graduate School of Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sang Cheul [Division of Oncology/Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Joo [Department of Pathology, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Han Na; Kim, Jung Lim [Graduate School of Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Suk [Division of Oncology/Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young A., E-mail: ydanbi@korea.ac.kr [Brain Korea 21 Program for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been implicated in tumorigenesis and metastatic progression in various types of cancer cells, but the role and cellular mechanism in the invasive phenotype of gastric cancer cells is not known. Herein, we determined the roles of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression in BMP-2-mediated metastatic function in gastric cancer. We found that stimulation of BMP-2 in gastric cancer cells enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK. Accompanying activation of AKT and ERK kinase, BMP-2 also enhanced phosphorylation/degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and the nuclear translocation/activation of NF-{kappa}B. Interestingly, blockade of PI3K/AKT and ERK signaling using LY294002 and PD98059, respectively, significantly inhibited BMP-2-induced motility and invasiveness in association with the activation of NF-{kappa}B. Furthermore, BMP-2-induced MMP-9 expression and enzymatic activity was also significantly blocked by treatment with PI3K/AKT, ERK, or NF-{kappa}B inhibitors. Immunohistochemistry staining of 178 gastric tumor biopsies indicated that expression of BMP-2 and MMP-9 had a significant positive correlation with lymph node metastasis and a poor prognosis. These results indicate that the BMP-2 signaling pathway enhances tumor metastasis in gastric cancer by sequential activation of the PI3K/AKT or MAPK pathway followed by the induction of NF-{kappa}B and MMP-9 activity, indicating that BMP-2 has the potential to be a therapeutic molecular target to decrease metastasis.

  11. Neurogranin in the nucleus accumbens regulates NMDA receptor tolerance and motivation for ethanol seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reker, Ashlie N; Oliveros, Alfredo; Sullivan, John M; Nahar, Lailun; Hinton, David J; Kim, Taehyun; Bruner, Robert C; Choi, Doo-Sup; Goeders, Nicholas E; Nam, Hyung W

    2018-03-15

    Dysfunction of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) signaling in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of alcohol use disorders (AUD). Neurogranin (Ng), a calmodulin-binding protein, is exclusively expressed in the post-synapse, and mediates NMDAR driven synaptic plasticity by regulating the calcium-calmodulin (Ca 2+ -CaM) pathway. To study the functional role of Ng in AUD, we administrated behavior tests including Pavlovian instrument transfer (PIT), operant conditioning, and rotarod test using Ng null mice (Ng -/- mice). We used adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Ng expression and pharmacological manipulation to validate behavioral responses in Ng -/- mice. The results from our multidisciplinary approaches demonstrated that deficit of Ng increases tolerance to NMDAR inhibition and elicit faster cue reactivity during PIT without changes in ethanol reward. Operant conditioning results demonstrated that Ng -/- mice self-administered significantly more ethanol and displayed reduced sensitivity to aversive motivation. We identified that ethanol exposure decreases mGluR5 (metabotropic glutamate receptor 5) expression in the NAc of Ng -/- mice and pharmacological inhibition of mGluR5 reverses NMDAR desensitization in Ng -/- mice. Together these findings specifically suggest that accumbal Ng plays an essential role in the counterbalance between NMDAR and mGluR5 signaling; which alters NMDAR resistance, and thereby altering aversive motivation for ethanol and may ultimately contribute to susceptibility for alcohol addiction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Acacetin protects against cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction by mediating MAPK and PI3K/Akt signal pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Since inhibiting cardiac remodeling is a critical treatment goal after myocardial infarction (MI, many drugs have been evaluated for this purpose. Acacetin is a flavonoid compound that has been shown to have anti-cancer, anti-mutagenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-peroxidative effects. In this study, we investigated whether acacetin is able to exert a protective effect against MI. One week after anterior wall standard MI surgeries or sham surgeries were performed in mice, acacetin was administered via gavage for two weeks. The results of echocardiographic and hemodynamic evaluation revealed that cardiac dysfunction significantly improved after acacetin treatment. H&E staining indicated that the ratio of the infarct size and the cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was decreased by acacetin. Masson's staining detected that the fibrotic area ratio was evidently lower in the acacetin-treated MI group. TUNEL assays showed that acacetin ameliorated cardiomyocyte apoptosis after MI. RT-qPCR analysis showed that levels of hypertrophic and fibrotic markers were significantly decreased after acacetin treatment. Western blot analysis of various signaling pathway proteins showed that acacetin targets the MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Collectively, acacetin improves mouse left ventricular function and attenuates cardiac remodeling by inhibiting of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  13. Phytochemicals and PI3K Inhibitors in Cancer—An Insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanti Suvarna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In today's world of modern medicine and novel therapies, cancer still remains to be one of the prime contributor to the death of people worldwide. The modern therapies improve condition of cancer patients and are effective in early stages of cancer but the advanced metastasized stage of cancer remains untreatable. Also most of the cancer therapies are expensive and are associated with adverse side effects. Thus, considering the current status of cancer treatment there is scope to search for efficient therapies which are cost-effective and are associated with lesser and milder side effects. Phytochemicals have been utilized for many decades to prevent and cure various ailments and current evidences indicate use of phytochemicals as an effective treatment for cancer. Hyperactivation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K signaling cascades is a common phenomenon in most types of cancers. Thus, natural substances targeting PI3K pathway can be of great therapeutic potential in the treatment of cancer patients. This chapter summarizes the updated research on plant-derived substances targeting PI3K pathway and the current status of their preclinical studies and clinical trials.

  14. Leucine Affects α-Amylase Synthesis through PI3K/Akt-mTOR Signaling Pathways in Pancreatic Acinar Cells of Dairy Calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Long; Liang, Ziqi; Zheng, Chen; Liu, Baolong; Yin, Qingyan; Cao, Yangchun; Yao, Junhu

    2018-05-23

    Dietary nutrient utilization, particularly starch, is potentially limited by digestion in dairy cow small intestine because of shortage of α-amylase. Leucine acts as an effective signal molecular in the mTOR signaling pathway, which regulates a series of biological processes, especially protein synthesis. It has been reported that leucine could affect α-amylase synthesis and secretion in ruminant pancreas, but mechanisms have not been elaborated. In this study, pancreatic acinar (PA) cells were used as a model to determine the cellular signal of leucine influence on α-amylase synthesis. PA cells were isolated from newborn Holstein dairy bull calves and cultured in Dulbecco's modifed Eagle's medium/nutrient mixture F12 liquid media containing four leucine treatments (0, 0.23, 0.45, and 0.90 mM, respectively), following α-amylase activity, zymogen granule, and signal pathway factor expression detection. Rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, was also applied to PA cells. Results showed that leucine increased ( p synthesis of α-amylase as well as phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, mTOR, and S6K1 while reduced ( p synthesis. In addition, the extracellular leucine dosage significantly influenced intracellular metabolism of isoleucine ( p synthesis through promoting the PI3K/Akt-mTOR pathway and reducing the GCN2 pathway in PA cells of dairy calves. These pathways form the signaling network that controls the protein synthesis and metabolism. It would be of great interest in future studies to explore the function of leucine in ruminant nutrition.

  15. Model-independent search for $CP$ violation in $D^{0} \\to K^{-}K^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}$ and $D^{0} \\to \\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Cowie, E; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-11-04

    A search for $CP$ violation in the phase-space structures of $D^{0}$ and $\\bar{D^{0}}$ decays to the final states $K^{-}K^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}$ and $\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ is presented. The search is carried out with a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{−1}$ collected in 2011 by the LHCb experiment in $pp$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. For the $K^{-}K^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}$ final state, the four-body phase space is divided into 32 bins, each bin with approximately 1800 decays. The $p$-value under the hypothesis of no $CP$ violation is 9.1 %, and in no bin is a $CP$ asymmetry greater than 6.5 % observed. The phase space of the $\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ final state is partitioned into 128 bins, each bin with approximately 2500 decays. The p-value under the hypothesis of no $CP$ violation is 41 %, and in no bin is a $CP$ asymmetry greater than 5.5 % observed. All results are consistent with the hypothesis of no $CP$ violation at the current sensitivity.

  16. Evidence of the immunomodulatory role of dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors in transplantation: an experimental study in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilchez, Valery; Turcios, Lilia; Butterfield, David A; Mitov, Mihail I; Coquillard, Cristin L; Brandon, Ja Anthony; Cornea, Virgilius; Gedaly, Roberto; Marti, Francesc

    2017-10-01

    The PI3K/mTOR signaling cascade is fundamental in T-cell activation and fate decisions. We showed the distinct regulation of PI3K/mTOR in regulatory and effector T-cells and proposed the potential therapeutic benefit of targeting this pathway to control the balance between effector and regulatory T-cell activities. Substantial adverse effects in long-term clinical usage of rapamycin suggest the use of alternative treatments in restraining effector T-cell function in transplant patients. We hypothesize that dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors may represent an immunosuppressant alternative. Here we show that dual PI3K/mTOR PI-103 and PKI-587 inhibitors interfered IL-2-dependent responses in T-cells. However, in contrast to the inhibitory effects in non-Treg T-cell proliferation and effector functions, dual inhibitors increased the differentiation, preferential expansion, and suppressor activity of iTregs. Rapamycin, PI-103, and PKI-587 targeted different signaling events and induced different metabolic patterns in primary T-cells. Similar to rapamycin, in vivo administration of PI-103 and PKI-587 controlled effectively the immunological response against allogeneic skin graft. These results characterize specific regulatory mechanisms of dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors in T-cells and support their potential as a novel therapeutic option in transplantation. © 2017 Steunstichting ESOT.

  17. Cusps in K{sub L}{yields}3{pi} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissegger, M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstr. 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Fuhrer, A. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstr. 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)], E-mail: afuhrer@itp.unibe.ch; Gasser, J. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstr. 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Kubis, B.; Rusetsky, A. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2008-01-24

    The pion mass difference generates a pronounced cusp in K{yields}3{pi} decays, the strength of which is related to the {pi}{pi} S-wave scattering lengths. We apply an effective field theory framework developed earlier to evaluate the amplitudes for K{sub L}{yields}3{pi} decays in a systematic manner, where the strictures imposed by analyticity and unitarity are respected automatically. The amplitudes for the decay {eta}{yields}3{pi} are also given.

  18. A study of $CP$ violation in $B^\\mp \\rightarrow Dh^\\mp$ ($h=K,\\pi$) with the modes $D \\rightarrow K^\\mp \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0$, $D \\rightarrow \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ and $D \\rightarrow K^+K^-\\pi^0$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casanova Mohr, Raimon; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gastaldi, Ugo; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Ninci, Daniele; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Sterpka, Christopher Francis; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang

    2015-06-26

    An analysis of the decays of $B^\\mp \\rightarrow D K^\\mp$ and $B^\\mp \\rightarrow D \\pi^\\mp $ is presented in which the $D$ meson is reconstructed in the three-body final states $K^\\mp \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0$, $\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$ and $K^+ K^- \\pi^0$. Using data from LHCb corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0~fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions, measurements of several $CP$ observables are performed. First observations are obtained of the suppressed ADS decay $B^\\mp \\rightarrow [\\pi^\\mp K^\\pm \\pi^0]_D \\pi^\\mp$ and the quasi-GLW decay $B^\\mp \\rightarrow [K^+ K^- \\pi^0]_D \\pi^\\mp$. The results are interpreted in the context of the unitarity triangle angle $\\gamma$ and related parameters.

  19. LHCb sensitivity to sin(2$\\beta$) from the CP-asymmetry in B$^0$ $\\rightarrow$ J/$\\psi$($\\mu\\mu$)K$^0_S$($\\pi^+\\pi^-$) decays

    CERN Document Server

    Amato, S; Gandelman, M; Göbel, C; Mangiafave, N; Poss, S; Rodrigues, F

    2009-01-01

    This note presents an update of the B$^0$ $\\rightarrow$ J/$\\psi$($\\mu\\mu$)K$^0_S$($\\pi^+\\pi^-$) analysis in order to obtain the LHCb sensitivity to sin(2$/beta$). We present two selection criteria, one considering only lifetime unbiased cuts and another which includes lifetime biased cuts to reduce further the background contamination. For an integrated luminosity of 2 fb$^-1$ and after L0 trigger, we estimate a yield of 193k events for the B$^0$ $\\rightarrow$ J/$\\psi$($\\mu\\mu$)K$^0_S$ channel with the lifetime unbiased selection criteria, with a total background to signal ration 3.43. For the lifetime biased selection, the signal yield is 208k events and the background to signal ratio is to 0.63. The statistical sensitivity on sin(2$/beta$) is found to be 0.023 and 0.020 for the unbiased and biased selections, respectively.

  20. Hydrostatic Compress Force Enhances the Viability and Decreases the Apoptosis of Condylar Chondrocytes through Integrin-FAK-ERK/PI3K Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dandan; Kou, Xiaoxing; Jin, Jing; Xu, Taotao; Wu, Mengjie; Deng, Liquan; Fu, Lusi; Liu, Yi; Wu, Gang; Lu, Haiping

    2016-01-01

    Reduced mechanical stimuli in many pathological cases, such as hemimastication and limited masticatory movements, can significantly affect the metabolic activity of mandibular condylar chondrocytes and the growth of mandibles. However, the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena remain unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that integrin-focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-ERK (extracellular signal–regulated kinase)/PI3K (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase) signaling pathway mediated the cellular response of condylar chondrocytes to mechanical loading. Primary condylar chondrocytes were exposed to hydrostatic compressive forces (HCFs) of different magnitudes (0, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 kPa) for 2 h. We measured the viability, morphology, and apoptosis of the chondrocytes with different treatments as well as the gene, protein expression, and phosphorylation of mechanosensitivity-related molecules, such as integrin α2, integrin α5, integrin β1, FAK, ERK, and PI3K. HCFs could significantly increase the viability and surface area of condylar chondrocytes and decrease their apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. HCF of 250 kPa resulted in a 1.51 ± 0.02-fold increase of cell viability and reduced the ratio of apoptotic cells from 18.10% ± 0.56% to 7.30% ± 1.43%. HCFs could significantly enhance the mRNA and protein expression of integrin α2, integrin α5, and integrin β1 in a dose-dependent manner, but not ERK1, ERK2, or PI3K. Instead, HCF could significantly increase phosphorylation levels of FAK, ERK1/2, and PI3K in a dose-dependent manner. Cilengitide, the potent integrin inhibitor, could dose-dependently block such effects of HCFs. HCFs enhances the viability and decreases the apoptosis of condylar chondrocytes through the integrin-FAK-ERK/PI3K pathway. PMID:27827993

  1. Effects of SIRT1 gene knock-out via activation of SREBP2 protein-mediated PI3K/AKT signaling on osteoarthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Zeng, Hui; Lei, Ming; Xiao, De-Ming; Li, Wei; Yuan, Hao; Lin, Jian-Jing

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of SIRT1 gene knock-out on osteoarthritis in mice, and the possible roles of SREBP2 protein and the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in the effects. Mice were randomly divided into a normal group and a SIRT1 gene knock-out group (6 mice in each group). In these groups, one side of the knee anterior cruciate ligament was traversed, and the ipsilateral medial meniscus was cut to establish an osteoarthritis model of knee joint. The countralateral synovial bursa was cut out, serving as controls. The knee joint specimens were then divided into four groups: SIRT1 +/+ control group (group A, n=6); SIRT1 +/+ osteoarthritis group (group B, n=6); SIRT1 -/- control group (group C, n=6); SIRT1 -/- osteoarthritis group (group D, n=6). HE staining, Masson staining, Safranin O-Fast Green staining and Van Gieson staining were used to observe the morphological changes in the articular cartilage of the knee. Immunohistochemical staining was employed to detect the expression of SIRT1, SREBP2, VEGF, AKT, HMGCR and type II collagen proteins. SA-β-gal staining was utilized to evaluate chondrocyte aging. The results showed clear knee joint cartilage destruction and degeneration in the SIRT1 -/- osteoarthritis group. The tidal line was twisted and displaced anteriorly. Type II collagen was destroyed and distributed unevenly. Compared with the SIRT1 +/+ osteoarthritis group and SIRT1 -/- control group, SIRT1 protein expression was not obviously changed in the SIRT1 -/- osteoarthritis group (P>0.05), while the expression levels of the SREBP2, VEGF and HMGCR proteins were significantly increased (Pknock-out may aggravate cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis by activating the SREBP2 protein-mediated PI3K/AKT signalling pathway, suggesting that SIRT1 gene may play a protective role against osteoarthritis.

  2. TGFβ1-mediated PI3K/Akt and p38 MAP kinase dependent alternative splicing of fibronectin extra domain A in human podocyte culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madne, Tarunkumar Hemraj; Dockrell, Mark Edward Carl

    2018-04-30

    Alternative splicing is an important gene regulation process to distribute proteins in health and diseases. Extra Domain A+ Fibronectin (EDA+Fn) is an alternatively spliced form of fibronectin (Fn) protein, present in the extra cellular matrix (ECM) and a recognised marker of various pathologies. TGFβ1 has been shown to induce alternative splicing of EDA+Fn in many cell types. Podocytes are spectacular cell type and play a key role in filtration and synthesise ECM proteins in renal physiology and pathology. In our previous study we have demonstrated expression and alternative splicing of EDA+Fn in basal condition in human podocytes culture. TGFβ1 further induced the basal expression and alternative splicing of EDA+Fn through Alk5 receptor and SR proteins. In this study, we have investigated TGFβ1 mediated signalling involved in alternative splicing of EDA+Fn in human podocytes. We have performed western blotting to characterise the expression of the EDA+Fn protein and other signalling proteins and RT-PCR to look for signalling pathways involved in regulation of alternative splicing of EDA+Fn in conditionally immortalised human podocytes culture.We have used TGFβ1 as a stimulator and SB431542, SB202190 and LY294002 for inhibitory studies. In this work, we have demonstrated in human podocytes culture TGFβ1 2.5ng/ml induced phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8, Smad2 and Smad3 via the ALK5 receptor. TGFβ1 significantly induced the PI3K/Akt pathway and the PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitor LY294002 significantly downregulated basal as well as TGFβ1 induced alternative splicing of EDA+Fn in human podocytes. In addition to this, TGFβ1 significantly induced the p38 MAP kinase signalling pathway and p38 MAP kinase signalling pathway inhibitor SB202190 downregulated the TGFβ1-mediated alternative splicing of EDA+Fn in human podocytes. The results with PI3K and p38 MAP kinase signalling pathway suggest that inhibiting PI3K signalling pathway downregulated the basal alternative

  3. Observation of the suppressed ADS modes $B^\\pm \\to [\\pi^\\pm K^\\mp \\pi^+\\pi^-]_D K^\\pm$ and $B^\\pm \\to [\\pi^\\pm K^\\mp \\pi^+\\pi^-]_D \\pi^\\pm$

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Oyanguren Campos, M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lohn, S; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Mcnab, A; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of $B^{\\pm}\\to DK^{\\pm}$ and $B^{\\pm}\\to D\\pi^{\\pm}$ decays is presented where the $D$ meson is reconstructed in the four-body final state $K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp} \\pi^+ \\pi^-$. Using LHCb data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $1.0{\\rm \\,fb}^{-1}$, first observations are made of the suppressed ADS modes $B^{\\pm}\\to [\\pi^{\\pm} K^{\\mp}\\pi^+\\pi^-]_D K^{\\pm}$ and $B^{\\pm}\\to [\\pi^{\\pm} K^{\\mp} \\pi^+\\pi^- ]_D\\pi^{\\pm}$ with a significance of $5.1\\sigma$ and greater than $10\\sigma$, respectively. Measurements of $CP$ asymmetries and $CP$-conserving ratios of partial widths from this family of decays are also performed. The magnitude of the ratio between the suppressed and favoured $B^{\\pm}\\to DK^{\\pm}$ amplitudes is determined to be $r^K_B = 0.097 \\pm{0.011}$.

  4. Cadmium induces carcinogenesis in BEAS-2B cells through ROS-dependent activation of PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Lei; Poyil, Pratheeshkumar; Budhraja, Amit; Hitron, J. Andrew; Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biosciences (BK21 program), Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Cadmium has been widely used in industry and is known to be carcinogenic to humans. Although it is widely accepted that chronic exposure to cadmium increases the incidence of cancer, the mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced carcinogenesis are unclear. The main aim of this study was to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and the signal transduction pathways involved. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells to cadmium induced cell transformation, as evidenced by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and clonogenic assays. Chronic cadmium treatment also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of cadmium-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. In contrast, the cadmium-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion and migration were prevented by transfection with catalase, superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), or SOD2. In particular, chronic cadmium exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K, AKT, GSK-3β, and β-catenin and transfection with each of the above antioxidant enzymes markedly inhibited cadmium-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the cadmium-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. Moreover, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with cadmium-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest a direct involvement of ROS in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and implicate a role of AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling in this process. -- Highlights: ► Chronic exposure to cadmium induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. ► ROS involved in cadmium-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. ► Cadmium activates ROS-dependent AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin-mediated signaling. ► ROS

  5. Fisetin inhibits UVB-induced cutaneous inflammation and activation of PI3K/AKT/NFκB signaling pathways in SKH-1 hairless mice†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Harish Chandra; Athar, Mohammad; Elmets, Craig A.; Afaq, Farrukh

    2014-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation has been shown to induce inflammation, DNA damage, p53 mutations, and alterations in signaling pathways eventually leading to skin cancer. In the present study, we investigated whether fisetin reduces inflammatory responses and modulates PI3K/AKT/NFκB cell survival signaling pathways in UVB exposed SKH-1 hairless mouse skin. Mice were exposed to 180 mJ/cm2 of UVB radiation on alternate days for a total of seven exposures, and fisetin (250 and 500 nmol) was applied topically after 15 min of each UVB exposure. Fisetin treatment to UVB exposed mice resulted in decreased hyperplasia and reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells. Fisetin treatment also reduced inflammatory mediators such as COX-2, PGE2 as well as its receptors (EP1- EP4), and MPO activity. Furthermore, fisetin reduced the level of inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 in UVB exposed skin. Fisetin treatment also reduced cell proliferation markers as well as DNA damage as evidenced by increased expression of p53 and p21 proteins. Further studies revealed that fisetin inhibited UVB-induced expression of PI3K, phosphorylation of AKT, and activation of the NFκB signaling pathway in mouse skin. Overall, these data suggest that fisetin may be useful against UVB-induced cutaneous inflammation and DNA damage. PMID:25169110

  6. Fisetin inhibits UVB-induced cutaneous inflammation and activation of PI3K/AKT/NFκB signaling pathways in SKH-1 hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Harish Chandra; Athar, Mohammad; Elmets, Craig A; Afaq, Farrukh

    2015-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation has been shown to induce inflammation, DNA damage, p53 mutations and alterations in signaling pathways eventually leading to skin cancer. In this study, we investigated whether fisetin reduces inflammatory responses and modulates PI3K/AKT/NFκB cell survival signaling pathways in UVB-exposed SKH-1 hairless mouse skin. Mice were exposed to 180 mJ cm(-2) of UVB radiation on alternate days for a total of seven exposures, and fisetin (250 and 500 nmol) was applied topically after 15 min of each UVB exposure. Fisetin treatment to UVB-exposed mice resulted in decreased hyperplasia and reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells. Fisetin treatment also reduced inflammatory mediators such as COX-2, PGE2 as well as its receptors (EP1-EP4) and MPO activity. Furthermore, fisetin reduced the level of inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 in UVB-exposed skin. Fisetin treatment also reduced cell proliferation markers as well as DNA damage as evidenced by increased expression of p53 and p21 proteins. Further studies revealed that fisetin inhibited UVB-induced expression of PI3K, phosphorylation of AKT and activation of the NFκB signaling pathway in mouse skin. Overall, these data suggest that fisetin may be useful against UVB-induced cutaneous inflammation and DNA damage. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  7. Inhibition of spontaneous recovery of fear by mGluR5 after prolonged extinction training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chun Mao

    Full Text Available Fear behavior is vital for survival and involves learning contingent associations of non-threatening cues with aversive stimuli. In contrast, excessive levels of fear can be maladaptive and lead to anxiety disorders. Generally, extensive sessions of extinction training correlates with reduced spontaneous recovery. The molecular mechanisms underlying the long-term inhibition of fear recovery following repeated extinction training are not fully understood. Here we show that in rats, prolonged extinction training causes greater reduction in both fear-potentiated startle and spontaneous recovery. This effect was specifically blocked by metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5, but not by mGluR1 antagonists and by a protein synthesis inhibitor. Similar inhibition of memory recovery following prolonged extinction training was also observed in mice. In agreement with the instrumental role of mGluR5 in the prolonged inhibition of fear recovery, we found that FMR1-/- mice which exhibit enhanced mGluR5-mediated signaling exhibit lower spontaneous recovery of fear after extinction training than wild-type littermates. At the molecular level, we discovered that prolonged extinction training reversed the fear conditioning-induced increase in surface expression of GluR1, AMPA/NMDA ratio, postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95 and synapse-associated protein-97 (SAP97. Accordingly, delivery of Tat-GluR2(3Y, a synthetic peptide that blocks AMPA receptor endocytosis, inhibited prolonged extinction training-induced inhibition of fear recovery. Together, our results demonstrate that prolonged extinction training results in the mGluR5-dependent long-term inhibition of fear recovery. This effect may involve the degradation of original memory and may explain the beneficial effects of prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of phobias.

  8. Inhibition of spontaneous recovery of fear by mGluR5 after prolonged extinction training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Sheng-Chun; Chang, Chih-Hua; Wu, Chia-Chen; Orejarena, M Juliana; Orejanera, Maria Juliana; Manzoni, Olivier J; Gean, Po-Wu

    2013-01-01

    Fear behavior is vital for survival and involves learning contingent associations of non-threatening cues with aversive stimuli. In contrast, excessive levels of fear can be maladaptive and lead to anxiety disorders. Generally, extensive sessions of extinction training correlates with reduced spontaneous recovery. The molecular mechanisms underlying the long-term inhibition of fear recovery following repeated extinction training are not fully understood. Here we show that in rats, prolonged extinction training causes greater reduction in both fear-potentiated startle and spontaneous recovery. This effect was specifically blocked by metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), but not by mGluR1 antagonists and by a protein synthesis inhibitor. Similar inhibition of memory recovery following prolonged extinction training was also observed in mice. In agreement with the instrumental role of mGluR5 in the prolonged inhibition of fear recovery, we found that FMR1-/- mice which exhibit enhanced mGluR5-mediated signaling exhibit lower spontaneous recovery of fear after extinction training than wild-type littermates. At the molecular level, we discovered that prolonged extinction training reversed the fear conditioning-induced increase in surface expression of GluR1, AMPA/NMDA ratio, postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) and synapse-associated protein-97 (SAP97). Accordingly, delivery of Tat-GluR2(3Y), a synthetic peptide that blocks AMPA receptor endocytosis, inhibited prolonged extinction training-induced inhibition of fear recovery. Together, our results demonstrate that prolonged extinction training results in the mGluR5-dependent long-term inhibition of fear recovery. This effect may involve the degradation of original memory and may explain the beneficial effects of prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of phobias.

  9. Evidence for $\\pi K$ -atoms with DIRAC-II

    CERN Document Server

    Allkofer, Yves

    2008-01-01

    DIRAC-II is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN Proton Synchroton (PS) which has been designed to search for piK atoms, a bound state of a pi±K± pair, and measure their lifetime. These atoms are observed through an excess of low energetic piK pairs over the background, detected in the two spectrometer arms. This excess comes from the ionization of piK atoms in the target and can be related to their mean life. The piK S-wave scattering length combination |a1/2 - a3/2| (for isospin 1/2 and 3/2) can be related to the latter. The aim of the upgraded DIRAC-II experiment is a measurement of the scattering length combination |a1/2 - a3/2| with a precision of 5%. piK atoms have not been observed so far. The original DIRAC experiment was designed to measure the scattering lengths of pipi atoms. So far, close to 15 000 atoms have been detected, leading to a precision on |a0 - a2| which is better than 10%. In chiral perturbation theories (ChPT) the pipi scattering lengths have been calculated with 2% precision a...

  10. mTOR inhibition elicits a dramatic response in PI3K-dependent colon cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin A Deming

    Full Text Available The phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K signaling pathway is critical for multiple cellular functions including metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis, and is the most commonly altered pathway in human cancers. Recently, we developed a novel mouse model of colon cancer in which tumors are initiated by a dominant active PI3K (FC PIK3ca. The cancers in these mice are moderately differentiated invasive mucinous adenocarcinomas of the proximal colon that develop by 50 days of age. Interestingly, these cancers form without a benign intermediary or aberrant WNT signaling, indicating a non-canonical mechanism of tumorigenesis. Since these tumors are dependent upon the PI3K pathway, we investigated the potential for tumor response by the targeting of this pathway with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor. A cohort of FC PIK3ca mice were treated with rapamycin at a dose of 6 mg/kg/day or placebo for 14 days. FDG dual hybrid PET/CT imaging demonstrated a dramatic tumor response in the rapamycin arm and this was confirmed on necropsy. The tumor tissue remaining after treatment with rapamycin demonstrated increased pERK1/2 or persistent phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (pS6, indicating potential resistance mechanisms. This unique model will further our understanding of human disease and facilitate the development of therapeutics through pharmacologic screening and biomarker identification.

  11. Antitumor efficacy of PKI-587, a highly potent dual PI3K/mTOR kinase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Robert; Feldberg, Larry R; Lucas, Judy; Chaudhary, Inder; Dehnhardt, Christoph; Santos, Efren Delos; Chen, Zecheng; dos Santos, Osvaldo; Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Venkatesan, Aranapakam; Hollander, Irwin

    2011-05-15

    The aim of this study was to show preclinical efficacy and clinical development potential of PKI-587, a dual phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/mTOR inhibitor. In vitro class 1 PI3K enzyme and human tumor cell growth inhibition assays and in vivo five tumor xenograft models were used to show efficacy. In vitro, PKI-587 potently inhibited class I PI3Ks (IC(50) vs. PI3K-α = 0.4 nmol/L), PI3K-α mutants, and mTOR. PKI-587 inhibited growth of 50 diverse human tumor cell lines at IC(50) values of less than 100 nmol/L. PKI-587 suppressed phosphorylation of PI3K/mTOR effectors (e.g., Akt), and induced apoptosis in human tumor cell lines with elevated PI3K/mTOR signaling. MDA-MB-361 [breast; HER2(+), PIK3CA mutant (E545K)] was particularly sensitive to this effect, with cleaved PARP, an apoptosis marker, induced by 30 nmol/L PKI-587 at 4 hours. In vivo, PKI-587 inhibited tumor growth in breast (MDA-MB-361, BT474), colon (HCT116), lung (H1975), and glioma (U87MG) xenograft models. In MDA-MB-361 tumors, PKI-587 (25 mg/kg, single dose i.v.) suppressed Akt phosphorylation [at threonine(T)308 and serine(S)473] for up to 36 hours, with cleaved PARP (cPARP) evident up to 18 hours. PKI-587 at 25 mg/kg (once weekly) shrank large (∼1,000 mm(3)) MDA-MB-361 tumors and suppressed tumor regrowth. Tumor regression correlated with suppression of phosphorylated Akt in the MDA-MB-361 model. PKI-587 also caused regression in other tumor models, and efficacy was enhanced when given in combination with PD0325901 (MEK 1/2 inhibitor), irinotecan (topoisomerase I inhibitor), or HKI-272 (neratinib, HER2 inhibitor). Significant antitumor efficacy and a favorable pharmacokinetic/safety profile justified phase 1 clinical evaluation of PKI-587. ©2011 AACR.

  12. Comprehensive behavioral study of mGluR3 knockout mice: implication in schizophrenia related endophenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously performed systematic association studies of glutamate receptor gene family members with schizophrenia, and found positive associations of polymorphisms in the GRM3 (a gene of metabotropic glutamate receptor 3: mGluR3) with the disorder. Physiological roles of GRM3 in brain functions and its functional roles in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia remain to be resolved. Results We generated mGluR3 knockout (KO) mice and conducted comprehensive behavioral analyses. KO mice showed hyperactivity in the open field, light/dark transition, and 24-hour home cage monitoring tests, impaired reference memory for stressful events in the Porsolt forced swim test, impaired contextual memory in cued and contextual fear conditioning test, and impaired working memory in the T-Maze forced alternation task test. Hyperactivity and impaired working memory are known as endophenotypes of schizophrenia. We examined long-term synaptic plasticity by assessing long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region in the hippocampi of KO and wild-type (WT) mice. We observed no differences in the amplitude of LTP between the two genotypes, suggesting that mGluR3 is not essential for LTP in the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus. As hyperactivity is typically associated with increased dopaminergic transmission, we performed in vivo microdialysis measurements of extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens of KO and WT mice. We observed enhancements in the methamphetamine (MAP)-induced release of dopamine in KO mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that a disturbance in the glutamate-dopamine interaction may be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia-like behavior, such as hyperactivity in mGluR3 KO mice. PMID:24758191

  13. Differential Dopamine Regulation of Ca2+ Signaling and Its Timing Dependence in the Nucleus Accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Immani Swapna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine action in the nucleus accumbens (NAc is thought to drive appetitive behavior and Pavlovian reward learning. However, it remains controversial how dopamine achieves these behavioral effects by regulating medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs of the NAc, especially on a behaviorally relevant timescale. Metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR-induced Ca2+ signaling dependent on the Ca2+- releasing messenger inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 plays a critical role in controlling neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity. Here, we show that transient dopamine application facilitates mGluR/IP3-induced Ca2+ signals within a time window of ∼2–10 s in a subpopulation of MSNs in the NAc core. Dopamine facilitation of IP3-induced Ca2+ signaling is mediated by D1 dopamine receptors. In dopamine-insensitive MSNs, activation of A2A adenosine receptors causes enhancement of IP3-evoked Ca2+ signals, which is reversed by D2 dopamine receptor activation. These results show that dopamine differentially regulates Ca2+ signaling on the order of seconds in two distinct MSN subpopulations.

  14. Measurement of angular and $C\\!P$ asymmetries in $D^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $D^0 \\to K^+K^-\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Aidala, Christine Angela; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albicocco, Pietro; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Alfonso Albero, Alejandro; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Arzymatov, Kenenbek; Aslanides, Elie; Atzeni, Michele; Audurier, Benjamin; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Beliy, Nikita; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Berninghoff, Daniel; Bertholet, Emilie; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bhasin, Srishti; Bhom, Jihyun; Bian, Lingzhu; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørn, Mikkel; Blago, Michele Piero; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blusk, Steven; Bobulska, Dana; Bocci, Valerio; Boente Garcia, Oscar; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brodski, Michael; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brossa Gonzalo, Arnau; Brundu, Davide; Buchanan, Emma; Buonaura, Annarita; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Byczynski, Wiktor; Cadeddu, Sandro; Cai, Hao; Calabrese, Roberto; Calladine, Ryan; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Chapman, Matthew George; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chekalina, Viktoriia; Chen, Chen; Chen, Shanzhen; Chitic, Stefan-Gabriel; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Ciambrone, Paolo; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Coelho, Joao A B; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Colombo, Tommaso; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Da Silva, Cesar Luiz; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; Danilina, Anna; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Del Buono, Luigi; Delaney, Blaise; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Desse, Fabrice; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Didenko, Sergey; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Douglas, Lauren; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Durante, Paolo; Durham, John Matthew; Dutta, Deepanwita; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Ene, Alexandru; Escher, Stephan; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fazzini, Davide; Federici, Luca; Fernandez Declara, Placido; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Lopes, Lino; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Färber, Christian; Féo Pereira Rivello Carvalho, Mauricio; Gabriel, Emmy; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gan, Yuyue; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; Garcia Plana, Beatriz; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Gerstel, Dawid; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Grabowski, Jascha Peter; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruber, Lukas; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gu, Chenxi; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hancock, Thomas Henry; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Thomas; Hasse, Christoph; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Hecker, Malte; Heinicke, Kevin; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hidalgo Charman, Raoul; Hill, Donal; Hilton, Martha; Hopchev, Plamen Hristov; Hu, Wenhua; Huang, Wenqian; Huard, Zachary; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Ibis, Philipp; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Ivshin, Kuzma; Jacobsson, Richard; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kazeev, Nikita; Kecke, Matthieu; Keizer, Floris; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kim, Kyung Eun; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Kopecna, Renata; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kostiuk, Igor; Kotriakhova, Sofia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreps, Michal; Kress, Felix Johannes; Krokovny, Pavel; Krupa, Wojciech; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lancierini, Davide; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Pei-Rong; Li, Tenglin; Li, Zhuoming; Liang, Xixin; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Lisovskyi, Vitalii; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Loi, Angelo; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lovell, George Holger; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Macko, Vladimir; Mackowiak, Patrick; Maddrell-Mander, Samuel; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Maisuzenko, Dmitrii; Majewski, Maciej Witold; Malde, Sneha; Malecki, Bartosz; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Marangotto, Daniele; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Marshall, Phillip John; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Massafferri, André; Materok, Marcel; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurice, Emilie; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Mead, James Vincent; Meadows, Brian; Meaux, Cedric; Meier, Frank; Meinert, Nis; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Millard, Edward James; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Minzoni, Luca; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Mombächer, Titus; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morello, Gianfranco; Morello, Michael Joseph; Morgunova, Olga; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Murphy, Colm Harold; Murray, Donal; Mödden, Antje; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nanut, Tara; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nogay, Alla; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Ossowska, Anna; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Pajero, Tommaso; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Panshin, Gennady; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Pereima, Dmitrii; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petrucci, Stefano; Petruzzo, Marco; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pietrzyk, Guillaume; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pili, Martina; Pinci, Davide; Pinzino, Jacopo; Pisani, Flavio; Piucci, Alessio; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Playfer, Stephen; Plews, Jonathan; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polukhina, Natalia; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Pullen, Hannah Louise; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Qin, Jia-Jia; Quagliani, Renato; Quintana, Boris; Rachwal, Bartlomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Ravonel Salzgeber, Melody; Reboud, Meril; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Reiss, Florian; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Ren, Zan; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rinnert, Kurt; Robbe, Patrick; Robert, Arnaud; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Roehrken, Markus; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Vidal, Joan; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Gras, Cristina; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarpis, Gediminas; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saur, Miroslav; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepulveda, Eduardo Enrique; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seuthe, Alex; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shmanin, Evgenii; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smeaton, John Gordon; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Mark; Soares, Marcelo; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stepanova, Margarita; Stevens, Holger; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Strokov, Sergey; Sun, Jiayin; Sun, Liang; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szumlak, Tomasz; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tang, Zhipeng; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Tou, Da Yu; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tuci, Giulia; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Usachov, Andrii; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagner, Alexander; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Veronesi, Michele; Veronika, Naomi; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitkovskiy, Arseniy; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Wang, Mengzhen; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Zhenzi; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Weisser, Constantin; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Ifan; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xiao, Dong; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Ao; Xu, Menglin; Xu, Qingnian; Xu, Zehua; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yeomans, Lauren Emma; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zonneveld, Jennifer Brigitta; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The first measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry of the dimuon pair ($A_{FB}$), the triple-product asymmetry ($A_{2\\phi}$), and the charge-parity-conjugation asymmetry ($A_{CP}$), in $D^0\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $D^0\\to K^+K^-\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decays are reported. They are performed using data from proton-proton collisions collected with the LHCb experiment from 2011 to 2016, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 5 fb$^{-1}$. The asymmetries are measured to be \\begin{align*} A_{FB}(D^0\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^-) &= (\\phantom{-}3.3\\pm3.7\\pm0.6)\\%,\\\\ A_{2\\phi}(D^0\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^-)&= (-0.6\\pm3.7\\pm0.6)\\%,\\\\ A_{CP}(D^0\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^-) &= (\\phantom{-}4.9\\pm3.8\\pm0.7)\\%,\\\\ A_{FB}(D^0\\to K^+K^-\\mu^+\\mu^-) &= (0\\pm11\\pm2)\\%,\\\\ A_{2\\phi}(D^0\\to K^+K^-\\mu^+\\mu^-)&= (9\\pm11\\pm1)\\%,\\\\ A_{CP}(D^0\\to K^+K^-\\mu^+\\mu^-) &= (0\\pm11\\pm2)\\%, \\end{align*} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The asymmetries are also measured as a function of t...

  15. Species differences in mGluR5 binding sites in mammalian central nervous system determined using in vitro binding with [18F]F-PEB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Shil; Hamill, Terence G.; Connolly, Brett; Jagoda, Elaine; Li Wenping; Gibson, Raymond E.

    2007-01-01

    Binding of [ 18 F]3-fluoro-5-[(pyridin-3-yl)ethynyl]benzonitrile ([ 18 F]F-PEB) was evaluated in membranes and tissue sections prepared from rat, rhesus and human brain. Saturation equilibrium binding experiments with frozen brain cortex and caudate-putamen membranes of young adult rhesus and human and with cortex and striatum from rat yielded data indicative of specific high-affinity binding (K D =0.1-0.15 nM, n≥3) to a saturable site previously shown to be metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5; Patel S, Ndubizu O, Hamill T, Chaudhary A, Burns HD, Hargreaves RJ, Gibson RE. Screening cascade and development of potential positron emission tomography radiotracers for mGluR5: in vitro and in vivo characterization. Mol Imaging Biol 2005;7:314-323). High-affinity binding of [ 18 F]F-PEB was also detected in cerebellum membranes from rat, rhesus and human. The density of binding sites (B max ) measured using [ 18 F]F-PEB followed the rank order cortex∼caudate-putamen/striatum>cerebellum for all three species, with the cerebellum B max being significantly lower than that observed in the other regions. Receptor autoradiography studies in tissue sections confirmed that the regional distribution of [ 18 F]F-PEB in mammalian central nervous system is consistent with that of mGluR5 and that a small but specific mGluR5 signal is observed in rhesus and human cerebellum. A small and quantifiable specific signal could also be observed in rat cerebellum using this radiotracer. Immunohistochemical analysis in brain sections revealed a rank order of staining in rhesus and human brain of cortex∼caudate-putamen>cerebellum. Rat brain immunohistochemistry followed the same rank order, although the staining in the cerebellum was significantly lower. Using a 'no-wash' wipe assay, the development of a specific signal within 20 min of incubation of tissue brain sections (>60% in the cortex and striatum; 36-49% in the cerebellum) from all three species confirmed previous in vivo

  16. Imp2 regulates GBM progression by activating IGF2/PI3K/Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Qingchun; Wang, Lijun; Yu, Fengbo; Gao, Haijun; Lei, Ting; Li, Peiwen; Liu, Pengfei; Zheng, Xu; Hu, Xitong; Chen, Yong; Jiang, Zhenfeng; Sayari, Arash J; Shen, Jia; Huang, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas multiforme (GBM) are the most frequently occurring malignant brain cancers. Treatment for GBM consists of surgical resection and subsequent adjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Despite this, GBM patient survival is limited to 12-15 months, and researchers are continually trying to develop improved therapy options. Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (Imp2) is known to be upregulated in many cancers and is known to regulate the signaling activity of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2). However, relatively little is known about its role in malignant development of GBM. In this study, we first found Imp2 is upregulated in GBM tissues by using clinical samples and public database search. Studies with loss and gain of Imp2 expression in in vitro GBM cell culture system demonstrated the role of Imp2 in promoting GBM cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Additionally, our results show that Imp2 regulates the activity of IGF2, which further activates PI3K/Akt signaling, thereby to promote GBM malignancy. Inhibition of Imp2 was also found to sensitize GBM to temozolomide treatment. These observations add to the current knowledge of GBM biology, and may prove useful in development of more effective GBM therapy.

  17. Simple description of the Jsup(P)=1/sup +/K/sup + -/. pi. /sup +/. pi. /sup -/ system in the reactions K/sup + -/p. -->. K/sup + -/. pi. /sup +/. pi. /sup -/p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnegie, R K; Cashmore, R J; Davier, M; Dunwoodie, W M; Lasinski, T A; Leith, D W.G.S.; Williams, S H [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Calif. (USA)

    1977-09-12

    A model in which Q/sub 1/ and Q/sub 2/ resonance contributions add coherently to a Gaussian background is shown to reproduce the mass dependence of the Jsup(P)=1/sup +/K*..pi.. and rhoK partial waves in K/sup + -/p..-->..K/sup + -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/p at 13 GeV/c. Through a fit to the data, the mass and total width for Q/sub 1/ are found to be m=1289+-3+-(25) MeV, GAMMA=150+-9(+-70) MeV and for Q/sub 2/, m=1404+-3(+-10) MeV, GAMMA=142+-4(+-15) MeV, where estimated systematic errors are given in parentheses. While a significant background is required for the 1/sup +/K*..pi.. system, none is needed for the 1/sup +/rhoK system.

  18. CXCL12 gene silencing down-regulates metastatic potential via blockage of MAPK/PI3K/AP-1 signaling pathway in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Su, H; Yu, B; Guo, T; Gong, Z; Qi, J; Zhao, X; Du, J

    2018-01-05

    To investigate the effect of CXCL12 gene silencing on proliferation,invasion, angiogenesis and the relationship of MAPK/PI3K/AP-1 signaling pathway in colon cancer cells. RT-PCR and Western-blot were used to detect the expression of CXCL12 mRNA and protein in four colon cancer cell lines. Human colon cancer cells were transfected with CXCL12 siRNA carrying by Lipofectamine 2000. The expression of CXCL12 protein was confirmed by immunoblotting. WST-1, invasion and angiogenesis assay were used to examine the effect on proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in colon cancer cells after CXCL12 siRNA silence, respectively. The phosphorylation of MAPK/PI3K/AP-1 protein levels was detected by Western blotting in CXCL12 siRNA suppression DLD-1 cell. CXCL12 mRNA and proteins were only expressed in DLD-1 colon cancer cell lines. CXCL12 siRNA were transfected into DLD-1 cells, the expression CXCL12 proteins was significantly inhibited (P colon cancer cell. The silencing CXCL12 gene significantly inhibits the proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis ability of some types colon carcinoma cells through down-regulation of MAPK/PI3K/AP-1 signaling pathway.

  19. E2/ER β Enhances Calcineurin Protein Degradation and PI3K/Akt/MDM2 Signal Transduction to Inhibit ISO-Induced Myocardial Cell Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Ho Lin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Secretion of multifunctional estrogen and its receptor has been widely considered as the reason for markedly higher frequency of heart disease in men than in women. 17β-Estradiol (E2, for instance, has been reported to prevent development of cardiac apoptosis via activation of estrogen receptors (ERs. In addition, protein phosphatase such as protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 and calcineurin (PP2B are also involved in cardiac hypertrophy and cell apoptosis signaling. However, the mechanism by which E2/ERβ suppresses apoptosis is not fully understood, and the role of protein phosphatase in E2/ERβ action also needs further investigation. In this study, we observed that E2/ERβ inhibited isoproterenol (ISO-induced myocardial cell apoptosis, cytochrome c release and downstream apoptotic markers. Moreover, we found that E2/ERβ blocks ISO-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells through the enhancement of calcineurin protein degradation through PI3K/Akt/MDM2 signaling pathway. Our results suggest that supplementation with estrogen and/or overexpression of estrogen receptor β gene may prove to be effective means to treat stress-induced myocardial damage.

  20. First observation of $D^0- \\bar D^0$ oscillations in $D^0 \\to K^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays and measurement of the associated coherence parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hongming, Li; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusardi, Nicola; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-06-17

    Charm meson oscillations are observed in a time-dependent analysis of the ratio of $D^0\\to K^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ to $D^0\\to K^-\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+$ decay rates, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3.0\\,{\\rm fb}^{-1}$ recorded by the LHCb experiment. The measurements presented are sensitive to the phase-space averaged ratio of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed to Cabibbo-favoured amplitudes $r_{D}^{K3\\pi}$ and the product of the coherence factor $R_{D}^{K3\\pi}$ and a charm mixing parameter $y^{'}_{K3\\pi}$. The constraints measured are $r_{D}^{K3\\pi}=(5.67 \\pm 0.12)\\times10^{-2}$, which is the most precise determination to date, and $R_{D}^{K3\\pi} \\cdot y^{'}_{K3\\pi} = (0.3 \\pm 1.8)\\times 10^{-3}$, which provides useful input for determinations of the CP-violating phase $\\gamma$ in $B^\\pm \\to D K^\\pm, D \\to K^\\mp\\pi^\\pm\\pi^\\mp\\pi^\\pm$ decays. The analysis also gives the most precise measurement of the $D^0\\to K^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ branching fraction, and the first observation of $D^0-\\bar D^0$ oscillations...

  1. PI3K activation is associated with intracellular sodium/iodide symporter protein expression in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knostman, Katherine AB; McCubrey, James A; Morrison, Carl D; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Capen, Charles C; Jhiang, Sissy M

    2007-01-01

    The sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) is a membrane glycoprotein mediating active iodide uptake in the thyroid gland and is the molecular basis for radioiodide imaging and therapeutic ablation of thyroid carcinomas. NIS is expressed in the lactating mammary gland and in many human breast tumors, raising interest in similar use for diagnosis and treatment. However, few human breast tumors have clinically evident iodide uptake ability. We previously identified PI3K signaling as important in NIS upregulation in transgenic mouse models of breast cancer, and the PI3K pathway is commonly activated in human breast cancer. NIS expression, subcellular localization, and function were analyzed in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and MCF-7 cells stably or transiently expressing PI3K p110alpha subunit using Western blot of whole cell lysate, cell surface biotinylation Western blot and immunofluorescence, and radioiodide uptake assay, respectively. NIS localization was determined in a human breast cancer tissue microarray using immunohistochemical staining (IHC) and was correlated with pre-existing pAkt IHC data. Statistical analysis consisted of Student's t-test (in vitro studies) or Fisher's Exact Test (in vivo correlational studies). In this study, we demonstrate that PI3K activation in MCF-7 human mammary carcinoma cells leads to expression of underglycosylated NIS lacking cell surface trafficking necessary for iodide uptake ability. PI3K activation also appears to interfere with cell surface trafficking of exogenous NIS as well as all-trans retinoic acid-induced endogenous NIS. A correlation between NIS expression and upregulation of PI3K signaling was found in a human breast cancer tissue microarray. Thus, the PI3K pathway likely plays a major role in the discordance between NIS expression and iodide uptake in breast cancer patients. Further study is warranted to realize the application of NIS-mediated radioiodide ablation in breast cancer

  2. Role of GSK-3β in Regulation of Canonical Wnt/β-catenin Signaling and PI3-K/Akt Oncogenic Pathway in Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shelly; Ghanghas, Preety; Rana, Chandan; Sanyal, S N

    2017-08-09

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are emerging as novel chemopreventive agents because of their ability in blocking cellular proliferation, and thereby tumor development, and also by promoting apoptosis. GSK-3β, a serine threonine kinase and a negative regulator of the oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, plays a critical role in the regulation of oncogenesis. Celecoxib and etoricoxib, the two cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective NSAIDs, and Diclofenac, a preferential COX-2 inhibitory NSAID, had shown uniformly the chemopreventive and anti-neoplastic effects in the early stage of colon cancer by promoting apoptosis as well as an over-expression of GSK-3β while down-regulating the PI3-K/Akt oncogenic pathway.

  3. PI3K-independent AKT activation in cancers: a treasure trove for novel therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Kiran; Mahajan, Nupam P

    2012-09-01

    AKT/PKB serine threonine kinase, a critical signaling molecule promoting cell growth and survival pathways, is frequently dysregulated in many cancers. Although phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K), a lipid kinase, is well characterized as a major regulator of AKT activation in response to a variety of ligands, recent studies highlight a diverse group of tyrosine (Ack1/TNK2, Src, PTK6) and serine/threonine (TBK1, IKBKE, DNAPKcs) kinases that activate AKT directly to promote its pro-proliferative signaling functions. While some of these alternate AKT activating kinases respond to growth factors, others respond to inflammatory and genotoxic stimuli. A common theme emerging from these studies is that aberrant or hyperactivation of these alternate kinases is often associated with malignancy. Consequently, evaluating the use of small molecular inhibitors against these alternate AKT activating kinases at earlier stages of cancer therapy may overcome the pressing problem of drug resistance surfacing especially in patients treated with PI3K inhibitors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cusps in K->3{pi} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colangelo, G. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstr. 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Gasser, J. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstr. 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Kubis, B. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Rusetsky, A. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)]. E-mail: rusetsky@itkp.uni-bonn.de

    2006-07-06

    pion mass difference generates a pronounced cusp in K->3{pi} decays. As has recently been pointed out by Cabibbo and Isidori, an accurate measurement of the cusp may allow one to pin down the S-wave {pi}{pi} scattering lengths to high precision. Here, we present and illustrate an effective field theory framework that allows one to determine the structure of this cusp in a straightforward manner. The strictures imposed by analyticity and unitarity are respected automatically.

  5. A measurement of the ratio of branching fractions: $\\frac{\\mathcal{B}(B^{\\pm}\\rightarrow D K^{\\pm})}{\\mathcal{B}(B^{\\pm}\\rightarrow D\\pi^{\\pm})}$ for $D\\rightarrow K\\pi$, $KK$, $K\\pi\\pi\\pi$ and $K^0_S\\pi\\pi$

    CERN Document Server

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Using the 36.5~pb$^{-1}$ of data collected by the LHCb experiment in 2010, the ratio of two $B_u$ hadronic branching fractions: ${\\cal B}(B^{\\pm}\\rightarrow D K^{\\pm})\\ /\\ {\\cal B}(B^{\\pm}\\rightarrow D \\pi^{\\pm})$ is measured for events in which the $D$ meson is reconstructed in one of four final states. In the Cabibbo-favoured decays $D^0\\rightarrow K^{-}\\pi^{+}$ and $D^{0}\\rightarrow K^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}$, this ratio is measured as $(6.30\\pm0.38\\pm0.40)\\%$. It is determined to be $(9.31\\pm1.89\\pm0.53)\\%$ in the $CP$ eigenstate mode $D\\rightarrow K^{+} K^{-}$ and $(12\\,^{+6}_{-5}\\pm1)\\%$ in the $D\\rightarrow K^0_{\\rm\\scriptscriptstyle S}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ channel. From this work, two observables are measured: \\begin{eqnarray*} R_{CP+} &=& 1.48 \\pm 0.31 (stat.) \\pm 0.12 (syst.)\\\\ A_{CP+} &=& 0.07 \\pm 0.18 (stat.) \\pm 0.07 (syst.) \\end{eqnarray*}

  6. MiR-20a Induces Cell Radioresistance by Activating the PTEN/PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yuqin; Zheng, Lin; Ding, Yi; Li, Qi; Wang, Rong; Liu, Tongxin; Sun, Quanquan; Yang, Hua; Peng, Shunli; Wang, Wei; Chen, Longhua

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of miR-20a in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell radioresistance, which may reveal potential strategies to improve treatment. Methods and Materials: The expression of miR-20a and PTEN were detected in HCC cell lines and paired primary tissues by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cell radiation combined with colony formation assays was administrated to discover the effect of miR-20a on radiosensitivity. Bioinformatics prediction and luciferase assay were used to identify the target of miR-20a. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 was used to inhibit phosphorylation of Akt, to verify whether miR-20a affects HCC cell radioresistance through activating the PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway. Results: MiR-20a levels were increased in HCC cell lines and tissues, whereas PTEN was inversely correlated with it. Overexpression of miR-20a in Bel-7402 and SMMC-7721 cells enhances their resistance to the effect of ionizing radiation, and the inhibition of miR-20a in HCCLM3 and QGY-7701 cells sensitizes them to it. PTEN was identified as a direct functional target of miR-20a for the induction of radioresistance. Overexpression of miR-20a activated the PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Additionally, the kinase inhibitor LY294002 could reverse the effect of miR-20a–induced radioresistance. Conclusion: MiR-20a induces HCC cell radioresistance by activating the PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway, which suggests that miR-20a/PTEN/PI3K/Akt might represent a target of investigation for developing effective therapeutic strategies against HCC

  7. First determination of the $CP$ content of $D \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and updated determination of the $CP$ contents of $D \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ and $D \\to K^+K^-\\pi^0$

    CERN Document Server

    Malde, S; Wilkinson, G; Naik, P; Prouve, C; Rademacker, J; Libby, J; Nayak, M; Gershon, T; Briere, R A

    2015-01-01

    Quantum-correlated $\\psi(3770) \\to D\\bar{D}$ decays collected by the CLEO-c experiment are used to perform a first measurement of $F_+^{4\\pi}$, the fractional $CP$-even content of the self-conjugate decay $D \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$, obtaining a value of $0.737 \\pm 0.028$. An important input to the measurement comes from the use of $D \\to K^0_{\\rm S}\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $D \\to K^0_{\\rm L}\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays to tag the signal mode. This same technique is applied to the channels $D \\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ and $D \\to K^+K^-\\pi^0$, yielding $F_+^{\\pi\\pi\\pi^0} = 1.014 \\pm 0.045 \\pm 0.022$ and $F_+^{KK\\pi^0} = 0.734 \\pm 0.106 \\pm 0.054$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. These measurements are consistent with those of an earlier analysis, based on $CP$-eigenstate tags, and can be combined to give values of $F_+^{\\pi\\pi\\pi^0} = 0.973 \\pm 0.017$ and $F_+^{KK\\pi^0} = 0.732 \\pm 0.055$. The results will enable the three modes to be included in a model-independent manner in measurements of the ...

  8. PI3K pathway activation results in low efficacy of both trastuzumab and lapatinib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Leiping; Hu, Xichun; Zhang, Qunling; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Si; Guo, Haiyi; Jia, Zhen; Wang, Biyun; Shao, Zhimin; Wang, Zhonghua

    2011-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is the most crucial ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family member in HER2-positive (refered to HER2-overexpressing) breast cancer which are dependent on or 'addictive' to the Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. HER2-related target drugs trastuzumab and lapatinib have been the foundation of treatment of HER2--positive breast cancer. This study was designed to explore the relationship between PI3K pathway activation and the sensitivity to lapatinib in HER2--positive metastatic breast cancer patients pretreated with anthracyclins, taxanes and trastuzumab. Sixty-seven HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients were recruited into a global lapatinib Expanded Access Program and 57 patients have primary tumor specimens available for determination of PI3K pathway status. PTEN status was determined by immunohistochemical staining and PIK3CA mutations were detected via PCR sequencing. All patients were treated with lapatinib 1250 mg/day continuously and capecitabine 1000 mg/m 2 twice daily on a 2-week-on and 1-week-off schedule until disease progression, death, withdrawal of informed consent, or intolerable toxicity. PIK3CA mutations and PTEN loss were detected in 12.3% (7/57) and 31.6% (18/57) of the patients, respectively. Twenty-two patients with PI3K pathway activation (defined as PIK3CA mutation and/or PTEN expression loss) had a lower clinical benefit rate (36.4% versus 68.6%, P = 0.017) and a lower overall response rate (9.1% versus 31.4%, P = 0.05), when compared with the 35 patients with no activation. A retrospective analysis of first trastuzumab-containing regimen treatment data showed that PI3K pathway activation correlated with a shorter median progression-free survival (4.5 versus 9.0 months, P = 0.013). PIK3CA mutations occur more frequently in elder patients for HER2-positive breast cancer. PIK3CA mutations and PTEN loss are not mutually exclusive. PI3K pathway activation resulting

  9. Apoptosis Induction of Human Prostate Carcinoma DU145 Cells by Diallyl Disulfide via Modulation of JNK and PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathways

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    Young Hyun Yoo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Diallyl disulfide (DADS, a sulfur compound derived from garlic, has various biological properties, such as anticancer, antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the mechanisms of action underlying the compound's anticancer activity have not been fully elucidated. In this study, the apoptotic effects of DADS were investigated in DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells. Our results showed that DADS markedly inhibited the growth of the DU145 cells by induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was accompanied by modulation of Bcl-2 and inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP family proteins, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ΔΨm and proteolytic activation of caspases. We also found that the expression of death-receptor 4 (DR4 and Fas ligand (FasL proteins was increased and that the level of intact Bid proteins was down-regulated by DADS. Moreover, treatment with DADS induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, including extracellular-signal regulating kinase (ERK, p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK. A specific JNK inhibitor, SP600125, significantly blocked DADS-induced-apoptosis, whereas inhibitors of the ERK (PD98059 and p38 MAPK (SB203580 had no effect. The induction of apoptosis was also accompanied by inactivation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt and the PI3K inhibitor LY29004 significantly increased DADS-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence demonstrating that the proapoptotic effect of DADS is mediated through the activation of JNK and the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in DU145 cells.

  10. Thrombopoietin/MPL participates in initiating and maintaining RUNX1-ETO acute myeloid leukemia via PI3K/AKT signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulikkan, John Anto; Madera, Dmitri; Xue, Liting; Bradley, Paul; Landrette, Sean Francis; Kuo, Ya-Huei; Abbas, Saman; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Valk, Peter; Castilla, Lucio Hernán

    2012-07-26

    Oncogenic mutations in components of cytokine signaling pathways elicit ligand-independent activation of downstream signaling, enhancing proliferation and survival in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene, MPL, a homodimeric receptor activated by thrombopoietin (THPO), is mutated in myeloproliferative disorders but rarely in AML. Here we show that wild-type MPL expression is increased in a fraction of human AML samples expressing RUNX1-ETO, a fusion protein created by chromosome translocation t(8;21), and that up-regulation of Mpl expression in mice induces AML when coexpressed with RUNX1-ETO. The leukemic cells are sensitive to THPO, activating survival and proliferative responses. Mpl expression is not regulated by RUNX1-ETO in mouse hematopoietic progenitors or leukemic cells. Moreover, we find that activation of PI3K/AKT but not ERK/MEK pathway is a critical mediator of the MPL-directed antiapoptotic function in leukemic cells. Hence, this study provides evidence that up-regulation of wild-type MPL levels promotes leukemia development and maintenance through activation of the PI3K/AKT axis, and suggests that inhibitors of this axis could be effective for treatment of MPL-positive AML.

  11. Selective Disruption of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5-Homer Interactions Mimics Phenotypes of Fragile X Syndrome in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weirui; Molinaro, Gemma; Collins, Katie A; Hays, Seth A; Paylor, Richard; Worley, Paul F; Szumlinski, Karen K; Huber, Kimberly M

    2016-02-17

    Altered function of the Gq-coupled, Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors, specifically mGlu5, is implicated in multiple mouse models of autism and intellectual disability. mGlu5 dysfunction has been most well characterized in the fragile X syndrome mouse model, the Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mouse, where pharmacological and genetic reduction of mGlu5 reverses many phenotypes. mGlu5 is less associated with its scaffolding protein Homer in Fmr1 KO mice, and restoration of mGlu5-Homer interactions by genetic deletion of a short, dominant negative of Homer, H1a, rescues many phenotypes of Fmr1 KO mice. These results suggested that disruption of mGlu5-Homer leads to phenotypes of FXS. To test this idea, we examined mice with a knockin mutation of mGlu5 (F1128R; mGlu5(R/R)) that abrogates binding to Homer. Although FMRP levels were normal, mGlu5(R/R) mice mimicked multiple phenotypes of Fmr1 KO mice, including reduced mGlu5 association with the postsynaptic density, enhanced constitutive mGlu5 signaling to protein synthesis, deficits in agonist-induced translational control, protein synthesis-independent LTD, neocortical hyperexcitability, audiogenic seizures, and altered behaviors, including anxiety and sensorimotor gating. These results reveal new roles for the Homer scaffolds in regulation of mGlu5 function and implicate a specific molecular mechanism in a complex brain disease. Abnormal function of the metabotropic, or Gq-coupled, glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) has been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, including a genetic cause of intellectual disability and autism called fragile X syndrome. In brains of a mouse model of fragile X, mGlu5 is less associated with its binding partner Homer, a scaffolding protein that regulates mGlu5 localization to synapses and its ability to activate biochemical signaling pathways. Here we show that a mouse expressing a mutant mGlu5 that cannot bind to Homer is sufficient to mimic many of the biochemical, neurophysiological, and

  12. Estrogen receptor β exhibited anti-tumor effects on osteosarcoma cells by regulating integrin, IAP, NF-kB/BCL-2 and PI3K/Akt signal pathway

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    Minfei Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of Estrogen receptor β (ERβ on osteosarcoma cells, and explore the regulatory mechanisms involved in this process. Osteosarcoma U2-OS cells consisted four groups, and treated by E2, E2 + LY294002 (ERβ agonists, E2 + ERβ siRNA, E2 + ERβ siRNA + LY294002, respectively. Cell counting kit 8 (CCK-8 assay was performed to detect the cell viability of U2-OS cells in each group. The effects of ERβ on the migration and invasion ability of U2-OS cells were examined by wound healing assay and transwell cell culture chamber, respectively. The expression of Inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP and integrin α5 in U2-OS cells of each group was detected by quantitative RT-PCR, and the expression of phosphorylated p65 (p-p65, p-AKT and Bcl-2 was detected by western blotting. The cell viability, migration and invasion ability of U2-OS cells were significantly increased by ERβ siRNA, but inhibited by ERβ agonists LY294002 (p < 0.05. ERβ siRNA significantly downregulated Integrin α5 and unregulated IAP in U2-OS cells (p < 0.05. The expression of p-p65, p-AKT and Bcl-2 was significantly reduced by LY294002, but increased by ERβ siRNA (p < 0.05. In conclusion, ERβ exhibited obvious anti-tumor effects on osteosarcoma cells by regulating integrin, IAP, NF-kBBCL-2 and PI3K/Akt signal pathway. Keywords: Estrogen receptor β, Osteosarcoma, Anti-tumor, Regulatory mechanism

  13. Piperlongumine induces apoptosis and autophagy in leukemic cells through targeting the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and p38 signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongfei; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Hongmei; Wang, Bing; Dou, Lin; Li, Yin

    2018-02-01

    Piperlongumine is an alkaloid compound extracted from Piper longum L. It is a chemical substance with various pharmacological effects and medicinal value, including anti-tumor, lipid metabolism regulatory, antiplatelet aggregation and analgesic properties. The present study aimed to understand whether piperlongumine induces the apoptosis and autophagy of leukemic cells, and to identify the mechanism involved. Cell viability and autophagy were detected using MTT, phenazine methyl sulfate and trypan blue exclusion assays. The apoptosis rate was calculated using flow cytometry. The protein expression levels of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3, Akt and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) were measured using western blotting. The cell growth of leukemic cells was completely inhibited following treatment with piperlongumine, and marked apoptosis was also induced. Dead cells as a result of autophagy were stained using immunofluorescence and observed under a light microscope. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mTOR signaling was suppressed by treatment with piperlongumine, while p38 signaling and caspase-3 activity were induced by treatment with piperlongumine. It was concluded that piperlongumine induces apoptosis and autophagy in leukemic cells through targeting the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and p38 signaling pathways.

  14. Ganoderma tsugae Extract Inhibits Growth of HER2-Overexpressing Cancer Cells via Modulation of HER2/PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway

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    Han-Peng Kuo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ganoderma, also known as Lingzhi or Reishi, has been used for medicinal purposes in Asian countries for centuries. It is a medicinal fungus with a variety of biological properties including immunomodulatory and antitumor activities. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which Ganoderma tsugae (GT, one of the most common species of Ganoderma, inhibits the proliferation of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. Here, we show that a quality assured extract of GT (GTE inhibited the growth of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and enhanced the growth-inhibitory effect of antitumor drugs (e.g., taxol and cisplatin in these cells. We also demonstrate that GTE induced cell cycle arrest by interfering with the HER2/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Furthermore, GTE curtailed the expression of the HER2 protein by modulating the transcriptional activity of the HER2 gene and the stability/degradation of the HER2 protein. In conclusion, this study suggests that GTE may be a useful adjuvant therapeutic agent in the treatment of cancer cells that highly express HER2.

  15. The p85α regulatory subunit of PI3K mediates cAMP-PKA and retinoic acid biological effects on MCF7 cell growth and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, Caterina F; Di Zazzo, Erika; Zuchegna, Candida; Di Domenico, Marina; D'Inzeo, Sonia; Nicolussi, Arianna; Avvedimento, Enrico V; Coppa, Anna; Porcellini, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    Phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K) signalling regulates various cellular processes, including cell survival, growth, proliferation and motility, and is among the most frequently mutated pathways in cancer. Although the involvement of p85αPI3K SH2 domain in signal transduction has been extensively studied, the function of the SH3 domain at the N-terminus remains elusive. A serine (at codon 83) adjacent to the N-terminal SH3 domain in the PI3K regulatory subunit p85αPI3K that is phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA) in vivo and in vitro has been identified. Virtually all receptors binding p85αPI3K can cooperate with cAMP-PKA signals via phosphorylation of p85αPI3KSer83. To analyse the role of p85αPI3KSer83 in retinoic acid (RA) and cAMP signalling, in MCF7 cells, we used p85αPI3K mutated forms, in which Ser83 has been substituted with alanine (p85A) to prevent phosphorylation or with aspartic acid (p85D) to mimic the phosphorylated residue. We demonstrated that p85αPI3KSer83 is crucial for the synergistic enhancement of RARα/p85αPI3K binding induced by cAMP/RA co-treatment in MCF7 cells. Growth curves, colorimetric MTT assay and cell cycle analysis demonstrated that phosphorylation of p85αPI3KSer83 plays an important role in the control of MCF7 cell proliferation and in RA-induced inhibition of proliferation. Wound healing and transwell experiments demonstrated that p85αPI3KSer83 was also essential both for the control of migratory behaviour and for the reduction of motility induced by RA. This study points to p85αPI3KSer83 as the physical link between different pathways (cAMP-PKA, RA and FAK), and as an important regulator of MCF7 cell proliferation and migration.

  16. Clinical use of PI3K inhibitors in B-cell lymphoid malignancies: today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwell, I B; Flowers, C R; Blum, K A; Cohen, J B

    2017-03-01

    PI3K inhibitors are an important new therapeutic option for the treatment of relapsed and refractory B-cell lymphoid malignancies. Idelalisib is a PI3Kδ inhibitor that has been approved for the treatment of lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the relapsed/refractory setting, and several other PI3K inhibitors are being developed targeting other isoforms of the PI3K enzyme, which results in distinct toxicities and variable efficacy in the clinical setting. Areas covered: We provide a general overview of PI3K inhibitors, recommended applications, and the mechanism and management of toxicities. We further review trials, ongoing and completed, leading to the approval of idelalisib as well other PI3K inhibitors currently in development. Articles were obtained from PubMed, and abstracts were searched for the past 5 years from the websites for ASCO, ASH, EHA, and ICML/Lugano. Expert commentary: PI3K inhibitors provide an important and powerful pharmacologic tool in the armamentarium against hematologic malignancies, especially for relapsed/refractory B-cell lymphoid malignancies. Unique toxicities are associated with inhibition of different isoforms of the PI3K enzyme, as demonstrated with the infectious and autoimmune toxicities associated with the PI3Kδ inhibitor, idelalisib. Due to these unique toxicities, PI3K inhibitors should only be used in formally approved combinations and settings.

  17. PI3K-Akt-mTORC1-S6K1/2 Axis Controls Th17 Differentiation by Regulating Gfi1 Expression and Nuclear Translocation of RORγ

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    Yutaka Kurebayashi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The PI3K-Akt-mTORC1 axis contributes to the activation, survival, and proliferation of CD4+ T cells upon stimulation through TCR and CD28. Here, we demonstrate that the suppression of this axis by deletion of p85α or PI3K/mTORC1 inhibitors as well as T cell-specific deletion of raptor, an essential component of mTORC1, impairs Th17 differentiation in vitro and in vivo in a S6K1/2-dependent fashion. Inhibition of PI3K-Akt-mTORC1-S6K1 axis impairs the downregulation of Gfi1, a negative regulator of Th17 differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that S6K2, a nuclear counterpart of S6K1, is induced by the PI3K-Akt-mTORC1 axis, binds RORγ, and carries RORγ to the nucleus. These results point toward a pivotal role of PI3K-Akt-mTORC1-S6K1/2 axis in Th17 differentiation.

  18. An Experimental Study of the Decay $D^0 \\to K^- K^- K^+ \\pi^+$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devmal, Shiral Cleophas [Cincinnati U.

    2000-05-01

    Using data from the E791 experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), we have studied the Cabibbo favored, but phase space suppressed decay $D^0 \\to K^-K^- K^+ \\pi^+$ with the normalization channel $D^0 \\to K^- \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^+$. We report the branching ratio of $D^0 \\to K^- K^- K^+ \\pi^+$ relative to the branching ratio of $D^0 \\to K^- \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^+$. This value is (0.54 $\\pm$ 0.13 $\\pm$ 0.07)%. We see a clear signal of $K^-K^+$ resonance in the decay $D^0 \\to K^-K^-K^+\\pi^+$ from which we conclude that about (60 $\\pm$ 30)% of $KKK\\pi$ comes from $D^0 \\to \\phi K^-\\pi^+; \\phi \\to K^-K^+$. We also set the range (0.30% - 0.90%) for the ratio $P_{q\\overline{q}} = P_{NoPop}$ where $P_{q\\bar{q}}$ is the contribution from either $D^0 \\to K^-K^-K^+\\pi^+$ terms that pop an $s\\bar{s}$ or corresponding $D^0 \\to K^- \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^+$ terms that pop either $u\\bar{u}$ or $d\\bar{d}$ pair and $P_{NoPop}$ is the contributions from the $D^0 \\to K^- \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^+$ terms that do not have such corresponding popping.

  19. Antidiabetic Effects of a Chinese Herbal Medicinal Compound Sangguayin Preparation via PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway in db/db Mice

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    Qichang Xing

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sangguayin (SGY, comprising four types of Chinese herbs, can be used as both food and medicine and has been clinically used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM for a long time. Our previous study demonstrated the antidiabetic effect of SGY in experimental T2DM rats fed with a high-fat diet and treated with a low dose of streptozotocin. However, its mechanism of action is questionable. In this study, we refined the traditional SGY decoction and investigated its antidiabetic activity in db/db mice. We evaluated the possible molecular mechanism using skeletal muscle tissues. The results show that the treatment with SGY preparation resulted in a decrease in the blood glucose, glycated serum protein, and blood lipid levels and an improvement in the glucose tolerance as well as insulin resistance. In addition, SGY preparation remarkably upregulated the expression of insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1, phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K, protein kinase B (Akt, and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4. Thus, SGY preparation is an effective agent for the treatment of T2DM, and its molecular mechanism may be related to the regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling in the skeletal muscle.

  20. Cerebral mGluR5 availability contributes to elevated sleep need and behavioral adjustment after sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Sebastian C; Sousek, Alexandra; Hefti, Katharina; Saberi-Moghadam, Sohrab; Buck, Alfred; Ametamey, Simon M; Scheidegger, Milan; Franken, Paul; Henning, Anke; Seifritz, Erich; Tafti, Mehdi; Landolt, Hans-Peter

    2017-10-05

    Increased sleep time and intensity quantified as low-frequency brain electrical activity after sleep loss demonstrate that sleep need is homeostatically regulated, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. We here demonstrate that metabotropic glutamate receptors of subtype 5 (mGluR5) contribute to the molecular machinery governing sleep-wake homeostasis. Using positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and electroencephalography in humans, we find that increased mGluR5 availability after sleep loss tightly correlates with behavioral and electroencephalographic biomarkers of elevated sleep need. These changes are associated with altered cortical myo-inositol and glycine levels, suggesting sleep loss-induced modifications downstream of mGluR5 signaling. Knock-out mice without functional mGluR5 exhibit severe dysregulation of sleep-wake homeostasis, including lack of recovery sleep and impaired behavioral adjustment to a novel task after sleep deprivation. The data suggest that mGluR5 contribute to the brain's coping mechanisms with sleep deprivation and point to a novel target to improve disturbed wakefulness and sleep.

  1. Cerebral mGluR5 availability contributes to elevated sleep need and behavioral adjustment after sleep deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefti, Katharina; Saberi-Moghadam, Sohrab; Buck, Alfred; Ametamey, Simon M; Scheidegger, Milan; Franken, Paul; Henning, Anke; Seifritz, Erich

    2017-01-01

    Increased sleep time and intensity quantified as low-frequency brain electrical activity after sleep loss demonstrate that sleep need is homeostatically regulated, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. We here demonstrate that metabotropic glutamate receptors of subtype 5 (mGluR5) contribute to the molecular machinery governing sleep-wake homeostasis. Using positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and electroencephalography in humans, we find that increased mGluR5 availability after sleep loss tightly correlates with behavioral and electroencephalographic biomarkers of elevated sleep need. These changes are associated with altered cortical myo-inositol and glycine levels, suggesting sleep loss-induced modifications downstream of mGluR5 signaling. Knock-out mice without functional mGluR5 exhibit severe dysregulation of sleep-wake homeostasis, including lack of recovery sleep and impaired behavioral adjustment to a novel task after sleep deprivation. The data suggest that mGluR5 contribute to the brain's coping mechanisms with sleep deprivation and point to a novel target to improve disturbed wakefulness and sleep. PMID:28980941

  2. The Bone Marrow-Mediated Protection of Myeloproliferative Neoplastic Cells to Vorinostat and Ruxolitinib Relies on the Activation of JNK and PI3K Signalling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno A Cardoso

    Full Text Available The classical BCR-ABL-negative Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN are a group of heterogeneous haematological diseases characterized by constitutive JAK-STAT pathway activation. Targeted therapy with Ruxolitinib, a JAK1/2-specific inhibitor, achieves symptomatic improvement but does not eliminate the neoplastic clone. Similar effects are seen with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi, albeit with poorer tolerance. Here, we show that bone marrow (BM stromal cells (HS-5 protected MPN-derived cell lines (SET-2; HEL and UKE-1 and MPN patient-derived BM cells from the cytotoxic effects of Ruxolitinib and the HDACi Vorinostat. This protective effect was mediated, at least in part, by the secretion of soluble factors from the BM stroma. In addition, it correlated with the activation of signalling pathways important for cellular homeostasis, such as JAK-STAT, PI3K, JNK, MEK-ERK and NF-κB. Importantly, the pharmacological inhibition of JNK and PI3K pathways completely abrogated the BM protective effect on MPN cell lines and MPN patient samples. Our findings shed light on mechanisms of tumour survival and may indicate novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MPN.

  3. The Bone Marrow-Mediated Protection of Myeloproliferative Neoplastic Cells to Vorinostat and Ruxolitinib Relies on the Activation of JNK and PI3K Signalling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Bruno A.; Belo, Hélio; Barata, João T.; Almeida, António M.

    2015-01-01

    The classical BCR-ABL-negative Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN) are a group of heterogeneous haematological diseases characterized by constitutive JAK-STAT pathway activation. Targeted therapy with Ruxolitinib, a JAK1/2-specific inhibitor, achieves symptomatic improvement but does not eliminate the neoplastic clone. Similar effects are seen with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), albeit with poorer tolerance. Here, we show that bone marrow (BM) stromal cells (HS-5) protected MPN-derived cell lines (SET-2; HEL and UKE-1) and MPN patient-derived BM cells from the cytotoxic effects of Ruxolitinib and the HDACi Vorinostat. This protective effect was mediated, at least in part, by the secretion of soluble factors from the BM stroma. In addition, it correlated with the activation of signalling pathways important for cellular homeostasis, such as JAK-STAT, PI3K, JNK, MEK-ERK and NF-κB. Importantly, the pharmacological inhibition of JNK and PI3K pathways completely abrogated the BM protective effect on MPN cell lines and MPN patient samples. Our findings shed light on mechanisms of tumour survival and may indicate novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MPN. PMID:26623653

  4. Gene mutation in ATM/PI3K region of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongmei; Wu Xinyao; Xia Yunfei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To define the correlation between nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell radiosensitivity and gene mutation in the ATM/PI3K coding region. Methods: The gene mutation in the ATM/PI3K region of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines which vary in radiosensitivity, was monitored by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and fluorescence-marked ddNTP cycle sequencing technique. Results: No gene mutation was detected in the ATM/PI3K region of either CNE1 or CNE2. Conclusion: Disparity in intrinsic radiosensitivity between different NPC cell lines depends on some other factors and mechanism without being related to ATM/PI3K mutations

  5. Adenosine A2A receptor-dependent proliferation of pulmonary endothelial cells is mediated through calcium mobilization, PI3-kinase and ERK1/2 pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Aftab; Schaack, Jerome B.; White, Carl W.; Ahmad, Shama

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •A 2A receptor-induced pulmonary endothelial growth is mediated by PI3K and ERK1/2. •Cytosolic calcium mobilization is also critical for pulmonary endothelial growth. •Effectors of A 2A receptor, like tyrosine kinases and cAMP increase PI3K/Akt signaling. •Activation of A 2A receptor can contribute to vascular remodeling. -- Abstract: Hypoxia and HIF-2α-dependent A 2A receptor expression and activation increase proliferation of human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). This study was undertaken to investigate the signaling mechanisms that mediate the proliferative effects of A 2A receptor. A 2A receptor-mediated proliferation of HLMVECs was inhibited by intracellular calcium chelation, and by specific inhibitors of ERK1/2 and PI3-kinase (PI3K). The adenosine A 2A receptor agonist CGS21680 caused intracellular calcium mobilization in controls and, to a greater extent, in A 2A receptor-overexpressing HLMVECs. Adenoviral-mediated A 2A receptor overexpression as well as receptor activation by CGS21680 caused increased PI3K activity and Akt phosphorylation. Cells overexpressing A 2A receptor also manifested enhanced ERK1/2 phosphorylation upon CGS21680 treatment. A 2A receptor activation also caused enhanced cAMP production. Likewise, treatment with 8Br-cAMP increased PI3K activity. Hence A 2A receptor-mediated cAMP production and PI3K and Akt phosphorylation are potential mediators of the A 2A -mediated proliferative response of HLMVECs. Cytosolic calcium mobilization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation are other critical effectors of HLMVEC proliferation and growth. These studies underscore the importance of adenosine A 2A receptor in activation of survival and proliferative pathways in pulmonary endothelial cells that are mediated through PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 pathways

  6. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K) Activity Bound to Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) Receptor, which Is Continuously Sustained by IGF-I Stimulation, Is Required for IGF-I-induced Cell Proliferation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Toshiaki; Nakamura, Yusaku; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Shibano, Takashi; Chida, Kazuhiro; Minami, Shiro; Asano, Tomoichiro; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Continuous stimulation of cells with insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in G1 phase is a well established requirement for IGF-induced cell proliferation; however, the molecular components of this prolonged signaling pathway that is essential for cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase are unclear. IGF-I activates IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) tyrosine kinase, followed by phosphorylation of substrates such as insulin receptor substrates (IRS) leading to binding of signaling molecules containing SH2 domains, including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) to IRS and activation of the downstream signaling pathways. In this study, we found prolonged (>9 h) association of PI3K with IGF-IR induced by IGF-I stimulation. PI3K activity was present in this complex in thyrocytes and fibroblasts, although tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS was not yet evident after 9 h of IGF-I stimulation. IGF-I withdrawal in mid-G1 phase impaired the association of PI3K with IGF-IR and suppressed DNA synthesis the same as when PI3K inhibitor was added. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Tyr1316-X-X-Met of IGF-IR functioned as a PI3K binding sequence when this tyrosine is phosphorylated. We then analyzed IGF signaling and proliferation of IGF-IR−/− fibroblasts expressing exogenous mutant IGF-IR in which Tyr1316 was substituted with Phe (Y1316F). In these cells, IGF-I stimulation induced tyrosine phosphorylation of IGF-IR and IRS-1/2, but mutated IGF-IR failed to bind PI3K and to induce maximal phosphorylation of GSK3β and cell proliferation in response to IGF-I. Based on these results, we concluded that PI3K activity bound to IGF-IR, which is continuously sustained by IGF-I stimulation, is required for IGF-I-induced cell proliferation. PMID:22767591

  7. Reactive oxygen species via redox signaling to PI3K/AKT pathway contribute to the malignant growth of 4-hydroxy estradiol-transformed mammary epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O Okoh

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 17-β-estradiol (E2-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS on the induction of mammary tumorigenesis. We found that ROS-induced by repeated exposures to 4-hydroxy-estradiol (4-OH-E2, a predominant catechol metabolite of E2, caused transformation of normal human mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells with malignant growth in nude mice. This was evident from inhibition of estrogen-induced breast tumor formation in the xenograft model by both overexpression of catalase as well as by co-treatment with Ebselen. To understand how 4-OH-E2 induces this malignant phenotype through ROS, we investigated the effects of 4-OH-E2 on redox-sensitive signal transduction pathways. During the malignant transformation process we observed that 4-OH-E2 treatment increased AKT phosphorylation through PI3K activation. The PI3K-mediated phosphorylation of AKT in 4-OH-E2-treated cells was inhibited by ROS modifiers as well as by silencing of AKT expression. RNA interference of AKT markedly inhibited 4-OH-E2-induced in vitro tumor formation. The expression of cell cycle genes, cdc2, PRC1 and PCNA and one of transcription factors that control the expression of these genes - nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1 was significantly up-regulated during the 4-OH-E2-mediated malignant transformation process. The increased expression of these genes was inhibited by ROS modifiers as well as by silencing of AKT expression. These results indicate that 4-OH-E2-induced cell transformation may be mediated, in part, through redox-sensitive AKT signal transduction pathways by up-regulating the expression of cell cycle genes cdc2, PRC1 and PCNA, and the transcription factor - NRF-1. In summary, our study has demonstrated that: (i 4-OH-E2 is one of the main estrogen metabolites that induce mammary tumorigenesis and (ii ROS-mediated signaling leading to the activation of PI3K/AKT pathway plays an important role in the generation of 4-OH-E2

  8. PI3K/Akt contributes to increased expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in macrophages exposed to hypoxic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, So Young; Jeong, Eunshil; Joung, Sun Myung; Lee, Joo Young

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hypoxic stress-induced TLR4 expression is mediated by PI3K/Akt in macrophages. ► PI3K/Akt regulated HIF-1 activation leading to TLR4 expression. ► p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was not involved in TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. ► Sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia-mediated TLR4 expression by inhibiting PI3K/Akt. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play critical roles in triggering immune and inflammatory responses by detecting invading microbial pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Increased expression of TLR4 is implicated in aggravated inflammatory symptoms in ischemic tissue injury and chronic diseases. Results from our previous study showed that TLR4 expression was upregulated by hypoxic stress mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) at a transcriptional level in macrophages. In this study, we further investigated the upstream signaling pathway that contributed to the increase of TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. Either treatment with pharmacological inhibitors of PI3K and Akt or knockdown of Akt expression by siRNA blocked the increase of TLR4 mRNA and protein levels in macrophages exposed to hypoxia and CoCl 2 . Phosphorylation of Akt by hypoxic stress preceded nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α. A PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) attenuated CoCl 2 -induced nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1α. In addition, HIF-1α-mediated upregulation of TLR4 expression was blocked by LY294002. Furthermore, sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia- and CoCl 2 -induced upregulation of TLR4 mRNA and protein by inhibiting PI3K/Akt activation and the subsequent nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1α. However, p38 was not involved in HIF-1α activation and TLR4 expression induced by hypoxic stress in macrophages. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PI3K/Akt contributes to hypoxic stress-induced TLR4 expression at least partly through the regulation of HIF-1 activation. These reveal a novel

  9. PI3K/Akt contributes to increased expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in macrophages exposed to hypoxic stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Young; Jeong, Eunshil; Joung, Sun Myung [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joo Young, E-mail: joolee@catholic.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon 420-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxic stress-induced TLR4 expression is mediated by PI3K/Akt in macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PI3K/Akt regulated HIF-1 activation leading to TLR4 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was not involved in TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia-mediated TLR4 expression by inhibiting PI3K/Akt. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play critical roles in triggering immune and inflammatory responses by detecting invading microbial pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Increased expression of TLR4 is implicated in aggravated inflammatory symptoms in ischemic tissue injury and chronic diseases. Results from our previous study showed that TLR4 expression was upregulated by hypoxic stress mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) at a transcriptional level in macrophages. In this study, we further investigated the upstream signaling pathway that contributed to the increase of TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. Either treatment with pharmacological inhibitors of PI3K and Akt or knockdown of Akt expression by siRNA blocked the increase of TLR4 mRNA and protein levels in macrophages exposed to hypoxia and CoCl{sub 2}. Phosphorylation of Akt by hypoxic stress preceded nuclear accumulation of HIF-1{alpha}. A PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) attenuated CoCl{sub 2}-induced nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1{alpha}. In addition, HIF-1{alpha}-mediated upregulation of TLR4 expression was blocked by LY294002. Furthermore, sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia- and CoCl{sub 2}-induced upregulation of TLR4 mRNA and protein by inhibiting PI3K/Akt activation and the subsequent nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1{alpha}. However, p38 was not involved in HIF-1{alpha} activation and TLR4 expression induced by hypoxic stress in macrophages. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PI3K

  10. Quercetin postconditioning attenuates myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats through the PI3K/Akt pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Quercetin (Que, a plant-derived flavonoid, has multiple benefical actions on the cardiovascular system. The current study investigated whether Que postconditioning has any protective effects on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury in vivo and its potential cardioprotective mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to 5 groups (20 animals/group: sham, I/R, Que postconditioning, Que+LY294002 [a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling pathway inhibitor], and LY294002+I/R. I/R was produced by 30-min coronary occlusion followed by 2-h reperfusion. At the end of reperfusion, myocardial infarct size and biochemical changes were compared. Apoptosis was evaluated by both TUNEL staining and measurement of activated caspase-3 immunoreactivity. The phosphorylation of Akt and protein expression of Bcl-2 and Bax were determined by Western blotting. Que postconditioning significantly reduced infarct size and serum levels of creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase compared with the I/R group (all P<0.05. Apoptotic cardiomyocytes and caspase-3 immunoreactivity were also suppressed in the Que postconditioning group compared with the I/R group (both P<0.05. Akt phosphorylation and Bcl-2 expression increased after Que postconditioning, but Bax expression decreased. These effects were inhibited by LY294002. The data indicate that Que postconditioning can induce cardioprotection by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and modulating the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins.

  11. Quercetin postconditioning attenuates myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats through the PI3K/Akt pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, Z.Z.; Wu, Y.; Ke, J.J.; He, X.H.; Wang, Y.L. [Department of Anesthesiology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China)

    2013-09-24

    Quercetin (Que), a plant-derived flavonoid, has multiple benefical actions on the cardiovascular system. The current study investigated whether Que postconditioning has any protective effects on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in vivo and its potential cardioprotective mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to 5 groups (20 animals/group): sham, I/R, Que postconditioning, Que+LY294002 [a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway inhibitor], and LY294002+I/R. I/R was produced by 30-min coronary occlusion followed by 2-h reperfusion. At the end of reperfusion, myocardial infarct size and biochemical changes were compared. Apoptosis was evaluated by both TUNEL staining and measurement of activated caspase-3 immunoreactivity. The phosphorylation of Akt and protein expression of Bcl-2 and Bax were determined by Western blotting. Que postconditioning significantly reduced infarct size and serum levels of creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase compared with the I/R group (all P<0.05). Apoptotic cardiomyocytes and caspase-3 immunoreactivity were also suppressed in the Que postconditioning group compared with the I/R group (both P<0.05). Akt phosphorylation and Bcl-2 expression increased after Que postconditioning, but Bax expression decreased. These effects were inhibited by LY294002. The data indicate that Que postconditioning can induce cardioprotection by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and modulating the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins.

  12. TFII-I regulates target genes in the PI-3K and TGF-β signaling pathways through a novel DNA binding motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Puimedon, Maria; Borralleras, Cristina; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Campuzano, Victoria

    2013-09-25

    General transcription factor (TFII-I) is a multi-functional protein involved in the transcriptional regulation of critical developmental genes, encoded by the GTF2I gene located on chromosome 7q11.23. Haploinsufficiency at GTF2I has been shown to play a major role in the neurodevelopmental features of Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS). Identification of genes regulated by TFII-I is thus critical to detect molecular determinants of WBS as well as to identify potential new targets for specific pharmacological interventions, which are currently absent. We performed a microarray screening for transcriptional targets of TFII-I in cortex and embryonic cells from Gtf2i mutant and wild-type mice. Candidate genes with altered expression were verified using real-time PCR. A novel motif shared by deregulated genes was found and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in embryonic fibroblasts were used to document in vitro TFII-I binding to this motif in the promoter regions of deregulated genes. Interestingly, the PI3K and TGFβ signaling pathways were over-represented among TFII-I-modulated genes. In this study we have found a highly conserved DNA element, common to a set of genes regulated by TFII-I, and identified and validated novel in vivo neuronal targets of this protein affecting the PI3K and TGFβ signaling pathways. Overall, our data further contribute to unravel the complexity and variability of the different genetic programs orchestrated by TFII-I. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Kushenin induces the apoptosis of HCV-infected cells by blocking the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway via inhibiting NS5A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Na; Liu, Xiaojing; Lin, Shumei [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Luo, Wenjuan, E-mail: wenjuanluoxa@163.com [School of Pharmacy, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710061 (China); Liu, Min, E-mail: minliusx@163.com [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710061 (China)

    2016-07-01

    With the increased burden induced by HCV, there is an urgent need to develop better-tolerated agents with good safety. In this study, we evaluated the anti-HCV capability of kushenin, as well as the possible mechanism to Huh7.5-HCV cells. The results demonstrated that kushenin significantly inhibited the HCV-RNA level. Similarly, the expression of HCV-specific protein NS5A was also decreased. Molecular docking results displayed that kushenin bonded well to the active pockets of HCV NS5A, further confirming the effects of kushenin on HCV replication. Coimmunoprecipitation assay determined that kushenin suppressed the interaction between PI3K and NS5A in HCV-replicon cells. Furthermore, kushenin exerted an obviously induced function on HCV-replicon cells apoptosis by inhibiting PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway, which could be ameliorated by the specific activator IGF-1 addition. Taken together, kushenin possesses the ability to inhibit HCV replication, and contributes to the increased apoptosis of HCV-infected cells by blocking the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway via inhibiting NS5A. Our results provide important evidence for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of HCV infection, and suggest that kushenin has the potential to treat HCV disease. - Highlights: • Kushenin inhibits HCV replication. • Kushenin bonds directly to NS5A protein. • Kushenin induces the apoptosis of HCV-infected cells. • kushenin suppresses the interaction between PI3K and NS5A. • Kushenin inhibits PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway.

  14. Kushenin induces the apoptosis of HCV-infected cells by blocking the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway via inhibiting NS5A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Na; Liu, Xiaojing; Lin, Shumei; Luo, Wenjuan; Liu, Min

    2016-01-01

    With the increased burden induced by HCV, there is an urgent need to develop better-tolerated agents with good safety. In this study, we evaluated the anti-HCV capability of kushenin, as well as the possible mechanism to Huh7.5-HCV cells. The results demonstrated that kushenin significantly inhibited the HCV-RNA level. Similarly, the expression of HCV-specific protein NS5A was also decreased. Molecular docking results displayed that kushenin bonded well to the active pockets of HCV NS5A, further confirming the effects of kushenin on HCV replication. Coimmunoprecipitation assay determined that kushenin suppressed the interaction between PI3K and NS5A in HCV-replicon cells. Furthermore, kushenin exerted an obviously induced function on HCV-replicon cells apoptosis by inhibiting PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway, which could be ameliorated by the specific activator IGF-1 addition. Taken together, kushenin possesses the ability to inhibit HCV replication, and contributes to the increased apoptosis of HCV-infected cells by blocking the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway via inhibiting NS5A. Our results provide important evidence for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of HCV infection, and suggest that kushenin has the potential to treat HCV disease. - Highlights: • Kushenin inhibits HCV replication. • Kushenin bonds directly to NS5A protein. • Kushenin induces the apoptosis of HCV-infected cells. • kushenin suppresses the interaction between PI3K and NS5A. • Kushenin inhibits PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway.

  15. Combinatorial therapy with adenoviral-mediated PTEN and a PI3K inhibitor suppresses malignant glioma cell growth in vitro and in vivo by regulating the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Yang; Guo, Liyun; Song, Yunpeng; Wang, Le; Yu, Kai; Huang, Qiang; Zhong, Yue

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly invasive and challenging tumor of the central nervous system. The mutation/deletion of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene is the main genetic change identified in glioblastomas. PTEN plays a critical role in tumorigenesis and has been shown to be an important therapeutic target. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 is commonly used to inhibit glioma cell growth via regulation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. In this study, we examined the growth inhibitory effects of a combinatorial therapy of adenoviral-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) and LY294002 on LN229 and U251 glioma cells in vitro and on tumor xenografts in vivo. In vitro, LN229 and U251 glioma cells were treated by combinatorial therapy with Ad-PTEN and LY294002. The growth ability was determined by MTT assay. The cell cycle distribution was analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell invasive ability was analyzed by transwell invasion assay and cell apoptosis analysis via FITC-Annexin V analysis. In vivo, U251 subcutaneous glioblastoma xenograft was used to assay anti-tumor effect of combinatorial therapy with Ad-PTEN and LY294002 by mean volume of tumors, immunohistochemistry and TUNEL method. The combinatorial treatment clearly suppressed cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, reduced cell invasion and promoted cell apoptosis compared with the Ad-PTEN or LY294002 treatment alone. The treatment worked by inhibiting the PI3K/AKT pathway. In addition, the growth of U251 glioma xenografts treated with the combination of Ad-PTEN and LY294002 was significantly inhibited compared with those treated with Ad-PTEN or LY294002 alone. Our data indicated that the combination of Ad-PTEN and LY294002 effectively suppressed the malignant growth of human glioma cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts, suggesting a promising new approach for glioma gene therapy that warrants further investigation.

  16. Precision measurement of the ratio BR(K{sub S{yields}{pi}}{sup +{pi}-}e{sup +}e{sup -})/BR(K{sub L{yields}{pi}}{sup +{pi}-{pi}}{sub D}{sup 0})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batley, J.R. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Kalmus, G.E. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Lazzeroni, C. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Munday, D.J. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Patel, M. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Physics Department, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Slater, M.W. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Wotton, S.A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Arcidiacono, R. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Sezione dell' INFN di Torino, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale dell' Universita, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Bocquet, G.; Ceccucci, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Cundy, D. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Istituto di Cosmogeofisica del CNR di Torino, I-10133 Torino (Italy); Doble, N. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Sezione dell' INFN di Pisa, I-56100 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, I-56100 Pisa (Italy); Falaleev, V.; Gatignon, L.; Gonidec, A.; Grafstroem, P.; Kubischta, W. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Marchetto, F. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Sezione dell' INFN di Torino, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Mikulec, I. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Osterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik, A-10560 Wien (Austria)

    2011-01-03

    The K{sub S{yields}{pi}}{sup +{pi}-}e{sup +}e{sup -} decay mode was investigated using the data collected in 2002 by the NA48/1 Collaboration. With about 23 k K{sub S{yields}{pi}}{sup +{pi}-}e{sup +}e{sup -} events and 59 k K{sub L{yields}{pi}}{sup +{pi}-{pi}}{sub D}{sup 0} normalization decays, the K{sub S{yields}{pi}}{sup +{pi}-}e{sup +}e{sup -} branching ratio relative to the K{sub L{yields}{pi}}{sup +{pi}-{pi}}{sub D}{sup 0} one was determined to be BR(K{sub S{yields}{pi}}{sup +{pi}-}e{sup +}e{sup -})/BR(K{sub L{yields}{pi}}{sup +{pi}-{pi}}{sub D}{sup 0})=(3.28{+-}0.06{sub stat{+-}}0.04{sub syst})x10{sup -2}. This result was used to set the upper limit |g{sub E1}/g{sub BR}|<3.0 at 90% CL on the presence, in the decay amplitude, of an E1 direct emission (g{sub E1}) term relative to the dominant inner bremsstrahlung (g{sub BR}) term. The CP-violating asymmetry A{sub {phi}} in the sin{phi}cos{phi} distribution of K{sub S{yields}{pi}}{sup +{pi}-}e{sup +}e{sup -} events, where {phi} is the angle between the {pi}{sup +{pi}-} and the e{sup +}e{sup -} decay planes in the kaon centre of mass, was found to be A{sub {phi}=}(-0.4{+-}0.8)%, consistent with zero. These results are in good agreement with a description of the K{sub S{yields}{pi}}{sup +{pi}-}e{sup +}e{sup -} decay amplitude dominated by the CP-even inner bremsstrahlung process.

  17. Strong synergism between small molecule inhibitors of HER2, PI3K, mTOR and Bcl-2 in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamunyela, Roswita H; Serafin, Antonio M; Akudugu, John M

    2017-02-01

    Targeting pro-survival cell signaling components has been promising in cancer therapy, but the benefit of targeting with single agents is limited. For malignancies such as triple-negative breast cancer, there is a paucity of targets that are amenable to existing interventions as they are devoid of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), progesterone receptor (PR), and estrogen receptor (ER). Concurrent targeting of cell signaling entities other than HER2, PR and ER with multiple agents may be more effective. Evaluating modes of interaction between agents can inform efficient selection of agents when used in cocktails. Using clonogenic cell survival, interaction between inhibitors of HER2 (TAK-165), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) (NVP-BEZ235), and the pro-survival gene (Bcl-2) (ABT-263) in three human breast cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and MCF-12A) ranged from strong to very strong synergism. The strongest synergy was demonstrated in PR and ER negative cells. Inhibition of PI3K, mTOR and Bcl-2 could potentially be effective in the treatment of triple-negative cancers. The very strong synergy observed even at lowest concentrations of inhibitors indicates that these cocktails might be able to be used at a minimised risk of systemic toxicity. Concurrent use of multiple inhibitors can potentiate conventional interventions like radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Opposite effects of Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras on radiation-induced apoptosis via differential activation of PI3K/Akt and Rac/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.-A.; Kang, C.-M.; Lee, Y.-S.; Lee, S.-J.; Bae, S.-W.; Cho, C.-K.

    2003-01-01

    It has been well known that Ras signaling is involved in various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, distinct cellular functions of Ras isozymes are not fully understood. Here we show the opposing roles of Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras genes in the modulation of cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Overexpression of active isoform of Ha-Ras (12V-Ha- Ras) in Rat2 cells increases resistance to the ionizing radiation. Constitutive activation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt is detected specifically in 12V-Ha-Ras-overexpressing cells. The specific PI3K inhibitor LY294002 inhibits PI3K/Akt signaling and potentiates the radiation-induced apoptosis, suggesting that activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in the increased radio-resistance in cells overexpressing 12V-Ha-Ras. Overexpression of activated Ki-Ras (12V-Ki-Ras), on the other hand, markedly increases radiation sensitivity. The p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity is selectively enhanced by ionizing radiation in cells overexpressing 12V-Ki-Ras. The specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, PD169316, or dominant-negative p38 MAP kinase decreases radiation-induced cell death. We further show that the mechanism that underlies potentiation of cell death in cells overexpressing 12V-Ki-Ras involves Bax translocation to the mitochondrial membrane. Elevated Bax translocation following ionizing irradiation in 12V-Ki-Ras-overexpressing cells is completely inhibited by PD169316 or dominant-negative p38 MAP kinase. In addition, introduction of cells with RacN17, a dominant negative mutant of Rac, resulted in a marked inhibition of radiation-induced Bax translocation and apoptotic cell death as well as p38 MAP kinase activation. Taken together, these findings explain the opposite effects of Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras on modulation of radio-sensitivity, and suggest that differential activation of PI3K/Akt and Rac/p38 MAP kinase signaling by Ha-Ras and Ki-Ras may

  19. Observation of the Decay B sup+- -> pi sup+- pi sup 0 , study of B sup+- -> K sup+- pi sup 0 , and search for B sup 0 -> pi sup 0 pi sup 0

    CERN Document Server

    Roodman, A

    2003-01-01

    The present results for the branching fractions and charge asymmetries in B sup+- -> h sup+- pi sup 0 (where h sup+- = pi sup+-, K sup+-) and a search for the decay B sup 0 -> pi sup 0 pi sup 0 using a sample of approximately 88 million B(bar B) pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factor at SLAC. They measure BETA(B sup+- -> pi sup+- pi sup 0) = (5.5 sub - sub 0 sub . sub 9 sup + sup 1 sup . sup 0 +- 0.6) x 10 sup - sup 6 , where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The B sup+- -> pi sup+- pi sup 0 signal has a significance of 7.7 sigma including systematic uncertainties. The simultaneously measure the K sup+- pi sup 0 branching fraction to be BETA(B sup+- -> K sup+- pi sup 0) = (12.8 sub - sub 1 sub . sub 1 sup + sup 1 sup . sup 2 +- 1.0) x 10 sup - sup 6. The charge asymmetries are ALPHA subpi subsup sub+- sub ) subpi subsup 0 = -0.03 sub - sub 0 sub . sub 1 sub 7 sup + sup 0 sup . sup 1 sup 8 +- 0.02 and ALPHA subKappa subsup sub+- sub ) subpi sub...

  20. Developing a Model Using Homer for a Hybrid Hydrogen Fuel Cell System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fera Annisa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Hydrogen is widely considered be the fuel of the near future. Combined wind/PV energy hybrid systems can be used to sources energy to hydrogen production. This paper describes design, simulation and feasibility study of a hybrid energy system for a household in Malaysia. One year recorded wind speed and solar radiation are used for the design of a hybrid energy system. In 2000 was average annual wind speed in Johor Bahru is 3.76 m/s and annual average solar energy resource available is 5.08 kWh/m2/day. National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s HOMER software was used to select an optimum hybrid energy system. In the optimization process, HOMER simulates every system configuration in the search space and displays the feasible ones in a table, sorted by total net present cost (TNPC. The optimization study indicates that sensitivity analysis of the HOMER is shown in the overall winner which shows that the most least cost and optimize hybrid system is combination of 10 kW of PV array, 1 unit of wind turbine, 2 kW of fuel cell, 120 units of batteries and 6 kW converter as well as 1 kW of electrolyzer so as to generate the minimum COE, $2.423 kWh- 1. Although renewable sources (wind and PV involved in the power generation, 1 kg of hydrogen was produced in this system. Pengembangan Model Dengan Menggunakan Homer Untuk Sistem Sel Berbahan bakar Hidrogen Hibrida ABSTRAK. Hidrogen secara luas dianggap sebagai bahan bakar masa depan. Gabungan sistem hibrida energi angin/fotovoltaik dapat digunakan untuk sumber energi produksi hidrogen. Makalah ini menjelaskan desain, simulasi dan studi kelayakan dari sistem energi hibrida untuk rumah tangga di Malaysia. Satu tahun kecepatan angin tercatat dan radiasi matahari digunakan untuk desain sistem energi hibrida. Pada tahun 2000 adalah kecepatan angin rata-rata tahunan di Johor Bahru 3.76 m/det dan rata-rata sumber daya energi surya tahunan yang tersedia adalah 5.08 kWjam/m2/ hari. Software HOMER digunakan