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Sample records for accrediting industrial safety

  1. Accreditation of Industrial Engineering Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, George H.

    The guidelines used in the accreditation of industrial engineering programs are discussed. Changes that have taken place in engineering curriculum are described, along with the philosophy of educators in formulating industrial engineering program requirements in the areas of faculty, facilities, curriculum, administration, and scholastic work.…

  2. The Accreditation of Laboratories Proficiency and Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Recently, China National Accreditation Board for Laboratories (CNAL) has released CNAL/AC23:2004 Medical Laboratories: Accreditation Criteria For Quality and Proficiency, and meanwhile GB 19489 Laboratories: General Requirements For Biosafety and ISO 15190 Medical Laboratories-Requirements For Safetywill be adopted by CNAL as the accreditation criteria for laboratories safety.

  3. Impact of hospital accreditation on patients' safety and quality indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Awa, Bahjat

    2011-01-01

    Ecole de Santé Publique Université Libre de Bruxelles Academic Year 2010-2011 Al-Awa, Bahjat Impact of Hospital Accreditation on Patients' Safety and Quality Indicators Dissertation Summary I. Introduction: There is increased interest around the world in the evaluation of healthcare, coming not only from governments, but also from providers and consumers [1]. Therefore initiatives to address quality of health care have become worldwide phenomena [2]. As quality is crucial fa...

  4. Industrial Education Safety Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    California is one of the few states in which school districts have a legal responsibility for accidents involving students while they are participating in assigned school activities. This guide was prepared to help school administrators and teachers evaluate their safety instruction programs and industrial education facilities in accordance with…

  5. Study of industry safety management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book deals with general remarks, industrial accidents, statistics of industrial accidents, unsafe actions, making machinery and facilities safe, safe activities, having working environment safe, survey of industrial accidents and analysis of causes, system of safety management and operations, safety management planning, safety education, human engineering such as human-machines system, system safety, and costs of disaster losses. It lastly adds individual protective equipment and working clothes including protect equipment for eyes, face, hands, arms and feet.

  6. Predicting the outcomes of performance error indicators on accreditation status in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The null hypothesis for this study suggested that there was no significant difference in the types of performance error indicators between accredited and non-accredited programs on the following types of indicators: (1) number of significant event reports per unit, (2) number of forced outages per unit, (3) number of unplanned automatic scrams per unit, and (4) amount of equivalent availability per unit. A sample of 90 nuclear power plants was selected for this study. Data were summarized from two data bases maintained by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations. Results of this study did not support the research hypothesis. There was no significant difference between the accredited and non-accredited programs on any of the four performance error indicators. The primary conclusions of this include the following: (1) The four selected performance error indicators cannot be used individually or collectively to predict accreditation status in the nuclear power industry. (2) Annual performance error indicator ratings cannot be used to determine the effects of performance-based training on plant performance. (3) The four selected performance error indicators cannot be used to measure the effect of operator job performance on plant effectiveness

  7. Leadership for safety: industrial experience

    OpenAIRE

    Flin, R; Yule, S

    2004-01-01

    The importance of leadership for effective safety management has been the focus of research attention in industry for a number of years, especially in energy and manufacturing sectors. In contrast, very little research into leadership and safety has been carried out in medical settings. A selective review of the industrial safety literature for leadership research with possible application in health care was undertaken. Emerging findings show the importance of participative, transformational ...

  8. Industrial hazard and safety handbook

    CERN Document Server

    King, Ralph W

    1979-01-01

    Industrial Hazard and Safety Handbook (Revised Impression) describes and exposes the main hazards found in industry, with emphasis on how these hazards arise, are ignored, are identified, are eliminated, or are controlled. These hazard conditions can be due to human stresses (for example, insomnia), unsatisfactory working environments, as well as secret industrial processes. The book reviews the cost of accidents, human factors, inspections, insurance, legal aspects, planning for major emergencies, organization, and safety measures. The text discusses regulations, codes of practice, site layou

  9. Leadership for safety: industrial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flin, R; Yule, S

    2004-12-01

    The importance of leadership for effective safety management has been the focus of research attention in industry for a number of years, especially in energy and manufacturing sectors. In contrast, very little research into leadership and safety has been carried out in medical settings. A selective review of the industrial safety literature for leadership research with possible application in health care was undertaken. Emerging findings show the importance of participative, transformational styles for safety performance at all levels of management. Transactional styles with attention to monitoring and reinforcement of workers' safety behaviours have been shown to be effective at the supervisory level. Middle managers need to be involved in safety and foster open communication, while ensuring compliance with safety systems. They should allow supervisors a degree of autonomy for safety initiatives. Senior managers have a prime influence on the organisation's safety culture. They need to continuously demonstrate a visible commitment to safety, best indicated by the time they devote to safety matters. PMID:15576692

  10. 78 FR 45781 - Accreditation of Third-Party Auditors/Certification Bodies to Conduct Food Safety Audits and to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ...-Party Audits and Certification for Food and Food Facilities III. FSMA Imports Public Meeting and... 1 and 16 Accreditation of Third-Party Auditors/Certification Bodies to Conduct Food Safety Audits... Food Safety Audits and to Issue Certifications AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS....

  11. FOOD SAFETY IN CATERING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cattaneo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Catering industry plays a very important role in public health management, because about 30% of total daily meals are consumed in catering industry (restaurants, bar. In this work food safety was evaluated in 20 catering centres throughout microbiological analyses of different categories of meals. Results demonstrate that there was an important decrease of microbial contamination between 2006 and 2007, no pathogens were found in 217 samples examined: this was obtained by improving voluntary controls.

  12. Safety Management Analysis In Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    T. Subramani; R. Lordsonmillar

    2014-01-01

    The Indian society and economy have suffered human and financial losses as a result of the poor safety record in the construction industry. The purpose of this study is to examine safety management in the construction industry. The study will collects data from general contractors, who are involved in major types of construction. Collected data include information regarding organizational safety policy, safety training, safety meetings, safety equipment, safety inspections, sa...

  13. Strengthening organizational performance through accreditation research-a framework for twelve interrelated studies: the ACCREDIT project study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pope Catherine

    2011-10-01

    -scale, project-based studies. The overall approach for our research is a multi-level, multi-study design. Discussion The ACCREDIT project will examine the utility, reliability, relevance and cost effectiveness of differing forms of accreditation, focused on general practice, aged care and acute care settings in Australia. Empirically, there are potential research gains to be made by understanding accreditation and extending existing knowledge; theoretically, this design will facilitate a systems view of accreditation of benefit to the partnership, international research communities, and future accreditation designers. "Accreditation of health-care organisations is a multimillion dollar industry which shapes care in many countries. Recent reviews of research show little evidence that accreditation increases safety or improves quality. It's time we knew about the cost and value of accreditation and about its future direction." [Professor John Øvretveit, Karolinska Institute, Sweden, 7 October 2009

  14. Industrial Radiography Safety in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    400 μSv average for industrial radiographers in a developed country such as the United Kingdom (NRPB 2005), it is less than that reported for a developing country such as Iran (AEOI 2004), which is 1650 μSv. Industrial radiography accidents most frequently occur with radiation devices using sealed sources such as iridium 192 and cobalt 60, and not with x-ray generators. In comparison to other countries, the safety record of industrial radiographers as judged by accident data and dose records, places Australia somewhere between that of an advanced country and a developing one. Many of the investigations into accidents in industrial radiography have revealed that their frequency and severity would have been reduced or even eliminated if the persons involved had been better prepared to use the equipment, and better prepared to deal with accident and incident situations. In Australia, there appears to be scope for improvement and standardisation of training in the use of industrial radiography equipment, and more importantly, in the training for response to possible accidents and incidents. A national standard for radiation safety training and assessment should be developed by a competent organisation such as the Australian Institute for Non-Destructive Testing. It should be incorporated into the Code of Practice or Safety Guide for industrial radiography and adopted by all jurisdictions. The use of a code of safe practice for industrial radiography should continue. The present NH and MRC code is in need of review. Such a review must result in a code and a guideline document which are readily useable by the industry, standardise training in radiation safety, ensure a high level of operational radiation safety and are available for adoption by the various Australian jurisdictions with minimal supplementary local requirements. Copyright (2006) The Australian Institute for Non-Destructive Testing

  15. An Overview of Trials´Accreditation and Recognition of Brazilian Tests Used for the Safety Evaluation of Cosmetic Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana dos Santos Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For some time, Brazil has been appointed as one of the greatest consumers of cosmetic products in the world. Although cosmetics may seem harmless, destined exclusively to enhance personal appearance or to clean and protect the skin, hair and nails, new studies and events are highlighting the need to evaluate the safety of such products. The present work interrelated the lifecycle of a cosmetic product with the safety trials and tests applicable to some cycle phases. From this information, a survey was made of accredited Conformity Assessment Bodies (CAB and test facilities recognized by the General Coordination for Accreditation (CGCRE which are competent respectively to carry out safety trials and tests of cosmetics. Twenty five competent laboratories were identified to carry out chemical and/or biological trials of cosmetics, according to the legislation ABNT ISO IEC 17025:2005, and 10 test facilities recognized by the Compliance Monitoring Program that can carry out tests of the development of a product for register purposes, aiming at human health and safety. It is interesting to notice that Brazil has accredited laboratories to carry out trials that are critical for the health of the population, such as the levels of heavy metals and the presence of pathogens. On the other hand, CGCRE does not have a program to recognize safety clinical trials. The importance of this kind of study is understood, considering the world history of adverse reactions and the great consumption of cosmetics in the country.

  16. Industrial Safety Training for Soviet Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, A.

    1978-01-01

    Various forms of worker training in industrial safety in the Soviet Union are described by a Soviet labor inspector, with special "industrial safety rooms" the principal means of inplant instruction. Safety education in vocational schools and "people's universities" is also touched on. (MF)

  17. Safety Management Analysis In Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Subramani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Indian society and economy have suffered human and financial losses as a result of the poor safety record in the construction industry. The purpose of this study is to examine safety management in the construction industry. The study will collects data from general contractors, who are involved in major types of construction. Collected data include information regarding organizational safety policy, safety training, safety meetings, safety equipment, safety inspections, safety incentives and penalties, workers’ attitude towards safety, labor turnover rates and compliance with safety legislation. The study will also reveal several factors of poor safety management. Thus the paper will conclude by providing a set of recommendations and strategies to contractors for improving their safety performance.

  18. Pennsylvania Industrial Arts Safety Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Charles D., Ed.

    Intended to alert industrial arts teachers, teacher educators, school administrators, and industrial arts supervisors to the importance of a strong safety program, this guide provides the instructional resources for instituting safety instruction in the public schools, for the inservice training of industrial arts teachers, and for the education…

  19. Radiation Safety in Industrial Radiography. Specific Safety Guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations for ensuring radiation safety in industrial radiography used in non-destructive testing. This includes industrial radiography work that utilizes X ray and gamma sources, both in shielded facilities that have effective engineering controls and in outside shielded facilities using mobile sources. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Duties and responsibilities; 3. Safety assessment; 4. Radiation protection programme; 5. Training and qualification; 6. Individual monitoring of workers; 7. Workplace monitoring; 8. Control of radioactive sources; 9. Safety of industrial radiography sources and exposure devices; 10. Radiography in shielded enclosures; 11. Site radiography; 12. Transport of radioactive sources; 13. Emergency preparedness and response; Appendix: IAEA categorization of radioactive sources; Annex I: Example safety assessment; Annex II: Overview of industrial radiography sources and equipment; Annex III: Examples of accidents in industrial radiography

  20. Reviewing industrial safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains guidance and reference materials for Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) experts, in addition to the OSART Guidelines (TECDOC-449), for use in the review of industrial safety activities at nuclear power plants. It sets out objectives for an excellent industrial safety programme, and suggests investigations which should be made in evaluating industrial safety programmes. The attributes of an excellent industrial safety programme are listed as examples for comparison. Practical hints for reviewing industrial safety are discussed, so that the necessary information can be obtained effectively through a review of documents and records, discussions with counterparts, and field observations. There are several annexes. These deal with major features of industrial safety programmes such as safety committees, reporting and investigation systems and first aid and medical facilities. They include some examples which are considered commendable. The document should be taken into account not only when reviewing management, organization and administration but also in the review of related areas, such as maintenance and operations, so that all aspects of industrial safety in an operating nuclear power plant are covered

  1. Industrial Arts Curriculum Guide for Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This guide is intended to draw attention to the necessity for safety education in every aspect of industrial arts and to provide resources for upgrading and improving safety instruction in the classroom. It also can be used for inservice training of industrial art teachers and for undergraduate teacher education in Connecticut. Introductory…

  2. Accreditation of nuclear engineering programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) Professional Development and Accreditation Committee (PDAC) has the responsibility for accreditation of engineering and technology programs for nuclear and similarly named programs. This committee provides society liaison with the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), is responsible for the appointment and training of accreditation visitors, nomination of members for the ABET Board and Accreditation Commissions, and review of the criteria for accreditation of nuclear-related programs. The committee is composed of 21 members representing academia and industry. The ABET consists of 19 participating bodies, primarily professional societies, and 4 affiliate bodies. Representation on ABET is determined by the size of the professional society and the number of programs accredited. The ANS, as a participating body, has one member on the ABET board, two members on the Engineering Accreditation Commission, and one on the Technology Accreditation Commission. The ABET board sets ABET policy and the commissions are responsible for accreditation visits

  3. New Jersey Industrial Arts Education Safety Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobylarz, Joseph D.; Olender, Francis B.

    This guide was developed to assist the teacher in planning, implementing, revising, or improving safety instruction in industrial arts classes in New Jersey, and has as its theme, "Safety Is Everyone's Responsibility." The guide is organized in seven major sections. The first section explains the purpose of the guide, outlines the contents of a…

  4. Safety Considerations in the Chemical Process Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, Stanley M.

    There is an increased emphasis on chemical process safety as a result of highly publicized accidents. Public awareness of these accidents has provided a driving force for industry to improve its safety record. There has been an increasing amount of government regulation.

  5. Quality and safety in Spain; La calidad y seguridad industrial en Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto Barrio, J. M.; Martinez Martin, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    For three decades, and after the entry of Spain into the EU, it has been developed a regulatory, stable but evolving, framework that has allowed to create the conditions and structures to have stringent safety conditions of products and manufacturing facilities, as well as all the activities necessary for their certification and control. This development has been possible, among others, by the work of impulse and coordination of the Ministry of industry, Energy and Tourism, and particularly of the quality and Industrial safety sub directorate. On the other hand it has been developed a quality infrastructure that has, at the State level, with a standardisation (AENOR) entity and an accreditation body (ENAC) with recognized prestige around the world. In this article, in the first part, a list the regulations which apply to products and manufacturing facilities is shown, as well as explain the role played by standards and accreditation system in industrial safety and the factor of competitiveness that this entails for our industrial sector, and, in the second part, the institutional role of the Ministry and, the aforementioned Sub directorate, is described. The aim of the article is to be a descriptive reference of the current regulatory framework as well as the role of the State in this process. (Author)

  6. Radiation protection and safety in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of ionizing radiation, particularly in medicine and industry, is growing throughout the world, with further expansion likely as technical developments result from research. One of the longest established applications of ionizing radiation is industrial radiography, which uses both X radiation and gamma radiation to investigate the integrity of equipment and structures. Industrial radiography is widespread in almost all Member States. It is indispensable to the quality assurance required in modern engineering practice and features in the work of multinational companies and small businesses alike. Industrial radiography is extremely versatile. The equipment required is relatively inexpensive and simple to operate. It may be highly portable and capable of being operated by a single worker in a wide range of different conditions, such as at remote construction sites, offshore locations and cross-country pipelines as well as in complex fabrication facilities. The associated hazards demand that safe working practices be developed in order to minimize the potential exposure of radiographers and other persons who may be in the vicinity of the work. The use of shielded enclosures (fixed facilities), with effective safety devices, significantly reduces any radiation exposures arising from the work. This Safety Report summarizes good and current state of the art practices in industrial radiography and provides technical advice on radiation protection and safety. It contains information for Regulatory Authorities, operating organizations, workers, equipment manufacturers and client organizations, with the intention of explaining their responsibilities and means to enhance radiation protection and safety in industrial radiography

  7. Distinctions among Accreditation Agencies for Business Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Charles P.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, business accreditation has become a growth industry. In 1988, some eleven percent of business programs were accredited by an accrediting body devoted solely to business program accreditation. Today, over forty-two percent boast of such external validation of their programs. Although the three principal accrediting…

  8. CAECC Software Testing Laboratory Accredited by CNAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Software Testing Laboratory of China Aerospace Engineering and Consultation Center (CAECC) is accredited by China National Accreditation Board for Laboratories (CNAL) as the first such laboratory in domestic space industry. Since CNAL is a member of International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC),software testing reports certificated to CAECC are recognized by 45 laboratory accreditation organizations in AsiaPacific region, Europe and America.

  9. Work life and patient safety culture in Canadian healthcare: connecting the quality dots using national accreditation results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan I

    2012-01-01

    Fostering quality work life is paramount to building a strong patient safety culture in healthcare organizations. Data from two patient safety culture and work-life questionnaires used for Accreditation Canada's national program were analyzed. Strong team leadership was reported in that units were doing a good job of identifying, assessing and managing risks to patients. Seventy-one percent of respondents gave their unit a positive overall grade on patient safety, and 79% of respondents felt that they could often do their best-quality work in their job. However, healthcare workers felt that they did not have enough time to do their jobs adequately and indicated that co-workers were cutting corners in patient care in order to save time. This article discusses engaging both senior leadership and the entire organization in the change process, ensuring supervisory support, and using performance measures to focus organizational efforts on key priorities all as improvement strategies relevant to these findings. These strategies can be used by organizations across sectors and jurisdictions and by healthcare leaders to positively affect work life and patient safety. PMID:22354056

  10. Modified Fittings Enhance Industrial Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center is not only home to one of the largest buildings in the world - the massive Vehicle Assembly Building - it also hosts a number of one-of-a-kind facilities. The more than 30-mile-long campus has witnessed every launch from the Space Shuttle Launch Pad, as well as many homecomings at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Just as important, the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) has seen each element of the International Space Station (ISS) that passes through Kennedy before it goes into orbit. The SSPF is where ISS components are checked, tested, and adjusted before being packed into the Space Shuttle for transport. In an environment like the SSPF - spanning 457,000 square feet of processing areas, operational control rooms, laboratories, logistics areas, and office space - large workstands and equipment used to support the processing of ISS components need to be moved around the facility. One of the devices employed for this task is an air pallet. An air pallet moves on cushions of air instead of wheels. Compressed air inflates the cushions underneath the pallet and is then expelled through exhaust holes. This forms a thin film of air between the cushions and the floor, lifting the platform off the floor and making it easy to move the heavy workstands, equipment, and ISS components. Concerned with the safety of the connections on the pressurized air hoses used for the air pallets, engineers at Kennedy modified an existing commercial cam and groove fitting to control the air supply hose in the event of an accidental release of a pressurized hose. This modification prevented the hose from detaching and, propelled by compressed air, striking workers or equipment. "At the time, these were not available on commercial coupling halves, so NASA made a modification and then put them into use. If a worker were to accidentally try to remove a pressurized hose from the pallet, it no longer rapidly separated, and it safely relieved the pressure," says Paul

  11. A REVIEW ON INDUSTRIAL SAFETY AND HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Govind

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Progress of the industrial safety and occupational health movements in the United States toward their common goal of protecting the physical welfare of workers is discussed in this article. When these activities and workmen's compensation began, about a half century ago, it was anticipated that they would be "complementary and mutually sustaining." Besides presenting historical accounts of the safety and health movements, the authors evaluate the current problems and relationships among safety, health, and compensation activities. This article constitutes part of a broader study by the authors to be published under the title "Workmen's Compensation and Occupational Disability." (Author's abstract courtesy EBSCO. This Article will examine that historical perspective, covering both state and federal law, and will comprehensively detail the current law relating to occupational safety and health in the State of Washington.

  12. Improving labor safety in the petroleum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khobot' ko, V.I.; Nugayev, R.Ya.

    1979-01-01

    A principal problem when creating new techniques and technology is development of optimal interaction in the man-machine-environment interface to eliminate accidents. In the oil and gas industry, this is solved by development of a single management document for ergonomic norms and standard level requirements, as well as establishing a standard safety system. To give production manager greater responsibility for safety, implementation of a ''Single operating system for creation of safe working conditions'' has been initiated.

  13. The Next Accreditation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Lynne M

    2016-02-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has implemented a new accreditation system for graduate medical education in the United States. This system, called the Next Accreditation System, focuses on more continuous monitoring of the outcomes of residency training, and for high-quality programs, less on the detailed processes of that training. This allows programs to innovate to best meet the needs of their trainees and communities. This new system also reviews the clinical learning environment at each institution sponsoring graduate medical education, focusing on professionalism, trainee supervision, duty hour and fatigue management, care transitions, and integration of residents into patient safety and health care quality. This Next Accreditation System is too new to fully assess its outcomes in better preparing residents for medical practice. Assessments of its early implementation, however, suggest we can expect such outcomes in the near future. PMID:26859375

  14. Trends in Area of Safety Communications within Industrial Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Franekova; Ales Janota; Karol Rastocny

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the problems of safety communication in industrial networks for purpose of assurance of functional safety. It is intents on analysis of treats on industry networks and there is described recommended safety protections and their location into layer communication protocol applicable in fieldbus network, which they are used within safety critical processes control.

  15. Workplace Safety and Health Topics: Industries and Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH Industries & Occupations Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Agriculture Aircrew Safety & Health Body Art Center for Workers Compensation Studies (CWCS) Cleaning and ...

  16. Safety analyse of cryptography protocol used within safety-related control systems in industry

    OpenAIRE

    Franeková, Mária; Fedor KÁLLAY; Kurytnik, Igor Piotr

    2008-01-01

    In the paper the possibilities of solution safety communication within area of safety-related control industry system are summarised with using cryptography techniques. Requirements to safety are based on generic standard for functional safety of Electrical/Electronic/Programmable Electronic (E/E/PE) systems IEC 61508 and standards, which define safety and security profiles in industrial network used in measurement and control systems. In mainly part of paper the model of safe...

  17. [Accreditation in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fügedi, Gergely; Lám, Judit; Belicza, Éva

    2016-01-24

    Besides the rapid development of healing procedures and healthcare, efficiency of care, institutional performance and safe treatment are receiving more and more attention in the 21st century. Accreditation, a scientifically proven tool for improving patient safety, has been used effectively in healthcare for nearly a hundred years, but only started to spread worldwide since the 1990s. The support and active participation of medical staff are determining factors in operating and getting accross the nationally developed, upcoming Hungarian accreditation system. However, this active assistance cannot be expected without the participants' understanding of the basic goals and features of the system. The presence of the ISO certification in Hungary, well-known by healthcare professionals, further complicates the understanding and orientation among quality management and improvement systems. This paper aims to provide an overview of the history, goals, function and importance of healthcare accreditation, and its similarities and differences regarding ISO certification. PMID:26772826

  18. Using game theory to improve safety within chemical industrial parks

    CERN Document Server

    Reniers, Genserik

    2013-01-01

    Though the game-theoretic approach has been vastly studied and utilized in relation to economics of industrial organizations, it has hardly been used to tackle safety management in multi-plant chemical industrial settings. Using Game Theory for Improving Safety within Chemical Industrial Parks presents an in-depth discussion of game-theoretic modelling which may be applied to improve cross-company prevention and -safety management in a chemical industrial park.   By systematically analyzing game-theoretic models and approaches in relation to managing safety in chemical industrial parks, Using Game Theory for Improving Safety within Chemical Industrial Parks explores the ways game theory can predict the outcome of complex strategic investment decision making processes involving several adjacent chemical plants. A number of game-theoretic decision models are discussed to provide strategic tools for decision-making situations.   Offering clear and straightforward explanations of methodologies, Using Game Theor...

  19. Safety Management Practices in the Bhutanese Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Dorji

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry is considered as one of the most hazardous industrial sectors wherein the construction workers are more prone to accidents. In developed countries such as United Kingdom and United States of America, there is strict legal enforcement of safety in the construction industry and also in the implementation of safety management systems which are designed to minimize or eliminate accidents at work places. However, occupational safety in construction industry is very poor in developing countries such as Bhutan. This study investigates the prevalent safety management practices and perceptions in the construction industry in Bhutan. The study was conducted among 40 construction contractors and 14 government officials through method of questionnaire survey, interview and discussion. The result of the study revealed that there are many occupational safety problems in the construction industry in Bhutan, problems such as lack of safety regulations and standards, low priority of safety, lack of data on safety at construction sites, lack of competent manpower, lack of safety training, lack of safety promotion and lack of documented and organized safety management systems. Furthermore, the study also proposes some recommendations for safe construction in Bhutan.

  20. Safety and security profiles of industry networks used in safety- critical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária FRANEKOVÁ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The author describes the mechanisms of safety and security profiles of industry and communication networks used within safety – related applications in technological and information levels of process control recommended according to standards IEC 61784-3,4. Nowadays the number of vendors of the safety – related communication technologies who guarantees besides the standard communication, the communication amongst the safety – related equipment according to IEC 61508 is increasing. Also the number of safety – related products is increasing, e. g. safety Fieldbus, safety PLC, safety curtains, safety laser scanners, safety buttons, safety relays and other. According to world survey the safety Fieldbus denoted the highest growth from all manufactured safety products.The main part of this paper is the description of the safety-related Fieldbus communication system, which has to guaranty Safety Integrity Level.

  1. System safety education focused on industrial engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, W. L.; Morris, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    An educational program, designed to train students with the specific skills needed to become safety specialists, is described. The discussion concentrates on application, selection, and utilization of various system safety analytical approaches. Emphasis is also placed on the management of a system safety program, its relationship with other disciplines, and new developments and applications of system safety techniques.

  2. Application of VR and HF technologies for improving industrial safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loupos, K.; Christopoulos, D.; Vezzadini, L.; Hoekstra, W.; Salem, W.; Chung, P.W.H.

    2007-01-01

    Safety in industrial environments can nowadays be regarded as an issue of major importance. Large amounts of money are spent by industries on this matter in order to improve safety in all levels, by reducing risks of causing damages to equipment, human injuries or even fatalities. Virtual Reality (V

  3. Preliminary study on improving safety culture in Malaysian nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents preliminary study on safety culture and its implementation in Malaysian nuclear industries by realizing the importance of safety culture; identification of important safety culture attributes; safety culture assessment and the practices to incorporate the identified safety culture attributes in organization. The first section of this paper explains the terms and definitions related to safety culture. Second, for the realization of importance of safety culture in organization, the international operational experiences emphasizing the importance of safety culture are described. Third, important safety culture attributes which are frequently cited in literature are provided. Fourth, methods to assess safety culture in operating organization are described. Finally, the practices to enhance the safety culture in an organization are discussed

  4. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported on the following: radiation monitoring with regard to personnel monitoring and health physics instrumentation; environs surveillance with regard to atmospheric monitoring, water monitoring, radiation background measurements, and soil and grass samples; radiation and safety surveys with regard to laboratory operations monitoring, radiation incidents, and laundry monitoring; industrial safety and special projects with regard to accident analysis, disabling injuries, and safety awards

  5. Behavioral Safety in the Food Services Industry: Challenges and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebbon, Angela; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur Oli; Austin, John

    2012-01-01

    During the course of a 6-year behavioral safety consult at a food and drink industry site, data were collected on the number of Occupational Safety Health Administration (OSHA) recordable incidents, number of lost and restricted days, and number of peer safety observations. Employees were trained to identify safe and unsafe behavior, conduct peer…

  6. OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ISSUES IN VICTORIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY, AUSTRALIA

    OpenAIRE

    M. Asad, Abdurrahman

    2010-01-01

    The construction industry has one of the highest injury ratios of all Australian industries. Individuals employed on the construction industries find themselves confronted with dangerous and life-threatening work conditions. However, it appears that the trend in Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) performance of construction industry has improved consistently compared with the other industries. The enforcement of OHS law and regulation, and the outcome of authority function to assist and pro...

  7. Evaluation Indicator System for China’s Agricultural Industrial Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingpeng; GAO; Bin; CHEN; Qinyang; LI

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of new characteristics and trend of China’s agricultural development in the post-WTO period,combining analysis of factors influencing agricultural industrial safety,this paper builds an evaluation indicator system for China’s agricultural industrial safety by scientific indicator system design method.This indicator system includes risk factor indicators(showing risk degree)and capacity factor indicators(showing guaranteeing ability),and consists of 7 subsystems:consumption safety,production safety,industrial controlling capacity,industrial development capacity,industrial development environment,government functions and industrial foundation condition.Risk factor is divided into 5 levels:higher risk,high risk,medium risk,low risk and lower risk;guarantee risk is also divided into five levels:strong,healthy,normal,weak and disabled.According to the overall evaluation score obtained from weighting sum,the agricultural industrial safety includes 5 types:very safe,safe,basically safe,not safe and hazardous.This evaluation indicator system is expected to providing theoretical reference for evaluating China’s agricultural industrial safety.

  8. Safety of Nanotechnology in Food Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Amini, Seyed Mohammad; Gilaki, Marzieh; Karchani, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    The arrival of nanotechnology in various industries has been so rapid and widespread because of its wide-ranging applications in our daily lives. Nutrition and food service is one of the biggest industries to be affected by nanotechnology in all areas, changing even the nature of food itself. Whether it’s farming, food packaging, or the prevention of microbial contamination the major food industries have seen dramatic changes because of nanotechnology. Different nanomaterials such as nanopowd...

  9. Safety culture and safety management within the Norwegian-controlled shipping industry ; State of art, interrelationships, and influencing factors

    OpenAIRE

    Oltedal, Helle Asgjerd

    2011-01-01

    This research focuses attention on safety challenges within the Norwegian shipping industry. A status picture of the shipboard safety culture and the interrelationships with safety management and organizational factors is given. Three research questions are explored: (1) What characterizes safety culture and safety management within the shipping industry? (2) What is the relationship between safety culture and safety performance within the shipping industry? (3) What charact...

  10. Health and safety record of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the claim of the nuclear industry to have an excellent safety record, in terms of health and accident records of workers in the industry. It does not consider accidents which have not resulted in harm to the workers' health. The nuclear industry is considered to include all work with ionising radiations and radioactive materials, in education, research, medicine and industry. Since 'safety' is not an absolute concept, comparisons are made with the published records of other industries, and a study is made of the performance of the nuclear industry in relation to its own safety criteria. Data are presented on the radiation exposure of nuclear workers in Europe, America, India and Australia, in relation to the internationally recommended limits, and there is some discussion of the risks involved in these limits. The death rate in parts of the nuclear industry in America, the United Kingdom, and Australia is presented and compared with the death rate for other industries in those countries, and a listing is made of deaths caused by radiation in the period 1945 to 1968. Injury rates for the US and Australian nuclear industries are also compared with the injury rates for other industries in these countries. Consideration is given to the safety record of individual components of the nuclear industry (using the wide definition of this industry given above), special attention being given to health records of uranium miners, plutonium workers and radiologists. Although there are difficulties in obtaining sufficiently detailed information of this kind it is considered that the data presented, relative to any reasonable standard, demonstrate that the nuclear industry has a safety record to be proud of. (author)

  11. Principles and methods of securing industrial ecological safety

    OpenAIRE

    П. Г. Белов; Ю. Ф. Запорожченко

    1999-01-01

    Proposed is classification of risks, determined is regularity and factors of technogenic acci­dents, proposed is energoentropic concept of technogenic risks, considered are the principles and methods of securing industrial and ecologic safety

  12. Industrial irradiator radiation safety program assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark A.

    2000-03-01

    Considerable attention is typically given to radiation safety in the design of irradiators and initially establishing the program. However, one component that may not receive enough attention is applying the continuous improvement philosophy to the radiation safety program. Periodic total program assessments of radiation safety can ensure that the design and implementation of the program continues to be applicable to the operations. The first step in the process must be to determine what is to be covered in the program assessment. While regulatory compliance audits are a component, the most useful evaluation will extend beyond looking only at compliance and determine whether the radiation safety program is the most appropriate for the particular operation. Several aspects of the irradiator operation, not all of which may routinely be considered "radiation safety", per se, should be included: Design aspects of the irradiator and operating system, system controls, and maintenance procedures, as well as the more traditional radiation safety program components such as surveys, measurements and training.

  13. Management of health, safety and environment in process industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan; Fiévez, C.; Gerbec, M.;

    2008-01-01

    The present status of industrial HSE management in a number of EU member states is reviewed, with a focus on the integration of health, safety and environment in single management systems. The review provides insight into the standards and paradigms adopted by industry, and it identifies trends...... efficiently and also from the further development of meaningful safety performance indicators that identify the conditions prior to accidents and incidents. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  14. Road safety and trade and industry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2014-01-01

    Trade and industry mostly experience the negative consequences of crashes, but sometimes the consequences are positive. The negative consequences of road traffic crashes include loss of personnel and damage to vehicles. Some other industries, such as damage repair companies, on the other hand, deriv

  15. Behaviour Grid for Improving Safety in Industrial Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de J. (Johannes); Teeuw, W.B. (Wouter)

    2012-01-01

    The Saxion University of Applied Sciences recently started the project “Safety atWork”. The objective of the project is to increase safety at the workplace by applyingand combining state of the art artifacts Ambient Intelligence, Industrial & ProductDesign and Smart Functional Materi

  16. Applying the behaviour grid for improving safety in industrial environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de J. (Johannes); Heylen, D. (Dirk); Teeuw, W.B. (Wouter)

    2013-01-01

    The Saxion University of Applied Sciences recently started its “Safety at Work” project. Its objective is to increase safety in the workplace by combining and applying state-of-the-art factors from Ambient Intelligence, Industrial & Product Design and Smart Materials [1].The human fa

  17. Safety and security profiles of industry networks used in safety- critical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Franeková, Mária

    2008-01-01

    The author describes the mechanisms of safety and security profiles of industry and communication networks used within safety – related applications in technological and information levels of process control recommended according to standards IEC 61784-3,4. Nowadays the number of vendors of the safety – related communication technologies who guarantees besides the standard communication, the communication amongst the safety – related equipment according to IEC 61508 is increasing. Also the n...

  18. From industrial safety to corporate health management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, K J

    2005-04-15

    Occupational health and safety is one of the most important topics of ergonomics. In many countries the practical issues are addressed in worker protection laws or rules and most companies have some sort of occupational health and safety system. As with many other ergonomics approaches, such activities are often necessary because of legal requirements. Such efforts are often viewed by management as primarily cost intensive. To change this image, it would be helpful to have a more positive, management-oriented approach. Corporate health management as a module of an integrated management system can fulfil this goal.

  19. Biosensor: an emerging safety tool for meat industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Jairath, Gauri; Ahlawat, Satyavir Singh; Pathera, Ashok; Singh, Prashant

    2016-04-01

    The meat industry associated with the health hazards like deadly pathogens, veterinary drugs, pesticide residues, toxins and heavy metals is in need of a tool to tackle the awful situation and ensure safer product to consumer. The growth in the industry, global trade scenario, stringent laws and consumer awareness has placed an extra onus on the meat industry to meet out the expectations and demands. Biosensors are the latest tool of detection in the fast growing industries including the food industry. Hence an attempt is envisaged here to review the possibility of harnessing biosensors as tool of safety to safe guard the consumer health and address safety issues in reference to the common threats of concern in the meat industry. PMID:27413204

  20. Approaching safety in the Swedish and Danish construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grill, Martin; Grytnes, Regine; Törner, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    identifies seven factors perceived by the professionals as related to lower occupational accident rates in the construction industry. Engaging in participatory management, promoting long-term planning and long-term tenures, encouraging cooperation, cautiousness and compliance to rules as well as challenging...... authorities, were described as connected to successful safety management. These factors may guide further research in the field, as well as safety managers and officials engaged in decreasing accident rates in the construction industry in Scandinavia and elsewhere.......Background: Persistent high accident rates in the construction industry motivate research to improve the understanding of underlying factors affecting safety behaviour and safety outcomes. The Scandinavian countries of Sweden and Denmark are culturally similar but with a considerable difference...

  1. Radiation safety in industrial radiography in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article presents the application of radiography in almost all sectors of the industry from construction stage of plants, in oil and gas, petrochemical and power industry which are the biggest users of radiography. Industrial radiography is being conducted using a set of operational procedures developed by the level 3 radiographer and approved by the Radiological Health and Safety Officer (RHSO) to ensure safe and successful completion of the activity

  2. New Safety Model for the Commercial Human Spaceflight Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, A.; Bond, S.; Maropoulos, P.

    2012-01-01

    The aviation and space domains have safety guidelines and recommended practices for Design Organisations (DOs) and Operators alike. In terms of Aerospace DOs there are certification criteria to meet and to demonstrate compliance there are Advisory Circulars or Acceptable Means of Compliance to follow. Additionally there are guidelines such as Aerospace Recommended Practices (ARP), Military Standards (MIL-STD 882 series) and System Safety Handbooks to follow in order to identify and manage failure conditions. In terms of Operators there are FAA guidelines and a useful ARP that details many tools and techniques in understanding Operator Safety Risks. However there is currently no methodology for linking the DO and Operator safety efforts. In the space domain NASA have provided safety standards and guidelines to follow and also within Europe there are European Co-operation of Space Standardization (ECSS) to follow. Within the emerging Commercial Human Spaceflight Industry, the FAA's Office of Commercial Space Transportation has provided hazard analysis guidelines. However all of these space domain safety documents are based on the existing aerospace methodology and once again, there is no link between the DO and Operator's safety effort. This paper addresses the problematic issue and presents a coherent methodology of joining up the System Safety effort of the DOs to the Operator Safety Risk Management such that a 'Total System' approach is adopted. Part of the rationale is that the correct mitigation (control) can be applied within the correct place in the accident sequence. Also this contiguous approach ensures that the Operator is fully aware of the safety risks (at the accident level) and therefore has an appreciation of the Total System Risk. The authors of this paper contend that it is better practice to have a fully integrated safety model as opposed to disparate requirements or guidelines. Our methodology is firstly to review 'best practice' approaches from

  3. Safety, economic incentives and insurance in the Norwegian petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increased use of key performance indicators and incentive schemes in the petroleum industry. Applying modern incentive theory, we explore what implications this management trend has for injury and major accident prevention efforts and safety. Can economic incentives be designed for accident prevention activities? In cases where this is not possible, what are the challenges for the safety efforts? In particular, how are safety efforts affected by enhanced economic incentives for other performance dimensions like production and rate of return? Can safety be neglected? What remedies are available?

  4. Accredited Birth Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 717-933-9743 Accredited since January 2016 100 Bright Eyes Midwifery and Wild Rivers Women's Health Accredited ... Birthing Center-Cedar Park Accredited 1130 Cottonwood Creek Trail Building D Suite 2 Cedar Park, TX 78613 ...

  5. Promoting safety culture in radiation industry through radiation audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper illustrates the Malaysian experience in implementing and promoting effective radiation safety program. Current management practice demands that an organization inculcate culture of safety in preventing radiation hazard. The aforementioned objectives of radiation protection can only be met when it is implemented and evaluated continuously. Commitment from the workforce to treat safety as a priority and the ability to turn a requirement into a practical language is also important to implement radiation safety policy efficiently. Maintaining and improving safety culture is a continuous process. There is a need to establish a program to measure, review and audit health and safety performance against predetermined standards. This program is known as radiation safety audit and is able to reveal where and when action is needed to make improvements to the systems of controls. A structured and proper radiation self-auditing system is seen as the sole requirement to meet the current and future needs in sustainability of radiation safety. As a result safety culture, which has been a vital element on safety in many industries can be improved and promote changes, leading to good safety performance and excellence. (author)

  6. Community Road Safety Initiatives for the Minerals Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Horberry

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Major companies in the minerals industry are increasingly recognizing that their operations have an impact in the wider community. Regarding transportation issues, this impact extends beyond purely the safety of company vehicle fleets to consideration of Community Road Safety (CRS concerns, which address the driving, walking, and riding practices of community members in a locale with increased heavy vehicle traffic. Our assessment here of national and international trends in approaches to road safety awareness and associated road safety strategies is meant to inform companies in the minerals industry of developments that can influence the design of their road safety initiatives. The review begins by considering the overall road safety context and the dominant “safe systems” framework employed internationally. Thereafter, it considers what is typically included in CRS initiatives for the minerals industry. Three case studies are then presented to highlight approaches that feature exemplary collaboration, design, implementation, or impact. Thereafter, we analyze lessons learnt by key researchers and practitioners in the CRS field. Finally, we conclude that best CRS practices for the minerals industry rely on eleven factors, including for example collaboration with local entities and stepwise implementation.

  7. Further activities of safety culture toward nuclear transportation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On September 30, 1999, a criticality accident occurred at the uranium processing facility of the JCO Co. Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as ''JCO'') Tokai plant, located in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture. This was an unprecedented accident in Japan's history of peaceful use of nuclear power, resulting in three workers exposed to severe radiation, two of whom died, and the evacuation and enforced indoor confinement of local residents. Nuclear power suppliers must take personal responsibility for ensuring safety. In this connection, the electric power industry, heavy electric machinery manufacturers, fuel fabricators, and nuclear power research organizations gathered together to establish the Nuclear Safety Network (NSnet) in December 1999, based on the resolve to share and improve the level of the safety culture across the entire nuclear power industry and to assure that such an accident never occurs again. NSnet serves as a link between nuclear power enterprises, research organizations, and other bodies, based on the principles of equality and reciprocity. A variety of activities are pursued, such as diffusing a safety culture, implementing mutual evaluation among members, and exchanging safety-related information. Aiming to share and improve the safety culture throughout the entire nuclear power industry, NSnet thoroughly implements the principle of safety first, while at the same time making efforts to restore trust in nuclear power

  8. INPO accreditation - product definition for utility training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of its responsibility to promote training excellence, the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) initiated an accreditation program in 1982 on behalf of its member utilities. The purpose of the accreditation program is to assist INPO members in developing and maintaining training programs that produce well-qualified, competent personnel to operate the nation's nuclear power plants. Accreditation formally recognizes nuclear utility training as meeting the INPO accreditation objectives and criteria for initial and continuing training programs for operations, maintenance, and technical personnel. The ultimate objective to be achieved by accreditation is to maintain high-quality training and enhance the professionalism of the personnel who operate the nuclear power plants. While initial accreditation represents recognition that quality training programs have been put in place at the nuclear power plants, the renewal of accreditation represents recognition that quality training programs have been put in place at the nuclear power plants, the renewal of accreditation will keep the training programs vital, effective, and up to high standards. The nuclear power industry has accepted the responsibility of striving for excellence in training its personnel to safely operate the power plants. The full use of accreditation and the accrediting process is an important means to fulfilling this responsibility

  9. Probabilistic safety targets in different industrial applications and their comparability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey is given of quantified safety objectives that have developed - for various purposes - in different industry and high-technology sectors (e.g. process and petrochemical industries; nuclear industry, aeronautics; structural applications such as off-shore structures and dams; pharmaceutics and toxic substances) over the past two-decades. In certain cases such objectives are to be regarded as design and operational objectives; in others they are aimed at determining acceptability/tolerability of risks to which individuals or groups of the population are exposed in modern society. Associated to the demonstration of quantified safety objectives are Probabilistic safety/risk analyses at various levels, which implies the resolution of problems related to their validity and uncertainty-bands. Considerations are put forward with regard to the comparability or non-comparability) of several of the objectives that are examined. (author)

  10. Safety in Rubber Industry Workplaces European Experiences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claudio Celeta

    2011-01-01

    In Europe,since many years,safety in workplaces has been one of the main priorities for authorities and enterprises.European authorities have arranged a set of standards and rules,so that this target is achieved and maintained as far as possible.In particular,the so-called Machinery Directive has a considerable importance.Its first edition was published in the Official Journal of the European Community in 1989 and has been continuously updated up to the edition actually in force,published in 2006. The Machinery Directive provides that different risks shall be considered when designing and manufacturing a machine,such as sources of energy,static electricity,high temperature,explosive materials and chemical reactions,noise,vibrations,powders and gases,assembling errors etc.

  11. Managing for safety and safety culture within the UK nuclear industry. A regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines the basis of the legal system for the regulation of health and safety at work within the United Kingdom (UK), and in particular, the regulation of the nuclear industry. The framework, formulated by the regulator, which has been published as a practical guide for directors, managers, health and safety professionals and employee representatives for the successful management of health and safety is explained. This guidance, however, concentrates, to a large extent, on management systems and only addresses in part the types of issues, such as behaviours, values, attitudes and beliefs which contribute to the safety culture of an organization. The regulator of the UK nuclear industry has considered research, and other work, carried out by several organizations in this area, notably the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (ACSNI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and produced its own framework for managing for safety at nuclear installations. As a regulator, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), and its inspectorate responsible for regulation of the nuclear industry, HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (HMNII), are not the appropriate organization to assess the safety culture of an organization, but positively encourage organizations to both carry out this assessment themselves and to monitor their performance. To this end, HSE has developed, and made available, the Health and Safety Climate Tool which is aimed at providing organizations with information which can be used as part of a continuous improvement process. (author)

  12. Introduction of systematic safety assessment techniques to underground coal industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Beirne, T.; Napper, A. (Australian Coal Association, Sydney, NSW (Australia))

    1990-08-01

    Statistics show the mining industry to be one of the most hazardous industries in Australia. The use of formal system safety and risk assessment techniques could do much to supplement existing safety management techniques, helping to identify and offer solutions to reduce the hazardous and loss creating situations commonly encountered. The concepts of system safety (also known as systematic safety assessment) and risk assessment have been analysed and numerous attempts (mostly successful) made to introduce various investigative techniques into operational mines. Most of these techniques were developed in other high risk industries and needed various adaptions to be useful in a mine operation where many of the losses fall into the high frequency low severity class. A balance must be found between technical excellence and the relatively simple detail required by mine staff when using these techniques. The key objectives of this project were to review the applicability of system safety and risk assessment techniques via case studies, and to deposit within the industry a skill base to continue such work. These key objectives have been fully met.

  13. Implementation of the safety components base on industrial networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, P.; Hetmańczyk, M. P.

    2015-11-01

    Capabilities of modern automation systems, especially in the field of industrial networks applications, encouraging them to favor during the process of developing the automation project [2,3,5]. Extensive network topologies and simplicity and clear structure causing displacement of the classic wiring. The article presents: project workflow for creating laboratory stand based on industrial network and base on it implementing the safety system. The individual steps of the process are described. In addition, the paper presents the main concept for controlling the safety functions of the system.

  14. Teamwork and Safety in the Maritime Industry: A SWOT Approach

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The past few decades the use of teams has increased, also in complex sociotechnical systems such as the maritime industry. Safety issues involve a wide range of elements, including human factors, and pose a number of challenges to organisations in the shipping industry. The primary aim of this study was to examine the Big Five of teamwork model and its ability to capture teamwork aspects of all kinds of teams, independent of team type, organisational level and domain. The collect...

  15. Assessing safety culture and safety performance in a high hazard industry

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Ceri

    2014-01-01

    In the UK 27 million working days are lost due to work-related illness or injury; at an estimate of £13.4 billion to the economy. Over the last 30 years researchers have examined safety culture and its relationship to poor safety performance. An organisation in the high hazard construction industry wanted to understand the factors that shaped and influenced safety performance and safety culture. This thesis details a research project which addresses that aim. A multi-method, triangulated appr...

  16. Structural modeling of safety performance in construction industry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Khosravi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With rapid economic development and industrialization, the construction industry continues to rank among the most hazardous industries in the world. Therefore, construction safety is always a significant concern for both practitioners and researchers. The objective of this study was to create a structural modeling of components that influence the safety performance in construction projects.We followed a two-stage Structural Equation Model based on a questionnaire study (n=230. In the first stage, we applied the Structural Equation Model to the proposed model to test the validity of the observed variables of each latent variable. In the next stage, we modified the proposed model. The LISREL 8.8 software was used to conduct the analysis of the structural model.A good-fit structural model (Goodness of Fit Index=0.92; Root Mean Square Residual=0.04; Root Mean Square Error of Approximation=0.04; Comparative Fit Index=0.98; Normalized Fit Index=0.96 indicated that social and organizational constructs influence safety performance via the general component of the safety climate.The new structural model can be used to provide better understanding of the links between safety performance indicators and contributing components, and make stronger recommendations for effective intervention in construction projects.

  17. Post-Fukushima Probabilistic Safety Enhancements of Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Janghwan; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Lee, Hyun-Gyo [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd. Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Nuclear concerned society as well as regulatory agency of Korea also asked several safety measures be included to the existing safety principles. These measures include the post-Fukushima near action items, several mid-long term obligations for severe accidents and rare external hazards which were disregarded due to unlikely event probabilities. This paper illustrates some activities being done or planned in view of probabilistic assessment boundaries; 1) Items currently performed by industry, 2) Regulatory measures which will impact to the industry activities, 3) Activities planned by mid-long bases. After the Fukushima accident, the significance of severe accidents and PSA came to the public as well as the industry itself. Among fifty safety-related plans, in this paper, we showed the implementation strategies and interim insights from LPSD PSA. The plans or activities now underway are further enhancing the safety for operating by introducing PSR and construction plants by inclusion of PSA insights into SAR. The main focus for safety improvement is targeted by not only the hardware improvement, but also systematic structure and effective operational improvement. The results of LPSD PSA implementation strategy will contribute to conforming of regulatory requirement and legislation of PSA which requests the application of extended scope of analysis, new methodology, PSA quality, living PSA through technically sound and application- specific PSA models.

  18. Post-Fukushima Probabilistic Safety Enhancements of Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear concerned society as well as regulatory agency of Korea also asked several safety measures be included to the existing safety principles. These measures include the post-Fukushima near action items, several mid-long term obligations for severe accidents and rare external hazards which were disregarded due to unlikely event probabilities. This paper illustrates some activities being done or planned in view of probabilistic assessment boundaries; 1) Items currently performed by industry, 2) Regulatory measures which will impact to the industry activities, 3) Activities planned by mid-long bases. After the Fukushima accident, the significance of severe accidents and PSA came to the public as well as the industry itself. Among fifty safety-related plans, in this paper, we showed the implementation strategies and interim insights from LPSD PSA. The plans or activities now underway are further enhancing the safety for operating by introducing PSR and construction plants by inclusion of PSA insights into SAR. The main focus for safety improvement is targeted by not only the hardware improvement, but also systematic structure and effective operational improvement. The results of LPSD PSA implementation strategy will contribute to conforming of regulatory requirement and legislation of PSA which requests the application of extended scope of analysis, new methodology, PSA quality, living PSA through technically sound and application- specific PSA models

  19. Safety in Trade and Industrial and Technical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John C.

    Intended to serve as a resource guide to assist trade, industrial, and technical teachers in maintaining an effective and efficient safety program, the document does not contain information concerning the many specific operations of the various trades. The materials serve as a background for teachers as they develop their own units of instruction…

  20. Food Safety Practices in the Egg Products Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viator, Catherine L; Cates, Sheryl C; Karns, Shawn A; Muth, Mary K; Noyes, Gary

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a national census survey of egg product plants (n = 57) to obtain information on the technological and food safety practices of the egg products industry and to assess changes in these practices from 2004 to 2014. The questionnaire asked about operational and sanitation practices, microbiological testing practices, food safety training for employees, other food safety issues, and plant characteristics. The findings suggest that improvements were made in the industry's use of food safety technologies and practices between 2004 and 2014. The percentage of plants using advanced pasteurization technology and an integrated, computerized processing system increased by almost 30 percentage points. Over 90% of plants voluntarily use a written hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) plan to address food safety for at least one production step. Further, 90% of plants have management employees who are trained in a written HACCP plan. Most plants (93%) conduct voluntary microbiological testing. The percentage of plants conducting this testing on egg products before pasteurization has increased by almost 30 percentage points since 2004. The survey findings identify strengths and weaknesses in egg product plants' food safety practices and can be used to guide regulatory policymaking and to conduct required regulatory impact analysis of potential regulations.

  1. Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Hahn; Thomas Anderson

    2005-04-01

    Traditionally, the primary focus of the chemical industry has been safety and productivity. However, recent threats to our nation’s critical infrastructure have prompted a tightening of security measures across many different industry sectors. Reducing vulnerabilities of control systems against physical and cyber attack is necessary to ensure the safety, security and effective functioning of these systems. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has developed a strategy to secure these vulnerabilities. Crucial to this strategy is the Control Systems Security and Test Center (CSSTC) established to test and analyze control systems equipment. In addition, the CSSTC promotes a proactive, collaborative approach to increase industry's awareness of standards, products and processes that can enhance the security of control systems. This paper outlines measures that can be taken to enhance the cybersecurity of process control systems in the chemical sector.

  2. Approaching safety in the Swedish and Danish construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grill, Martin; Grytnes, Regine; Törner, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    -compliance; cooperation or conflict; caution or cockiness; planning management; and employment security. Interconnections between the thematic areas revealed patterns of interaction between managers and employees, interpreted as process models of participatory and directive safety cultures. Conclusion: This study......Background: Persistent high accident rates in the construction industry motivate research to improve the understanding of underlying factors affecting safety behaviour and safety outcomes. The Scandinavian countries of Sweden and Denmark are culturally similar but with a considerable difference...... in accidents rates, especially in construction, and as such offer an opportunity to explore organizational and managerial issues related to safety outcomes. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with five construction managers and four construction workers in Danish and Swedish construction...

  3. SAFETY PERFORMANCE OF SUBCONTRACTORS IN THE PALESTINIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Enshassi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Subcontractors perform most of the construction works and their effect on industry are apparent in different activities of construction. Therefore, subcontractors need more attention from government and contractors union. The aim of this paper is to identify, evaluate, and rank factors that influence safety performance of subcontractors in the Gaza Strip (Palestine according to their relative importance. The study concluded that reported accident rates will decrease among subcontractors and their workers if new workers are trained well in the work site and they are informed about dangerous places, and if a workable safety plan is well preplanned. The results also showed that reported accident rates increased among subcontractors when using old, unsafe equipment and due to the complexity or difficulty in the construction sites features. Owners and general contractors need to stipulate strict clauses for safety in the contract for improving safety record of subcontractors. Construction workers must receive proper job related safety and health training with a safety logbook. It is recommended that the subcontractors and workers should attend continuing safety programs on regular basis as part of their perquisite to work in construction sites.

  4. Should healthcare providers do safety cases? Lessons from a cross-industry review of safety case practices

    OpenAIRE

    Sujan, Mark A.; Habli, Ibrahim; Kelly, Tim P.; Pozzi, Simone; Johnson, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Healthcare organisations are often encouraged to learn from other industries in order to develop proactive and rigorous safety management practices. In the UK safety–critical industries safety cases have been used to provide justification that systems are acceptably safe. There has been growing interest in healthcare in the application of safety cases for medical devices and health information technology. However, the introduction of safety cases into general safety management and re...

  5. Human factor in the problem of Russian nuclear industry safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The approach to human factor definition, considered in the paper, consists of recognition of as many as possible factors for developing a complete list of factors, which have influence on mistakes or successful work of NPP personnel. Safety culture is considered as the main factor. The enhancement in nuclear power industry includes an optimization of organizational structures and development of personnel safety attitudes. The organizational factors, as possible root causes for human errors, need to be identified, assessed and improved. The organizational activities taken in Russia are presented

  6. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND RISK ASSESSMENT IN THE MINING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Radosavljević

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Global dynamics of the technological changes creates a need for modern approaches while evaluating and analysing the risk in the mining industry. Analysing and managing technical systems in the mining industry is a key factor concerning the quality of their functioning. Dependability, safety, and maintenance management based on the risk analysis can contribute substantially to the overall effectiveness and efficiency of the mining technological systems. Besides applying adequate technology, organizing and harmonizing the system links among various structures and standardization is of the great importance in achieving business goals. The choice and use of the optimal solutions in the analysis ought to recognize, anticipate, forestall, reduce, and minimize the risk and possible destructive applications. The mining industry production practice recognizes the need for the strategy of organizational and process redesigning as well as raising this issue to the level of the other managing functions of the company. A realistic view of the present state in the risk analysis shows the need for the rapid transformation in the mining industry. The study puts forward a proposal for the possible approaches and improvement relating to the following and implementing modern, standardized world trends, (models and methods concerning the analysis of the technical and occupational safety risk in some of the basic processes in the mining industry.

  7. Virtual moire interference approach for an industrial safety monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Rida; Cofer, Darren

    2001-10-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the feasibility and reliability of using the moire interference phenomenon as a means to detect human intrusion within a monitored zone. We applied moire interference principle for use in low-cost, safety-critical industrial monitoring applications. Moire interference is usually applied in the context of industrial applications for shape measurements. In this framework, we show how we can apply this concept to build a new safety product that detects human intrusion into dangerous areas on the factory floor. We demonstrate that a solution based on moire interference offers the potential for detection true 3D objects while preventing false alarms due to lighting variations or shadows and simplifying the image processing software. In addition, our prosed approach is advantageous in the product certification process because it is an active detection method.

  8. Probabilistic safety assessment in the chemical and nuclear industries

    CERN Document Server

    Fullwood, Ralph R

    2000-01-01

    Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) determines the probability and consequences of accidents, hence, the risk. This subject concerns policy makers, regulators, designers, educators and engineers working to achieve maximum safety with operational efficiency. Risk is analyzed using methods for achieving reliability in the space program. The first major application was to the nuclear power industry, followed by applications to the chemical industry. It has also been applied to space, aviation, defense, ground, and water transportation. This book is unique in its treatment of chemical and nuclear risk. Problems are included at the end of many chapters, and answers are in the back of the book. Computer files are provided (via the internet), containing reliability data, a calculator that determines failure rate and uncertainty based on field experience, pipe break calculator, event tree calculator, FTAP and associated programs for fault tree analysis, and a units conversion code. It contains 540 references and many...

  9. Labeled Multi-Bernoulli Tracking for Industrial Mobile Platform Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Rathnayake, Tharindu; Hoseinnezhad, Reza; Tennakoon, Ruwan; Bab-Hadiashar, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a track-before-detect labeled multi-Bernoulli filter tailored for industrial mobile platform safety applications. We derive two application specific separable likelihood functions that capture the geometric shape and colour information of the human targets who are wearing a high visible vest. These likelihoods are then used in a labeled multi-Bernoulli filter with a novel two step Bayesian update. Preliminary simulation results show that the proposed solution can successfu...

  10. Evaluation of food safety management systems in Serbian dairy industry

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Tomašević; Nada Šmigić; Ilija Đekić; Vlade Zarić; Nikola Tomić; Jelena Miocinovic; Andreja Rajković

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports incentives, costs, difficulties and benefits of food safety management systems implementation in the Serbian dairy industry. The survey involved 27 food business operators with the national milk and dairy market share of 65 %. Almost two thirds of the assessed dairy producers (70.4 %) claimed that they had a fully operational and certified HACCP system in place, while 29.6 % implemented HACCP, but had no third party certification. ISO 22000 was implemented and certified in ...

  11. Wearable sensors networks for safety applications in industrial scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Musu, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Industrial contexts, and in particular the port areas, are very complex systems to be monitored and controlled due to the combined presence of vehicles and people. The port areas are the gateway between navigation and terrestrial transportation and are of great importance in transport logistics. Unfortunately, the management of port areas is quite complex because the safety of the workers must be always assured. Therefore, in such a context, a centralized control system for the ...

  12. SAFETY PERFORMANCE OF SUBCONTRACTORS IN THE PALESTINIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Adnan Enshassi; Rafiq M. Choudhry; Peter E. Mayer; Younis Shoman

    2008-01-01

    Subcontractors perform most of the construction works and their effect on industry are apparent in different activities of construction. Therefore, subcontractors need more attention from government and contractors union. The aim of this paper is to identify, evaluate, and rank factors that influence safety performance of subcontractors in the Gaza Strip (Palestine) according to their relative importance. The study concluded that reported accident rates will decrease among subcontractors and ...

  13. Safety Politics and Risk Perceptions in Malaysian Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangel, Arne

    Abstract The book deals with the analysis of work hazards and safety in industrial enterprises in Peninsular Malaysia, Southeast Asia. It traces the development of this theme of conflict within the context constituted by state, labour market and labour-management relations in Malaysia. The book...... by the state from Burawoy, Beronius, and Adesina about production politics and social relations in the labour process provides an integrated perspective on individual risk perceptions, safety practices in enterprises, and government regulation. The empirical data were collected during the period 1989...... and safety, when compared with the influence of local conditions? What kind of process develops, as local theory about work hazards are formed among workers. And, which are the opportunities for changing working environment institutions in Malaysia? The first part of the book discusses traditions...

  14. Evaluation of food safety management systems in Serbian dairy industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Tomašević

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports incentives, costs, difficulties and benefits of food safety management systems implementation in the Serbian dairy industry. The survey involved 27 food business operators with the national milk and dairy market share of 65 %. Almost two thirds of the assessed dairy producers (70.4 % claimed that they had a fully operational and certified HACCP system in place, while 29.6 % implemented HACCP, but had no third party certification. ISO 22000 was implemented and certified in 29.6 % of the companies, while only 11.1 % had implemented and certified IFS standard. The most important incentive for implementing food safety management systems for Serbian dairy producers was to increase and improve safety and quality of dairy products. The cost of product investigation/analysis and hiring external consultants were related to the initial set-up of food safety management system with the greatest importance. Serbian dairy industry was not greatly concerned by the financial side of implementing food safety management systems due to the fact that majority of prerequisite programmes were in place and regularly used by almost 100 % of the producers surveyed. The presence of competency gap between the generic knowledge for manufacturing food products and the knowledge necessary to develop and implement food safety management systems was confirmed, despite the fact that 58.8 % of Serbian dairy managers had university level of education. Our study brings about the innovation emphasizing the attitudes and the motivation of the food production staff as the most important barrier for the development and implementation of HACCP. The most important identified benefit was increased safety of dairy products with the mean rank scores of 6.85. The increased customer confidence and working discipline of staff employed in food processing were also found as important benefits of implementing/operating HACCP. The study shows that the level of HACCP

  15. Application of fuzzy integrated evaluation in the safety of coal industry of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; TAO Shu-ren

    2005-01-01

    Based on fuzzy integrated evaluation theory, the safety of coal industry was analyzed, the factors affecting the safety of coal industry was considered, and its fuzzy integrated estimating theory and results were given. Finally this paper proposed a new method of industry safety estimation. According to this method, we can integrate the factors affecting coal industry and deal with the parameters and targets of evaluating factors by quantitative analysis, thus give a scientific and reasonable safety degree analyzing evaluation.

  16. Does accreditation stimulate change? A study of the impact of the accreditation process on Canadian healthcare organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabah Abdo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One way to improve quality and safety in healthcare organizations (HCOs is through accreditation. Accreditation is a rigorous external evaluation process that comprises self-assessment against a given set of standards, an on-site survey followed by a report with or without recommendations, and the award or refusal of accreditation status. This study evaluates how the accreditation process helps introduce organizational changes that enhance the quality and safety of care. Methods We used an embedded multiple case study design to explore organizational characteristics and identify changes linked to the accreditation process. We employed a theoretical framework to analyze various elements and for each case, we interviewed top managers, conducted focus groups with staff directly involved in the accreditation process, and analyzed self-assessment reports, accreditation reports and other case-related documents. Results The context in which accreditation took place, including the organizational context, influenced the type of change dynamics that occurred in HCOs. Furthermore, while accreditation itself was not necessarily the element that initiated change, the accreditation process was a highly effective tool for (i accelerating integration and stimulating a spirit of cooperation in newly merged HCOs; (ii helping to introduce continuous quality improvement programs to newly accredited or not-yet-accredited organizations; (iii creating new leadership for quality improvement initiatives; (iv increasing social capital by giving staff the opportunity to develop relationships; and (v fostering links between HCOs and other stakeholders. The study also found that HCOs' motivation to introduce accreditation-related changes dwindled over time. Conclusions We conclude that the accreditation process is an effective leitmotiv for the introduction of change but is nonetheless subject to a learning cycle and a learning curve. Institutions invest

  17. Modern aspects of occupational safety at meat industry enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Evtushenko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Analyzing causes of injury on Meat Processing Plants give an opportunity to create reasonable and effective ways of prevention and decreasing risks of workers injuries. Methods and materials. The method of an accidental statistical analysis is used during the studies to define general traumatical tendencies in the meat industry of Ukraine which happened within 2003 –2013 years as well as the method of a priori ranking factors on the results of the expert survey. Resultsand discussion.The stage of industrial injuries in the meat industry of Ukraine during 2003-2013 is analyzed. The results of the analysis of the distribution of occupational injuries from machinery, equipment, vehicles, devices the usage of which led to the accident are presented. Identified the most common traumatic factors and jobs | in the meat industry of Ukraine. Found the most traumatic situations in the meat industry due to imperfect safety guard in moving parts of equipment (26%, lack of blocking devices of drive stationary equipment (9%, and engine malfunction (3%. Conclusion. Results of research can be used in improving management decisions projects that can provide safe working conditions on meat processing plants.

  18. Radiological safety in petroleum industry. Towards prevention culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the frame of regulatory control of industrial applications the audit of sealed and open radioactive sources in oil uses is one of the most relevant. The handling of radioactive sources, the requirement of procedures and training are just a few examples among all those that make up the radiological safety culture. A number of requirements divided into three main groups: operational safety at the storage area of radioactive sources, during transportation and during the applications (Cementation, well logging and use of radiotracers) are highlighted. Due to the great number of aspects that have to be taken in account as well as the interrelation of all control processes it is highly recommended that aspects of safety culture and quality should be considered and improvements regarding prevention, should be introduced so as to correct deviations that could arise in order to avoid radiological risk situations, emphasizing risk perception situations, attitude training, implementation of audit and level of safety in the facilities and control of duties, involving radiological material handling, described in the present work. (author)

  19. Research study about the establishment of safety culture. Effects of organizational factors in construction industry's safety indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To find the relationships between safety related activities (such as safety patrol' or '4s/5s activities') and accidents rate in the workplace, questionnaires were sent to 965 construction companies and 120 answers were returned. In this questionnaire, safety activities, safety regulations and safety policies of the companies were asked and organizational climates, company policies, philosophies and the number of accidents in workplace were also asked. There seems some relationships between accidents rate and safety activities, safety regulations and safety policies in the companies, but the deviations between estimate values and observed values are so great that it seems impossible to estimate the accidents rate in the working place from the safety activities, safety regulations and safety policies of the companies. On the other hand, some characteristics of safety activities and organizational climates in the construction industry were identified using multi variants analysis. More detailed researches using sophisticated questionnaire will be conducted in the construction industry and petrochemical industry and relationships between the accidents rate and the safety activities will be compared between different industries. (author)

  20. A Nuclear Safety System based on Industrial Computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plant Protection System(PPS), a nuclear safety Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system for Nuclear Power Plants(NPPs), generates reactor trip on abnormal reactor condition. The Core Protection Calculator System (CPCS) is a safety system that generates and transmits the channel trip signal to the PPS on an abnormal condition. Currently, these systems are designed on the Programmable Logic Controller(PLC) based system and it is necessary to consider a new system platform to adapt simpler system configuration and improved software development process. The CPCS was the first implementation using a micro computer in a nuclear power plant safety protection system in 1980 which have been deployed in Ulchin units 3,4,5,6 and Younggwang units 3,4,5,6. The CPCS software was developed in the Concurrent Micro5 minicomputer using assembly language and embedded into the Concurrent 3205 computer. Following the micro computer based CPCS, PLC based Common-Q platform has been used for the ShinKori/ShinWolsong units 1,2 PPS and CPCS, and the POSAFE-Q PLC platform is used for the ShinUlchin units 1,2 PPS and CPCS. In developing the next generation safety system platform, several factors (e.g., hardware/software reliability, flexibility, licensibility and industrial support) can be considered. This paper suggests an Industrial Computer(IC) based protection system that can be developed with improved flexibility without losing system reliability. The IC based system has the advantage of a simple system configuration with optimized processor boards because of improved processor performance and unlimited interoperability between the target system and development system that use commercial CASE tools. This paper presents the background to selecting the IC based system with a case study design of the CPCS. Eventually, this kind of platform can be used for nuclear power plant safety systems like the PPS, CPCS, Qualified Indication and Alarm . Pami(QIAS-P), and Engineering Safety

  1. Safety approaches in hazardous non-nuclear industries and their relation to nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several industries present major accident hazards: nuclear, chemical, explosive, natural gas, and the various forms of transportation of their product and waste. Natural events present similar or greater potential for disaster. When the sizes and likelihoods of the accidents in question are compared there is often found to be a large gap between the public perception and political acceptability of the hazards in question, and their relative real significance or probability. A variety of regulatory agencies have developed, in the United Kingdom and elsewhere, to control such hazards. The UK chemical industry uses a variety of techniques including simple hazard identification, engineering codes and standards, HAZOP, event and fault-tree analysis, consequence or risk quantification. The multistage safety acceptance procedures used by a few chemical companies are similar in concept to the stages of the licensing procedure used in the UK for nuclear power stations. UK regulatory regimes for the nuclear and chemical industry are compared. The advantages and disadvantages of licensing are discussed. The need for sample inspection is noted. The question of performance targets is considered. The role of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is currently under scrutiny. PSA is a useful tool, which enables comparisons to be made between levels of safety achievable by different means or in different situations. It assumes assurance of reasonable standards of operation and care. It may seem attractive as a basis for regulatory control, but it should be applied only as an aid to judgement. An example is given of the use by the Health and Safety Executive of quantitative risk criteria for advice on the siting of buildings near chemical major hazards. The presentation of risk information to the public is discussed. The Health and Safety Commission's general policy on access to information is described. 11 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  2. Safety- and Risk Analysis Activities in Chemical Industry in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozine, Igor; Duijm, Nijs Jan; Lauridsen Kurt [Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark). Systems Analysis Department

    2001-07-01

    The current paper gives an overview of the legislation and the methods used in safety and risk management in the chemical industry within Europe and in particular within the European Union. The paper is based on a report that has been written for the SOS-1 project under the Nordic nuclear safety research (NKS). Safety- and risk-related matters in the process industry, in particular, in chemical, within the EU are subject to consideration at three levels: (1) EU legislation, (2) European/intemational standardisation, and (3) socio-economic analysis. EC Directives define the 'essential requirements', e.g., protection of health and safety, that must be fulfilled when goods are placed on the market or some industry is put into operation. The European standards bodies (CEN, CENELEC and ETSI) have the task of establishing the corresponding technical specifications, meeting the essential requirements of the Directives, compliance with which will provide a presumption of conformity with the essential requirements. Such specifications are referred to as 'harmonised standards'. Compliance with harmonised standards remains voluntary, and manufacturers are free to choose any other technical solution that provides compliance with the essential requirements. This view is stated in the 'New Approach' to technical harmonisation and standardisation (details can be found on the web page: http://europe.eu.int/comm/enterprise/newapproach/standardization/index .html). Standardisation as well as the regulation of technical risks is increasingly being undertaken at European or international level. The European legislator limits its role to the affirmation of overall objectives, and leaves it to the economic players to draw up the technical procedures and standards to specify in detail the ways and means of attaining them. Many countries have introduced requirements that new legislation and/or administrative regulations be subject to socio-economic analysis

  3. 77 FR 24722 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Safety of Nanomaterials in Cosmetic Products; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Safety of Nanomaterials in... ``Guidance for Industry: Safety of Nanomaterials in Cosmetic Products.'' The draft guidance, when finalized, will represent FDA's current thinking on the safety assessment of nanomaterials in cosmetic...

  4. 78 FR 10064 - Safety Zone; Vigor Industrial Roll-Out, West Duwamish Waterway, Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Vigor Industrial Roll-Out, West Duwamish... at Vigor Industrial. The safety zone is necessary to ensure the safety of the maritime public...

  5. The industry commitment to global transport safety standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, L. [World Nuclear Transport Inst., London (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Standards and regulations have no intrinsic practical effect without taking into account those who are the object of such standards and regulations. Standards and regulations do not become operationally effective until they are implemented by the entities which are subject to them. Accordingly, there is a necessary synergy between the regulator and the regulated - the regulators whose task it is to make and enforce the rules for safe, efficient and reliable transport, and those whose job it is to transport within the rules. One has no full meaning without the other. Harmonisation issues which can impede efficient and timely implementation of regulations can occur at any stage of the process, starting with the timely publication of the IAEA Regulations, incorporation by the modal organisations, adoption by national competent authorities and finally, rendered operational by industrial transport organisations. Both, the regulator and the transporter, can be more effective in achieving their purposes when they co-operate in the interest of mutual understanding. PATRAM provides one excellent opportunity for such exchange between the regulator and the regulated - there are other important opportunities within the IAEA and international modal organisations. I suggest, however, that more could be done between the regulators and the regulated collectively to share real-life experiences with actually implementing the regulations and operating within them, and to draw appropriate lessons. In the case of the international transport safety regulatory regime, it is the nuclear transport industry, such as represented by the World Nuclear Transport Institute (WNTI), which is, of course, the object of transport safety standards and regulations. And as such, the nuclear transport industry is a principal stakeholder in the regime. Regulatory compliance is a cornerstone of the nuclear transport industry. The international nature of the fuel cycle mandates transnational movement of

  6. Development and Evaluation of a Computer-Based Program for Assessing Quality of Family Medicine Teams Based on Accreditation Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Valjevac, Salih; Ridjanovic, Zoran; Masic, Izet

    2009-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED SUMMARY Introduction Agency for healthcare quality and accreditation in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (AKAZ) is authorized body in the field of healthcare quality and safety improvement and accreditation of healthcare institutions. Beside accreditation standards for hospitals and primary health care centers, AKAZ has also developed accreditation standards for family medicine teams. Methods Software development was primarily based on Accreditation Sta...

  7. Occupational health and safety in the mining industry in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraqui, C H; Caubet, A; Harourate, K; Laraqui, O; Verger, C

    1999-01-01

    The mining sector is one of the pillars of our national economy. Our paper concerns safety and occupational health in the mining sector in Morocco. This sector employs 60,000 persons, more than half of them working in the phosphate sectors. There are 36 occupational medical services, with 83 practitioners 395 nurses and 91 agents, protecting 43,926 workers (73% of all personnel). The task of labour inspection in this sector is entrusted to mining engineers. The statistics of the central department of industrial inspection in mines from 1975 to 1995 show a fall in occupational injuries and a progressive increase reported in occupational diseases, 96% of which are silicosis. The improvement of prevention and health at work in the mining sector in Morocco has led to a reduction in occupational hazards and specially occupational injuries. However, an effort seems required so as to generalize occupational medical and safety services in all the mining enterprises and in the craft mining sector in particular.

  8. Forklift safety a practical guide to preventing powered industrial truck incidents and injuries

    CERN Document Server

    Swartz, George

    1999-01-01

    Written for the more than 1.5 million powered industrial truck operators and supervisors in general industry, as well as those in the construction and marine industries, this Second Edition provides an updated guide to training operators in safety and complying with OSHA's 1999 forklift standard. This edition of Forklift Safety includes a new chapter devoted to the new OSHA 1910.178 standard and new information regarding dock safety, narrow aisle trucks, off-dock incidents, tip-over safety, pallet safety, and carbon monoxide.

  9. A health and safety survey of Irish funeral industry workers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, N

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Those handling deceased individuals, including the funeral industry, face a variety of health and safety hazards including occupationally acquired infectious disease. AIMS: To identify the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of Irish funeral industry workers towards occupational hazards and infectious disease in 2009. METHODS: The sample analysed consisted of all listed member premises of the Irish Association of Funeral Directors as at 1 July 2009. A postal survey was sent to each premises in July 2009, with two rounds of follow-up reviews sent to non-responders. Four main areas were covered--occupational hazards, embalming, industry expertise and demographics. The quantitative and qualitative results were analysed to assess knowledge, attitudes and beliefs. Data collection was completed on 31 December 2009. RESULTS: Two hundred and thirty listed member premises were contacted. Twenty-two were unsuitable for the survey. One hundred and thirty-eight valid replies were received from 130 premises, representing a premises response rate of 63% (130\\/208). Seventy-three premises (56%) identified themselves as embalmers. Embalmers had variable vaccine uptake and variable knowledge, attitude and beliefs towards embalming those with blood-borne viruses. Fifteen per cent of respondents reported a work-related injury, back injury being the most common. Splash and sharps injuries were reported as a work-related injury, and infections believed to be work related were also reported. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates widespread occupational health concerns among this professional group. It confirms the need for occupational health advice and services. There is also a strong desire for regulation of this profession in Ireland.

  10. Training Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Training Accreditation Program establishes the objectives and criteria against which DOE nuclear facility training is evaluated to determine its readiness for accreditation. Training programs are evaluated against the accreditation objectives and criteria by facility personnel during the initial self-evaluation process. From this self-evaluation, action plans are made by the contractor to address the scope of work necessary in order to upgrade any deficiencies noted. This scope of work must be formally documented in the Training Program Accreditation Plan. When reviewed and approved by the responsible Head of the Field Organization and cognizant Program Secretarial Office, EH-1 concurrence is obtained. This plan then becomes the document which guides accreditation efforts for the contractor

  11. Industry safety and policy proposal on China’s vehicle and parts sectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CATARC

    2008-01-01

    <正>I. Importance of the vehicle industry safety China has become a big vehicle production country, but not yet a strong one. Therefore people of the industry need to strengthen their awareness on the situation.

  12. STUDYING OF SAFETY CLIMATE ASSESSMENT: A CASE STUDY AT STEEL INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan DARVISH

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of safety climate used as a practical means has determined and assessed potential problems relevant to safety issues in an organization and can be used in individuals’ performance and work efficiency and decreasing rate of incidents ;as well as; guidance to provide safety organization policy and comparison of safety performance in different organizations. The study wants to determine and prepare safety climate profile and application of its results in improving safety situation. In this study, applied tools presented by Loughborough University are used to evaluate safety climate in one of steel industries and data is collected through questionnaire, group discussions or purposeful interviews and observations, and safety climate score was obtained in 17 scopes. Calculating the score of each safety climate domain and preparing the profile indicated there is the average rate (4.89 2 in the safety climate of the industry.

  13. The Role Of Industrial Safety Measures In Combating Occupational Hazards And Accidents In India

    OpenAIRE

    Sharmistha Bhattacharjee

    2012-01-01

    The presence of occupational hazards and industrial accidents de-motivates the worker to contribute their best to the organization. The participation of workers in the workplace which promises safety and security fosters teamwork, quality of product high productivity and a good communication between management and the industrial workers. For combating occupational hazards and accidents in an industrial site, safety is necessary and a challenging issue in an industrial environment. S...

  14. Occupational Health, Safety and Risk Analysis in Large Scale Industry of Lahore

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Qasim; Aroj Bashir; Malik Muhammad Anees; Muhammad Usman Ghani; Moeen Khalid; Faisal Hanan; Jahanzaib Malik

    2014-01-01

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) it is concerned with guarding the safety, health and welfare of people who are engaged in work or employment. The aim of paper is discussed Occupational Health, Safety and Risk Analysis In large scale industry of Lahore. The paper has completed after study various articles and research paper related to Occupational safety and health so it concluded that Promotion of Health is an important part of occupational health professionals. Health educators, safety ...

  15. Factors Contribute to Safety Culture in the Manufacturing Industry in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ong Choon Hee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explain the role of safety culture in the manufacturing industry in Malaysia and identify factors contribute to safety culture. It is suggested in this study that leadership support, management commitment and safety management system are important factors that contribute to safety culture. This study also provides theoretical implications to guide future research and offers practical implications to the managers in the development of safety culture. Given that ...

  16. Role of industry in the environmental health and safety aspects of the developing Plowshare industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    lt is first pointed out that no person or organization has a more vital interest in the early establishment of an effective health and safety program within which commercial operations based on Plowshare technology can be carried on with assurance than does that facet of industry which is directly involved in the attempt to prove out these Plowshare applications. The formulation of such a code must be a matter of the highest priority to all concerned. To accomplish this task successfully, however, requires the exercise of a truly hard-nosed objectivity both on the part of the Governmental agencies who bear statutory responsibility for ensuring the public health and safety and also on that of the industrial groups who are trying to realize the significant economic potentials inherent in the Plowshare technology. While it is abundantly clear that achievement of a sound and reliable public health and safety code is imperative for both regulatory agencies and operating industry, it must also be recognized that both groups serve the inescapable additional responsibility of acting as the public's trustees to assure the healthy development of a new technology which may well prove to be of vital importance to the Nation. The basic nature of the joint operating procedure required in order to provide an effective way of fulfilling these common obligations is then examined. The discussion then turns to the present stage of the developmental progress of the potential Plowshare industry. Scientific breakthrough has long since been accomplished and scientific feasibility has been quite generally proven. For a number of important possible applications even technological feasibility has been established. In these cases the demonstration of economic feasibility and the attainment of public acceptance are the two factors that still remain to be achieved before a full-fledged if still infant industry becomes a reality. Industry alone is capable of determining economic feasibility. It

  17. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is reported in sections entitled: radiation monitoring; Environmental Management Program; radiation and safety surveys; industrial safety and special projects; Office of Operational Safety; and training, lectures, publications, and professional activities. There were no external or internal exposures to personnel which exceeded the standards for radiation protection as defined in DOE Manual Chapter 0524. Only 35 employees received whole body dose equivalents of 10 mSv (1 rem) or greater. There were no releases of gaseous waste from the Laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. There were no releases of liquid radioactive waste from the Laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. The quantity of those radionuclides of primary concern in the Clinch River, based on the concentration measured at White Oak Dam and the dilution afforded by the Clinch River, averaged 0.16 percent of the concentration guide. The average background level at the Perimeter Air Monitoring (PAM) stations during 1980 was 9.0 μrad/h (0.090 μGy/h). Soil samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for eleven radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Plutonium-239 content ranged from 0.37 Bq/kg (0.01 pCi/g) to 1.5 Bq/kg (0.04 pCi/g), and the uranium-235 content ranged from 0.7 Bq/kg (0.02 pCi/g) to 16 Bq/kg (0.43 pCi/g). Grass samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for twelve radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Plutonium-239 content ranged from 0.04 Bq/kg (0.001 pCi/g) to 0.07 Bq/kg (0.002 pCi/g), and the uranium-235 content ranged from 0.37 Bq/kg (0.01 pCi/g) to 12 Bq/kg

  18. [Accreditation of forensic laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sołtyszewski, Ireneusz

    2010-01-01

    According to the framework decision of the European Union Council, genetic laboratories which perform tests for the benefit of the law enforcement agencies and the administration of justice are required to obtain a certificate of accreditation testifying to compliance with the PN EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 standard. The certificate is the official confirmation of the competence to perform research, an acknowledgement of credibility, impartiality and professional independence. It is also the proof of establishment, implementation and maintenance of an appropriate management system. The article presents the legal basis for accreditation, the procedure of obtaining the certificate of accreditation and selected elements of the management system. PMID:21863740

  19. Developing an industry-oriented safety curriculum using the Delphi technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Der-Fa; Wu, Tsung-Chih; Chen, Chi-Hsiang; Chang, Shu-Hsuan; Yao, Kai-Chao; Liao, Chin-Wen

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we examined the development of industry-oriented safety degree curricula at a college level. Based on a review of literature on the practices and study of the development of safety curricula, we classified occupational safety and health curricula into the following three domains: safety engineering, health engineering, and safety and health management. We invited 44 safety professionals to complete a four-round survey that was designed using a modified Delphi technique. We used Chi-square statistics to test the panel experts' consensus on the significance of the items in the three domains and employed descriptive statistics to rank the participants' rating of each item. The results showed that the top three items for each of the three domains were Risk Assessment, Dangerous Machinery and Equipment, and Fire and Explosion Prevention for safety engineering; Ergonomics, Industrial Toxicology, and Health Risk Assessment for health engineering; and Industrial Safety and Health Regulations, Accident Investigation and Analysis, and Emergency Response for safety and health management. Only graduates from safety programmes who possess practical industry-oriented abilities can satisfy industry demands and provide value to the existence of college safety programmes.

  20. Developing an industry-oriented safety curriculum using the Delphi technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Der-Fa; Wu, Tsung-Chih; Chen, Chi-Hsiang; Chang, Shu-Hsuan; Yao, Kai-Chao; Liao, Chin-Wen

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we examined the development of industry-oriented safety degree curricula at a college level. Based on a review of literature on the practices and study of the development of safety curricula, we classified occupational safety and health curricula into the following three domains: safety engineering, health engineering, and safety and health management. We invited 44 safety professionals to complete a four-round survey that was designed using a modified Delphi technique. We used Chi-square statistics to test the panel experts' consensus on the significance of the items in the three domains and employed descriptive statistics to rank the participants' rating of each item. The results showed that the top three items for each of the three domains were Risk Assessment, Dangerous Machinery and Equipment, and Fire and Explosion Prevention for safety engineering; Ergonomics, Industrial Toxicology, and Health Risk Assessment for health engineering; and Industrial Safety and Health Regulations, Accident Investigation and Analysis, and Emergency Response for safety and health management. Only graduates from safety programmes who possess practical industry-oriented abilities can satisfy industry demands and provide value to the existence of college safety programmes. PMID:26104789

  1. DRUGS EFFICIENCY AND SAFETY: THE ROLE OF PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    F. I. Belyalov

    2015-01-01

    Relationships of pharmaceutical industry with medical science and practice are analyzed. The influence of pharmaceutical industry on clinical trials, journal publications, governmental organizations, physicians and researchers is discussed.

  2. A Comparative Study on Safety and Security Management Systems in Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palanisamy Sivaprakash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: To understand and appreciate the safety and security management systems in industries with a view to find out critical areas requiring attention so as to enhance the effectiveness of safety management systems and security management systems in large, medium and small scale industries. Approach: The study was restricted to Large, Medium and Small scale industries located in Tamilnadu, Kerala, Pondycherry, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh states of India. The data have been randomly collected from 45 samples each from Large, Medium and Small scale industries. This study has taken into the account of 6 major elements namely management commitment, documentation, facilities, promotion, procedure and training and each major elements having 6 sub elements thus consisting of 36 sub elements of safety management systems and 36 sub elements of security management systems. The sub-elements are prepared such as to reflect the availability of the safety and security management system in industries. Results: Major accident hazard industries require more attention towards safety and security management systems. The safety management system has gained more prevalence than security management system in large scale industries than the medium and small scale industries. The safety management system has considerable prevalence than security management system in medium scale industries than the small scale industries. The safety and security management system have more or less the same prevalence in the small scale industries. Conclusion: All the industries should devise systems for the adoption and implementation of safety and security management system. Security failures can lead to safety failures and hence they must be given equal importance. The major accident hazard industries should adopt all the safety and security management elements. All the elements of safety and security management systems should be given equal importance for effective and

  3. Testing frequencies of safety related pumps and valves: Probabilistic safety assessment versus United States industry codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PSA provides a mechanism for identifying key risk significant components and estimating the effects of test frequency changes. If it is possible to optimize the testing frequencies of these components, component failure probabilities can be minimized. This reduces overall system unavailability and the probability of core damage. In cases where test frequencies cannot be adjusted directly into an optimal range, it is at least useful to know where the existing test frequency lies relative to the optimal value. From this, one can determine whether a component is being undertested or overtested. Test intervals have been historically established on the basis of deterministic industry standards such as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Section XI, Subsections IWP and IWV, of this code, respectively, set recommended test intervals for safety related pumps and valves. Since optimal test intervals have not been established on the basis of actual experience data, it has not been possible for testing program developers to judge whether increases in test intervals will have a positive or negative effect on component unavailability. The paper reviews the basic theory of optimal test intervals for periodically tested components, discusses recent work which addresses the effects of operational data uncertainties and demonstrates that, on the basis of actual operational reliability data, safety related pumps and motor operated valves are not being overtested. 11 refs, 2 tabs

  4. Safety Reviews of Technical System Modifications in the Nuclear Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Falk, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The function of safety reviews (here understood as expert judgements on proposals for design modifications and redesign of technical systems in commercial Nuclear Power Plants, supported by formalised safety review processes) plays a fundamental role for safety in nuclear installations. The primary aims of the presented case studies includes: critically examining and identifying the main areas for improvement of the existing technical safety review process as it is conducted at a Swedish nucl...

  5. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Task III, Demonstration plant safety, industrial hygiene, and major disaster plan (Deliverable No. 35)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-03-01

    This Health and Safety Plan has been adopted by the IFG Demonstration Plant managed by Memphis Light, Gas and Water at Memphis, Tennessee. The plan encompasses the following areas of concern: Safety Plan Administration, Industrial Health, Industrial Safety, First Aid, Fire Protection (including fire prevention and control), and Control of Safety Related Losses. The primary objective of this plan is to achieve adequate control of all potentially hazardous activities to assure the health and safety of all employees and eliminate lost work time to both the employees and the company. The second objective is to achieve compliance with all Federal, state and local laws, regulations and codes. Some thirty specific safe practice instruction items are included.

  6. [Accreditation of medical laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Andrea Rita; Ring, Rózsa; Fehér, Miklós; Mikó, Tivadar

    2003-07-27

    In Hungary, the National Accreditation Body was established by government in 1995 as an independent, non-profit organization, and has exclusive rights to accredit, amongst others, medical laboratories. The National Accreditation Body has two Specialist Advisory Committees in the health care sector. One is the Health Care Specialist Advisory Committee that accredits certifying bodies, which deal with certification of hospitals. The other Specialist Advisory Committee for Medical Laboratories is directly involved in accrediting medical laboratory services of health care institutions. The Specialist Advisory Committee for Medical Laboratories is a multidisciplinary peer review group of experts from all disciplines of in vitro diagnostics, i.e. laboratory medicine, microbiology, histopathology and blood banking. At present, the only published International Standard applicable to laboratories is ISO/IEC 17025:1999. Work has been in progress on the official approval of the new ISO 15189 standard, specific to medical laboratories. Until the official approval of the International Standard ISO 15189, as accreditation standard, the Hungarian National Accreditation Body has decided to progress with accreditation by formulating explanatory notes to the ISO/IEC 17025:1999 document, using ISO/FDIS 15189:2000, the European EC4 criteria and CPA (UK) Ltd accreditation standards as guidelines. This harmonized guideline provides 'explanations' that facilitate the application of ISO/IEC 17025:1999 to medical laboratories, and can be used as a checklist for the verification of compliance during the onsite assessment of the laboratory. The harmonized guideline adapted the process model of ISO 9001:2000 to rearrange the main clauses of ISO/IEC 17025:1999. This rearrangement does not only make the guideline compliant with ISO 9001:2000 but also improves understanding for those working in medical laboratories, and facilitates the training and education of laboratory staff. With the

  7. Evaluation model for safety capacity of chemical industrial park based on acceptable regional risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guohua Chen; Shukun Wang; Xiaoqun Tan

    2015-01-01

    The paper defines the Safety Capacity of Chemical Industrial Park (SCCIP) from the perspective of acceptable regional risk. For the purpose of exploring the evaluation model for the SCCIP, a method based on quantitative risk assessment was adopted for evaluating transport risk and to confirm reasonable safety transport capacity of chemical industrial park, and then by combining with the safety storage capacity, a SCCIP evaluation model was put forward. The SCCIP was decided by the smaller one between the largest safety storage capacity and the maximum safety transport capacity, or else, the regional risk of the park will exceed the acceptable level. The developed method was applied to a chemical industrial park in Guangdong province to obtain the maximum safety transport capacity and the SCCIP. The results can be realized in the regional risk control of the park effectively.

  8. Safety in industrial applications: From fixed fences to direct interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Oberer-Treitz, Susanne; Dietz, Thomas; Verl, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Human-Robot-Cooperation will allow leveraging the capabilities of human and robot better through direct interaction, but requires new methods to ensure the safety of the worker. The article introduces a new methodology for the safety assessment in robotics by analyzing the collision risk of a robot. The concept for passive safety assessment, i.e. the approach to consider the collision potential of a robot system for analyzing its danger potential is presented. A test-setup to parameterize and...

  9. The Evaluation of Factors Influencing Safety Performance : A Case in an Industrial Gas Manufacturing Company (Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Enchill

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Safety has become a very important element in firms and organisations especially in Ghana. The impact of safety factors on a firm’s 3E’s (Employee, Environment and Equipment can improve or deteriorate firm’s public image. This paper identified the key safety indicators and also provided a set of core factors that contribute meaningful in promoting safety performance in an Industrial Gas producer in Ghana using the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Organisational, Human, Technical and Environmental factors were identified as the safety indicators in relation to the study area. The studies revealed that organisational factor is the most important factor or criterion that could facilitate a better safety performance of the Industrial Gas Company. In addition, employees was identified the best safety alternative, whilst environment and equipment followed sequentially

  10. Responsibility for managing and legal consequences in the field of industrial safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of industrial safety is to protect the aspirations, the life and the health of the employee from injury and by accident prevention in the field to combat dangers to life and health. The necessity for industrial safety is just as uncontentious as the objectives pursued by it. There is also a humanitarian connotation here since the health and welfare of employees are of central importance. In addition, economic aspects have to be taken into consideration, for industrial accidents mean unnecessary industrial costs which can have not insignificant economic consequences. Boards of directors, heads of various departments in the hierarchy, also the members of those departments must be absolutely clear as to what are the requirements for industrial safety in detail, what consequences arise for the introduction and organization of industrial processes right through the organization of the enterprise itself and how in this respect responsibilities are to be allocated to those affected. (orig.)

  11. 42 CFR 424.58 - Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... findings by the accreditation organization and findings by CMS or its designated survey team on standards... to designate and approve one or more independent accreditation organizations for purposes of... for accreditation organizations. (1) An independent accreditation organization applying for...

  12. Construction Safety And Health Factors At The Industry Level: The Case Of Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Charles Y.J. Cheah

    2007-01-01

    The construction industry is one of the most hazardous industries due to the unique nature of its products and the processes involved. Recent occurrences of highly publicized construction site accidents in Singapore have highlighted the immediate needs for the local industry to address safety and attention at the industry level. The objective of this paper is to examine issues and critical factors affecting S&H standards in Singapore. Clearly, collective efforts should be pursued at the indus...

  13. 76 FR 65734 - Guidance for Industry on Evaluating the Safety of Flood-Affected Food Crops for Human Consumption...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Evaluating the Safety of Flood... entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Evaluating the Safety of Flood-Affected Food Crops for Human Consumption... industry entitled ``Evaluating the Safety of Flood-affected Food Crops for Human Consumption''...

  14. The strengthening of the nuclear safety regulatory system in restructuring of electric power industry sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear safety concern, which may accompany such external environmental factors as privatization and restructuring of the electric power industry, is emerging as an international issue. In order to cope with the concern about nuclear safety, it is important to feedback valuable experiences of advanced countries which ever restructured their electric power industries earlier and further to reflect the current safety issues, which are raised internationally, fully into the nuclear safety regulatory system. This paper is to review the safety issues that might take place in the process of increasing competition in the nuclear power industry, and further to present a basic direction and effective measures for ensuring nuclear safety in response thereto from the viewpoint of safety regulation. It includes a political direction for regulatory body's efforts to rationalize and enforce efficiently its regulation. It proposes to ensure that regulatory specialty and regulatory cost are stably secured. Also, this paper proposes for maintaining a sound nuclear safety regulatory system to monitor thoroughly the safety management activities of the industry, which might be neglected as a result of focusing on reduction of the cost for producing electric power

  15. Regulatory and industry co-operation on nuclear safety research. Challenges and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulator-industry co-operation in nuclear safety research has potential advantages as well as disadvantages. This report provides research managers in industry, regulatory organisations and research centres with information on current practices in collaborative safety research in OECD member countries. It identifies means of establishing effective industry-regulator collaboration and provides indications on how to overcome difficulties that can arise. It also advises on possible areas of concern. The report addresses in particular the issue of regulator independence, means to preserve it and ways to demonstrate it to the public while undertaking collaboration with industry. (author)

  16. Safety of technical facilities in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five papers were submitted on the activities of the Czech Labor Safety Office dealing with the results of surveillance in 1988, draft measures aimed at improving nuclear power installation safety, problems of the construction, start-up and operation of the Dukovany nuclear power plant, production of regulations and technical safety during the construction of the Temelin nuclear power plant, qualifications of organizations, responsibilities of authorized organizations, requirements for enclosed and primary technical documentation in producing equipment for nuclear power, and obligations of authorized organizations in nuclear power unit operations, maintenance of nuclear power installations and education of nuclear power plant personnel. (J.B.)

  17. From Evaluation to Accreditation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    for policy. In the state controlled and public financed Danish higher education system quality assessment became institutionalised in a national agency, the "evaluation centre", which was to do recurrent assessment of all higher education programmes. This was later given up. Recently accreditation......Quality was introduced as political priority in Danish higher education during the 1980ties, associated with new public management as well as with new liberalism and conservatism. As a political goal the concept of quality has a paradoxical character because it does not lay out any definite course...... of education programmes has been introduced, also in the form of a national agency with the mission of accrediting all higher education programmes. The paper discusses reasons for and problems in this approach, and the more general social functions of quality assessment and accreditation....

  18. Ergonomic and work safety evaluation criteria of process excellence in the foundry industry

    OpenAIRE

    Butlewski, M.; A. Misztal; Jasiulewicz-Kaczmarek, M.; Janik, S.

    2014-01-01

    The article presents a concept of criteria assessment called the “process excellence” for ergonomics and work safety in enterprises of the foundry industry as well as points to the possibility of its application.

  19. Evaluating safety-critical organizations - emphasis on the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, Teemu; Oedewald, Pia (VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2009-04-15

    An organizational evaluation plays a key role in the monitoring, as well as controlling and steering, of the organizational safety culture. If left unattended, organizations have a tendency to gradually drift into a condition where they have trouble identifying their vulnerabilities and mechanisms or practices that create or maintain these vulnerabilities. The aim of an organizational evaluation should be to promote increased understanding of the sociotechnical system and its changing vulnerabilities. Evaluation contributes to organizational development and management. Evaluations are used in various situations, but when the aim is to learn about possible new vulnerabilities, identify organizational reasons for problems, or prepare for future challenges, the organization is most open to genuine surprises and new findings. It is recommended that organizational evaluations should be conducted when - there are changes in the organizational structures - new tools are implemented - when the people report increased workplace stress or a decreased working climate - when incidents and near-misses increase - when work starts to become routine - when weak signals (such as employees voicing safety concerns or other worries, the organization 'feels' different, organizational climate has changed) are perceived. In organizations that already have a high safety level, safety managers work for their successors. This means that they seldom see the results of their successful efforts to improve safety. This is due to the fact that it takes time for the improvement to become noticeable in terms of increased measurable safety levels. The most challenging issue in an organizational evaluation is the definition of criteria for safety. We have adopted a system safety perspective and we state that an organization has a high potential for safety when - safety is genuinely valued and the members of the organization are motivated to put effort on achieving high levels of safety

  20. Evaluating safety-critical organizations - emphasis on the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An organizational evaluation plays a key role in the monitoring, as well as controlling and steering, of the organizational safety culture. If left unattended, organizations have a tendency to gradually drift into a condition where they have trouble identifying their vulnerabilities and mechanisms or practices that create or maintain these vulnerabilities. The aim of an organizational evaluation should be to promote increased understanding of the sociotechnical system and its changing vulnerabilities. Evaluation contributes to organizational development and management. Evaluations are used in various situations, but when the aim is to learn about possible new vulnerabilities, identify organizational reasons for problems, or prepare for future challenges, the organization is most open to genuine surprises and new findings. It is recommended that organizational evaluations should be conducted when - there are changes in the organizational structures - new tools are implemented - when the people report increased workplace stress or a decreased working climate - when incidents and near-misses increase - when work starts to become routine - when weak signals (such as employees voicing safety concerns or other worries, the organization 'feels' different, organizational climate has changed) are perceived. In organizations that already have a high safety level, safety managers work for their successors. This means that they seldom see the results of their successful efforts to improve safety. This is due to the fact that it takes time for the improvement to become noticeable in terms of increased measurable safety levels. The most challenging issue in an organizational evaluation is the definition of criteria for safety. We have adopted a system safety perspective and we state that an organization has a high potential for safety when - safety is genuinely valued and the members of the organization are motivated to put effort on achieving high levels of safety - it is

  1. Is Gerontology Ready for Accreditation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, William E.; Ferraro, Kenneth F.; Montgomery, Rhonda J. V.

    2012-01-01

    The authors review widely accepted criteria for program accreditation and compare gerontology with well-established accredited fields including clinical psychology and social work. At present gerontology lacks many necessary elements for credible professional accreditation, including defined scope of practice, applied curriculum, faculty with…

  2. Accreditation and the Credit Hour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, James V.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the role that accreditation plays in defining and enforcing the credit-hour measure. Regional accreditation agencies are generally more flexible in terms of defining credit hours than are national agencies, which are more rigid in their expectations. Specialized accrediting agencies usually make the least mention of credit units. (SLD)

  3. Proceedings of the Seminar on Environmental and Radiation Safety Aspect at Non-nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Seminar on Environmental and Radiation Safety Aspect at Non-nuclear Industry held on March 2003 in Jakarta. The purpose of this Seminar be able to information exchange among research workers in National Nuclear Energy Agency. The Seminar discussed about Science and Technology of Radiation Safety and Environment. There are 17 papers which have separated index. (PPIN)

  4. Assessment of Native Languages for Food Safety Training Programs for Meat Industry Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Sherrlyn S.; Cordray, Joseph C.; Sapp, Stephen; Sebranek, Joseph G.; Anderson, Barbara; Wenger, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Challenges arise when teaching food safety to culturally diverse employees working in meatpacking and food manufacturing industries. A food safety training program was developed in English, translated into Spanish, and administered to 1,265 adult learners. Assessments were conducted by comparing scores before and immediately following training.…

  5. Issues of Safety and Security: New Challenging to Malaysia Tourism Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Ayob Norizawati; Masron Tarmiji

    2014-01-01

    The safety and security issues nowadays become one of the forces causing changes in tourism industry in era of millennium. The main concern of this issues more focus on crime rates, terrorism, food safety, health issues and natural disaster. This topic gained the popularity in tourism research after 9/11 tragedy and since then the academicians and practitioners started seeking the best solution in ways to mitigate these negative impacts. For Malaysia, the image as safety and secure destinatio...

  6. Integrated occupational safety and health management solutions and industrial cases

    CERN Document Server

    Häkkinen, Kari; Niskanen, Toivo

    2015-01-01

    Maximizing reader insights into a new movement toward leadership approaches that are collaborated and shared,  and which views Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) and performance excellence within the wider examination of leadership relationships and practices, this book argues that these relationships and processes are so central to the establishment of OSH functioning that studying them warrants a broad, cross-disciplinary, multiple method analysis. Exploring the complexity of leadership by the impact that contexts (e.g., national and organizational culture) may have on leaders, this book discusses the related literature, then moves forward to show how a more comprehensive practical approach to Occupational Safety and Health and performance excellence can function on levels pertaining to events, individuals, groups, and organizations. This book proposes that greater clarity in understanding leadership in Occupational Safety and Health and performance excellence can be developed from addressing two fundame...

  7. The Impact of Companies’ Age on Safety Culture in the Metal Products Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ooshaksaraie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Safety culture is a complex structure in an organization that includes values and attitudes, most of which are potentially changeable and related to actual accident behavior. In this study, the components of safety culture included organizational commitment, management involvement, employee empowerment, reporting system and rewarding system. Approach: The numbers of occupational injuries in industries have steadily increased during recent years. The major objectives of this study were to evaluate the safety culture and to analyze the difference in safety culture in the metal products industry in Iran (Guilan province with regard to companies’ age. Metal products industry was chosen because of the higher occupational injuries rates amongst the industries in Iran. Results: The companies were chosen based on their age. A total of 714 respondents from 14 companies participated in the survey. The method used in this study was a questionnaires quantitative type based on a Lickert scale and the data collected were analyzed statistically. The one-way ANOVA was used to test for significant difference in safety culture in the metal products industry with regard to companies’ age. The results showed that safety culture was not strong based on the mean for average score of 2.58 which was less than 3 compared to the possible maximum of 5. One-way ANOVA analysis revealed that there was a significant difference among safety culture with respect to companies’ age. New companies had stronger safety culture compared to older one. Conclusion: Based on the findings the hypothesis of this study is accepted. This study also indicated that the safety culture in the metal products industry in target population group was not strong however, can be improved through improvement of its five components.

  8. Industry Initiated Core Safety Attributes for Human Spaceflight for the 7th IAASS Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Now that the NASA Commercial Crew Program (CCP) is beginning its full certification contract for crew transportation to the International Space Station (ISS), is it time for industry to embrace a minimum set of core safety attributes? Those attributes can then be evolved into an industry-led set of basic safety standards and requirements. After 50 years of human space travel sponsored by governments, there are two basic conditions that now exist within the international space industry. The first, there is enough of a space-faring history to encourage the space industry to design, develop and operate human spaceflight systems without government contracts for anything other than services. Second, industry is capable of defining and enforcing a set of industry-based safety attributes and standards for human spaceflight to low-Earth orbit (LEO). This paper will explore both of these basic conditions with a focus on the safety attributes and standards. In the United States, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is now starting to dialogue with industry about the basic safety principles and attributes needed for potential future regulatory oversight. This process is not yet formalized and will take a number of years once approval is given to move forward. Therefore, throughout the next few years, it is an excellent time and opportunity for industry to collaborate together and develop the core set of attributes and standards. As industry engages and embraces a common set of safety attributes, then government agencies, like the FAA and NASA can use that industry-based product to strengthen their efforts on a safe commercial spaceflight foundation for the future. As the commercial space industry takes the lead role in establishing core safety attributes, and then enforcing those attributes, the entire planet can move away from governmental control of design and development and let industry expand safe and successful space operations in LEO. At that point the

  9. Impacts of electricity industry restructure on nuclear safety and corresponding strategies to respond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restructuring and privatization of the electricity power industry has raised new concerns that such process could affect nuclear safety. Since electricity industry of Korea is also being restructured, regulatory body should make pro-active and precautionary efforts to remove negative impacts on nuclear safety and to make positive effects maximized. This paper examines the international efforts of nuclear regulator cope with electricity restructuring, analyzes the impacts of relevant issues raised by other countries on domestic nuclear safety, and proposes policy directions to resolve such issues

  10. Safety and Security in Industrial Applications of Radioactive Sources: Two Principles, Only One Commitment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina applies the basic principles of radiation protection and the necessary requirements to ensure radiation safety and physical security of radioactive sources, established in its Regulatory Standards. The criteria used by Regulatory Standards aim to reinforce and strengthen the measures of safety and security of radioactive material applying the concepts of safety culture and defence in depth. The paper refers to the criteria currently applied to mobile radioactive sources that are used in industrial applications with measurement purposes, studies of well logging and industrial radiography. (author)

  11. Radiation Safety Regulatory Policy and Rule for NORM Industries in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background information and the basic status concerning NORM industries in China is briefly introduced in the paper, including current natural radiation levels and the main results of a general survey related to NORM industries implemented by the Ministry of Environmental Protection. An introduction to the radiation safety regulatory policy and rule for NORM industries in China is also briefly presented. Finally, some considerations concerning NORM regulatory issues are discussed. (author)

  12. Heuristics and ontologies as keys to enter complex organisational systems : virtual reality (VR) applications to improve industrial safety

    OpenAIRE

    Affeltranger, Bastien; Plot, Emmanuel; Debray, Bruno; Le Cardinal, Gilles; Camus, Fabrice

    2006-01-01

    International audience A major issue in industrial safety is that different stakeholders, namely those involved in the generation, mitigation and monitoring of industrial risks (both occupational and of major accidents), develop different perceptions of what industrial safety is, or how it should be achieved. Because they differ, these representations generate likewise different analyses and assessments of industrial safety features and levels. When diverging, such risk perceptions can be ...

  13. Is gerontology ready for accreditation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, William E; Ferraro, Kenneth F; Montgomery, Rhonda J V

    2012-01-01

    The authors review widely accepted criteria for program accreditation and compare gerontology with well-established accredited fields including clinical psychology and social work. At present gerontology lacks many necessary elements for credible professional accreditation, including defined scope of practice, applied curriculum, faculty with applied professional credentials, and resources necessary to support professional credentialing review. Accreditation with weak requirements will be dismissed as "vanity" accreditation, and strict requirements will be impossible for many resource-poor programs to achieve, putting unaccredited programs at increased risk for elimination. Accreditation may be appropriate in the future, but it should be limited to professional or applied gerontology, perhaps for programs conferring bachelor's or master's degrees. Options other than accreditation to enhance professional skills and employability of gerontology graduates are discussed. PMID:22289064

  14. Is gerontology ready for accreditation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, William E; Ferraro, Kenneth F; Montgomery, Rhonda J V

    2012-01-01

    The authors review widely accepted criteria for program accreditation and compare gerontology with well-established accredited fields including clinical psychology and social work. At present gerontology lacks many necessary elements for credible professional accreditation, including defined scope of practice, applied curriculum, faculty with applied professional credentials, and resources necessary to support professional credentialing review. Accreditation with weak requirements will be dismissed as "vanity" accreditation, and strict requirements will be impossible for many resource-poor programs to achieve, putting unaccredited programs at increased risk for elimination. Accreditation may be appropriate in the future, but it should be limited to professional or applied gerontology, perhaps for programs conferring bachelor's or master's degrees. Options other than accreditation to enhance professional skills and employability of gerontology graduates are discussed.

  15. Health protection and industrial safety. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard applies to components of the primary circuit including its auxiliary facilities, and of the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors; to lifting gear and load take-ups for the transport of nuclear fuel and primary circuit components; to elevators within the containment, electrical installations, and piping and valves of radiation protection monitoring equipment. Part 1 defines the terms and specifies engineered safety requirements

  16. Systematic impact of institutional pressures on safety climate in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qinghua; Dong, Shuang; Rose, Timothy; Li, Heng; Yin, Qin; Cao, Dongping

    2016-08-01

    This paper explores how three types of institutional pressure (i.e., coercive, mimetic and normative pressures) systematically impact on the safety climate of construction projects. These impacts are empirically tested by survey data collected from 186 questionnaires of construction companies operating in Shanghai, China. The results, obtained by partial least squares analysis, show that organizational management commitment to safety and employee involvement is positively related to all three institutional pressures, while the perception of responsibility for safety and health is significantly influenced by coercive and mimetic pressure. However, coercive and normative pressures have no significant effect on the applicability of safety rules and work practices, revealing the importance of external organizational pressures in improving project safety climate from a systematic view. The findings also provide insights into the use of institutional forces to facilitate the improvement of safety climate in the construction industry. PMID:26706434

  17. Scale development of safety management system evaluation for the airline industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Fu; Chen, Shu-Chuan

    2012-07-01

    The airline industry relies on the implementation of Safety Management System (SMS) to integrate safety policies and augment safety performance at both organizational and individual levels. Although there are various degrees of SMS implementation in practice, a comprehensive scale measuring the essential dimensions of SMS is still lacking. This paper thus aims to develop an SMS measurement scale from the perspective of aviation experts and airline managers to evaluate the performance of company's safety management system, by adopting Schwab's (1980) three-stage scale development procedure. The results reveal a five-factor structure consisting of 23 items. The five factors include documentation and commands, safety promotion and training, executive management commitment, emergency preparedness and response plan and safety management policy. The implications of this SMS evaluation scale for practitioners and future research are discussed.

  18. Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division, annual report for 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    Activities during the past year are summarized for the Health Physics Department, the Environmental Management Department, and the Safety Department. The Health Physics Department conducts radiation and safety surveys, provides personnel monitoring services for both external and internal radiation, and procures, services, and calibrates appropriate portable and stationary health physics instruments. The Environmental Management Department insures that the activities of the various organizations within ORNL are carried out in a responsible and safe manner. This responsibility involves the measurement, field monitoring, and evaluation of the amounts of radionuclides and hazardous materials released to the environment and the control of hazardous materials used within ORNL. The department also collaborates in the design of ORNL Facilities to help reduce the level of materials released to the environment. The Safety Department is responsible for maintaining a high level of staff safety. This includes aspects of both operational and industrial safety and also coordinates the activities of the Director's Safety Review Committee. (ACR)

  19. Systematic impact of institutional pressures on safety climate in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qinghua; Dong, Shuang; Rose, Timothy; Li, Heng; Yin, Qin; Cao, Dongping

    2016-08-01

    This paper explores how three types of institutional pressure (i.e., coercive, mimetic and normative pressures) systematically impact on the safety climate of construction projects. These impacts are empirically tested by survey data collected from 186 questionnaires of construction companies operating in Shanghai, China. The results, obtained by partial least squares analysis, show that organizational management commitment to safety and employee involvement is positively related to all three institutional pressures, while the perception of responsibility for safety and health is significantly influenced by coercive and mimetic pressure. However, coercive and normative pressures have no significant effect on the applicability of safety rules and work practices, revealing the importance of external organizational pressures in improving project safety climate from a systematic view. The findings also provide insights into the use of institutional forces to facilitate the improvement of safety climate in the construction industry.

  20. Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division, annual report for 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities during the past year are summarized for the Health Physics Department, the Environmental Management Department, and the Safety Department. The Health Physics Department conducts radiation and safety surveys, provides personnel monitoring services for both external and internal radiation, and procures, services, and calibrates appropriate portable and stationary health physics instruments. The Environmental Management Department insures that the activities of the various organizations within ORNL are carried out in a responsible and safe manner. This responsibility involves the measurement, field monitoring, and evaluation of the amounts of radionuclides and hazardous materials released to the environment and the control of hazardous materials used within ORNL. The department also collaborates in the design of ORNL Facilities to help reduce the level of materials released to the environment. The Safety Department is responsible for maintaining a high level of staff safety. This includes aspects of both operational and industrial safety and also coordinates the activities of the Director's Safety Review Committee

  1. Safety and reliability in industrial organizations - The key factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey-based technique has been developed that measures and generates comparative data on important organizational, work group, and job-level variables that are directly related to on-the-job accidents. This paper describes the results of an analysis of data from more than 2,700 employees in the chemical, oil, construction, and wood products industries. These analyses indicate that several key variables are significantly related to accidents in the workplace

  2. Laboratory Accreditation in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, María Amelia; Collino, Cesar; Chiabrando, Gustavo A

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory accreditation is an essential element in the healthcare system since it contributes substantially to decision-making, in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of the health status of the patients, as well as in the organization and management of public healthcare. Therefore, the clinical biochemistry professional works continuously to provide reliable results and contributes to the optimization of operational logistics and integration of a laboratory into the health system. ISO 15189 accreditation, ensures compliance of the laboratory to minimize instances of error through the planning, prevention, implementation, evaluation and improvement of its procedures, which provides skill areas that involve both training undergraduate and graduate professionals in clinical biochemistry. PMID:27683497

  3. FIS accreditation guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Ojanen, Pinja

    2010-01-01

    The International Ski Federation (FIS) was founded to support and develop the sport of skiing 100 years ago. Since then skiing has grown in importance and has become more popular. Nowadays ski companies, athletes and family members, but also fan clubs, national ski associations, sponsors and local organizers get involved for a sporting event. The aim of this project-based thesis was to create guidelines and make the FIS accreditation system as user-friendly as possible. For the groups (ser...

  4. Mammography accreditation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, P.

    1993-12-31

    In the mid-1980`s, the movement toward the use of dedicated mammography equipment provided significant improvement in breast cancer detection. However, several studies demonstrated that this change was not sufficient to ensure optimal image quality at a low radiation dose. In particular, the 1985 Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends identified the wide variations in image quality and radiation dose, even from dedicated units. During this time period, the American Cancer Society (ACS) launched its Breast Cancer Awareness Screening Campaign. However, there were concerns about the ability of radiology to respond to the increased demand for optimal screening examinations that would result from the ACS program. To respond to these concerns, the ACS and the American College of Radiology (ACR) established a joint committee on mammography screening in 1986. After much discussion, it was decided to use the ACR Diagnostic Practice Accreditation Program as a model for the development of a mammography accreditation program. However, some constraints were required in order to make the program meet the needs of the ACS. This voluntary, peer review program had to be timely and cost effective. It was determined that the best way to address these needs would be to conduct the program by mail. Finally, by placing emphasis on the educational nature of the program, it would provide an even greater opportunity for improving mammographic quality. The result of this effort was that, almost six years ago, in May 1987, the pilot study for the ACR Mammography Accreditation Program (MAP) began, and in August of that year, the first applications were received. In November 1987, the first 3-year accreditation certificates were awarded.

  5. The 'PROCESO' index: a new methodology for the evaluation of operational safety in the chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acknowledgement of industrial installations as complex systems in the early 1980s outstands as a milestone in the path to operational safety. Process plants are social-technical complex systems of a dynamic nature, whose properties depend not only on their components, but also on the inter-relations among them. A comprehensive assessment of operational safety requires a systemic approach, i.e. an integrated framework that includes all the relevant factors influencing safety. Risk analysis methodologies and safety management systems head the list of methods that point in this direction, but they normally require important plant resources. As a consequence, their use is frequently restricted to especially dangerous processes often driven by compliance with legal requirements. In this work a new safety index for the chemical industry, termed the 'Proceso' Index (standing for the Spanish terms for PROCedure for the Evaluation of Operational Safety), has been developed. PROCESO is based on the principles of systems theory, has a tree-like structure and considers 25 areas to guide the review of plant safety. The method uses indicators whose respective weight values have been obtained via an expert judgement technique. This paper describes the steps followed to develop this new Operational Safety Index, explains its structure and illustrates its application to process plants

  6. Need for safety of nanoparticles used in food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mukul; Ansari, Kausar M; Tripathi, Anurag; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2011-02-01

    Nanotechnology derived products are now used in various spheres of life including food industry. Indeed nanotechnology may transform entire food industry in terms of production, processing and packaging and consumption. Due to their small size, nanoparticles find application as a carrier of antimicrobial polypeptides required against microbial deterioration of food quality. Detection of food pathogens, fungus producing mycotoxins, viruses and bacteria through nanosensors, which are quick, sensitive and less labour intensive procedures, is another area having potential application. The use of nanosensors in plastic packaging to detect gases released due to food spoilage is of consumer's relevance. Majority of nanoparticles for food use are organic moieties, hence it is of utmost importance to investigate their physico-chemical characteristics followed by toxicological implications to intestinal cells. It remains to be seen that nanostructured ingredients and nutrient delivery system may also carry other foreign substances to blood. Nano sized particles for food usage, having new chemical and physical properties may vary from normal macro particles that may also influence the interaction with living systems. Hence in vitro and in vivo studies are required for nanoparticles to be used in foods prior to their commercialization.

  7. Work health and safety in cotton ginning industry: a survey of practices in australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This survey focuses on the WH and S (Work Health and Safety) practices in Australia and relates them with those in Pakistan. It also highlights the planned areas of work required on WH and S in cotton ginning industry of Pakistan. This article is one a series of research studies that will inform a broader approach development. The aim of the survey was to design a standardized health and safety Act for cotton ginning industry of Pakistan and to help ginners meet their due industry obligations under the model WH and S Act. The first component of the research study survey was to review the relevant Australian work and safety model as this provides a framework to protect the health, safety and welfare of all employees at work and of other people who might be affected by the job. The second aspect of the research study survey concerned site visits to cotton gins with the support of Australian Centre for Agricultural Health and Safety, Moree, NSW. During these visits the existing ginning process in terms of WH and S were reviewed. Informal interviews were also conducted with Gin Managers and Ginning Experts regarding WH and S in the Australian cotton ginning industry. (author)

  8. Nanotechnology: a future tool to improve quality and safety in meat industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Jairath, Gauri; Ahlawat, Satyavir Singh

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology refers to the new aspect of science modifies its physical, chemical and biological properties leading to new applications or enhanced utility. Keeping the pace with other industries, the meat industry has adopted the new technology in a range of applications to improve the quality and safety of products. The potential applications include the improvement in the tastes, texture, flavor, production of low fat and salt products, enhanced nutrient absorption, improved packaging techniques and better pathogen detection system. However some safety issues need to be addressed before taking a ride on the technology at the full throttle. PMID:27413202

  9. Safety culture in the Finnish and Swedish nuclear industries - history and present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, T.; Pietikaeinen, E. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland)); Kahlbom, U. (RiskPilot AB (Sweden)); Rollenhagen, C. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2010-03-15

    The report presents results from an interview study that examined the characteristics of the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The study also tested the theoretical model of safety culture developed by the authors. The interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16). Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). The study gave insight into the nature of safety culture in the nuclear industry. It provided an overview on the variety of factors that people in the industry consider important for safety. The respondents rather coherently saw such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and safety and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Some of the respondents described a certain Nordic orientation towards safety. One characteristic was a sense of personal responsibility for safety. However, there was no clear agreement on the existence of a shared Nordic nuclear safety culture. Sweden and Finland were seen different for example in the way the co-operation between plants and nuclear safety authorities was arranged and re-search activities organized. There were also perceived differences in the way everyday activities like decision making were carried out in the organizations. There are multiple explanations for the differences. The industry in Sweden has been driven by the strong supplier. In Finland the regulator's role in shaping the culture has been more active. Other factors creating differences are e.g. national culture and company culture and the type of the power plant. Co-operation between Nordic nuclear power organizations was viewed valuable yet challenging from safety point of view. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide under-standing of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as

  10. Safety culture in the Finnish and Swedish nuclear industries - history and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents results from an interview study that examined the characteristics of the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The study also tested the theoretical model of safety culture developed by the authors. The interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16). Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). The study gave insight into the nature of safety culture in the nuclear industry. It provided an overview on the variety of factors that people in the industry consider important for safety. The respondents rather coherently saw such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and safety and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Some of the respondents described a certain Nordic orientation towards safety. One characteristic was a sense of personal responsibility for safety. However, there was no clear agreement on the existence of a shared Nordic nuclear safety culture. Sweden and Finland were seen different for example in the way the co-operation between plants and nuclear safety authorities was arranged and re-search activities organized. There were also perceived differences in the way everyday activities like decision making were carried out in the organizations. There are multiple explanations for the differences. The industry in Sweden has been driven by the strong supplier. In Finland the regulator's role in shaping the culture has been more active. Other factors creating differences are e.g. national culture and company culture and the type of the power plant. Co-operation between Nordic nuclear power organizations was viewed valuable yet challenging from safety point of view. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide under-standing of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as a

  11. Clinical laboratory accreditation in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoo, Anil; Sood, Swaroop Krishan

    2012-06-01

    Test results from clinical laboratories must ensure accuracy, as these are crucial in several areas of health care. It is necessary that the laboratory implements quality assurance to achieve this goal. The implementation of quality should be audited by independent bodies,referred to as accreditation bodies. Accreditation is a third-party attestation by an authoritative body, which certifies that the applicant laboratory meets quality requirements of accreditation body and has demonstrated its competence to carry out specific tasks. Although in most of the countries,accreditation is mandatory, in India it is voluntary. The quality requirements are described in standards developed by many accreditation organizations. The internationally acceptable standard for clinical laboratories is ISO15189, which is based on ISO/IEC standard 17025. The accreditation body in India is the National Accreditation Board for Testing and Calibration Laboratories, which has signed Mutual Recognition Agreement with the regional cooperation the Asia Pacific Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation and with the apex cooperation the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation. PMID:22727005

  12. On the state of the radiation safety in the atomic energy and nuclear industry of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general aspects of the activity of organs of government in the field of human radiation protection and some other problems of nuclear industry connecting with the new economic and politic situation in Russia have been discussed. There are present information about the organs of government relating to the questions of radiation safety and the major directions of governmental policy in this fields. Some problems of the elimination of the consequences of the accidents in NPPs (Chernobyl, Chelyabinsk), the programs of the radiation safety improvement of population and the information about new normative nuclear safety documents have also been written in this report. (author)

  13. 78 FR 59621 - Extension of the Current Fees for the Accredited Laboratory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... for the Accredited Laboratory Program'' (76 FR 20220). The rule increased fees for the Accredited...://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/regulations/federal-register . FSIS will also make copies of... food safety news and information. This service is available at...

  14. Evaluation of the safety engineering of the industries which use the natural gas (PB e PE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco S. Másculo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas in Industries is a field of studies that has recently been object of concern andresearch in universities and research centers. This analysis has become more evident dueto several factors as the increasing use in industries of the natural gas replacing thecombustible oil (BPF in your energetic matrix. The aim of this article is introducing someconsiderations about ergonomics and safety of work of the Industries which use the NaturalGas, analyzing the changes occurred with after your introduction. The industrial consumerswere stratified in several variables, such as: Kinds of the Industrial Production; Geographicallocation; Gas consumption in the industry, among others. Although the geographical locationof the studied companies was in the eastern Northeast (PB and PE, the results can begeneralized in the measure in which they were boarded global characteristics big sizecompanies, almost all owning or trying to obtain quality certifications, environmental andsafety engineering.

  15. HACCP as a Regulatory Innovation to Improve Food Safety in the Meat Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Unnevehr, Laurian J.; Jensen, Helen H.

    1996-01-01

    Industrial engineers in the food-processing industry have developed the Halyard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) system as a preventive approach to ensuring the safety of meat and poultry products. This paper discusses both the origins of HACCP as an engineering concept and the economics of HACCP as a regulatory tool. The authors contend that the economics literature has not adequately explored the benefits from prevention, particularly when the costs of hazard detection are high and t...

  16. 42 CFR 423.168 - Accreditation organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., validation review, onsite observation, or CMS's daily experience with the accreditation organization suggests... whenever it is considering granting an accreditation organization's application for approval. The notice... Federal Register indicating whether it has granted the accreditation organization's request for...

  17. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There were no external or internal exposures to personnel which exceeded the standards for radiation protection as defined in DOE Manual Chapter 0524. Only 39 employees received whole body dose equivalents of one rem or greater. The highest whole body dose equivalent to an employee was 3.3 rem. The highest internal exposure was less than 25% of a maximum permissible dose for any calendar quarter. During 1978, 23 portable instruments were added to the inventory and 228 retired. The total number in service on January 1, 1979, was 1023. There were no releases of gaseous waste or liquid radioactive waste from the laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. The average background level at the PAM stations during 1978 was 9.3 μR/hr, or 81 mR/yr. Soil samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for eleven radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Grass samples were collected and analyzed for twelve radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. During 1978, the Radiation and Safety Surveys personnel continued to assist the operating groups in keeping contamination, air concentrations, and personnel exposure levels below the established maximum permissible levels. Fourteen radiation incidents involving radioactive materials were recorded during 1978. Of the 582,000 articles of wearing apparel and 192,000 articles, such as mops, laundry bags, towels, etc., monitored during 1978 about four percent were found to be contaminated. Three lost workday cases occurred at ORNL in 1978, a frequency rate of 0.07. The Serious Injury frequency rate for 1978 was 1.40, as based on the new OSHA system for recording injuries and illness (RII). A total of 55 days were lost or charged for the three lost workday cases in 1978

  18. OECD/NEA WGFCS Workshop: Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities - Regulatory Approaches and Industry Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel is produced, processed, and stored mainly in industrial-scale facilities. Uranium ores are processed and refined to produce a pure uranium salt stream, Uranium is converted and enriched, nuclear fuel is fabricated (U fuel and U/Pu fuel for the closed cycle option); and spent fuel is stored and reprocessed in some countries (close cycle option). Facilities dedicated to the research and development of new fuel or new processes are also considered as Fuel Cycle Facilities. The safety assessment of nuclear facilities has often been led by the methodology and techniques initially developed for Nuclear Power Plants. As FCFs cover a wide diversity of installations the various approaches of national regulators, and their technical support organizations, for the Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities are also diverse, as are the approaches by their industries in providing safety justifications for their facilities. The objective of the Working Group on Fuel Cycle Safety is to advance the understanding for both regulators and operators of relevant aspects of nuclear fuel cycle safety in member countries. A large amount of experience is available in safety assessment of FCFs, which should be shared to develop ideas in this field. To contribute to this task, the Workshop on 'Safety Assessment of Fuel Cycle Facilities - Regulatory Approaches and Industry Perspectives' was held in Toronto, on 27 - 29 September 2011. The workshop was hosted by Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. The current proceedings provide summary of the results of the workshop with the text of the papers given and presentations made

  19. 78 FR 24211 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Safety Considerations for Container Labels and Carton Labeling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... closure design (December 13, 2012, 77 FR 74196), and the third guidance will focus on minimizing risks... Container Labels and Carton Labeling Design To Minimize Medication Errors; Availability AGENCY: Food and... the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Safety Considerations for...

  20. Toward a sustainable cement industry in 2020 : improvement of the environmental, health & safety performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2001-01-01

    This background document concentrates on technical and managerial aspects of Environmental, Health & Safety Performance (EHS) control in the cement industry. It gives an overview of options for improvement toward a sustainable cement production in 2020. Energy consumption and use of alternative fuel

  1. Toward a sustainable cement industry in 2020 : improvement of the environmental, health & safety performance

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    This background document concentrates on technical and managerial aspects of Environmental, Health & Safety Performance (EHS) control in the cement industry. It gives an overview of options for improvement toward a sustainable cement production in 2020. Energy consumption and use of alternative fuels and raw materials are included in this substudy.

  2. Safety- and risk analysis activities in other areas than the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozine, I.; Duijm, N.J.; Lauridsen, K. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark)

    2000-12-01

    The report gives an overview of the legislation within the European Union in the field of major industrial hazards and gives examples of decision criteria applied in a number of European countries when judging the acceptability of an activity. Furthermore, the report mentions a few methods used in the analysis of the safety of chemical installations. (au)

  3. Industrial Safety. MAS-123. Waste Isolation Division (WID). Management and Supervisor Training (MAST) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM.

    This learning module, which is part of a management and supervisor training program for managers and supervisors employed at the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Division, is designed to prepare trainees to promote and monitor the industrial safety program at their plant. The following topics are covered in the module's individual sections:…

  4. Safety and Health for Industrial/Vocational Education; for Supervisors and Instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firenze, Robert J.; Walters, James B.

    This course is designed to enable industrial/vocational education supervisors and instructors to establish and administer effective safety and health programs in their schools. Although the course is intended as complete training to be given over a 3-day period, it may be divided into individual units for presentation over longer periods of time.…

  5. 42 CFR 488.8 - Federal review of accreditation organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... organization proposes to adopt new requirements or change its survey process. An accreditation organization... national accreditation organization. CMS's review and evaluation of a national accreditation organization... criteria— (1) The equivalency of an accreditation organization's accreditation requirements of an entity...

  6. Developing a Model for Evaluation and Accreditation of Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM Mosadegh Rad

    2005-10-01

    for Evaluation and Accreditation of Hospitals is developed. In this model, the context, structure (input, process and results (out put were considered comprehensively. In this model items such as customer participation in treatment process, hospital information system, equity of services, employees’ participation in evaluation process, increasing employees and managers knowledge and capabilities level, risk and safety management and so on are considered. Discussion: The evaluation and accreditation system of Hospitals should be a comprehensive system in order to evaluate the whole dimensions of these organizations.

  7. Assessment of safety culture from the INB organization: A case study for nuclear fuel cycle industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present article describes strategies, methodologies and first results on the Safety Culture Self-assessment Project under way at INB since August 2001. As a Brazilian Government company in charge of the nuclear fuel cycle activities,. the main purposes of the Project is to evaluate the present status of its safety culture and to propose actions to ensure continuous safety improvement at management level of its industrial processes. The proposed safety culture assessment describes INB's various production sites taking into account the different aspects of their activities, such as regional, social and technical issues. The survey was performed in March/2002 very good attendance (about 80%) the employees. The first global survey results are presented in item 4. (author)

  8. Assessing outcomes of industrial hygiene graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lisa; Fredrickson, Ann

    2009-05-01

    To ensure that industrial hygiene professionals continue to be prepared for current and future trends, it is important to regularly assess the value of their education. Described here are the results of discussions with employers and a mailed survey of graduates. Comparisons are made with past mailed surveys of both groups. Two sets of discussions were held in late 2005 with employers of industrial hygienists and other health and safety professionals. Twenty-eight participants were asked to discuss current and future needs for professionals in their organization and economic sector, their expectations for knowledge and skills when hiring professionals, methods for finding and hiring, and the importance of ABET accreditation. At the same time, a survey was mailed to 71 industrial hygiene students graduating in the last 15 years. Respondents were asked to rank the value of and their proficiency in 42 competencies. Questions also assessed employment experience, certification, the importance of ABET accreditation, and demographic characteristics. There was a lot of agreement between the two stakeholder groups (employers and graduates) about the most important skill and knowledge areas. Most employers identified communicating effectively and exposure assessment among the most important skills, with designing and initiating research as among the least. Hazard recognition, exposure measurement principles, and personal protective equipment were the most highly ranked knowledge areas. Employers discussed the need for good "business skills" such as teamwork, communication, and project management, and the importance of problem-solving skills. Graduates reported that skills in the areas of recognition, evaluation, and control were most valuable in their first jobs and generally reported high levels of proficiency in these skill areas. There was a similar dichotomy in opinions about accreditation within each stakeholder group. The reputation of the academic program was

  9. Assessing outcomes of industrial hygiene graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lisa; Fredrickson, Ann

    2009-05-01

    To ensure that industrial hygiene professionals continue to be prepared for current and future trends, it is important to regularly assess the value of their education. Described here are the results of discussions with employers and a mailed survey of graduates. Comparisons are made with past mailed surveys of both groups. Two sets of discussions were held in late 2005 with employers of industrial hygienists and other health and safety professionals. Twenty-eight participants were asked to discuss current and future needs for professionals in their organization and economic sector, their expectations for knowledge and skills when hiring professionals, methods for finding and hiring, and the importance of ABET accreditation. At the same time, a survey was mailed to 71 industrial hygiene students graduating in the last 15 years. Respondents were asked to rank the value of and their proficiency in 42 competencies. Questions also assessed employment experience, certification, the importance of ABET accreditation, and demographic characteristics. There was a lot of agreement between the two stakeholder groups (employers and graduates) about the most important skill and knowledge areas. Most employers identified communicating effectively and exposure assessment among the most important skills, with designing and initiating research as among the least. Hazard recognition, exposure measurement principles, and personal protective equipment were the most highly ranked knowledge areas. Employers discussed the need for good "business skills" such as teamwork, communication, and project management, and the importance of problem-solving skills. Graduates reported that skills in the areas of recognition, evaluation, and control were most valuable in their first jobs and generally reported high levels of proficiency in these skill areas. There was a similar dichotomy in opinions about accreditation within each stakeholder group. The reputation of the academic program was

  10. Construction Safety And Health Factors At The Industry Level: The Case Of Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Y.J. Cheah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry is one of the most hazardous industries due to the unique nature of its products and the processes involved. Recent occurrences of highly publicized construction site accidents in Singapore have highlighted the immediate needs for the local industry to address safety and attention at the industry level. The objective of this paper is to examine issues and critical factors affecting S&H standards in Singapore. Clearly, collective efforts should be pursued at the industry level as the country moves towards the ultimate safety management strategy of self-regulation. The findings also indicate that the challenge of making worksites safe should not be placed solely on the contractors but should be shared by all parties affecting the value chain of construction, including the developers, the consultants and the government. The factors identified through factor analysis may inform legislators and industry practitioners in terms of the sources of problems and help develop effective strategies for improvement. Some of the experiences mentioned in the paper could also be relevant to other countries facing similar circumstances.

  11. Preliminary results from the application of risk matrix method for safety assessment in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the uses of ionizing radiation in industry are subject to procedures that provide a high level of safety, experience has shown that equipment failure, human errors, or the combination of both that can trigger accidental exposures may occur. Traditionally, the radiation safety checks whether these industrial practices (industrial radiography, industrial irradiators, among others) are sufficiently safe to prevent similar accidental exposures already occurred, so that becomes dependent on the published information and not always answers questions like: What other events can occur, or what other risks are present? Taking into account the results achieved by the Foro Iberoamericano de Organismos Reguladores Radiologicos y Nucleares, its leading position in the use of techniques of risk analysis in radioactive facilities and the need to develop a proactive approach to the prevention of accidents arising from the use of ionizing radiations in the industry, it intends to apply the risk analysis technique known as Risk Matrix to a hypothetical reference entity for the region in which industrial radiography is performed. In this paper the results of the first stage of this study are shown, that is the identification of initiating events (IE) and barriers that help mitigate the consequences of such IE, so that can appreciate the applicability of this method to industrial radiography services, to reduce the risk to acceptable levels. The fundamental advantage associated with the application of this methodology is that can be applied by the professionals working in the service and identifies specific weaknesses that from the point of view of safety there, so they can be prioritized resources depending on risk reduction. (Author)

  12. 9 CFR 439.10 - Criteria for obtaining accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... degree in chemistry, food science, food technology, or a related field. (i) For food chemistry.... 439.10 Section 439.10 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF.... (a) Analytical laboratories may be accredited for the analyses of food chemistry analytes, as...

  13. Industrial hygiene, occupational safety and respiratory symptoms in the Pakistani cotton industry

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Abdul Wali; Moshammer, Hanns Michael; Kundi, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the cotton industry of Pakistan, 15 million people are employed and exposed to cotton dust, toxic chemicals, noise and physical hazards. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of health symptoms, particularly respiratory symptoms, and to measure cotton dust and endotoxin levels in different textile factories of Faisalabad, Pakistan. Methods A cross-sectional investigation was performed in a representative sample of 47 cotton factories in the Faisalabad region in P...

  14. Assessment of safety and health in the tea industry of Barak valley, Assam: a fuzzy logic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajat; Dey, Sanjoy Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Traditional safety and health system measurement procedures, practiced in various industries produce qualitative results with a degree of uncertainty. This paper presents a fuzzy-logic-based approach to developing a fuzzy model for assessing the safety and health status in the tea industry. For this, the overall safety and health status at a tea estate has been considered as a function of 4 inputs: occupational safety, occupational health, behavioral safety and competency. A set of fuzzy rules based on expert human judgment has been used to correlate different fuzzy inputs and output. Fuzzy set operations are used to calculate the safety and health status of the tea industry. Application of the developed model at a tea estate showed that the safety and health status belongs to the fuzzy class of good with a crisp value of 7.2.

  15. System Quality Management in Software Testing Laboratory that Chooses Accreditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanet Brito R.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of software products will reach full maturity when executed by the scheme and provides third party certification. For the validity of the certification, the independent laboratory must be accredited for that function, using internationally recognized standards. This brings with it a challenge for the Industrial Laboratory Testing Software (LIPS, responsible for testing the products developed in Cuban Software Industry, define strategies that will permit it to offer services with a high level of quality. Therefore it is necessary to establish a system of quality management according to NC-ISO/IEC 17025: 2006 to continuously improve the operational capacity and technical competence of the laboratory, with a view to future accreditation of tests performed. This article discusses the process defined in the LIPS for the implementation of a Management System of Quality, from the current standards and trends, as a necessary step to opt for the accreditation of the tests performed.

  16. Wireless Sensing Based on RFID and Capacitive Technologies for Safety in Marble Industry Process Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Iacopetti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents wireless sensing systems to increase safety and robustness in industrial process control, particularly in industrial machines for marble slab working. The process is performed by abrasive or cutting heads activated independently by the machine controller when the slab, transported on a conveyer belt, is under them. Current slab detection systems are based on electromechanical or optical devices at the machine entrance stage, suffering from deterioration and from the harsh environment. Slab displacement or break inside the machine due to the working stress may result in safety issues and damages to the conveyer belt due to incorrect driving of the working tools. The experimented contactless sensing techniques are based on four RFID and two capacitive sensing technologies and on customized hardware/software. The proposed solutions aim at overcoming some limitations of current state-of-the-art detection systems, allowing for reliable slab detection, outside and/or inside the machine, while maintaining low complexity and at the same time robustness to industrial harsh conditions. The proposed sensing devices may implement a wireless or wired sensor network feeding detection data to the machine controller. Data integrity check and process control algorithms have to be implemented for the safety and reliability of the overall industrial process.

  17. FAULT TREE ANALYSIS FEATURES IN INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS SAFETY ASSESSMENT: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Iosif MORARU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fault tree analysis is useful both in designing new products/services or in dealing with identified problems in existing ones. In the quality planning process, the analysis can be used to optimize process features and goals and to design for critical factors and human error. As part of safety process improvement, as it is emphasized in the present paper, it can be used to help identify root causes of undesired events such as occupational injuries and illnesses. A case study of application in industrial safety systems illustrates the aim, principle and structure of the technique, allowing better prevention measures selection and implementation.

  18. Resolution 12/2004 Guideline for implementation of safety regulations in the practice of industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. This guide is intended to clarify, in relation to its application in practice Industrial Radiography, the provisions of: a) Joint Resolution CITMA-MINSAP, of December 15, 2002, Regulation: Basic Radiation Safety Standards, hereinafter Regulation NBS; b) Resolution No. 25/98 of CITMA Regulation. Authorization Practices Associated with the use of ionizing radiation , hereinafter Resolution 25/98; c) Resolution 121/2000 CITMA Regulation: For the Safe Transport of Radioactive materials , hereinafter Resolution 121/2000; and in d) Joint Resolution CITMA-MINSAP, Regulation: Selection, Training and Authorization of personnel performing Employment Practices Associated Radiation Ionizing . 2. For the purposes of applying this Guide considers the practice of Industrial Radiography includes the following techniques: a) Industrial Radiography with use of gamma radiation sources; b) crawler radiography equipment; and c) Industrial Radiography with X-rays

  19. 7 CFR 983.1 - Accredited laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accredited laboratory. 983.1 Section 983.1 Agriculture..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.1 Accredited laboratory. An accredited laboratory is a laboratory that has been approved or accredited by the U.S. Department of Agriculture....

  20. Accreditation in university environmental radioactivity laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The experimental work performed in university laboratories comes from many different fields and it is assumed to be of high quality. In general, the results are published in national or international journals or presented at conferences. Only a few laboratories have a clear understanding of the importance of implementing Quality Assurance Systems and the accreditation of their activities according to the international standards, such as ISO 17025. Today, few universities include this issue in the ir programmes. Most laboratories associate quality assurance with the fact that referees before publication have revised their works. Here the authors describe their experience in two university laboratories involved in environmental radioactivity control. Both laboratories have implanted a Quality Assurance System based on ISO 17025, the standard used for accreditation of the technical competence of laboratories. One of them (LARA-UPC) belongs to a research institute and the other (LRAUB) belongs to a university department with different logistic organisation. Both laboratories provide services to public and private institutions along side their teaching and research activities. The Quality Assurance Unit (UGQ-UB) is responsible for activities related to technical support in implementation and assessment in quality systems. In the case of these laboratories this UGQ performs internal audits. Accreditation is particularly important in environmental radioactivity analysis, where objective evidence of the quality of the data is required. Moreover, the results of radioactivity analysis are important: e.g. quality of water for human consumption (Directive 98/83/CE), environmental surveys (PVRA, Art. 35 of the Euratom Treaty for EU members), imports of agricultural products (Directive 99/1661/EC), export certificate required for agricultural products (2001/1621/EC), measurements in support of health and safety. It is important to assure the accuracy and precision of

  1. TU-A-18C-01: ACR Accreditation Updates in CT, Ultrasound, Mammography and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, R [Vanderbilt Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Berns, E [University of Colorado Health Science, Denver, CO (United States); Hangiandreou, N [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); McNitt-Gray, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, the ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, mammography, ultrasound, and computed tomography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program. To understand the new requirements of the ACR ultrasound accreditation program, and roles the physicist can play in annual equipment surveys and setting up and supervising the routine QC program. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process.

  2. TU-A-18C-01: ACR Accreditation Updates in CT, Ultrasound, Mammography and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, the ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, mammography, ultrasound, and computed tomography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program. To understand the new requirements of the ACR ultrasound accreditation program, and roles the physicist can play in annual equipment surveys and setting up and supervising the routine QC program. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process

  3. The costs of uncertainty: regulating health and safety in the Canadian uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federalism, and particularly federal/provincial jurisdictional relationships, have led to considerable uncertainty in the regulation of occupational health and safety and of environmental protection in the Canadian uranium mining industry. The two principal uranium producing provinces in Canada are Saskatchewan and Ontario. Since 1978, in an attempt to avoid constitutional issues, both these provinces and the federal government as well have proceeded unilaterally with health and safety reforms for the industry. In Saskatchewan this has resulted in areas of overlapping jurisdiction, which have led to uncertainty over the legal enforceability of the provincial regulations. In Ontario, the province has left significant gaps in the protection of both workers and the environment. Little progress can be expected in eliminating these gaps and overlaps until the current administrative and jurisdictional arrangements are understood

  4. Spreading the word of the concept 'inherent safety' in a general industrial setting in the Dutch province of Zeeland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, M.J.M.; Dijkman, A.; Zwanikken, S.; Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Gort, J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent accidents in The Netherlands in different kinds of industries, like fire works storage, catering and energy industry, triggered the Dutch government to start a national program to enhance the enforcement of industrial safety at the regional and municipal level. Stimulated by this program the

  5. 76 FR 62073 - Guidance for Industry on Implementation of the Fee Provisions of the FDA Food Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Implementation of the Fee... guidance for industry entitled ``Implementation of the Fee Provisions of Section 107 of the FDA Food Safety... guidance for industry entitled ``Implementation of the Fee Provisions of Section 107 of the FDA Food...

  6. Adaptation of CRM training for the railway industry: Operational safety benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Tsang, M.T.S.; Hörmann, H.-J.

    2009-01-01

    In aviation, Crew Resource Management (CRM) was developed to address safety issues derived from accident and incident investigations. As CRM has proven its effectiveness by improving teamwork, communication and staff responses to operational hazards, there have been many attempts to expand this concept into other high-risk sectors such as medical, nuclear, or military. Although some work was also conducted to modify CRM for the railway industry, no such experiences yet existed in China or Hon...

  7. Knowledge management for industrial safety, generic resource platform combined with an ontology based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Debray, Bruno; Abou Assali, Amjad; Pradaud, Isabelle; Vaudelin, Jacques; Lenne, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    International audience The capacity to manage risks and maintain industrial safety is largely based on the capacity of various actors to acquire, maintain and share knowledge on a large variety of subjects. The actors are, of course, the plant operator but also the employees, the competent authorities, the external maintenance teams or internal or external experts in charge of risk assessment and design of risk management. The knowledge ranges from the regulatory framework to the details o...

  8. Health and safety aspects of textile workers from Solapur (India) textile industries

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul B Hiremath; Ruth Kattumuri; Bimlesh Kumar; Gurudevi R Hiremath

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Textile sector in India plays an important role in the country's economy, providing employment to a significant population in rural and urban areas. Objectives: This paper focuses on health and safety aspects of textile workers in Solapur City (one of the key textile cluster) in the state of Maharashtra, India. Methodology: A sample of 180 workers from the identified textile industries of Solapur city were assessed for their general physique, muscle tone, lung condition, and eye...

  9. A Guidebook for Evaluating Organizations in the Nuclear Industry - an example of safety culture evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organizations in the nuclear industry need to maintain an overview on their vulnerabilities and strengths with respect to safety. Systematic periodical self assessments are necessary to achieve this overview. This guidebook provides suggestions and examples to assist power companies but also external evaluators and regulators in carrying out organizational evaluations. Organizational evaluation process is divided into five main steps. These are: 1) planning the evaluation framework and the practicalities of the evaluation process, 2) selecting data collection methods and conducting the data acquisition, 3) structuring and analysing the data, 4) interpreting the findings and 5) reporting the evaluation results with possible recommendations. The guidebook emphasises the importance of a solid background framework when dealing with multifaceted phenomena like organisational activities and system safety. The validity and credibility of the evaluation stem largely from the evaluation team's ability to crystallize what they mean by organization and safety when they conduct organisational safety evaluations - and thus, what are the criteria for the evaluation. Another important and often under-considered phase in organizational evaluation is interpretation of the findings. In this guidebook a safety culture evaluation in a Nordic nuclear power plant is presented as an example of organizational evaluation. With the help of the example, challenges of each step in the organizational evaluation process are described. Suggestions for dealing with them are presented. In the case example, the DISC (Design for Integrated Safety culture) model is used as the evaluation framework. The DISC model describes the criteria for a good safety culture and the organizational functions necessary to develop a good safety culture in the organization

  10. [Accreditation of processes in hepatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Gerardo; Pérez-Lázaro, Juan José; Tejedor, Martín; Planas, Ramón; De la Mata, Manuel; Córdoba, Juan; Jara, Paloma; Herrero, José Ignacio; Prieto, Martín; Suáreza, Gonzalo; Arroyo, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    The Spanish Association for the Study of the Liver decided in 2006 to develop a project to assess the quality of the professionals, processes and medical units dealing with the management of patients with liver diseases in Spain. The current article reports the criteria proposed to assess the quality and the accreditation of the processes in hepatology. The processes considered include most patients with liver diseases and the accreditation system designed is highly specific. This document, together with a previous one published in gastroenterología y hepatología concerning the accreditation of the professionals and a third document dealing with the accreditation of liver units that will be published soon, form the basis of the quality assessment of hepatology in our country.

  11. Issues of Safety and Security: New Challenging to Malaysia Tourism Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ayob Norizawati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety and security issues nowadays become one of the forces causing changes in tourism industry in era of millennium. The main concern of this issues more focus on crime rates, terrorism, food safety, health issues and natural disaster. This topic gained the popularity in tourism research after 9/11 tragedy and since then the academicians and practitioners started seeking the best solution in ways to mitigate these negative impacts. For Malaysia, the image as safety and secure destination was tarnished a few years lately and new unfortunates incident in this year bring more damage to Malaysia image. Healthy issues, terrorism, Lahad Datu intrusion, repeated kidnapping and shooting in Sabah, twin airlines incident, riot and illegal demonstration and false reporting by international media brings new challenging to Malaysia. Although some incident may be had short-term impact to Malaysia tourism industry, but it’s still gave the big impact to Malaysia branding process. Many travellers and Malaysian itself still believe that Malaysia is a one of safer destination and country to visit and stayed in, but more outstanding efforts was require to make sure Malaysia tourism industry was capable to recover from this negative impact as soon as possible.

  12. Implementation of the safety assessment in the practice of industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CNSN as regulatory authority has regulatory control processes based on regulations, permits, inspections and limitation to ensure the supervision and control of the practice of industrial radiography. On the other hand in the light of the new regulations approved and being implemented such as: Resolution 334/2011 CITMA 'Regulation on Notification and authorization of practices and activities associated with the use of ionizing radiation sources' and Resolution 17 / 2012, Security Guide: Security Assessment Practices and Activities associated with the use of ionizing radiation (recommendatory), it is necessary for compliance with regulatory requirements concerning the safety assessment. Since 2009 it has been applied this experience in different medical practices and industry, providing a systematic and consistent basis, to the safety assessment of all facilities and activities, which has helped increase the confidence that has been achieved an adequate level of security. The work was able to identify that there is a group of barriers operating in the risk reduction in various accident sequences and therefore have a relative importance in risk reduction, recommendations in this regard to improve the program management of safety in the practice of industrial radiography.

  13. Establish Central Kitchen under HACCP Control in Food and Beverage Industry to Ensure Food Safety and Hygiene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuihua Qi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, food safety and hygiene have been a social problem. So, it is worth studying in-depth that how to control the safety and hygiene of food and beverage. This paper proposes to establish central kitchens under HACCP control to ensure food safety and hygiene in the food and beverage industry. Considering the practical difficulties in the application of HACCP, this paper introduces the establishment of dishes HACCP system with some examples to give the reference of the food and beverage industry. Central kitchens have many advantages while HACCP is the golden standard to ensure food safety and hygiene, hence, it will ensure food safety and hygiene if both can be combined with in the use of food and beverage industry.

  14. Operation safety of complex industrial systems. Main concepts; Surete de fonctionnement des systemes industriels complexes. Principaux concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwingelstein, G

    2009-06-15

    Operation safety consists in knowing, evaluating, foreseeing, measuring and mastering the technological system and human failures in order to avoid their impacts on health and people's safety, on productivity, and on the environment, and to preserve the Earth's resources. This article recalls the main concepts of operation safety: 1 - evolutions in the domain; 2 - failures, missions and functions of a system and of its components: functional failure, missions and functions, industrial processes, notions of probability; 3 - basic concepts and operation safety: reliability, unreliability, failure density, failure rate, relations between them, availability, maintainability, safety. (J.S.)

  15. Health and safety aspects of textile workers from Solapur (India textile industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul B Hiremath

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Textile sector in India plays an important role in the country's economy, providing employment to a significant population in rural and urban areas. Objectives: This paper focuses on health and safety aspects of textile workers in Solapur City (one of the key textile cluster in the state of Maharashtra, India. Methodology: A sample of 180 workers from the identified textile industries of Solapur city were assessed for their general physique, muscle tone, lung condition, and eyesight using different techniques. The study aimed at developing a framework for understanding risks to textile workers resulting from lack of health and safety standards in companies. Results: Findings showed that most of the workers have been affected by respiratory problems, increase in muscle tone, eye problems and musculoskeletal problem. It has been also observed that job security or regular work impacts positively to the worker’s long term body health. However, there is an immediate need to adopt and implement measures in accordance with Indian Factories Act (OHSAS 18001/ILO-OSH 2001 which includes directions and procedures in respect of industrial installations, work environment and occupational health and safety guidelines.

  16. Sensor Networks or Smart Artifacts? An Exploration of Organizational Issues of an Industrial Health and Safety Monitoring System

    OpenAIRE

    Kortuem, Gerd; Alford, David; Ball, Linden; Busby, Jerry; Davies, Nigel; Efstratiou, Christos; Finney, Joe; WHITE, MARIAN; Kinder, Katharina

    2007-01-01

    Industrial health and safety is an important yet largely unexplored application area of ubiquitous computing. In this paper we investigate the relationship between technology and organization in the context of a concrete industrial health and safety system. The system is designed to reduce the number of incidents of "�vibration white finger"� (VWF) at construction sites and uses wireless sensor nodes for monitoring workers'� exposure to vibrations and testing of compliance with legal health a...

  17. Safety aspects in the use of 9 MV industrial linac for open field radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron Accelerators are used for industrial radiography in various industries. Usually fixed accelerators in a well-shielded enclosure are used for radiography. However, in some special cases it is desired to have portable accelerators to carry out the radiography work at site. In many military applications the heavy objects are checked at the site, for which portable accelerators are preferred. X-ray intensity emanating from an industrial accelerator is very high. Proper safety precaution needs to be adopted by the radiation workers as well as other non-radiation workers involved in the open field radiography work and other supporting activities. A case of 9 MV linear accelerators to be used for open field radiography is being discussed here. Portable shielding thickness, which is to be given in the primary and secondary direction is evaluated numerically and suggested in the paper. As the portable radiography enclosure is open top and has limited wall height, more air volume above the enclosure is likely to get irradiated. Although the wall shielding is adequate, there is possibility of high radiation level around the radiography enclosure due to sky-shine radiation. Sky-shine radiation level is evaluated numerically and is presented in this paper. For the protection of the radiation and non-radiation workers about 100 m cordoning off is recommended. Operators sit inside a cabin of the transport car located outside the cordoning area. Various safety precautions and interlock facility to be adopted for safe radiography work practices are described in this paper. (author)

  18. Role of human factor in safety assurance in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discuss the issues of human resource activities in the Rosatom Corporation that aim to achieve and maintain the required levels of safety culture and qualification of personnel involved in the operations of nuclear energy sites. These activities are supported by the appropriate resources, organisational management structure and quality control system, legislation, regulations and methodological support. It is emphasized that systematic and versatile HR-related activities in the nuclear industry represent one of the key areas of production operations that assure safety and reliability of nuclear sites at all stages of their life cycle. Especially important is the assurance of high professional level of nuclear regulators. They believe that it would appear sensible, in addition to the existing system of training, to engage the mechanisms of rotation of personnel from utility organisations to regulatory authorities

  19. Influence of material and gear parameters on the safety of gearing in metallurgical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Medvecká - Beňová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the appropriate choice of parameters to obtain the desired level of safety of gears in a gearbox to drive the conveyor in the metallurgical industry under increased load. Steel with surface hardness up to 350 HBW, or heat treated steel with hardness of 500 - 650 HBW are used. As a final heat treatment are used surface hardening, cementation and hardening, nitridation. Good properties of heat-treated steels are at the correct thickness of the heat-treated layer of the tooth. Results are presented for dual-ratio gearbox with spur gears from operation of an integrated steel company.

  20. EFFICIENCY OF FIRE-FIGHTING PROTECTION OBJECTS IN PROVISION OF FIRE SAFETY AT INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zhovna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an analysis of economic results pertaining to organization of a system for fire-fighting protection of industrial enterprises in theRepublicofBelarus. Statistical data on operational conditions of technical means of fire-fighting protection, particularly, automatic systems for detection and extinguishing of fires, systems of internal fire-fighting water-supply.  Requirements and provisions  of normative and technical documents are thoroughly studied. Observance of these documents is to ensure the required level of  fire safety. On the basis of the obtained results concerning  economic analysis of efficiency optimization directions are defined for selection of technical means of fire-fighting protection at objects of industrial purpose.

  1. 7 CFR 205.506 - Granting accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Accreditation of Certifying Agents § 205.506 Granting accreditation....

  2. A quantitative risk assessment tool for the external safety of industrial plants with a dust explosion hazard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, M.M. van der; Klein, A.J.J.; Maaijer, M. de; Berg, A.C. van den; Deursen, J.R. van; Versloot, N.H.A.

    2007-01-01

    A quantitative risk assessment (QRA) tool has been developed by TNO for the external safety of industrial plants with a dust explosion hazard. As a first step an industrial plant is divided into groups of modules, defined by their size, shape, and constructional properties. Then the relevant explosi

  3. Accreditation of Engineering Programs In The USA

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, E. C.; Reyes-Guerra, David R.

    1989-01-01

    Accreditation is a way of assessing the quality of education. In the United States accreditation of engineering programs is carried out by volunteers, engineering educators and practitioners who evaluate programs against criteria developed by the profession. Universities voluntarily submit their engineering programs for professional accreditation. The process is supported by various professional engineering societies, the universities that request accreditation, the volunteers who carry out t...

  4. Accreditation of Emergency Department at a Teaching Hospital in Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Fereshteh Farzianpour; Roholah Askari; Amin T. Hamedani; Gholamosien Khorshidi; Sanaz Amirifar; Shadi Hosseini

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: Considering the importance of emergency departments in healthcare system and the high mortality rate of patients referred to these departments, it is crucial to provide quality services in emergency departments. Accreditation is a systematic process for improving quality of care and it enables managers to assess and evaluate the healthcare system. Accreditation of an organization provides an obvious commitment for improving quality of safety, quality of patient care, ensuri...

  5. IMPLEMENTATION OF A SAFETY PROGRAM FOR THE WORK ACCIDENTS’ CONTROL. A CASE STUDY IN THE CHEMICAL INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Cesar de Faria Nogueira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a case study related to the implementation of a Work Safety Program in a chemical industry, based on the Process Safety Program, PSP, of a huge energy company. The research was applied, exploratory, qualitative and with and data collection method through documentary and bibliographical research. There will be presented the main practices adopted in order to make the Safety Program a reality inside a chemical industry, its results and contributions for its better development. This paper proposes the implementation of a Safety Program must be preceded by a diagnosis of occupational safety and health management system and with constant critical analysis in order to make the necessary adjustments.

  6. Evolving framework of the LNG industry: Expected growth and continuing importance of safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major increase in LNG trade, expected from the 1990s onwards, is quite significant in that a new framework will be developed. These changes and developments may well prove to be some of the most notable that have ever occurred in the 30-year history of the LNG industry. All over the world, new buyers and sellers are entering the scene, while in Japan, small and medium-size businesses are switching to LNG. Transporters and LNG carriers are also expecting an increase in their numbers. We are about to see a wide-ranging diversification in terms of the geography and the size of the companies that deal with LNG. Safety continues to be the main issue in promoting the development of the LNG market. The wider the spread of LNG, the greater the need will be for further development of the systems and organizations for transferring safety technology and skills. In addition to enhancing safety, it will be necessary to seek harmony with the social environment. This paper discusses measures for the future based on the author's many years of experience, particularly in the field of receiving terminals

  7. Positive organizational behavior and safety in the offshore oil industry: Exploring the determinants of positive safety climate

    OpenAIRE

    Hystad, Sigurd William; Bartone, Paul T.; Eid, Jarle

    2013-01-01

    Much research has now documented the substantial influence of safety climate on a range of important outcomes in safety critical organizations, but there has been scant attention to the question of what factors might be responsible for positive or negative safety climate. The present paper draws from positive organizational behavior theory to test workplace and individual factors that may affect safety climate. Specifically, we explore the potential influence of authentic leadersh...

  8. A concurrent diagnosis of microbiological food safety output and food safety management system performance: Cases from meat processing industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luning, P.A.; Jacxsens, L.; Rovira, J.; Oses Gomez, S.; Uyttendaele, M.; Marcelis, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Stakeholder requirements force companies to analyse their food safety management system (FSMS) performance to improve food safety. Performance is commonly analysed by checking compliance against preset requirements via audits/inspections, or actual food safety (FS) output is analysed by microbiologi

  9. Evolution and current situation of the quality and industrial safety. Concepts, laws and regulations; Evolucion y situacion actual de la calidad y seguridad industrial. Conceptos, leyes y reglamentos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this article is to show the difference between the concepts of quality and industrial safety and how in the legislation of products and industrial installation there is a very close relationship between both concepts. So, that Spanish companies could place in the market not only safe products but also reliable ones that meet the society's demand regarding quality. (Author)

  10. Testing laboratories, its function in ensuring industrial safety; Los laboratorios de ensayo, su funcion en el aseguramiento de la seguridad industrial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Fernandez, M.

    2015-07-01

    This article discusses and justifies the development of industrial laboratories (testing and calibration) in Spain, since its embryo, its creation and development, to the present day. Likewise, presents its interrelation with other agents, as well as the legislative and technical framework is application along to the years. Within this development of the sector, highlights the period of the conformity assessment, and consequently its relationship with Industrial safety. Finally, describes the organizational situation of the sector both nationally and internationally. (Author)

  11. The Accreditation-Eligibility Link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Nora Jean

    1981-01-01

    Public policy rests on the unreliable assumption that postsecondary education institutions and programs approved by nationally recognized private accrediting agencies are bona fide providers of educational services, worthy of students' time, effort, and money and of federal funds. Rather, federal fund eligibility should focus on measures of…

  12. Specialized Accreditation: College Library Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, Stuart

    1994-01-01

    Offers a detailed overview of accreditation standards, criteria, and procedures used by one specialized accreditor; and suggests ways to be prepared for site visits and reports. A directory of 73 specialized accreditors and a brief bibliography are appended. (18 references) (Author/SLW)

  13. Accreditation - ISO/IEC 17025

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, Rüdiger

    This chapter gives the background on the accreditation of testing and calibration laboratories according to ISO/IEC 17025 and sets out the requirements of this international standard. ISO 15189 describes similar requirements especially tailored for medical laboratories. Because of these similarities ISO 15189 is not separately mentioned throughout this lecture.

  14. Days on safety of industrial radiographic controls; Securite des controles radiographiques industriels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This program is divided in three parts: the context and the regulations, the preparation and the implementation, the tools of prevention and the initiatives and the perspectives.In the first part devoted to the context and regulation are: the context by the Authority of nuclear safety (A.S.N.), the regulation referential, the transport of gamma-graphs; in the second part are the distribution of liabilities, materials and associated requirements, the feedback of incidents and exploitation of it, training and base requirements, works of S.F.R.P./C.O.F.R.E.N.D. and the A.S.N. position; the third part includes help to evaluation of risks at working places of industry radiologists, dosimetry study of a working place, guide to evaluate oneself; the fourth part devoted to the initiatives and the perspectives are: regional experiences charters of good practices in industry radiography, integration of works and deployment by the members of the C.O.F.R.E.N.D., perspectives in matter of prevention of occupational risks in the area of industry radiography. (N.C.)

  15. ECOLOGY SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES OF UNCONVENTIONAL OIL RESERVES RECOVERY FOR SUSTAINABLE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav Zyrin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of effective technology for heavy oil recovery nowadays has a great importance, because of worsening geological conditions of the developed deposits, decreasing recovery factor, increasing the part of heavy oil. For the future sustainable development of oil producing industry the involved technologies must require energy effectiveness and ecological safety. The paper proves the enhanced oil recovery methods necessity for heavy oil deposits, highlighted thermal technologies as the most effective. But traditional thermal treatment technologies is a source of air pollutant emission, such as CO, NO etc. The calculation of emissions for traditional steam generator is provided. Besides, the paper shows the effectiveness of electrical enhanced oil recovery methods. The advantages of associated gas as a fuel for cogeneration plants is shown. The main approaches to implementation of carbon dioxide sequestration technologies in the oil and gas industry of Russia are defined. Conceptual view of СО2-EOR technologies potential within the context of sustainable development of oil and gas industry are presented. On the basis of the conducted research a number of scientific research and practical areas of the CCS technology development are revealed.

  16. Positive organizational behavior and safety in the offshore oil industry: Exploring the determinants of positive safety climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hystad, Sigurd W; Bartone, Paul T; Eid, Jarle

    2014-01-01

    Much research has now documented the substantial influence of safety climate on a range of important outcomes in safety critical organizations, but there has been scant attention to the question of what factors might be responsible for positive or negative safety climate. The present paper draws from positive organizational behavior theory to test workplace and individual factors that may affect safety climate. Specifically, we explore the potential influence of authentic leadership style and psychological capital on safety climate and risk outcomes. Across two samples of offshore oil-workers and seafarers working on oil platform supply ships, structural equation modeling yielded results that support a model in which authentic leadership exerts a direct effect on safety climate, as well as an indirect effect via psychological capital. This study shows the importance of leadership qualities as well as psychological factors in shaping a positive work safety climate and lowering the risk of accidents.

  17. Voluntary Safety Management System in the Manufacturing Industry – To What Extent does OHSAS 18001 Certification Help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paas Õnnela

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Occupational risk prevention can be managed in several ways. Voluntary safety management standard OHSAS 18001 is a tool, which is considered to give contribution in effective risk management in the manufacturing industry. The current paper examines the benefits of OHSAS 18001 based on the statistical analysis. MISHA method is used for safety audit in 16 Estonian enterprises. The results demonstrate the objectives why companies implement or are willing to implement OHSAS 18001, bring out differences in safety activities for 3 types of companies and determine correlations among different safety activity areas. The information is valuable for enterprises that are willing to improve their safety activities via a voluntary safety management system.

  18. Training Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years increased attention has been given to all aspects of the operation of Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. Contributing to this is the finding that the severity of the accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 has, in large part, been attributed to personnel training deficiencies. Initially the impact of the Three Mile Island accident and the lessons learned were directed at DOE Category A reactor facilities. This resulted in numerous initiatives to upgrade the safety of operations and to improve the training of personnel responsible for operating these facilities

  19. High-dose secondary calibration laboratory accreditation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, J.C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    There is a need for high-dose secondary calibration laboratories to serve the multi-billion dollar radiation processing industry. This need is driven by the desires of industry for less costly calibrations and faster calibration-cycle response time. Services needed include calibration irradiations of routine processing dosimeters and the supply of reference standard transfer dosimeters for irradiation in the production processing facility. In order to provide measurement quality assurance and to demonstrate consistency with national standards, the high-dose secondary laboratories would be accredited by means of an expansion of an existing National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program. A laboratory performance criteria document is under development to implement the new program.

  20. Nuclear safety. ICFTU proposals for the international control of the nuclear energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    are strong proponents of its use and others have said that they are only prepared to accept its application if safety controls are substantially improved. All affiliates of the ICFTU are convinced that energy policy options must be widened through increased research and development of new and renewable sources and through extensive energy conservation measures. The environmental impact of all methods of energy generation must be assessed on the basis of the public availability of all relevant information. It is in this context, that whatever their views about the desirability or otherwise of nuclear power, all ICFTU affiliates recognise the immediate need to assure the highest possible level of safety for all nuclear plants and activities everywhere - for example to deal with radioactive wastes created over the last 30 years. Even if some countries opt out of nuclear power it is likely that many others will be committed to it for many years. Given the widespread effects of a catastrophic failure anywhere in the world we must therefore all be concerned to strengthen the international safety regime. Because of their historic role in campaigning for health and safety at work, unions are well placed to exercise an independent watchdog role - making use of the knowledge and skills of their members in the nuclear industry - and are also able to speak on behalf of a large membership which is representative representative of the wide public concern about nuclear safety. Immediately following the Chernobyl disaster, the ICFTU Executive Board adopted a resolution (reproduced as Appendix 2 to this document) calling for immediate steps to tighten up nuclear safety. In the light of subsequent developments, the Confederation has now given further detailed consideration to the whole question of nuclear safety and has decided to publish this report which contains detailed proposals for tighter international control of nuclear energy via the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA

  1. Unravelling safety compliance in the mining industry: examining the role of work stress, job insecurity, satisfaction and commitment as antecedents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uanda Masia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Safety compliance remains a major issue in the South African mining industry. This article explores the roles of specific work-related job and attitudinal variables in predicting compliance.Research purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of work stress, job insecurity, satisfaction and commitment to safety compliance in a mine.Motivation for the study: The study aims to predict safety compliance through work-related variables in order to manage safety better.Research design, approach and method: The researchers used a cross-sectional survey design with a convenience sample (n = 158. They distributed a survey booklet. It included a biographical questionnaire, scales for job insecurity, satisfaction, affective organisational commitment, workplace accidents and safety compliance as well as a work stress measure that comprised dimensions of role clarity, conflict and overload.Main findings: The results showed that work stress and job insecurity had a negative relationship with safety compliance. The researchers found that only job satisfaction was a significant predictor of safety.Practical/managerial implications: Although exploratory, this study suggests that promoting job satisfaction may improve safety compliance whilst job stress and job insecurity also relate negatively to safety compliance.Contribution/value-add: This study shows that job satisfaction is more important than organisational commitment, job security and work stress for predicting safety compliance.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF METHODS IMPROVING INDUSTRIAL SAFETY OF TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSES IN ASPHALT-CONCRETE PLANT MIXERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Ivanova

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. The problem of improvement of industrial safety of technol-ogical processes in mixers of asphalt-concrete plants is considered on the basis of analysis of organic impurities content in incomplete combustion products, and es-timation of efficiency of purification of asphalt-concrete plant emissions in the presence of “wet” flue gas purification system is given.Results and conclusions. It has been found that the efficiency of hydrocarbon fuel burning affects the amount of hydrophobic dust thrown into the atmosphere, and burning of heavy fuel oil is attended by significant incompleteness of fuel combustion, and this is connected with the processes of fuel dispersion and evapo-ration. The optimal measures for efficient combustion and cleaning of hydrophob-ic dust are described.

  3. Report on the upstream petroleum industry task force on safety (1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation discussed seven recommendations for improving bulk transportation in oil and natural gas fields. The recommendations dealt with: (1) formation of an oilfield trucking association, (2) minimum training standards and courses to be established, (3) industry and its oilfield truckers to improve work planning and operating standards, (4) code of practice for trucking of production fluids, (5) adopt occupational health and safety guidelines for handling and transportation of bulk sour products, (6) spark arresters and positive air shutoff to be required on all diesel equipment used to carry production fluids, and 7) a campaign to improve membership and commitment. A list of member companies in the Oilfield Driver Training Committee and the Technical Resource Committee was also provided

  4. The responsible for the radiological safety in the industry. Between the environment work and the technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the industrial applications of sealed radioactive sources, there are two clearly defined branches for which these materials are used: radioactive sources used in fixed and mobile equipment. These devices are used in a myriad of applications and each time with more technological advanced systems. This requires a permanent improvement on the training of the responsible, and introduces a mandatory exchange to other groups of intervention during the useful life of the device. Accident risks during the use of the equipment, although its rate of occurrence is low, are related to mistakes during operation, improper use, maintenance performed by staff without knowledge, human failures or oversights and incidents occurring during transport. All these risks are surrounded by different groups of factors that influence during the safe use of radioactive material within the installation. So, it is evidenced the importance of implementing aspects of the 'Safety Culture' and evaluations of suitability of the person responsible for radiation safety. In this paper we will refer to all the concepts that surround the election of the head of radioactive material, the factors involved during the operation, their training, the obligations of the installation, and responsible for environment and the technology

  5. Instilling safety culture in the passenger rail transport industry within the South African context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khulumane (John Maluleke

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available South Africa has two major rail operators that constitute the rail transport industry. These are Transnet Freight Rail (TFR, which operates freight and the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA. Although the Railway Safety Regulator (2011:29 reported the year on year declining trend of collisions, the main concern is that the costs incurred for each year’s incidents is escalating. This article is concerned with the declining safety standards of these operators as evidenced by 742 collisions recorded during the 2011/2012 financial year for both operators. The focus is mainly on collisions during the movement of rolling stock within the PRASA environment. The analysis of the occurrences is narrowed down, with the emphasis on the province of Gauteng. In the analysis of the causes of these collisions, the problems that led to the root causes of these collisions is reported. Of critical importance is that every transport operator is faced with the challenges of how to effectively respond to the basic transport needs and requirements of the travelling public. The transport users’ need is to travel between the two geographical points. During the journey between these geographical points, the operator has safety and security requirements and must provide a reliable, accessible and affordable transport system. As the travelling public becomes more affluent, the transport needs become open ended and require much more rational public choices. The rail transport system remains a vital or indispensable business sector of the economy. By investing in new technology, rolling stock and infrastructure, we woud see an increase in innovation, competitiveness, and an elevated standard of living.

  6. A new model for accreditation of residency programs in internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goroll, Allan H; Sirio, Carl; Duffy, F Daniel; LeBlond, Richard F; Alguire, Patrick; Blackwell, Thomas A; Rodak, William E; Nasca, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    A renewed emphasis on clinical competence and its assessment has grown out of public concerns about the safety, efficacy, and accountability of health care in the United States. Medical schools and residency training programs are paying increased attention to teaching and evaluating basic clinical skills, stimulated in part by these concerns and the responding initiatives of accrediting, certifying, and licensing bodies. This paper, from the Residency Review Committee for Internal Medicine of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, proposes a new outcomes-based accreditation strategy for residency training programs in internal medicine. It shifts residency program accreditation from external audit of educational process to continuous assessment and improvement of trainee clinical competence.

  7. Radiological protection, safety and security issues in the industrial and medical applications of radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    The use of radiation sources, namely radioactive sealed or unsealed sources and particle accelerators and beams is ubiquitous in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation. Besides radiological protection of the workers, members of the public and patients in routine situations, the use of radiation sources involves several aspects associated to the mitigation of radiological or nuclear accidents and associated emergency situations. On the other hand, during the last decade security issues became burning issues due to the potential malevolent uses of radioactive sources for the perpetration of terrorist acts using RDD (Radiological Dispersal Devices), RED (Radiation Exposure Devices) or IND (Improvised Nuclear Devices). A stringent set of international legally and non-legally binding instruments, regulations, conventions and treaties regulate nowadays the use of radioactive sources. In this paper, a review of the radiological protection issues associated to the use of radiation sources in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation is performed. The associated radiation safety issues and the prevention and mitigation of incidents and accidents are discussed. A comprehensive discussion of the security issues associated to the global use of radiation sources for the aforementioned applications and the inherent radiation detection requirements will be presented. Scientific, technical, legal, ethical, socio-economic issues are put forward and discussed.

  8. Radiation safety aspects in application of isotopes for industrial radiography in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakht, D. [Titas Gas Transmission and Distribution Company, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    1997-10-01

    Industrial Radiography arose out of the widespread applications of X-rays pioneered by Roentgen about 100 years back. It is routinely used in studying the integrity of structural materials and like most countries in the world, its use in Bangladesh is increasing at a faster rate. This is because Bangladesh is a developing country of 3rd world and in the backdrop of agrarian poverty ridden economy, its population may exceed 125 millions by 2000 AD, leaving some 12 millions people unemployed. To support them, therefore, immense activities are activated in different sectors. Accordingly, increasing importance on NDT is given and in most cases particular application of Gamma radiography is preferred using Iridium Isotope Ir-192. Consequently the points of implications of isotopes are in Open Field and Inservice Inspection Radiography, Handling of Radiation Emergencies, Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials and Hazardous Effects and Risk of Ionizing Radiation, etc. Accordingly over exposure of Ir-192 Radionuclides, Accidents and Unusual Occurrences: Case Studies, Training Courses on Safety and Regulation of Sealed Sources, Licenses for Radiography Operation including Safe Disposal of Isotopes are the salient issues to be viewed in appropriate perspectives. The role played by Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission and Bangladesh Society for NDT in collaboration with other members of the international committee for NDT are furthering the safe industrialization process

  9. Establish Central Kitchen under HACCP Control in Food and Beverage Industry to Ensure Food Safety and Hygiene

    OpenAIRE

    Cuihua Qi

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, food safety and hygiene have been a social problem. So, it is worth studying in-depth that how to control the safety and hygiene of food and beverage. This paper proposes to establish central kitchens under HACCP control to ensure food safety and hygiene in the food and beverage industry. Considering the practical difficulties in the application of HACCP, this paper introduces the establishment of dishes HACCP system with some examples to give the reference of the food and be...

  10. Execution of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (1994) in the Construction Industry from Contractors’ Point of View

    OpenAIRE

    Awang H.; Kamil I.M.

    2014-01-01

    Construction is one of the highest contributing industries to occupational accidents by sector in Malaysia. Statistics have been drawn from year to year that show an increasing number of cases of accidents by industry sector. While it is impossible to completely eliminate all accidents, with a proper and effective safety and health policy or rules set by top management, especially contractors, the rate of accidents on construction sites can be reduced. The main objective of this study is to a...

  11. Managing change in the nuclear industry: The effects on safety. INSAG-18. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear industry is going through a period of unprecedented change. The changes arise from the political and business environment in which the industry must operate, and from within the industry itself as it strives to become more competitive. These pressures have already led to significant changes in how nuclear enterprises are organized. The changes can be expected to continue. It is absolutely essential that throughout the period of time that organizational changes are taking place, and after the changes have occurred, very high standards of safety are maintained by all the elements that make up the industry. Changes can be made effectively and safely, and gains in efficiency and competitiveness, as well as safety, can be realized if changes are introduced carefully and managed well. Experience has shown that this is not a simple matter to achieve. Nuclear installations are complex, and it is inherently demanding to foresee all the implications that a change may have on safety. However, experience has shown very clearly that many changes have a strong potential to affect both the safety that has been built into a design and in the safety culture of an organization. Hence failure to manage change well can significantly affect the likelihood of an accident, the degree to which the assets of the company are put at risk and the company's reputation. This INSAG report is directed at members of boards of directors and senior executives who are responsible for the overall safety of an installation, who make decisions for change and who implement these decisions. It is also written for senior regulators who, on behalf of the public, ensure that boards of directors and executives meet their responsibilities for safety. This report discusses how and why change can challenge the maintenance of a high level of safety, and what can be done to control that challenge and hence reap all the benefits of change. It draws an analogy between the well established principles

  12. Managing change in the nuclear industry: The effects on safety. INSAG-18. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear industry is going through a period of unprecedented change. The changes arise from the political and business environment in which the industry must operate, and from within the industry itself as it strives to become more competitive. These pressures have already led to significant changes in how nuclear enterprises are organized. The changes can be expected to continue. It is absolutely essential that throughout the period of time that organizational changes are taking place, and after the changes have occurred, very high standards of safety are maintained by all the elements that make up the industry. Changes can be made effectively and safely, and gains in efficiency and competitiveness, as well as safety, can be realized if changes are introduced carefully and managed well. Experience has shown that this is not a simple matter to achieve. Nuclear installations are complex, and it is inherently demanding to foresee all the implications that a change may have on safety. However, experience has shown very clearly that many changes have a strong potential to affect both the safety that has been built into a design and in the safety culture of an organization. Hence failure to manage change well can significantly affect the likelihood of an accident, the degree to which the assets of the company are put at risk and the company's reputation. This INSAG report is directed at members of boards of directors and senior executives who are responsible for the overall safety of an installation, who make decisions for change and who implement these decisions. It is also written for senior regulators who, on behalf of the public, ensure that boards of directors and executives meet their responsibilities for safety. This report discusses how and why change can challenge the maintenance of a high level of safety, and what can be done to control that challenge and hence reap all the benefits of change. It draws an analogy between the well established principles for

  13. Risk management strategy to increase the safety of workers in the nanomaterials industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► On-site assessment of nanomaterials using physiochemical and cytotoxic analysis can help identify risks for each nanomaterials manufacturing plant. ► The risk of the nanomaterials manufacturing plants can be divided into three levels based on exposure routes (tier 1), aspect identification (tier 2), and toxicological screening (tier 3). ► According to the different risk levels, the precautionary risk management (PRM) such as technology control, engineering control, and personal protective equipment were applied. ► The PRM strategy can be effectively reduced workers risks for nanomaterial industries. - Abstract: In recent years, many engineered nanomaterials (NMs) have been produced, but increasing research has revealed that these may have toxicities far greater than conventional materials and cause significant adverse health effects. At present, there is insufficient data to determine the permissible concentrations of NMs in the workplace. There is also a lack of toxicity data and environmental monitoring results relating to complete health risk assessment. In view of this, we believe that workers in the NMs industry should be provided with simple and practical risk management strategy to ensure occupational health and safety. In this study, we developed a risk management strategy based on the precautionary risk management (PRM). The risk of the engineered NMs manufacturing plants can be divided into three levels based on aspect identification, solubility tests, dermal absorption, and cytotoxic analyses. The risk management strategies include aspects relating to technology control, engineering control, personal protective equipment, and monitoring of the working environment for each level. Here we report the first case in which a simple and practical risk management strategy applying in specific engineered NMs manufacturing plants. We are confident that our risk management strategy can be effectively reduced engineered NM industries risks for

  14. Risk management strategy to increase the safety of workers in the nanomaterials industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Min-Pei, E-mail: lingmp@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Health Risk Management, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Wei-Chao; Liu, Chia-Chyuan [Department of Cosmetic Science, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan 71710, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Yi-Shiao; Chueh, Miao-Ju [Industrial Safety and Health Association of the ROC, Taipei 11670, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shih, Tung-Sheng [Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Council of Labor Affairs, Taipei 22143, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-08-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On-site assessment of nanomaterials using physiochemical and cytotoxic analysis can help identify risks for each nanomaterials manufacturing plant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The risk of the nanomaterials manufacturing plants can be divided into three levels based on exposure routes (tier 1), aspect identification (tier 2), and toxicological screening (tier 3). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer According to the different risk levels, the precautionary risk management (PRM) such as technology control, engineering control, and personal protective equipment were applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PRM strategy can be effectively reduced workers risks for nanomaterial industries. - Abstract: In recent years, many engineered nanomaterials (NMs) have been produced, but increasing research has revealed that these may have toxicities far greater than conventional materials and cause significant adverse health effects. At present, there is insufficient data to determine the permissible concentrations of NMs in the workplace. There is also a lack of toxicity data and environmental monitoring results relating to complete health risk assessment. In view of this, we believe that workers in the NMs industry should be provided with simple and practical risk management strategy to ensure occupational health and safety. In this study, we developed a risk management strategy based on the precautionary risk management (PRM). The risk of the engineered NMs manufacturing plants can be divided into three levels based on aspect identification, solubility tests, dermal absorption, and cytotoxic analyses. The risk management strategies include aspects relating to technology control, engineering control, personal protective equipment, and monitoring of the working environment for each level. Here we report the first case in which a simple and practical risk management strategy applying in specific engineered NMs manufacturing plants. We are

  15. Developing Measures for Assessing the Causality of Safety Culture in a Petrochemical Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses safety culture in the petrochemical sector and the causes and consequences of safety culture. A sample of 520 responses selected by simple random sampling completed questionnaires for this survey, the return rate was 86.75%. The research instrument comprises four sections: basic information, the safety leadership scale (SLS), the safety climate scale (SCS), and the safety performance scale (SPS). SPSS 12.0, a statistical software package, was used for item analysis, validity analysis, and reliability analysis. Exploratory factor analysis indicated that (1) SLS abstracted three factors such as safety caring, safety controlling, and safety coaching; (2) SCS comprised three factors such as emergency response, safety commitment, and risk perception; and (3) SPS was composed of accident investigation, safety training, safety inspections, and safety motivation. We conclude that the SLS, SCS, and SPS developed in this paper have good construct validity and internal consistency and can serve as the basis for future research.

  16. [ISO 15189 medical laboratory accreditation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Tsutomu

    2004-10-01

    This International Standard, based upon ISO/IEC 17025 and ISO 9001, provides requirements for competence and quality that are particular to medical laboratories. While this International Standard is intended for use throughout the currently recognized disciplines of medical laboratory services, those working in other services and disciplines will also find it useful and appropriate. In addition, bodies engaged in the recognition of the competence of medical laboratories will be able to use this International Standard as the basis for their activities. The Japan Accreditation Board for Conformity Assessment (AB) and the Japanese Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (CCLS) are jointly developing the program of accreditation of medical laboratories. ISO 15189 requirements consist of two parts, one is management requirements and the other is technical requirements. The former includes the requirements of all parts of ISO 9001, moreover it includes the requirement of conformity assessment body, for example, impartiality and independence from any other party. The latter includes the requirements of laboratory competence (e.g. personnel, facility, instrument, and examination methods), moreover it requires that laboratories shall participate proficiency testing(s) and laboratories' examination results shall have traceability of measurements and implement uncertainty of measurement. Implementation of ISO 15189 will result in a significant improvement in medical laboratories management system and their technical competence. The accreditation of medical laboratory will improve medical laboratory service and be useful for patients. PMID:15624503

  17. [ISO 15189 medical laboratory accreditation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Tsutomu

    2004-10-01

    This International Standard, based upon ISO/IEC 17025 and ISO 9001, provides requirements for competence and quality that are particular to medical laboratories. While this International Standard is intended for use throughout the currently recognized disciplines of medical laboratory services, those working in other services and disciplines will also find it useful and appropriate. In addition, bodies engaged in the recognition of the competence of medical laboratories will be able to use this International Standard as the basis for their activities. The Japan Accreditation Board for Conformity Assessment (AB) and the Japanese Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (CCLS) are jointly developing the program of accreditation of medical laboratories. ISO 15189 requirements consist of two parts, one is management requirements and the other is technical requirements. The former includes the requirements of all parts of ISO 9001, moreover it includes the requirement of conformity assessment body, for example, impartiality and independence from any other party. The latter includes the requirements of laboratory competence (e.g. personnel, facility, instrument, and examination methods), moreover it requires that laboratories shall participate proficiency testing(s) and laboratories' examination results shall have traceability of measurements and implement uncertainty of measurement. Implementation of ISO 15189 will result in a significant improvement in medical laboratories management system and their technical competence. The accreditation of medical laboratory will improve medical laboratory service and be useful for patients.

  18. STUDYING OF SAFETY CLIMATE ASSESSMENT: A CASE STUDY AT STEEL INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan DARVISH; Mehdi ROOSTAEI; Azizi, Saeed

    2011-01-01

    Evolution of safety climate used as a practical means has determined and assessed potential problems relevant to safety issues in an organization and can be used in individuals’ performance and work efficiency and decreasing rate of incidents ;as well as; guidance to provide safety organization policy and comparison of safety performance in different organizations. The study wants to determine and prepare safety climate profile and application of its results in improving safety situation. In ...

  19. Management of fire and industrial safety - challenges during commissioning of a NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Construction and commissioning period of NPP are reduced world over drastically by stringent schedule for financial and economic reasons. For meeting the schedule, commissioning of components and systems are started immediate after installation, while construction activities are continued in parallel at the same place. Parallel activities' and 'Time Constraint' have brought new challenges to 'Management of Fire and Industrial Safely' during commissioning. An innovative approach was used during such phase of commissioning of TAPP-3 and 4. This paper outlines challenges encountered during this phase and special approach and measures used to meet those challenges. This paper also outlines problems encountered during implementation of these measures and subsequent change in approach to ensure smooth and safe execution of activities. Primarily, challenges were conflicting requirements by various agencies to carryout commissioning in parallel with construction activities concurrently. Main challenges were related to fall hazard, chemical hazard, fire hazard, electrical safety, work in confined space, housekeeping problem. Moreover it was within exclusion zone of another operating plant, which added one more dimension to those challenges. Conventional Safely management approach was little short to resolve these challenges. Such challenges were envisaged; analyzed and innovative measures were arrived at. Along with conventional safely analysis like Job Safely or Hazard Analysis (JSA or JHA), Accident Analysis, Accident Trend Analysis, Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA), innovative method like 'Area-Job- Hazard Charting' and 'Ratio Analysis' were used to understand activity dependent time varying hazard scenarios. Based on this analysis, decision were taken to change various existing elements of safely management like safety organizations; standard operating procedures (SOP); emergency operating procedures (EOP); resource allocation, planning and scheduling; safely training; safely

  20. FDI对我国零售业产业安全的影响%Influence of FDI on industrial safety of retail industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋永辉; 孙丹; 高超

    2012-01-01

    自从我国2004年兑现入世承诺全面开放零售市场以来,外资零售企业尤其是大型综合超市在我国发展迅猛。政府和企业为正确应对零售业市场日益激烈的竞争态势,首先应充分认识FDI对我国零售业产业安全的影响。建立零售业产业安全评价指标体系,对我国零售业产业安全度进行评价并得出结论:自2007年开始,我国零售业产业安全状态从基本安全向不安全发展,其不安全程度越来越严重。在此基础上,提出促使我国零售业转危为安、稳步发展的意见和建议。%Since China honors the commitment of entering WTO and fully opens the retail market from 2004,foreign-funded retail enterprises,especially large-scale comprehensive supermarkets developed rapidly in China.In order to deal with the increasingly intense competition situation in retail market properly,the government and enterprises should sufficiently recognize the influence of FDI on industrial safety of retail industry in China firstly.Evaluating indicator system of industrial safety of retail industry is established,the industrial safety degree of retail industry in China is evaluated.Conclusion is drawn that the industrial safety status of retail industry in China turned from basically safe to unsafe from 2007,and the unsafe degree becomes more and more severe.Based on it,opinions and suggestions are brought forward to promote retail industry in China turned from unsafe to safe and developing steadily.

  1. Behind Safety Violations : Understanding the antecedents of safety-compliant behaviour in the oil and gas industry

    OpenAIRE

    Dahl, Øyvind

    2014-01-01

    Investigations and analyses typically demonstrate that accidents at work, even those with a relatively limited extent of loss, are seldom caused by one single causal factor. Despite this, some causes are identified more frequently than others and across different types of workplace accidents. One type of such causes forms the point of departure for this thesis, namely safety violations, i.e. actions that are contrary to a written safety instruction. However, rather than focusing on violations...

  2. Exacerbating Staff Shortages and Student Dissatisfaction? The Impact of AACSB Accreditation on Faculty Recruitment in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Lightbody

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Australian accounting schools are widely perceived to be experiencing a staffing shortage. Many accountingschools are now seeking AACSB accreditation. There has been no consideration in the accounting literatureof how such accreditation might impact on the future ability of accounting schools to attract the ex-practiceaccountants that have traditionally comprised the majority of their faculty recruits. To examine suchimplications, this paper presents an interpretive case study of an Australian business school which is in theprocess of applying for AACSB accreditation. The paper argues that an implication of the increasinglyinflexible work environment driven by AACSB accreditation may be that academia becomes a less attractiveworkplace for ex-practitioner faculty. This may further exacerbate existing academic staff shortages andreduce diversity and professional knowledge within accounting schools, with consequent implications forteaching, student engagement, and industry engagement. This in turn may have long term ramifications forthe ability of the universities to attract students and thus earn the tuition fees on which they currently rely.

  3. Standard practice for design and use of safety alert system for hazardous work locations in the coatings and lining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This practice covers a safety alert system for hazardous work locations and materials for the coatings and lining application industry. This practice is designed for multi-employer work sites. Limitations--This practice does not identify specific hazardous materials or work locations but provides a means for rating each. This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment

  4. 75 FR 71133 - Guidance for Industry: The Safety of Imported Traditional Pottery Intended for Use With Food and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-22

    ... Pottery Intended for Use With Food and the Use of the Term ``Lead Free'' in the Labeling of Pottery; and... availability of a guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry: The Safety of Imported Traditional Pottery Intended for Use With Food and the Use of the Term `Lead Free' in the Labeling of Pottery; and...

  5. 76 FR 20686 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Safety Labeling Changes; Implementation of the Federal Food, Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Safety Labeling Changes; Implementation of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability...

  6. Early experiences of accredited clinical informatics fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Christopher A; Pageler, Natalie M; Palma, Jonathan P; Finnell, John T; Levy, Bruce P; Yackel, Thomas R; Mohan, Vishnu; Hersh, William R

    2016-07-01

    Since the launch of the clinical informatics subspecialty for physicians in 2013, over 1100 physicians have used the practice and education pathways to become board-certified in clinical informatics. Starting in 2018, only physicians who have completed a 2-year clinical informatics fellowship program accredited by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education will be eligible to take the board exam. The purpose of this viewpoint piece is to describe the collective experience of the first four programs accredited by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education and to share lessons learned in developing new fellowship programs in this novel medical subspecialty. PMID:27206458

  7. Engineering Accreditation in China: The Progress and Development of China's Engineering Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiaju, Bi

    2009-01-01

    Among engineering degree programs at the bachelor's level in China, civil engineering was the first one accredited in accordance with a professional programmatic accreditation system comparable to that of international practice. Launched in 1994, the accreditation of civil engineering aimed high and toward international standards and featured the…

  8. Beyond Texas City: the state of process safety in the unionized U.S. oil refining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuiston, Thomas H; Lippin, Tobi Mae; Bradley-Bull, Kristin; Anderson, Joseph; Beach, Josie; Beevers, Gary; Frederick, Randy J; Frederick, James; Greene, Tammy; Hoffman, Thomas; Lefton, James; Nibarger, Kim; Renner, Paul; Ricks, Brian; Seymour, Thomas; Taylor, Ren; Wright, Mike

    2009-01-01

    The March 2005 British Petroleum (BP) Texas City Refinery disaster provided a stimulus to examine the state of process safety in the U.S. refining industry. Participatory action researchers conducted a nation-wide mail-back survey of United Steelworkers local unions and collected data from 51 unionized refineries. The study examined the prevalence of highly hazardous conditions key to the Texas City disaster, refinery actions to address those conditions, emergency preparedness and response, process safety systems, and worker training. Findings indicate that the key highly hazardous conditions were pervasive and often resulted in incidents or near-misses. Respondents reported worker training was insufficient and less than a third characterized their refineries as very prepared to respond safely to a hazardous materials emergency. The authors conclude that the potential for future disasters plagues the refining industry. In response, they call for effective proactive OSHA regulation and outline ten urgent and critical actions to improve refinery process safety. PMID:19778828

  9. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    Niels Dupont

    2013-01-01

    CERN Safety rules and Radiation Protection at CMS The CERN Safety rules are defined by the Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE Unit), CERN’s institutional authority and central Safety organ attached to the Director General. In particular the Radiation Protection group (DGS-RP1) ensures that personnel on the CERN sites and the public are protected from potentially harmful effects of ionising radiation linked to CERN activities. The RP Group fulfils its mandate in collaboration with the CERN departments owning or operating sources of ionising radiation and having the responsibility for Radiation Safety of these sources. The specific responsibilities concerning "Radiation Safety" and "Radiation Protection" are delegated as follows: Radiation Safety is the responsibility of every CERN Department owning radiation sources or using radiation sources put at its disposition. These Departments are in charge of implementing the requi...

  10. A prospective, multi-method, multi-disciplinary, multi-level, collaborative, social-organisational design for researching health sector accreditation [LP0560737

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braithwaite Jeffrey

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accreditation has become ubiquitous across the international health care landscape. Award of full accreditation status in health care is viewed, as it is in other sectors, as a valid indicator of high quality organisational performance. However, few studies have empirically demonstrated this assertion. The value of accreditation, therefore, remains uncertain, and this persists as a central legitimacy problem for accreditation providers, policymakers and researchers. The question arises as to how best to research the validity, impact and value of accreditation processes in health care. Most health care organisations participate in some sort of accreditation process and thus it is not possible to study its merits using a randomised controlled strategy. Further, tools and processes for accreditation and organisational performance are multifaceted. Methods/design To understand the relationship between them a multi-method research approach is required which incorporates both quantitative and qualitative data. The generic nature of accreditation standard development and inspection within different sectors enhances the extent to which the findings of in-depth study of accreditation process in one industry can be generalised to other industries. This paper presents a research design which comprises a prospective, multi-method, multi-level, multi-disciplinary approach to assess the validity, impact and value of accreditation. Discussion The accreditation program which assesses over 1,000 health services in Australia is used as an exemplar for testing this design. The paper proposes this design as a framework suitable for application to future international research into accreditation. Our aim is to stimulate debate on the role of accreditation and how to research it.

  11. Occupational safety and health of employees in the catering industry in the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agim Shaqiri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It is important for the wider population to understand that 90% of the injuries that happen each year can be prevented. According to the ILO statistic, annual cost of financing cash benefits, health care and rehabilitation for work-related disabilities is colossal: a sum equivalent to 4 % of global gross domestic product (GDP for work injuries alone. And for some developing countries the cost equates 10 % of national GDP (ILO, 2008. This sector is composed mainly of small enterprises employing 10 people or less. EU workforce in the catering sector is young according to European statistics (EU-25, Eurostat 2005 some 48 % are under 35, and people of 55 years and older make up less than 10 % of the workforce, although numbers are rising as a result of demographic change. Female workers make 54 % of the workforce outnumbering men. The sector is considered a good place for young and relatively unskilled people to enter the workforce. The educational level of the workforce is low: 40 % of employees are relatively unskilled; only 1 employee in 10 has a high level of education. Despite the demanding working conditions, the sector does not have above-average rates of accidents and disease. Is Macedonia too rich or to turn blind to check this fact? Main objective of this paper will be a short overview on the Occupational Safety and Health situation in the catering industry with emphasis on legal framework, employer’s obligations and statistical data provided by the State Labour Inspectorate.

  12. Radiological safety programs in the petroleum and petrochemistry industry of Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnosis carried out five years ago showed that in Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) and its subsidiaries, exist about 530 radioactive sources. Also, about 1500 workers were also occupationally exposed, during operations such as industrial radiography and well logging. The same study determined the occurrence of some non-reported accidents and incidents with the overexposure of workers, specially contractors. Most of these problems were the result of the bad application of the radiological protection practices, and on the other hand, the disregarding of the governmental authorities in applying the regulatory standards. In order to solve this situation, PDVSA settled the safety guide for working with ionizing radiation, in which guidelines and technical advice are stablished to perform a safer work with radioactive elements. A radiological protection program was also organized in all the company operational areas. The paper includes the programs, practices and procedures implemented by PDVSA and its subsidiaries. Besides, the result of applying this comprehensive radiation protection program will be showed. (author). 1 ref

  13. Factors Associated with the Adoption of Food Safety Controls by the Mexican Meat Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Simán, Ema; Martínez-Hernández, Pedro Arturo; García-Muñiz, José G.; Cadena-Meneses, José

    Food marketing at international and domestic markets has focused on processing systems that improve food safety. The objective of this research is to determine the factors influencing the implementation of the HACCP system in the Mexican meat industry, and to identify the main marketing destination of their products. Only 18.5% of enterprises reports fully operational HACCP in their plants. The main destination of their production in the domestic market is supermarkets, suppliers and distributors and specific niches of the domestic market. Exports are to USA, Japan, Korea and Central America and some niches of the domestic market with requirements of higher quality. The four principal factors that motivate enterprises to adopt HACCP are associated with improvement of plant efficiency and profitability, adoption of good practices, improvement of product quality and waste reduction. It is concluded that Mexican enterprises adopt HACCP to successfully remain and face competition by foreign enterprises in the domestic market and to a lesser extent to compete in the international market.

  14. Accreditation to manage research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report for an accreditation to supervise research, the author proposes an overview of a study of transfers of vanadium towards benthic organisms (i.e. the toxicity of vanadium for sea coastal organisms), of studies of transfer of transuranic elements from sediment to marine benthic species. He presents current researches and perspectives: study of the level of metallic pollutants and physical-chemical characteristics of coastal waters in northern Cotentin, researches in Seine Bay, study of pollution biologic indicators. Numerous articles are provided in appendix

  15. Accredited Internship and Postdoctoral Programs for Training in Psychology: 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This is the official listing of accredited internship and postdoctoral residency programs in psychology. It reflects all Commission on Accreditation decisions through July 22, 2012. (Contains 15 footnotes.)

  16. The Accreditation Process for Engineering Curricula with Cooperative Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Williard D.

    1980-01-01

    Details the structure, accreditation procedures, and criteria of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, with particular attention to the assessment of cooperative engineering education programs. (SK)

  17. Safety

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Please note that the safety codes A9, A10 AND A11 (ex annexes of SAPOCO/42) entitled respectively "Safety responsibilities in the divisions" "The safety policy committee (SAPOCO) and safety officers' committees" and "Administrative procedure following a serious accident or incident" are available on the web at the following URLs: Code A9: http://edms.cern.ch/document/337016/LAST_RELEASED Code A10: http://edms.cern.ch/document/337019/LAST_RELEASED Code A11: http://edms.cern.ch/document/337026/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the TIS divisional secretariat, e-mail: tis.secretariat@cern.ch. TIS Secretariat

  18. Safety instrumented systems in the oil and gas industry : Concepts and methods for safety and reliability assessments in design and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundteigen, Mary Ann

    2009-07-01

    This thesis proposes new methods and gives new insight to safety and reliability assessments of safety instrumented systems (SISs). These systems play an important role in many industry sectors and are used to detect the onset of hazardous events and mitigate their consequences to humans, the environment, and material assets. The thesis focuses on SIS applications in the oil and gas industry. Here, the SIS must respond to hazardous events such as gas leakages, fires, and over pressurization. Because there are personnel onboard the oil and gas installations, the operations take place in a vulnerable marine environment, and substantial values are associated with the offshore facilities, the reliability of SIS is of great concern to the public, the authorities, and the plant owners. The objective of this project has been to identify some of the key factors that influence the SIS reliability, clarify their effects on reliability, and suggest means to improve the treatment of these factors in safety and reliability assessments in design and operation. The project builds on concepts, methods, and definitions in two key standards for SIS design, construction, and operation: IEC 61508 and IEC 61511. The main contributions from this project are: A product development model that integrates reliability, availability, maintainability, and safety (RAMS) requirements with product development. The contributions have been presented in ten articles, five published in international journals, two submitted for publication, and three presented at conferences and in conference proceedings. The contributions are also directed to the industry and the actors that are involved in SIS design, construction, and operation. Even if the oil and gas industry is the main focus area, the results may be relevant for other industry sectors as well. SIS manufacturers and SIS designers face a large number of requirements from authorities, oil companies, international standards, and so on. At the same

  19. Addressing safety issues through a joint industry programme; Traiter des problemes de securite a travers un programme industriel commun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, G.; Williams, T.P. [BG Technology (United Kingdom); Jones, A.M. [Health and Safety Executive (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    In an increasingly fragmented gas market, the focus for national gas safety may not rest with one major utility or gas supplier but may be spread across many companies. There will also be many new organisations in a liberalized gas industry with varying views on the needs and benefits of safety related technology development but all agree there is a need to ensure that the good safety record of gas as a domestic fuel is maintained. The number of carbon monoxide (CO) incidents is not decreasing significantly despite an increased awareness of the problem. As a consequence, a two-year joint industry programme addressing issues related to carbon monoxide has been established, co-ordinated by BG Technology and supported by gas organisations, government agencies, manufacturers and suppliers across Europe and the World. The 2-year 2 pound million programme has been constructed as twelve separate projects addressing issues such as the reporting and analysis of domestic incidents, improved service or installation practice, CO alarm reliability and information dissemination. The paper gives results and achievements of the programme, through new techniques, standards, procedures or equipment and demonstrates how the gas industry can work together to meet common safety objectives. (authors)

  20. Comments on "Reinventing Social Work Accreditation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, James

    2009-01-01

    It is unlikely that Stoesz and Karger will be widely commended for the critique of social work accreditation. Social work academics do not usually handle criticism with equanimity. In some respects, their case is overstated. The problems associated with social work accreditation are not caused by the low publication productivity of social work…

  1. Social Partnership in Accrediting Lithuanian VET Qualifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutlys, Vidmantas; Kaminskiene, Lina

    2008-01-01

    This article examines social partnership in accrediting qualifications in Lithuania. It defines the factors influencing social partnership and surveys future development perspectives, referring to the creation and implementation of the national qualifications system in Lithuania. Social partnership in qualifications accreditation is regarded as a…

  2. Accreditation and Expansion in Danish Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, an accreditation system for higher education has been introduced in Denmark. Accreditation partly represents continuity from an earlier evaluation system, but it is also part of a government policy to increasingly define higher education institutions as market actors. The ...

  3. Safety and human factors impacts of introducing quality management into high-risk industries: A field study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety has undertaken a study for getting a better understanding, especially in terms of Safety and Human Factors, of the changes caused by the progressive deployment of the Quality Management in French high risk industries. This study is based on both theoretical elements from the human sciences and management and practical elements from the field, collected from interviews in large French industrial sites involved in integrating this management method. The results show frequent discrepancies between theory, which is very positive and production-oriented, and reality, which is more complex and subtle, ever looking for trade-offs between production requirements and safety constraints. Thus, each step forward announced in the literature may be matched by possible steps backward in terms of safety on the ground. Where, in theory, processes enable practices to be mastered, in practice they can reduce autonomy and fossilize know-how. Where theoretically continuous improvement stimulates and strengthens performances, in reality it can also generate stress and deadlock. Where theoretically personal commitment and collective responsibility work towards all-out performance, in reality they can also operate to conceal safety deviations and infringements. The assessment of Quality Management processes in the nuclear field will benefit from these results raised from theoretical review and confirmed by similar management changes. (author)

  4. ACCREDITATION FOR TECHNICAL ABILITIES INCLUDING COMPUTER SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halit Hami OZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sector Skills are defined by state-sponsored, employer-led organizations that cover specific economic sectors in the European Union and other countries in the world to reduce skills gaps and shortages, improve productivity, boost the skills of their sector workforces and improve learning supply. The accreditation and registration systems used by professional bodies raise the profile of the profession. In many countries including the European Union, professional associations are beginning to accept practice-based accreditation, generally as an alternative to their mainstream systems. Besides studying the certain agencies in the European Union for assessing/accreditating practical abilities , Accreditation for practical abilities of Information Communication Technology and Business Management/Language domains developed by Accreditation Council for Practical abilities are also studied in detail as an example to establish a similar agency in Turkey.

  5. Defining and Measuring Safety Climate: A Review of the Construction Industry Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwatka, Natalie V; Hecker, Steven; Goldenhar, Linda M

    2016-06-01

    Safety climate measurements can be used to proactively assess an organization's effectiveness in identifying and remediating work-related hazards, thereby reducing or preventing work-related ill health and injury. This review article focuses on construction-specific articles that developed and/or measured safety climate, assessed safety climate's relationship with other safety and health performance indicators, and/or used safety climate measures to evaluate interventions targeting one or more indicators of safety climate. Fifty-six articles met our inclusion criteria, 80% of which were published after 2008. Our findings demonstrate that researchers commonly defined safety climate as perception based, but the object of those perceptions varies widely. Within the wide range of indicators used to measure safety climate, safety policies, procedures, and practices were the most common, followed by general management commitment to safety. The most frequently used indicators should and do reflect that the prevention of work-related ill health and injury depends on both organizational and employee actions. Safety climate scores were commonly compared between groups (e.g. management and workers, different trades), and often correlated with subjective measures of safety behavior rather than measures of ill health or objective safety and health outcomes. Despite the observed limitations of current research, safety climate has been promised as a useful feature of research and practice activities to prevent work-related ill health and injury. Safety climate survey data can reveal gaps between management and employee perceptions, or between espoused and enacted policies, and trigger communication and action to narrow those gaps. The validation of safety climate with safety and health performance data offers the potential for using safety climate measures as a leading indicator of performance. We discuss these findings in relation to the related concept of safety culture and

  6. Defining and Measuring Safety Climate: A Review of the Construction Industry Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwatka, Natalie V; Hecker, Steven; Goldenhar, Linda M

    2016-06-01

    Safety climate measurements can be used to proactively assess an organization's effectiveness in identifying and remediating work-related hazards, thereby reducing or preventing work-related ill health and injury. This review article focuses on construction-specific articles that developed and/or measured safety climate, assessed safety climate's relationship with other safety and health performance indicators, and/or used safety climate measures to evaluate interventions targeting one or more indicators of safety climate. Fifty-six articles met our inclusion criteria, 80% of which were published after 2008. Our findings demonstrate that researchers commonly defined safety climate as perception based, but the object of those perceptions varies widely. Within the wide range of indicators used to measure safety climate, safety policies, procedures, and practices were the most common, followed by general management commitment to safety. The most frequently used indicators should and do reflect that the prevention of work-related ill health and injury depends on both organizational and employee actions. Safety climate scores were commonly compared between groups (e.g. management and workers, different trades), and often correlated with subjective measures of safety behavior rather than measures of ill health or objective safety and health outcomes. Despite the observed limitations of current research, safety climate has been promised as a useful feature of research and practice activities to prevent work-related ill health and injury. Safety climate survey data can reveal gaps between management and employee perceptions, or between espoused and enacted policies, and trigger communication and action to narrow those gaps. The validation of safety climate with safety and health performance data offers the potential for using safety climate measures as a leading indicator of performance. We discuss these findings in relation to the related concept of safety culture and

  7. [Laboratory accreditation and proficiency testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwa, Katsuhiko

    2003-05-01

    ISO/TC 212 covering clinical laboratory testing and in vitro diagnostic test systems will issue the international standard for medical laboratory quality and competence requirements, ISO 15189. This standard is based on the ISO/IEC 17025, general requirements for competence of testing and calibration laboratories and ISO 9001, quality management systems-requirements. Clinical laboratory services are essential to patient care and therefore should be available to meet the needs of all patients and clinical personnel responsible for human health care. If a laboratory seeks accreditation, it should select an accreditation body that operates according to this international standard and in a manner which takes into account the particular requirements of clinical laboratories. Proficiency testing should be available to evaluate the calibration laboratories and reference measurement laboratories in clinical medicine. Reference measurement procedures should be of precise and the analytical principle of measurement applied should ensure reliability. We should be prepared to establish a quality management system and proficiency testing in clinical laboratories. PMID:12806918

  8. The effects of electric power industry restructuring on the safety of nuclear power plants in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas S.

    Throughout the United States the electric utility industry is restructuring in response to federal legislation mandating deregulation. The electric utility industry has embarked upon an extraordinary experiment by restructuring in response to deregulation that has been advocated on the premise of improving economic efficiency by encouraging competition in as many sectors of the industry as possible. However, unlike the telephone, trucking, and airline industries, the potential effects of electric deregulation reach far beyond simple energy economics. This dissertation presents the potential safety risks involved with the deregulation of the electric power industry in the United States and abroad. The pressures of a competitive environment on utilities with nuclear power plants in their portfolio to lower operation and maintenance costs could squeeze them to resort to some risky cost-cutting measures. These include deferring maintenance, reducing training, downsizing staff, excessive reductions in refueling down time, and increasing the use of on-line maintenance. The results of this study indicate statistically significant differences at the .01 level between the safety of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plants and boiling water reactor nuclear power plants. Boiling water reactors exhibited significantly more problems than did pressurized water reactors.

  9. Workplace Safety and Health Topics: Safety & Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Healthy Jobs - Prevention through Design Hierarchy of Controls Industry and Occupation Coding and Support Logging Safety Machine Safety Motor Vehicle Safety Motor-Vehicle Safety of Law Enforcement Officers Nail Gun Safety National Occupational Mortality Surveillance (NOMS) Noise and ...

  10. The influence of workplace factors on employee safety awareness in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In any organization, safety performance will in some way be related to employee safety awareness and enhancement of awareness should lead to improvement in safety performance. If awareness is to be enhanced, factors influencing awareness need to be understood and influential factors developed and used to this effect. This paper describes a study which sought to establish, in the context of a nuclear electricity generating company, if relationships do exist between possible influences and safety awareness and, if so, to what extent. The study revealed that five factors - training/experience, safety initiatives, communication, organization and personnel - were judged to be influential and that some of these were key influences. The evidence may be used to influence safety awareness enhancement in this organizational setting. There may be a wider application of these results, certainly within the company and possibly in other similar organizations. (author)

  11. Execution of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (1994 in the Construction Industry from Contractors’ Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awang H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction is one of the highest contributing industries to occupational accidents by sector in Malaysia. Statistics have been drawn from year to year that show an increasing number of cases of accidents by industry sector. While it is impossible to completely eliminate all accidents, with a proper and effective safety and health policy or rules set by top management, especially contractors, the rate of accidents on construction sites can be reduced. The main objective of this study is to analyse the degree of application of the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1994 (OSHA 1994 in the construction industry and to identify the contributing factors leading to a lack of execution of OSHA 1994 on construction sites with a primary focus on contractors’ point of view. Five on-going construction projects in Perak were selected as case studies and site inspections were conducted. The results showed that none of the contractors have fully implemented the rules and regulations provided by the government. Within this report, some recommendations are made towards enhancing the safety and health issues on construction sites.

  12. The Cost of Food Safety Technologies in the Meat and Poultry Industries.

    OpenAIRE

    Ollinger, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper uses plant-level micro-data from the 2002 Census of Manufactures, Food Safety Inspection Service, and the Economic Research Service in a translog cost function to examine the costs of effort devoted to the performance of sanitation and process control tasks and levels of food safety technology use. Results suggest that more effort devoted to performance of sanitation and process control tasks and greater use of food safety technologies modestly reduce long run costs.

  13. Accreditation - Its relevance for laboratories measuring radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Inst. (Iceland)

    2001-11-01

    Accreditation is an internationally recognised way for laboratories to demonstrate their competence. Obtaining and maintaining accreditation is, however, a costly and time-consuming procedure. The benefits of accreditation also depend on the role of the laboratory. Accreditation may be of limited relevance for a research laboratory, but essential for a laboratory associated with a national authority and e.g. issuing certificates. This report describes work done within the NKSBOK-1.1 sub-project on introducing accreditation to Nordic laboratories measuring radionuclides. Initially the focus was on the new standard ISO/IEC 17025, which was just in a draft form at the time, but which provides now a new framework for accreditation of laboratories. Later the focus was widened to include a general introduction to accreditation and providing through seminars a forum for exchanging views on the experience laboratories have had in this field. Copies of overheads from the last such seminar are included in the appendix to this report. (au)

  14. 21 CFR 900.4 - Standards for accreditation bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... image quality, or upon request by FDA, the accreditation body shall review a facility's clinical images... review by the accreditation body demonstrates that a problem does exist with respect to image quality or... accreditation body shall review clinical images from each facility accredited by the body at least once every...

  15. A New approach to the spread of safety culture. The trend of studies and practice in the foreign nuclear power industry, and future approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to clarify organizational factors influencing on safety and to suggest future approach for the spread of safety culture. As the results of investigations on safety companies, characteristics of organizational policies, those of safety activities' purposes, and organizational factors which encourage workers to take a positive attitude toward the safety activities were clarified. Based on the clarified characteristics and the trend of studies and practice in the foreign nuclear power industry, it was suggested that it would be necessary for the spread of safety culture in an organization to learn lessons for the prevention of accidents' recurring and to maintain safety behavior and attitude for the prevention of accidents' occurring. For support of this, it is desired to develop the assessment system of organizational safety and the planning system of safety management. The new approach was also suggested with the process model for influence of organizational factors which include workers' psychological aspects. (author)

  16. Accreditation, a tool for business competitiveness; La acreditacion. Una herramienta al servicio de la competitividad empresarial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, B.

    2015-07-01

    Conformity Assessment Bodies (laboratories , certification and inspection bodies, etc ) assess conformity of products and services to requirements , usually relating to quality and safety. For their activities to provide due confidence both in national and international markets these bodies must demonstrate to have the relevant technical competence and to perform according to international standards. This confidence is based on the assessments conducted in different countries by the accreditation body in Spain ENAC. Using accredited conformity assessment bodies bodies: risks are minimized; customer confidence is increased; acceptance in foreign countries is enhanced; self-regulation is promoted. (Author)

  17. Quality and safety standards in the food industry, developments and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trienekens, J.H.; Zuurbier, P.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Consumer concerns related to food safety scandals and globalization of food production have resulted in a global and interconnected system for the production and distribution of food. In the last decade many public and private standards on food safety and quality have been developed as a result of t

  18. Food safety controls in different governance structures in China’s vegetable and fruit industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jie-hong; LI Kai; LIANG Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Food safety issues constitute an international topic discussed by many scholars. Although there is an extensive body of literature on comparisons of food safety control practices across different governance structures, these studies have been conducted mainly in terms of qualitative and descriptive analysis. In addition, little attention has been given to family farms. This study addresses the food safety control practices adopted by ifrms with different governance structures in China. Food safety control is expressed by the folowing aspects, i.e., polution-free, green, organic, and/or geographical indication prod-ucts certiifcation, establishment of production records, and pesticide residue testing. Three types of governance structures that engage in agricultural production are distinguished: farmer cooperatives, agricultural companies, and family farms. The food safety control practices of various governance structures are investigated based on a database that comprises 600 vegetable and fruit enterprises in Zhejiang, China. The results show that (1) pesticide residue testing is adopted by the most ifrms, folowed by products certiifcation, and production records are adopted by the fewest ifrms, and (2) agricul-tural companies adopt more food safety control practices than family farms, while farmer cooperatives adopt the fewest food safety control practices. Governance structure features of a cooperative in terms of ownership, decision-making, and income distribution are the main reasons for the low level of food safety control in the cooperative.

  19. The usage of crash-safety simulation software in the automotive industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschut, R.; Hyun, Y.W.

    1998-01-01

    The last 10 years the safety issue for road vehicles has become increasingly important. Not only regulations but also NCAP testing force manufacturers to develop restraint systems which can meet the stringent criteria set by these procedures. Because of the various safety requirements the developmen

  20. Accreditation of a personal dosimetry service in Switzerland: practical experience and transition from EN 45004 to ISO 17025.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschung, M; Wernli, C

    2001-01-01

    In compliance with the Swiss legislation on radiological protection, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) operates a dosimetry service that is approved by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate. In 1997, the dosimetry service was also accredited by the Swiss Federal Office of Metrology and Accreditation as an inspection body for legal personal and environmental dosimetry, according to EN 45004. The accreditation covers determination of personal dose equivalent for photon, neutron and beta radiation, and ambient dose equivalent for photon and neutron radiation, by means of thermoluminescence and solid state track detection techniques. Within this formal accreditation it was confirmed that the relevant requirements of ISO 9002 are also fulfilled. The first re-accreditation will take place in 2001 and work is going on to achieve the transition from EN 45004 to ISO 17025. Accreditation is a feasible, practicable and acceptable way to achieve harmonisation in the field of dosimetry. However, before starting on the path to formal accreditation, a careful analysis should be made, taking into consideration not only cost-benefit aspects but also national legal requirements. PMID:11586715

  1. Accreditation of a personal dosimetry service in Switzerland: Practical experience and transition from EN 45004 to ISO 17025

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschung, M.; Wernli, C

    2001-07-01

    In compliance with the Swiss legislation on radiological protection, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) operates a dosimetry service that is approved by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate. In 1997, the dosimetry service was also accredited by the Swiss Federal Office of Metrology and Accreditation as an inspection body for legal personal and environmental dosimetry, according to EN 45004. The accreditation covers determination of personal dose equivalent for photon, neutron and beta radiation, and ambient dose equivalent for photon and neutron radiation, by means of thermoluminescence and solid state track detection techniques. Within this formal accreditation it was confirmed that the relevant requirements of ISO 9002 are also fulfilled. The first re-accreditation will take place in 2001 and work is going on to achieve the transition from EN 45004 to ISO 17025. Accreditation is a feasible, practicable and acceptable way to achieve harmonisation in the field of dosimetry. However, before starting on the path to formal accreditation, a careful analysis should be made, taking into consideration not only cost-benefit aspects but also national legal requirements. (author)

  2. Safety Guide no. 5.14 issued in Spain by the Nuclear Safety Council: Security and radiological requirements in the industrial gamma radiography facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive facilities where industrial gamma radiography equipment are used, require a use authorization in accordance to the Spanish regulations. In order to get authorized the person in charge of the installation has to display a set of documents; among them two of the most important attending to radiological safety, are the 'Operatory Manual' and the 'Emergency Procedures'. The fulfillment of these documents is essential to get, from the radiological point of view, the optimal conditions for the running of the installation. The Regulation on Sanitary Protection against the Ionizing Radiation, transposition of Directives 80/836/EURATOM and 84/467/EURATOM, provides certain targets to be reached and a set of radioactive protection measures, applied, in general terms, to this kind of installations. The experience gathered on the running of these specially radioactive risky installations demands special attention to the fulfillment of the security and radiological protection measures. The Nuclear Safety Council issued in 1998 the safety guide 5.14, in order to help people in charge of those installations to fulfill the security and radiological requirements, as well to became the guideline in the writing of obligatory documents, specially those referring to the 'Operatory Manual' and the 'Emergency Procedures', where the safe operational procedures of this kind of equipment are described. (author)

  3. Surveyor Management of Hospital Accreditation Program: A Thematic Analysis Conducted in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymourzadeh, Ehsan; Ramezani, Mozhdeh; Arab, Mohammad; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas; Akbari Sari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background The surveyors in hospital accreditation program are considered as the core of accreditation programs. So, the reliability and validity of the accreditation program heavily depend on their performance. Objectives This study aimed to identify the dimensions and factors affecting surveyor management of hospital accreditation programs in Iran. Materials and Methods This qualitative study used a thematic analysis method, and was performed in Iran in 2014. The study participants included experts in the field of hospital accreditation, and were derived from three groups: 1. Policy-makers, administrators, and surveyors of the accreditation bureau, the ministry of health and medical education, Iranian universities of medical science; 2. Healthcare service providers, and 3. University professors and faculty members. The data were collected using semi-structured in-depth interviews. Following text transcription and control of compliance with the original text, MAXQDA10 software was used to code, classify, and organize the interviews in six stages. Results The findings from the analysis of 21 interviews were first classified in the form of 1347 semantic units, 11 themes, 17 sub-themes, and 248 codes. These were further discussed by an expert panel, which then resulted in the emergence of seven main themes - selection and recruitment of the surveyor team, organization of the surveyor team, planning to perform surveys, surveyor motivation and retention, surveyor training, surveyor assessment, and recommendations - as well as 27 sub-themes, and 112 codes. Conclusions The dimensions and variables affecting the surveyors’ management were identified and classified on the basis of existing scientific methods in the form of a conceptual framework. Using the results of this study, it would certainly be possible to take a great step toward enhancing the reliability of surveys and the quality and safety of services, while effectively managing accreditation program surveyors.

  4. Accreditation standards for undergraduate forensic science programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marilyn Tebbs

    Undergraduate forensic science programs are experiencing unprecedented growth in numbers of programs offered and, as a result, student enrollments are increasing. Currently, however, these programs are not subject to professional specialized accreditation. This study sought to identify desirable student outcome measures for undergraduate forensic science programs that should be incorporated into such an accreditation process. To determine desirable student outcomes, three types of data were collected and analyzed. All the existing undergraduate forensic science programs in the United States were examined with regard to the input measures of degree requirements and curriculum content, and for the output measures of mission statements and student competencies. Accreditation procedures and guidelines for three other science-based disciplines, computer science, dietetics, and nursing, were examined to provide guidance on accreditation processes for forensic science education programs. Expert opinion on outcomes for program graduates was solicited from the major stakeholders of undergraduate forensic science programs-forensic science educators, crime laboratory directors, and recent graduates. Opinions were gathered by using a structured Internet-based survey; the total response rate was 48%. Examination of the existing undergraduate forensic science programs revealed that these programs do not use outcome measures. Of the accreditation processes for other science-based programs, nursing education provided the best model for forensic science education, due primarily to the balance between the generality and the specificity of the outcome measures. From the analysis of the questionnaire data, preliminary student outcomes, both general and discipline-specific, suitable for use in the accreditation of undergraduate forensic science programs were determined. The preliminary results were reviewed by a panel of experts and, based on their recommendations, the outcomes

  5. Effect of Occupational Health and Safety Management System on Work-Related Accident Rate and Differences of Occupational Health and Safety Management System Awareness between Managers in South Korea's Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Seok J.; Lin, Hsing K.; Chen, Gang; Yi, Shinjea; Choi, Jeawook; Rui, Zhenhua

    2013-01-01

    Background The study was conducted to investigate the current status of the occupational health and safety management system (OHSMS) in the construction industry and the effect of OHSMS on accident rates. Differences of awareness levels on safety issues among site general managers and occupational health and safety (OHS) managers are identified through surveys. Methods The accident rates for the OHSMS-certified construction companies from 2006 to 2011, when the construction OHSMS became widel...

  6. From Science to Safety: The Long Way to Risk Management Assessment in Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-nuclear countries started to express their interest in building electronuclear programs in the early 2000s, with the consequence of creating the 'nuclear renaissance' concept. Nuclear reactors involve numerous and highly technical sciences: they cover fields from fundamental neutronics to thermohydraulics, from fuel thermomechanics to radiological gas diffusion. These sciences are in complete interactions with each other and computational tools are often required to simulate their effects on a research reactor safety. As these topics have to be examined together, with interaction between each other and in relation to the specificities of the facility, it is crucial to get a keystone engineer to manage these specialized analyses. Consequently, safety assessment requires also specific skills that are not based only on these sciences and that are not initially held by a nuclear engineer. Thus the first objective program is to define the inherent human, professional, and technical characteristics required by a safety analyst. Formalizing a safety analyst profile imposes to identify a set of applicable knowledge, hard and soft skills requirements in four topics. Several routes can be explored to build a safety analyst from a nuclear engineer, such as implementing nuclear safety into universities programs, theoretical training programs tutoring programs; such topics can be dealt with by dedicated instances such as ENSTTI and 'field-based' approaches emerging from case by case analysis. In this context, it is important to notice that research reactors require the same basic sciences and are not as complex as nuclear power plants. Hence holding a comprehensive set of knowledge allowing the global safety assessment of the reactor is more easily achievable by a safety analyst. Research reactors are the first object on which this set of knowledge will be applied. It would then be eventually extrapolated to any nuclear installation, and profitably nuclear power plants

  7. Changes in compliance rates of evaluation criteria after health care accreditation: Mainly on radiologic technologists working at University Hospitals in Daejeon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Eun Ju; Kim, Hyun Joo [Dept. of Public Health, The Graduate School of Konyang University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Yong [Public Health Medical Service, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Seok Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Konyang University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    This study aimed to assess whether the changes in compliance rates of evaluation criteria after healthcare accreditation among radiologic technologists working at four university hospitals which had acquired healthcare accreditation in Daejeon metropolitan area. In this study, the evaluation criteria of healthcare accreditation were reclassified and reevaluated to three areas which include patient safety, staff safety, and environmental safety. Each area has eight, three, and five questions, respectively. Each compliance rate was quantitatively measured on a scale of 0 to 10 before and after in this study. The result shows that the overall compliance rates were decreased on all areas compared to the time healthcare accreditation was obtained. The compliance rate of hand hygiene was drastically reduced. To maintain the compliance rates, not only individuals but healthcare organizations should simultaneously endeavor. In particular, healthcare organizations should make an effort to provide continuous education opportunity to their workers and supervise the compliance regularly.

  8. Changes in compliance rates of evaluation criteria after health care accreditation: Mainly on radiologic technologists working at University Hospitals in Daejeon area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to assess whether the changes in compliance rates of evaluation criteria after healthcare accreditation among radiologic technologists working at four university hospitals which had acquired healthcare accreditation in Daejeon metropolitan area. In this study, the evaluation criteria of healthcare accreditation were reclassified and reevaluated to three areas which include patient safety, staff safety, and environmental safety. Each area has eight, three, and five questions, respectively. Each compliance rate was quantitatively measured on a scale of 0 to 10 before and after in this study. The result shows that the overall compliance rates were decreased on all areas compared to the time healthcare accreditation was obtained. The compliance rate of hand hygiene was drastically reduced. To maintain the compliance rates, not only individuals but healthcare organizations should simultaneously endeavor. In particular, healthcare organizations should make an effort to provide continuous education opportunity to their workers and supervise the compliance regularly

  9. Safety instrumented systems in the oil and gas industry : Concepts and methods for safety and reliability assessments in design and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundteigen, Mary Ann

    2009-07-01

    This thesis proposes new methods and gives new insight to safety and reliability assessments of safety instrumented systems (SISs). These systems play an important role in many industry sectors and are used to detect the onset of hazardous events and mitigate their consequences to humans, the environment, and material assets. The thesis focuses on SIS applications in the oil and gas industry. Here, the SIS must respond to hazardous events such as gas leakages, fires, and over pressurization. Because there are personnel onboard the oil and gas installations, the operations take place in a vulnerable marine environment, and substantial values are associated with the offshore facilities, the reliability of SIS is of great concern to the public, the authorities, and the plant owners. The objective of this project has been to identify some of the key factors that influence the SIS reliability, clarify their effects on reliability, and suggest means to improve the treatment of these factors in safety and reliability assessments in design and operation. The project builds on concepts, methods, and definitions in two key standards for SIS design, construction, and operation: IEC 61508 and IEC 61511. The main contributions from this project are: A product development model that integrates reliability, availability, maintainability, and safety (RAMS) requirements with product development. The contributions have been presented in ten articles, five published in international journals, two submitted for publication, and three presented at conferences and in conference proceedings. The contributions are also directed to the industry and the actors that are involved in SIS design, construction, and operation. Even if the oil and gas industry is the main focus area, the results may be relevant for other industry sectors as well. SIS manufacturers and SIS designers face a large number of requirements from authorities, oil companies, international standards, and so on. At the same

  10. New vision of the control organisms in industrial safety and maintenance, based approach to new pressure equipment; Nueva vision de los organismos de control en la seguridad industrial y mantenimiento en base al nuevo enfoque de equipos a presion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardez Garcia, A.

    2010-07-01

    Control agencies are companies dedicated to the verification of compliance with the safety of products and facilities as administrative regulation in industrial safety through certification activities, testing, inspection or audit.Changes have been made that will stimulate the increase of companies engaged in this sector.

  11. Drugs and devices: audit and accreditation the Malaysian Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    important differences. Nevertheless, conforming to both GMP and ISO 9001/2 will indeed be an ideal achievement, technical and administratively. In tandem with global regulatory requirement, the device industry has taken proactive moves to meet international standards. According to a reL ent Standard Malaysian Glove Scheme survey, 26 latex examination glove manufacturers have been accredited for ISO 9001/1 9 certified for EN 46001/1 and another 14 certified for FDA: QSR/GMP. As for product certification scheme, 22 manufacturers are reported to have acquired the CE marking. Amidst current regulatory complexities, promotion of global convergence of regulatory system via harmonization is indeed vital. Establish consistent audits leading to mutual recognition acceptance will certainly achieve an economic and effective approach towards regulating drugs and devices in the interest of public health

  12. Safe China final report. Promoting the EU and German standards and practices of environmental protection and industrial safety in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the results of the international technology transfer and cooperation project SafeChina (''Promoting the EU and German standards and practices of Environmental Protection and Industrial Safety in China'', www.safechina.risk-technologies.com). The purpose of the project was to build an education, training and certification infrastructure and to offer to Chinese engineers and other professionals the possibility to learn about the EU HSE practices and regulation and qualify as Environmental- and Safety engineers according to the EU criteria, guidelines and practice. The main partners in the project have been Steinbeis University Berlin/Steinbeis Transfer Institute Advanced Risk Technologies, and the OEG mbH (Deutsche lnvestitions- und Entwicklungsgesellschaft mbH), subsidiary of KfW Banking Group, Germany. Main Chinese partners were Beijing Municipal Institute of Labour Protection and Capital University of Economics and Business, Beijing.

  13. Safe China final report. Promoting the EU and German standards and practices of environmental protection and industrial safety in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, A.; Guntrum, R.; Liu, Y. (eds.)

    2013-07-01

    This document presents the results of the international technology transfer and cooperation project SafeChina (''Promoting the EU and German standards and practices of Environmental Protection and Industrial Safety in China'', www.safechina.risk-technologies.com). The purpose of the project was to build an education, training and certification infrastructure and to offer to Chinese engineers and other professionals the possibility to learn about the EU HSE practices and regulation and qualify as Environmental- and Safety engineers according to the EU criteria, guidelines and practice. The main partners in the project have been Steinbeis University Berlin/Steinbeis Transfer Institute Advanced Risk Technologies, and the OEG mbH (Deutsche lnvestitions- und Entwicklungsgesellschaft mbH), subsidiary of KfW Banking Group, Germany. Main Chinese partners were Beijing Municipal Institute of Labour Protection and Capital University of Economics and Business, Beijing.

  14. Quality And Safety Management Systems: Joint Action For Certification Of Small Firms In An Industrial Cluster In Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerolamo, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and discusses a proposal for joint action among small firms in an industrial cluster in Brazil for the certification of quality and safety management systems. It proposes a management system model, the implementation process, and periodic auditing. It is the result of an action-research project developed in a metal-mechanical cluster. Its originality lies mainly in the proposal for a joint action programme for the certification of companies, led by the cluster governance agency, to increase the collective efficiency of a cluster. Despite the obstacles encountered, this proposal can help to reduce the difficulties faced by small businesses in implementing and maintaining management systems, and in the long run to foster a culture of quality and safety management. It also contributes to joint actions within the cluster. The challenge faced by the cluster governance agency is to sustain the certification programme in the long term.

  15. Design and safety studies on the European Facility for Industrial Transmutation (EFIT) with CERMET fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X.N.; Rineiski, A.; Liu, P.; Matzerath Boccaccini, C.; Flad, M.; Gabrielli, F.; Maschek, W. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). IKET; Morita, K. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering

    2008-07-01

    European R and D for ADS design and fuel development is driven in the 6{sup th} FP of the EU by the EUROTRANS Programme [1]. In EUROTRANS two ADS design routes are followed, the XT-ADS and the EFIT. The XT-ADS is designed to provide the experimental demonstration of transmutation in an Accelerator Driven System. The EFIT development, the European Facility for Industrial Transmutation, aims at a generic conceptual design of a full transmuter. A key issue of the R and D work is the choice of an adequate fuel to be used in an Accelerator Driven Transmuter (ADT) like EFIT. Various fuel forms have been assessed. CERCER and CERMET fuels, specifically with the matrices MgO and Mo, have finally been selected and are now under closer investigation. Within EUROTRANS, a special domain named 'AFTRA', is responsible to more deeply assess the behavior of these dedicated fuels and to provide the fuel data base for the core design of the EFIT. The EFIT concept has to be optimized towards: a good transmutation efficiency, high burnup, low reactivity swing, low power peaking, adequate subcriticality, reasonable beam requirements and a high safety level. The final recommendation on fuels by AFTRA gave a ranking of these fuels based on the mentioned criteria. The composite CERMET fuel (Pu{sub 0.5},Am{sub 0.5})O{sub 2-x} - Mo (with the isotope {sup 92}Mo comprising 93% of the molybdenum) has been recommended as the primary candidate for the EFIT. This CERMET fuel fulfils adopted criteria for fabrication and reprocessing, and provides excellent safety margins. Disadvantages include the cost for enrichment of {sup 92}Mo and a lower specific transmutation rate of minor actinides, because of the higher neutron absorption cross-section of the matrix. The composite CERCER fuel (Pu{sub 0.4},Am{sub 0.6})O{sub 2-x} - MgO has therefore been recommended as a backup solution as it might offer a higher consumption rate of minor actinides, and can be manufactured for a lower unit cost

  16. IS 2010 and ABET Accreditation: An Analysis of ABET-Accredited Information Systems Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier, Bruce; White, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Many strong forces are converging on information systems academic departments. Among these forces are quality considerations, accreditation, curriculum models, declining/steady student enrollments, and keeping current with respect to emerging technologies and trends. ABET, formerly the Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology, is at…

  17. Proposed Accreditation Standards for Degree-Granting Correspondence Programs Offered by Accredited Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw-Hill Continuing Education Center, Washington, DC.

    A study on proposed accreditation standards grew out of a need to (1) stimulate the growth of quality correspondence degree programs; and (2) provide a policy for accreditation of correspondence degree programs so that graduates would be encouraged to pursue advanced degree programs offered elsewhere by educational institutions. The study focused…

  18. Experiments toward non-contact safety standards for automated industrial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostelman, Roger; Hong, Tsai; Madhavan, Raj

    2005-05-01

    The performance evaluation of an obstacle detection and segmentation algorithm for Automated Guided Vehicle (AGV) navigation in factory-like environments using a new 3D real-time range camera is the subject of this paper. Our approach expands on the US ASME B56.5 Safety Standard, which now allows for non-contact safety sensors, by performing tests on objects specifically sized in both the US and the British Safety Standards. These successful tests placed the recommended, as well as smaller, material-covered and sized objects on the vehicle path for static measurement. The segmented (mapped) obstacles were then verified in range to the objects and object size using simultaneous, absolute measurements obtained using a relatively accurate 2D scanning laser rangefinder. These 3D range cameras are expected to be relatively inexpensive and used indoors and possibly used outdoors for a vast amount of mobile robot applications building on experimental results explained in this paper.

  19. Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division annual report for 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities over the past year are summarized for the Health Physics Department, the Environmental Management Program, and the Safety Department. The Health Physics Department conducts radiation and safety surveys, provides personnel monitoring services for both external and internal radiation, and procures, services, and calibrates appropriate portable and stationary health physics instruments. It was determined that the maximum whole-body dose sustained by an employee was about 3.8 rems, which is 76% of the applicable standard of 5 rems. The greatest cumulative dose to the skin of the whole body received by an employee during 1981 was about 5.9 rems, or 39% of the applicable standard of 15 rems. Atmospheric iodine sampled by the Department of Environmental Management at the perimeter stations averged 0.13E to 14 μCi/cc during 1981. This average represents 131I released to uncontrolled areas. All air samples taken had values below the allowable standards. The concentrations of 90Sr in milk from both the immediate and remote environs of ORNL are also within FRC range I. The average value of 1.5 E to 9 μCi/mL represents 0.5% of the CG/sub w/ for drinking water applicable to individuals in the general population. The Safety Department reported that the continuing emphasis on safety during CY 1981 resulted in significant improvements in the ORNL safety program: safety performance was better than all CY 1981 on-the-job injury and illness goals. Through December 31, 1981, the Laboratory had worked 600 days and accumulated 14,015,826 exposure-hours since the last lost-work-day case

  20. Technical management techniques for identification and control of industrial safety and pollution hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R.; Dyer, M. K.; Hoard, E. G.; Little, D. G.; Taylor, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    Constructive recommendations are suggested for pollution problems from offshore energy resources industries on outer continental shelf. Technical management techniques for pollution identification and control offer possible applications to space engineering and management.

  1. Understanding Clinical Alarm Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasewicz, Carol L; Mattox, Elizabeth Andersson

    2015-08-01

    Patient safety organizations and health care accreditation agencies recognize the significance of clinical alarm hazards. The Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation, a nonprofit organization focused on development and use of safe and effective medical equipment, identifies alarm management as a major issue for health care organizations. ECRI Institute, a nonprofit organization that researches approaches for improving patient safety and quality of care, identifies alarm hazards as the most significant of the "Top Ten Health Technology Hazards" for 2014. A new Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal focusing on clinical alarm safety contains new requirements for accredited hospitals to be fully implemented by 2016. Through a fictional unfolding case study, this article reviews selected contributing factors to clinical alarm hazards present in inpatient, high-acuity settings. Understanding these factors improves contributions by nurses to clinical alarm safety practice.

  2. Relevance for Food Safety of Applications of Nanotechnology in the Food and Feed Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Pratt, Iona; Adley, Catherine; Chambers, Gordon; Anderson, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    The application of nanotechnology in the food and feed industry offers many potential benefits for both consumers and manufacturers.The ultrafine dimensions of nanoparticles, and consequently their very large surface area, enable them to function more effectively than conventional macro-scale structures in many applications. Nanotechnology is however a relatively new area of science and the benefits and risks associated with its use in the food and feed industry are not fully understood at th...

  3. Probabilistic analysis of safety in industrial irradiation plants; Analisis probabilistico de seguridad en plantas industriales de irradiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alderete, F.; Elechosa, C. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. del Libertador 8250 - Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: falderet@sede.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    The Argentinean Nuclear Regulatory Authority is carrying out the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) of the two industrial irradiation plants existent in the country. The objective of this presentation is to show from the regulatory point of view, the advantages of applying this tool, as well as the appeared difficulties; for it will be made a brief description of the facilities, of the method and of the normative one. Both plants are multipurpose facilities classified as 'industrial irradiator category IV' (panoramic irradiator with source deposited in pool). Basically, the execution of an APS consists of the following stages: 1. Identification of initiating events. 2. Modeling of Accidental Sequences (Event Trees). 3. Analysis of Systems (Fault trees). 4. Quantification of Accidental Sequences. The argentine normative doesn't demand to these facilities the realization of an APS, however the basic standard of Radiological Safety establishes that in the design of this type of facilities in the cases that is justified, should make sure that the annual probability of occurrence of an accidental sequence and the resulting dose in a person gives as result an radiological risk inferior to the risk limit adopted as acceptance criteria. On the other hand the design standard specifies for these irradiators it demands a maximum fault rate of 10{sup -2} for the related components with the systems of radiological safety. In our case, the possible initiating events have been identified that carried out to not wanted situations (about people exposure, radioactive contamination). Then, for each one of the significant initiating events, the corresponding accidental sequences were modeled and the safety systems that intervene in this sequences by means of fault trees were analyzed, for then to determine the fault probabilities of the same ones. At the moment they are completing these fault trees, but the difficulty resides in the impossibility of obtaining real data

  4. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

      “Safety is the highest priority”: this statement from CERN is endorsed by the CMS management. An interpretation of this statement may bring you to the conclusion that you should stop working in order to avoid risks. If the safety is the priority, work is not! This would be a misunderstanding and misinterpretation. One should understand that “working safely” or “operating safely” is the priority at CERN. CERN personnel are exposed to different hazards on many levels on a daily basis. However, risk analyses and assessments are done in order to limit the number and the gravity of accidents. For example, this process takes place each time you cross the road. The hazard is the moving vehicle, the stake is you and the risk might be the risk of collision between both. The same principle has to be applied during our daily work. In particular, keeping in mind the general principles of prevention defined in the late 1980s. These principles wer...

  5. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Plagge, C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

    Fire Safety – Essential for a particle detector The CMS detector is a marvel of high technology, one of the most precise particle measurement devices we have built until now. Of course it has to be protected from external and internal incidents like the ones that can occur from fires. Due to the fire load, the permanent availability of oxygen and the presence of various ignition sources mostly based on electricity this has to be addressed. Starting from the beam pipe towards the magnet coil, the detector is protected by flooding it with pure gaseous nitrogen during operation. The outer shell of CMS, namely the yoke and the muon chambers are then covered by an emergency inertion system also based on nitrogen. To ensure maximum fire safety, all materials used comply with the CERN regulations IS 23 and IS 41 with only a few exceptions. Every piece of the 30-tonne polyethylene shielding is high-density material, borated, boxed within steel and coated with intumescent (a paint that creates a thick co...

  6. Yarrowia lipolytica: Safety assessment of an oleaginous yeast with a great industrial potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewald, M.; Boekhout, T.; Neuveglise, C.; Gaillardin, C.; van Dijck, P.W.M.; Wyss, M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Yarrowia lipolytica has been developed as a production host for a large variety of biotechnological applications. Efficacy and safety studies have demonstrated the safe use of Yarrowia-derived products containing significant proportions of Yarrowia biomass (as for DuPont's eicosapentaenoic

  7. Benchmarking safety culture in major hazards industries in the Rotterdam area (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Bezemer, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Main findings: The safety culture scores of the (petro)chemical companies and the refineries were all good or acceptable. In contrast, in the bulk storage and chemical warehousing/logistics sectors several companies scored the acceptable minimum or even below. Strengths and weaknesses of process saf

  8. A CONCEPTUAL DISASTER RISK REDUCTION FRAMEWORK FOR HEALTH AND SAFETY HAZARDS IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir S. GOHARDANI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The health and safety hazard status of construction workers is constantly challenged by the projects in the built environment. In this article, various aspects of health and safety hazards for construction workers have been reviewed and investigated through a disaster risk reduction prism. This approach has further led to the perception of glancing at the construction sector as an ongoing disaster zone and equally provides a new management perspective. From this perspective, the occurrence of a disaster within the construction sector corresponds to the temporary or permanent ill-health or death of a construction worker. Geographical location is one of the factors that play an important role in addressing the health and safety hazards for construction workers. In addition to the location, geographical considerations equally encapsulate regional, cultural, governmental and work ethical effects. These effects may potentially contribute to disparities in the construction sector. With an increasing level of understanding for health and safety hazards in the construction domain, more efficient prevention measures can be taken in order to enable a disaster management cycle, capable of responding to the rigorous demands of the construction sector.

  9. 78 FR 20926 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Providing Postmarket Periodic Safety Reports in the International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... accordance with ICH E2C (see 62 FR 27470 (May 19, 1997) and 69 FR 5551 (Feb. 5, 2004)) instead of a PADER... experience report (PAER), to satisfy the periodic safety reporting requirements in FDA regulations. The... drugs) or a Periodic Adverse Experience Report (PAER) (for biologics) (21 CFR 314.80(c)(2) and...

  10. Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter of the environmental control report deals with the environmental impact of the industry in Austria. It gives a review of the structure and types of the industry, the legal framework and environmental policy of industrial relevance. The environmental situation of the industry in Austria is analyzed in detail, concerning air pollution (SO2, NOx, CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, NH3, Pb, Cd, Hg, dioxin, furans), waste water, waste management and deposit, energy and water consumption. The state of the art in respect of the IPPC-directives (European Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Bureau) concerning the best available techniques of the different industry sectors is outlined. The application of European laws and regulations in the Austrian industry is described. (a.n.)

  11. Proficiency test in the accreditation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M.; Idoeta, R.

    2008-08-01

    In the accreditation process of a radioactivity measurements laboratory, according to ISO standard 17025, proficiency tests play a fundamental role. These PTs constitute an irreplaceable tool for the validation of measuring methods. In the case of Spain, ENAC, which is the Spanish accreditation national body, requires that the laboratory has to take part in a PT for each one of the accredited measuring methods in the period of time between two reassessments of the accreditation, what happens every 4-5 years. In specific areas of determination procedures, among which radioactive measurements could be included, the number of methods which can be accredited is very large. The purpose of the present work is to establish a classification into families of the different radioactivity measurement procedures, as well as to establish complementary actions that guarantee that carrying out periodically proficiency-tests on any of the included procedures in each family, every measurement procedure include in that family is controlled, complying with the criteria established by ENAC.

  12. Safety culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keen, L.J. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Safety culture has become a topic of increasing interest for industry and regulators as issues are raised on safety problems around the world. The keys to safety culture are organizational effectiveness, effective communications, organizational learning, and a culture that encourages the identification and resolution of safety issues. The necessity of a strong safety culture places an onus on all of us to continually question whether the safety measures already in place are sufficient, and are being applied. (author)

  13. Looking ahead to significant improvements in mining safety and health through innovative research and effective diffusion into the industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeffery L. Kohler

    2015-01-01

    Mining safety and health improvements over the past decades are remarkable by many metrics, and yet the expectation of society, and the goal of the mining industry, is zero harm. If we examine the underlying enablers for the significant gains that have been achieved, the key role that research to help understand the causes of problems and to develop lasting solutions is clear. Many of the remaining challenges have been resistant to solutions by various approaches. Some, such as fatalities and injuries from ground con-trol or powered haulage are prominent year after year. Different approaches are indicated and new solu-tions will be required if we are to achieve a goal of zero harm. These will originate with research, but into which topics, and what are some of these different approaches? This paper examines the current state of mine safety in the United States and highlights areas of significant opportunity for research that will lead to solutions. The likely direction of research that will enable realization of the ‘zero harm’ goal is described in terms of evolutionary and revolutionary approaches. Both are important, but the author’s view is that some of the largest gains will be made with trans-disciplinary approaches that break from the past. Topical areas of research are suggested and several research questions are given to illustrate the direction of future research in mining safety and health.

  14. Ergonomics support for local initiative in improving safety and health at work: International Labour Organization experiences in industrially developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, T; Kogi, K

    2005-04-15

    Ergonomics has played essential roles in the technical cooperation activities of the International Labour Organization (ILO) in occupational safety and health in industrially developing countries. Ergonomics support focusing on practical day-to-day needs at the grass-root workplace has strengthened the local initiative in improving safety and health. Practical action-tools such as ergonomics checklists, local good example photos and group discussions have assisted workers and employers in identifying feasible solutions using locally available resources. Direct participation of workers and employers has been promoted in ergonomics training aimed at immediate solutions. ILO Guidelines on Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems have played increasingly important roles in the systematic planning of local improvement actions. Policy-level programmes to develop network support mechanisms to the grass-root workplace were essential for following up and sustaining local achievements. Practical ergonomics support tools, such as action checklists and low-cost improvement guides, should be developed and widely applied so as to reach grass-root levels and help local people create safer and healthier workplaces.

  15. Ergonomics support for local initiative in improving safety and health at work: International Labour Organization experiences in industrially developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, T; Kogi, K

    2005-04-15

    Ergonomics has played essential roles in the technical cooperation activities of the International Labour Organization (ILO) in occupational safety and health in industrially developing countries. Ergonomics support focusing on practical day-to-day needs at the grass-root workplace has strengthened the local initiative in improving safety and health. Practical action-tools such as ergonomics checklists, local good example photos and group discussions have assisted workers and employers in identifying feasible solutions using locally available resources. Direct participation of workers and employers has been promoted in ergonomics training aimed at immediate solutions. ILO Guidelines on Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems have played increasingly important roles in the systematic planning of local improvement actions. Policy-level programmes to develop network support mechanisms to the grass-root workplace were essential for following up and sustaining local achievements. Practical ergonomics support tools, such as action checklists and low-cost improvement guides, should be developed and widely applied so as to reach grass-root levels and help local people create safer and healthier workplaces. PMID:16040528

  16. Contractor’s Awareness on Occupational Safety and Health (OSH Management Systems in Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Kamar I.F.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems is part of the overall management system that facilitates the management of the OS&H risks associated with the business of the organization. This includes the organizational structure, planning activities, responsibilities, practices, procedures, processes and resources for developing, implementing, achieving, reviewing and maintaining the organization’s OS&H policy. The purpose of this research is to determine the level of awareness of contractors on OSH management systems. A total of 34 numbers of class A contractors in Kelantan registered with Pusat Khidmat Kontraktor (PKK were randomly selected. Data was collected using self-administered questionnaire. The findings indicate that most of the Class A Contractor in Kelantan aware that the occupational safety and health management system are important and should be practiced to achieve zero accident and death on site

  17. Enhancing Food Safety and Productivity: Technology Use in the Canadian Food Processing Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Sabourin, David; Baldwin, John R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the factors contributing to the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian food-processing sector. The numbers of technologies used by a plant is found to be highly correlated with expected gains in firm performance. The benefits of enhanced food safety and quality, as well as productivity improvements, are closely associated with technology use. Impediments that negatively affect technology use include software costs, problems with external financing, lack of cash ...

  18. Accreditation of ethics committees: experience of an ethics committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Ragini; Saraiya, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Many ethics committees (ECs) approving clinical trials in India have got themselves registered with the Drugs Controller General of India as per regulatory requirements. However, there is still scope to improve their functioning. Accreditation, which entails adherence to national and international standards, helps an EC to protect the rights, safety and well-being of research participants. The National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health (NIRRH) ethics committee for clinical studies has received recognition, or accreditation, from the Strategic Initiative for Developing Capacity in Ethical Review (SIDCER). An EC receives recognition from SIDCER if it meets five standards related to its structure and composition; adherence to specific policies; completeness of the review process; after-review process; and documentation and archiving. The extent to which these standards have been met is assessed in various ways, such as review of the EC's records, interviews of selected EC members and observation of a full board meeting of the EC. This paper describes the experiences of the NIRRH EC during and after the process of receiving recognition.

  19. The radiological safety in the petroleum industry. The behavior toward the prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inside the mark of the regulatory control it takes a preponderant place the control of sealed and open radioactive sources, in oil applications. In this task, the handling of the radioactive sources, the demand of the use of written procedures and the training, they are only some examples, of all those that conform the regulatory control. Among these topics they stand out a series of aspects divided in three big groups: operative radiological safety in the base, in the transport and in the task properly said. Given the great quantity of aspects that should be kept in mind, as well as the integration of all the control processes should be included strongly, aspects of safety and quality culture, and to introduce improvements as for the prevention refers, to correct deviations and remoteness that can be produced, avoiding like this, situations of radiological risk, emphasizing aspects of perception of the risk, training in attitudes, the implementation of audits and verifications of the safety level of the installation and the pursuit and control of the tasks that involve the manipulation of radioactive material, which are described in this work. (Author)

  20. Practical applications of safety culture concepts in human performance advances on Russian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sometimes, many from negative external factors can be compensated by human psychological readiness of worker. However there would be main worse to come: some cases of personnel activity and organisational factors, some person's peculiarities (attitudes, responsibility, etc.) add considerable number of the events at NPPs. A lot of aspects of Human Factor Reliability are united in Safety Culture concept. This paper presents some results of our recently research in that area. In 'proactive approach': Unique methods for measuring maturity and satisfaction of personnel motivation: comparative analysis of the labour and safety culture motivation from attitude; organization of the socio-psychological climate and safety attitude examining monitoring at all of Russia's NPPs; working-out recommendations for managers on improving human performance are presented. Besides, ergonomic research concerning work conditions at the NPP is displayed. In 'reactive approach': Analysis of the incorrect activity cases, which led to the breaches of work of the Russian NPPs, is shown. The special method to work-up is used. It was issue, that events caused by a human error, depends not only on the worker's professional competence, but on the attitude and motivation, some professionally important psychological and psycho-physiological quality data, the functional state, the group's socio-psychological climate, etc. (author)

  1. Divergent sight: studies on the application of industrial quality and safety improvement methods in eye hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F. de Korne

    2011-01-01

    Quality improvement in health care is an essential attribute towards maintaining quality while meeting today’s growing patient populations, budget constraints, and competitive environments. Such challenges are not exclusive to health care. Other high-risk industries aviation, for example have shown

  2. 10 CFR 34.42 - Radiation Safety Officer for industrial radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., and ALARA procedures as required by 10 CFR part 20 of this chapter, and reviewing them regularly to ensure that the procedures in use conform to current 10 CFR part 20 procedures, conform to other NRC...); (2) 2000 hours of hands-on experience as a qualified radiographer in industrial...

  3. An integrated approach towards safety during change in the chemical process industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gort, J.; Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Lemkowitz, S.; Steijger, N.; Moonen, C.

    2004-01-01

    Increasing global competition and shareholder pressure cause major changes in the chemical industry. Over the last decade companies continuously improve their manpower efficiency. As a result most chemical plants of today can be regarded as lean plants. Plans to further reduce the number of staff ar

  4. HPS instrument calibration laboratory accreditation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, F.X; Eisenhower, E.H.; Swinth, K.L.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an accurate overview of the development and structure of the program established by the Health Physics Society (HPS) for accrediting instrument calibration laboratories relative to their ability to accurately calibrate portable health physics instrumentation. The purpose of the program is to provide radiation protection professionals more meaningful direct and indirect access to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) national standards, thus introducing a means for improving the uniformity, accuracy, and quality of ionizing radiation field measurements. The process is designed to recognize and document the continuing capability of each accredited laboratory to accurately perform instrument calibration. There is no intent to monitor the laboratory to the extent that each calibration can be guaranteed by the program; this responsibility rests solely with the accredited laboratory.

  5. HPS instrument calibration laboratory accreditation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an accurate overview of the development and structure of the program established by the Health Physics Society (HPS) for accrediting instrument calibration laboratories relative to their ability to accurately calibrate portable health physics instrumentation. The purpose of the program is to provide radiation protection professionals more meaningful direct and indirect access to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) national standards, thus introducing a means for improving the uniformity, accuracy, and quality of ionizing radiation field measurements. The process is designed to recognize and document the continuing capability of each accredited laboratory to accurately perform instrument calibration. There is no intent to monitor the laboratory to the extent that each calibration can be guaranteed by the program; this responsibility rests solely with the accredited laboratory

  6. 7 CFR 205.507 - Denial of accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Accreditation of Certifying Agents § 205.507 Denial of accreditation....

  7. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY ACCREDITATION CONFERENCE (NELAC): CONSTITUTION, BYLAWS, AND STANDARDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The principles and operating procedures for the National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference (NELAC) are contained in the NELAC Constitution and Bylaws. The major portion of this document (standards) contains detailed requirements for accrediting environmental labo...

  8. 基于产业发展视角的中国餐饮业食品安全研究%Research on the Food Safety of Catering Industry in China from the Perspective of Industrial Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵京桥

    2014-01-01

    Study on the food safety of catering industry from the perspective of industrial development is an important supplement of food safety issues .Currently, the food safety risk management ability is far behind the catering industry revenue growth , leading to food safety risk with high uncertainty .As the industrial development has close relationship with food safety risk , promoting the scientific development of catering industry is an important means to improve food safety risk management level .And then, the influence of industrial development on food safety is discussed from the fol-lowing aspects:market entrance , the degree of industrialization , the standards and regulations of the industry , labour level and industrial organization , thinking formulating a scientific industrial policy is complementary with constructing ef-fective government regulation system , perfecting supervision system and strengthening the supervision can improve the il-legal cost , to curb the illegal behavior of industry , and scientific industrial policy can help legitimate business catering enterprises to obtain better development opportunity .%当前中国餐饮业食品安全风险控制能力远远落后于餐饮业收入规模的增长,餐饮业食品安全风险具有很高的不确定性。产业运行与食品安全风险之间的具有密切关系,推动餐饮产业的科学发展是提高餐饮业食品安全风险控制水平的重要抓手。本文从餐饮业产业进入门槛,产业化程度,产业标准与规范,劳动力水平以及行业组织等方面讨论了产业发展对食品安全风险的影响,认为制定科学的产业政策与构建有效的政府监管体系是互补的,通过完善监管体系、加强监管力度可以提高违法违规行为的成本,遏制行业违法违规行为,科学的产业政策帮助合法合规经营的餐饮企业获得更好的发展机会。

  9. Report from the EPAA workshop: in vitro ADME in safety testing used by EPAA industry sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, K; Bremm, K D; Alépée, N; Bessems, J G M; Blaauboer, B; Boehn, S N; Burek, C; Coecke, S; Gombau, L; Hewitt, N J; Heylings, J; Huwyler, J; Jaeger, M; Jagelavicius, M; Jarrett, N; Ketelslegers, H; Kocina, I; Koester, J; Kreysa, J; Note, R; Poth, A; Radtke, M; Rogiers, V; Scheel, J; Schulz, T; Steinkellner, H; Toeroek, M; Whelan, M; Winkler, P; Diembeck, W

    2011-04-01

    There are now numerous in vitro and in silico ADME alternatives to in vivo assays but how do different industries incorporate them into their decision tree approaches for risk assessment, bearing in mind that the chemicals tested are intended for widely varying purposes? The extent of the use of animal tests is mainly driven by regulations or by the lack of a suitable in vitro model. Therefore, what considerations are needed for alternative models and how can they be improved so that they can be used as part of the risk assessment process? To address these issues, the European Partnership for Alternative Approaches to Animal Testing (EPAA) working group on prioritization, promotion and implementation of the 3Rs research held a workshop in November, 2008 in Duesseldorf, Germany. Participants included different industry sectors such as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, industrial- and agro-chemicals. This report describes the outcome of the discussions and recommendations (a) to reduce the number of animals used for determining the ADME properties of chemicals and (b) for considerations and actions regarding in vitro and in silico assays. These included: standardisation and promotion of in vitro assays so that they may become accepted by regulators; increased availability of industry in vivo kinetic data for a central database to increase the power of in silico predictions; expansion of the applicability domains of in vitro and in silico tools (which are not necessarily more applicable or even exclusive to one particular sector) and continued collaborations between regulators, academia and industry. A recommended immediate course of action was to establish an expert panel of users, developers and regulators to define the testing scope of models for different chemical classes. It was agreed by all participants that improvement and harmonization of alternative approaches is needed for all sectors and this will most effectively be achieved by stakeholders from different

  10. Radiation safety and culture of prevention in the use of radioactive materials in industry : criteria and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As time goes by and experience is gained, modernization and technological development show the need to implement more complex programs and procedures to ensure a high level of compliance with radiation safety, particularly in those activities in which radioactive material is used in industry. A relevant aspect of present technology is the concern to introduce mechanisms to prevent radiological accidents or incidents, to ensure early detection of failures. This includes systems that either individually or as a whole, increase the level of responsibility of the different disciplines involved, so as to avoid a situation that could lead to loss of control of the facility or part of it. The prevention of an abnormal situation, overexposure of workers or unwanted risks, should be considered in the level of vulnerability of the facility, a concept drawn from international protection systems and which is applied directly in radiation safety. Preventive management, risk communication and proposals for change or improvement along with the detection of risks and training, constitute all the factors contained within prevention policies. Dose limitation, optimization and justification, old tools used for decades, could not be replaced by other modern concepts and criteria. ALARA culture (including performance indicators) should be considered. The atmosphere at work, working under pressure as well as other factors such as quality issues, ethics of prevention, etc. align with this idea of prevention and safety, besides changes in attitude, towards risk prevention (methods, reports, intervention guides, working instructions, and any other helpful tool), are followed by preventive, as well as predictive and corrective maintenance, applied to minimize the dose absorbed by workers. A clear policy of prevention is needed as well as an appropriate level of radiation safety which should be taken into account since the very beginning of the development of a given practice. All these

  11. Radiation Safety and Culture of Prevention in the Use of Radioactive Materials in Industry. Criteria and Trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As time goes by and experience is gained, modernization and technological development show the need to implement more complex programs and procedures to ensure a high level of compliance with radiation safety, particularly in those activities in which radioactive material is used in industry. A relevant aspect of present technology is the concern to introduce mechanisms to prevent radiological accidents or incidents, to ensure early detection of failures. This includes systems that either individually or as a whole, increase the level of responsibility of the different disciplines involved, so as to avoid a situation that could lead to loss of control of the facility or part of it. The prevention of an abnormal situation, overexposure of workers or unwanted risks, should be considered in the level of vulnerability of the facility, a concept drawn from international protection systems and which is applied directly in radiation safety. Preventive management, risk communication and proposals for change or improvement along with the detection of risks and training, constitute all the factors contained within prevention policies. Dose limitation, optimization and justification, old tools used for decades, could not be replaced by other modern concepts and criteria. ALARA culture (including performance indicators) should be considered. The atmosphere at work, working under pressure as well as other factors such as quality issues, ethics of prevention, etc. align with this idea of prevention and safety, besides changes in attitude, towards risk prevention (methods, reports, intervention guides, working instructions, and any other helpful tool), are followed by preventive, as well as predictive and corrective maintenance, applied to minimize the dose absorbed by workers. A clear policy of prevention is needed as well as an appropriate level of radiation safety which should be taken into account since the very beginning of the development of a given practice. All these

  12. Current Practices and Implementation of Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources in Industrial Radiography in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper aims to illustrate the current level of maturity on the compliance to the international regulatory requirements on safety and security of radioactive sources in the Philippines as perceived by the licensees themselves through the implementation of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) as the regulatory body. The study showed that current practices and implementation of radiation safety in the use of radioactive sources in industrial radiography as perceive by the operators showed that out of the 38 questions, only five questions got an answer of ‘No’ (i.e. only 13.1% of the respondents are not compliant to the requirements — while 86.9% could be compliant). On the implementation of the security of radioactive sources, which was answered by senior managers, out of 14 respondents, 6, 1 and 5 respondents answered levels 3, 4 and 5, respectively. Therefore, the current security level of the licensees according to their perception showed the following: 50% at level 3, 8.33% at level 4 and 41.6% at level 5. The paper recommends that national regulatory requirements should be harmonized with the international standards and that continuing awareness and training programme should be carried out both for the operating organization and the regulators. The continued compliance to the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources and Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources and the development and promotion of safety and security culture among radiographers and the regulators shall be one of the outcomes of the paper. (author)

  13. DOE standard: The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This technical standard describes the US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP), organizational responsibilities, and the accreditation process. DOELAP evaluates and accredits personnel dosimetry and radiobioassay programs used for worker monitoring and protection at DOE and DOE contractor sites and facilities as required in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. The purpose of this technical standard is to establish procedures for administering DOELAP and acquiring accreditation

  14. Home infusion accreditation: another quality recognition branding tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannally, Sandra C

    2010-01-01

    Accreditation plays a significant role in fostering public confidence in the healthcare organization, enhancing organizational effectiveness, and improving patient care. It also provides the basis on which referral sources and payers can be assured that accredited organizations have complied with a common set of requirements and standards. Accreditation is the only comprehensive measure of a home infusion company's performance. The objective of this article is to provide information to help streamline and simplify the accreditation process and lower implementation times and associated costs.

  15. BUSINESS ETHICS AS AN ACCREDITATION REQUIREMENT: A KNOWLEDGE MAPPING APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Rita A. Franks; Albert D. Spalding, Jr

    2013-01-01

    Most of the more prominent and highly ranked business and management schools in the United States and elsewhere are accredited by one of two international accrediting organizations, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) or the Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs (ACBSP). Both of these organizations require the inclusion of business ethics in the curriculum of each accredited institution. Business ethics, however, is a concept that includes, overla...

  16. Industrialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter discusses the role-plays by nuclear technology to enhance productivity in industry. Some of the techniques, Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) - x, gamma, electron and neutron radiography, nuclear gauges, materials characterization are discussed thoroughly

  17. A status report regarding industry implementation of safety parameter display systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a summary of the results of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff's review of installed safety parameter display systems (SPDS) at 57 nuclear units. The staff describes its rationale and practice for determining acceptability of some of the methods for satisfying the various requirements for SPDS as well as some methods that the staff has not accepted. The staff's discussion of identified strengths and weaknesses should aid licensees in solving some of the problems they may be experiencing with their SPDS

  18. CNAL Successfully Passed APLAC Peer Evaluation Inspection Body Accreditation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Aug. 9-12, 2004, APLAC (Asia Pacific Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation) conducted evaluation of CNAL on Inspection Body Accreditation. After four-day′s evaluation (including Secretariat Office and witnessing assessment), the evaluation group of APLAC declared that "CNAL has operated the Accreditation System of Inspection Body which complies with the requirements in MR001 and MR002.

  19. Improving Outcome Assessment in Information Technology Program Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Bryan S.; Reynolds, Charles

    2010-01-01

    As of March 2010, there were fourteen Information Technology programs accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, known as ABET, Inc (ABET Inc. 2009). ABET Inc. is the only recognized institution for the accreditation of engineering, computing, and technology programs in the U.S. There are currently over 128 U.S. schools…

  20. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  1. Consumer concerns about industrialized agriculture and food safety: importance, origin and possible solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Bonny, Sylvie

    2000-01-01

    Le questionnement des consommateurs envers le productivisme agricole et les risques sanitaires alimentaires : importance, origine, et solutions recherchées. L'agriculture et l'industrie agro-alimentaire modernes font actuellement, en Europe occidentale et en particulier en France, l'objet de critiques de la part des consommateurs, notamment en matière de qualité des produits et d'impacts sur l'environnement. Ce texte vise à analyser ces questionnements et les réponses apportées par les différ...

  2. Corporate Social Responsibility: Safety, Health and Enviromental Issues in The Kenyan Oil and Gas Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Makone, Francis O.

    2009-01-01

    As the oil industry in Kenya continues to grow, increased pressure is being placed on these companies to contribute in Corporate Social activities. The concept of CSR in the Kenyan Oil companies has been a topic of great interest. These oil companies have however been found to have a narrow perspective of what CSR entails as they do not identify all their stakeholders in their efforts to be socially responsible. Oil companies in Kenya also have various reasons as to why they come up with CSR ...

  3. Report on nuclear industry quality assurance procedures for safety analysis computer code development and use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of a request from Commissioner V. Gilinsky to investigate in detail the causes of an error discovered in a vendor Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) computer code in March, 1978, the staff undertook an extensive investigation of the vendor quality assurance practices applied to safety analysis computer code development and use. This investigation included inspections of code development and use practices of the four major Light Water Reactor Nuclear Steam Supply System vendors and a major reload fuel supplier. The conclusion reached by the staff as a result of the investigation is that vendor practices for code development and use are basically sound. A number of areas were identified, however, where improvements to existing vendor procedures should be made. In addition, the investigation also addressed the quality assurance (QA) review and inspection process for computer codes and identified areas for improvement

  4. Radiation technology in finishing process improves health, safety and environment (HSE) in the furniture manufacturing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In furniture manufacturing, processes like cross cutting, molding, planning, shaping, turning, assembling and finishing are involved. The most significant types of negative impact of these processes are such as dust emission, noise, hazardous work, health risk, emission of organic solvent, toxic chemicals emission and chemical waste. In the finishing process, a number of negative effects that will cause health, safety and environmental (HSE) performance. This article highlights the environmental problems in the furniture finishing processes and how the radiation technology can reduce these negative impacts. The drawbacks that hamper the manufacturers from adopting this technology are also discussed. The objective of the paper is to create the awareness among the industrialist and consumers on the HSE hazardous in furniture finishing and steps can be taken to improve

  5. Industrial risks - Traceability and the centralization of responsibilities are essential for nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new regulation has been implemented in France concerning the safety and the transparency of nuclear activities. The main changes are the centralisation of the responsibilities through first, a clear reaffirmation that the operator of the facility is the only responsible for the facility operations and secondly the limitation of sub-contracting to the level 3 for instance a society chosen by EDF to provide services can sub-contract some of these services but the sub-contractor himself is not allowed to sub-contract. The transparency of nuclear activities is improved through making it compulsory to have a written record of any decision taken in a nuclear facility. (A.C.)

  6. 38 CFR 21.4253 - Accredited courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... teacher's certificate or teacher's degree. (5) The course is approved by the State as meeting the... college degree) or it may be vocational or professional (an occupation). (c) Accrediting agencies. A... student is to graduate. For example, a 4-year college may require a 1.5 grade point average the first...

  7. Assessment and accreditation of Mexican medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, J A; Aguirre, E; Hernández, A; Hidalgo, V; Domínguez, F; Durante, I; Jesús, R; Castillo, O

    1996-09-01

    With the objective of evaluating and accrediting the quality of medical education in the country, the Mexican Association of Medical Schools initiated the National Programme for the Strengthening of the Quality of Medical Education (PNFCE). This programme led to the establishment of the National System of Accreditation. Medical school deans in Mexico determined the criteria for the evaluation of quality and its subsequent standards through a consensus process. The following 10 criteria resulted: general basis and educational objectives; government and institutional orientation; educational programme and academic structure; educational process assessment; students; teaching staff; institutional coherence; resources; clinical sites; and administration. Eighty-eight standards were developed in the instrument designed for the self-evaluation phase. The information resulting from the self-evaluation will be verified by a group of experts during a survey visit, which will be finalized with a report to serve as the basis for the decision to be made by the Accreditation Commission. The self-evaluation phase started in 1994. In 1996 four schools submitted their request for accreditation. As of July 1996, one survey visit has been completed and three more are programmed for the second half of the year.

  8. 42 CFR 422.157 - Accreditation organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....157 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Quality Improvement § 422.157 Accreditation..., it applies and enforces standards that are at least as stringent as Medicare requirements...

  9. Accreditation's Benefits for Individuals and Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Participation in accreditation processes, on visiting teams as well as through institutional self-study, is an excellent opportunity for individual academics to augment their professional expertise in a range of higher education issues: strategic planning and assessment, resource management and capital investments, curriculum planning and program…

  10. Implementation of Computer Vision Based Industrial Fire Safety Automation by Using Neuro-Fuzzy Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunatha K.C.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A computer vision-based automated fire detection and suppression system for manufacturing industries is presented in this paper. Automated fire suppression system plays a very significant role in Onsite Emergency System (OES as it can prevent accidents and losses to the industry. A rule based generic collective model for fire pixel classification is proposed for a single camera with multiple fire suppression chemical control valves. Neuro-Fuzzy algorithm is used to identify the exact location of fire pixels in the image frame. Again the fuzzy logic is proposed to identify the valve to be controlled based on the area of the fire and intensity values of the fire pixels. The fuzzy output is given to supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA system to generate suitable analog values for the control valve operation based on fire characteristics. Results with both fire identification and suppression systems have been presented. The proposed method achieves up to 99% of accuracy in fire detection and automated suppression.

  11. Radon concentrations in abandoned mines, Cumbria, UK: safety implications for industrial archaeologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gillmore

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a number of surveys performed in a geographical area of the UK, part of which until recently was considered low radon risk. The Cumbrian region was identified by the Building Research Establishment (BRE in its 1999 guide as an area without a significant radon problem in the built environment. The geology of the region, which includes the Northern Pennine Orefield is varied, but consists of granites, andesites, tuffs, carbonates, sandstones and shales. Mineralisation has taken place (mostly lead and copper ores primarily along fault and fracture zones, one example being Copper Valley, northwest of Coniston village. This work quantifies the risk of exposure to radon in a number of abandoned mine environments. High radon levels, up to 28 589 Bq m−3, have been measured in parts of one mine. This study demonstrates that industrial archaeologists (such as the Cumbrian Amenity Trust Mining History Society or CATMHS members and explorers of abandoned mines can be at risk from radon exposure and it proposes a management scheme to allow industrial archaeologists to continue exploration whilst minimising the risk to health from radon.

  12. Health, safety and the environment : Are some oil industry uses of freshwater irresponsible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforuk, A.

    2002-08-01

    A multi billion-dollar oilsands/heavy oil boom is sure to increase water demand in Alberta as the United States requires a secure supply of oil that could be fulfilled by Alberta. Approximately 310,000 barrels of water a day will be required to support five new projects in the vicinity of Cold Lake, Alberta, and an additional 372,000 barrels a day of freshwater are expected to be required to support five oilsand mining projects north of Fort McMurray and four in-situ developments south of the city. Climate change, drying and fragmented forest and increased industrial demands for water have resulted in dramatic declines in river flows in Alberta, and this situation raises troubling questions. It is estimated that 7 to 9 barrels of water are required to produce one barrel of oil. One question that must be answered is: Is water injection an irresponsible use of fresh water? Ecologists are worried, since water injection represents a net loss in the water cycle. It is suggested that brackish or saline water be used instead of fresh water for water injection purposes, so as to reduce the amount of fresh water used by the oil industry. As it stands, water is a more expensive commodity than oil. The author indicated that increasing the rate of resource consumption cannot solve an environmental problem.

  13. Implementing and measuring safety goals and safety culture. 1. Lessons to Learn from Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Tokaimura and the New Era of the European Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to analyze the reasons, the progression, and the improvements made in the aftermath of the world's three most disastrous and publicized nuclear accidents, as well as the lessons still to be learned. At present, the entire European electrical grid is integrated, and reactor manufacturers have become fewer and bigger. Until now, largely only the operators were accused of committing human errors. This contradicts the claim that later technological improvements offset the possibility of a repetition of the accident. To improve the safety culture, new complementary views are presented that previously had been overlooked. Technological improvements and safety culture deficiencies at the managerial level are still missing. Although the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI), Chernobyl, and Tokaimura occurred on different continents at entirely different plants, these accidents share many common features in terms of precursors, progression, and succession. In the actual work, these common features are analyzed, and as a result, some recommendations are made. The results of the analyses show the following deficiencies in safety culture: 1. The precursors were not properly evaluated, and consequently, the correct conclusions were not deduced and applied. 2. The operators need much improved information about the status of the process that they control to be able to make the right decisions. 3. Operators must improve their awareness of observing deviations at an early stage to avoid accidents, and they also must improve their preparedness to meet the challenges of unexpected occurrences. 4. Management must learn to see the activities at the plant through the operators' eyes. 5. The price of the 'profit' of meeting time schedules by pressuring people is all to high for these practices to continue. The significance of the results is that they give direction to an improved safety culture, as follows: 1. Industry and management authority must assume

  14. From bad pharma to good pharma: aligning market forces with good and trustworthy practices through accreditation, certification, and rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer E

    2013-01-01

    This article explores whether the bioethical performance and trustworthiness of pharmaceutical companies can be improved by harnessing market forces through the use of accreditation, certification, or rating. Other industries have used such systems to define best practices, set standards, and assess and signal the quality of services, processes, and products. These systems have also informed decisions in other industries about where to invest, what to buy, where to work, and when to regulate. Similarly, accreditation, certification, and rating programs can help drug companies address stakeholder concerns in four areas: clinical trial design and management, dissemination of clinical trial results, marketing practices, and the accessibility of medicines. To illuminate processes - such as conflicts of interests and revolving-door policies - that can jeopardize the integrity of accreditation, certification, and ratings systems, the article concludes with a consideration of recent failures of credit-rating agencies and a review of the regulatory capture literature. PMID:24088150

  15. Protection of human research participants: accreditation of programmes in the Indian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Neelambari; Nigar, Shagoofa; Das, Soma; Divate, Uma; Divate, Pathik

    2014-01-01

    The recent negative media reports on the status of participants in clinical trials in India, together with the concerns expressed by the regulatory bodies, have raised questions regarding India's credibility in the conduct of clinical research. Even though the regulations require the registration of trials with the Clinical Trial Registry-India and despite the recently mandated registration of ethics committees (ECs) with the Drugs Controller General of India, the lack of governmental audit and accreditation procedures and bodies has resulted in inadequate protection of human participants in clinical research. Institutions and research sites would benefit by implementing a human research protection programme, which would safeguard the rights, safety and wellbeing of participants in clinical trials, in addition to improving the processes and procedures for the conduct of the trial. The Jehangir Clinical Development Centre, Pune has received accreditation from the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programme (AAHRPP). A unique feature of the AAHRPP is the integrative nature of the programme, wherein the sponsors of the trial, investigators, EC members and institution work towards the common goal of protecting research participants. Here, we discuss the improvement needed in the quality standards of institutions for them to be able to meet the requirements of the AAHRPP. We also suggest the need for a governmental accreditation body, which will be required for the future promotion of and improvement in the standards for clinical practice in India. PMID:24509113

  16. The responsible by the radiological safety in the industry. Among the labour environment and the today technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inside the industrial applications of the sealed radioactive sources, there are clearly exist two defined branches for which these materials are used: radioactive sources used in fixed equipment and in mobile ones. These devices are used in a countless of applications and every time with more advanced technological systems. This requires a permanent improvement inside the training of the responsible one and in turn it introduces an obligatory change to other intervention groups during the useful life of the device. The accident risks to those that are associate the use of these equipment, they are errors during the operation, undue use, maintenance carried out by personal without knowledge, flaws of human type or negligence and incidents happened during the transport. All these 'risks' its are surrounded of different groups of factors that influence during the safe use of the radioactive material, inside the installation of one way or another. Then it stands out the importance of implanting aspects of 'Safety Culture', evaluations of aptitude of the responsible one for the radiological safety, introduction of improvements in aspects of quality and communication of risks, chord to what indicates the normative of the Argentine Republic and the international requirements, which will be approached in the present work. (Author)

  17. How can nanobiotechnology oversight advance science and industry: examples from environmental, health, and safety studies of nanoparticles (nano-EHS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanotechnology has great potential to transform science and industry in the fields of energy, material, environment, and medicine. At the same time, more concerns are being raised about the occupational health and safety of nanomaterials in the workplace and the implications of nanotechnology on the environment and living systems. Studies on environmental, health, and safety (EHS) issues of nanomaterials have a strong influence on public acceptance of nanotechnology and, eventually, affect its sustainability. Oversight and regulation by government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) play significant roles in ensuring responsible and environmentally friendly development of nanotechnology. The EHS studies of nanomaterials can provide data and information to help the development of regulations and guidelines. We present research results on three aspects of EHS studies: physico-chemical characterization and measurement of nanomaterials; emission, exposure, and toxicity of nanomaterials; and control and abatement of nanomaterial releases using filtration technology. Measurement of nanoparticle agglomerates using a newly developed instrument, the Universal NanoParticle Analyzer (UNPA), is discussed. Exposure measurement results for silicon nanoparticles in a pilot scale production plant are presented, as well as exposure measurement and toxicity study of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Filtration studies of nanoparticle agglomerates are also presented as an example of emission control methods.

  18. Result of China National Accreditation for Laboratories Achieving Good Credit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ With the efforts of the past 10 years, the accreditation system for laboratories, which is complete in range, integrate on function and normative on operation, has been set up in China, and has achieved good reputation home and abroad. The result of laboratories accreditation is widely admitted and used in the international. Since the China national accreditation system for laboratories entering the international multilateral mutual recognition arrangement, the accreditation for laboratories has been playing an increasingly important role in the international trade. The testing result provided by the accreditation laboratories is required by many international-famous enterprises when they purchase in China, and there have been 37 economic systems admitting the result of China national accreditation for laboratories. More and more governmental departments require using accreditation for laboratories in the administrative management and law enforcement.

  19. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author proposes an overview of methods and concepts used in the nuclear industry, at the design level as well as at the exploitation level, to ensure an acceptable safety level, notably in the case of nuclear reactors. He first addresses the general objectives of nuclear safety and the notion of acceptable risk: definition and organisation of nuclear safety (relationships between safety authorities and operators), notion of acceptable risk, deterministic safety approach and main safety principles (safety functions and confinement barriers, concept of defence in depth). Then, the author addresses the safety approach at the design level: studies of operational situations, studies of internal and external aggressions, safety report, design principles for important-for-safety systems (failure criterion, redundancy, failure prevention, safety classification). The next part addresses safety during exploitation and general exploitation rules: definition of the operation domain and of its limits, periodic controls and tests, management in case of incidents, accidents or aggressions

  20. Human factors research in Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry creation of safety culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horie, Yasuo [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    To prevent accident of nuclear power plant, Human Factors Center was built in the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in July 1987. It developed an evaluation method of human error cases and an application method of human factors information. Now it continues analysis and application of human factors information, development of training/work support tools and research/experiment of human behavior. Japan-Human Performance Evaluation System (J-HPES) was developed as an analytical system for analysis and evaluation of human factors related to the trouble and for using the result as the common property by storage the analytical results. J-HPES has a standard procedure consisted of collecting and analyzing data and proposing the countermeasures. The analytical results are arranged by 4 kinds of charts by putting into the form of a diagram. Moreover, it tries to find the causes with indirect and potential causes. Two kinds of materials, Caution Report and Human Factors Precept by means of Illustrations, are published. People can gain access to HFC database by URL http://criepi.denken.or.jp/CRIEPI/HFC/DB. To prevent these accidents, creation of human factors culture has been required. Five kinds of teaching materials and the training method are developed. (S.Y.)

  1. Cultivating Safety Culture in Malaysia Nuclear Industries through Education and Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) is a national R and D organisation under Ministry of Science, Technology and the Innovation Malaysia, focusing on the application and promotion of nuclear and related technologies for national development. The core business of Nuclear Malaysia is R and D, and our approach has been customer focused, and remains in line with the mainstream of national socio-economic agenda. Thus Nuclear Malaysia.s activities support the short and long- terms national developmental programme. As a result of conducting R and D we generate products and services, including marketing of products and providing technical services, consultancy and training. Hence we would be able to move forwards towards achieving self-reliance and sustainability. Training service centre has been entrusted to enhance the application of nuclear technology in various socio-economic sectors i.e. industry, medical, agricultural and the environment. Thus, skill manpower should be developed and able to participate in various activities to support national development agenda. In executing the functions, the Centre has sufficient resources in term of manpower (for coordinating and training), finance and facilities. In addition, the Centre is backed by a pool of experienced and skilled personnel from other divisions in Nuclear Malaysia and also from our associates or partners to ensure smooth implementation of training

  2. The use of computational method to assess the safety and quality of ventilation in industrial buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial buildings, particularly those containing nuclear and process plant, often require high standards of ventilation in order to cope with unusual features of the operations or process which take place within the buildings. Four examples of recent studies carried out by the present authors are given in this paper: storage of coal in a covered stockyard, a chlor-alkali plant, a clean room, and the turbine hall of a nuclear power station. In each of these examples, quite detailed information was required about air flows, temperatures and gas concentrations, and it was decided to use the two-equation k,epsilon model of turbulence to help predict these variables. This is solved with equations for momentum and continuity by finite differences. It is concluded that complex computer programs of this kind can provide valuable assistance in support of the more traditional hand calculations using BS codes and CIBS guides. However, careful engineering judgement must be exercised in the use of the programs and in the interpretation of the results. (author)

  3. Cultivating Safety Culture in Malaysia Nuclear Industries through Education and Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Sabariah Kader [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwang Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) is a national R and D organisation under Ministry of Science, Technology and the Innovation Malaysia, focusing on the application and promotion of nuclear and related technologies for national development. The core business of Nuclear Malaysia is R and D, and our approach has been customer focused, and remains in line with the mainstream of national socio-economic agenda. Thus Nuclear Malaysia.s activities support the short and long- terms national developmental programme. As a result of conducting R and D we generate products and services, including marketing of products and providing technical services, consultancy and training. Hence we would be able to move forwards towards achieving self-reliance and sustainability. Training service centre has been entrusted to enhance the application of nuclear technology in various socio-economic sectors i.e. industry, medical, agricultural and the environment. Thus, skill manpower should be developed and able to participate in various activities to support national development agenda. In executing the functions, the Centre has sufficient resources in term of manpower (for coordinating and training), finance and facilities. In addition, the Centre is backed by a pool of experienced and skilled personnel from other divisions in Nuclear Malaysia and also from our associates or partners to ensure smooth implementation of training

  4. Wah Fung Knitters Is Accredited China's Model Textile Enterprise for Energy Saving and Emissions Reduction Technology%Wah Fung Knitters Is Accredited China's Model Textile Enterprise for Energy Saving and Emissions Reduction Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Wah Fung Knitters, one of the leasers of utilizing new production technology and improving production facilities to promote energy saving and environment protection in the knitting, dyeing and finishing industry, has been accredited for China's Model Textile Enterprise for Energy Saving and Emissions Reduction Technology.

  5. 78 FR 11204 - Accreditation and Reaccreditation Process for Firms Under the Third Party Review Program: Part I...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Accreditation and Reaccreditation Process for Firms Under the Third Party Review Program: Part I; Draft Guidance for Industry, Food and Drug Administration Staff, and Third Party Reviewers; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION:...

  6. [Merits of acquiring ISO15189 accreditation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Masami

    2010-01-01

    In Japan, an ISO15189 accreditation system was started in 2005. To date, 47 hospitals have been accredited. In this session, I will present the merits of acquiring accreditation regarding ISO15189 based on our experience. Our hospital has 263 beds. The Clinical Examination Section consists of 12 staff (including 5 part-time workers): 7 in change of sample examination and 5 in charge of physiological examination. The annual number of samples is approximately 150,000. Samples collected on health checkups account for 90%. To improve the quality and service, assessment by third persons has been positively utilized in our hospital. Accreditation regarding ISO9001, ISO14001, ISO27001, privacy mark, hospital function assessment, the functional assessment of "ningen-dock"/health checkup hospitals, labor/hygiene service function assessment, and ISO15189 has been acquired. Patients may not recognize ISO. So, it must be utilized, considering that the acquisition of accreditation is not a goal but a starting point. Furthermore, cost-performance should be improved to achieve utilization-related merits. It is important to not only acquire accreditation but also help clinical staff and patients become aware of some changes/merits. Patients may consult a hospital for the following reasons: confidence in the hospital, and the staffs kind/polite attitudes. Long-term management strategies should be established without pursuing only short-term profits. I will introduce several merits of acquiring accreditation regarding ISO15189. Initially, incidental conditions for bids and appeal points include accreditation regarding ISO15189. Our corporation has participated in some competitive bids regarding health checkup business. In some companies, the bid conditions included ISO acquisition. In our hospital, clinical trials have been positively carried out. For participation in trials, hospitals must pass an institutional examination. However, ISO acquisition facilitates the preparation of

  7. Safety matters

    OpenAIRE

    Gelder, P. van

    1999-01-01

    Several events have transpired recently to underscore yet again how important the issue of safety is for the local construction industry. This month regular contributor J.A. McInnis takes a look at how some of these events relate to one major area of site safety: safety whilst working at a height.

  8. Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this short paper it has only been possible to deal in a rather general way with the standards of safety used in the UK nuclear industry. The record of the industry extending over at least twenty years is impressive and, indeed, unique. No other industry has been so painstaking in protection of its workers and in its avoidance of damage to the environment. Headings are: introduction; how a nuclear power station works; radiation and its effects (including reference to ICRP, the UK National Radiological Protection Board, and safety standards); typical radiation doses (natural radiation, therapy, nuclear power programme and other sources); safety of nuclear reactors - design; key questions (matters of concern which arise in the public mind); safety of operators; safety of people in the vicinity of a nuclear power station; safety of the general public; safety bodies. (U.K.)

  9. Accredited Medical Web: an experience in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Sarrias, R; Mayer, MA; M. Latorre

    2000-01-01

    Introduction The Official Medical College of Barcelona (OMCB) is a centennial corporation created to defend the interests of the medical profession and ensure that it adheres to ethical and scientific norms in order to offer the best healthcare services to society. The Internet has the capacity to transmit a volume of information that is both difficult to control and widely available. The OMCB emphasizes the necessity to contribute to the accreditation of medical/healthcare information diffus...

  10. The effect of certification and accreditation on quality management in 4 clinical services in 73 European hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Charles D.; Groene, Oliver; Botje, Daan; Sunol, Rosa; Kutryba, Basia; Klazinga, Niek; Bruneau, Charles; Hammer, Antje; Wang, Aolin; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Wagner, Cordula; Klazinga, N; Kringos, DS; Lombarts, K; Plochg, T; Lopez, MA; Secanell, M; Sunol, R; Vallejo, P; Bartels, P; Kristensen, S; Michel, P; Saillour-Glenisson, F; Vlcek, F; Car, M; Jones, S; Klaus, E; Garel, P; Hanslik, K; Saluvan, M; Bruneau, C; Depaigne-Loth, A; Shaw, C; Hammer, A; Ommen, O; Pfaff, H; Groene, O; Botje, D; Wagner, C; Kutaj-Wasikowska, H; Kutryba, B; Escoval, A; Franca, M; Almeman, F; Kus, H; Ozturk, K; Mannion, R; Arah, OA; Chow, A; DerSarkissian, M; Thompson, C; Wang, A; Thompson, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between ISO 9001 certification, healthcare accreditation and quality management in European hospitals. Design A mixed method multi-level cross-sectional design in seven countries. External teams assessed clinical services on the use of quality management systems, illustrated by four clinical pathways. Setting and Participants Seventy-three acute care hospitals with a total of 291 services managing acute myocardial infarction (AMI), hip fracture, stroke and obstetric deliveries, in Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Turkey. Main Outcome Measure Four composite measures of quality and safety [specialized expertise and responsibility (SER), evidence-based organization of pathways (EBOP), patient safety strategies (PSS) and clinical review (CR)] applied to four pathways. Results Accreditation in isolation showed benefits in AMI and stroke more than in deliveries and hip fracture; the greatest significant association was with CR in stroke. Certification in isolation showed little benefit in AMI but had more positive association with the other conditions; greatest significant association was in PSS with stroke. The combination of accreditation and certification showed least benefit in EBOP, but significant benefits in SER (AMI), in PSS (AMI, hip fracture and stroke) and in CR (AMI and stroke). Conclusions Accreditation and certification are positively associated with clinical leadership, systems for patient safety and clinical review, but not with clinical practice. Both systems promote structures and processes, which support patient safety and clinical organization but have limited effect on the delivery of evidence-based patient care. Further analysis of DUQuE data will explore the association of certification and accreditation with clinical outcomes. PMID:24615598

  11. Industrial Control Network Information Safety Protection Measures and Application%工业控制网络信息安全的防护措施与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉敏

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, industrial incidents caused by network virus emerge in endlessly, industrial network security is increasingly crucial. Out of consideration to ensure the safe and stable operation of control system in critical infrastructure industries, loopholes and potential safety problems exist in different application industrial control networks. It's necessary to build a targeted safety protection system. This thesis explains dove's industrial control network information safety protection measures and application.%近几年,因网络病毒引起的工业事件层出不穷,工业网络安全问题已经日益严峻,为保证能源和关键性基础设施行业控制系统的安全稳定运行,不同应用领域工业控制网络存在的漏洞和安全隐患,需要建立有针对性的安全防护体系。简述多芬诺工业控制网络信息安全的防护措施与应用。

  12. Incompatibilities analysis in the accredited laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Szewieczek

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the presented paper aimed at motivating the necessity of the accreditation of research and standardising laboratories as factors deciding about the competitive advantage of those organisations on the European Union market.Design/methodology/approach used for the research has covered the analyses of results of internal and external audits conducted in one of Polish accredited laboratories and estimation of the incompatibilities occurred.Findings of the carried out research are as follows: number and character of incompatibilities, which are exposed during internal and external audits, reflect size of organisation, where the management system is implemented, phase of implementation as well as the time of functioning.Practical implications refers to any organisation which has quality management system implemented as well as to any accredited laboratory using internal audits as an element of continuous improvement and treating incompatibilities not as something disqualifying the investigated area, but as an supporting element. Originality/value of the presented paper belongs to the methodology comprising the usage of internal audits’ results - proved incompatibilities - as a tool for obtaining and assuring the confidence in the management system.

  13. Quality management system and accreditation of the in vivo monitoring laboratory at Karslruhe Institute of Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breustedt, B; Mohr, U; Biegard, N; Cordes, G

    2011-03-01

    The in vivo monitoring laboratory (IVM) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), with one whole body counter and three partial-body counters, is an approved lab for individual monitoring according to German regulation. These approved labs are required to prove their competencies by accreditation to ISO/IEC 17025:2005. In 2007 a quality management system (QMS), which was successfully audited and granted accreditation, was set up at the IVM. The system is based on the ISO 9001 certified QMS of the central safety department of the Research Centre Karlsruhe the IVM belonged to at that time. The system itself was set up to be flexible and could be adapted to the recent organisational changes (e.g. founding of KIT and an institute for radiation research) with only minor effort. PMID:21075765

  14. Quality indicators to compare accredited independent pharmacies and accredited chain pharmacies in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkaravichien, Wiwat; Wongpratat, Apichaya; Lertsinudom, Sunee

    2016-08-01

    Background Quality indicators determine the quality of actual practice in reference to standard criteria. The Community Pharmacy Association (Thailand), with technical support from the International Pharmaceutical Federation, developed a tool for quality assessment and quality improvement at community pharmacies. This tool has passed validity and reliability tests, but has not yet had feasibility testing. Objective (1) To test whether this quality tool could be used in routine settings. (2) To compare quality scores between accredited independent and accredited chain pharmacies. Setting Accredited independent pharmacies and accredited chain pharmacies in the north eastern region of Thailand. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in 34 accredited independent pharmacies and accredited chain pharmacies. Quality scores were assessed by observation and by interviewing the responsible pharmacists. Data were collected and analyzed by independent t-test and Mann-Whitney U test as appropriate. Results were plotted by histogram and spider chart. Main outcome measure Domain's assessable scores, possible maximum scores, mean and median of measured scores. Results Domain's assessable scores were close to domain's possible maximum scores. This meant that most indicators could be assessed in most pharmacies. The spider chart revealed that measured scores in the personnel, drug inventory and stocking, and patient satisfaction and health promotion domains of chain pharmacies were significantly higher than those of independent pharmacies (p pharmacies and chain pharmacies in the premise and facility or dispensing and patient care domains. Conclusion Quality indicators developed by the Community Pharmacy Association (Thailand) could be used to assess quality of practice in pharmacies in routine settings. It is revealed that the quality scores of chain pharmacies were higher than those of independent pharmacies. PMID:27118461

  15. The responsible by the radiological safety in the industry. Between the occupational environment and the today technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In industrial applications of the sealed radioactive sources, there are two clearly definite branches for which these materials are utilized: radioactive sources utilized in fixed and in portable equipment. These devices are utilized in an endless number of applications and each time with more advanced technological systems. This requires a permanent improvement in the training of the responsible, and at the same time introduces an obligatory change to other intervention groups during the useful life of the device. The risks of accident, to the ones associated with the use of these equipment, though their rate of occurrence is low, they are errors during the operation, undue use, maintenance by personnel without knowledge, human type failures or carelessness and incidents occurred during the transportation. All these risks are surrounded by different groups of factors that influence during the sure use of the radioactive material inside the installation. Therefore the importance to establish aspects of Safety Culture, aptitude evaluations of the radiological security responsible, improvements introduction in quality and risks communication aspects, in agreement with the Argentine Republic regulations and the international requests, is emphasized. In the present paper all concepts about the radioactive material responsible election, the training, the factors that intervene during the operation, the installation obligations, insecurity situations and the changes or improvements that technology introduces, are referenced. (author)

  16. You've found a safety signal--now what?: regulatory implications of industry signal detection activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Sidney N

    2007-01-01

    Signals detected by measuring disproportionality of drug-event combinations are only statistical indicators of possible real safety issues, and are not per se necessarily medically important. Nevertheless, once a signal is observed, sponsors are obligated by regulations and ethical considerations to determine whether it represents a new product-associated risk by additional analysis, validation and evaluation of its clinical relevance. Signal strength does not necessarily correlate with medical significance. Strong signals most often represent known, expected and/or medically trivial adverse reactions or confounding by treatment indication, common co-morbidities or other common concomitant treatments. Conversely, any product with reasonably extensive clinical use and reporting of suspected adverse reactions is likely to manifest many weak but clinically unimportant signals, creating significant background 'noise'. Since relatively rare, medically important adverse drug reactions are often likely to manifest as weak signals, sponsors face a potentially onerous burden of evaluating multiple signals in order to distinguish true, clinically important events of concern from spurious signals. This paper discusses the regulatory, clinical and potential legal liability issues that confront industry as a consequence of signal identification activities, including: current and anticipated regulatory requirements for detection, assessment and reporting; the reliability of the data used for signal generation; assessment of clinical relevance; organisational approaches and responses to observed signals; targeted clinical and scientific responses to observed signals; and potential regulatory, legal and commercial impact.

  17. Preliminary results from the application of risk matrix method for safety assessment in industrial radiography; Resultados preliminares de la aplicacion del metodo de matrices de riesgo para evaluaciones de seguridad en radiografia industrial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez G, A.; Cruz, D. [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Truppa, W. [Autoridad Reguladora Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Aravena, M. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile); Tamayo, B., E-mail: alopezg@cnsns.gob.mx [Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    Although the uses of ionizing radiation in industry are subject to procedures that provide a high level of safety, experience has shown that equipment failure, human errors, or the combination of both that can trigger accidental exposures may occur. Traditionally, the radiation safety checks whether these industrial practices (industrial radiography, industrial irradiators, among others) are sufficiently safe to prevent similar accidental exposures already occurred, so that becomes dependent on the published information and not always answers questions like: What other events can occur, or what other risks are present? Taking into account the results achieved by the Foro Iberoamericano de Organismos Reguladores Radiologicos y Nucleares, its leading position in the use of techniques of risk analysis in radioactive facilities and the need to develop a proactive approach to the prevention of accidents arising from the use of ionizing radiations in the industry, it intends to apply the risk analysis technique known as Risk Matrix to a hypothetical reference entity for the region in which industrial radiography is performed. In this paper the results of the first stage of this study are shown, that is the identification of initiating events (IE) and barriers that help mitigate the consequences of such IE, so that can appreciate the applicability of this method to industrial radiography services, to reduce the risk to acceptable levels. The fundamental advantage associated with the application of this methodology is that can be applied by the professionals working in the service and identifies specific weaknesses that from the point of view of safety there, so they can be prioritized resources depending on risk reduction. (Author)

  18. Fatigue in seafarers working in the offshore oil and gas re-supply industry: effects of safety climate, psychosocial work environment and shift arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hystad, Sigurd W; Saus, Evelyn-Rose; Sætrevik, Bjørn; Eid, Jarle

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the influence of safety climate and psychosocial work environment on the reported fatigue of seafarers working in the offshore oil and gas re-supply industry (n = 402). We found that seafarers who reported high psychological demands and perceived the organisational-level safety climate negatively,reported significantly more mental fatigue, physical fatigue, and lack of energy. In addition, seafarers who reported having high levels of job control reported being significantly less mentally fatigued. We also found some combined effects of safety climate and shift arrangement. Organisational-level safety climate did not influence the levels of physical fatigue in seafarers working on the night shift. On the contrary, seafarers working during the days reported to be more physically fatigued when they perceived the organisational-level climate to be negative compared with the positive. The opposite effect was found for group-level safety climate: seafarers working during the nights reported to be more physically fatigued when they perceived the group-level climate to be negative compared with the positive. The results from this study point to the importance of taking into consideration aspects of the psychosocial work environment and safety climate,and their potential impact on fatigue and safety in the maritime organisations.

  19. Measuring up to the challenges of the 21st century. An international evaluation of the Centre for Metrology and Accreditation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clapman, P.; Kaarls, R.; Temmes, M.

    1997-04-01

    The international evaluation of the Centre for Metrology and Accreditation (MIKES) is part of the process in which all relevant industrial and technology policy measures and organizations under the auspices of the Ministry of Trade and Industry (MTI) are being evaluated with the aim of improving their effectiveness. The overall conclusion of the evaluation is that MIKES is serving the country well. An effective national measurement system (FINMET) is being maintained which provides a wide range of calibration services covering most of the nation`s needs. The accreditation service (FINAS) is now well established, is operating effectively, and has good prospects for growth. The evaluators present, however, a number of proposals (including 33 specific recommendations) where they feel that the metrology and accreditation arrangements could be better-suited to meet future national and international challenges. According to the recommendations the Finnish quality policy framework should be developed in a consistent way. There is a need of a comprehensive governmental quality policy statement upon which the inter-ministry coordination and harmonization of various conformity assessment activities can be based. MIKES should retain its current status as an agency within MTI. The national measurement system should be more centralised and a new purpose-built national standards laboratory should be procured. The responsibility for legal metrology should be transferred to MIKES. The terms of reference and membership of Advisory Committee for Metrology, as well as the Advisory Committee for Accreditation should be revised to ensure wider representation of all relevant, and especially industrial interests

  20. Evolving Alignment in International Continuing Professional Development Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Graham T; Aboulsoud, Samar; Gordon, Jennifer; McKenna, Mindi; Meuser, James; Staz, Mark; Campbell, Craig M

    2016-01-01

    Several of the world's accreditation systems for continuing professional development (CPD) are evolving to encourage continuous improvement in the competence and performance of health care providers and in the organizations in which they provide patient care. Clinicians learn best when they can to choose from a diverse array of activities and formats that are relevant and meet their needs. Since choice and diversity are key to meeting clinicians' needs, several CPD accreditors have been engaging in deliberate, concerted efforts to identify a core set of principles that can serve as the basis for determining substantive equivalency between CPD accreditation systems. Substantive equivalency is intended to support the mobility of learners, allowing them to access accredited learning activities that are recognized by various CPD accreditation systems in a manner that maximizes the value of those accreditation systems, while minimizing the burden of adhering to their requirements. In this article, we propose a set of core principles that all CPD accreditation systems must express as the basis for determining substantive equivalency between CPD accreditation systems. The article will illustrate how five CPD accreditation systems (two in the USA, two in Canada, and one in Qatar), differing in focus (activity-based versus provider-based), context, and culture, express these values and metrics, and concludes by identifying the value of substantive equivalency for learners, medical regulators, and CPD accreditation systems.

  1. International accreditation of ambulatory surgical centers and medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Michael F

    2013-07-01

    The two forces that have driven the increase in accreditation of outpatient ambulatory surgery centers (ASC's) in the United States are reimbursement of facility fees by Medicare and commercial insurance companies, which requires either accreditation, Medicare certification, or state licensure, and state laws which mandate one of these three options. Accreditation of ASC's internationally has been driven by national requirements and by the competitive forces of "medical tourism." The three American accrediting organizations have all developed international programs to meet this increasing demand outside of the United States. PMID:23830758

  2. Evolving Alignment in International Continuing Professional Development Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Graham T; Aboulsoud, Samar; Gordon, Jennifer; McKenna, Mindi; Meuser, James; Staz, Mark; Campbell, Craig M

    2016-01-01

    Several of the world's accreditation systems for continuing professional development (CPD) are evolving to encourage continuous improvement in the competence and performance of health care providers and in the organizations in which they provide patient care. Clinicians learn best when they can to choose from a diverse array of activities and formats that are relevant and meet their needs. Since choice and diversity are key to meeting clinicians' needs, several CPD accreditors have been engaging in deliberate, concerted efforts to identify a core set of principles that can serve as the basis for determining substantive equivalency between CPD accreditation systems. Substantive equivalency is intended to support the mobility of learners, allowing them to access accredited learning activities that are recognized by various CPD accreditation systems in a manner that maximizes the value of those accreditation systems, while minimizing the burden of adhering to their requirements. In this article, we propose a set of core principles that all CPD accreditation systems must express as the basis for determining substantive equivalency between CPD accreditation systems. The article will illustrate how five CPD accreditation systems (two in the USA, two in Canada, and one in Qatar), differing in focus (activity-based versus provider-based), context, and culture, express these values and metrics, and concludes by identifying the value of substantive equivalency for learners, medical regulators, and CPD accreditation systems. PMID:27584065

  3. CIEMAT EXTERNAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE: ISO/IEC 17025 ACCREDITATION AND 3 Y OF OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AS AN ACCREDITED LABORATORY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, A M; Rodríguez, R; López, J L; Martín, R; Benavente, J F

    2016-09-01

    In 2008, the CIEMAT Radiation Dosimetry Service decided to implement a quality management system, in accordance with established requirements, in order to achieve ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation. Although the Service comprises the approved individual monitoring services of both external and internal radiation, this paper is specific to the actions taken by the External Dosimetry Service, including personal and environmental dosimetry laboratories, to gain accreditation and the reflections of 3 y of operational experience as an accredited laboratory. PMID:26567323

  4. 77 FR 70446 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the American Association for Accreditation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for Continuing CMS Approval of Its Ambulatory Surgical Center Accreditation Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid... Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for continued recognition as...

  5. 76 FR 63612 - National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation Meeting AGENCY: National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of... of the National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation (NCFMEA). For each...

  6. Higher Education Community Engagement and Accreditation: Activating Engagement through Innovative Accreditation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, Lorilee R.; Williams, Julie E.; Abrams, Eleanor D.

    2009-01-01

    Convergence is occurring between external demands placed on U.S. higher education institutions, such as those from state and federal governments for greater accountability, and calls for higher education's recommitment to public purposes. One important example of this convergence is the redesign of accreditation processes and standards. Because of…

  7. On the use of genetic algorithm to optimize industrial assets lifecycle management under safety and budget constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonchampt, J.; Fessart, K. [EDF R and D, Departement MRI, 6, quai Watier, 78401 Chatou cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the method and tool dedicated to optimize investments planning for industrial assets. These investments may either be preventive maintenance tasks, asset enhancements or logistic investments such as spare parts purchases. The two methodological points to investigate in such an issue are: 1. The measure of the profitability of a portfolio of investments 2. The selection and planning of an optimal set of investments 3. The measure of the risk of a portfolio of investments The measure of the profitability of a set of investments in the IPOP tool is synthesised in the Net Present Value indicator. The NPV is the sum of the differences of discounted cash flows (direct costs, forced outages...) between the situations with and without a given investment. These cash flows are calculated through a pseudo-Markov reliability model representing independently the components of the industrial asset and the spare parts inventories. The component model has been widely discussed over the years but the spare part model is a new one based on some approximations that will be discussed. This model, referred as the NPV function, takes for input an investments portfolio and gives its NPV. The second issue is to optimize the NPV. If all investments were independent, this optimization would be an easy calculation, unfortunately there are two sources of dependency. The first one is introduced by the spare part model, as if components are indeed independent in their reliability model, the fact that several components use the same inventory induces a dependency. The second dependency comes from economic, technical or logistic constraints, such as a global maintenance budget limit or a safety requirement limiting the residual risk of failure of a component or group of component, making the aggregation of individual optimum not necessary feasible. The algorithm used to solve such a difficult optimization problem is a genetic algorithm. After a description

  8. On the use of genetic algorithm to optimize industrial assets lifecycle management under safety and budget constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the method and tool dedicated to optimize investments planning for industrial assets. These investments may either be preventive maintenance tasks, asset enhancements or logistic investments such as spare parts purchases. The two methodological points to investigate in such an issue are: 1. The measure of the profitability of a portfolio of investments 2. The selection and planning of an optimal set of investments 3. The measure of the risk of a portfolio of investments The measure of the profitability of a set of investments in the IPOP tool is synthesised in the Net Present Value indicator. The NPV is the sum of the differences of discounted cash flows (direct costs, forced outages...) between the situations with and without a given investment. These cash flows are calculated through a pseudo-Markov reliability model representing independently the components of the industrial asset and the spare parts inventories. The component model has been widely discussed over the years but the spare part model is a new one based on some approximations that will be discussed. This model, referred as the NPV function, takes for input an investments portfolio and gives its NPV. The second issue is to optimize the NPV. If all investments were independent, this optimization would be an easy calculation, unfortunately there are two sources of dependency. The first one is introduced by the spare part model, as if components are indeed independent in their reliability model, the fact that several components use the same inventory induces a dependency. The second dependency comes from economic, technical or logistic constraints, such as a global maintenance budget limit or a safety requirement limiting the residual risk of failure of a component or group of component, making the aggregation of individual optimum not necessary feasible. The algorithm used to solve such a difficult optimization problem is a genetic algorithm. After a description

  9. Radiological emergencies in industry (causes and consequences). Address at the second national course of Radiation Safety in Industry. Jun 5-7 2000 Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The address discusses the following issues: review of accidents in industrial radiography, human factors, technical failures, factors that decrease risk, personnel training, design of equipment and recommendations

  10. First experiences with patient safety initiatives in Greek rural primary care. Action research by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skalkidis, Y.; Manoli, A.; Evagelos, D.; Nikolaos, T.; Sekeri, Z.; Dantsi, F.; Wensing, M.; Esmail, A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accreditation of primary care organizations within Greece is still in its infancy. Our task in Greece was to attempt to introduce a patient safety initiative in a local area, focusing on developing minimum standards for accreditation, assess whether a pragmatic approach would engage phys

  11. [Industry regulation and its relationship to the rapid marketing of medical devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Atsuko

    2012-01-01

    In the market of medical devices, non-Japanese products hold a large part even in Japan. To overcome this situation, the Japanese government has been announcing policies to encourage the medical devices industry, such as the 5-year strategy for medical innovation (June 6, 2012). The Division of Medical Devices has been contributing to rapid marketing of medical devices by working out the standards for approval review and accreditation of medical devices, guidances on evaluation of medical devices with emerging technology, and test methods for biological safety evaluation of medical devices, as a part of practice in the field of regulatory science. The recent outcomes are 822 standards of accreditation for Class II medical devices, 14 guidances on safety evaluation of medical devices with emerging technology, and the revised test methods for biological safety evaluation (MHLW Notification by Director, OMDE, Yakushokuki-hatsu 0301 No. 20 "Basic Principles of Biological Safety Evaluation Required for Application for Approval to Market Medical Devices"). PMID:23243983

  12. "Educate the Individual... to a Sane Appreciation of the Risk" A History of Industry's Responsibility to Warn of Job Dangers Before the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, David; Markowitz, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Workers Right to Know laws later in that decade were signature moments in the history of occupational safety and health. We have examined how and why industry leaders came to accept that it was the obligation of business to provide information about the dangers to health of the materials that workers encountered. Informing workers about the hazards of the job had plagued labor-management relations and fed labor disputes, strikes, and even pitched battles during the turn of the century decades. Industry's rhetorical embrace of the responsibility to inform was part of its argument that government regulation of the workplace was not necessary because private corporations were doing it. PMID:26696286

  13. The Food Safety Modernization Act’s Produce Safety Rule

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Theresa M. J.; Strawn, Laura K.; Eifert, Joseph D.; Rideout, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Limited resources are available for extension personnel to distribute to stakeholders seeking information on the Food and Drug Administration’s Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) and its seven different rules: Produce Safety Rule, Preventive Controls for Human Food Rule, Preventative Controls for Animal Food Rule, Foreign Supplier Verification Program for Importers of Food for Humans and Animals, Accredited Third-Party Certification Rule, Focused Mitigation Strategies to Protect Food Agains...

  14. European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Centers with FACT-JACIE Accreditation Have Significantly Better Compliance with Related Donor Care Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthias, Chloe; O'Donnell, Paul V; Kiefer, Deidre M; Yared, Jean; Norkin, Maxim; Anderlini, Paolo; Savani, Bipin N; Diaz, Miguel A; Bitan, Menachem; Halter, Joerg P; Logan, Brent R; Switzer, Galen E; Pulsipher, Michael A; Confer, Dennis L; Shaw, Bronwen E

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have identified healthcare practices that may place undue pressure on related donors (RDs) of hematopoietic cell products and an increase in serious adverse events associated with morbidities in this population. As a result, specific requirements to safeguard RD health have been introduced to Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy/The Joint Accreditation Committee ISCT and EBMT (FACT-JACIE) Standards, but the impact of accreditation on RD care has not previously been evaluated. A survey of transplant program directors of European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation member centers was conducted by the Donor Health and Safety Working Committee of the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research to test the hypothesis that RD care in FACT-JACIE accredited centers is more closely aligned with international consensus donor care recommendations than RD care delivered in centers without accreditation. Responses were received from 39% of 304 centers. Our results show that practice in accredited centers was much closer to recommended standards as compared with nonaccredited centers. Specifically, a higher percentage of accredited centers use eligibility criteria to assess RDs (93% versus 78%; P = .02), and a lower percentage have a single physician simultaneously responsible for an RD and their recipient (14% versus 35%; P = .008). In contrast, where regulatory standards do not exist, both accredited and nonaccredited centers fell short of accepted best practice. These results raise concerns that despite improvements in care, current practice can place undue pressure on donors and may increase the risk of donation-associated adverse events. We recommend measures to address these issues through enhancement of regulatory standards as well as national initiatives to standardize RD care.

  15. Higher education accreditation in the Philippines: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the historical perspective, rationales, implications, different types and processes that undergoes in the accreditation of private higher educational institutions in the Philippines. As a result, higher education accreditation in the Philippines is centered on four key result areas, namely: quality of teaching and research, support for students, relations with the community, and management of resources.

  16. Accreditation of Health Educational Programs. Part 1: Staff Working Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Study of Accreditation of Selected Health Educational Programs, Washington, DC.

    This publication contains the first set of working papers concerned with structure, financing, research, and expansion as they relate to the accreditation of health education programs conducted by professional agencies. Texts of these papers are included: (1) "Historical Introduction to Accreditation of Health Educational Programs" by W.K. Selden,…

  17. Primary Medical Care Provider Accreditation (PMCPA): pilot evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, S.M.; Chauhan, U.; Lester, H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While practice-level or team accreditation is not new to primary care in the UK and there are organisational indicators in the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) organisational domain, there is no universal system of accreditation of the quality of organisational aspects of care in the

  18. Reputation Cycles: The Value of Accreditation for Undergraduate Journalism Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Robin; Davenport, Lucinda D.; Bowe, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Accreditation is among various outside influences when developing an ideal journalism curriculum. The value of journalism accreditation standards for undergraduate programs has been studied and is still debated. This study discovers views of opinion leaders in U.S. journalism programs, as surveyed program directors give reasons for being…

  19. AACSB Accreditation and Possible Unintended Consequences: A Deming View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanovich, Paul; Mueller, James; Benson, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The AACSB accreditation process reflects basic quality principles, providing standards and a process for feedback for continuous improvement. However, implementation can lead to unintended negative consequences. The literature shows that while institutionalism and critical theory have been used as a theoretical base for evaluating accreditation,…

  20. Accreditation of Agricultural Engineering University studies in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, Vasco Fitas; Silva, Luis Leopoldo

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the evaluation and accreditation processes of high studies study programs in Portugal; the process of Quality evaluation of new study courses; Nature of engineering profession; EurAgEng recognition; Recognition process implementation;Elements for the recognition process; Some aspects to assure curricula comparability; European Accreditation Process.

  1. Accreditation and improvement in process quality: A nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bie Bogh, Søren; Hollnagel, Erik; Johnsen, Søren P;

    -accredited hospitals for neither stroke (P = 0.55), heart failure (P=0.88), bleeding ulcer (P=0.67) and perforated ulcer (P =0.16). Non-accredited hospitals performed better in the study period regarding stroke (Ptable 1), whereas no clear differences were found for heart failure, bleeding ulcer or perforated...

  2. Shaping Performance: Do International Accreditations and Quality Management Really Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigsch, Stefano; Schenker-Wicki, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, international accreditations have become an important form of quality management for business schools all over the world. However, given their high costs and the risk of increasing bureaucratisation and control, accreditations remain highly disputed in academia. This paper uses quantitative data to assess whether accreditations…

  3. Rehabilitation Counselor Education Accreditation: History, Structure, and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Linda R.; Kuehn, Marvin D.

    2009-01-01

    This review examines some of the critical factors that influenced the evolution of rehabilitation counselor education accreditation. The article discusses the history and structure of the accreditation process and the activities that have occurred to maintain the relevancy and viability of the process. Major issues that the Council on…

  4. Policy Priorities for Accreditation Put Quality College Learning at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Carol Geary

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring the quality of college learning is, beyond doubt, the most important responsibility of higher education accreditation. Yet, almost no one currently thinks that accreditation, especially at the institutional level, is what it should be for twenty-first-century students and institutions of higher education. In this article, the author…

  5. 76 FR 81793 - Net Worth Standard for Accredited Investors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Parts 230, 239, 270, and 275 RIN 3235-AK90 Net Worth Standard for Accredited Investors... basis of having a net worth in excess of $1 million. This change to the net worth standard was effective.... Discussion A. Net Worth Standard for Accredited Investors (1) Overview of the Amended Rules (2) Treatment...

  6. Accreditation of Medical Education in China: Accomplishments and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    As an external review mechanism, accreditation has played a positive global role in quality assurance and promotion of educational reform. Accreditation systems for medical education have been developed in more than 100 countries including China. In the past decade, Chinese standards for basic medical education have been issued together with…

  7. COAMFTE Accreditation and California MFT Licensing Exam Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Benjamin E.; Kunker, Shelly A.; Brown, Stephen W.; Saiki, Dustin Y.

    2011-01-01

    Professional accreditation of graduate programs in marital and family therapy (MFT) is intended to ensure the strength of the education students receive. However, there is great difficulty in assessing the real-world impact of accreditation on students. Only one measure is applied consistently to graduates of all MFT programs, regardless of…

  8. Nano Regulation in Austria (II): Workplace Safety, Industrial Law and Environmental Law (NanoTrust Dossier No. 019en – January 2011)

    OpenAIRE

    Gazsó, André; Eisenberger, Iris; Nentwich, Michael; Simkó, Myrtill; Fiedeler, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    This dossier focuses on workplace safety, industrial law as well as on environmental law (water, air, soil, waste). These fields of law are likewise influenced by EU law and are very complex due to their interlocking with Austrian law. Discussion and conclusion refer to both dossiers on nano-regulation in Austria. They tentatively conclude that current legislation covers in principle nanotechnologies, especially in those cases where nano materials / nano products endanger legal interests. Exi...

  9. Promoting Implementation of Safety Culture in Nuclear Application for Industrial Facilities; an Important Role of Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setianingsih, Lilis Susanti [KINS-KAIST Master Degree Program, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Implementation of nuclear energy for industrial purposes has reached its highest peak. BAPETEN, as Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency of Indonesia has published regulations regarding nuclear energy utilization. As high risk associating such utilization requires direct and thoroughly supervision in order to assure its compliance to safety and security aspect, procedures related to operational activities must by fully applied. Radiation Protection Program as one type of procedures that must be available in nuclear energy utilization operation is intended to provide operators specifically technical guidance to avoid undesired negative effects of incidents or accidents. It is the responsibility of managerial level in a company to provide the procedures and to further supervise their application in the field. Radiation workers, those are all employees working in or within radiation area must understand how to execute the procedures properly. The radiation protection program is intended to protect workers, member of community and property as well as the environment from the negative impacts of nuclear utilization operational due to its radiation exposure. Safety culture, a compound of nature derived from behavior of organization and people within the organization to pay a full attention and give main priority in radiation safety matters, is expected to be achieved by implementing the radiation protection program as safety habits at the work place. It requires a management commitment to ensure that all aspect in safety and, whenever necessary, security are accomplished within the radiation protection program in order to build a safety culture in a radiation work place. Government Regulation No. 33 2007 about Safety for Ionizing Radiation and Security for Radioactive Source and Government Regulation No. 29 2008 regarding Licensing for Utilization of Ionizing Radiation and Nuclear Material present regulation and arrangement related to radiation protection program as a basic

  10. Promoting Implementation of Safety Culture in Nuclear Application for Industrial Facilities; an Important Role of Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implementation of nuclear energy for industrial purposes has reached its highest peak. BAPETEN, as Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency of Indonesia has published regulations regarding nuclear energy utilization. As high risk associating such utilization requires direct and thoroughly supervision in order to assure its compliance to safety and security aspect, procedures related to operational activities must by fully applied. Radiation Protection Program as one type of procedures that must be available in nuclear energy utilization operation is intended to provide operators specifically technical guidance to avoid undesired negative effects of incidents or accidents. It is the responsibility of managerial level in a company to provide the procedures and to further supervise their application in the field. Radiation workers, those are all employees working in or within radiation area must understand how to execute the procedures properly. The radiation protection program is intended to protect workers, member of community and property as well as the environment from the negative impacts of nuclear utilization operational due to its radiation exposure. Safety culture, a compound of nature derived from behavior of organization and people within the organization to pay a full attention and give main priority in radiation safety matters, is expected to be achieved by implementing the radiation protection program as safety habits at the work place. It requires a management commitment to ensure that all aspect in safety and, whenever necessary, security are accomplished within the radiation protection program in order to build a safety culture in a radiation work place. Government Regulation No. 33 2007 about Safety for Ionizing Radiation and Security for Radioactive Source and Government Regulation No. 29 2008 regarding Licensing for Utilization of Ionizing Radiation and Nuclear Material present regulation and arrangement related to radiation protection program as a basic

  11. 水利施工行业安全隐患与对策探究%Research of Water Conservancy Construction Industry Safety Hidden Trouble and Countermeasures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周成坤

    2013-01-01

      工程施工的安全问题是工程施工的重要环节,是一个建筑施工企业生存发展的必要前提。只有强化建筑施工企业施工安全意识与施工安全管理才能有效地规避施工中的安全风险。本文主要研究水利施工行业所存在的安全隐患问题,找出问题并制定合理的应对办法,供水利施工行业相关人员参考。%Security problem of engineering construction is an important link of project construction, a construction enterpris-e development essential prerequisite for existence. Only by st-rengthening the construction enterprise construction safety aw-areness and safety management can ef ectively avoid safety ri-sk in construction. This paper mainly studies the safety hazards of water conservancy construction industry to find out the pro-blems and formulate reasonable measures for reference of wat-er conservancy construction industry related personnel.

  12. Accreditation and participatory design in the healthcare sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Scheuer, John Damm; Hertzum, Morten

    2015-01-01

    parts of the accreditation process and fit well with clinical evidence-based thinking. We describe and compare effects-driven IT development with accreditation, in terms of the Danish Quality Model which is used throughout the Danish healthcare sector, and we discuss the prospects and challenges......We revisit the role of participatory design approaches in the light of the accreditation regime currently imposed on the Danish healthcare sector. We describe effects-driven IT development as an instrument supporting sustained participatory design. Effects-driven IT development includes specifying......, realizing, and measuring the effects from using an information technology. This approach aligns with much of the logic in accreditation but is distinguished by its focus on effects, whereas current accreditation approaches focus on processes. Thereby, effects-driven IT development might support challenging...

  13. Safety in construction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swuste, P.H.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    The available literature on Construction Safety is not very optimistic about the chances of evidence-based safety in the construction industry exerting a positive influence. Many articles indicate that the structures and processes that are designed to ensure safety in the industry are poor. Safety m

  14. Proficiency Tests for Environmental Radioactivity Measurement Organized by an Accredited Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Cédric; Osmond, Mélanie

    2008-08-01

    For 40 years, STEME (Environmental Sample Processing and Metrology Department) organized international proficiency testing (PT) exercises formerly for WHO (World Health Organization) and EC (European Community) and currently for ASN (French Nuclear Safety Authority). Five PT exercises are organized each year for the measurement of radionuclides (alpha, beta and gamma) in different matrixes (water, soil, biological and air samples) at environmental levels. ASN can deliver a French ministerial agreement to participate on environmental radioactivity measurements French network for laboratories asking it [1]. Since 2006, November, STEME is the first French entity obtaining a COFRAC (French Committee of Accreditation) accreditation as "Interlaboratory Comparisons" for the organization of proficiency tests for environmental radioactivity measurement according to standard International Standard Organization (ISO) 17025 and guide ISO 43-1. STEME has in charge to find, as far as possible, real sample or to create, by radionuclide adding, an adapted sample. STEME realizes the sampling, the samples preparation and the dispatching. STEME is also accredited according to Standard 17025 for radioactivity measurements in environmental samples and determines homogeneity, stability and reference values. After the reception of participating laboratories results, STEME executes statistical treatments in order to verify the normal distribution, to eliminate outliers and to evaluate laboratories performance. Laboratories participate with several objectives, to obtain French agreement, to prove the quality of their analytical performance in regards to standard 17025 or to validate new methods or latest developments. For 2 years, in addition to usual PT exercises, new PT about alpha or beta measurement in air filters, radioactive iodine in carbon cartridges or measurement of environmental dosimeters are organized. These PT exercises help laboratories to improve radioactive measurements

  15. Development and Validation of Career Development Guidelines by Task/Activity Analysis of Occupational Safety and Health Professions: Industrial Hygiene and Safety Professional. Final Report. Technical Report XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Ralph J.; And Others

    This report summarizes research findings which resulted in development of curricula for occupational safety and health professions based on task/activity analyses and related performance objectives. The first seven chapters focus on the seven objectives. Chapter 1, Literature Review and Selection of Employers, concerns tasks required for…

  16. National Standard of "General Request on Biological Safety" Was Officially Issued

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ May 28 2004, sponsored by Standardization Administration of P.R. China ( SAC ) and Certification and Accreditation Administration of P.R. China (CNCA), China National Accreditation Board For Laboratories (CNAL) organized the press conference on National Standard of "General Request on Biological Safety" in Beijing.

  17. On Demonstration Construction of Safety Production in New Materials Industry%新材料产业的安全生产示范建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏海

    2016-01-01

    In view of the present situation of innovational development and safety production in new materials industry, this paper studies the construction of safety production responsibility system and the building of a long-term effective mecha-nism of safety production.Through constructing three work teams,supervising security hidden dangers,utilizing modern science and technology,reinforcing government and enterprise linkage and attaching great importance to the construction of safety culture,the essential security level in enterprises has been constantly improved to ensure a steady situation of produc-tion safety.%针对新材料产业创新发展的现状和安全生产要求,研究了如何推进安全生产责任制的措施,即构建安全生产长效机制,抓好三支队伍建设,严查安全隐患,科技兴安,政企联动,重视安全文化建设,不断提升新材料行业企业本质安全水平,确保安全生产形势的不断稳定.

  18. Fisheries and aquaculture industries involvement to control product health and quality safety to satisfy consumer-driven objectives on retail markets in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Eva [University of South Denmark, Department of Environmental and Business Economics, Niels Bohrs vej 9, DK-6700 Esbjerg (Denmark); Institute for Marine Research, University Kiel, Duesternbrooker Weg 20, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Rosenthal, Harald [University of South Denmark, Department of Environmental and Business Economics, Niels Bohrs vej 9, DK-6700 Esbjerg (Denmark); Institute for Marine Research, University Kiel, Duesternbrooker Weg 20, 24105 Kiel (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Over the past years the export of agricultural and fishery products from developing countries has substantially increased to markets within the OECD. Retailers and importers are expanding their international operations to meet consumer demands for year-round delivery of products. Moreover, consumers have become increasingly concerned about the safety of food, including those derived from aquatic resources [FAO/NACA/WHO Joint Study Group, 1999. Report food safety issues associated with products from aquaculture. WHO Technical Report Series No 883: VII, pp. 1-55]. Governments and leading businesses are responding by imposing new safety regulations and standards to the international food system (e.g. HACCP, EUREP-GAP), product liability and labeling [Reilly, A., Howgate, P., Kaeferstein, F., 1997. Safety hazards and the application of HACCP in aquaculture. In: Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Fish Inspection and Quality Control: A Global Focus, Arlington, VA, 19-24 May 1996. Technomic Publishing, Lancaster, PA, pp. 353-373]. Initial concerns for imports of aquacultural products from developing to industrialized countries focussed on bacterial contamination [Buras, N. 1993. Microbial safety of produce from wastewater-fed aquaculture. In: Pullin, R.V.C., Rosenthal, H., MacLean, J.L.(Eds.), Proceedings of ICLARM Conferences, vol. 31, pp. 285-295]. Today, if trade opportunities are to be maintained, these countries must adapt to a full array of regulations and standards. This paper describes four scenarios in aquaculture and fishing product trade between developing countries and countries in the European Union.

  19. Management of waste from the use of radioactive material in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education safety guide

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance on the > fulfilment of the safety requirements established in Safety Standards > Series No. WS-R-2, Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste, > Including Decommissioning. It covers the roles and responsibilities of > different bodies involved in the predisposal management of radioactive > waste and in the handling and processing of radioactive material. It > is intended for organizations generating and handling radioactive > waste or handling such waste on a centralized basis for and the > regulatory body responsible for regulating such activities.  > Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of human health and the > environment; 3. Roles and responsibilities; 4. General safety > considerations; 5. Predisposal management of radioactive waste; 6. > Acceptance of radioactive waste in disposal facilities; 7. Record > keeping and reporting; 8. Management systems; Appendix I: Fault > schedule for safety assessment and environmental impact assessment; > Ap...

  20. Relationship of safety climate perceptions and job satisfaction among employees in the construction industry: the moderating role of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilkovska, Biljana Blaževska; Žileska Pančovska, Valentina; Mijoski, Goran

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the degree to which construction sector employees perceive that safety is important in their organizations/sites and how job satisfaction affects these perceptions when age is introduced as a moderator variable. Two-way analysis of variance demonstrated that job satisfaction has a strong effect on perceived management commitment to work safety and that this relationship was moderated by respondents' age. Job satisfaction was associated with perceived accident rate and safety inspection frequency, but the proposed role of age in this linkage was not confirmed. Consequently, the findings indicated that by increasing the level of job satisfaction, perceptions of these safety climate aspects proved to be more positive. The conclusion is that these relationships could further lead to a lower percentage of accidents and injuries in the workplace and better health among employees. A significant relationship between job satisfaction, age and perceived co-workers' commitment to work safety was not found.

  1. Relationship of safety climate perceptions and job satisfaction among employees in the construction industry: the moderating role of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilkovska, Biljana Blaževska; Žileska Pančovska, Valentina; Mijoski, Goran

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the degree to which construction sector employees perceive that safety is important in their organizations/sites and how job satisfaction affects these perceptions when age is introduced as a moderator variable. Two-way analysis of variance demonstrated that job satisfaction has a strong effect on perceived management commitment to work safety and that this relationship was moderated by respondents' age. Job satisfaction was associated with perceived accident rate and safety inspection frequency, but the proposed role of age in this linkage was not confirmed. Consequently, the findings indicated that by increasing the level of job satisfaction, perceptions of these safety climate aspects proved to be more positive. The conclusion is that these relationships could further lead to a lower percentage of accidents and injuries in the workplace and better health among employees. A significant relationship between job satisfaction, age and perceived co-workers' commitment to work safety was not found. PMID:26693996

  2. The method validation step of biological dosimetry accreditation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, L.; Voisin, P.A.; Guillou, A.C.; Busset, A.; Gregoire, E.; Buard, V.; Delbos, M.; Voisin, Ph. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, LDB, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    One of the missions of the Laboratory of Biological Dosimetry (L.D.B.) of the Institute for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (I.R.S.N.) is to assess the radiological dose after an accidental overexposure suspicion to ionising radiation, by using radio-induced changes of some biological parameters. The 'gold standard' is the yield of dicentrics observed in patients lymphocytes, and this yield is converted in dose using dose effect relationships. This method is complementary to clinical and physical dosimetry, for medical team in charge of the patients. To obtain a formal recognition of its operational activity, the laboratory decided three years ago, to require an accreditation, by following the recommendations of both 17025 General Requirements for the Competence of Testing and Calibration Laboratories and 19238 Performance criteria for service laboratories performing biological dosimetry by cyto-genetics. Diagnostics, risks analysis were realized to control the whole analysis process leading to documents writing. Purchases, personnel department, vocational training were also included in the quality system. Audits were very helpful to improve the quality system. One specificity of this technique is that it is not normalized therefore apart from quality management aspects, several technical points needed some validations. An inventory of potentially influent factors was carried out. To estimate their real effect on the yield of dicentrics, a Placket-Burman experimental design was conducted. The effect of seven parameters was tested: the BUdr (bromodeoxyuridine), PHA (phytohemagglutinin) and colcemid concentration, the culture duration, the incubator temperature, the blood volume and the medium volume. The chosen values were calculated according to the uncertainties on the way they were measured i.e. pipettes, thermometers, test tubes. None of the factors has a significant impact on the yield of dicentrics. Therefore the uncertainty linked to their use was

  3. Challenges for academic accreditation: the UK experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearman, Richard; Seddon, Deborah

    2010-08-01

    Several factors (government policy, demographic trends, employer pressure) are leading to new forms of degree programmes in UK universities. The government is strongly encouraging engagement between universities and employers. Work-based learning is increasingly found in first and second cycle programmes, along with modules designed by employers and increasing use of distance learning. Engineering faculties are playing a leading part in these developments, and the Engineering Council, the engineering professional bodies and some universities are collaborating to develop work-based learning programmes as a pathway to professional qualification. While potentially beneficial to the engineering profession, these developments pose a challenge to traditional approaches to programme accreditation. This paper explores how this system deals with these challenges and highlights the issues that will have to be addressed to ensure that the system can cope effectively with change, especially the development of individually tailored, work-based second cycle programmes, while maintaining appropriate standards and international confidence.

  4. 15 CFR 285.13 - Denial, suspension, revocation, or termination of accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... revoke accreditation. (1) If a laboratory's accreditation is suspended, NVLAP shall notify the laboratory... NVLAP proposes to deny or revoke accreditation of a laboratory, NVLAP shall inform the laboratory of the... period. (2) If accreditation is revoked, the laboratory may be given the option of...

  5. Research on safety guarantee system for chemical industrial parks%化工园区安全保障体系探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国华; 贾梅生; 黄庭枫

    2013-01-01

    This paper is inclined to introduce and synthesize some new ideas and research results about safety control and secure engineering technology in running chemical industrial parks.As is well known,chemical industrial parks involve more safety and security problems for their own particular nature.Yet,there is still shortage of a systematic framework and comprehensive measures to ensure their regular production practice.To meet the actual need,we would like to bring forward a set of safety production and management warranty including three strategies.The first one deals with a set of inherent safety-ensuring strategies through eliminating or getting rid of likely hazards to prevent likely accidents.In our suggested framework,the inherent safety strategy is supposed to include three key techniques,i.e.optimized layout of management goals,idealistic chain of their industrial products and safety and security controlling power.As a rule,the operating goals should be oriented to guide the stage of designing a new chemical industrial park or the stage of introducing a new chemical plant to a well managed chemical park so that the park is always in a position to keep on its successful production and implement the most effective measures for accident prevention.The second strategy of the framework is to make sure successful risk control with the so-called four key techniques thoroughly carried out,i.e.identifying and recognizing hidden hazards,analyzing and controlling Domino effect accidents,early-warning and always aware of community emergencies.The said risk control strategy should be oriented to decrease the accident frequency or alleviating the accident detrimental influence.PDCA is needed for this strategy to heighten the safety control rate of the chemical industrial parks.And,now,the last strategy is to establish necessary institutions and cuhivate safety culture.There exists a vast need for the chemical industrial parks to ask for the managers and workers to display

  6. Photovoltaic module certification/laboratory accreditation criteria development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterwald, C.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Hammond, R.L.; Wood, B.D.; Backus, C.E.; Sears, R.L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zerlaut, G.A. [SC-International Inc., Phoenix, AZ (United States); D`Aiello, R.V. [RD Associates, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This document provides an overview of the structure and function of typical product certification/laboratory accreditation programs. The overview is followed by a model program which could serve as the basis for a photovoltaic (PV) module certification/laboratory accreditation program. The model covers quality assurance procedures for the testing laboratory and manufacturer, third-party certification and labeling, and testing requirements (performance and reliability). A 30-member Criteria Development Committee was established to guide, review, and reach a majority consensus regarding criteria for a PV certification/laboratory accreditation program. Committee members represented PV manufacturers, end users, standards and codes organizations, and testing laboratories.

  7. on interpretation teaching in light of translation accreditation tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐嘉璐

    2011-01-01

    with the development of society,the interpretation accreditation tests becomes a more popular subject.what are the features of these interpretation accreditation tests and what the teachers should learn from them in their teaching are the issues we should pay attention to.based on the requirements of three different translation accreditation tests and the status of interpretation teaching,this paper analyzes the required qualifications of interpreters and put forward suggestions for teachers in interpretation teaching.this paper aims to enhance the current level of interpretation teaching.

  8. Guiding the accreditation process utilizing an oversight committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The highly technical and complex training necessary for nuclear utilities plus regulatory and Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) accreditation demands are causing utilities to redefine training needs. The complexity of subject matter and tasks has caused utilities to recognize the importance of training methods. The INPO accreditation oversight committee responds to the new need to emphasize and standardize educational methods, Consolidated Edison established an INPO Accreditation Oversight Committee for its Indian Point facility. This presentation will describe the committee's purpose, composition, responsibilities, and the results achieved. The committee's formulation and responsibilities and the influence of committee members on training programs and management will be discussed

  9. ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A

  10. ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A.

  11. 浅谈煤化工企业的安全管理措施%Safety management in coal chemical industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管吉峰

    2015-01-01

    Coal chemical enterprises face great security risks,so it is crucial to do good job in safety management,improve the security level of the enterprise,and to ensure the safety of employees and their health in safe and stable development of the industry.%煤化工企业在安全上存在很大的风险,所以如何做好安全的管理工作,真正的提升企业的本质安全水平、最大限度的保障员工生命安全以及他们的身体健康是保证企业能够持续健康稳定发展的重要环节。

  12. An Investigation into the Impact of Service Quality, Frequent Flier Programs and Safety Perception on Satisfaction and Customer Loyalty in the Airline Industry in Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandada Maxwell

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the factors that make passengers loyal to an airline in Southern Africa by investigating the impact of service quality and safety perception on customer satisfaction and how satisfaction and frequent flyer programs (FFP subsequently influence customer loyalty. The key finding was that service quality positively influenced customer satisfaction, and satisfaction was an important antecedent of customer loyalty. The analysis also suggested that safety perception and FFP positively influence customer loyalty, while their relationship with satisfaction was not significant. An analysis of switching behaviour revealed that satisfied customers may still switch to other airlines. The main contribution of this study is the development of a customer loyalty model for the aviation industry in Southern Africa. Knowledge of customer loyalty drivers will assist airline marketing managers in developing strategies for improving passenger load factors and profitability.

  13. China's Work Safety Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Jiakun

    2005-01-01

    @@ General Situation of China's Work Safety in 2004 In 2004, the national work safety situation remained stable as a whole and gained momentum to improve. The totality of accidents held the line and began to drop. The safety conditions in industrial,mining, and commercial/trading enterprises improved. Progress was made in ensuring work safety in the relevant industries and fields. The safety situation in most provinces (autonomous regions, municipalities directly under the Central Government) kept stable.

  14. 7 CFR 205.500 - Areas and duration of accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 205.500 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Accreditation of Certifying Agents § 205.500 Areas...

  15. 7 CFR 205.501 - General requirements for accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Accreditation of Certifying Agents § 205... certifying agent under this subpart must: (1) Have sufficient expertise in organic production or...

  16. 7 CFR 205.502 - Applying for accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Accreditation of Certifying Agents § 205.502 Applying for...

  17. ADN Programs Accredited by the National League for Nursing, 1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursing Outlook, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The complete list of programs leading to an associate degree in nursing that are accredited by the National League for Nursing is presented, without annotation. The institutions are listed alphabetically by State. (Author/AJ)

  18. Accreditation and Participatory Design in the Health-Care Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Scheuer, John Damm; Hertzum, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the role of participatory design approaches emphasizing the current context of the accreditation regime imposed on the Danish healthcare sector. We describe effects-driven IT development as an instrument supporting sustained participatory design. Effects-driven IT development includes...... specifying, realizing, and measuring effects from using an information technology. This approach aligns with much of the logic inherent in accreditation and it supports challenging parts of the accreditation process. Effects-driven IT development furthermore might support effects related to clinical evidence......-based thinking. We describe and compare effects- driven IT development with accreditation and discuss the prospects and challenges for this approach to participatory design within the healthcare domain....

  19. ACCREDITATION OF OPEN AND DISTANCE LEARNING: A Framework for Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpil KOCDAR

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a framework for the accreditation of higher open and distance learning (ODL programs in Turkey. The study was designed as a sequential monomethod multistrand mixed model including two strands which were both qualitative (QUAL→QUAL. In the first strand, both quantitative and qualitative data were collected through a three-round Delphi study with an expert panel consisting of 28 experts. In the second strand, qualitative data were collected via focus group interview. Based on a comprehensive literature review and the findings from the study, a framework was proposed including an initial accreditation process for new ODL programs and a re-accreditation process for ongoing programs. In addition, 35 criteria for new programs and 42 criteria for ongoing programs were developed to be used in the accreditation process.

  20. Accreditation of medical schools: the question of purpose and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azila, N M A; Tan, C P L

    2005-08-01

    Accreditation is a process by which official accrediting bodies evaluate institutions using a set of criteria and standards, following established procedures, to ensure a high quality of education needed to produce highly competent graduates. Additional objectives include (1) ensuring quality institutional functioning, (2) strengthening capabilities of educational institutions for service to the nation and (3) improving public confidence in medical schools. The accreditation process provides an opportunity for the institution to critically reflect upon all the aspects of its programme and the level of compliance or attainment of the requirements. The self-evaluation exercise, which identifies strengths and weaknesses, is perceived as formative. It is envisaged that eventually institutions will adopt a learning culture for curriculum development, implementation, monitoring and matching the outcomes. In conclusion, periodic accreditation activities can act as a "monitoring" system to ensure that the quality of medical education is maintained according to established standards. PMID:16315622

  1. International Federations (IF) accreditation instructions manual: Nanjing 2014

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This accreditation instructions manual for International Federations is developed by the Nanjing Youth Olympic Games Organising Committee (NYOGOC) in accordance with the guidelines established in the Youth Olympic Games event manual by the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

  2. Virginia Tech's Cook Counseling Center receives international counseling accreditation

    OpenAIRE

    DeLauder, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Thomas E. Cook Counseling Center has been accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc., an organization of United States, Canadian, and Australian counseling agencies based in Alexandria, Va.

  3. The accreditation process of careers in MERCOSUR: would the veterinary career in Uruguay achieve accreditation in accordance with the required standards of the Argentinian and Brazilian agencies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Passarini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available MERCOSUR created the ARCU-SUR system as a regional mechanism for accreditation of undergraduate programmes. The Veterinary career in Uruguay achieved accreditation by ARCU-SUR in 2010. As re-accreditation approaches an evaluation of the career with the Brazilian and Argentinian national standards of accreditation was simulated due to their strong influence on the definition of the regional criteria. Institutional self-assessment was updated and compared with the accreditation indicators of the Brazilian and Argentinian agencies. The idea of quality of the accreditation system in Brazil emphasizes the training of the teaching staff while in Argentina emphasizes the teaching and learning processes. The career could achieve accreditation with the Argentinian parameters but should improve aspects of the academic training of their teachers to achieve accreditation in Brazil. This work made it possible to adjust the Development Plan of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine.

  4. Building on Shaky Ground: Quality and Safety in China’s Construction Industry in the Wake of the Wenchuan and Yushu Earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ting

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available [In China, development of building regulations has largely been motivated by a desire to maintain the booming construction industry which has sustained strong economic growth. As a result, the government has fallen behind on ensuring quality and safety in residential housing projects. The devastation left by the Wenchuan and Yushu earthquakes was a grim reminder of this. This essay aims to draw out some of the regulatory mistakes that have been made and proposes solutions to the issues raised. Regulators must refocus their attention on protecting the public and lay the legislative groundwork for healthy development in the sector.

  5. Standards for explosion protection in the mining industry - safety, cost effectiveness, environmental protection; Normen fuer den Explosionsschutz im Bergbau - Sicherheit, Wirtschaftlichkeit, Umweltschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, E. [Deutsche Steinkohle AG (DSK), Friedrichsthal/Herne (Germany). Hauptstelle fuer das Grubenrettungswesen; Blasgude, H.G. [FABERG, Normenausschuss Bergbau, Essen (Germany)

    2006-12-14

    Standards for explosion protection in the mining industry serve primarily for optimum protection of human life. In addition, however, the management and economic benefits of standardisation in this sector are considerable. In addition to the increase in the safety level and the greater cost effectiveness further advantages such as the secured supply of raw materials and a higher productivity thanks to optimisation of operating processes and material flows are achieved by application of standards. Furthermore, an effective contribution to environmental protection is made by methane gas drainage, because harmful greenhouse gases are avoided. (orig.)

  6. Quality Assessment of Family Medicine Teams Based on Accreditation Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Valjevac, Salih; Ridjanovic, Zoran; Masic, Izet

    2009-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED In order to speed up and simplify the self assessment and external assessment process, provide better overview and access to Accreditation Standards for Family Medicine Teams and better assessment documents archiving, Agency for Healthcare Quality and Accreditation in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (AKAZ) has developed self assessment and externals assessment software for family medicine teams. This article presents the development of standardized sof...

  7. Accreditation ISO/IEC 1705 in dosimetry: Experience and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to present the experience in the process of accreditation of the radiation dosimetry service in which there are trials for the determination of radiation doses due to internal and external exhibitions. Is They describe the aspects that were considered for the design and development of a system of quality and results after its implementation. A review of the benefits accreditation has been reported to the organization is finally made. (Author)

  8. The history of European public health education accreditation in perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien D. Goodman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this paper is to investigate the history of accreditation of academic public health education and understand why there is a 65 year gap between the first system in America and the uptake of accreditation in Europe. The paper intends to search for parallels and dissimilarities between the development in America and Europe and then consider if any parallels could be used for determining the future role of accreditation in Europe. Methods: The paper draws heavily upon a literature review and analysis and the examination and interpretation of primary and secondary sources. Firstly there is an exploration of the American development which is complemented by an evaluation of the developments in Europe. Results: The paper demonstrates that there are two key features required for the development of accreditation: interstate collaboration and a liberalisation or opening up of the education market. Conclusions: Since the Second World War, Europe has embraced interstate collaboration which has led to a liberalisation of certain economic markets. The future for sector based accreditation of public health education will be determined by the extent Europe pursues liberalisation and whether a competitive environment will bring into question the transparency and trust in state sponsored accreditation agencies.

  9. A hybrid health service accreditation program model incorporating mandated standards and continuous improvement: interview study of multiple stakeholders in Australian health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, David; Hinchcliff, Reece; Hogden, Anne; Mumford, Virginia; Debono, Deborah; Pawsey, Marjorie; Westbrook, Johanna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    The study aim was to investigate the understandings and concerns of stakeholders regarding the evolution of health service accreditation programs in Australia. Stakeholder representatives from programs in the primary, acute and aged care sectors participated in semi-structured interviews. Across 2011-12 there were 47 group and individual interviews involving 258 participants. Interviews lasted, on average, 1 h, and were digitally recorded and transcribed. Transcriptions were analysed using textual referencing software. Four significant issues were considered to have directed the evolution of accreditation programs: altering underlying program philosophies; shifting of program content focus and details; different surveying expectations and experiences and the influence of external contextual factors upon accreditation programs. Three accreditation program models were noted by participants: regulatory compliance; continuous quality improvement and a hybrid model, incorporating elements of these two. Respondents noted the compatibility or incommensurability of the first two models. Participation in a program was reportedly experienced as ranging on a survey continuum from "malicious compliance" to "performance audits" to "quality improvement journeys". Wider contextual factors, in particular, political and community expectations, and associated media reporting, were considered significant influences on the operation and evolution of programs. A hybrid accreditation model was noted to have evolved. The hybrid model promotes minimum standards and continuous quality improvement, through examining the structure and processes of organisations and the outcomes of care. The hybrid model appears to be directing organisational and professional attention to enhance their safety cultures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Obtaining accreditation by the pharmacy compounding accreditation board, part 3: developing a program of qualtity assurance and continuous qualtiy improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaleiro, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Before a compounding pharmacy can receive accreditation from the Pharmacy Compounding Accreditation Board, the pharmacy must show evidence of both quality assurance activities and continuous quality improvement activities. Although quality assurance data gathering and monitoring can be integrated into pharmacy activities fairly easily, the coninuous quality improvement program may take a little more time and effort to implement . Before integrating these programs, compounding pharmacists must have a complete understanding of the differences between these two programs. Even if accreditation with the Pharmacy Compounding Accreditation Board is not being considered, it is important that compounding pharmacies have these two programs implemented. In the long run, it will pay off in higher quality services, error prevention, and perhaps greater efficiency of pharmacy operations. PMID:23969712

  11. Doing It Old School: Peer-Led Occupational Safety Training in the U.S. Construction Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyai, Clayton; Stafford, Pete; Trahan, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Many labour organizations that sponsor occupational health and safety training champion "peer training," preferring instructors drawn from the shopfloor over academically credentialed experts. But peer training is hardly new: in the skilled trades, master craftsmen have instructed apprentices since the Middle Ages. Building on the…

  12. Work Climate, Organizational Commitment, and Highway Safety in the Trucking Industry: Toward Causal Modeling of Large Truck Crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Carroll M.; Scott, Aaron J.; Nafukho, Fredrick M.

    2008-01-01

    While theoretical models aimed at explaining or predicting employee turnover outcomes have been developed, minimal consideration has been given to the same task regarding safety, often measured as the probability of a crash in a given time frame. The present literature review identifies four constructs from turnover literature, which are believed…

  13. Developments in infertility counselling and its accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monach, Jim

    2013-03-01

    Infertility counselling was placed in a unique position by the passage of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 and the requirement that couples being treated should be offered counselling. However professional counselling was, and largely still is, at a stage at which there was no universal agreement on the knowledge, standards or qualifications required for practice. Nevertheless, infertility counselling became the first example of counselling to be required by statute, beyond the more generalised requirement in adoption birth records access. Counselling is intended to describe skilled talking therapy offered by a professional with specific training and qualifications directed to helping individuals and couples to achieve goals they own themselves. The therapeutic intervention of counselling is primarily directed to helping clients in a stressful situation to deploy their own coping skills effectively and thus make the difficult choices inseparable from ART. Counselling outcome research consistently demonstrates the effectiveness of the sort of counselling delivered in assisted conception units with mild-moderate anxiety and depression delivered by skilled and experienced practitioners. This article reviews the role of counsellors as members of the assisted conception clinical team and the status of regulation and accreditation in this very new profession.

  14. Vending machines: Food safety and quality assessment focused on food handlers and the variables involved in the industry

    OpenAIRE

    Raposo, António; Carrascosa, Conrado; Pérez, Esteban; Saavedra, Pedro; Sanjuán, Esther; Millán, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    "The purpose of this paper was to analyse the quality and safety parameters of food products sold in vending machines. A hygienic-sanitary assessment was conducted on 338 vending machines located on the island of Gran Canaria. Hygiene Assessment System (HAS) surveys, food handler examinations and microbiological (processed food and water) and physicochemical (water) controls were applied, permitting evaluation through the identification of the main risks and/or hazards of the hygienic-sanitar...

  15. Accreditation of Emergency Department at a Teaching Hospital in Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Farzianpour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Considering the importance of emergency departments in healthcare system and the high mortality rate of patients referred to these departments, it is crucial to provide quality services in emergency departments. Accreditation is a systematic process for improving quality of care and it enables managers to assess and evaluate the healthcare system. Accreditation of an organization provides an obvious commitment for improving quality of safety, quality of patient care, ensuring safety surveillance and continuous activities for reducing dangers which threaten patients and staff. Therefore, given the vital role as well as and the perpetual and indispensable service provided by the emergency departments, it is necessary to re-evaluate the manner of service provision in these departments according to the standards and criteria of accreditation, so that an observance of these criteria will lead to improvement of emergency medicine in Iran. Thus, the present study was undertaken with the purpose of accreditation of emergency department of a teaching hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences according to the standards of Iranian Deputy of Health and the JCI. Approach: This is a descriptive-analytic study with a cross-sectional structure. Our study population consisted of 50 individuals of the healthcare staff (physicians and nurses working in morning and evening work shifts of the emergency department in the teaching hospital. Data collection tools consisted of standard questionnaires of the Deputy of Health (9 series and questionnaires developed by authors based on the standards of the Joint Commission International (JCI regarding patient satisfaction with services provided in emergency departments. In order to determine the reliability and validity of the data collection tools, professors and experts reviewed the questionnaire of quality and patient safety in accordance with standards of quality patient safety from the

  16. 78 FR 45930 - Guidance for Industry: Safety Labeling Changes-Implementation of Section 505(o)(4) of the Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... Register of April 13, 2011 (76 FR 20686), FDA announced the availability of a draft guidance for industry...--Implementation of Section 505(o)(4) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and... new provisions to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) authorizing FDA to...

  17. Joint submission of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the Organization of CANDU Industries to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manufacturing company members of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the Organization of CANDU Industries are proud to have played their part in the development of the peaceful application of nuclear technology in Ontario, and the achievement of the very real benefits discussed in this paper, which greatly outweigh the hypothetical risks

  18. Patient safety: the what, how, and when.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Roxie M

    2015-12-01

    Patient safety is a construct that implies behavior intended to minimize the risk of harm to patients through effectiveness and individual performance designed to avoid injuries to patients from the care that is intended to help them. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has made patient safety a focused area in the new Clinical Learning Environment Review process. This lecture will focus on definitions of patient safety terminology; describe the culture of patient safety and a just culture; discuss what to report, who to report it too, and methods of conducting patient safety investigations.

  19. Feasibility study on introduction of KOLAS (Korea Laboratory Accreditation Scheme) in nuclear examination facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dae Gyu; Hong, K. P.; Song, W. S.; Min, D. K

    1999-07-01

    To be an institute officially authorized by the KOLAS, the understanding and the analysis of following contents is required.: the understanding of concept required to get the accreditation of testing, the system specifying an internationally accredited testing and examination organization, international organization in the field of laboratory accreditation, domestic laboratory accreditation organization(KOLAS), the investigation of the regulations with laboratory accreditation in Korea, the investigation of the procedures accrediting a testing and examination organization, the investigation of general requirements(ISO 17025) for a testing and examination organization. (author)

  20. 化工行业“安全观察与沟通”的初步探索%Safety Observation and Communication Exploration on Chemical Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵林; 王述存; 孟力

    2016-01-01

    安全观察与沟通是落实有感领导、展现领导承诺的一种有效手段[1]。通过对杜邦公司安全文化体系的认知,深刻剖析在化工危险作业中应该如何做好安全观察与沟通。结合当前在化工生产中的重点应用及注意事项,本文分别对安全观察与沟通的概况、内容及应用等,进行了较详细的分析与阐述。在工作中倡导并积极开展安全观察与沟通,将达到较好的安全管理效果。%Security Watch is to implement felt leadership and communication, as a means to show leadership commitments. Through the perception of the state company's safety culture system, a profound analysis of the chemical industry should be how to do dangerous work safety observation and communication. Combined with the current focus on the application and precautions in chemical production, the significance of safety observation and communication, content and applications were carried on for a more detailed exposition and analysis. Advocacy at work and actively carrying out safety observation and communication will achieve better security management effectiveness.

  1. TH-C-18C-01: MRI Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pooley, R [Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Bernstein, M; Shu, Y; Gorny, K; Felmlee, J [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Panda, A [Mayo Clinic, Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Clinical diagnostic medical physicists may be responsible for implementing and maintaining a comprehensive MR safety program. Accrediting bodies including the ACR, IAC, Radsite and The Joint Commission each include aspects of MR Safety into their imaging accreditation programs; MIPPA regulations further raise the significance of non-compliance. In addition, The Joint Commission recently announced New and Revised Diagnostic Imaging Standards for accredited health care organizations which include aspects of MR Safety. Hospitals and clinics look to the physicist to understand guidelines, regulations and accreditation requirements related to MR safety. The clinical medical physicist plays a significant role in a clinical practice by understanding the physical basis for the risks and acting as a facilitator to successfully implement a safety program that provides well-planned siting, allows for the safe scanning of certain implanted devices, and helps radiologists manage specific patient exams. The MRI scanning of specific devices will be discussed including cardiac pacemakers and neurostimulators such as deep brain stimulators. Furthermore for sites involved in MR guided interventional procedures, the MR physicist plays an essential role to establish safe practices. Creating a framework for a safe MRI practice includes the review of actual safety incidents or close calls to determine methods for prevention in the future. Learning Objectives: Understand the requirements and recommendations related to MR safety from accrediting bodies and federal regulations. Understand the Medical Physicist's roles to ensure MR Safety. Identify best practices for dealing with implanted devices, including pacemakers and deep brain stimulators. Review aspects of MR safety involved in an MR guided interventional environment. Understand the important MR safety aspects in actual safety incidents or near misses.

  2. Assessment, Development and Implementation of Training Materials for Food Defense/Safety, Biosecurity, and Traceability within the Catfish Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hood, Anna F.; Williams, J. Byron; Crist, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research and subsequent training sessions was to assess food defense in the catfish industry, promote awareness and educate catfish farmers and processors on the principles of food defense, biosecurity and traceability of agricultural commodities and ingredients used in human food production. In the catfish processing chain, preliminary investigations have indicated that there are areas throughout production, processing and distribution that are susceptible to potential ...

  3. Quality assurance procedure for functional performance of industrial gamma radiography exposure devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Industrial Gamma Radiography Exposure Device (IGRED) consists of various moving parts and accessories and wear and tear take place often. This may increase the possibility of radiation incidents and result in avoidable radiation exposure. Quality assurance tests of the equipment for functional performance plays a major role in ensuring that the exposure device and its accessories perform their intended functions and satisfy radiation safety requirements to avert potential exposures to operators. Therefore, in India it is practiced as mandatory requirement that each IGRED is tested for its functional performance and only after ascertaining that features of operational safety are satisfactory, loading of the source into the radiography exposure device can be permitted. This procedure which is being. practiced since the late 1970s, has contributed significantly towards the safe use of IGREDs and minimising the occurrence of radiation accidents. The purpose of this document is to highlight the importance of periodic functional performance check of each IGRED as per the checklist for the testing procedures. It is also proposed to entrust this activity to accredited laboratories, which have the necessary infrastructure to carry out this activity. The prerequisites for accreditation of such laboratories to carry out this activity and the testing procedures to be adopted for checking the functional performance of various models of IGREDs used in this country are given in this report. (author)

  4. Investigation on safety cognition and safety behaviors among farmer workers in construction industries in Shanghai%上海市建筑业农民工安全认知和安全行为调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王剑; 张立强; 金伟; 陈德; 吕姿之

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解上海市建筑业农民工安全认知和安全行为状况,为制定干预措施提供依据.方法 对上海市2家建筑企业的1088名农民工进行问卷调查.结果 调查对象安全认知水平较高,有96.7%的调查对象认为有必要在工作场所采取安全防护设施.60.8%认为从事的工作安全.安全行为的报告率相对较低,83.5%的对象一直会主动佩戴防护用具.平时未感到紧张匆忙、认为劳动强度不大、工作熟练、单位安全防护设备量足,安全认知和安全行为水平均较高,OR值分别为1.896 (95%CI:1.414-2.543)、1.961 (95%CI:1.340-2.869); 1.381 (95%CI:1.041-1.833)、1.559 (95%CI:1.022-2.377); 1.383 (95%CI:1.013-1.887)、1.558 (95%CI:1.062-2.284); 1.825(95% CI:1.273-2.615)、1.864 (95%CI:1.392-2.496).结论 上海市建筑业农民工的伤害相关安全行为的报告率有待提高,建议有针对性的开展健康教育.%Objective To understand safety cognition and safety behaviors among farmer workers in construction industries, and provide evidence for intervention. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted among 1088 fanner workers in two construction industries in Shanghai. Results The safety cognition level was high. 96.1% of respondents agreed that security protection facilities were necessary at workplace. 60. 8% of them thought his job was safe. The safety behavior prevalence rates were relatively lower. 83. 5% of them wore labor protective appliance actively and consistently. Related influence factors such as "never felt job busy" , "thought labor intensity was not high" , "skilled in job" , "enough protective equipment at workplace" were positive associated with safety cognition and behavior, odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were 1. 8% (1.414-2.543), 1.961 (1.340-2.869), 1.381 (1.041-1.833), 1.559 (1.022-2.377), 1.383 (1.013-1.887), 1.558 (1.062-2.284), 1.825 (1.273-2.615), 1.864 (1.392-2.496 ) respectively. Conclusion

  5. Safety strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis for safety strategy in nuclear industry and especially nuclear power plants is the prevention of radioactivity release inside or outside of the technical installation. Therefore either technical or administrative measures are combined to a general strategy concept. This introduction will explain in more detail the following topics: - basic principles of safety - lines of assurance (LOA) - defense in depth - deterministic and probabilistic methods. This presentation is seen as an introduction to the more detailed discussion following in this course, nevertheless some selected examples will be used to illustrate the aspects of safety strategy development although they might be repeated later on. (orig.)

  6. An Audit of Emergency Department Accreditation Based on Joint Commission International Standards (JCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Hashemi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite thousands of years from creation of medical knowledge, it not much passes from founding the health care systems. Accreditation is an effective mechanism for performance evaluation, quality enhancement, and the safety of health care systems. This study was conducted to assess the results of emergency department (ED accreditation in Shohadaye Tajrish Hospital, Tehran, Iran, 2013 in terms of domesticated standards of joint commission international (JCI standards. Methods: This is a cohort study with a four months follow up which was conducted in the ED of Shohadaye Tajrish hospital in December 2013. The standard evaluation check list of Iran hospitals (based on JCI standards included 24 heading and 337 subheading was used for this purpose. The effective possible causes of weak spots were found and their solutions considered. After correction, assessment of accreditation were repeated again. Finally, the achieved results of two periods were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results: Quality improvement, admission in department and patient assessment, competency and capability test for staffs, collection and analysis of data, training of patients, and facilities had the score of below 50%. The mean of total score for accreditation in ED in the first period was 60.4±30.15 percent and in the second period 68.9±22.9 (p=0.005. Strategic plans, head of department, head nurse, resident physician, responsible nurse for the shift, and personnel file achieved the score of 100%. Of total headings below 50% in the first period just in two cases, collection and analysis of data with growth of 40% as well as competency and capability test for staffs with growth of 17%, were reached to more than 50%. Conclusion: Based on findings of the present study, the ED of Shohadaye Tajrish hospital reached the score of below 50% in six heading of quality improvement, admission in department and patient assessment, competency and capability test for

  7. Photovoltaic module certification/laboratory accreditation criteria development: Implementation handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterwald, C.R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Hammond, R.L.; Wood, B.D.; Backus, C.E.; Sears, R.L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zerlaut, G.A. [SC-International, Inc., Tempe, AZ (United States); D`Aiello, R.V. [RD Associates, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This document covers the second phase of a two-part program. Phase I provided an overview of the structure and function of typical product certification/laboratory accreditation programs. This report (Phase H) provides most of the draft documents that will be necessary for the implementation of a photovoltaic (PV) module certification/laboratory accreditation program. These include organizational documents such as articles of incorporation, bylaws, and rules of procedure, as well as marketing and educational program documents. In Phase I, a 30-member criteria development committee was established to guide, review and reach a majority consensus regarding criteria for a PV certification/laboratory accreditation program. Committee members represented PV manufacturers, end users, standards and codes organizations, and testing laboratories. A similar committee was established for Phase II; the criteria implementation committee consisted of 29 members. Twenty-one of the Phase I committee members also served on the Phase II committee, which helped to provide program continuity during Phase II.

  8. Accreditation of testing laboratories in CNEA (National Atomic Energy Commission)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recognition of the technical capability of a testing laboratory is carried out by Laboratory Accreditation Bodies as the result of a satisfactory evaluation and the systematic follow up of the certified qualification. In Argentina the creation of a National Center for the Accreditation of Testing Laboratories, as a first step to assess a National Accreditation System is currently projected. CNEA, as an institution involved in technological projects and in the development and production of goods and services, has adopted since a long time ago quality assurance criteria. One of their requirements is the qualification of laboratories. Due to the lack of a national system, a Committee for the Qualification of Laboratories was created jointly by the Research and Development and Nuclear Fuel Cycle Areas with the responsibility of planning and management of the system evaluation and the certification of the quality of laboratories. The experience in the above mentioned topics is described in this paper. (author)

  9. 77 FR 51540 - Medicare Program; Approved Renewal of Deeming Authority of the Accreditation Association for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... Authority of the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, Inc. for Medicare Advantage Health... Medicare Advantage ``deeming authority'' of the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, Inc... the Medicare program, eligible beneficiaries may receive covered services through a Medicare...

  10. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY ACCREDITATION CONFERENCE; CONSTITUTION, BYLAWS AND STANDARDS: APPROVED MAY 25, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    The principles and operating procedures for the National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference (NELAC) are contained in the NELAC Constitution and Bylaws. The major portion of this document (standards) contains detailed requirements for accrediting environmental labo...

  11. 75 FR 51464 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the American Association for Accreditation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities for Continued Deeming Authority for Ambulatory Surgical Centers AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). ACTION: Final notice... for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities' (AAAASF) request for continued recognition as...

  12. 76 FR 22709 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the American Association for Accreditation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities, Inc. for Deeming Authority for... decision to approve the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities...

  13. 77 FR 19290 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Renewal of Deeming Authority of the Accreditation Association for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Deeming Authority of the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, Inc. for Medicare Advantage... the Medicare Advantage ``deeming authority'' of the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health... covered services through a Medicare Advantage (MA) organization that contracts with CMS. The...

  14. Analysis and Countermeasures of the status of safety supervision of the road transport industry%道路运输行业安全监管现状分析及对策研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田明

    2015-01-01

    结合道路运输行业安全监管现状,从道路运输行业安全监管职责和内容、监管方式、安全检查方面对道路运输行业安全监管存在的问题进行分析,并有针对性的提出了相应的建议和对策。%Combined with the status of safety supervision of road transport industry, from the analysis of ex-isting safety supervision of the road transport industry in road transportation industry safety supervision re-sponsibilities and content, the way of supervision, security check, and puts forward the corresponding sug-gestions and countermeasures.

  15. 采矿业安全经济贡献率实证研究%Empirical Study on Contribution Rate of Safety Economy in Mining Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈林; 谭海霞; 王宏图; 吴军; 任唤林

    2011-01-01

    Safety investment is a safeguarding force to mining,and one of main reasons for the increased growth rate of Total Factor Productivity (TFP) as well, To figure out the contribntion of the safety investment to mining economic gnowth,a new production safety index system with six principal items was constructed. The study shows that safety level in China mining production was improved continuously more titan 17 times during 1991-2008. Then the co-integration theory and dynamic construction model was adopted to establish the mining economic growth model. The empirical results indicated that the investment of labor and capital are still major factors to promote economic growth of mining in our country. The production safety index not only contributed the short-term GDP growth of mining industry, but promoted the long-erm elasticity coefficient at 8.8%,%安全投入不仅是采矿业的保障要素,也是促进全要素增加率增长的重要因素.为了弄清安全投入对经济增长的贡献,构造了一个以6个分指标为基础的生产安全性指标体系,发现我国采矿业生产安全性水平在1991-2008年间提高了17倍多.并运用协整理论和动态建模方法建立了我国采矿业经济增长模型.结果表明,资本和劳动仍然是影响我国采矿业经济增长的主要因素,生产安全性指数在短期内拉动了采矿业GDP的增长,其长期拉动弹性系数为8.8%.

  16. Sustained use of an occupational sun safety program in a recreation industry: follow-up to a randomized trial on dissemination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, David B; Walkosz, Barbara J; Andersen, Peter A; Scott, Michael D; Cutter, Gary R

    2015-12-01

    The sustainability of evidence-based programs is needed to obtain long-term benefits. To assess sustainability of Go Sun Smart (GSS), an occupational skin cancer prevention program disseminated to the North American ski industry. Fifty-three of the 68 ski areas from the original dissemination trial participated in 2012 and 2013, 5 to 7 years after program distribution by enhanced or basic dissemination strategies. Sustained use was measured by: (1) on-site observation of sun protection communication and (2) an online survey with senior managers. In the sustainability assessment, sun safety communication had declined, and dissemination strategy did not affect continued use. Managers held weaker attitudes about skin cancer importance and program fit, but more managers provided free/reduced-cost sunscreen than in the dissemination trial. Manager turnover was a key factor in program discontinuance. Sustainability remains a challenge. Additional research is needed to determine the best strategies for sustainability. PMID:26622909

  17. Injuries and Safe Communities Accreditation: Is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinelnikov, Sergey; Friedman, Lee S; Chavez, Emily A

    2016-06-01

    Safe Communities (SC) is a global movement that brings together community stakeholders to collaboratively address injury concerns. SC accreditation is a formal process through which communities are recognized for strengthening local injury prevention capacity. Six million Americans live in 25 SC sites, but no research has been done to understand the model's potential impact on this population. This study explored the temporal relationship between SC accreditation and injury trends in three SC sites from the state of Illinois-Arlington Heights, Itasca, and New Lenox. Hospitalization data, including patient demographics, exposure information, injury outcomes, and economic variables, were obtained from a statewide hospital discharge database for a 12-year period (1999-2011). Joinpoint regression models were fitted to identify any periods of significant change, examine the direction of the injury trend, and to estimate monthly percent changes in injury counts and rates. Poisson random-intercept regression measured the average total change since the official SC accreditation for the three communities combined and compared them to three matched control sites. In joinpoint regression, one of the SC sites showed a 10-year increase in hospitalization cases and rates followed by a two-year decline, and the trend reversal occurred while the community was pursuing the SC accreditation. Injury hospitalizations decreased after accreditation compared to the pre-accreditation period when SC sites were compared to their control counterparts using Poisson modeling. Our findings suggest that the SC model may be a promising approach to reduce injuries. Further research is warranted to replicate these findings in other communities.

  18. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute process of accreditation according to the standards of the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Stefano; Di Turi, Annunziata; Caolo, Giuseppina; Pignatelli, Adriana C; Papa, Elena; Branca, Marta; Cerimele, Marina; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-01-01

    The accreditation process is, on the one hand, a tool used to homogenize procedures, rendering comparable and standardized processes of care, and on the other, a methodology employed to develop a culture of quality improvement. Although not yet proven by evidence-based studies that health outcomes improve as a result of an accreditation to excellence, it is undeniable that better control of healthcare processes results in better quality and safety of diagnostic and therapeutic pathways. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute underwent the accreditation process in accordance with the standards criteria set by the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI), and it has recently completed the process, acquiring its designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC). This was an invaluable opportunity for the Regina Elena Institute to create a more cohesive environment, to widely establish a culture of quality, to implement an institutional information system, and to accelerate the process of patient involvement in strategic decisions. The steps of the process allowed us to evaluate the performance and the organization of the institute and put amendments in place designed to be adopted through 26 improvement actions. These actions regarded several aspects of the institute, including quality culture, information communication technology system, care, clinical trials unit, disease management team, nursing, and patient empowerment and involvement. Each area has a timeline. We chose to present the following 3 improvement actions: clinical trial center, computerized ambulatory medical record, and centrality of patient and humanization of clinical pathway.

  19. Requirements for the accreditation of a calibration laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CNEA's activity in calibration is recent but it has a significant development. To assure high quality results, activity must be sustained and improved from day to day. The calibrations laboratory was accredited before Laboratories Qualification Committee, thus adding reliability to its results and making it more competitive when compared to other laboratories not accredited. Among other services given are supervision and follow up of calibrations in laboratories, participation in interlaboratory assays together with other calibration laboratories and assessments on calibration aspects of measuring equipment. (author)

  20. Establishing a clinical pharmacology fellowship program for physicians, pharmacists, and pharmacologists: a newly accredited interdisciplinary training program at the Ohio State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Phelps, Mitch A; Neidecker, Marjorie V; Apseloff, Glen

    2014-01-01

    Studying the effect of drugs on humans, clinical pharmacologists play an essential role in many academic medical and research teams, within the pharmaceutical industry and as members of government regulatory entities. Clinical pharmacology fellowship training programs should be multidisciplinary and adaptable, and should combine didactics, applied learning, independent study, and one-on-one instruction. This article describes a recently developed 2 year clinical pharmacology fellowship program - one of only nine accredited by the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology - that is an integrative, multi faceted, adaptable method for training physicians, pharmacists, and scientists for leadership roles in the pharmaceutical industry, in academia, or with regulatory or accreditation agencies. The purpose of this article is to provide information for academic clinicians and researchers interested in designing a similar program, for professionals in the field of clinical pharmacology who are already affiliated with a fellowship program and may benefit from supplemental information, and for clinical researchers interested in clinical pharmacology who may not be aware that such training opportunities exist. This article provides the details of a recently accredited program, including design, implementation, accreditation, trainee success, and future directions.