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Sample records for acclimated complex source

  1. Characterization of two diesel fuel degrading microbial consortia enriched from a non acclimated, complex source of microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varese Giovanna C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bioremediation of soils impacted by diesel fuels is very often limited by the lack of indigenous microflora with the required broad substrate specificity. In such cases, the soil inoculation with cultures with the desired catabolic capabilities (bioaugmentation is an essential option. The use of consortia of microorganisms obtained from rich sources of microbes (e.g., sludges, composts, manure via enrichment (i.e., serial growth transfers on the polluting hydrocarbons would provide bioremediation enhancements more robust and reproducible than those achieved with specialized pure cultures or tailored combinations (co-cultures of them, together with none or minor risks of soil loading with unrelated or pathogenic allocthonous microorganisms. Results In this work, two microbial consortia, i.e., ENZ-G1 and ENZ-G2, were enriched from ENZYVEBA (a complex commercial source of microorganisms on Diesel (G1 and HiQ Diesel (G2, respectively, and characterized in terms of microbial composition and hydrocarbon biodegradation capability and specificity. ENZ-G1 and ENZ-G2 exhibited a comparable and remarkable biodegradation capability and specificity towards n-C10 to n-C24 linear paraffins by removing about 90% of 1 g l-1 of diesel fuel applied after 10 days of aerobic shaken flask batch culture incubation at 30°C. Cultivation dependent and independent approaches evidenced that both consortia consist of bacteria belonging to the genera Chryseobacterium, Acinetobacter, Psudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Alcaligenes and Gordonia along with the fungus Trametes gibbosa. However, only the fungus was found to grow and remarkably biodegrade G1 and G2 hydrocarbons under the same conditions. The biodegradation activity and specificity and the microbial composition of ENZ-G1 and ENZ-G2 did not significantly change after cryopreservation and storage at -20°C for several months. Conclusions ENZ-G1 and ENZ-G2 are very similar highly enriched consortia

  2. Influence of sex, source, health status and acclimation on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of sex, source (pond and wild) acclimation and health status on some blood parameters of C. gariepinus was studied. There were no significant differences between the blood parameters (haemoglobin (Ht), packed cell volume (PCV), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), red blood cells (RBC), RBC indices ...

  3. Acclimation of denitrifying activated sludge to a single vs. complex external carbon source during a start-up of sequencing batch reactors treating ammonium-rich anaerobic sludge digester liquors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Luczkiewicz, Aneta; Majtacz, Joanna; Kowal, Przemyslaw; Jankowska, Katarzyna; Ciesielski, Slawomir; Pagilla, Krishna; Makinia, Jacek

    2014-11-01

    In this study, denitrification of ammonium-reach anaerobic sludge digester liquor was investigated during start-up periods of two laboratory-scale "fill-and-draw" reactors. One reactor was fed with a single carbon source (ethanol), whereas the other reactor was fed with a complex carbon source (fusel oil). During two acclimation experiments, the structure of microbial community involved in denitrification was analyzed using 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints and fluorescent in situ hybridization. The characteristics of the mixed liquor were additionally supported by regular measurements of nitrate uptake rates. The addition of fusel oil and ethanol resulted in a significant enhancement of the denitrification rate and efficiency combined with the increasing volumetric addition of sludge digester liquor up to 15 % of the reactor volume. The microbiological analyses revealed that the addition of sludge digester liquor as well as both external carbon sources (fusel oil and ethanol) did not affect the structure of microbial communities in a severe way. In both reactors, Curvibacter sp. and Azoarcus sp. were found as the most abundant representatives of denitrifiers.

  4. Intensification of the aerobic bioremediation of an actual site soil historically contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs through bioaugmentation with a non acclimated, complex source of microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fava Fabio

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biotreatability of actual-site polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB-contaminated soils is often limited by their poor content of autochthonous pollutant-degrading microorganisms. In such cases, inoculation might be the solution for a successful bioremediation. Some pure and mixed cultures of characterized PCB degrading bacteria have been tested to this purpose. However, several failures have been recorded mostly due to the inability of inoculated microbes to compete with autochthonous microflora and to face the toxicity and the scarcity of nutrients occurring in the contaminated biotope. Complex microbial systems, such as compost or sludge, normally consisting of a large variety of robust microorganisms and essential nutrients, would have better chances to succeed in colonizing degraded contaminated soils. However, such sources of microorganisms have been poorly applied in soil bioremediation and in particular in the biotreatment of soil with PCBs. Thus, in this study the effects of Enzyveba, i.e. a consortium of non-adapted microorganisms developed from composted material, on the slurry- and solid-phase aerobic bioremediation of an actual-site, aged PCB-contaminated soil were studied. Results A slow and only partial biodegradation of low-chlorinated biphenyls, along with a moderate depletion of initial soil ecotoxicity, were observed in the not-inoculated reactors. Enzyveba significantly increased the availability and the persistence of aerobic PCB- and chlorobenzoic acid-degrading cultivable bacteria in the bioreactors, in particular during the earlier phase of treatment. It also markedly enhanced PCB-biodegradation rate and extent (from 50 to 100% as well as the final soil detoxification, in particular under slurry-phase conditions. Taken together, data obtained suggest that Enzyveba enhanced the biotreatability of the selected soil by providing exogenous bacteria and fungi able to remove inhibitory or toxic intermediates of

  5. Cr(Vi) reduction capacity of activated sludge as affected by nitrogen and carbon sources, microbial acclimation and cell multiplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro Orozco, A.M., E-mail: mferro@cidca.org.ar [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Criotecnologia de Alimentos (CIDCA) CCT La Plata CONICET - Fac. de Cs. Exactas, UNLP. 47 y 116 (B1900AJJ) La Plata (Argentina); Contreras, E.M.; Zaritzky, N.E. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Criotecnologia de Alimentos (CIDCA) CCT La Plata CONICET - Fac. de Cs. Exactas, UNLP. 47 y 116 (B1900AJJ) La Plata (Argentina); Fac. de Ingenieria, UNLP. 47 y 1 (B1900AJJ) - La Plata (Argentina)

    2010-04-15

    The objectives of the present work were: (i) to analyze the capacity of activated sludge to reduce hexavalent chromium using different carbon sources as electron donors in batch reactors, (ii) to determine the relationship between biomass growth and the amount of Cr(VI) reduced considering the effect of the nitrogen to carbon source ratio, and (iii) to determine the effect of the Cr(VI) acclimation stage on the performance of the biological chromium reduction assessing the stability of the Cr(VI) reduction capacity of the activated sludge. The highest specific Cr(VI) removal rate (q{sub Cr}) was attained with cheese whey or lactose as electron donors decreasing in the following order: cheese whey {approx} lactose > glucose > citrate > acetate. Batch assays with different nitrogen to carbon source ratio demonstrated that biological Cr(VI) reduction is associated to the cell multiplication phase; as a result, maximum Cr(VI) removal rates occur when there is no substrate limitation. The biomass can be acclimated to the presence of Cr(VI) and generate new cells that maintain the ability to reduce chromate. Therefore, the activated sludge process could be applied to a continuous Cr(VI) removal process.

  6. Metabolic acclimation of source and sink tissues to salinity stress in bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Longxing; Chen, Liang; Liu, Li; Lou, Yanhong; Amombo, Erick; Fu, Jinmin

    2014-11-22

    Salinity is one of the major environmental factors affecting plant growth and survival by modifying source and sink relationships at physiological and metabolic levels. Individual metabolite levels and/or ratios in sink and source tissues may reflect the complex interplay of metabolic activities in sink and source tissues at the whole-plant level. We used a non-targeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) approach to study sink and source tissue-specific metabolite levels and ratios from bermudagrass under salinity stress. Shoot growth rate decreased while root growth rate increased which lead to an increased root/shoot growth rate ratio under salt stress. A clear shift in soluble sugars (sucrose, glucose and fructose) and metabolites linked to nitrogen metabolism (glutamate, aspartate and asparagine) in favor of sink roots was observed, when compared with sink and source leaves. The higher shifts in soluble sugars and metabolites linked to nitrogen metabolism in favor of sink roots may contribute to the root sink strength maintenance that facilitated the recovery of the functional equilibrium between shoot and root, allowing the roots to increase competitive ability for below-ground resource capture. This trait could be considered in breeding programs for increasing salt tolerance, which would help maintain root functioning (i.e. water and nutrient absorption, Na(+) exclusion) and adaptation to stress. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  7. Acclimation of the Global Transcriptome of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 to Nutrient Limitations and Different Nitrogen Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A

    2012-01-01

    The unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a model organism for laboratory-based studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and is a potential platform for biotechnological applications. Two of its most notable properties are its exceptional tolerance of high-light intensity and very rapid growth under optimal conditions. In this study, transcription profiling by RNAseq has been used to perform an integrated study of global changes in transcript levels in cells subjected to limitation for the major nutrients CO(2), nitrogen, sulfate, phosphate, and iron. Transcriptional patterns for cells grown on nitrate, ammonia, and urea were also studied. Nutrient limitation caused strong decreases of transcript levels of the genes encoding major metabolic pathways, especially for components of the photosynthetic apparatus, CO(2) fixation, and protein biosynthesis. Uptake mechanisms for the respective nutrients were strongly up-regulated. The transcription data further suggest that major changes in the composition of the NADH dehydrogenase complex occur upon nutrient limitation. Transcripts for flavoproteins increased strongly when CO(2) was limiting. Genes involved in protection from oxidative stress generally showed high, constitutive transcript levels, which possibly explains the high-light tolerance of this organism. The transcriptomes of cells grown with ammonia or urea as nitrogen source showed increased transcript levels for components of the CO(2) fixation machinery compared to cells grown with nitrate, but in general transcription differences in cells grown on different N-sources exhibited surprisingly minor differences.

  8. Acclimation of the global transcriptome of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 to nutrient limitations and different nitrogen sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eLudwig

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a model organism for laboratory-based studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and is a potential platform for biotechnological applications. Two of its most notable properties are its exceptional tolerance of high light intensity and very rapid growth under optimal conditions. In this study, transcription profiling by RNAseq has been used to perform an integrated study of global changes in transcript levels in cells subjected to limitation for the major nutrients CO2, nitrogen, sulfate, phosphate and iron. Transcriptional patterns for cells grown on nitrate, ammonia, and urea were also studied. Nutrient limitation caused strong decreases of transcript levels of the genes encoding major metabolic pathways, especially for components of the photosynthetic apparatus, CO2 fixation and protein biosynthesis. Uptake mechanisms for the respective nutrients were strongly up-regulated. The transcription data further suggest that major changes in the composition of the NADH dehydrogenase complex occur upon nutrient limitation. Transcripts for flavoproteins increased strongly when CO2 was limiting. Genes involved in protection from oxidative stress generally showed high, constitutive transcript levels, which possibly explains the high-light tolerance of this organism. The transcriptomes of cells grown with ammonia or urea as nitrogen source showed increased transcript levels for components of the CO2 fixation machinery compared to cells grown with nitrate, but in general transcription differences in cells grown on different N-sources exhibited surprisingly minor differences.

  9. Segregating complex sound sources through temporal coherence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Krishnan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new approach for the segregation of monaural sound mixtures is presented based on the principle of temporal coherence and using auditory cortical representations. Temporal coherence is the notion that perceived sources emit coherently modulated features that evoke highly-coincident neural response patterns. By clustering the feature channels with coincident responses and reconstructing their input, one may segregate the underlying source from the simultaneously interfering signals that are uncorrelated with it. The proposed algorithm requires no prior information or training on the sources. It can, however, gracefully incorporate cognitive functions and influences such as memories of a target source or attention to a specific set of its attributes so as to segregate it from its background. Aside from its unusual structure and computational innovations, the proposed model provides testable hypotheses of the physiological mechanisms of this ubiquitous and remarkable perceptual ability, and of its psychophysical manifestations in navigating complex sensory environments.

  10. SOURCES OF FINANCING INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzhela Zakhitovna Namitulina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject article is relevant because It is devoted to description of sources of financing of defense enterprises and peculiarities of selection of sources of financing enterprises of the military-industrial complex. In the first part of the article provides an overview of the financial resources and types of funding organizations and enterprises. Description of modern methods of creating a climate for innovation, supporting innovative ideas, and domestic entrepreneurship. The second part of the article describes the direction, the form of financing for companies, taking into account the peculiarities of the development and operation of defense enterprises. The first phase of the study was to identify the main sources of financing for companies in difficult socio-economic conditions of the potential customer of defense products. The second phase of the study was to determine the ranking factors the use of different sources of funding and its impact on the development of enterprises. The presented research topic is particularly relevant in connection with an increase in the role of sources of financing development of the industry for the growth of innovation activity of enterprises. The urgency of acquiring those aspects of economic relations that with the financing of new projects enterprises of the defense-industrial complex, the financing of the state defense order. In today's economic environment has the need to address financial security of the defense-industrial complex, to attract new sources of funding, development of bank lending in the defense sector and the participation of banks in the financing of projects of the enterprises of the military-industrial complex. The processes of market transformation of enterprises of the military-industrial complex (MIC have acquired a special significance in relation to defining the role of these enterprises in the country and providing security to the complexity of their adaptation to market

  11. Quantitative estimation of source complexity in tsunami-source inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Jan; Cummins, Phil R.; Hawkins, Rhys; Jakir Hossen, M.

    2016-04-01

    This work analyses tsunami waveforms to infer the spatiotemporal evolution of sea-surface displacement (the tsunami source) caused by earthquakes or other sources. Since the method considers sea-surface displacement directly, no assumptions about the fault or seafloor deformation are required. While this approach has no ability to study seismic aspects of rupture, it greatly simplifies the tsunami source estimation, making it much less dependent on subjective fault and deformation assumptions. This results in a more accurate sea-surface displacement evolution in the source region. The spatial discretization is by wavelet decomposition represented by a trans-D Bayesian tree structure. Wavelet coefficients are sampled by a reversible jump algorithm and additional coefficients are only included when required by the data. Therefore, source complexity is consistent with data information (parsimonious) and the method can adapt locally in both time and space. Since the source complexity is unknown and locally adapts, no regularization is required, resulting in more meaningful displacement magnitudes. By estimating displacement uncertainties in a Bayesian framework we can study the effect of parametrization choice on the source estimate. Uncertainty arises from observation errors and limitations in the parametrization to fully explain the observations. As a result, parametrization choice is closely related to uncertainty estimation and profoundly affects inversion results. Therefore, parametrization selection should be included in the inference process. Our inversion method is based on Bayesian model selection, a process which includes the choice of parametrization in the inference process and makes it data driven. A trans-dimensional (trans-D) model for the spatio-temporal discretization is applied here to include model selection naturally and efficiently in the inference by sampling probabilistically over parameterizations. The trans-D process results in better

  12. Stochastic electromagnetic radiation of complex sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.W.L.

    2007-01-01

    The emission of electromagnetic radiation by localized complex electric charge and current distributions is studied. A statistical formalism in terms of general dynamical multipole fields is developed. The appearing coefficients are treated as stochastic variables. Hereby as much as possible a

  13. Low Complexity Bayesian Single Channel Source Separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beierholm, Thomas; Pedersen, Brian Dam; Winther, Ole

    2004-01-01

    . Simulations with separation of a male and a female speaker using priors trained on the same speakers show comparable performance with the blind separation approach of G.-J. Jang and T.-W. Lee (see NIPS, vol.15, 2003) with a SNR improvement of 4.9 dB for both the male and female speaker. Mixing coefficients...... keeping the complexity low using machine learning and CASA (computational auditory scene analysis) approaches (Jang and Lee, 2003; Roweis, S.T., 2001; Wang, D.L. and Brown, G.J., 1999; Hu, G. and Wang, D., 2003)....

  14. Complex space source theory of spatially localized electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Seshadri, SR

    2013-01-01

    The author highlights that there is a need obtain exact full-wave solutions that reduce to the paraxial beams in the appropriate limit. Complex Space Source Theory of Spatially Localized Electromagnetic Waves treats the exact full-wave generalizations of all the basic types of paraxial beam solutions. These are developed by the use of Fourier and Bessel transform techniques and the complex space source theory of spatially localized electromagnetic waves is integrated as a branch of Fourier optics.

  15. Foliar temperature acclimation reduces simulated carbon sensitivity to climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas G.; Malyshev, Sergey L.; Shevliakova, Elena; Kattge, Jens; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2016-04-01

    Plant photosynthesis and respiration are the largest carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere, and their parameterizations represent large sources of uncertainty in projections of land carbon uptake in Earth system models (ESMs). The incorporation of temperature acclimation of photosynthesis and foliar respiration, commonly observed processes, into ESMs has been proposed as a way to reduce this uncertainty. Here we show that, across 15 flux tower sites spanning multiple biomes at various locations worldwide (10° S-67° N), acclimation parameterizations improve a model's ability to reproduce observed net ecosystem exchange of CO2. This improvement is most notable in tropical biomes, where photosynthetic acclimation increased model performance by 36%. The consequences of acclimation for simulated terrestrial carbon uptake depend on the process, region and time period evaluated. Globally, including acclimation has a net effect of increasing carbon assimilation and storage, an effect that diminishes with time, but persists well into the future. Our results suggest that land models omitting foliar temperature acclimation are likely to overestimate the temperature sensitivity of terrestrial carbon exchange, thus biasing projections of future carbon storage and estimates of policy indicators such as the transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions.

  16. Optimal localization of diffusion sources in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhao-Long; Han, Xiao; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Locating sources of diffusion and spreading from minimum data is a significant problem in network science with great applied values to the society. However, a general theoretical framework dealing with optimal source localization is lacking. Combining the controllability theory for complex networks and compressive sensing, we develop a framework with high efficiency and robustness for optimal source localization in arbitrary weighted networks with arbitrary distribution of sources. We offer a minimum output analysis to quantify the source locatability through a minimal number of messenger nodes that produce sufficient measurement for fully locating the sources. When the minimum messenger nodes are discerned, the problem of optimal source localization becomes one of sparse signal reconstruction, which can be solved using compressive sensing. Application of our framework to model and empirical networks demonstrates that sources in homogeneous and denser networks are more readily to be located. A surprising finding is that, for a connected undirected network with random link weights and weak noise, a single messenger node is sufficient for locating any number of sources. The framework deepens our understanding of the network source localization problem and offers efficient tools with broad applications. PMID:28484635

  17. Photosynthetic acclimation responses of maize seedlings grown under artificial laboratory light gradients mimicking natural canopy conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias eHirth

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we assessed the ability of the C4 plant maize to perform long-term photosynthetic acclimation in an artificial light quality system previously used for analysing short-term and long-term acclimation responses (LTR in C3 plants. We aimed to test if this light system could be used as a tool for analysing redox-regulated acclimation processes in maize seedlings. Photosynthetic parameters obtained from maize samples harvested in the field were used as control. The results indicated that field grown maize performed a pronounced LTR with significant differences between the top and the bottom levels of the plant stand corresponding to the strong light gradients occurring in it. We compared these data to results obtained from maize seedlings grown under artificial light sources preferentially exciting either photosystem II or photosystem I. In C3 plants, this light system induces redox signals within the photosynthetic electron transport chain which trigger state transitions and differential phosphorylation of light harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHCII. The LTR to these redox signals induces changes in the accumulation of plastid psaA transcripts, in chlorophyll (Chl fluorescence values Fs/Fm, in Chl a/b ratios and in transient starch accumulation in C3 plants. Maize seedlings grown in this light system exhibited a pronounced ability to perform both short-term and long-term acclimation at the level of psaA transcripts, Chl fluorescence values Fs/Fm and Chl a/b ratios. Interestingly, maize seedlings did not exhibit redox-controlled variations of starch accumulation probably because of its specific differences in energy metabolism. In summary, the artificial laboratory light system was found to be well-suited to mimic field light conditions and provides a physiological tool for studying the molecular regulation of the LTR of maize in more detail.

  18. On the source inversion of fugitive surface layer releases. Part II. Complex sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfélix, V.; Escrig, A.; López-Lilao, A.; Celades, I.; Monfort, E.

    2017-06-01

    The experimental measurement of fugitive emissions of particulate matter entails inherent complexity because they are usually discontinuous, of short duration, may be mobile, and are affected by weather conditions. Owing to this complexity, instead of experimental measurements, emission factors are used to inventory such emissions. Unfortunately, emission factor datasets are still very limited at present and are insufficient to identify problematic operations and appropriately select control measures. To extend these datasets, a source inversion methodology (described in Part I of this work) was applied to field campaigns in which operation-specific fugitive particulate matter emission factors were determined for several complex fugitive sources, some of which were mobile. Mobile sources were treated as a superposition of instantaneous sources. The experimental campaigns were conducted at ports (bulk solids terminals), aggregate quarries, and cement factories, encompassing powder handling operations and vehicle circulation on paved and unpaved roads. Emission factors were derived for the operations and materials involved in these scenarios and compared with those available in the emission factor compilations. Significant differences were observed between the emission factors obtained in the studied handling operations. These differences call into question the use of generic emission factors and highlight the need for more detailed studies in this field.

  19. Costs and benefits of cold acclimation in field released Drosophila – Associating laboratory and field results.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Johannes; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; A. Hoffmann, Ary

    2008-01-01

    using the ability of field released Drosophila melanogaster to find a resource as a proxy of fitness. Measurements were carried out on two continents across a range of temperatures. Cold acclimation improved the flies' ability to find resources at low temperatures. However, this came at a cost at higher......Physiological and evolutionary responses to thermal variation are often investigated under controlled laboratory conditions. However, this approach may fail to account for the complexity of natural environments. Here we investigated the costs and benefits of developmental or adult cold acclimation...... temperatures where cold acclimated flies were up to 36 times less likely to find a resource under warm conditions. These costs were not detected in standard laboratory tests but indicate that physiological acclimation may improve fitness only over a narrow set of thermal conditions while it may have...

  20. Deposition parameterizations for the Industrial Source Complex (ISC3) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesely, Marvin L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Doskey, Paul V. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shannon, J. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Improved algorithms have been developed to simulate the dry and wet deposition of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) with the Industrial Source Complex version 3 (ISC3) model system. The dry deposition velocities (concentrations divided by downward flux at a specified height) of the gaseous HAPs are modeled with algorithms adapted from existing dry deposition modules. The dry deposition velocities are described in a conventional resistance scheme, for which micrometeorological formulas are applied to describe the aerodynamic resistances above the surface. Pathways to uptake at the ground and in vegetative canopies are depicted with several resistances that are affected by variations in air temperature, humidity, solar irradiance, and soil moisture. The role of soil moisture variations in affecting the uptake of gases through vegetative plant leaf stomata is assessed with the relative available soil moisture, which is estimated with a rudimentary budget of soil moisture content. Some of the procedures and equations are simplified to be commensurate with the type and extent of information on atmospheric and surface conditions available to the ISC3 model system user. For example, standardized land use types and seasonal categories provide sets of resistances to uptake by various components of the surface. To describe the dry deposition of the large number of gaseous organic HAPS, a new technique based on laboratory study results and theoretical considerations has been developed providing a means of evaluating the role of lipid solubility in uptake by the waxy outer cuticle of vegetative plant leaves.

  1. Cold acclimation in eucalypt hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, M. H.; Chaves, M. M.; Silva, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated cold resistance and the capacity for cold acclimation of different Eucalyptus genotypes. Seedlings of half-sib families of E. globulus and hybrids E. gunnii x globulus, E. viminalis x globulus and E. cypellocarpa x globulus were exposed daily for 56 days to a 9-h photoperiod at 14.7 degrees C, followed by 15 h in a dark cold room maintained at 2.5 degrees C with the root system maintained at 8 degrees C to cold harden the seedlings. Unhardened seedlings were maintained at about 16 degrees C during the dark period. Cold acclimation occurred in all families with decreases in the temperature causing 50% mortality (LT(50)) of between 1.5 and 3 degrees C. Both hardened and unhardened plants of hybrid families were more cold tolerant than E. globulus. A significant correlation between LT(50) and leaf osmotic pressure was observed; the increase in osmotic pressure in hardened plants was predominantly a result of an increase in the concentration of soluble sugars. Exotherm peaks were similar in hardened and unhardened plants. These results indicate that cold hardening increased the ability of eucalypts to endure extracellular ice formation. The maintenance of photosynthetic capacity in cold-hardened plants may also play a role in their response to freezing.

  2. Effect of operational strategies on activated sludge’s acclimation to phenol, subsequent aerobic granulation, and accumulation of polyhydoxyalkanoates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wosman, Afrida; Lu, Yuhao; Sun, Supu; Liu, Xiang [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Yangpu District, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Wan, Chunli, E-mail: hitwan@163.com [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Yangpu District, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Zhang, Yi, E-mail: sybil_zhang@yahoo.com [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Yangpu District, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Lee, Duu-Jong [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tay, JooHwa [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Activated sludge was acclimated to phenol with 2 different strategies. • Acclimated sludge later underwent aerobic granulation process. • Sludge acclimated with phenol only degraded phenol and formed granules faster. • Sludge acclimated with phenol + acetate formed more stable and robust granules. • Both sludge exhibited significant PHA accumulation in early granulation stage. - Abstract: Aerobic granules, a relative novel form of microbial aggregate, are capable of degrading many toxic organic pollutants. Appropriate strategy is needed to acclimate seed sludge to the toxic compounds for successful granulation. In this study, two distinct strategies, i.e. mixed or single carbon sources, were experimented to obtain phenol-acclimated sludge. Their effects on reactor performance, biomass characteristics, microbial population and the granulation process were analyzed. Sludge fed with phenol alone exhibited faster acclimation and earlier appearance of granules, but possibly lower microbial diversity and reactor stability. Using a mixture of acetate and phenol in the acclimation stage, on the other hand, led to a reactor with slower phenol degradation and granulation, but eventual formation of strong and stable aerobic granules. In addition, the content of intracellular polyhydoxyakanoates (PHA) was also monitored, and significant accumulation was observed during the pre-granulation stage, where PHA >50% of dry weight was observed in both reactors.

  3. Complex decision making as a source of infotainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Korthagen (Iris)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract In many policy processes nowadays a variety of actors is involved which results in complex decision making processes, since these different actors have various perspectives on the problem and the matching solutions. Such complex processes are difficult to grasp in short reports

  4. The Effect of Contractual Complexity on Technology Sourcing Agreements

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Zeynep; Higgins, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    Most research on strategic alliances ignores the underlying contracts that govern the terms of the relationship. This is problematic since it is how these contracts are structured that determines how firms will benefit from a relationship. We present a novel method to analyze contractual complexity in a multi-dimensional framework in an attempt to link together the contractual complexity and control rights literatures. We find that the stage of development, age and prevalence of the underl...

  5. Bacterial Acclimation Inside an Aqueous Battery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexian Dong

    Full Text Available Specific environmental stresses may lead to induced genomic instability in bacteria, generating beneficial mutants and potentially accelerating the breeding of industrial microorganisms. The environmental stresses inside the aqueous battery may be derived from such conditions as ion shuttle, pH gradient, free radical reaction and electric field. In most industrial and medical applications, electric fields and direct currents are used to kill bacteria and yeast. However, the present study focused on increasing bacterial survival inside an operating battery. Using a bacterial acclimation strategy, both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis were acclimated for 10 battery operation cycles and survived in the battery for over 3 days. The acclimated bacteria changed in cell shape, growth rate and colony color. Further analysis indicated that electrolyte concentration could be one of the major factors determining bacterial survival inside an aqueous battery. The acclimation process significantly improved the viability of both bacteria E. coli and B. subtilis. The viability of acclimated strains was not affected under battery cycle conditions of 0.18-0.80 mA cm(-2 and 1.4-2.1 V. Bacterial addition within 1.0×10(10 cells mL(-1 did not significantly affect battery performance. Because the environmental stress inside the aqueous battery is specific, the use of this battery acclimation strategy may be of great potential for the breeding of industrial microorganisms.

  6. Bacterial Acclimation Inside an Aqueous Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dexian; Chen, Baoling; Chen, P

    2015-01-01

    Specific environmental stresses may lead to induced genomic instability in bacteria, generating beneficial mutants and potentially accelerating the breeding of industrial microorganisms. The environmental stresses inside the aqueous battery may be derived from such conditions as ion shuttle, pH gradient, free radical reaction and electric field. In most industrial and medical applications, electric fields and direct currents are used to kill bacteria and yeast. However, the present study focused on increasing bacterial survival inside an operating battery. Using a bacterial acclimation strategy, both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis were acclimated for 10 battery operation cycles and survived in the battery for over 3 days. The acclimated bacteria changed in cell shape, growth rate and colony color. Further analysis indicated that electrolyte concentration could be one of the major factors determining bacterial survival inside an aqueous battery. The acclimation process significantly improved the viability of both bacteria E. coli and B. subtilis. The viability of acclimated strains was not affected under battery cycle conditions of 0.18-0.80 mA cm(-2) and 1.4-2.1 V. Bacterial addition within 1.0×10(10) cells mL(-1) did not significantly affect battery performance. Because the environmental stress inside the aqueous battery is specific, the use of this battery acclimation strategy may be of great potential for the breeding of industrial microorganisms.

  7. Plasma clearance of cadmium and zinc in non-acclimated and metal-acclimated trout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, M. Jasim; Grosell, M.; McDonald, D.G.; Wood, C.M

    2003-08-20

    Adult rainbow trout were pre-exposed to a sublethal concentration of waterborne cadmium (Cd, 26.7 nmol/l) or waterborne zinc (Zn, 2294 nmol/l) for 30 days to induce acclimation. A single dose of radiolabeled Cd (64.4 nmol/kg) or Zn (183.8 nmol/kg) was injected into the vascular system of non-acclimated and Cd- or Zn-acclimated trout through indwelling arterial catheters. Subsequently, repetitive blood samples over 10 h and terminal tissue samples (liver, heart, bile, stomach, intestine, kidney, gills, muscle, and spleen) were taken to characterize the effect of metal acclimation on clearance kinetics in vivo. Plasma clearance of Cd in Cd-acclimated fish (0.726{+-}0.015 and 0.477{+-}0.012 ml/min per kg for total and newly accumulated Cd, respectively), was faster than that in non-acclimated trout (0.493{+-}0.013 and 0.394{+-}0.009 ml/min per kg). Unlike plasma Cd, the levels of Cd in red blood cells (RBCs) were 1.2-2.2 times higher in Cd-acclimated fish than in non-acclimated fish. At 10 h post-injection, the liver accumulated the highest proportion ({approx}22%) of the injected Cd dose in both non-acclimated and Cd-acclimated fish but did not account for the difference in plasma levels of Cd between two groups. Plasma clearance of Zn ({approx}0.23 ml/min per kg for new Zn) was substantially lower than Cd clearance. Pre-acclimation to waterborne Zn reduced the new Zn levels in RBCs, but did not affect the clearance of Zn from blood plasma or tissue burdens of Zn in fish. Bile concentrations of both Cd and Zn were elevated in acclimated fish, but total bile burden accounted for <1% of the injected metal dose. The results suggest that the detoxification process of injected plasma Cd is stimulated by pre-acclimation to waterborne Cd, and that Zn levels are homeostatically controlled in both non-acclimated and acclimated trout.

  8. Effects of copper, hypoxia and acute temperature shifts on mitochondrial oxidation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to warm temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sappal, Ravinder [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Fast, Mark [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada); Siah, Ahmed [British Columbia Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences, 871A Island Highway, Campbell River, British Columbia V9W 2C2 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Warm acclimation reduced the electron transport system (ETS) efficiency. • Warm acclimation altered the effects of acute temperature shift, hypoxia and Cu on ETS. • Warm acclimation increased thermal sensitivity of state 3 and reduced that of state 4. • Cu stimulated while hypoxia inhibited ETS respiratory activity. • Interactions of Cu and hypoxia on the ETS and plasma metabolites were antagonistic. - Abstract: Temperature fluctuations, hypoxia and metals pollution frequently occur simultaneously or sequentially in aquatic systems and their interactions may confound interpretation of their biological impacts. With a focus on energy homeostasis, the present study examined how warm acclimation influences the responses and interactions of acute temperature shift, hypoxia and copper (Cu) exposure in fish. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were acclimated to cold (11 °C; control) and warm (20 °C) temperature for 3 weeks followed by exposure to environmentally realistic levels of Cu and hypoxia for 24 h. Subsequently, mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) respiratory activity supported by complexes I–IV (CI–IV), plasma metabolites and condition indices were measured. Warm acclimation reduced fish condition, induced aerobic metabolism and altered the responses of fish to acute temperature shift, hypoxia and Cu. Whereas warm acclimation decelerated the ETS and increased the sensitivity of maximal oxidation rates of the proximal (CI and II) complexes to acute temperature shift, it reduced the thermal sensitivity of state 4 (proton leak). Effects of Cu with and without hypoxia were variable depending on the acclimation status and functional index. Notably, Cu stimulated respiratory activity in the proximal ETS segments, while hypoxia was mostly inhibitory and minimized the stimulatory effect of Cu. The effects of Cu and hypoxia were modified by temperature and showed reciprocal antagonistic interaction on the ETS and plasma

  9. Branchial ionocyte organization and ion-transport protein expression in juvenile alewives acclimated to freshwater or seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, A.K.; Hiroi, J.; Schultz, E.T.; McCormick, S.D.

    2012-01-01

    The alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) is a clupeid that undergoes larval and juvenile development in freshwater preceding marine habitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate osmoregulatory mechanisms in alewives that permit homeostasis in different salinities. To this end, we measured physiological, branchial biochemical and cellular responses in juvenile alewives acclimated to freshwater (0.5p.p.t.) or seawater (35.0p.p.t.). Plasma chloride concentration was higher in seawater-acclimated than freshwater-acclimated individuals (141mmoll -1 vs 134mmoll -1), but the hematocrit remained unchanged. In seawateracclimated individuals, branchial Na +/K +-ATPase (NKA) activity was higher by 75%. Western blot analysis indicated that the abundance of the NKA subunit and a Na+/K+/2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1) were greater in seawater-acclimated individuals by 40% and 200%, respectively. NKA and NKCC1 were localized on the basolateral surface and tubular network of ionocytes in both acclimation groups. Immunohistochemical labeling for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was restricted to the apical crypt of ionocytes in seawater-acclimated individuals, whereas sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 (NHE3) labeling was present on the apical surface of ionocytes in both acclimation groups. Ionocytes were concentrated on the trailing edge of the gill filament, evenly distributed along the proximal 75% of the filamental axis and reduced distally. Ionocyte size and number on the gill filament were not affected by salinity; however, the number of lamellar ionocytes was significantly lower in seawater-acclimated fish. Confocal z-series reconstructions revealed that mature ionocytes in seawater-acclimated alewives occurred in multicellular complexes. These complexes might reduce paracellular Na + resistance, hence facilitating Na+ extrusion in hypo-osmoregulating juvenile alewives after seaward migration. ?? 2012. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Losing the boxes: fragmentation as a source of system complexity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baumbach, J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available . This paper, which looks at systems containing people, argues that the use of transdisciplinary approaches will aid in the insight and comprehension of complex problems. It will also be shown that the inclusion of subjective and inter-subjective system aspects...

  11. Complexity measures and information planes of x-ray astrophysical sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovallo, Michele; Telesca, Luciano

    2011-03-01

    The complex dynamics of x-ray astrophysical sources is investigated by analyzing their daily light curves in four different energy bands by using three information-theoretic measures: Fisher information measure, the Shannon entropy and the disequilibrium. The obtained results suggest a universal complex behavior in the x-ray light, independent of the source and of the energy band.

  12. Interferência de diferentes métodos de aclimatação na sobrevivência de pós-larvas de Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931 - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v31i1.307 Survival of acclimated Litopenaeus vannamei postlarvae associated with acclimation method, time and water sources - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v31i1.307

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Nilson Mendes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Observou-se o impacto de três métodos de aclimatação na sobrevivência de PL10 de L. vannamei (choque direto, diluição gradativa e gotejamento, utilizando-se águas oligohalina e doce. Para verificar alterações estruturais nas brânquias das PLs aclimatadas por gotejamento, realizaram-se análises histopatológicas e histoquímicas. A correlação entre a sobrevivência, método e tempo de aclimatação e tipos de água foram analisados usando Modelos Lineares Generalizados (p The effects of different acclimation methods to freshwater and oligohalin water on L. vannamei postlarvae (PL10 survival and gills histologic and histochemical studies were analysed. Three methods of acclimation were used: direct shock, gradual diluition and dripping. Three General Linear Models and Stepwise process (p10 showed short primary filaments and rare secundary filaments. The PL16 had primary elongated filaments and secundary filaments reaching over the prolongament of the primary filament. The APS method showed a negative result and the Alcian Blue method showed positive reaction to acidglicoproteins and acidglicosaminoglicans in all postlarvae gills. The acclimation did not change the morphology of branchiae. Recommended time to acclimation of L. vannamei to freshwater was 48h by dripping and can be started at the PL10 stage.

  13. Cognitive Complexity of Mathematics Instructional Tasks in a Taiwanese Classroom: An Examination of Task Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Yu; Silver, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    We examined geometric calculation with number tasks used within a unit of geometry instruction in a Taiwanese classroom, identifying the source of each task used in classroom instruction and analyzing the cognitive complexity of each task with respect to 2 distinct features: diagram complexity and problem-solving complexity. We found that…

  14. Thermal acclimation in rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax, leads to faster myotomal muscle contractile properties and improved swimming performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Woytanowski

    2013-01-01

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax display an impressive ability to acclimate to very cold water temperatures. These fish express both anti-freeze proteins and glycerol in their plasma, liver, muscle and other tissues to avoid freezing at sub-zero temperatures. Maintenance of glycerol levels requires active feeding in very cold water. To understand how these fish can maintain activity at cold temperatures, we explored thermal acclimation by the myotomal muscle of smelt exposed to cold water. We hypothesized that cold-acclimated fish would show enhanced swimming ability due to shifts in muscle contractile properties. We also predicted that shifts in swimming performance would be associated with changes in the expression patterns of muscle proteins such as parvalbumin (PV and myosin heavy chain (MyHC. Swimming studies show significantly faster swimming by smelt acclimated to 5°C compared to fish acclimated to 20°C when tested at a common test temperature of 10°C. The cold-acclimated fish also had faster muscle contractile properties, such as a maximum shortening velocity (Vmax almost double that of warm-acclimated fish at the same test temperature. Cold-acclimation is associated with a modest increase in PV levels in the swimming muscle. Fluorescence microscopy using anti-MyHC antibodies suggests that MyHC expression in the myotomal muscle may shift in response to exposure to cold water. The complex set of physiological responses that comprise cold-acclimation in smelt includes modifications in muscle function to permit active locomotion in cold water.

  15. Thermal acclimation in rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax, leads to faster myotomal muscle contractile properties and improved swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woytanowski, John R; Coughlin, David J

    2013-03-15

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) display an impressive ability to acclimate to very cold water temperatures. These fish express both anti-freeze proteins and glycerol in their plasma, liver, muscle and other tissues to avoid freezing at sub-zero temperatures. Maintenance of glycerol levels requires active feeding in very cold water. To understand how these fish can maintain activity at cold temperatures, we explored thermal acclimation by the myotomal muscle of smelt exposed to cold water. We hypothesized that cold-acclimated fish would show enhanced swimming ability due to shifts in muscle contractile properties. We also predicted that shifts in swimming performance would be associated with changes in the expression patterns of muscle proteins such as parvalbumin (PV) and myosin heavy chain (MyHC). Swimming studies show significantly faster swimming by smelt acclimated to 5°C compared to fish acclimated to 20°C when tested at a common test temperature of 10°C. The cold-acclimated fish also had faster muscle contractile properties, such as a maximum shortening velocity (Vmax) almost double that of warm-acclimated fish at the same test temperature. Cold-acclimation is associated with a modest increase in PV levels in the swimming muscle. Fluorescence microscopy using anti-MyHC antibodies suggests that MyHC expression in the myotomal muscle may shift in response to exposure to cold water. The complex set of physiological responses that comprise cold-acclimation in smelt includes modifications in muscle function to permit active locomotion in cold water.

  16. Dynamic Acclimation to High Light in Arabidopsis thaliana Involves Widespread Reengineering of the Leaf Proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. E. Miller

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana transferred from low to high light increase their capacity for photosynthesis, a process of dynamic acclimation. A mutant, gpt2, lacking a chloroplast glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate translocator, is deficient in its ability to acclimate to increased light. Here, we have used a label-free proteomics approach, to perform relative quantitation of 1993 proteins from Arabidopsis wild type and gpt2 leaves exposed to increased light. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006598. Acclimation to light is shown to involve increases in electron transport and carbon metabolism but no change in the abundance of photosynthetic reaction centers. The gpt2 mutant shows a similar increase in total protein content to wild type but differences in the extent of change of certain proteins, including in the relative abundance of the cytochrome b6f complex and plastocyanin, the thylakoid ATPase and selected Benson-Calvin cycle enzymes. Changes in leaf metabolite content as plants acclimate can be explained by changes in the abundance of enzymes involved in metabolism, which were reduced in gpt2 in some cases. Plants of gpt2 invest more in stress-related proteins, suggesting that their reduced ability to acclimate photosynthetic capacity results in increased stress.

  17. Wave field synthesis of moving virtual sound sources with complex radiation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Jens; Spors, Sascha

    2011-11-01

    An approach to the synthesis of moving virtual sound sources with complex radiation properties in wave field synthesis is presented. The approach exploits the fact that any stationary sound source of finite spatial extent radiates spherical waves at sufficient distance. The angular dependency of the radiation properties of the source under consideration is reflected by the amplitude and phase distribution on the spherical wave fronts. The sound field emitted by a uniformly moving monopole source is derived and the far-field radiation properties of the complex virtual source under consideration are incorporated in order to derive a closed-form expression for the loudspeaker driving signal. The results are illustrated via numerical simulations of the synthesis of the sound field of a sample moving complex virtual source.

  18. Characterization of Medicago populations under cold acclimation by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... Root to shoot ratios of acclimated and non acclimated plants were compared. Among the .... estimation of variability for cold stress adaptations. ..... maize seedlings as determined by root morphology and .... China 9(2):142-146.

  19. Effects of heat acclimation on time perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Maria; Jakobson, Ainika; Havik, Merle; Timpmann, Saima; Burk, Andres; Ööpik, Vahur; Allik, Jüri; Kreegipuu, Kairi

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive performance is impaired during prolonged exercise in hot environment compared to temperate conditions. These effects are related to both peripheral markers of heats stress and alterations in CNS functioning. Repeated-exposure to heat stress results in physiological adaptations, and therefore improvement in exercise capacity and cognitive functioning are observed. The objective of the current study was to clarify the factors contributing to time perception under heat stress and examine the effect of heat acclimation. 20 young healthy male subjects completed three exercise tests on a treadmill: H1 (at 60% VO(2)peak until exhaustion at 42°C), N (at 22°C; duration equal to H1) and H2 (walk until exhaustion at 42°C) following a 10-day heat acclimation program. Core temperature (T(C)) and heart rate (HR), ratings of perceived fatigue and exertion were obtained continuously during the exercise, and blood samples of hormones were taken before, during and after the exercise test for estimating the prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol response to acute exercise-heat stress. Interval production task was performed before, during and after the exercise test. Lower rate of rise in core temperature, heart rate, hormone response and subjective ratings indicated that the subjects had successfully acclimated. Before heat acclimation, significant distortions in produced intervals occurred after 60 minutes of exercise relative to pre-trial coefficients, indicating speeded temporal processing. However, this effect was absent after in acclimated subjects. Blood prolactin concentration predicted temporal performance in both conditions. Heat acclimation slows down the increase in physiological measures, and improvement in temporal processing is also evident. The results are explained within the internal clock model in terms of the pacemaker-accumulator functioning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of Medicago populations under cold acclimation by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... Moreover, there were differences between populations of the same species of cold acclimation, which will encourage for a study of association between cold acclimation and molecular polymorphism. Key words: Cold acclimation, root: shoot ratios, molecular polymorphism, annuals populations, Medicago.

  1. Optimising the acquisition and retention of heat acclimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Jonkman, A.G.; Layden, J.D.; Linnane, D.M.; Weller, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Heat acclimation (HA) often starts in a moderately hot environment to prevent thermal overload and stops immediately prior to athletic activities. The aims of this study were 1) to establish whether acclimation to a moderately hot climate is sufficient to provide full acclimation for extreme heat

  2. Density of state in a complex random matrix theory with external source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikami, S. [Department of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Komaba, Tokyo (Japan); Pnini, R. [Department of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Komaba, Tokyo (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Cooperation (Japan)

    1998-09-04

    The density of state for a complex NxN random matrix coupled to an external deterministic source is considered for a finite N, and a compact expression in an integral representation is obtained. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  3. Complex source point theory of paraxial and nonparaxial cosine-Gauss and Bessel-Gauss beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Colin J R

    2013-02-15

    It shown how cosine-Gauss and Bessel-Gauss beams can be generated using the complex source point theory. Paraxial beams are treated first. An analytic expression is derived for the nonparaxial cosine-Gaussian beam, based on the complex source point approach, and numerical results are presented to illustrate its behavior. A way to generate nonparaxial Bessel-Gauss beams is also indicated.

  4. Dealing with information about complex issues : the role of source perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mors, Emma ter

    2009-01-01

    This thesis focuses on how the way people deal with information about complex issues depends of their perceptions of sources that provide the relevant information. The complex issue under consideration throughout this thesis is that of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS). In short, CCS involves

  5. Virtues of acclimated microbial cultures in wastewater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main take-home message from this paper is two-pronged: 1) BOD tests on recalcitrant wastewater must be done using acclimated seed cultures, and 2) the assessment of the strength of recalcitrant or toxic wastewater must be based on both BOD and COD tests. Journal of Building and Land Development Vol.

  6. Complex Evaluation of Light Sources in Case of Electric Power Cost Increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Kolesnik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives complex evaluation of efficiency of incandescent lamps, luminescent and light-emitting-diode (LED light sources in case of electric power price increase. On the basis of experimental table lamp electric power indices of light-emitting-diode (LED light sources with equivalent luminous flux have been determined. Dependences of main indices of economic efficiency of various light sources on their operational regimes have been obtained and rate of influence on these indices of electric power price increase have been determined. Economically justified variants and conditions for application of various light sources have been substantiated.

  7. Mechanisms of oat (Avena sativa L.) acclimation to phosphate deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żebrowska, Ewa; Milewska, Marta; Ciereszko, Iwona

    2017-01-01

    Deficiency of available forms of phosphorus is common in most soils and causes reduction of crop plants growth and yield. Recently, model plants responses to phosphate (Pi) deficiency have been intensively studied. However, acclimation mechanisms of cereals like oat (Avena sativa L.), to low Pi stress remains not fully understood. Oat plants have been usually cultured on poor soils, with a low nutrient content, but their responses to such conditions are not well known, therefore the main goal of the study was to investigate the mechanisms that enable oat plants to grow under low Pi conditions. Four oat cultivars (A. sativa, cv. Arab, Krezus, Rajtar and Szakal) were grown for three weeks in a nutrient media with various P sources: inorganic-KH2PO4 (control), organic-phytate (PA) and with no phosphate (-P). The effects of Pi deficiency on the level of P, oat growth parameters, intensity of photosynthesis, plant productivity, root exudation ability, localization, activity and isoforms of acid phosphatases, enzymes involved in Pi mobilization, were estimated. In addition, the effect of mycorrhization on plant growth was also observed. All studied oat cultivars grown on Pi-deficient media had significantly decreased Pi content in the tissues. Pi deficiency caused inhibition of shoot growth, but generally it did not affect root elongation; root diameter was decreased, root/shoot ratios increased, whereas PA plants showed a similar growth to control. Photosynthesis rate and productivity parameters decreased under low Pi nutrition, however, sugar content generally increased. Studied oat cultivars did not respond to low Pi via increased exudation of carboxylates from the roots, as pH changes in the growth media were not observed. Pi starvation significantly increased the activity of extracellular and intracellular acid phosphatases (APases) in comparison to the control plants. Three major APase isoforms were detected in oat tissues and the isoform pattern was similar in all

  8. 3D color reconstructions in single DMD holographic display with LED source and complex coding scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlipała, Maksymilian; Kozacki, Tomasz

    2017-06-01

    In the paper we investigate the possibility of color reconstructions of holograms with a single DMD and incoherent LED source illumination. Holographic display is built with 4F imaging system centering reconstruction volume around the DMD surface. The display design employs complex coding scheme, which allows reconstructing complex wave from a binary hologram. In order to improve the quality of reconstructed holograms time multiplexing method is used. During the optical reconstructions we analyze quality of reconstructed holograms with incoherent RGB light sources as a function of reconstruction distance, present the possibility of 3D hologram reconstruction, and investigate temporal coherence effects in holographic display with the DMD.

  9. A GIS-based atmospheric dispersion model for pollutants emitted by complex source areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teggi, Sergio; Costanzini, Sofia; Ghermandi, Grazia; Malagoli, Carlotta; Vinceti, Marco

    2018-01-01

    Gaussian dispersion models are widely used to simulate the concentrations and deposition fluxes of pollutants emitted by source areas. Very often, the calculation time limits the number of sources and receptors and the geometry of the sources must be simple and without holes. This paper presents CAREA, a new GIS-based Gaussian model for complex source areas. CAREA was coded in the Python language, and is largely based on a simplified formulation of the very popular and recognized AERMOD model. The model allows users to define in a GIS environment thousands of gridded or scattered receptors and thousands of complex sources with hundreds of vertices and holes. CAREA computes ground level, or near ground level, concentrations and dry deposition fluxes of pollutants. The input/output and the runs of the model can be completely managed in GIS environment (e.g. inside a GIS project). The paper presents the CAREA formulation and its applications to very complex test cases. The tests shows that the processing time are satisfactory and that the definition of sources and receptors and the output retrieval are quite easy in a GIS environment. CAREA and AERMOD are compared using simple and reproducible test cases. The comparison shows that CAREA satisfactorily reproduces AERMOD simulations and is considerably faster than AERMOD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Acclimation of mechanical and hydraulic functions in trees:Impact of the thigmomorphogenetic process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eBadel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The secondary xylem (wood of trees mediates several functions including water transport and storage, mechanical support and storage of photosynthates. The optimal structures for each of these functions will most likely differ. The complex structure and function of xylem could lead to trade-offs between conductive efficiency, resistance to embolism and mechanical strength needed to count for mechanical loading due to gravity and wind. This has been referred to as the trade-off triangle, with the different optimal solutions to the structure/function problems depending on the environmental constraints as well as taxonomic histories. Thus, the optimisation of each function will lead to drastically different anatomical structures. Trees are able to acclimate the internal structure of their trunk and branches according to the stress they experience. These acclimations lead to specific structures that favour the efficiency or the safety of one function but can be antagonistic with other functions. Currently, there are no means to predict the way a tree will acclimate or optimize its internal structure in support of its various functions under differing environmental conditions. In this review, we will focus on the acclimation of xylem anatomy and its resulting mechanical and hydraulic functions to recurrent mechanical strain that usually result from wind-induced thigmomorphogenesis with a special focus on the construction cost and the possible trade-off between wood functions.

  11. Acclimation of mechanical and hydraulic functions in trees: impact of the thigmomorphogenetic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badel, Eric; Ewers, Frank W; Cochard, Hervé; Telewski, Frank W

    2015-01-01

    The secondary xylem (wood) of trees mediates several functions including water transport and storage, mechanical support and storage of photosynthates. The optimal structures for each of these functions will most likely differ. The complex structure and function of xylem could lead to trade-offs between conductive efficiency, resistance to embolism, and mechanical strength needed to count for mechanical loading due to gravity and wind. This has been referred to as the trade-off triangle, with the different optimal solutions to the structure/function problems depending on the environmental constraints as well as taxonomic histories. Thus, the optimisation of each function will lead to drastically different anatomical structures. Trees are able to acclimate the internal structure of their trunk and branches according to the stress they experience. These acclimations lead to specific structures that favor the efficiency or the safety of one function but can be antagonistic with other functions. Currently, there are no means to predict the way a tree will acclimate or optimize its internal structure in support of its various functions under differing environmental conditions. In this review, we will focus on the acclimation of xylem anatomy and its resulting mechanical and hydraulic functions to recurrent mechanical strain that usually result from wind-induced thigmomorphogenesis with a special focus on the construction cost and the possible trade-off between wood functions.

  12. Thermoregulation in hypergravity-acclimated rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Conrad B.; Patterson, Susan L.; Horowitz, John M.; Oyama, Jiro

    1989-01-01

    The effect of acclimation to hypergravity on thermoregulatory responses of rats was determined by comparing data on core temperature, T(c), tail temperature, and O2 consumption in rats raised at 1 G (C) and at 2.1 G. It was found that, when C rats were exposed to an ambient temperature of 9 C concurrently with exposure to 2.1 G, the T(c) fell by about 6 C, while in rats acclimated to 2.1 G, the T(c) fell only by 1 C. Results of O2 consumption measurements showed that C rats exposed simultaneously to cold and hypergravity were not activating their thermogenic mechanism sufficiently to prevent a fall in T(c). In other experiments, rats acclimated to either 1 or 2.1 G were found to lack the ability to maintain their T(c) when exposed to a 5.8-G field or when cold-stressed at 1 G for extended times.

  13. Evaluation of a Florida coastal golf complex as a local and watershed source of bioavailable contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael A., Robert L. Quarles, Darrin D. Dantin and James C. Moore. 2004. Evaluation of a Coastal Golf Complex as a Local and Watershed Source of Bioavailable Contaminants. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 48(3-4):254-262. (ERL,GB 1183). Contaminant fate in coastal areas impacte...

  14. A simple iterative independent component analysis algorithm for vibration source signal identification of complex structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Sup Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Independent Component Analysis (ICA, one of the blind source separation methods, can be applied for extracting unknown source signals only from received signals. This is accomplished by finding statistical independence of signal mixtures and has been successfully applied to myriad fields such as medical science, image processing, and numerous others. Nevertheless, there are inherent problems that have been reported when using this technique: insta- bility and invalid ordering of separated signals, particularly when using a conventional ICA technique in vibratory source signal identification of complex structures. In this study, a simple iterative algorithm of the conventional ICA has been proposed to mitigate these problems. The proposed method to extract more stable source signals having valid order includes an iterative and reordering process of extracted mixing matrix to reconstruct finally converged source signals, referring to the magnitudes of correlation coefficients between the intermediately separated signals and the signals measured on or nearby sources. In order to review the problems of the conventional ICA technique and to vali- date the proposed method, numerical analyses have been carried out for a virtual response model and a 30 m class submarine model. Moreover, in order to investigate applicability of the proposed method to real problem of complex structure, an experiment has been carried out for a scaled submarine mockup. The results show that the proposed method could resolve the inherent problems of a conventional ICA technique.

  15. NMR-based Metabolomics to Study the Cold-acclimation Strategy of Two Miscanthus Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Hyacinthe; Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Molinié, Roland; Pelloux, Jérôme; Mesnard, François; Gillet, Françoise; Fliniaux, Ophélie

    2017-01-01

    Abiotic stress is a major cause of yield loss in plant culture. Miscanthus, a perennial C4 grass, is now considered a major source of renewable energy, especially for biofuel production. During the first year of planting in Northern Europe, Miscanthus was exposed to frost temperature, which generated high mortality in young plants and large loss of yield. One strategy to avoid such loss is to apply cold-acclimation, which confers on plants a better resistance to low temperature. The aim of this study is to describe the effect of a cold-acclimation period on the metabolome of two Miscanthus genotypes that vary in their frost sensitivity at the juvenile stage. Miscanthus × giganteus (GIG) is particularly sensitive to frost, whereas Miscanthus sinensis August Feder (AUG) is tolerant. Polar metabolite extraction was performed on Miscanthus, grown in non-acclimated or cold-acclimated conditions. Extracts were analysed by 1 H-NMR followed by multivariate statistical analysis. Discriminant metabolites were identified. More than 40 metabolites were identified in the two Miscanthus genotypes. GIG and AUG showed a different metabolic background before cold treatment, probably related to their genetic background. After cold-acclimation, GIG and AUG metabolomes remained different. The tolerant genotype showed notably higher levels of accumulation in proline, sucrose and maltose when subjected to cold. These two genotypes seem to have a different adaptation strategy in cold conditions. The studied change in the metabolome concerns different types of molecules related to the cold-tolerant behaviour of Miscanthus. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Heat Acclimation-Mediated Cross-Tolerance: Origins in within-Life Epigenetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Michal

    2017-01-01

    The primary outcome of heat acclimation is increased thermotolerance, which stems from enhancement of innate cytoprotective pathways. These pathways produce "ON CALL" molecules that can combat stressors to which the body has never been exposed, via cross-tolerance mechanisms (heat acclimation-mediated cross-tolerance-HACT). The foundation of HACT lies in the sharing of generic stress signaling, combined with tissue/organ- specific protective responses. HACT becomes apparent when acclimatory homeostasis is achieved, lasts for several weeks, and has a memory. HACT differs from other forms of temporal protective mechanisms activated by exposure to lower "doses" of the stressor, which induce adaptation to higher "doses" of the same/different stressor; e.g., preconditioning, hormesis. These terms have been adopted by biochemists, toxicologists, and physiologists to describe the rapid cellular strategies ensuring homeostasis. HACT employs two major protective avenues: constitutive injury attenuation and abrupt post-insult release of help signals enhanced by acclimation. To date, the injury-attenuating features seen in all organs studied include fast-responding, enlarged cytoprotective reserves with HSPs, anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic molecules, and HIF-1α nuclear and mitochondrial target gene products. Using cardiac ischemia and brain hypoxia models as a guide to the broader framework of phenotypic plasticity, HACT is enabled by a metabolic shift induced by HIF-1α and there are less injuries caused by Ca +2 overload, via channel or complex-protein remodeling, or decreased channel abundance. Epigenetic markers such as post-translational histone modification and altered levels of chromatin modifiers during acclimation and its decline suggest that dynamic epigenetic mechanisms controlling gene expression induce HACT and acclimation memory, to enable the rapid return of the protected phenotype. In this review the link between in vivo physiological evidence and the

  17. Heat Acclimation-Mediated Cross-Tolerance: Origins in within-Life Epigenetics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Horowitz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary outcome of heat acclimation is increased thermotolerance, which stems from enhancement of innate cytoprotective pathways. These pathways produce “ON CALL” molecules that can combat stressors to which the body has never been exposed, via cross-tolerance mechanisms (heat acclimation-mediated cross-tolerance—HACT. The foundation of HACT lies in the sharing of generic stress signaling, combined with tissue/organ- specific protective responses. HACT becomes apparent when acclimatory homeostasis is achieved, lasts for several weeks, and has a memory. HACT differs from other forms of temporal protective mechanisms activated by exposure to lower “doses” of the stressor, which induce adaptation to higher “doses” of the same/different stressor; e.g., preconditioning, hormesis. These terms have been adopted by biochemists, toxicologists, and physiologists to describe the rapid cellular strategies ensuring homeostasis. HACT employs two major protective avenues: constitutive injury attenuation and abrupt post-insult release of help signals enhanced by acclimation. To date, the injury-attenuating features seen in all organs studied include fast-responding, enlarged cytoprotective reserves with HSPs, anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic molecules, and HIF-1α nuclear and mitochondrial target gene products. Using cardiac ischemia and brain hypoxia models as a guide to the broader framework of phenotypic plasticity, HACT is enabled by a metabolic shift induced by HIF-1α and there are less injuries caused by Ca+2 overload, via channel or complex-protein remodeling, or decreased channel abundance. Epigenetic markers such as post-translational histone modification and altered levels of chromatin modifiers during acclimation and its decline suggest that dynamic epigenetic mechanisms controlling gene expression induce HACT and acclimation memory, to enable the rapid return of the protected phenotype. In this review the link between in vivo

  18. Radiological and chemical source terms for Solid Waste Operations Complex. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothe, G.F.

    1994-06-03

    The purpose of this document is to describe the radiological and chemical source terms for the major projects of the Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC), including Project W-112, Project W-133 and Project W-100 (WRAP 2A). For purposes of this document, the term ``source term`` means the design basis inventory. All of the SWOC source terms involve the estimation of the radiological and chemical contents of various waste packages from different waste streams, and the inventories of these packages within facilities or within a scope of operations. The composition of some of the waste is not known precisely; consequently, conservative assumptions were made to ensure that the source term represents a bounding case (i.e., it is expected that the source term would not be exceeded). As better information is obtained on the radiological and chemical contents of waste packages and more accurate facility specific models are developed, this document should be revised as appropriate. Radiological source terms are needed to perform shielding and external dose calculations, to estimate routine airborne releases, to perform release calculations and dose estimates for safety documentation, to calculate the maximum possible fire loss and specific source terms for individual fire areas, etc. Chemical source terms (i.e., inventories of combustible, flammable, explosive or hazardous chemicals) are used to determine combustible loading, fire protection requirements, personnel exposures to hazardous chemicals from routine and accident conditions, and a wide variety of other safety and environmental requirements.

  19. Engineering complex nanolasers: from spaser quantum information sources to near-field anapole lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Gongora, J. S. Totero

    2017-02-16

    In this invited contribution I will review recent results of our research in the field of complex nanolasers. I will begin by discussing recent experimental results from a new type of ultra-dark nanoparticles, which behave as an ideal black-body and spontaneously produce single color pulses thanks to an equivalent Bose-Einstein Condensation of light. I will then discuss new quantum information sources from core-shell spaser nanoparticles. Finally, I will illustrate a new type of laser source that emits only in the near field, discussing applications in integrated optical circuits.

  20. Characterization of Medicago populations under cold acclimation by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of Medicago populations under cold acclimation by morphological traits and microsatellite (SSR) markers. ... altitude (lower ability to cold acclimation). Tests differentiation between species by fisher pair indicates that all species were different from each other. Results show the highest level of homozygosity ...

  1. Induction of thermotolerance through heat acclimation in lablab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The acclimation of plants to moderately high temperature plays an important role in inducing plant tolerance to subsequent lethal temperatures. This study was performed to investigate the effects of heat acclimation and sudden heat stress on the antioxidant and metabolic profile of lablab bean (Dolichos lablab). Following ...

  2. Uncertainty estimation in sediment fingerprinting un-mixing models: impact of source characterisation and complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, Sophie; Rowan, John; Franks, Stewart; Walden, John; Melland, Alice; Jordan, Phil; Fenton, Owen; hUallacháin, Daire Ó.

    2014-05-01

    Sediment fingerprinting techniques are being applied more frequently to inform soil and water management issues. Identification of sediment source areas and assessment of their relative contributions are essential in targeting cost-effective mitigation strategies. Sediment fingerprinting utilises natural sediment properties (e.g. chemical, magnetic, radiometric) to trace the contributions from different source areas by 'unmixing' a catchment outlet sample back to its constituent sources. Early qualitative approaches have been superseded by quantitative methodologies using multiple (composite) tracers coupled with linear programming. Despite the inclusion of fingerprinting results in environmental management strategies, techniques are subject to potentially significant uncertainties. Intra-source heterogeneity, although widely recognised as a source of uncertainty, is difficult to address, particularly in large study catchments, or where source collection is restricted. Inadequate characterisation may result in the translation of significant uncertainties to a group fingerprint and onward to contribution estimates. Franks and Rowan (2000) developed an uncertainty inclusive un-mixing model (FR2000+) based on Bayesian Monte-Carlo methods. Source area contributions are reported with confidence intervals which incorporate sampling and un-mixing uncertainties. Consequently the impact of uncertainty on the reliability of predictions can be considered. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of source area sampling resolution and spatial complexity on source area contribution estimates and their relative uncertainty envelope. High resolution source area sampling was conducted in a 10 km2 intensive grassland catchment in Co. Wexford, Ireland, according to potential field and non-field sources. Seven potential source areas were sampled; channel banks (n=55), road verges (n=44), topsoils (n=35), subsoils (n=32), tracks (n=6), drains (n=2) and eroding ditches (n=5

  3. Effects of cadmium exposure on the gill proteome of Cottus gobio: Modulatory effects of prior thermal acclimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorts, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifer.dorts@unamur.be [Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Kestemont, Patrick [Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Thézenas, Marie-Laetitia; Raes, Martine [Research Unit in Cell Biology (URBC) (NARILIS), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Silvestre, Frédéric [Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Fish acclimated to elevated temperature were subsequently exposed to cadmium. • Interaction of both stressors on LDH activity and protein expression was complex. • Both stressors have opposite effects at branchial protein expression level. • Proteins belonging to the same functional class exhibited differing responses. • Prior acclimation to elevated temperature modulated the effects of cadmium exposure. - Abstract: Temperature and trace metals are common environmental stressors, and their importance is increasing due to global climate change and anthropogenic pollution. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether acclimation to elevated temperature affects the response of the European bullhead (Cottus gobio) to subsequent cadmium (Cd) exposure by using enzymatic and proteomic approaches. Fish acclimated to 15 (standard temperature), 18 or 21 °C for 28 days were exposed to 1 mg Cd/L for 4 days at the respective acclimation temperature. First, exposure to Cd significantly decreased the activity of the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in gills of fish acclimated to 15 or 18 °C. However, an acclimation to 21 °C suppressed the inhibitory effect of Cd. Second, using a proteomic analysis by 2D-DIGE, we observed that thermal acclimation was the first parameter affecting the protein expression profile in gills of C. gobio, while subsequent Cd exposure seemed to attenuate this temperature effect. Moreover, our results showed opposite effects of these two environmental stressors at protein expression level. From the 52 protein spots displaying significant interaction effects of temperature and Cd exposure, a total of 28 different proteins were identified using nano LC–MS/MS and the Peptide and Protein Prophet algorithms of Scaffold software. The identified differentially expressed proteins can be categorized into diverse functional classes, related to protein turnover, folding and chaperoning, metabolic process, ion transport, cell

  4. Deconditioning-induced exercise responses as influenced by heat acclimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartz, E.; Bhattacharya, A.; Sperinde, S. J.; Brock, P. J.; Sciaraffa, D.; Haines, R. F.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A study to determine the effect of heat acclimation and physical training in temperate conditions on changes in exercise tolerance following water-immersion deconditioning is presented. Five young men were tested on a bicycle ergometer before and after heat acclimation and after water immersion. The subjects and the experimental procedure, heat acclimation and exercise training, water immersion, and exercise tolerance are discussed. Heat acclimation resulted in the usual decreases in exercise heart rate and rectal temperature and an increase in sweat rate. Water immersion resulted in substantial diuresis despite water consumed. The results show that heat acclimation provides an effective method of preventing the adverse effects of water-immersion deconditioning on exercise tolerance.

  5. Preliminary acclimation strategies for successful startup in conventional biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elías, Ana; Barona, Astrid; Gallastegi, Gorka; Rojo, Naiara; Gurtubay, Luis; Ibarra-Berastegi, Gabriel

    2010-08-01

    The question of how to obtain the best inocula for conventional biofilters arises when an acclimation/adaptation procedure is to be applied. Bearing in mind that no standardized procedure for acclimating inocula exists, certain preliminary strategies for obtaining an active inoculum from wastewater treatment sludge are proposed in this work. Toluene was the contaminant to be degraded. Concerning the prior separation of sludge phases, no obvious advantage was found in separating the supernatant phase of the sludge before acclimation. As far as a continuous or discontinuous acclimation mode is concerned, the latter is recommended for rapidly obtaining acclimated sludge samples by operating the system for no longer than 1 month. The continuous mode rendered similar degradation rates, although it required longer operating time. Nevertheless, the great advantage of the continuous system lay in the absence of daily maintenance and the ready availability of the activated sample.

  6. Europium (III) and Uranium (VI) complexation by natural organic matter (NOM): Effect of source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautenburger, Ralf; Sander, Jonas M; Hein, Christina

    2017-03-01

    For the safe long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), detailed information about geo-chemical behavior of radioactive and toxic metal ions under environmental conditions is important. Natural organic matter (NOM) can play a crucial role in the immobilization or mobilization of these metal ions due to its complexation and colloid formation tendency. In this study, the complexation of europium (as chemical homologue of trivalent actinides such as americium) and uranium (as main component of HLW) by ten humic acids (HA) from different sources and Suwannee NOM river extract has been analyzed. Capillary electrophoresis in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been used for the evaluation of complex stability constants log β. In order to determine the complex stability constants a conservative single site model was used in this study. In dependence of their source and thus of NOM structure the log β values for the analyzed humic acids are in the range of 6.1-7.0 for Eu(III) and 5.2-6.4 for U(VI) (UO 2 2+ ), respectively. In contrast to the results for HA the used Suwannee river NOM reveals log β values in the range of nearly two orders of magnitude lower (4.6 for Eu 3+ and 4.5 for UO 2 2+ ) under the geochemical conditions applied in this study. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Performance of pond-wetland complexes as a preliminary processor of drinking water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weidong; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Zhongqiong; Zhang, Rongbin; Chen, Qinghua; Yu, Xinfeng; Yin, Chengqing

    2016-01-01

    Shijiuyang Constructed Wetland (110 hm(2)) is a drinking water source treatment wetland with primary structural units of ponds and plant-bed/ditch systems. The wetland can process about 250,000 tonnes of source water in the Xincheng River every day and supplies raw water for Shijiuyang Drinking Water Plant. Daily data for 28 months indicated that the major water quality indexes of source water had been improved by one grade. The percentage increase for dissolved oxygen and the removal rates of ammonia nitrogen, iron and manganese were 73.63%, 38.86%, 35.64%, and 22.14% respectively. The treatment performance weight of ponds and plant-bed/ditch systems was roughly equal but they treated different pollutants preferentially. Most water quality indexes had better treatment efficacy with increasing temperature and inlet concentrations. These results revealed that the pond-wetland complexes exhibited strong buffering capacity for source water quality improvement. The treatment cost of Shijiuyang Drinking Water Plant was reduced by about 30.3%. Regional rainfall significantly determined the external river water levels and adversely deteriorated the inlet water quality, thus suggesting that the "hidden" diffuse pollution in the multitudinous stream branches as well as their catchments should be the controlling emphases for river source water protection in the future. The combination of pond and plant-bed/ditch systems provides a successful paradigm for drinking water source pretreatment. Three other drinking water source treatment wetlands with ponds and plant-bed/ditch systems are in operation or construction in the stream networks of the Yangtze River Delta and more people will be benefited. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Low complexity underdetermined blind source separation system architecture for emerging remote healthcare applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mopuri, Suresh; Reddy, P Sreenivasa; Ch, Karthik; Prasad, A Siva; Acharyya, Amit; Ramakrishna, V Siva

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a low complexity architecture for the Under-determined Blind Source Separation (UBSS) algorithm targeting remote healthcare applications. UBSS algorithm, departing from the typical BSS convention-equal number of the sources and sensors present, which is of tremendous interest in the field of Biomedical signal processing especially for remote health care applications. Since such applications are constrained by the on-chip area and power consumption limitation due to the battery backup, a low complexity architecture needs to be formulated. In this paper, firstly we have introduced UBSS architecture, followed by the identification of the most computationally intensive module N-point Discrete Hilbert Transform (DHT) and finally proposed a low complexity DHT architecture design to make the entire UBSS architecture suitable for such resource constrained applications. The proposed DHT architecture implementation and experimental comparison results show that the proposed design saves 50.28%, 48.40% and 46.27% on-chip area and 53.25%, 48.01% and 45.95% power consumption when compared to the state of the art method for N = 32, 64 and 128 respectively. Furthermore the proposed DHT architecture works for N = 2m point, but the state of art architecture works for N = 4m point, where m is an integer.

  9. Mechanisms of oat (Avena sativa L.) acclimation to phosphate deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewska, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Background Deficiency of available forms of phosphorus is common in most soils and causes reduction of crop plants growth and yield. Recently, model plants responses to phosphate (Pi) deficiency have been intensively studied. However, acclimation mechanisms of cereals like oat (Avena sativa L.), to low Pi stress remains not fully understood. Oat plants have been usually cultured on poor soils, with a low nutrient content, but their responses to such conditions are not well known, therefore the main goal of the study was to investigate the mechanisms that enable oat plants to grow under low Pi conditions. Methods Four oat cultivars (A. sativa, cv. Arab, Krezus, Rajtar and Szakal) were grown for three weeks in a nutrient media with various P sources: inorganic—KH2PO4 (control), organic—phytate (PA) and with no phosphate (−P). The effects of Pi deficiency on the level of P, oat growth parameters, intensity of photosynthesis, plant productivity, root exudation ability, localization, activity and isoforms of acid phosphatases, enzymes involved in Pi mobilization, were estimated. In addition, the effect of mycorrhization on plant growth was also observed. Results All studied oat cultivars grown on Pi-deficient media had significantly decreased Pi content in the tissues. Pi deficiency caused inhibition of shoot growth, but generally it did not affect root elongation; root diameter was decreased, root/shoot ratios increased, whereas PA plants showed a similar growth to control. Photosynthesis rate and productivity parameters decreased under low Pi nutrition, however, sugar content generally increased. Studied oat cultivars did not respond to low Pi via increased exudation of carboxylates from the roots, as pH changes in the growth media were not observed. Pi starvation significantly increased the activity of extracellular and intracellular acid phosphatases (APases) in comparison to the control plants. Three major APase isoforms were detected in oat tissues and the

  10. Mechanisms of oat (Avena sativa L. acclimation to phosphate deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Żebrowska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Deficiency of available forms of phosphorus is common in most soils and causes reduction of crop plants growth and yield. Recently, model plants responses to phosphate (Pi deficiency have been intensively studied. However, acclimation mechanisms of cereals like oat (Avena sativa L., to low Pi stress remains not fully understood. Oat plants have been usually cultured on poor soils, with a low nutrient content, but their responses to such conditions are not well known, therefore the main goal of the study was to investigate the mechanisms that enable oat plants to grow under low Pi conditions. Methods Four oat cultivars (A. sativa, cv. Arab, Krezus, Rajtar and Szakal were grown for three weeks in a nutrient media with various P sources: inorganic—KH2PO4 (control, organic—phytate (PA and with no phosphate (−P. The effects of Pi deficiency on the level of P, oat growth parameters, intensity of photosynthesis, plant productivity, root exudation ability, localization, activity and isoforms of acid phosphatases, enzymes involved in Pi mobilization, were estimated. In addition, the effect of mycorrhization on plant growth was also observed. Results All studied oat cultivars grown on Pi-deficient media had significantly decreased Pi content in the tissues. Pi deficiency caused inhibition of shoot growth, but generally it did not affect root elongation; root diameter was decreased, root/shoot ratios increased, whereas PA plants showed a similar growth to control. Photosynthesis rate and productivity parameters decreased under low Pi nutrition, however, sugar content generally increased. Studied oat cultivars did not respond to low Pi via increased exudation of carboxylates from the roots, as pH changes in the growth media were not observed. Pi starvation significantly increased the activity of extracellular and intracellular acid phosphatases (APases in comparison to the control plants. Three major APase isoforms were detected in oat

  11. Biophysical consequences of photosynthetic temperature acclimation for climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas G.; Lombardozzi, Danica; Tawfik, Ahmed; Bonan, Gordon; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2017-03-01

    Photosynthetic temperature acclimation is a commonly observed process that is increasingly being incorporated into Earth System Models (ESMs). While short-term acclimation has been shown to increase carbon storage in the future, it is uncertain whether acclimation will directly influence simulated future climate through biophysical mechanisms. Here, we used coupled atmosphere-biosphere simulations using the Community Earth System Model (CESM) to assess how acclimation-induced changes in photosynthesis influence global climate under present-day and future (RCP 8.5) conditions. We ran four 30 year simulations that differed only in sea surface temperatures and atmospheric CO2 (present or future) and whether a mechanism for photosynthetic temperature acclimation was included (yes or no). Acclimation increased future photosynthesis and, consequently, the proportion of energy returned to the atmosphere as latent heat, resulting in reduced surface air temperatures in areas and seasons where acclimation caused the biggest increase in photosynthesis. However, this was partially offset by temperature increases elsewhere, resulting in a small, but significant, global cooling of 0.05°C in the future, similar to that expected from acclimation-induced increases in future land carbon storage found in previous studies. In the present-day simulations, the photosynthetic response was not as strong and cooling in highly vegetated regions was less than warming elsewhere, leading to a net global increase in temperatures of 0.04°C. Precipitation responses were variable and rates did not change globally in either time period. These results, combined with carbon-cycle effects, suggest that models without acclimation may be overestimating positive feedbacks between climate and the land surface in the future.

  12. Effect of cold acclimation on antioxidant status in cold acclimated skaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jung Hee; Kim, Ki Jin; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Lee, In-Seon

    2008-09-01

    We investigated whether cold acclimation leads to increased activity of the antioxidant defense enzymes and muscle injury. Comparisons were between short track skaters (n=6) and inline skaters (n=6) during rest and at submaximal cycling (65% VO2max) in cold (ambient temperature: 5+/-1 degrees C, relative humidity: 41+/-8%) and warm conditions (ambient temperature: 21+/-1 degrees C, relative humidity: 35+/-5%), during 60 min, respectively, and during the recovery phase. Erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSHpx), reduced glutathione (GSH), thiobarbituric substance acid (TBARS), serum creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), plasma myoglobin (Mb) and cortisol were determined. Activities of CAT and GSHpx and the level of GSH and TBARS in erythrocyte and the level of LDH in serum were elevated in cold acclimated subjects. We suggested that the compensatory increase in antioxidative defense enzymes resulting from long-term cold exposure may reflect the elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and muscle injury at this environment acclimation.

  13. Acclimation of subsurface microbial communities to mercury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lipthay, Julia R.; Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Oregaard, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    We studied the acclimation to mercury of bacterial communities of different depths from contaminated and noncontaminated floodplain soils. The level of mercury tolerance of the bacterial communities from the contaminated site was higher than those of the reference site. Furthermore, the level...... of mercury tolerance and functional versatility of bacterial communities in contaminated soils initially were higher for surface soil, compared with the deeper soils. However, following new mercury exposure, no differences between bacterial communities were observed, which indicates a high adaptive potential...... of the subsurface communities, possibly due to differences in the availability of mercury. IncP-1 trfA genes were detected in extracted community DNA from all soil depths of the contaminated site, and this finding was correlated to the isolation of four different mercury-resistance plasmids, all belonging...

  14. The superluminal motion of Gamma-Ray-Burst sources and the complex afterglow of GRB 030329

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, S; De Rújula, Alvaro; Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2004-01-01

    The source of the very bright Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 030329 is close enough to us for there to be a hope to measure or significantly constrain its putative superluminal motion. Such a phenomenon is expected in the ``Cannonball'' (CB) model of GRBs. Recent precise data on the optical and radio afterglow of this GRB --which demonstrated its very complex structure-- allow us to pin down the CB-model's prediction for the afterglow-source position as a function of time. It has been stated that (the unpublished part of) the new radio data ``unequivocably disprove'' the CB model. We show how greatly exaggerated that obituary announcement was, and how precise a refined analysis of the data would have to be, to be still of interest.

  15. Low-complexity and error-resilient hyperspectral image compression based on distributed source coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrardo, A.; Barni, M.; Bertoli, A.; Garzelli, A.; Magli, E.; Nencini, F.; Penna, B.; Vitulli, R.

    2008-10-01

    In this paper we propose a lossless compression algorithm for hyperspectral images based on distributed source coding; this algorithm represents a significant improvement over our prior work on the same topic, and has been developed during a project funded by ESA-ESTEC. In particular, the algorithm achieves good compression performance with very low complexity; moreover, it also features a very good degree of error resilience. These features are obtained taking inspiration from distributed source coding, and particularly employing coset codes and CRC-based decoding. As the CRC can be used to decode blocks using a reference different from that used to compress the image, this yields error resilience. In particular, if a block is lost, decoding using the closest collocated block in the second previous band is successful about 70% of the times.

  16. Freshwater fish internals as a promising source of biologically active lipid complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samoilovа D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The research on development of technology of fat extraction from freshwater fish entrails has been carried out. The study of mass composition of freshwater fish internals has shown that the highest content of fat (averaged 13,8 % is typical for internals of fish like carp, perch, silver carp, pike. The higher content is typical for silver carp (14.4 % permitting the possibility of its use as a source of lipid complexes. The chemical composition of the internal organs of researched objects has been studied; to justify the rational modes of extracting lipid complexes from freshwater fish internals the methods of extracting fat (thermal, enzymatic and low temperature have been tested. The quality indicators of raw fat have been analyzed and the conclusion on possibility of combining the ways of oil extraction in order to increase its output and improve the quality characteristics has been made

  17. EEG source localization and global dimensional complexity in high- and low- hypnotizable subjects: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isotani, T; Lehmann, D; Pascual-Marqui, R D; Kochi, K; Wackermann, J; Saito, N; Yagyu, T; Kinoshita, T; Sasada, K

    2001-01-01

    Individuals differ in hypnotizability. Information on hypnotizability-related EEG characteristics is controversial and incomplete, particularly on intracerebral source localization and EEG dimensionality. 19-channel, eyes-closed resting EEGs from right-handed, healthy, 8 high- and 4 low-hynotizable subjects (age: 26.7 +/- 7.3 years) were analyzed. Hypnotizability was rated after the subjects' ability to attain a deep hypnotic stage (amnesia). FFT Dipole Approximation analysis in seven EEG frequency bands showed significant differences (p Power spectral analysis of Global Field Power time series (curves) showed no overall power differences in any band. Full-band Global Dimensional Complexity was higher in high-hypnotizable subjects (p < 0.02). Thus, before hypnosis, high and low hypnotizables were in different brain electric states, with more posterior brain activity gravity centers (excitatory right, routine or relaxation left) and higher dimensional complexity (higher arousal) in high than low hypnotizables. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. STATE OF THE ART TECHNIQUES USED FOR NOISE SOURCE IDENTIFICATION ON COMPLEX BODIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu STOICA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, many approaches have been undertaken in order to asses detailed noise source identification on complex bodies, i.e. aircrafts, cars, machinery. Noise source identification implies to accurately obtain the position and frequency of the dominant noise sources. There are cases where traditional testing methods can not be applied at all or their use involves some limitations. Optical systems used for near field analysis require a line of sight that may not be available. The state-of-the-art technology for this purpose is the use of a large number of microphones whose signals are acquired simultaneously, i.e. microphone phased array. Due to the excessive cost of the instruments and the data acquisition system required, the implementation of this technology was restricted to governmental agencies (NASA, DLR and big companies such as Boeing and Airbus. During the past years, this technique was developed in wind tunnels and some universities to perform noise source identification on scale airframes, main landing gear models, and aerodynamic profiles (used on airplanes, helicopter rotors and wind mills.

  19. Low complexity source and channel coding for mm-wave hybrid fiber-wireless links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedev, Alexander; Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Pang, Xiaodan

    2014-01-01

    performance of several encoded high-definition video sequences constrained by the channel bitrate and the packet size. We argue that light video compression and low complexity channel coding for the W-band fiber-wireless link enable low-delay multiple channel 1080p wireless HD video transmission.......We report on the performance of channel and source coding applied for an experimentally realized hybrid fiber-wireless W-band link. Error control coding performance is presented for a wireless propagation distance of 3 m and 20 km fiber transmission. We report on peak signal-to-noise ratio...

  20. Source rock potential of Franciscan complex: the galloping gourmet and the hydrocarbon kitchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larue, D.K. Underwood, M.B.

    1986-04-01

    Previous workers suggested that western North America was characterized by coastal upwelling during much of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic Eras. Areas of coastal upwelling are commonly characterized by excellent source rocks - because high-quality organic matter is preserved in oxygen-minimum zones - and by high sedimentation rates. The Franciscan complex, of Jurassic to Miocene age, records part of the interaction between Pacific oceanic plates and the North American continental margin. The Franciscan complex is an amalgam of terranes, most of which represent deposition in deep to intermediate-depth waters on oceanic lithosphere and trench-related continental margin facies. The authors analyzed the source rock potential of Franciscan complex rocks using Rock-Eval pyrolysis techniques. Turbiditic mudstones of the eastern belt Franciscan complex contain moderate amounts of total organic carbon (TOC about 1%), but have low volatile contents as indicated by hydrogen and oxygen indexes. TOC is 1-3% for organic matter in argillaceous melange matrix of the coastal belt of northern California, the Permanente terrane, and San Simeon; however, volatile content is low. The Calera limestone of the Permanente terrane was deposited under locally anoxic conditions, probably on a mid-Pacific seamount, and later accreted to North America. It contains from 0 to 7% TOC, and volatile content is low. Significant volatile content is found only in turbiditic mudstones of the coastal belt Franciscan, northern California, where TOC averages about 1% in Type III kerogens. Slates locally bearing blue amphiboles, lawsonite, jadeite, and limestones tectonically interleaved with slates in melange on Cedros Island, Baja California, contain up to several percent TOC, but are extremely depleted in volatiles.

  1. Uncoupling High Light Responses from Singlet Oxygen Retrograde Signaling and Spatial-Temporal Systemic Acquired Acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Melanie; Crisp, Peter A; d'Alessandro, Stefano; Ganguly, Diep; Gordon, Matthew; Havaux, Michel; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica; Pogson, Barry J

    2016-07-01

    Distinct ROS signaling pathways initiated by singlet oxygen ((1)O2) or superoxide and hydrogen peroxide have been attributed to either cell death or acclimation, respectively. Recent studies have revealed that more complex antagonistic and synergistic relationships exist within and between these pathways. As specific chloroplastic ROS signals are difficult to study, rapid systemic signaling experiments using localized high light (HL) stress or ROS treatments were used in this study to uncouple signals required for direct HL and ROS perception and distal systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). A qPCR approach was chosen to determine local perception and distal signal reception. Analysis of a thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase mutant (tapx), the (1)O2-retrograde signaling double mutant (ex1/ex2), and an apoplastic signaling double mutant (rbohD/F) revealed that tAPX and EXECUTER 1 are required for both HL and systemic acclimation stress perception. Apoplastic membrane-localized RBOHs were required for systemic spread of the signal but not for local signal induction in directly stressed tissues. Endogenous ROS treatments revealed a very strong systemic response induced by a localized 1 h induction of (1)O2 using the conditional flu mutant. A qPCR time course of (1)O2 induced systemic marker genes in directly and indirectly connected leaves revealed a direct vascular connection component of both immediate and longer term SAA signaling responses. These results reveal the importance of an EXECUTER-dependent (1)O2 retrograde signal for both local and long distance RBOH-dependent acclimation signaling that is distinct from other HL signaling pathways, and that direct vascular connections have a role in spatial-temporal SAA induction. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Tsunami landslide source models as a tool for analyzing complex case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, S. T.; Watts, P.; Kirby, J. T.

    2003-12-01

    In tsunami generation, coseismic displacement sources can essentially be considered as having negligible duration (i.e., of a few to a few dozen seconds), as compared to characteristic times of tsunami propagation (i.e., period of at least several minutes). By contrast, submarine landslides, when they occur in or near very deep water areas, may last for a much longer time and thus produce tsunami sources of significant duration as compared to tsunami period. In analyzing data from landslide tsunami case studies, and in particular wave data, it is therefore very important to be able to understand the full history of both landslide and tsunami generation, in order to accurately estimate landslide time of failure based on such data. Recent three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic models developed to simulate tsunami generation by complex landslide scenarios offer such possibilities. Using these models, together with field data, the authors were able to identify both likely types and times of failure in specific case studies, in order to reproduce at best the observations in both the near and far field. To obtain far field results, the modeled 3D tsunami source is used as initial condition in a two-dimensional long wave propagation model. The cases of Skagway, PNG, and Unimak 1946 will be specifically discussed.

  3. Evaluation of a Florida coastal golf complex as a local and watershed source of bioavailable contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Michael A.; Quarles, Robert L.; Dantin, Darrin D.; Moore, James C

    2004-02-01

    Contaminant fate in coastal areas impacted by golf course runoff is not well understood. This report summarizes trace metal, pesticide and PCB residues for colonized periphyton, Ruppia maritima (widgeon grass), Callinectes sapidus Rathbun (blue crabs) and Crassostrea virginica Gemlin (Eastern oyster) collected from areas adjacent to a Florida golf course complex which receive runoff containing reclaimed municipal wastewater. Concentrations of 19 chlorinated pesticides and 18 PCB congeners were usually below detection in the biota. In contrast, 8 trace metals were commonly detected although concentrations were not usually significantly different for biota collected from reference and non-reference coastal areas. Residue concentrations in decreasing order were typically: zinc, arsenic, copper, chromium, lead, nickel, cadmium and mercury. Mean BCF values for the eight trace metals ranged between 160-57 000 (periphyton), 79-11 033 (R. maritima), 87-162 625 (C. virginica) and 12-9800 (C. sapidus). Most trace metal residues in periphyton colonized adjacent to the golf complex, were either similar to or significantly less than those reported for periphyton colonized in nearby coastal areas impacted by urban stormwater runoff and treated municipal and industrial wastewater discharges. Consequently, the recreational complex does not appear to be a major source of bioavailable contaminants locally nor in the immediate watershed based on results for the selected biota.

  4. Transgenerational acclimation of fishes to climate change and ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Philip L

    2014-01-01

    There is growing concern about the impacts of climate change and ocean acidification on marine organisms and ecosystems, yet the potential for acclimation and adaptation to these threats is poorly understood. Whereas many short-term experiments report negative biological effects of ocean warming and acidification, new studies show that some marine species have the capacity to acclimate to warmer and more acidic environments across generations. Consequently, transgenerational plasticity may be a powerful mechanism by which populations of some species will be able to adjust to projected climate change. Here, I review recent advances in understanding transgenerational acclimation in fishes. Research over the past 2 to 3 years shows that transgenerational acclimation can partially or fully ameliorate negative effects of warming, acidification, and hypoxia in a range of different species. The molecular and cellular pathways underpinning transgenerational acclimation are currently unknown, but modern genetic methods provide the tools to explore these mechanisms. Despite the potential benefits of transgenerational acclimation, there could be limitations to the phenotypic traits that respond transgenerationally, and trade-offs between life stages, that need to be investigated. Future studies should also test the potential interactions between transgenerational plasticity and genetic evolution to determine how these two processes will shape adaptive responses to environmental change over coming decades.

  5. Sampling-based correlation estimation for distributed source coding under rate and complexity constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ngai-Man; Wang, Huisheng; Ortega, Antonio

    2008-11-01

    In many practical distributed source coding (DSC) applications, correlation information has to be estimated at the encoder in order to determine the encoding rate. Coding efficiency depends strongly on the accuracy of this correlation estimation. While error in estimation is inevitable, the impact of estimation error on compression efficiency has not been sufficiently studied for the DSC problem. In this paper,we study correlation estimation subject to rate and complexity constraints, and its impact on coding efficiency in a DSC framework for practical distributed image and video applications. We focus on, in particular, applications where binary correlation models are exploited for Slepian-Wolf coding and sampling techniques are used to estimate the correlation, while extensions to other correlation models would also be briefly discussed. In the first part of this paper, we investigate the compression of binary data. We first propose a model to characterize the relationship between the number of samples used in estimation and the coding rate penalty, in the case of encoding of a single binary source. The model is then extended to scenarios where multiple binary sources are compressed, and based on the model we propose an algorithm to determine the number of samples allocated to different sources so that the overall rate penalty can be minimized, subject to a constraint on the total number of samples. The second part of this paper studies compression of continuous valued data. We propose a model-based estimation for the particular but important situations where binary bit-planes are extracted from a continuous-valued input source, and each bit-plane is compressed using DSC. The proposed model-based method first estimates the source and correlation noise models using continuous valued samples, and then uses the models to derive the bit-plane statistics analytically. We also extend the model-based estimation to the cases when bit-planes are extracted based on the

  6. Low-Complexity Compression Algorithm for Hyperspectral Images Based on Distributed Source Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjian Nian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A low-complexity compression algorithm for hyperspectral images based on distributed source coding (DSC is proposed in this paper. The proposed distributed compression algorithm can realize both lossless and lossy compression, which is implemented by performing scalar quantization strategy on the original hyperspectral images followed by distributed lossless compression. Multilinear regression model is introduced for distributed lossless compression in order to improve the quality of side information. Optimal quantized step is determined according to the restriction of the correct DSC decoding, which makes the proposed algorithm achieve near lossless compression. Moreover, an effective rate distortion algorithm is introduced for the proposed algorithm to achieve low bit rate. Experimental results show that the compression performance of the proposed algorithm is competitive with that of the state-of-the-art compression algorithms for hyperspectral images.

  7. Bacterial Synergism in Lignocellulose Biomass Degradation - Complementary Roles of Degraders As Influenced by Complexity of the Carbon Source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortes Tolalpa, Larisa; Falcao Salles, Joana; van Elsas, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass (LCB) is an attractive source of carbon for the production of sugars and other chemicals. Due to its inherent complexity and heterogeneity, efficient biodegradation requires the actions of different types of hydrolytic enzymes. In nature, complex microbial communities that

  8. Electrical Signaling, Photosynthesis and Systemic Acquired Acclimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Szechyńska-Hebda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrical signaling in higher plants is required for the appropriate intracellular and intercellular communication, stress responses, growth and development. In this review, we have focus on recent findings regarding the electrical signaling, as a major regulator of the systemic acquired acclimation (SAA and the systemic acquired resistance (SAR. The electric signaling on its own cannot confer the required specificity of information to trigger SAA and SAR, therefore, we have also discussed a number of other mechanisms and signaling systems that can operate in combination with electric signaling. We have emphasized the interrelation between ionic mechanism of electrical activity and regulation of photosynthesis, which is intrinsic to a proper induction of SAA and SAR. In a special way, we have summarized the role of non-photochemical quenching and its regulator PsbS. Further, redox status of the cell, calcium and hydraulic waves, hormonal circuits and stomatal aperture regulation have been considered as components of the signaling. Finally, a model of light-dependent mechanisms of electrical signaling propagation has been presented together with the systemic regulation of light-responsive genes encoding both, ion channels and proteins involved in regulation of their activity. Due to space limitations, we have not addressed many other important aspects of hormonal and ROS signaling, which were presented in a number of recent excellent reviews.

  9. Spatial Regression and Prediction of Water Quality in a Watershed with Complex Pollution Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoying; Liu, Qun; Luo, Xingzhang; Zheng, Zheng

    2017-08-16

    Fast economic development, burgeoning population growth, and rapid urbanization have led to complex pollution sources contributing to water quality deterioration simultaneously in many developing countries including China. This paper explored the use of spatial regression to evaluate the impacts of watershed characteristics on ambient total nitrogen (TN) concentration in a heavily polluted watershed and make predictions across the region. Regression results have confirmed the substantial impact on TN concentration by a variety of point and non-point pollution sources. In addition, spatial regression has yielded better performance than ordinary regression in predicting TN concentrations. Due to its best performance in cross-validation, the river distance based spatial regression model was used to predict TN concentrations across the watershed. The prediction results have revealed a distinct pattern in the spatial distribution of TN concentrations and identified three critical sub-regions in priority for reducing TN loads. Our study results have indicated that spatial regression could potentially serve as an effective tool to facilitate water pollution control in watersheds under diverse physical and socio-economical conditions.

  10. Synergistic microbial consortium for bioenergy generation from complex natural energy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Victor Bochuan; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Chua, Song-Lin; Zhang, Qichun; Cao, Bin; Chye, Joachim Loo Say; Yang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Microbial species have evolved diverse mechanisms for utilization of complex carbon sources. Proper combination of targeted species can affect bioenergy production from natural waste products. Here, we established a stable microbial consortium with Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to produce bioenergy from an abundant natural energy source, in the form of the sarcocarp harvested from coconuts. This component is mostly discarded as waste. However, through its usage as a feedstock for MFCs to produce useful energy in this study, the sarcocarp can be utilized meaningfully. The monospecies S. oneidensis system was able to generate bioenergy in a short experimental time frame while the monospecies E. coli system generated significantly less bioenergy. A combination of E. coli and S. oneidensis in the ratio of 1:9 (v:v) significantly enhanced the experimental time frame and magnitude of bioenergy generation. The synergistic effect is suggested to arise from E. coli and S. oneidensis utilizing different nutrients as electron donors and effect of flavins secreted by S. oneidensis. Confocal images confirmed the presence of biofilms and point towards their importance in generating bioenergy in MFCs.

  11. Modeling watershed non-point source pollution: complexity, uncertainty and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Han, F.; Luo, X.; Wu, B.

    2012-12-01

    Non-point source pollution (NPSP) is a major cause of surface water quality degradation. Watershed models (e.g. the Soil and Water Assessment Tool, SWAT) have been increasingly used to simulate NPSP and support the pollution prevention. These models originated from hydrologic models but add significant complexity. Their simulations usually involve substantial uncertainty especially when observational data are scarce, which largely limits the models application. Based on our past and ongoing studies, this presentation discusses the following issues: 1) effective and efficient methods to quantify the uncertainty associated with the model simulations; 2) cost-effective strategies to reduce the uncertainty through data acquisition and assimilation; 3) directions to improve the current NPSP models. While discussing the first issue, Probabilistic Collocation Method (PCM) based approaches of uncertainty analysis (UA) and data assimilation will be presented, and the important role of management concerns in the UA will be discussed. Regarding the second issue, approaches to optimize data acquisition and assimilation, based on the concept of value of information (VOI), will be introduced, and the tradeoff between uncertainty and cost will be discussed. While addressing the last issue, two key points will be made. First, the complexity of the NPSP models does not necessarily lead to good simulation results, but is very likely to introduce significant uncertainty and the parameter identifiability issue. Thus, the model complexity has to be tailored to the data condition. Second, some core modeling assumptions should be re-examined through further studies on the physical process of NPSP. For example, our recent experimental studies showed that the enrichment theory widely adopted in NPSP models has significant limitations. This presentation calls for more efforts on developing a new generation of watershed NPSP models.

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Acclimation Processes of the Photosynthetic Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Heidari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Photosynthetic energy conversion efficiency is characteristic of a system which is determined by interactions between various components of the system. The complex process of photosynthesis has been studied as a whole system which enables in silico examination of a large number of candidate genes for genetic engineering for a higher photosynthetic energy conversion efficiency. One of the most important environmental factors which influence the photosynthesis efficiency is light regime which can cause producing ROS components. To acclimate to such fluctuations, plants have evolved adaptive mechanisms to minimize damage of the photosynthetic apparatus excess light. A fast compatibility response to high light stresses is non-photochemical quenching process (NPQ, dissipating excessive energy to heat. Light harvested state switches into a quenched state by a conformational change of light harvesting complex (LHCII that regulated by xanthophylls and the PsbS protein within seconds. Low lumen pH activates xanthophyll synthesis via a xanthophyll cycle which consists of the de-epoxidation of violaxanthin to zeaxanthin by violaxanthin de-epoxidase in high light and inversely by zeaxanthin epoxidase in low light which occurs more slowly. Materials and Methods Thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana (Chlombia-0 were grown on soil at 25/22 °C day/night temperature, with a 16/8 h photoperiod, and 40-70% (depend of plant species relative humidity. The light intensity was 150–200 µE m-2s-1 white light. Intensity of chlorophyll fluorescence was measured with PAM-2000 fluorometer (Heinz Walz, Germany and the manufacturer’s software (PamWin v.2. Results and Discussion In the present study, a dynamic kinetics amplified mathematical model was developed based on differential equations in order to predict short-term changes in NPQ in the process of adaptation to different light conditions. We investigated the stationary and dynamic behavior of the model

  13. Interaction with diurnal and circadian regulation results in dynamic metabolic and transcriptional changes during cold acclimation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Espinoza

    Full Text Available In plants, there is a large overlap between cold and circadian regulated genes and in Arabidopsis, we have shown that cold (4°C affects the expression of clock oscillator genes. However, a broader insight into the significance of diurnal and/or circadian regulation of cold responses, particularly for metabolic pathways, and their physiological relevance is lacking. Here, we performed an integrated analysis of transcripts and primary metabolites using microarrays and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As expected, expression of diurnally regulated genes was massively affected during cold acclimation. Our data indicate that disruption of clock function at the transcriptional level extends to metabolic regulation. About 80% of metabolites that showed diurnal cycles maintained these during cold treatment. In particular, maltose content showed a massive night-specific increase in the cold. However, under free-running conditions, maltose was the only metabolite that maintained any oscillations in the cold. Furthermore, although starch accumulates during cold acclimation we show it is still degraded at night, indicating significance beyond the previously demonstrated role of maltose and starch breakdown in the initial phase of cold acclimation. Levels of some conventional cold induced metabolites, such as γ-aminobutyric acid, galactinol, raffinose and putrescine, exhibited diurnal and circadian oscillations and transcripts encoding their biosynthetic enzymes often also cycled and preceded their cold-induction, in agreement with transcriptional regulation. However, the accumulation of other cold-responsive metabolites, for instance homoserine, methionine and maltose, did not have consistent transcriptional regulation, implying that metabolic reconfiguration involves complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. These data demonstrate the importance of understanding cold acclimation in the correct day-night context, and are further

  14. Sensitivity to Angular and Radial Source Movements as a Function of Acoustic Complexity in Normal and Impaired Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundbeck, Micha; Grimm, Giso; Hohmann, Volker; Laugesen, Søren; Neher, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to static sounds, spatially dynamic sounds have received little attention in psychoacoustic research so far. This holds true especially for acoustically complex (reverberant, multisource) conditions and impaired hearing. The current study therefore investigated the influence of reverberation and the number of concurrent sound sources on source movement detection in young normal-hearing (YNH) and elderly hearing-impaired (EHI) listeners. A listening environment based on natural environmental sounds was simulated using virtual acoustics and rendered over headphones. Both near-far ('radial') and left-right ('angular') movements of a frontal target source were considered. The acoustic complexity was varied by adding static lateral distractor sound sources as well as reverberation. Acoustic analyses confirmed the expected changes in stimulus features that are thought to underlie radial and angular source movements under anechoic conditions and suggested a special role of monaural spectral changes under reverberant conditions. Analyses of the detection thresholds showed that, with the exception of the single-source scenarios, the EHI group was less sensitive to source movements than the YNH group, despite adequate stimulus audibility. Adding static sound sources clearly impaired the detectability of angular source movements for the EHI (but not the YNH) group. Reverberation, on the other hand, clearly impaired radial source movement detection for the EHI (but not the YNH) listeners. These results illustrate the feasibility of studying factors related to auditory movement perception with the help of the developed test setup.

  15. Sensitivity to Angular and Radial Source Movements as a Function of Acoustic Complexity in Normal and Impaired Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Giso; Hohmann, Volker; Laugesen, Søren; Neher, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to static sounds, spatially dynamic sounds have received little attention in psychoacoustic research so far. This holds true especially for acoustically complex (reverberant, multisource) conditions and impaired hearing. The current study therefore investigated the influence of reverberation and the number of concurrent sound sources on source movement detection in young normal-hearing (YNH) and elderly hearing-impaired (EHI) listeners. A listening environment based on natural environmental sounds was simulated using virtual acoustics and rendered over headphones. Both near-far (‘radial’) and left-right (‘angular’) movements of a frontal target source were considered. The acoustic complexity was varied by adding static lateral distractor sound sources as well as reverberation. Acoustic analyses confirmed the expected changes in stimulus features that are thought to underlie radial and angular source movements under anechoic conditions and suggested a special role of monaural spectral changes under reverberant conditions. Analyses of the detection thresholds showed that, with the exception of the single-source scenarios, the EHI group was less sensitive to source movements than the YNH group, despite adequate stimulus audibility. Adding static sound sources clearly impaired the detectability of angular source movements for the EHI (but not the YNH) group. Reverberation, on the other hand, clearly impaired radial source movement detection for the EHI (but not the YNH) listeners. These results illustrate the feasibility of studying factors related to auditory movement perception with the help of the developed test setup. PMID:28675088

  16. Acclimation improves salt stress tolerance in Zea mays plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, Camilla; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-08-20

    Plants exposure to low level salinity activates an array of processes leading to an improvement of plant stress tolerance. Although the beneficial effect of acclimation was demonstrated in many herbaceous species, underlying mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain poorly understood. In the present study we have addressed this issue by investigating ionic mechanisms underlying the process of plant acclimation to salinity stress in Zea mays. Effect of acclimation were examined in two parallel sets of experiments: a growth experiment for agronomic assessments, sap analysis, stomatal conductance, chlorophyll content, and confocal laser scanning imaging; and a lab experiment for in vivo ion flux measurements from root tissues. Being exposed to salinity, acclimated plants (1) retain more K(+) but accumulate less Na(+) in roots; (2) have better vacuolar Na(+) sequestration ability in leaves and thus are capable of accumulating larger amounts of Na(+) in the shoot without having any detrimental effect on leaf photochemistry; and (3) rely more on Na(+) for osmotic adjustment in the shoot. At the same time, acclimation affect was not related in increased root Na(+) exclusion ability. It appears that even in a such salt-sensitive species as maize, Na(+) exclusion from uptake is of a much less importance compared with the efficient vacuolar Na(+) sequestration in the shoot. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. When complex is easy on the mind: internal repetition of visual information in complex objects is a source of perceptual fluency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayça Berfu Ünal; Linda Steg; Roos Pals; Yannick Joye

    2015-01-01

    Across 3 studies, we investigated whether visual complexity deriving from internally repeating visual information over many scale levels is a source of perceptual fluency. Such continuous repetition of visual information is formalized in fractal geometry and is a key-property of natural structures.

  18. SCFA lead lab technical assistance review of the Pit 7 Complex source containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, D.; Janeday, D.; Woodward, D.; Imrich, J.; Evans, J.; Morris, M.; Reimus, P.; Hazen, T.

    2001-01-29

    On January 29-30, 2001 a technical assistance team (TAT) met with the Pit 7 project team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to review technologies being evaluated for remediation in the Site 300 Pit 7 Complex and the process for selecting these technologies. Specifically, the project team presented the TAT with a core need to identify technically and economically practicable technologies and methods to stabilize, contain, or control the tritium and uranium in the source areas at the Pits 3 and 5 landfill area to prevent further releases of these contaminants to groundwater and the migration of tritiated and uranium-contaminated groundwater. The approaches and needs for the systems surrounding the landfills were also presented and discussed. With encouragement from the project team, the TAT expanded its focus to include additional site characterization, a water balance model, and computational models. The TAT was comprised of leading technical and regulatory experts from around the country and was assembled by SCFA's Lead Lab in response to a technical assistance request from John Ziagos, Project Manager for the Pit 7 Area (Technical Assistance Request: LLNL No.1). A list of the TAT members is included below and contact information the TAT members and site participants is in Appendix B. To familiarize the TAT assistance team with Pit 7 Complex issues, the project team gave a presentation outlining the site geology, contaminant hydrogeology, land-use issues, stakeholder concerns, regulatory requirements, groundwater flow and transport modeling efforts, pit source characterization efforts, and remedial options. Time for clarification and questions between the TAT and the site team was integrated into the presentation schedule. On the morning of the second day, the TAT reconvened with the site team and John Evans of the TAT presented information about a helium soil gas survey method that could potentially be used to locate and characterize tritium

  19. Costs and benefits of cold acclimation in field released Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten N; Hoffmann, Ary A; Overgaard, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    One way animals can counter the effects of climatic extremes is via physiological acclimation, but acclimating to one extreme might decrease performance under different conditions. Here, we use field releases of Drosophila melanogaster on two continents across a range of temperatures to test...... for costs and benefits of developmental or adult cold acclimation. Both types of cold acclimation had enormous benefits at low temperatures in the field; in the coldest releases only cold-acclimated flies were able to find a resource. However, this advantage came at a huge cost; flies that had not been cold......-acclimated were up to 36 times more likely to find food than the cold-acclimated flies when temperatures were warm. Such costs and strong benefits were not evident in laboratory tests where we found no reduction in heat survival of the cold-acclimated flies. Field release studies, therefore, reveal costs of cold...

  20. Tracing coastal and estuarine groundwater discharge sources in a complex faulted and fractured karst aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomasino, D.; Price, R. M.

    2013-05-01

    Groundwater discharge can be an important input of water, nutrients and other constituents to coastal wetlands and adjacent marine areas, particularly in karst regions with little to no surface water flow. A combination of natural processes (e.g., sea-level rise and climate change) and anthropogenic pressures (e.g., urban growth and development) can alter the subterranean water flow to the coastline. For water management practices and environmental preservation to be better suited for the natural and human environment, a better understanding is needed of the hydrogeologic connectivity between the areas of fresh groundwater recharge and the coastal zone. The Yucatan peninsula has a unique tectonic and geologic history consisting of a Cretaceous impact crater, Miocene and Eocene tectonic plate movements, and multiple sea-level stands. These events have shaped many complex geologic formations and structures. The Sian Káan Biosphere Reserve (SKBR), a UNESCO World Heritage Site located along the Atlantic Ocean, overlaps two distinct hydrogeologic regions: the evaporate region to the south and south west, and the Holbox Fracture Zone to the north. These two regions create a complex network of layered, perched and fractured aquifers and an extensive groundwater cave network. The two regions are distinguished by bedrock mineralogical differences that can be used to trace shallow subsurface water from interior portions of the peninsula to the Bahia de la Ascension in the SKBR. The objective of this research was to use naturally occurring geochemical tracers (eg., Cl-, SO42-, HCO3-, K+, Mg2+, Na+, Ca2+ and stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen) to decipher the sources of groundwater flow through the coastal wetlands of the SKBR and into the Bahia de la Ascension. Surface water and groundwater samples were collected during two field campaigns in 2010 and 2012 within the coastal and estuarine waters of the SKBR. Additional water samples were collected at select cenotes along

  1. Drinking and water balance during exercise and heat acclimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Brock, P. J.; Keil, L. C.; Morse, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    The interactions between fluid intake and balance, and plasma ion, osmotic, and endocrine responses during dehydration produced by exercise in cool and warm environments during acclimation are explored. Two groups of five male subjects performed 8 days of ergometer exercise in hot and thermoneutral conditions, respectively. The exercise trials lasted 2 hr each. Monitoring was carried out on the PV, osmotic, sodium, and endocrine concentrations, voluntary fluid intake, fluid balances, and fluid deficits. A negative correlation was observed between the plasma sodium and osmolality during acclimation. The presence of hypervolemia during acclimation is suggested as a cause of drinking, while the vasopressin concentration was not found to be a significant factor stimulating drinking. Finally, the predominant mechanism in fluid intake during exercise and heat exposure is concluded to be the renin-angiotensin II system in the presence of reductions in total body water and extracellular plasma volumes.

  2. Can phenotypic plasticity in Rubisco performance contribute to photosynthetic acclimation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Amanda P; Kubien, David S

    2014-02-01

    Photosynthetic acclimation varies among species, which likely reveals variations at the biochemical level in the pathways that constitute carbon assimilation and energy transfer. Local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity affect the environmental response of photosynthesis. Phenotypic plasticity allows for a wide array of responses from a single individual, encouraging fitness in a broad variety of environments. Rubisco catalyses the first enzymatic step of photosynthesis, and is thus central to life on Earth. The enzyme is well conserved, but there is habitat-dependent variation in kinetic parameters, indicating that local adaptation may occur. Here, we review evidence suggesting that land plants can adjust Rubisco's intrinsic biochemical characteristics during acclimation. We show that this plasticity can theoretically improve CO2 assimilation; the effect is non-trivial, but small relative to other acclimation responses. We conclude by discussing possible mechanisms that could account for biochemical plasticity in land plant Rubisco.

  3. Ground motion in the presence of complex Topography II: Earthquake sources and 3D simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Stephen; Ramirez-Guzman, Leonardo; Meremonte, Mark; Leeds, Alena L.

    2017-01-01

    Eight seismic stations were placed in a linear array with a topographic relief of 222 m over Mission Peak in the east San Francisco Bay region for a period of one year to study topographic effects. Seventy‐two well‐recorded local earthquakes are used to calculate spectral amplitude ratios relative to a reference site. A well‐defined fundamental resonance peak is observed with individual station amplitudes following the theoretically predicted progression of larger amplitudes in the upslope direction. Favored directions of vibration are also seen that are related to the trapping of shear waves within the primary ridge dimensions. Spectral peaks above the fundamental one are also related to topographic effects but follow a more complex pattern. Theoretical predictions using a 3D velocity model and accurate topography reproduce many of the general frequency and time‐domain features of the data. Shifts in spectral frequencies and amplitude differences, however, are related to deficiencies of the model and point out the importance of contributing factors, including the shear‐wave velocity under the topographic feature, near‐surface velocity gradients, and source parameters.

  4. The microglial NADPH oxidase complex as a source of oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landreth Gary E

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, and manifests as progressive cognitive decline and profound neuronal loss. The principal neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease are the senile plaques and the neurofibrillary tangles. The senile plaques are surrounded by activated microglia, which are largely responsible for the proinflammatory environment within the diseased brain. Microglia are the resident innate immune cells in the brain. In response to contact with fibrillar beta-amyloid, microglia secrete a diverse array of proinflammatory molecules. Evidence suggests that oxidative stress emanating from activated microglia contribute to the neuronal loss characteristic of this disease. The source of fibrillar beta-amyloid induced reactive oxygen species is primarily the microglial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase. The NADPH oxidase is a multicomponent enzyme complex that, upon activation, produces the highly reactive free radical superoxide. The cascade of intracellular signaling events leading to NADPH oxidase assembly and the subsequent release of superoxide in fibrillar beta-amyloid stimulated microglia has recently been elucidated. The induction of reactive oxygen species, as well as nitric oxide, from activated microglia can enhance the production of more potent free radicals such as peroxynitrite. The formation of peroxynitrite causes protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, which ultimately lead to neuronal cell death. The elimination of beta-amyloid-induced oxidative damage through the inhibition of the NADPH oxidase represents an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. A Thermal-based Two-Source Energy Balance Model for Estimating Evapotranspiration over Complex Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustas, William; Anderson, Martha; Nieto, Hector; Andreu, Ana; Yang, Yun; Cammalleri, Carmelo; Alfieri, Joseph; Gao, Feng; Hain, Christopher; Torres-Rua, Alfonso

    2017-04-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) provides valuable information for quantifying root-zone water availability, evapotranspiration (ET) and crop condition as well as providing useful information for constraining prognostic land surface models. This presentation describes a robust but relatively simple LST-based land surface model called the Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model. The TSEB algorithms solve for the soil/substrate and canopy temperatures that achieves a balance in the radiation and turbulent heat flux exchange for the soil/substrate and vegetation elements coupled to the lower atmosphere. As a result, the TSEB modeling framework is applicable to a wide range of environmental and canopy cover conditions, which has been a limitation in many other LST-based energy balance approaches. This is particularly relevant in applying surface energy balance models using LST over heterogeneous landscapes with complex vegetation distribution and architecture/structure. An overview of applications of the TSEB modeling framework to a variety of landscapes will be presented. In addition, a modeling system will be described called the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) that couples the TSEB scheme with an atmospheric boundary layer model in time-differencing mode to routinely map continental-scale daily ET at 5 to 10-km resolution using geostationary satellites. A related algorithm (DisALEXI) spatially disaggregates ALEXI output down to finer spatial resolutions using polar orbiting satellites such as Landsat, which provides pixel resolutions at the scale of human management activities affecting land use⪉nd cover.

  6. Availability of ferrocyanide and ferricyanide complexes as a nitrogen source to cyanogenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Gu, Ji-Dong; Li, Tian-Peng

    2008-08-01

    The effects of additional nitrogen on the toxicity and removal of ferrocyanide and ferricyanide by cyanogenic plants were investigated. Maize (Zea mays L. var. ZN 304) seedlings were grown in the hydroponic solutions with or without additional nitrogen, and amended with either potassium ferrocyanide or potassium ferricyanide at 25.0 +/- 0.5 degrees C for 144 h. Various physiological parameters were monitored to determine the responses of the plant seedlings to the exposure of these two chemicals. A remarkable decrease in transpiration rate, biomass, shoot length, chlorophyll contents, and soluble proteins was evident for maize seedlings grown in the N-free hydroponic solutions spiked with either ferrocyanide or ferricyanide (P hydroponic solutions spiked with either of these chemicals (P > 0.05). A higher removal of ferrocyanide than ferricyanide was registered in the N-free hydroponic solutions, but more ferricyanide than ferrocyanide was removed by maize grown in the N-containing nutrient solutions (P hydroponic solutions than the N-free nutrient solutions (P solution was assimilated by maize and additional nitrogen had a significantly negative impact on the uptake of both chemicals (P < 0.01). Results of this study suggest that uptake and assimilation mechanisms for ferrocyanide and ferricyanide might be quite different in maize and the application of the external nitrogen has a substantial influence on the removal of both iron cyanides by plants. None of the iron cyanide complexes can serve as a sole nitrogen source to support maize growth.

  7. Acclimation of rice photosynthesis to irradiance under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Erik H; Hubbart, Stella; Chen, Yizhu; Peng, Shaobing; Horton, Peter

    2002-12-01

    Acclimation to irradiance was measured in terms of light-saturated photosynthetic carbon assimilation rates (P(max)), Rubisco, and pigment content in mature field-grown rice (Oryza sativa) plants in tropical conditions. Measurements were made at different positions within the canopy alongside irradiance and daylight spectra. These data were compared with a second experiment in which acclimation to irradiance was assessed in uppermost leaves within whole-plant shading regimes (10% low light [LL], 40% medium light [ML], and 100% high light [HL] of full natural sunlight). Two varieties, japonica (tropical; new plant type [NPT]) and indica (IR72) were compared. Values for Rubisco amount, chlorophyll a/b, and P(max) all declined from the top to the base of the canopy. In the artificial shading experiment, acclimation of P(max) (measured at 350 microL L(-1) CO(2)) occurred between LL and ML for IR72 with no difference observed between ML and HL. The Rubisco amount increased between ML and HL in IR72. A different pattern was seen for NPT with higher P(max) (measured at 350 microL L(-1) CO(2)) at LL than IR72 and some acclimation of this parameter between ML and HL. Rubisco levels were higher in NPT than IR72 contrasting with P(max). Comparison of data from both experiments suggests a leaf aging effect between the uppermost two leaf positions, which was not a result of irradiance acclimation. Results are discussed in terms of: (a) acclimation of photosynthesis and radiation use efficiency at high irradiance in rice, and (b) factors controlling photosynthetic rates of leaves within the canopy.

  8. Passive heat acclimation improves skeletal muscle contractility in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racinais, S; Wilson, M G; Périard, J D

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of repeated passive heat exposure (i.e., acclimation) on muscle contractility in humans. Fourteen nonheat-acclimated males completed two trials including electrically evoked twitches and voluntary contractions in thermoneutral conditions [Cool: 24°C, 40% relative humidity (RH)] and hot ambient conditions in the hyperthermic state (Hot: 44-50°C, 50% RH) on consecutive days in a counterbalanced order. Rectal temperature was ~36.5°C in Cool and was maintained at ~39°C throughout Hot. Both trials were repeated after 11 days of passive heat acclimation (1 h per day, 48-50°C, 50% RH). Heat acclimation decreased core temperature in Cool (-0.2°C, P rate in Hot (+0.7 liter/h, P heat acclimation improved skeletal muscle contractility as evidenced by an increase in evoked peak twitch amplitude both in Cool (20.5 ± 3.6 vs. 22.0 ± 4.0 N·m) and Hot (20.5 ± 4.7 vs. 22.0 ± 4.0 N·m) (+9%, P heat acclimation improves skeletal muscle contractile function during electrically evoked and voluntary muscle contractions of different intensities both in Cool and Hot. These results suggest that repeated heat exposure may have important implications to passively maintain or even improve muscle function in a variety of performance and clinical settings. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Short Duration Heat Acclimation in Australian Football Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Kelly, Paul B. Gastin, Daniel B Dwyer, Simon Sostaric, Rodney J. Snow

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined if five sessions of short duration (27 min, high intensity, interval training (HIIT in the heat over a nine day period would induce heat acclimation in Australian football (AF players. Fourteen professional AF players were matched for VO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1 and randomly allocated into either a heat acclimation (Acc (n = 7 or Control (Con group (n = 7. The Acc completed five cycle ergometer HIIT sessions within a nine day period on a cycle ergometer in the heat (38.7 ± 0.5 °C; 34.4 ± 1.3 % RH, whereas Con trained in thermo-neutral conditions (22.3 ± 0.2 °C; 35.8 ± 0. % RH. Four days prior and two days post HIIT participants undertook a 30 min constant load cycling test at 60% VO2peak in the heat (37.9 ± 0.1 °C; 28.5 ± 0.7 % RH during which VO2, blood lactate concentration ([Lac-], heart rate (HR, rating of perceived exertion (RPE, thermal comfort, core and skin temperatures were measured. Heat acclimation resulted in reduced RPE, thermal comfort and [Lac-] (all p < 0.05 during the submaximal exercise test in the heat. Heart rate was lower (p = 0.007 after HIIT, in both groups. Heat acclimation did not influence any other measured variables. In conclusion, five short duration HIIT sessions in hot dry conditions induced limited heat acclimation responses in AF players during the in-season competition phase. In practice, the heat acclimation protocol can be implemented in a professional team environment; however the physiological adaptations resulting from such a protocol were limited.

  10. Thermal acclimation of photosynthesis: on the importance of adjusting our definitions and accounting for thermal acclimation of respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Danielle A; Yamori, Wataru

    2014-02-01

    While interest in photosynthetic thermal acclimation has been stimulated by climate warming, comparing results across studies requires consistent terminology. We identify five types of photosynthetic adjustments in warming experiments: photosynthesis as measured at the high growth temperature, the growth temperature, and the thermal optimum; the photosynthetic thermal optimum; and leaf-level photosynthetic capacity. Adjustments of any one of these variables need not mean a concurrent adjustment in others, which may resolve apparently contradictory results in papers using different indicators of photosynthetic acclimation. We argue that photosynthetic thermal acclimation (i.e., that benefits a plant in its new growth environment) should include adjustments of both the photosynthetic thermal optimum (T opt) and photosynthetic rates at the growth temperature (A growth), a combination termed constructive adjustment. However, many species show reduced photosynthesis when grown at elevated temperatures, despite adjustment of some photosynthetic variables, a phenomenon we term detractive adjustment. An analysis of 70 studies on 103 species shows that adjustment of T opt and A growth are more common than adjustment of other photosynthetic variables, but only half of the data demonstrate constructive adjustment. No systematic differences in these patterns were found between different plant functional groups. We also discuss the importance of thermal acclimation of respiration for net photosynthesis measurements, as respiratory temperature acclimation can generate apparent acclimation of photosynthetic processes, even if photosynthesis is unaltered. We show that while dark respiration is often used to estimate light respiration, the ratio of light to dark respiration shifts in a non-predictable manner with a change in leaf temperature.

  11. Acclimation to different depths by the marine angiosperm Posidonia oceanica: transcriptomic and proteomic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattolo, Emanuela; Gu, Jenny; Bayer, Philipp E.; Mazzuca, Silvia; Serra, Ilia A.; Spadafora, Antonia; Bernardo, Letizia; Natali, Lucia; Cavallini, Andrea; Procaccini, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    For seagrasses, seasonal and daily variations in light and temperature represent the mains factors driving their distribution along the bathymetric cline. Changes in these environmental factors, due to climatic and anthropogenic effects, can compromise their survival. In a framework of conservation and restoration, it becomes crucial to improve our knowledge about the physiological plasticity of seagrass species along environmental gradients. Here, we aimed to identify differences in transcriptomic and proteomic profiles, involved in the acclimation along the depth gradient in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica, and to improve the available molecular resources in this species, which is an important requisite for the application of eco-genomic approaches. To do that, from plant growing in shallow (−5 m) and deep (−25 m) portions of a single meadow, (i) we generated two reciprocal Expressed Sequences Tags (EST) libraries using a Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) approach, to obtain depth/specific transcriptional profiles, and (ii) we identified proteins differentially expressed, using the highly innovative USIS mass spectrometry methodology, coupled with 1D-SDS electrophoresis and labeling free approach. Mass spectra were searched in the open source Global Proteome Machine (GPM) engine against plant databases and with the X!Tandem algorithm against a local database. Transcriptional analysis showed both quantitative and qualitative differences between depths. EST libraries had only the 3% of transcripts in common. A total of 315 peptides belonging to 64 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. ATP synthase subunits were among the most abundant proteins in both conditions. Both approaches identified genes and proteins in pathways related to energy metabolism, transport and genetic information processing, that appear to be the most involved in depth acclimation in P. oceanica. Their putative rules in acclimation to depth were discussed. PMID:23785376

  12. Acclimation to different depths by the marine angiosperm Posidonia oceanica: transcriptomic and proteomic profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela eDattolo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For seagrasses, seasonal and daily variations in light and temperature represent the mains factors driving their distribution along the bathymetric cline. Changes in these environmental factors, due to climatic and anthropogenic effects, can compromise their survival. In a framework of conservation and restoration, it becomes crucial to improve our knowledge about the physiological plasticity of seagrass species along environmental gradients. Here, we aimed to identify differences in transcriptomic and proteomic profiles, involved in the acclimation along the depth gradient in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica, and to improve the available molecular resources in this species, which is an important requisite for the application of eco-genomic approaches. To do that, from plant growing in the shallow (-5m and a deep (-25m portions of a single meadow, (i we generated two reciprocal EST (Expressed Sequences Tags libraries using a Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization (SSH approach, to obtain depth/specific transcriptional profiles, and (ii we identified proteins differentially expressed, using the highly innovative USIS mass spectrometry methodology, coupled with 1D-SDS electrophoresis and labeling free approach. Mass spectra were searched in the open source Global Proteome Machine (GPM engine against plant databases and with the X!Tandem algorithm against a local database. Transcriptional analysis showed both quantitative and qualitative differences between depths. EST libraries had only the 3% of transcripts in common. A total of 315 peptides belonging to 64 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. ATP synthase subunits were among the most abundant proteins in both conditions. Both approaches identified genes and proteins in pathways related to energy metabolism, transport and genetic information processing, that appear o be the most involved in depth acclimation in P. oceanica. Their putative rules in acclimation to depth were discussed.

  13. Model of complex integrated use of alternative energy sources for highly urbanized areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova Elena Ivanovna

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The increase of population and continuous development of highly urbanized territories poses new challenges to experts in the field of energy saving technologies. Only a multifunctional and autonomous system of building engineering equipment formed by the principles of energy efficiency and cost-effectiveness meets the needs of modern urban environment. Alternative energy sources, exploiting the principle of converting thermal energy into electrical power, show lack of efficiency, so it appears to be necessary for reaching a visible progress to skip this middle step. A fuel cell, converting chemical energy straight into electricity, and offering a vast diversity of both fuel types and oxidizing agents, gives a strong base for designing a complex integrated system. Regarding the results of analysis and comparison conducted among the most types of fuel cells proposed by contemporary scholars, a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC is approved to be able to ensure the smooth operation of such a system. While the advantages of this device meet the requirements of engineering equipment for modern civil and, especially, dwelling architecture, its drawbacks do not contradict with the operating regime of the proposed system. The article introduces a model of a multifunctional system based on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC and not only covering the energy demand of a particular building, but also providing the opportunity for proper and economical operation of several additional sub-systems. Air heating and water cooling equipment, ventilating and conditioning devices, the circle of water supply and preparation of water discharge for external use (e.g. agricultural needs included into a closed circuit of the integrated system allow evaluating it as a promising model of further implementation of energy saving technologies into architectural and building practice. This, consequently, will positively affect both ecological and economic development of urban environment.

  14. Alterations in mitochondrial electron transport system activity in response to warm acclimation, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sappal, Ravinder [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); MacDougald, Michelle [Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Health Sciences Centre, Prince Philip Drive, St. John’s, NL, A1B 3V6 (Canada); Fast, Mark [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Siah, Ahmed [British Columbia Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences, 871A Island Highway, Campbell River, BC, V9W 2C2 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Sequential inhibition and activation allows assessment of multiple segments of the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation have global effects on the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation sensitize the electron transport system to copper. • Thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper act additively to impair mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Fish expend significant amounts of energy to handle the numerous potentially stressful biotic and abiotic factors that they commonly encounter in aquatic environments. This universal requirement for energy singularizes mitochondria, the primary cellular energy transformers, as fundamental drivers of responses to environmental change. Our study probed the interacting effects of thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation (HRO) and copper (Cu) exposure in rainbow trout to test the prediction that they act jointly to impair mitochondrial function. Rainbow trout were acclimated to 11 (controls) or 20 °C for 2 months. Liver mitochondria were then isolated and their responses in vitro to Cu (0–20 μM) without and with HRO were assessed. Sequential inhibition and activation of mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) enzyme complexes permitted the measurement of respiratory activities supported by complex I–IV (CI–IV) in one run. The results showed that warm acclimation reduced fish and liver weights but increased mitochondrial protein indicating impairment of energy metabolism, increased synthesis of defense proteins and/or reduced liver water content. Whereas acute rise (11 → 20 °C) in temperature increased mitochondrial oxidation rates supported by CI–IV, warm acclimation reduced the maximal (state 3) and increased the basal (state 4) respiration leading to global uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). HRO profoundly inhibited both maximal and basal respiration rates supported by CI–IV, reduced RCR for all except

  15. Molecular processes of transgenerational acclimation to a warming ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Veilleux, Heather D.

    2015-07-20

    Some animals have the remarkable capacity to acclimate across generations to projected future climate change1, 2, 3, 4; however, the underlying molecular processes are unknown. We sequenced and assembled de novo transcriptomes of adult tropical reef fish exposed developmentally or transgenerationally to projected future ocean temperatures and correlated the resulting expression profiles with acclimated metabolic traits from the same fish. We identified 69 contigs representing 53 key genes involved in thermal acclimation of aerobic capacity. Metabolic genes were among the most upregulated transgenerationally, suggesting shifts in energy production for maintaining performance at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, immune- and stress-responsive genes were upregulated transgenerationally, indicating a new complement of genes allowing the second generation of fish to better cope with elevated temperatures. Other differentially expressed genes were involved with tissue development and transcriptional regulation. Overall, we found a similar suite of differentially expressed genes among developmental and transgenerational treatments. Heat-shock protein genes were surprisingly unresponsive, indicating that short-term heat-stress responses may not be a good indicator of long-term acclimation capacity. Our results are the first to reveal the molecular processes that may enable marine fishes to adjust to a future warmer environment over multiple generations.

  16. Metabolic acclimation to heat stress in farm housed Holstein cows ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of body condition score to metabolic acclimation in heat stressed Holstein cows. Body condition of cows had no effect on any of the tested parameters during the thermal neutral period, except for the percentage of protein in milk. Heat stress has been demonstrated to have ...

  17. Molecular processes of transgenerational acclimation to a warming ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Heather D.; Ryu, Taewoo; Donelson, Jennifer M.; van Herwerden, Lynne; Seridi, Loqmane; Ghosheh, Yanal; Berumen, Michael L.; Leggat, William; Ravasi, Timothy; Munday, Philip L.

    2015-12-01

    Some animals have the remarkable capacity to acclimate across generations to projected future climate change; however, the underlying molecular processes are unknown. We sequenced and assembled de novo transcriptomes of adult tropical reef fish exposed developmentally or transgenerationally to projected future ocean temperatures and correlated the resulting expression profiles with acclimated metabolic traits from the same fish. We identified 69 contigs representing 53 key genes involved in thermal acclimation of aerobic capacity. Metabolic genes were among the most upregulated transgenerationally, suggesting shifts in energy production for maintaining performance at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, immune- and stress-responsive genes were upregulated transgenerationally, indicating a new complement of genes allowing the second generation of fish to better cope with elevated temperatures. Other differentially expressed genes were involved with tissue development and transcriptional regulation. Overall, we found a similar suite of differentially expressed genes among developmental and transgenerational treatments. Heat-shock protein genes were surprisingly unresponsive, indicating that short-term heat-stress responses may not be a good indicator of long-term acclimation capacity. Our results are the first to reveal the molecular processes that may enable marine fishes to adjust to a future warmer environment over multiple generations.

  18. Induction of thermotolerance through heat acclimation and salicylic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many putative signaling molecules like SA, ABA, H2O2 and CaCl2 and heat acclimation have been found to be involved in inducing thermotolerance as well as in initiating the underlying signal transduction pathway for upregulating various genes involved in thermotolerace. In the present investigation, we observed the ...

  19. Sensitivity to Angular and Radial Source Movements as a Function of Acoustic Complexity in Normal and Impaired Hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbeck, Micha; Grimm, Giso; Hohmann, Volker

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to static sounds, spatially dynamic sounds have received little attention in psychoacoustic research so far. This holds true especially for acoustically complex (reverberant, multisource) conditions and impaired hearing. The current study therefore investigated the influence of reverb......In contrast to static sounds, spatially dynamic sounds have received little attention in psychoacoustic research so far. This holds true especially for acoustically complex (reverberant, multisource) conditions and impaired hearing. The current study therefore investigated the influence...... than the YNH group, despite adequate stimulus audibility. Adding static sound sources clearly impaired the detectability of angular source movements for the EHI (but not the YNH) group. Reverberation, on the other hand, clearly impaired radial source movement detection for the EHI (but not the YNH...

  20. Kurtosis based blind source extraction of complex noncircular signals with application in EEG artifact removal in real-time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush eJavidi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A new class of complex domain blind source extraction (BSE algorithms suitable for the extraction of both circular and noncircular complex signals is proposed. This is achieved through sequential extraction based on the degree of kurtosis and in the presence of noncircular measurement noise. The existence and uniqueness analysis of the solution is followed by a study of fast converging variants of the algorithm. The performance is first assessed through simulations on well understood benchmark signals, followed by a case study on real-time artifact removal from EEG signals, verified using both qualitative and quantitative metrics. The results illustrate the power of the proposed approach in real-time blind extraction of general complex-valued sources.

  1. A stable isotope approach for source apportionment of chlorinated ethene plumes at a complex multi-contamination events urban site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Schmidt, Marie; Pellegatti, Eleonora; Paramatti, Enrico; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Gargini, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of chlorinated aliphatic compounds such as chlorinated methanes, ethanes and ethenes was examined as an intrinsic fingerprint for apportionment of sources. A complex field site located in Ferrara (Italy), with more than 50years history of use of chlorinated aliphatic compounds, was investigated in order to assess contamination sources. Several contamination plumes were found in a complex alluvial sandy multi-aquifer system close to the river Po; sources are represented by uncontained former industrial and municipal dump sites as well as by spills at industrial areas. The carbon stable isotope signature allowed distinguishing 2 major sources of contaminants. One source of chlorinated aliphatic contaminants was strongly depleted in ¹³C (-40‰ which is commonly observed in recent production of chlorinated solvents. The degradation processes in the plumes could be traced interpreting the isotope enrichment and depletion of parent and daughter compounds, respectively. We demonstrate that, under specific production conditions, namely when highly chlorinated ethenes are produced as by-product during chloromethanes production, ¹³C depleted fingerprinting of contaminants can be obtained and this can be used to track sources and address the responsible party of the pollution in urban areas. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Superposition of nonparaxial vectorial complex-source spherically focused beams: Axial Poynting singularity and reverse propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, counterintuitive effects such as the generation of an axial (i.e., long the direction of wave motion) zero-energy flux density (i.e., axial Poynting singularity) and reverse (i.e., negative) propagation of nonparaxial quasi-Gaussian electromagnetic (EM) beams are examined. Generalized analytical expressions for the EM field's components of a coherent superposition of two high-order quasi-Gaussian vortex beams of opposite handedness and different amplitudes are derived based on the complex-source-point method, stemming from Maxwell's vector equations and the Lorenz gauge condition. The general solutions exhibiting unusual effects satisfy the Helmholtz and Maxwell's equations. The EM beam components are characterized by nonzero integer degree and order (n ,m ) , respectively, an arbitrary waist w0, a diffraction convergence length known as the Rayleigh range zR, and a weighting (real) factor 0 ≤α ≤1 that describes the transition of the beam from a purely vortex (α =0 ) to a nonvortex (α =1 ) type. An attractive feature for this superposition is the description of strongly focused (or strongly divergent) wave fields. Computations of the EM power density as well as the linear and angular momentum density fluxes illustrate the analysis with particular emphasis on the polarization states of the vector potentials forming the beams and the weight of the coherent beam superposition causing the transition from the vortex to the nonvortex type. Should some conditions determined by the polarization state of the vector potentials and the beam parameters be met, an axial zero-energy flux density is predicted in addition to a negative retrograde propagation effect. Moreover, rotation reversal of the angular momentum flux density with respect to the beam handedness is anticipated, suggesting the possible generation of negative (left-handed) torques. The results are particularly useful in applications involving the design of strongly focused optical laser

  3. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  4. Leaf respiratory acclimation to climate: comparisons among boreal and temperate tree species along a latitudinal transect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillaway, Dylan N; Kruger, Eric L

    2011-10-01

    In common gardens along an ∼900 km latitudinal transect through Wisconsin and Illinois, U.S.A., tree species typical of boreal and temperate forests were compared with respect to the nature and magnitude of leaf respiratory acclimation to contrasting climates. The boreal representatives were trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.), while the temperate species were eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr ex. Marsh var. deltoides) and sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.). Assessments were conducted on seedlings grown from seed sources collected near southern and northern range boundaries, respectively. Nighttime rates of leaf dark respiration (R(d)) at common temperatures, as well as R(d)'s short-term temperature sensitivity (energy of activation, E(o)), were assessed for all species and gardens twice during a growing season. Little evidence of R(d) thermal acclimation was observed, despite a 12 °C range in average air temperature across gardens. Instead, R(d) variation at warm temperatures was linked most closely with prior leaf photosynthetic performance, while R(d) variation at cooler temperatures was most strongly related to leaf nitrogen concentration. Moreover, E(o) differences across species and gardens appeared to stem from the somewhat independent limitations on warm versus cool R(d). Based on this construct, an empirical model relying on R(d) estimates from leaf photosynthesis and nitrogen concentration explained 55% of the observed E(o) variation.

  5. Chromatic acclimation and population dynamics of green sulfur bacteria grown with spectrally tailored light

    CERN Document Server

    Saikin, Semion K; Huh, Joonsuk; Hannout, Moataz; Wang, Yaya; Zare, Farrokh; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    Living organisms have to adjust to their surrounding in order to survive in stressful conditions. We study this mechanism in one of most primitive creatures - photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria. These bacteria absorb photons very efficiently using the chlorosome antenna complexes and perform photosynthesis in extreme low-light environments. How the chlorosomes in green sulfur bacteria are acclimated to the stressful light conditions, for instance, if the spectrum of light is not optimal for absorption, is unknown. Studying Chlorobaculum tepidum cultures with far-red to near-infrared light-emitting diodes, we found that these bacteria react to changes in energy flow by regulating the amount of light-absorbing pigments and the size of the chlorosomes. Surprisingly, our results indicate that the bacteria can survive in near-infrared lights capturing low-frequency photons by the intermediate units of the light-harvesting complex. The latter strategy may be used by the species recently found near hydrothermal ve...

  6. Using Multiple Sources of Information in Establishing Text Complexity. Reading Research Report. #11.03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Elfrieda H.

    2011-01-01

    A focus of the Common Core State Standards/English Language Arts (CCSS/ELA) is that students become increasingly more capable with complex text over their school careers. This focus has redirected attention to the measurement of text complexity. Although CCSS/ELA suggests multiple criteria for this task, the standards offer a single measure of…

  7. Threshold disorder as a source of diverse and complex behavior in random nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGuire, P.C.; Bohr, Henrik; Clark, J.W.

    2002-01-01

    We study the diversity of complex spatio-temporal patterns in the behavior of random synchronous asymmetric neural networks (RSANNs). Special attention is given to the impact of disordered threshold values on limit-cycle diversity and limit-cycle complexity in RSANNs which have 'normal' thresholds...

  8. Bearing detection in the presence of two sources of varying coherence using the complex cepstrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. R.; Elliott, K. B.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of the presence of two acoustic sources (one, the primary, whose location is to be detected) of varying coherence on a cepstral bearing finding procedure is experimentally studied. The coherence between the acoustic sources was altered by adding random noise of various SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) to the input signal of the primary source; the same base signal being fed to both sources. The results demonstrate that, when block liftering is used, the primary source bearing is reliably estimated for coherences as low as gamma sup 2 greater than or approx equal to 0.5. The results also imply that background noise (unreflected) of SNR greater than or approx equal to 10 dB will not markedly affect the accuracy of the bearing estimation algorithm.

  9. Uncoupling High Light Responses from Singlet Oxygen Retrograde Signaling and Spatial-Temporal Systemic Acquired Acclimation1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Matthew; Havaux, Michel; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Distinct ROS signaling pathways initiated by singlet oxygen (1O2) or superoxide and hydrogen peroxide have been attributed to either cell death or acclimation, respectively. Recent studies have revealed that more complex antagonistic and synergistic relationships exist within and between these pathways. As specific chloroplastic ROS signals are difficult to study, rapid systemic signaling experiments using localized high light (HL) stress or ROS treatments were used in this study to uncouple signals required for direct HL and ROS perception and distal systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). A qPCR approach was chosen to determine local perception and distal signal reception. Analysis of a thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase mutant (tapx), the 1O2-retrograde signaling double mutant (ex1/ex2), and an apoplastic signaling double mutant (rbohD/F) revealed that tAPX and EXECUTER 1 are required for both HL and systemic acclimation stress perception. Apoplastic membrane-localized RBOHs were required for systemic spread of the signal but not for local signal induction in directly stressed tissues. Endogenous ROS treatments revealed a very strong systemic response induced by a localized 1 h induction of 1O2 using the conditional flu mutant. A qPCR time course of 1O2 induced systemic marker genes in directly and indirectly connected leaves revealed a direct vascular connection component of both immediate and longer term SAA signaling responses. These results reveal the importance of an EXECUTER-dependent 1O2 retrograde signal for both local and long distance RBOH-dependent acclimation signaling that is distinct from other HL signaling pathways, and that direct vascular connections have a role in spatial-temporal SAA induction. PMID:27288360

  10. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radaelli, P. G.; Dhesi, S. S.

    2015-01-26

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007–2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described.

  11. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, P G; Dhesi, S S

    2015-03-06

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007-2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Understanding and quantifying foliar temperature acclimation for Earth System Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, N. G.; Dukes, J.

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthesis and respiration on land are the two largest carbon fluxes between the atmosphere and Earth's surface. The parameterization of these processes represent major uncertainties in the terrestrial component of the Earth System Models used to project future climate change. Research has shown that much of this uncertainty is due to the parameterization of the temperature responses of leaf photosynthesis and autotrophic respiration, which are typically based on short-term empirical responses. Here, we show that including longer-term responses to temperature, such as temperature acclimation, can help to reduce this uncertainty and improve model performance, leading to drastic changes in future land-atmosphere carbon feedbacks across multiple models. However, these acclimation formulations have many flaws, including an underrepresentation of many important global flora. In addition, these parameterizations were done using multiple studies that employed differing methodology. As such, we used a consistent methodology to quantify the short- and long-term temperature responses of maximum Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax), maximum rate of Ribulos-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration (Jmax), and dark respiration (Rd) in multiple species representing each of the plant functional types used in global-scale land surface models. Short-term temperature responses of each process were measured in individuals acclimated for 7 days at one of 5 temperatures (15-35°C). The comparison of short-term curves in plants acclimated to different temperatures were used to evaluate long-term responses. Our analyses indicated that the instantaneous response of each parameter was highly sensitive to the temperature at which they were acclimated. However, we found that this sensitivity was larger in species whose leaves typically experience a greater range of temperatures over the course of their lifespan. These data indicate that models using previous acclimation formulations are likely incorrectly

  13. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Sources Fondation Pablo Iglesias. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Archives privées de Manuel ArijaArchives extérieuresArchives FNJS de EspañaPrensa Archives Générales de l’Administration. Alcala de Henares. Sections : Opposition au franquismeSig. 653 Sig TOP 82/68.103-68.602.Índice de las cartas colectivas, Relaciones, Cartas al Ministro de Información de Marzo de 1965. c.662. Sources cinématographiques Filmothèque Nationale d’Espagne.NO.DO. N° 1157C. 08/03/1965.aguirre Javier, Blanco vertical....

  14. Acclimation increases freezing stress response of Arabidopsis thaliana at proteome level

    KAUST Repository

    Fanucchi, Francesca

    2012-06-01

    This study used 2DE to investigate how Arabidopsis thaliana modulates protein levels in response to freezing stress after sub-lethal exposure at - 10 °C, both in cold-acclimated and in non-acclimated plants. A map was implemented in which 62 spots, corresponding to 44 proteins, were identified. Twenty-two spots were modulated upon treatments, and the corresponding proteins proved to be related to photosynthesis, energy metabolism, and stress response. Proteins demonstrated differences between control and acclimation conditions. Most of the acclimation-responsive proteins were either not further modulated or they were down-modulated by freezing treatment, indicating that the levels reached during acclimation were sufficient to deal with freezing. Anabolic metabolism appeared to be down-regulated in favor of catabolic metabolism. Acclimated plants and plants submitted to freezing after acclimation showed greater reciprocal similarity in protein profiles than either showed when compared both to control plants and to plants frozen without acclimation. The response of non-acclimated plants was aimed at re-modulating photosynthetic apparatus activity, and at increasing the levels of proteins with antioxidant-, molecular chaperone-, or post-transcriptional regulative functions. These changes, even less effective than the acclimation strategy, might allow the injured plastids to minimize the production of non-useful metabolites and might counteract photosynthetic apparatus injuries. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chicken feather hydrolysate as an inexpensive complex nitrogen source for PHA production by Cupriavidus necator on waste frying oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benesova, P; Kucera, D; Marova, I; Obruca, S

    2017-08-01

    The chicken feather hydrolysate (FH) has been tested as a potential complex nitrogen source for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by Cupriavidus necator H16 when waste frying oil was used as a carbon source. The addition of FH into the mineral salt media with decreased inorganic nitrogen source concentration improved the yields of biomass and polyhydrohyalkanoates. The highest yields were achieved when 10 vol.% of FH prepared by microwave-assisted alkaline hydrolysis of 60 g l-1 feather was added. In this case, the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) yields were improved by more than about 50% as compared with control cultivation. A positive impact of FH was also observed for accumulation of copolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) when sodium propionate was used as a precursor. The copolymer has superior processing and mechanical properties in comparison with PHB homopolymer. The application of FH eliminated the inhibitory effect of propionate and resulted in altered content of 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) in copolymer. Therefore, the hydrolysed feather can serve as an excellent complex source of nitrogen for the polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production. Moreover, by the combination of two inexpensive types of waste, such as waste frying oil and feather hydrolysate, it is possible to produce PHA with substantially improved efficiency and sustainability. Millions of tons of feathers, important waste product of poultry-processing industry, are disposed off annually without any further benefits. Thus, there is an inevitable need for new technologies that enable ecologically and economically sensible processing of this waste. Herein, we report that alkali-hydrolysed feathers can be used as a complex nitrogen source considerably improving polyhydroxyalkanoates production on waste frying oil employing Cupriavidus necator. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Adaptive and acclimative responses of cyanobacteria to far-red light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Fei; Bryant, Donald A

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria use three major photosynthetic complexes, photosystem (PS) I, PS II and phycobilisomes, to harvest and convert sunlight into chemical energy. Until recently, it was generally thought that cyanobacteria only used light between 400 nm and 700 nm to perform photosynthesis. However, the discovery of chlorophyll (Chl) d in Acaryochloris marina and Chl f in Halomicronema hongdechloris showed that some cyanobacteria could utilize far-red light. The synthesis of Chl f (and Chl d) is part of an extensive acclimation process, far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP), which occurs in many cyanobacteria. Organisms performing FaRLiP contain a conserved set of 17 genes encoding paralogous subunits of the three major photosynthetic complexes. Far-red light photoacclimation leads to substantial remodelling of the photosynthetic apparatus and other changes in cellular metabolism through extensive changes in transcription. Far-red light photoacclimation appears to be controlled by a red/far-red photoreceptor, RfpA, as well as two response regulators (RfpB and RfpC), one of which is a DNA-binding protein. The remodelled photosynthetic complexes, including novel phycobiliproteins, absorb light above 700 nm and enable cells to grow in far-red light. A much simpler acclimation response, low-light photoacclimation (LoLiP), occurs in some cyanobacteria that contain the apcD4-apcB3-isiX cluster, which allows cells to grow under low light conditions. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Heat Acclimation and Water-Immersion Deconditioning: Responses to Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartz, E.; Bhattacharya, A.; Sperinde, S. J.; Brock, P. J.; Sciaraffa, D.; Haines, R. F.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Simulated subgravity conditions, such as bed rest and water immersion, cause a decrease in a acceleration tolerance (3, 4), tilt tolerance (3, 9, 10), work capacity (5, 7), and plasma volume (1, 8-10). Moderate exercise training performed during bed rest (4) and prior to water immersion (5) provides some protection against the adverse effects of deconditioning, but the relationship between exercise and changes due to deconditioning remains unclear. Heat acclimation increases plasma and interstitial volumes, total body water, stroke volume (11), and tilt tolerance (6) and may, therefore, be a more efficient method of ameliorating deconditioning than physical training alone. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of heat acclimation and moderate physical training, performed in cool conditions, on water-immersion deconditioning.

  18. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Analysis of Cyanobacterial Photosynthesis and Acclimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Douglas; Hurry, Vaughan; Clarke, Adrian K.; Gustafsson, Petter; Öquist, Gunnar

    1998-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are ecologically important photosynthetic prokaryotes that also serve as popular model organisms for studies of photosynthesis and gene regulation. Both molecular and ecological studies of cyanobacteria benefit from real-time information on photosynthesis and acclimation. Monitoring in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence can provide noninvasive measures of photosynthetic physiology in a wide range of cyanobacteria and cyanolichens and requires only small samples. Cyanobacterial fluorescence patterns are distinct from those of plants, because of key structural and functional properties of cyanobacteria. These include significant fluorescence emission from the light-harvesting phycobiliproteins; large and rapid changes in fluorescence yield (state transitions) which depend on metabolic and environmental conditions; and flexible, overlapping respiratory and photosynthetic electron transport chains. The fluorescence parameters FV/FM, FV′/FM′,qp,qN, NPQ, and φPS II were originally developed to extract information from the fluorescence signals of higher plants. In this review, we consider how the special properties of cyanobacteria can be accommodated and used to extract biologically useful information from cyanobacterial in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence signals. We describe how the pattern of fluorescence yield versus light intensity can be used to predict the acclimated light level for a cyanobacterial population, giving information valuable for both laboratory and field studies of acclimation processes. The size of the change in fluorescence yield during dark-to-light transitions can provide information on respiration and the iron status of the cyanobacteria. Finally, fluorescence parameters can be used to estimate the electron transport rate at the acclimated growth light intensity. PMID:9729605

  19. Global transcriptome profiles of Camellia sinensis during cold acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Chao; Zhao, Qiong-Yi; Ma, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Zong-Hong; Cao, Hong-Li; Kong, Yi-Meng; Yue, Chuan; Hao, Xin-Yuan; Chen, Liang; Ma, Jian-Qiang; Jin, Ji-Qiang; Li, Xuan; Yang, Ya-Jun

    2013-06-22

    Tea is the most popular non-alcoholic health beverage in the world. The tea plant (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) needs to undergo a cold acclimation process to enhance its freezing tolerance in winter. Changes that occur at the molecular level in response to low temperatures are poorly understood in tea plants. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of cold acclimation, we employed RNA-Seq and digital gene expression (DGE) technologies to the study of genome-wide expression profiles during cold acclimation in tea plants. Using the Illumina sequencing platform, we obtained approximately 57.35 million RNA-Seq reads. These reads were assembled into 216,831 transcripts, with an average length of 356 bp and an N50 of 529 bp. In total, 1,770 differentially expressed transcripts were identified, of which 1,168 were up-regulated and 602 down-regulated. These include a group of cold sensor or signal transduction genes, cold-responsive transcription factor genes, plasma membrane stabilization related genes, osmosensing-responsive genes, and detoxification enzyme genes. DGE and quantitative RT-PCR analysis further confirmed the results from RNA-Seq analysis. Pathway analysis indicated that the "carbohydrate metabolism pathway" and the "calcium signaling pathway" might play a vital role in tea plants' responses to cold stress. Our study presents a global survey of transcriptome profiles of tea plants in response to low, non-freezing temperatures and yields insights into the molecular mechanisms of tea plants during the cold acclimation process. It could also serve as a valuable resource for relevant research on cold-tolerance and help to explore the cold-related genes in improving the understanding of low-temperature tolerance and plant-environment interactions.

  20. Congenital anomalies of coronary arteries in complex congenital heart disease: diagnosis and analysis with dual-source CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang-fang; Lu, Bin; Gao, Yang; Hou, Zhi-hui; Schoepf, U Joseph; Spearman, James V; Cao, Hui-li; Sun, Ming-li; Jiang, Shi-liang

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) are sometimes associated with coronary artery anomalies (CAAs). Accurate preoperative evaluation of coronary artery anatomy is essential for successful surgical repair of complex CHD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of congenital CAAs in patients with complex CHD at dual-source CT. Four hundred seventeen consecutive patients with complex CHD underwent contrast-enhanced cardiac CT angiography. The results were retrospectively analyzed, including the types and incidences of CAAs in various forms of complex CHD. Each patient was analyzed independently by 2 experienced cardiovascular radiologists. Image quality of coronary arteries was assessed on a 5-point scale with 2 or less being nondiagnostic. Thirty-five of 417 studies were nondiagnostic (8.39%). Sixty-three cases of CAA (15.11%) were detected by anomalous ostia and coronary arteries. CAA was involved in 6 of 108 patients with tetralogy of Fallot (5.56%), 18 of 84 patients with double outlet right ventricle (21.43%), 11 of 97 patients with pulmonary artery atresia (11.34%), 7 of 36 patients with transposition of the great arteries (22.22%), 15 of 41 patients with single ventricle (36.59%), 4 of 12 patients with truncus arteriosus/aortopulmonary window (33.33%), and 2 of 39 patients with interruption of the aortic arch/coarctation of the aorta (5.13%). Twenty of these were accompanied with an anomalous coronary course (31.74%). Patients with complex CHD have a higher prevalence of CAAs, which should be considered before surgery. Dual-source CT is an effective technique to visualize and evaluate complex CHD. Copyright © 2013 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Acclimation of photosynthesis to low leaf water potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, M.A.; Boyer, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Photosynthesis is reduced at low leaf water potentials (PSI/sub l/) but repeated water deficits can decrease this reduction, resulting in photosynthetic acclimation. The contribution of the stomata and the chloroplasts to this acclimation is unknown. The authors evaluated stomatal and chloroplast contributions when soil-grown sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants were subjected to water deficit pretreatments for 2 weeks. The relationship between photosynthesis and PSI/sub l/, determined from gas-exchange and isopiestic thermocouple psychometry, was shifted 3 to 4 bars towards lower PSI/sub l/ in pretreated plants. Leaf diffusive resistance was similarly affected. Chloroplast activity, demonstrated in situ with measurements of quantum yield and the capacity to fix CO/sub 2/ at all partial pressures of CO/sub 2/, and in vitro by photosystem II activity of isolated organelles, was inhibited at low PSI/sub l/ but less in pretreated plants than in control plants. The magnitude of this inhibition indicated that decreases in chloroplast activity contributed more than closure of stomata both to losses in photosynthesis and to the acclimation of photosynthesis to low PSI/sub l/. 32 references, 8 figures.

  2. Acclimation of Photosynthesis to Low Leaf Water Potentials 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Mark A.; Boyer, John S.

    1984-01-01

    Photosynthesis is reduced at low leaf water potentials (Ψl) but repeated water deficits can decrease this reduction, resulting in photosynthetic acclimation. The contribution of the stomata and the chloroplasts to this acclimation is unknown. We evaluated stomatal and chloroplast contributions when soil-grown sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants were subjected to water deficit pretreatments for 2 weeks. The relationship between photosynthesis and Ψl, determined from gas-exchange and isopiestic thermocouple psychometry, was shifted 3 to 4 bars towards lower Ψl, in pretreated plants. Leaf diffusive resistance was similarly affected. Chloroplast activity, demonstrated in situ with measurements of quantum yield and the capacity to fix CO2 at all partial pressures of CO2, and in vitro by photosystem II activity of isolated organelles, was inhibited at low Ψl but less in pretreated plants than in control plants. The magnitude of this inhibition indicated that decreases in chloroplast activity contributed more than closure of stomata both to losses in photosynthesis and to the acclimation of photosynthesis to low Ψl. PMID:16663372

  3. Cardiovascular adaptations supporting human exercise-heat acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périard, Julien D; Travers, Gavin J S; Racinais, Sébastien; Sawka, Michael N

    2016-04-01

    This review examines the cardiovascular adaptations along with total body water and plasma volume adjustments that occur in parallel with improved heat loss responses during exercise-heat acclimation. The cardiovascular system is well recognized as an important contributor to exercise-heat acclimation that acts to minimize physiological strain, reduce the risk of serious heat illness and better sustain exercise capacity. The upright posture adopted by humans during most physical activities and the large skin surface area contribute to the circulatory and blood pressure regulation challenge of simultaneously supporting skeletal muscle blood flow and dissipating heat via increased skin blood flow and sweat secretion during exercise-heat stress. Although it was traditionally held that cardiac output increased during exercise-heat stress to primarily support elevated skin blood flow requirements, recent evidence suggests that temperature-sensitive mechanisms may also mediate an elevation in skeletal muscle blood flow. The cardiovascular adaptations supporting this challenge include an increase in total body water, plasma volume expansion, better sustainment and/or elevation of stroke volume, reduction in heart rate, improvement in ventricular filling and myocardial efficiency, and enhanced skin blood flow and sweating responses. The magnitude of these adaptations is variable and dependent on several factors such as exercise intensity, duration of exposure, frequency and total number of exposures, as well as the environmental conditions (i.e. dry or humid heat) in which acclimation occurs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahul Pandit

    2008-10-31

    Oct 31, 2008 ... ”The more complex a thing is, the more you can talk about it.” - attributed to Giorgio Parisi. ▻ ”C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas de la science.” (It is magnificent, but not all of it is science.) - attributed ... Earliest examples: theoretical computer science, algorithmic complexity, etc. ▻ Rapid progress after the ...

  5. Source pollution control program at the Camacari Petrochemical Complex: overall and individual improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, P.A.; Neto, D.B.; Carvalho, D.M. [CETREL S.A., Camacari, BA (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    Along with the technical progress experienced by the Camacari Petrochemical Complex in the last few years, new policies, following new worldwide trends, in pollution control and prevention became mandatory. This work describes some of these experiences as well as future perspectives. 3 refs., 2 fig., 13 tabs.

  6. Judging the Credibility of Internet Sources: Developing Critical and Reflexive Readers of Complex Digital Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baildon, Mark; Damico, James

    2011-01-01

    The "elaborate systems of communication" that historian Christopher Lasch observed nearly three decades ago have intensified in complexity and scope. The explosion of the Internet and wireless technologies has resulted in a dizzying proliferation of texts. Teachers and students are but a keystroke or mouse click away from a limitless stream of…

  7. Characterizing and locating air pollution sources in a complex industrial district using optical remote sensing technology and multivariate statistical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pao-Erh Paul; Yang, Jen-Chih Rena; Den, Walter; Wu, Chang-Fu

    2014-09-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are most frequent environmental nuisance complaints in urban areas, especially where industrial districts are nearby. Unfortunately, identifying the responsible emission sources of VOCs is essentially a difficult task. In this study, we proposed a dynamic approach to gradually confine the location of potential VOC emission sources in an industrial complex, by combining multi-path open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (OP-FTIR) measurement and the statistical method of principal component analysis (PCA). Close-cell FTIR was further used to verify the VOC emission source by measuring emitted VOCs from selected exhaust stacks at factories in the confined areas. Multiple open-path monitoring lines were deployed during a 3-month monitoring campaign in a complex industrial district. The emission patterns were identified and locations of emissions were confined by the wind data collected simultaneously. N,N-Dimethyl formamide (DMF), 2-butanone, toluene, and ethyl acetate with mean concentrations of 80.0 ± 1.8, 34.5 ± 0.8, 103.7 ± 2.8, and 26.6 ± 0.7 ppbv, respectively, were identified as the major VOC mixture at all times of the day around the receptor site. As the toxic air pollutant, the concentrations of DMF in air samples were found exceeding the ambient standard despite the path-average effect of OP-FTIR upon concentration levels. The PCA data identified three major emission sources, including PU coating, chemical packaging, and lithographic printing industries. Applying instrumental measurement and statistical modeling, this study has established a systematic approach for locating emission sources. Statistical modeling (PCA) plays an important role in reducing dimensionality of a large measured dataset and identifying underlying emission sources. Instrumental measurement, however, helps verify the outcomes of the statistical modeling. The field study has demonstrated the feasibility of

  8. Acclimation to extremely high ammonia levels in continuous biomethanation process and the associated microbial community dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis; Mancini, Enrico

    2018-01-01

    Acclimatized anaerobic communities to high ammonia levels can offer a solution to the ammonia toxicity problem in biogas reactors. In the current study, a stepwise acclimation strategy up to 10 g NH4+-N L−1, was performed in mesophilic (37 ± 1 °C) continuously stirred tank reactors. The reactors......). Overall, this study demonstrated for the first time that acclimation of methanogenic communities to extreme ammonia levels in continuous AD process is possible, by developing a specialised acclimation AD microbiome....

  9. Metal as Source of Chirality in Octahedral Complexes with Tripodal Tetradentate Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, María; Rodríguez, Ricardo; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Lahoz, Fernando J; García-Orduña, Pilar; Carmona, Daniel

    2018-01-24

    The challenging control of the absolute configuration of chiral-at-metal complexes is efficiently achieved using the tripodal tetradentate ligand L. The optical resolution of rac-[RhCl2(κ4C,N,N',P-L)] mediated by (S)-α-phenylglycine provides access to enantiopure complexes of general formula [Rh(κ4C,N,N',P-L)A(Solv)][SbF6]n that enantioselectively catalyze the Diels-Alder reaction between methacrolein and HCp with enantiomeric ratio of up to >99/1. The nature of the active species, the origin of the enantioselectivity and mechanistic details are disclosed by means of NMR spectroscopy and DFT studies.

  10. On analgesic and narcotic plants: Pliny and his Greek sources, the history of a complex graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Grafting is an important concept in the study of Pliny the Elder, who is a compiler of written sources. We intend to examine how this grafting works in Pliny's discussion of analgesic and narcotic plants, especially the most famous: opium poppy, henbane, mandrake, and hound's berry. We will study Pliny's use of Greek sources and ask how he took up his predecessors' works while integrating the changes that took place during the centuries in the diagnosis and treatment of pain. This cultural graft remains elusive because we do not have access to all of Pliny's Greek sources. When Pliny speaks about these plants, he sometimes copies out information, adding or removing details, and occasionally makes significant mistakes. The graft was particularly difficult in this case because these analgesic plants were considered so special and poisonous that they were sometimes rejected or even condemned. Nevertheless, we can say that this cultural graft succeeded, despite some obstacles, because Pliny assimilated and adapted these old Greek materials to his own time, society, and project.

  11. Worldwide variation in within-canopy photosynthetic acclimation: differences in temporal and environmental controls among plant functional types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Keenan, Trevor

    2017-04-01

    Major light gradients, characteristically 10- to 50-fold, constitute the most prominent feature of plant canopies. These gradients drive within-canopy variation in foliage structural, chemical and physiological traits. As a key acclimation response to variation in light availability, foliage photosynthetic capacity per area (Aarea) increases with increasing light availability within the canopy, maximizing whole canopy photosynthesis. Recently, a worldwide database including 831 within-canopy gradients with standardized light estimates for 304 species belonging to major vascular plant functional types was constructed and within-canopy variation in photosynthetic acclimation was characterized (Niinemets Ü, Keenan TF, Hallik L (2015) Tansley review. A worldwide analysis of within-canopy variations in leaf structural, chemical and physiological traits across plant functional types. The New Phytologist 205: 973-993). However, the understanding of how within-canopy photosynthetic gradients vary during the growing season and in response to site and stand characteristics is still limited. Here we analyzed temporal, environmental and site (nutrient availability, stand density, ambient CO2 concentration, water availability) sources of variation in within-canopy photosynthetic acclimation in different plant functional types. Variation in key structural (leaf dry mass per unit area, MA), chemical (nitrogen content per dry mass, NM, and area, NA) and physiological (photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, EN) photosynthetic capacity per dry mass, Amass and area, Aarea) was examined. The analysis demonstrates major, typically 1.5-2-fold, time-, environment and site-dependent modifications in within-canopy variation in foliage photosynthetic capacity. However, the magnitude and direction of temporal and environmental variations in plasticity significantly varied among functional types. Species with longer leaf life span and low rates of canopy expansion or flush-type canopy

  12. The impact of anode acclimation strategy on microbial electrolysis cell treating hydrogen fermentation effluent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Zhang, Ruizhe; Qian, Yawei

    2017-01-01

    The impact of different anode acclimation methods for enhancing hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was investigated in this study. The anodes were first acclimated in microbial fuel cells using acetate, butyrate and corn stalk fermentation effluent (CSFE) as substrate before......). The current density (480 ± 11 A/m3) and hydrogen production rate (4.52 ± 0.13 m3/m3/d) with the anode pre-acclimated with butyrate were also higher that another two reactors. These results demonstrated that the anode biofilm pre-acclimated with butyrate has significant advantages in CSFE treatment and could...

  13. Temperature acclimation of photosynthesis and respiration: A key uncertainty in the carbon cycle‐climate feedback

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lombardozzi, Danica L; Bonan, Gordon B; Smith, Nicholas G; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Fisher, Rosie A

    2015-01-01

    Earth System Models typically use static responses to temperature to calculate photosynthesis and respiration, but experimental evidence suggests that many plants acclimate to prevailing temperatures...

  14. Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Archives Archivo Histórico del Estado de Jalisco Fondo Gobernación, Asunto Pasaportes y Salvoconductos : G-8-877/9773-9775 G-8-878/9774, 9776, 9777 et 9781 G-8-879/9782-9788 G-8-880/9789-9798 G-8-881-882/9803 G-8-882/9804-9805 G-8-883/9806-9811 G-8-884/9813 G-8-885/9817-9820 G-8-886/9822-9825 G-8-887/9826-9830 G-8-888/9835 G-8-889-890/9837 G-8-889/9839 Sources imprimées Livres et chroniques O’Farrill Romulo, (2004) Reseña histórica estadística y comercial de México y sus estados, directorio g...

  15. Succinate dehydrogenase (mitochondrial complex II) is a source of reactive oxygen species in plants and regulates development and stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim-Messeder, Douglas; Caverzan, Andréia; Rauber, Rafael; de Souza Ferreira, Eduardo; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Galina, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are signaling molecules that regulate plant development and responses to stresses. Mitochondria are the source of most ROS in heterotrophic cells, and mitochondrial complex I and complex III are regarded as the main sites of ROS production in plant mitochondria. Recent studies have demonstrated that succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) also contributes to mitochondrial ROS production. However, the ability of SDH to generate ROS in plants is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of SDH in mitochondrial ROS production. Our results demonstrated that SDH is a direct source of ROS in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, and the induction of ROS production by specific SDH inhibitors impaired plant growth. In addition, this effect was accompanied by the down-regulation of cell cycle genes and the up-regulation of stress-related genes. However, the partial inhibition of SDH by a competitive inhibitor decreased ROS production, which was associated with increased shoot and root growth, and prevented the down-regulation of cell cycle genes and the induction of stress-related genes by noncompetitive inhibitors. In conclusion, SDH plays an important role in ROS production, being a direct source of ROS in plant mitochondria and regulating plant development and stress responses. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Shell Oil Company Wilmington Complex Specification of ?ǣSource

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  17. Epithelial remodeling and claudin mRNA abundance in the gill and kidney of puffer fish (Tetraodon biocellatus) acclimated to altered environmental ion levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Nicole M; Bui, Phuong; Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Kelly, Scott P

    2011-02-01

    In water of varying ion content, the gills and kidney of fishes contribute significantly to the maintenance of salt and water balance. However, little is known about the molecular architecture of the tight junction (TJ) complex and the regulation of paracellular permeability characteristics in these tissues. In the current studies, puffer fish (Tetraodon biocellatus) were acclimated to freshwater (FW), seawater (SW) or ion-poor freshwater (IPW) conditions. Following acclimation, alterations in systemic endpoints of hydromineral status were examined in conjunction with changes in gill and kidney epithelia morphology/morphometrics, as well as claudin TJ protein mRNA abundance. T. biocellatus were able to maintain endpoints of hydromineral status within relatively tight limits across the broad range of water ion content examined. Both gill and kidney tissue exhibited substantial alterations in morphology as well as claudin TJ protein mRNA abundance. These responses were particularly pronounced when comparing fish acclimated to SW versus those acclimated to IPW. TEM observations of IPW-acclimated fish gills revealed the presence of cells that exhibited the typical characteristics of gill mitochondria-rich cells (e.g. voluminous, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-immunoreactive, exposed to the external environment at the apical surface), but were not mitochondria-rich. To our knowledge, this type of cell has not previously been described in hyperosmoregulating fish gills. Furthermore, modifications in the morphometrics and claudin mRNA abundance of kidney tissue support the notion that spatial alterations in claudin TJ proteins along the nephron of fishes will likely play an important role in the regulation of salt and water balance in these organisms.

  18. Ground motion in the presence of complex topography: Earthquake and ambient noise sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Stephen; Meremonte, Mark; Ramírez-Guzmán, Leonardo; McNamara, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    To study the influence of topography on ground motion, eight seismic recorders were deployed for a period of one year over Poverty Ridge on the east side of the San Francisco Bay Area, California. This location is desirable because of its proximity to local earthquake sources and the significant topographic relief of the array (439 m). Topographic amplification is evaluated as a function of frequency using a variety of methods, including reference‐site‐based spectral ratios and single‐station horizontal‐to‐vertical spectral ratios using both shear waves from earthquakes and ambient noise. Field observations are compared with the predicted ground motion from an accurate digital model of the topography and a 3D local velocity model. Amplification factors from the theoretical calculations are consistent with observations. The fundamental resonance of the ridge is prominently observed in the spectra of data and synthetics; however, higher‐frequency peaks are also seen primarily for sources in line with the major axis of the ridge, perhaps indicating higher resonant modes. Excitations of lateral ribs off of the main ridge are also seen at frequencies consistent with their dimensions. The favored directions of resonance are shown to be transverse to the major axes of the topographic features.

  19. Cellular Source and Mechanisms of High Transcriptome Complexity in the Mammalian Testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Soumillon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the extent of genomic transcription and its functional relevance is a central goal in genomics research. However, detailed genome-wide investigations of transcriptome complexity in major mammalian organs have been scarce. Here, using extensive RNA-seq data, we show that transcription of the genome is substantially more widespread in the testis than in other organs across representative mammals. Furthermore, we reveal that meiotic spermatocytes and especially postmeiotic round spermatids have remarkably diverse transcriptomes, which explains the high transcriptome complexity of the testis as a whole. The widespread transcriptional activity in spermatocytes and spermatids encompasses protein-coding and long noncoding RNA genes but also poorly conserves intergenic sequences, suggesting that it may not be of immediate functional relevance. Rather, our analyses of genome-wide epigenetic data suggest that this prevalent transcription, which most likely promoted the birth of new genes during evolution, is facilitated by an overall permissive chromatin in these germ cells that results from extensive chromatin remodeling.

  20. Effect of thermal acclimation on thermal preference, resistance and locomotor performance of hatchling soft-shelled turtle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Xian WU,Ling-Jun HU, Wei DANG, Hong-Liang LU, Wei-Guo DU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The significant influence of thermal acclimation on physiological and behavioral performance has been documented in many ectothermic animals, but such studies are still limited in turtle species. We acclimated hatchling soft-shelled turtles Pelodiscus sinensis under three thermal conditions (10, 20 and 30 °C for 4 weeks, and then measured selected body temperature (Tsel, critical thermal minimum (CTMin and maximum (CTMax, and locomotor performance at different body temperatures. Thermal acclimation significantly affected thermal preference and resistance of P. sinensis hatchlings. Hatchling turtles acclimated to 10 °C selected relatively lower body temperatures and were less resistant to high temperatures than those acclimated to 20 °C and 30 °C. The turtles’ resistance to low temperatures increased with a decreasing acclimation temperature. The thermal resistance range (i.e. the difference between CTMax and CTMin, TRR was widest in turtles acclimated to 20 °C, and narrowest in those acclimated to 10 °C. The locomotor performance of turtles was affected by both body temperature and acclimation temperature. Hatchling turtles acclimated to relatively higher temperatures swam faster than did those acclimated to lower temperatures. Accordingly, hatchling turtles acclimated to a particular temperature may not enhance the performance at that temperature. Instead, hatchlings acclimated to relatively warm temperatures have a better performance, supporting the “hotter is better” hypothesis [Current Zoology 59 (6 : 718–724, 2013 ].

  1. Host and parasite thermal acclimation responses depend on the stage of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Karie A; Paull, Sara H; Johnson, Pieter T J; Golembieski, Michelle N; Stephens, Jeffrey P; LaFonte, Bryan E; Raffel, Thomas R

    2016-07-01

    Global climate change is expected to alter patterns of temperature variability, which could influence species interactions including parasitism. Species interactions can be difficult to predict in variable-temperature environments because of thermal acclimation responses, i.e. physiological changes that allow organisms to adjust to a new temperature following a temperature shift. The goal of this study was to determine how thermal acclimation influences host resistance to infection and to test for parasite acclimation responses, which might differ from host responses in important ways. We tested predictions of three, non-mutually exclusive hypotheses regarding thermal acclimation effects on infection of green frog tadpoles (Lithobates clamitans) by the trematode parasite Ribeiroia ondatrae with fully replicated controlled-temperature experiments. Trematodes or tadpoles were independently acclimated to a range of 'acclimation temperatures' prior to shifting them to new 'performance temperatures' for experimental infections. Trematodes that were acclimated to intermediate temperatures (19-22 °C) had greater encystment success across temperatures than either cold- or warm-acclimated trematodes. However, host acclimation responses varied depending on the stage of infection (encystment vs. clearance): warm- (22-28 °C) and cold-acclimated (13-19 °C) tadpoles had fewer parasites encyst at warm and cold performance temperatures, respectively, whereas intermediate-acclimated tadpoles (19-25 °C) cleared the greatest proportion of parasites in the week following exposure. These results suggest that tadpoles use different immune mechanisms to resist different stages of trematode infection, and that each set of mechanisms has unique responses to temperature variability. Our results highlight the importance of considering thermal responses of both parasites and hosts when predicting disease patterns in variable-temperature environments. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of

  2. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2003 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

    2009-03-31

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the seventh season (1997-2003) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the fifth season (1999-2003) of acclimating the resultant progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2003, acclimation of

  3. The processes of social complexity in the Northwest of the Iberian Peninsula: archaeology and written sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sastre, Inés

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The general aim of this paper is the analysis of the forms of social inequality in Northwestern “castro” communities, taking into account both the regional diversity and the Roman influence before the conquest. Two models are proposed: one segmentary and the other of large castro settlements, in order to define and interpret the diversity of social relations and the processes of change. This allows us to overcome the traditional homogenising points of view and to put forward an integral analysis from both the archaeological record and the ancient literary sources.

    El objetivo de este trabajo es realizar un análisis de las formas de desigualdad social de las sociedades castreñas del Noroeste que tenga en cuenta la diversidad regional así como el papel de la influencia romana anterior a la conquista en el desarrollo de estas comunidades. Para ello se recurre a dos modelos interpretativos: el de los castros segmentarios y el de los grandes asentamientos castreños. Esto permite afirmar que existen diversas formas de articularse las relaciones sociales en el Noroeste prerromano que no son reducibles a modelos uniformes y homogenizadores como los que tradicionalmente se han aplicado. A partir de esta constatación es posible integrar la información en el estudio de las fuentes literarias, de manera convergente con el análisis arqueológico.

  4. Differentially expressed genes and proteins upon drought acclimation in tolerant and sensitive genotypes of Coffea canephora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraccini, Pierre; Vinecky, Felipe; Alves, Gabriel S C; Ramos, Humberto J O; Elbelt, Sonia; Vieira, Natalia G; Carneiro, Fernanda A; Sujii, Patricia S; Alekcevetch, Jean C; Silva, Vânia A; DaMatta, Fábio M; Ferrão, Maria A G; Leroy, Thierry; Pot, David; Vieira, Luiz G E; da Silva, Felipe R; Andrade, Alan C

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying drought acclimation in coffee plants by the identification of candidate genes (CGs) using different approaches. The first approach used the data generated during the Brazilian Coffee expressed sequence tag (EST) project to select 13 CGs by an in silico analysis (electronic northern). The second approach was based on screening macroarrays spotted with plasmid DNA (coffee ESTs) with separate hybridizations using leaf cDNA probes from drought-tolerant and susceptible clones of Coffea canephora var. Conilon, grown under different water regimes. This allowed the isolation of seven additional CGs. The third approach used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify proteins displaying differential accumulation in leaves of drought-tolerant and susceptible clones of C. canephora. Six of them were characterized by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption-time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry) and the corresponding proteins were identified. Finally, additional CGs were selected from the literature, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to analyse the expression of all identified CGs. Altogether, >40 genes presenting differential gene expression during drought acclimation were identified, some of them showing different expression profiles between drought-tolerant and susceptible clones. Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that factors involved a complex network of responses probably involving the abscisic signalling pathway and nitric oxide are major molecular determinants that might explain the better efficiency in controlling stomata closure and transpiration displayed by drought-tolerant clones of C. canephora.

  5. Natural and Anthropogenic Source of Heavy Metals Pollution in the Soil Samples of an Industrial Complex; a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mohammadi Roozbahani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Soil serves as a major reservoir for contaminants as it can bind to various chemicals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of some metals (Cd, Cu, Fe and V in soil samples collected from different stations of Ahvaz Industrial Complex II to determine the natural and anthropogenic contribution of metal in the soil. Methods: This was an experimental study that carried out in 2013. Soil samples were obtained from 9 stations and were subjected to bulk digestion and chemical partitioning. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe and V in soil were determined by ICP-OES. Contaminant factor (CF and geo-accumulation index (I-geo were used to evaluate the soil pollution in the samples. ANOVA, Duncan Multiple Range and Pearson correlation coefficient matrix tests was used to analyze the data. Results: According to I-geo results, the soil samples of the Ahvaz Industrial Complex II could be classified as strongly to very strongly pollute for Cd and it was unpolluted to moderately pollute for Cu, Fe and V. The amount of anthropogenic pollution was more than that of natural sources and the anthropogenic order of metals pollution was Fe (88%> Cu (83%> Cd (75%> V (61%. Conclusion: Metals concentrations are the highest at a distance of 300m from the pollution source. V, Cu and Cd pollutants are probably originated from oil industries.

  6. H2O2_COD_EPA; MEC_acclimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    H2O2_COD_EPA: Measurements of hydrogen peroxide and COD concentrations for water samples from the MEC reactors.MEC_acclimation: raw data for current and voltage of the anode in the MEC reactor.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Sim, J., J. An, E. Elbeshbishy, R. Hodon, and H. Lee. Characterization and optimization of cathodic conditions for H2O2 synthesis in microbial electrochemical cells. Bioresource Technology. Elsevier Online, New York, NY, USA, 195: 31-36, (2015).

  7. An integrated analysis of molecular acclimation to high light in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nymark, Marianne; Valle, Kristin C; Brembu, Tore

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthetic diatoms are exposed to rapid and unpredictable changes in irradiance and spectral quality, and must be able to acclimate their light harvesting systems to varying light conditions. Molecular mechanisms behind light acclimation in diatoms are largely unknown. We set out to investiga...

  8. Thermal acclimation of leaf respiration but not photosynthesis in Populus deltoides x nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ow, Lai Fern; Griffin, Kevin L; Whitehead, David; Walcroft, Adrian S; Turnbull, Matthew H

    2008-01-01

    Dark respiration and photosynthesis were measured in leaves of poplar Populus deltoides x nigra ('Veronese') saplings to investigate the extent of respiratory and photosynthetic acclimation in pre-existing and newly emerged leaves to abrupt changes in air temperature. The saplings were grown at three temperature regimes and at high and low nitrogen availabilities. Rates of photosynthesis and dark respiration (R(d)) were measured at the initial temperature and the saplings were then transferred to a different temperature regime, where the plants remained for a second and third round of measurements on pre-existing and newly emerged leaves. Acclimation of photosynthesis was limited following transfer to warmer or cooler growing conditions. There was strong evidence of cold and warm acclimation of R(d) to growth temperature, but this was limited in pre-existing leaves. Full acclimation of R(d )was restricted to newly emerged leaves grown at the new growth temperature. These findings indicate that the extent of thermal acclimation differs significantly between photosynthesis and respiration. Importantly, pre-existing leaves in poplar were capable of some respiratory acclimation, but full acclimation was observed only in newly emerged leaves. The R(d)/A(max) ratio declined at higher growth temperatures, and nitrogen status of leaves had little impact on the degree of acclimation.

  9. Cold resistance depends on acclimation and behavioral caste in a temperate ant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modlmeier, Andreas P.; Pamminger, Tobias; Foitzik, Susanne; Scharf, Inon

    2012-10-01

    Adjusting to low temperatures is important for animals living in cold environments. We studied the chill-coma recovery time in temperate ant workers ( Temnothorax nylanderi) from colonies collected in autumn and spring in Germany. We experimentally acclimated these ant colonies to cold temperatures followed by warm temperatures. As expected, cold-acclimated workers recovered faster from freezing temperatures, but subsequent heat acclimation did not change the short recovery times observed after cold acclimation. Hence, either heat acclimation improves cold tolerance, possibly as a general response to stress, or at least it does not negate enhanced cold tolerance following cold acclimation. Colonies collected in spring showed similar cold tolerance levels to cold-acclimated colonies in the laboratory. Next, we compared the chill-coma recovery time of different worker castes and found that exterior workers recovered faster than interior workers. This difference may be related to their more frequent exposure to cold, higher activity level, or distinct physiology. Interior workers were also heavier and showed a higher gaster-to-head ratio and thorax ratio compared to exterior workers. An obvious difference between exterior and interior workers is activity level, but we found no link between activity and cold tolerance. This suggests that physiology rather than behavioral differences could cause the increased cold tolerance of exterior workers. Our study reveals the importance of acclimation for cold tolerance under natural and standardized conditions and demonstrates differences in cold tolerance and body dimensions in monomorphic behavioral castes of an ant.

  10. Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in

  11. Heat and cold acclimation in helium-cold hypothermia in the hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchia, X. J.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of the effects of acclimation of hamsters to high (34-35 C) and low (4-5 C) temperatures for periods up to 6 weeks on the induction of hypothermia in hamsters. Hypothermia was achieved by exposing hamsters to a helox mixture of 80% helium and 20% oxygen at 0 C. Hypothermic induction was most rapid (2-3 hr) in heat-acclimated hamsters and slowest (6-12 hr) in cold-acclimated hamsters. The induction period was intermediate (5-8 hr) in room temperature nonacclimated animals (controls). Survival time in hypothermia was relatable to previous temperature acclimations. The hypothesis that thermogenesis in cold-acclimated hamsters would accentuate resistance to induction of hypothermia was substantiated.

  12. Acclimation of microalgae to wastewater environments involves increased oxidative stress tolerance activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osundeko, Olumayowa; Dean, Andrew P; Davies, Helena; Pittman, Jon K

    2014-10-01

    A wastewater environment can be particularly toxic to eukaryotic microalgae. Microalgae can adapt to these conditions but the specific mechanisms that allow strains to tolerate wastewater environments are unclear. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the ability to acclimate microalgae to tolerate wastewater is an innate or species-specific characteristic. Six different species of microalgae (Chlamydomonas debaryana, Chlorella luteoviridis, Chlorella vulgaris, Desmodesmus intermedius, Hindakia tetrachotoma and Parachlorella kessleri) that had never previously been exposed to wastewater conditions were acclimated over an 8-week period in secondary-treated municipal wastewater. With the exception of C. debaryana, acclimation to wastewater resulted in significantly higher growth rate and biomass productivity. With the exception of C. vulgaris, total chlorophyll content was significantly increased in all acclimated strains, while all acclimated strains showed significantly increased photosynthetic activity. The ability of strains to acclimate was species-specific, with two species, C. luteoviridis and P. kessleri, able to acclimate more efficiently to the stress than C. debaryana and D. intermedius. Metabolic fingerprinting of the acclimated and non-acclimated microalgae using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was able to differentiate strains on the basis of metabolic responses to the stress. In particular, strains exhibiting greater stress response and altered accumulation of lipids and carbohydrates could be distinguished. The acclimation to wastewater tolerance was correlated with higher accumulation of carotenoid pigments and increased ascorbate peroxidase activity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide is involved in the cold acclimation-induced chilling tolerance of tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Wang, Jian; Shi, Kai; Xia, Xiao Jian; Zhou, Yan Hong; Yu, Jing Quan

    2012-11-01

    Cold acclimation increases plant tolerance to a more-severe chilling and in this process an accumulation of H(2)O(2) in plants is often observed. To examine the role of H(2)O(2) in cold acclimation in plants, the accumulation of H(2)O(2), antioxidant metabolism, the glutathione redox state, gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were analyzed after cold acclimation at 12/10 °C and during the subsequent chilling at 7/4 °C in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. Cold acclimation modestly elevated the levels of H(2)O(2), the gene expression of respiratory burst oxidase homolog 1 (Rboh1) and NADPH oxidase activity, leading to the up-regulation of the expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes. In non-acclimated plants chilling caused a continuous rise in the H(2)O(2) content, an increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and in the oxidized redox state of glutathione, followed by reductions in the CO(2) assimilation rate and the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (F(v)/F(m)). However, in cold-acclimated plants chilling-induced photoinhibition, membrane peroxidation and reductions in the CO(2) assimilation rate were significantly alleviated. Furthermore, a treatment with an NADPH oxidase inhibitor or H(2)O(2) scavenger before the plants subjected to the cold acclimation abolished the cold acclimation-induced beneficial effects on photosynthesis and antioxidant metabolism, leading to a loss of the cold acclimation-induced tolerance against chilling. These results strongly suggest that the H(2)O(2) generated by NADPH oxidase in the apoplast of plant cells plays a crucial role in cold acclimation-induced chilling tolerance. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolic acclimation to excess light intensity in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Maria C; Fiehn, Oliver; Durnford, Dion G

    2013-07-01

    There are several well-described acclimation responses to excess light in green algae but the effect on metabolism has not been thoroughly investigated. This study examines the metabolic changes during photoacclimation to high-light (HL) stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. Using principal component analysis, a clear metabolic response to HL intensity was observed on global metabolite pools, with major changes in the levels of amino acids and related nitrogen metabolites. Amino acid pools increased during short-term photoacclimation, but were especially prominent in HL-acclimated cultures. Unexpectedly, we observed an increase in mitochondrial metabolism through downstream photorespiratory pathways. The expression of two genes encoding key enzymes in the photorespiratory pathway, glycolate dehydrogenase and malate synthase, were highly responsive to the HL stress. We propose that this pathway contributes to metabolite pools involved in nitrogen assimilation and may play a direct role in photoacclimation. Our results suggest that primary and secondary metabolism is highly pliable and plays a critical role in coping with the energetic imbalance during HL exposure and a necessary adjustment to support an increased growth rate that is an effective energy sink for the excess reducing power generated during HL stress. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Rockfall source characterization at high rock walls in complex geological settings by photogrammetry, structural analysis and DFN techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliardi, Federico; Riva, Federico; Galletti, Laura; Zanchi, Andrea; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2016-04-01

    Rockfall quantitative risk analysis in areas impended by high, subvertical cliffs remains a challenge, due to the difficult definition of potential rockfall sources, event magnitude scenarios and related probabilities. For this reasons, rockfall analyses traditionally focus on modelling the runout component of rockfall processes, whereas rock-fall source identification, mapping and characterization (block size distribution and susceptibility) are over-simplified in most practical applications, especially when structurally complex rock masses are involved. We integrated field and remote survey and rock mass modelling techniques to characterize rock masses and detect rockfall source in complex geo-structural settings. We focused on a test site located at Valmadrera, near Lecco (Southern Alps, Italy), where cliffs up to 600 m high impend on a narrow strip of Lake Como shore. The massive carbonates forming the cliff (Dolomia Principale Fm), normally characterized by brittle structural associations due to their high strength and stiffness, are here involved in an ENE-trending, S-verging kilometre-scale syncline. Brittle mechanisms associated to folding strongly controlled the nature of discontinuities (bedding slip, strike-slip faults, tensile fractures) and their attributes (spacing and size), as well as the spatial variability of bedding attitude and fracture intensity, with individual block sizes up to 15 m3. We carried out a high-resolution terrestrial photogrammetric survey from distances ranging from 1500 m (11 camera stations from the opposite lake shore, 265 pictures) to 150 m (28 camera stations along N-S directed boat routes, 200 pictures), using RTK GNSS measurements for camera station geo-referencing. Data processing by Structure-from-Motion techniques resulted in detailed long-range (1500 m) and medium-range (150 to 800 m) point clouds covering the entire slope with maximum surface point densities exceeding 50 pts/m2. Point clouds allowed a detailed

  16. Coastal sources, sinks and strong organic complexation of dissolved cobalt within the US North Atlantic GEOTRACES transect GA03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Abigail E.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Hawco, Nicholas J.; Lam, Phoebe J.; Saito, Mak A.

    2017-06-01

    Cobalt is the scarcest of metallic micronutrients and displays a complex biogeochemical cycle. This study examines the distribution, chemical speciation, and biogeochemistry of dissolved cobalt during the US North Atlantic GEOTRACES transect expeditions (GA03/3_e), which took place in the fall of 2010 and 2011. Two major subsurface sources of cobalt to the North Atlantic were identified. The more prominent of the two was a large plume of cobalt emanating from the African coast off the eastern tropical North Atlantic coincident with the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) likely due to reductive dissolution, biouptake and remineralization, and aeolian dust deposition. The occurrence of this plume in an OMZ with oxygen above suboxic levels implies a high threshold for persistence of dissolved cobalt plumes. The other major subsurface source came from Upper Labrador Seawater, which may carry high cobalt concentrations due to the interaction of this water mass with resuspended sediment at the western margin or from transport further upstream. Minor sources of cobalt came from dust, coastal surface waters and hydrothermal systems along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The full depth section of cobalt chemical speciation revealed near-complete complexation in surface waters, even within regions of high dust deposition. However, labile cobalt observed below the euphotic zone demonstrated that strong cobalt-binding ligands were not present in excess of the total cobalt concentration there, implying that mesopelagic labile cobalt was sourced from the remineralization of sinking organic matter. In the upper water column, correlations were observed between total cobalt and phosphate, and between labile cobalt and phosphate, demonstrating a strong biological influence on cobalt cycling. Along the western margin off the North American coast, this correlation with phosphate was no longer observed and instead a relationship between cobalt and salinity was observed, reflecting the importance of

  17. Mitochondrial acclimation potential to ocean acidification and warming of Polar cod (Boreogadus saida) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Elettra; Kunz, Kristina L; Schmidt, Matthias; Storch, Daniela; Pörtner, Hans-O; Mark, Felix C

    2017-01-01

    Ocean acidification and warming are happening fast in the Arctic but little is known about the effects of ocean acidification and warming on the physiological performance and survival of Arctic fish. In this study we investigated the metabolic background of performance through analyses of cardiac mitochondrial function in response to control and elevated water temperatures and PCO2 of two gadoid fish species, Polar cod (Boreogadus saida), an endemic Arctic species, and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), which is a temperate to cold eurytherm and currently expanding into Arctic waters in the wake of ocean warming. We studied their responses to the above-mentioned drivers and their acclimation potential through analysing the cardiac mitochondrial function in permeabilised cardiac muscle fibres after 4 months of incubation at different temperatures (Polar cod: 0, 3, 6, 8 °C and Atlantic cod: 3, 8, 12, 16 °C), combined with exposure to present (400μatm) and year 2100 (1170μatm) levels of CO2. OXPHOS, proton leak and ATP production efficiency in Polar cod were similar in the groups acclimated at 400μatm and 1170μatm of CO2, while incubation at 8 °C evoked increased proton leak resulting in decreased ATP production efficiency and decreased Complex IV capacity. In contrast, OXPHOS of Atlantic cod increased with temperature without compromising the ATP production efficiency, whereas the combination of high temperature and high PCO2 depressed OXPHOS and ATP production efficiency. Polar cod mitochondrial efficiency decreased at 8 °C while Atlantic cod mitochondria were more resilient to elevated temperature; however, this resilience was constrained by high PCO2. In line with its lower habitat temperature and higher degree of stenothermy, Polar cod has a lower acclimation potential to warming than Atlantic cod.

  18. Bacterial Synergism in Lignocellulose Biomass Degradation – Complementary Roles of Degraders As Influenced by Complexity of the Carbon Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Cortes-Tolalpa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass (LCB is an attractive source of carbon for the production of sugars and other chemicals. Due to its inherent complexity and heterogeneity, efficient biodegradation requires the actions of different types of hydrolytic enzymes. In nature, complex microbial communities that work efficiently and often synergistically accomplish degradation. Studying such synergisms in LCB degradation is fundamental for the establishment of an optimal biological degradation process. Here, we examine the wheat straw degradation potential of synthetic microbial consortia composed of bacteria and fungi. Growth of, and enzyme secretion by, monocultures of degrader strains were studied in aerobic cultures using wheat straw as the sole carbon and energy source. To investigate synergism, co-cultures were constructed from selected strains and their performance was tested in comparison with the respective monocultures. In monoculture, each organism – with a typical enzymatic profile – was found to mainly consume the cellulose part of the substrate. One strain, Flavobacterium ginsengisoli so9, displayed an extremely high degradation capacity, as measured by its secreted enzymes. Among 13 different co-cultures, five presented synergisms. These included four bacterial bicultures and one bacterial–fungal triculture. The highest level of synergism was found in a Citrobacter freundii/Sphingobacterium multivorum biculture, which revealed an 18.2-fold increase of the produced biomass. As compared to both monocultures, this bacterial pair showed significantly increased enzymatic activities, in particular of cellobiohydrolases, mannosidases, and xylosidases. Moreover, the synergism was unique to growth on wheat straw, as it was completely absent in glucose-grown bicultures. Spent supernatants of either of the two partners were found to stimulate the growth on wheat straw of the counterpart organism, in a directional manner. Thus, the basis of the LCB

  19. Sources and timing of pyroxenite formation in the sub-arc mantle: Case study of the Cabo Ortegal Complex, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilhac, Romain; Grégoire, Michel; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Griffin, William L.; Henry, Hadrien; Ceuleneer, Georges

    2017-09-01

    Pyroxenites exposed in ophiolites and orogenic peridotite massifs may record petrogenetic processes occurring in mantle domains generated and/or transferred in supra-subduction environments. However, the timing of their formation and the geochemical characteristics of their source region commonly are obscured by metamorphic and metasomatic overprints. This is especially critical in arc-related environments, where pyroxenites may be formed during the differentiation of primitive magmas. Our approach combines Sr- and Nd-isotope geochemistry and geochronology, and modelling of REE diffusion, to further constrain the origin of a well-characterized set of pyroxenites from the arc-related Cabo Ortegal Complex, Spain. In the light of petrological constraints, Sr- and Nd-isotope systematics consistently indicate that cpx and amphibole have acquired disequilibrium during two main episodes: (1) a magmatic/metasomatic episode that led to the formation of the pyroxenites, coeval with that of Cabo Ortegal granulites and corresponding to the incipient stage of a potential Cadomian arc (459-762 Ma; isochron and second-stage Nd model ages); (2) an episode of metamorphic amphibolitization upon the percolation of relatively unradiogenic and LREE-enriched hydrous fluids, subsequent to the delamination of the pyroxenites from their arc-root settings during Devonian subduction. Calculations of diffusional timescale for the re-equilibration of REE are consistent with this scenario but provide only poor additional constraints due to the sensitivity of this method to grain size and sub-solidus temperature. We thus emphasize the necessity to combine isochron ages and Nd model ages corrected for radiogenic ingrowth to put time constraints on the formation of subduction- and/or collision-related pyroxenites, along with petrological and geochemical constraints. Homogeneous age-corrected 143Nd/144Nd of 0.5121-0.5125 (εNd between 0 and +7.5) and 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7037-0.7048 provide information

  20. Fingerprinting fluid sources in Troodos ophiolite complex orbicular glasses using high spatial resolution isotope and trace element geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Raúl O. C.; Kirchenbaur, Maria; Ballhaus, Chris; Münker, Carsten; Zirner, Aurelia; Gerdes, Axel; Heuser, Alexander; Botcharnikov, Roman; Lenting, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    The Troodos igneous complex (Cyprus) is a ca. 90 Ma old, well preserved supra-subduction zone ophiolite. Troodos is unique in that it shows evidence of fluid-saturation throughout the complex, from its base (i.e. podiform chromitites) to its uppermost units - the upper pillow lavas (UPL). However, it is unclear what the source of dissolved water in UPL tholeiites is, with possibilities including shallow seawater infiltration, assimilation of altered Troodos oceanic crust, recycled serpentinized oceanic crust, or subducted pelagic sediments. In order to identify and characterize these components we have carried out a detailed high-resolution study on tholeiitic lavas on orbicular structures and glasses from the UPL in Troodos. Basaltic orbicules were measured for their Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope compositions, and in situ for their B isotopes using LA-MC-ICP-MS. UPL orbicules display a very narrow range in ɛ Nd and ɛ Hf (+7 to +8 and +13 to +15, respectively) indicating melting of a depleted mantle source. Lead isotopes, specifically 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb, form a mixing array with pelagic sediments. Furthermore, high-resolution characterization of individual orbicules revealed that UPL tholeiites display strong variability in 87Sr/86Sr (0.7039-0.7060) at the outcrop scale. Samples display δ11 B between -8.2 (± 0.5)‰ and +5.9 (± 1.1)‰ with an average B content of ca. 5 μg/g. Contrary to expectation, altered orbicules and their associated hyaloclastite matrixes display lower δ11 B (down to -10‰) and higher B contents (max. 200 μg/g) when compared to fresh glass. Furthermore, the orbicules studied here show little or no evidence of interaction with seawater, which is supported by their trace element contents and isotope compositions. When all isotope systems are taken into account, UPL lavas reflect melting of a depleted mantle source that was overprinted by hydrous sediment melts, and potentially, fluid-like subduction components that in part originate

  1. Trait acclimation mitigates mortality risks of tropical canopy trees under global warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eSterck

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a heated debate about the effect of global change on tropical forests. Many scientists predict large-scale tree mortality while others point to mitigating roles of CO2 fertilization and – the notoriously unknown – physiological trait acclimation of trees. In this opinion article we provided a first quantification of the potential of trait acclimation to mitigate the negative effects of warming on tropical canopy tree growth and survival. We applied a physiological tree growth model that incorporates trait acclimation through an optimization approach. Our model estimated the maximum effect of acclimation when trees optimize traits that are strongly plastic on a week to annual time scale (leaf photosynthetic capacity, total leaf area, stem sapwood area to maximize carbon gain. We simulated tree carbon gain for temperatures (25-35ºC and ambient CO2 concentrations (390-800 ppm predicted for the 21st century. Full trait acclimation increased simulated carbon gain by up to 10-20% and the maximum tolerated temperature by up to 2ºC, thus reducing risks of tree death under predicted warming. Functional trait acclimation may thus increase the resilience of tropical trees to warming, but cannot prevent tree death during extremely hot and dry years at current CO2 levels. We call for incorporating trait acclimation in field and experimental studies of plant functional traits, and in models that predict responses of tropical forests to climate change.

  2. Antifreeze proteins in naturally cold acclimated leaves of Drimys angustifolia, Senecio icoglossus, and Eucalyptus ssp.

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    João Gustavo Provesi

    Full Text Available Summary Antifreeze proteins (AFPs present in plants may inhibit ice recrystallization even at low concentrations, and show potential application to many frozen foods. This study evaluated the presence of antifreeze proteins in naturally cold acclimated and non-acclimated leaves of Drimys angustifolia, Senecio icoglossus and Eucalyptus ssp. No proteins were detected in apoplastic extracts of Eucalyptus ssp. Extracts of cold acclimated and non-acclimated S. icoglossus showed protein concentrations of 42.89 and 17.76 µg mL-1, both with bands between 25 and 37 kDa in the SDS-PAGE. However, they did not inhibit recrystallization. The extract of cold acclimated D. angustifolia contained a protein concentration of 95.17 µg mL-1, almost five times higher than the extract of non-acclimated D. angustifolia. In the extract of cold acclimated D. angustifolia, there was presence of ice recrystallization inhibitors. This extract showed a protein band just below 37 kDa and another more intense band between 20 and 25 kDa. It is the first time that the presence of antifreeze proteins in this species is being described.

  3. Trait Acclimation Mitigates Mortality Risks of Tropical Canopy Trees under Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterck, Frank; Anten, Niels P R; Schieving, Feike; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2016-01-01

    There is a heated debate about the effect of global change on tropical forests. Many scientists predict large-scale tree mortality while others point to mitigating roles of CO2 fertilization and - the notoriously unknown - physiological trait acclimation of trees. In this opinion article we provided a first quantification of the potential of trait acclimation to mitigate the negative effects of warming on tropical canopy tree growth and survival. We applied a physiological tree growth model that incorporates trait acclimation through an optimization approach. Our model estimated the maximum effect of acclimation when trees optimize traits that are strongly plastic on a week to annual time scale (leaf photosynthetic capacity, total leaf area, stem sapwood area) to maximize carbon gain. We simulated tree carbon gain for temperatures (25-35°C) and ambient CO2 concentrations (390-800 ppm) predicted for the 21st century. Full trait acclimation increased simulated carbon gain by up to 10-20% and the maximum tolerated temperature by up to 2°C, thus reducing risks of tree death under predicted warming. Functional trait acclimation may thus increase the resilience of tropical trees to warming, but cannot prevent tree death during extremely hot and dry years at current CO2 levels. We call for incorporating trait acclimation in field and experimental studies of plant functional traits, and in models that predict responses of tropical forests to climate change.

  4. Global convergence in leaf respiration from estimates of thermal acclimation across time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwel, Mark C; Slot, Martijn; Lichstein, Jeremy W; Reich, Peter B; Kattge, Jens; Atkin, Owen K; Bloomfield, Keith J; Tjoelker, Mark G; Kitajima, Kaoru

    2015-09-01

    Recent compilations of experimental and observational data have documented global temperature-dependent patterns of variation in leaf dark respiration (R), but it remains unclear whether local adjustments in respiration over time (through thermal acclimation) are consistent with the patterns in R found across geographical temperature gradients. We integrated results from two global empirical syntheses into a simple temperature-dependent respiration framework to compare the measured effects of respiration acclimation-over-time and variation-across-space to one another, and to a null model in which acclimation is ignored. Using these models, we projected the influence of thermal acclimation on: seasonal variation in R; spatial variation in mean annual R across a global temperature gradient; and future increases in R under climate change. The measured strength of acclimation-over-time produces differences in annual R across spatial temperature gradients that agree well with global variation-across-space. Our models further project that acclimation effects could potentially halve increases in R (compared with the null model) as the climate warms over the 21st Century. Convergence in global temperature-dependent patterns of R indicates that physiological adjustments arising from thermal acclimation are capable of explaining observed variation in leaf respiration at ambient growth temperatures across the globe. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Age and source of water in springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex, Calhoun County, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James L.

    2004-01-01

    Water from wells and springs accounts for more than 90 percent of the public water supply in Calhoun County, Alabama. Springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex are used for public water supply for the cities of Anniston and Jacksonville. The largest ground-water supply is Coldwater Spring, the primary source of water for Anniston, Alabama. The average discharge of Coldwater Spring is about 32 million gallons per day, and the variability of discharge is about 75 percent. Water-quality samples were collected from 6 springs and 15 wells in Calhoun County from November 2001 to January 2003. The pH of the ground water typically was greater than 6.0, and specific conductance was less than 300 microsiemens per centimeter. The water chemistry was dominated by calcium, carbonate, and bicarbonate ions. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of the water samples indicates the occurrence of a low-temperature, water-rock weathering reaction known as silicate hydrolysis. The residence time of the ground water, or ground-water age, was estimated by using analysis of chlorofluorocarbon, sulfur hexafluoride, and regression modeling. Estimated ground-water ages ranged from less than 10 to approximately 40 years, with a median age of about 18 years. The Spearman rho test was used to identify statistically significant covariance among selected physical properties and constituents in the ground water. The alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved solids increased as age increased; these correlations reflect common changes in ground-water quality that occur with increasing residence time and support the accuracy of the age estimates. The concentration of sodium and chloride increased as age increased; the correlation of these constituents is interpreted to indicate natural sources for chloride and sodium. The concentration of silica increased as the concentration of potassium increased; this correlation, in addition to the isotopic data, is evidence that

  6. Predictive Big Data Analytics: A Study of Parkinson's Disease Using Large, Complex, Heterogeneous, Incongruent, Multi-Source and Incomplete Observations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo D Dinov

    Full Text Available A unique archive of Big Data on Parkinson's Disease is collected, managed and disseminated by the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI. The integration of such complex and heterogeneous Big Data from multiple sources offers unparalleled opportunities to study the early stages of prevalent neurodegenerative processes, track their progression and quickly identify the efficacies of alternative treatments. Many previous human and animal studies have examined the relationship of Parkinson's disease (PD risk to trauma, genetics, environment, co-morbidities, or life style. The defining characteristics of Big Data-large size, incongruency, incompleteness, complexity, multiplicity of scales, and heterogeneity of information-generating sources-all pose challenges to the classical techniques for data management, processing, visualization and interpretation. We propose, implement, test and validate complementary model-based and model-free approaches for PD classification and prediction. To explore PD risk using Big Data methodology, we jointly processed complex PPMI imaging, genetics, clinical and demographic data.Collective representation of the multi-source data facilitates the aggregation and harmonization of complex data elements. This enables joint modeling of the complete data, leading to the development of Big Data analytics, predictive synthesis, and statistical validation. Using heterogeneous PPMI data, we developed a comprehensive protocol for end-to-end data characterization, manipulation, processing, cleaning, analysis and validation. Specifically, we (i introduce methods for rebalancing imbalanced cohorts, (ii utilize a wide spectrum of classification methods to generate consistent and powerful phenotypic predictions, and (iii generate reproducible machine-learning based classification that enables the reporting of model parameters and diagnostic forecasting based on new data. We evaluated several complementary model

  7. Predictive Big Data Analytics: A Study of Parkinson's Disease Using Large, Complex, Heterogeneous, Incongruent, Multi-Source and Incomplete Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinov, Ivo D; Heavner, Ben; Tang, Ming; Glusman, Gustavo; Chard, Kyle; Darcy, Mike; Madduri, Ravi; Pa, Judy; Spino, Cathie; Kesselman, Carl; Foster, Ian; Deutsch, Eric W; Price, Nathan D; Van Horn, John D; Ames, Joseph; Clark, Kristi; Hood, Leroy; Hampstead, Benjamin M; Dauer, William; Toga, Arthur W

    2016-01-01

    A unique archive of Big Data on Parkinson's Disease is collected, managed and disseminated by the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI). The integration of such complex and heterogeneous Big Data from multiple sources offers unparalleled opportunities to study the early stages of prevalent neurodegenerative processes, track their progression and quickly identify the efficacies of alternative treatments. Many previous human and animal studies have examined the relationship of Parkinson's disease (PD) risk to trauma, genetics, environment, co-morbidities, or life style. The defining characteristics of Big Data-large size, incongruency, incompleteness, complexity, multiplicity of scales, and heterogeneity of information-generating sources-all pose challenges to the classical techniques for data management, processing, visualization and interpretation. We propose, implement, test and validate complementary model-based and model-free approaches for PD classification and prediction. To explore PD risk using Big Data methodology, we jointly processed complex PPMI imaging, genetics, clinical and demographic data. Collective representation of the multi-source data facilitates the aggregation and harmonization of complex data elements. This enables joint modeling of the complete data, leading to the development of Big Data analytics, predictive synthesis, and statistical validation. Using heterogeneous PPMI data, we developed a comprehensive protocol for end-to-end data characterization, manipulation, processing, cleaning, analysis and validation. Specifically, we (i) introduce methods for rebalancing imbalanced cohorts, (ii) utilize a wide spectrum of classification methods to generate consistent and powerful phenotypic predictions, and (iii) generate reproducible machine-learning based classification that enables the reporting of model parameters and diagnostic forecasting based on new data. We evaluated several complementary model-based predictive approaches

  8. An integrated analysis of molecular acclimation to high light in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Nymark

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic diatoms are exposed to rapid and unpredictable changes in irradiance and spectral quality, and must be able to acclimate their light harvesting systems to varying light conditions. Molecular mechanisms behind light acclimation in diatoms are largely unknown. We set out to investigate the mechanisms of high light acclimation in Phaeodactylum tricornutum using an integrated approach involving global transcriptional profiling, metabolite profiling and variable fluorescence technique. Algae cultures were acclimated to low light (LL, after which the cultures were transferred to high light (HL. Molecular, metabolic and physiological responses were studied at time points 0.5 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h after transfer to HL conditions. The integrated results indicate that the acclimation mechanisms in diatoms can be divided into an initial response phase (0-0.5 h, an intermediate acclimation phase (3-12 h and a late acclimation phase (12-48 h. The initial phase is recognized by strong and rapid regulation of genes encoding proteins involved in photosynthesis, pigment metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging systems. A significant increase in light protecting metabolites occur together with the induction of transcriptional processes involved in protection of cellular structures at this early phase. During the following phases, the metabolite profiling display a pronounced decrease in light harvesting pigments, whereas the variable fluorescence measurements show that the photosynthetic capacity increases strongly during the late acclimation phase. We show that P. tricornutum is capable of swift and efficient execution of photoprotective mechanisms, followed by changes in the composition of the photosynthetic machinery that enable the diatoms to utilize the excess energy available in HL. Central molecular players in light protection and acclimation to high irradiance have been identified.

  9. Induction and decay of short-term heat acclimation in moderately and highly trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Andrew T; Rehrer, Nancy J; Patterson, Mark J

    2011-09-01

    A rethinking of current heat-acclimation strategies is required as most research and advice for improving physiological strain in the heat includes maintaining hydration using long-term acclimation protocols (>10 days). Furthermore, these strategies have tended to use untrained and moderately trained participants. Therefore, the aims of this review were to (i) investigate the effectiveness of short-term heat acclimation (STHA) with moderately and highly trained athletes; (ii) determine the importance of fluid regulatory strain, which has a thermally independent role in heat adaptation; (iii) assess the impact of STHA on a marker of thermotolerance (inducible heat-shock protein 70 [HSP70]); and (iv) provide further information on the decay of acclimation to heat. The review suggests that 5-day STHA is effective, and adaptations may be more pronounced after fluid regulatory strain from a dehydration-acclimation regimen. Furthermore, highly trained athletes may have similar physiological gains to those who are less trained using STHA. However, research has tended to focus on untrained or moderately trained participants and more information is required for highly trained populations. HSP70 response is upregulated across STHA. This indicates increased thermotolerance and protective adaptive change that may indicate HSP70 response as a useful marker of heat acclimation. Physiological adaptations after heat acclimation are relatively short term and may vanish only a few days or weeks after removal from heat exposure. From a practical perspective 5-day STHA may be the preferred acclimation regimen for moderately and highly trained athletes as it has been shown to be effective, less expensive and less likely to disrupt the tapering for competition in elite performers. Furthermore, updated information on the time course of acclimation decay may allow a reliable estimate of how long individuals can be free from heat exposure before reacclimation is required. This is

  10. The Rate of Seasonal Changes in Temperature Alters Acclimation of Performance under Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson-Örtman, Viktor; Johansson, Frank

    2017-12-01

    How the ability to acclimate will impact individual performance and ecological interactions under climate change remains poorly understood. Theory predicts that the benefit an organism can gain from acclimating depends on the rate at which temperatures change relative to the time it takes to induce beneficial acclimation. Here, we present a conceptual model showing how slower seasonal changes under climate change can alter species' relative performance when they differ in acclimation rate and magnitude. To test predictions from theory, we performed a microcosm experiment where we reared a mid- and a high-latitude damselfly species alone or together under the rapid seasonality currently experienced at 62°N and the slower seasonality predicted for this latitude under climate change and measured larval growth and survival. To separate acclimation effects from fixed thermal responses, we simulated growth trajectories based on species' growth rates at constant temperatures and quantified how much and how fast species needed to acclimate to match the observed growth trajectories. Consistent with our predictions, the results showed that the midlatitude species had a greater capacity for acclimation than the high-latitude species. Furthermore, since acclimation occurred at a slower rate than seasonal temperature changes, the midlatitude species had a small growth advantage over the high-latitude species under the current seasonality but a greater growth advantage under the slower seasonality predicted for this latitude under climate change. In addition, the two species did not differ in survival under the current seasonality, but the midlatitude species had higher survival under the predicted climate change scenario, possibly because rates of cannibalism were lower when smaller heterospecifics were present. These findings highlight the need to incorporate acclimation rates in ecological models.

  11. Studies of the source complex behaviour and of the ultrasound radiation of contact flexible multi-element transducers; Etudes du comportement complexe de source et du rayonnement ultrasonore des traducteurs multi-elements flexibles au contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amory, V

    2007-12-15

    This work deals with the ultrasonic nondestructive testing of parts with complex geometries using soft multi-element sensors. The different types of contact control configurations are presented first. Then, the difficulties encountered with conventional contact transducers are explained and the multi-element piezoelectric transducers technology, developed to meet these difficulties, is presented. The second chapter presents the results of finite-element calculations showing the complexity of a transducer in a condition of testing utilization. In a same configuration, the radiated far field calculated by finite-elements is compared to the measurement in order to validate the way the source behaviour is calculated. However, despite the efficiency of the finite-elements simulation, this tool is numerically too costly and cannot be used to optimize a full multi-element transducer. Therefore, a realistic source model is built and implemented in a radiation code based on high-frequency asymptotic approximations where only L and T volume waves are calculated. The incapacity of this model to reproduce the behaviour of T waves in some directions of propagation has led to give a particular attention to the fore-waves, neglected in the radiation calculation. Chapter 3 treats of the building of an exact radiation model taking into consideration the fore-waves contribution emitted by a contact transducer exerting a random space-time distribution constraint at the surface of the considered medium. A radiation model, based on the calculation of exact Green functions of the Lamb problem is proposed. The exact model is particularly interesting in the case of sensor geometries with a long length with respect to other dimensions (2D case). Field calculation results are shown for an element of the matrix network (3D case) and for a linear element (2D case). A study of different existing approached models is carried out as well. The last chapter presents some results of the field

  12. Chromatic acclimation and population dynamics of green sulfur bacteria grown with spectrally tailored light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikin, Semion K.; Khin, Yadana; Huh, Joonsuk; Hannout, Moataz; Wang, Yaya; Zare, Farrokh; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang

    2014-05-01

    Living organisms have to adjust to their surrounding in order to survive in stressful conditions. We study this mechanism in one of most primitive creatures - photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria. These bacteria absorb photons very efficiently using the chlorosome antenna complexes and perform photosynthesis in extreme low-light environments. How the chlorosomes in green sulfur bacteria are acclimated to the stressful light conditions, for instance, if the spectrum of light is not optimal for absorption, is unknown. Studying Chlorobaculum tepidum cultures with far-red to near-infrared light-emitting diodes, we found that these bacteria react to changes in energy flow by regulating the amount of light-absorbing pigments and the size of the chlorosomes. Surprisingly, our results indicate that the bacteria can survive in near-infrared lights capturing low-frequency photons by the intermediate units of the light-harvesting complex. The latter strategy may be used by the species recently found near hydrothermal vents in the Pacific Ocean.

  13. Sucrose Synthase Expression during Cold Acclimation in Wheat 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Martin D.; Zabaleta, Eduardo J.; Pontis, Horacio G.; Salerno, Graciela L.

    1991-01-01

    When wheat (Triticum aestivum) seedlings are exposed to a cold temperature (2-4°C) above 0°C, sucrose accumulates and sucrose synthase activity increases. The effect of a cold period on the level of sucrose synthase (SS) was investigated. Using antibodies against wheat germ SS, Western blots studies showed that the amount of the SS peptide increased during 14 days in the cold, when plants were moved from 23°C to 4°C. The level of SS diminished when plants were moved back to 23°C. Northern blots of poly(A)+ RNA, confirmed a five- to sixfold induction of SS in wheat leaves during cold acclimation. These results indicate that SS is involved in the plant response to a chilling stress. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668270

  14. Nitrogen Starvation Acclimation in Synechococcus elongatus: Redox-Control and the Role of Nitrate Reduction as an Electron Sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Klotz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen starvation acclimation in non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria is characterized by a process termed chlorosis, where the light harvesting pigments are degraded and the cells gradually tune down photosynthetic and metabolic activities. The chlorosis response is governed by a complex and poorly understood regulatory network, which converges at the expression of the nblA gene, the triggering factor for phycobiliprotein degradation. This study established a method that allows uncoupling metabolic and redox-signals involved in nitrogen-starvation acclimation. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (GS by a precise dosage of l-methionine-sulfoximine (MSX mimics the metabolic situation of nitrogen starvation. Addition of nitrate to such MSX-inhibited cells eliminates the associated redox-stress by enabling electron flow towards nitrate/nitrite reduction and thereby, prevents the induction of nblA expression and the associated chlorosis response. This study demonstrates that nitrogen starvation is perceived not only through metabolic signals, but requires a redox signal indicating over-reduction of PSI-reduced electron acceptors. It further establishes a cryptic role of nitrate/nitrite reductases as electron sinks to balance conditions of over-reduction.

  15. Limited capacity for developmental thermal acclimation in three tropical wrasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motson, K.; Donelson, J. M.

    2017-06-01

    For effective conservation and management of marine systems, it is essential that we understand the biological impacts of and capacity for acclimation to increased ocean temperatures. This study investigated for the first time the effects of developing in projected warmer ocean conditions in the tropical wrasse species: Halichoeres melanurus, Halichoeres miniatus and Thalassoma amblycephalum. New recruits were reared for 11 weeks in control (29 °C) and +2 °C (31 °C) temperature treatments, consistent with predicted increases in sea surface temperature by 2100. A broad range of key attributes and performance parameters was tested, including aerobic metabolism, swimming ability, burst escape performance and physical condition. Response latency of burst performance was the only performance parameter in which evidence of beneficial thermal developmental acclimation was found, observed only in H. melanurus. Generally, development in the +2 °C treatment came at a significant cost to all species, resulting in reduced growth and physical condition, as well as metabolic and swimming performance relative to controls. Development in +2 °C conditions exacerbated the effects of warming on aerobic metabolism and swimming ability, compared to short-term warming effects. Burst escape performance parameters were only mildly affected by development at +2 °C, with non-locomotor performance (response latency) showing greater thermal sensitivity than locomotor performance parameters. These results indicate that the effects of future climate change on tropical wrasses would be underestimated with short-term testing. This study highlights the importance of holistic, longer-term developmental experimental approaches, with warming found to yield significant, species-specific responses in all parameters tested.

  16. Acclimation of metabolism to light in A rabidopsis thaliana: the glucose 6‐phosphate/phosphate translocator GPT2 directs metabolic acclimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DYSON, BETH C.; ALLWOOD, J. WILLIAM; FEIL, REGINA; XU, YUN; MILLER, MATTHEW; BOWSHER, CAROLINE G.; GOODACRE, ROYSTON; LUNN, JOHN E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mature leaves of plants transferred from low to high light typically increase their photosynthetic capacity. In A rabidopsis thaliana, this dynamic acclimation requires expression of GPT2, a glucose 6‐phosphate/phosphate translocator. Here, we examine the impact of GPT2 on leaf metabolism and photosynthesis. Plants of wild type and of a GPT2 knockout (gpt2.2) grown under low light achieved the same photosynthetic rate despite having different metabolic and transcriptomic strategies. Immediately upon transfer to high light, gpt2.2 plants showed a higher rate of photosynthesis than wild‐type plants (35%); however, over subsequent days, wild‐type plants acclimated photosynthetic capacity, increasing the photosynthesis rate by 100% after 7 d. Wild‐type plants accumulated more starch than gpt2.2 plants throughout acclimation. We suggest that GPT2 activity results in the net import of glucose 6‐phosphate from cytosol to chloroplast, increasing starch synthesis. There was clear acclimation of metabolism, with short‐term changes typically being reversed as plants acclimated. Distinct responses to light were observed in wild‐type and gpt2.2 leaves. Significantly higher levels of sugar phosphates were observed in gpt2.2. We suggest that GPT2 alters the distribution of metabolites between compartments and that this plays an essential role in allowing the cell to interpret environmental signals. PMID:25474495

  17. Acclimation to UV-B radiation and visible light in Lactuca sativa involves up-regulation of photosynthetic performance and orchestration of metabolome-wide responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargent, J J; Nelson, B C W; McGhie, T K; Barnes, P W

    2015-05-01

    UV-B radiation is often viewed as a source of stress for higher plants. In particular, photosynthetic function has been described as a common target for UV-B impairment; yet as our understanding of UV-B photomorphogenesis increases, there are opportunities to expand the emerging paradigm of regulatory UV response. Lactuca sativa is an important dietary crop species and is often subjected to rapid sunlight exposure at field transfer. Acclimation to UV-B and visible light conditions in L. sativa was dissected using gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements, in addition to non-destructive assessments of UV epidermal shielding (SUV ). After UV-B treatment, seedlings were subjected to wide-range metabolomic analysis using liquid chromatography hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-HRMS). During the acclimation period, net photosynthetic rate increased in UV-treated plants, epidermal UV shielding increased in both subsets of plants transferred to the acclimatory conditions (UV+/UV- plants) and Fv /Fm declined slightly in UV+/UV- plants. Metabolomic analysis revealed that a key group of secondary compounds was up-regulated by higher light conditions, yet several of these compounds were elevated further by UV-B radiation. In conclusion, acclimation to UV-B radiation involves co-protection from the effects of visible light, and responses to UV-B radiation at a photosynthetic level may not be consistently viewed as damaging to plant development. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Low-temperature effect on enzyme activities involved in sucrose-starch partitioning in salt-stressed and salt-acclimated cotyledons of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Mariana; Hilal, Mirna; González, Juan A; Prado, Fernando E

    2009-04-01

    The effect of low temperature on growth, sucrose-starch partitioning and related enzymes in salt-stressed and salt-acclimated cotyledons of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) was studied. The growth of cotyledons and growing axes in seedlings grown at 25/20 degrees C (light/dark) and shifted to 5/5 degrees C was lower than in those only growing at 25/20 degrees C (unstressed). However, there were no significant differences between low-temperature control and salt-treated seedlings. The higher activities of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS, EC 2.4.1.14) and soluble acid invertase (acid INV, EC 3.2.1.25) were observed in salt-stressed cotyledons; however, the highest acid INV activity was observed in unstressed cotyledons. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADP-GPPase, EC 2.7.7.27) was higher in unstressed cotyledons than in stressed ones. However, between 0 and 4days the highest value was observed in salt-stressed cotyledons. The lowest value of ADP-GPPase was observed in salt-acclimated cotyledons. Low temperature also affected sucrose synthase (SuSy, EC 2.4.1.13) activity in salt-treated cotyledons. Sucrose and glucose were higher in salt-stressed cotyledons, but fructose was essentially higher in low-temperature control. Starch was higher in low-temperature control; however, the highest content was observed at 0day in salt-acclimated cotyledons. Results demonstrated that low temperature induces different responses on sucrose-starch partitioning in salt-stressed and salt-acclimated cotyledons. Data also suggest that in salt-treated cotyledons source-sink relations (SSR) are changed in order to supply soluble sugars and proline for the osmotic adjustment. Relationships between starch formation and SuSy activity are also discussed.

  19. Norepinephrine turnover in heart and spleen of 7-, 22-, and 34 C-acclimated hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. B.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of norepinephrine (NE) concentration and endogenous turnover rates in both myocardial and spleen tissues in the golden hamster is examined as a function of chronic exposure to either high or low ambient temperatures. Changes in myocardial and spleen NE turnover values are discussed in terms of functional alterations in sympathetic nerve activity and the importance of such changes in temperature acclimation. It is found that acclimation of hamsters to 7 C for 7-10 weeks results in decreased myocardial NE concentration and an apparent increase in myocardial NE turnover. In contrast, exposure to 34 C for 6-8 weeks results in increased myocardial NE concentration and an apparent decrease in NE turnover in both myocardial and spleen tissues. The implication of altered NE synthesis is that sympathetic nerve activity is reduced with heat acclimation and is enhanced with cold acclimation.

  20. Seasonal acclimation in the photosynthetic and respiratory temperature responses of three submerged freshwater macrophyte species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilon, J.; Santamaria, L.

    2001-01-01

    Investigations of seasonal temperature acclimation in gas exchange are few and only exist for terrestrial and marine plants. Here we report on results obtained for three freshwater macrophyte species (Callitriche obtusangula, Potamogeton pectinatus and Potamogeton perfoliatus). We collected plants

  1. Rapid transcriptional and metabolic regulation of the deacclimation process in cold acclimated Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagter, Majken; Alpers, Jessica; Erban, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During low temperature exposure, temperate plant species increase their freezing tolerance in a process termed cold acclimation. This is accompanied by dampened oscillations of circadian clock genes and disrupted oscillations of output genes and metabolites. During deacclimation...... in response to warm temperatures, cold acclimated plants lose freezing tolerance and resume growth and development. While considerable effort has been directed toward understanding the molecular and metabolic basis of cold acclimation, much less information is available about the regulation of deacclimation....... RESULTS: We report metabolic (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) and transcriptional (microarrays, quantitative RT-PCR) responses underlying deacclimation during the first 24 h after a shift of Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia-0) plants cold acclimated at 4 °C back to warm temperature (20 °C). The data...

  2. Adaptation and acclimation of growth and photosynthesis of five Antarctic red algae to low temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggert, A; Wiencke, C

    Temperature requirements for growth, photosynthesis and dark respiration were determined for five Antarctic red algal species. After acclimation, the stenothermal species Gigartina skottsbergii and Ballia callitricha grew at 0 or up to 5 degrees C, respectively; the eurythermal species Kallymenia

  3. Response of low-strength phenol-acclimated activated sludge to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-07

    -acclimated activated sludge,. (ii) investigate the degradation pathways and (iii) model the growth and biodegradation kinetics, all under the condition of increasingly higher phenol concentrations (step-up shock loading).

  4. Seasonal acclimation in metabolism reduces light requirements of eelgrass (Zostera marina)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, Peter A.; Borum, Jens

    2011-01-01

    rates, especially so for cold acclimated plants in February (36% higher Q10-values). These changes were accompanied by a reduction in chlorophyll a and nitrogen concentrations in leaves by 35% and 60% respectively from February to August. The critical light requirement (EC) of Z. marina to maintain...... a positive carbon balance increased exponentially with increasing temperature but less so for summer-acclimated than for winter-acclimated plants. However, combining EC vs temperature models for whole-plants with data on daily light availability showed that seasonal acclimation in metabolism increased......We investigated the ability of eelgrass (Zostera marina) to adjust light requirements to seasonal changes in temperature, light and nutrient conditions through changes in metabolism, pigment and nutrient content. In agreement with expectations we found that rates of respiration and light saturated...

  5. Acclimation to a dynamic irradiance regime changes excessive irradiance sensitivity of Emiliania huxleyi and Thalassiosira weissflogii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poll, Willem H.; Visser, Ronald J. W.; Buma, Anita G. J.

    Effects of fluctuating irradiance regimes on excessive photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation sensitivity were assessed for Emiliania huxleyi (Lohman) and Thalassiosira weissflogii (Grunow) Fryxell and Hasle. Cultures acclimated to low irradiance were subjected to

  6. Reliable real-time calculation of heart-rate complexity in critically ill patients using multiple noisy waveform sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nehemiah T; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Salinas, Jose; Batchinsky, Andriy I

    2014-04-01

    Heart-rate complexity (HRC) has been proposed as a new vital sign for critical care medicine. The purpose of this research was to develop a reliable method for determining HRC continuously in real time in critically ill patients using multiple waveform channels that also compensates for noisy and unreliable data. Using simultaneously acquired electrocardiogram (Leads I, II, V) and arterial blood pressure waveforms sampled at 360 Hz from 250 patients (over 375 h of patient data), we evaluated a new data fusion framework for computing HRC in real time. The framework employs two algorithms as well as signal quality indices. HRC was calculated (via the method of sample entropy), and equivalence tests were then performed. Bland-Altman plots and box plots of differences between mean HRC values were also obtained. Finally, HRC differences were analyzed by paired t tests. The gold standard for obtaining true means was manual verification of R waves and subsequent entropy calculations. Equivalence tests between mean HRC values derived from manually verified sequences and those derived from automatically detected peaks showed that the "Fusion" values were the least statistically different from the gold standard. Furthermore, the fusion of waveform sources produced better error density distributions than those derived from individual waveforms. The data fusion framework was shown to provide in real-time a reliable continuously streamed HRC value, derived from multiple waveforms in the presence of noise and artifacts. This approach will be validated and tested for assessment of HRC in critically ill patients.

  7. Compositional evaluation of selected agro-industrial wastes as valuable sources for the recovery of complex carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojvodić, Aleksandra; Komes, Draženka; Vovk, Irena; Belščak-Cvitanović, Ana; Bušić, Arijana

    2016-11-01

    Re-utilization of various agro-industrial wastes is of growing importance from many aspects. Considering the variety and complexity of such materials, compositional data and compliant methodology is still undergoing many updates and improvements. Present study evaluated sugar beet pulp (SBP), walnut shell (WS), cocoa bean husk (CBH), onion peel (OP) and pea pods (PP) as potentially valuable materials for carbohydrate recovery. Macrocomponent analyses revealed carbohydrate fraction as the most abundant, dominating in dietary fibres. Upon complete acid hydrolysis of sample alcohol insoluble residues, developed procedures of high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one pre-column derivatization (PMP-derivatization) were used for carbohydrate monomeric composition determination. HPTLC exhibited good qualitative features useful for multi-sample rapid analysis, while HPLC superior separation and quantification characteristics. Distinctive monomeric patterns were obtained among samples. OP, SBP and CBH, due to the high galacturonic acid content (20.81%, 13.96% and 6.90% dry matter basis, respectively), may be regarded as pectin sources, while WS and PP as materials abundant in xylan-rich hemicellulose (total xylan content 15.53%, 9.63% dry matter basis, respectively). Present study provides new and valuable compositional data for different plant residual materials and a reference for the application of established methodology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhanced saccharification of lignocellulosic agricultural biomass and increased bioethanol titre using acclimated Clostridium thermocellum DSM1313.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisha, M; Saranyah, K; Shankar, Mukund; Saleena, L M

    2017-05-01

    Consolidated bioprocess assures an efficient lignocellulosic conversion to fermentable sugars and subsequently to bioethanol. Such a single-step hydrolysis and anaerobic fermentation was achieved with acclimated Clostridium thermocellum DSM 1313 on different mildly pre-treated agricultural lignocellulosic residues without any additional enzymes/and strains. Acclimation was achieved by serially sub-culturing in increasing concentration of individual substrates, such as rice husk, sugarcane bagasse, and banana pseudostem in the standard media, with cellobiose as an adjunct. The acclimated cellulolytic thermophile exhibited an early log phase entry with enhanced growth compared to the direct inoculation experiments with unacclimated culture. Around 672 mg/g of reducing sugar was produced from sugarcane bagasse media and 636 mg/g from rice husk media and 513 mg/g from banana pseudostem media with the acclimated organism. Bioethanol production also doubled in experiments with serially acclimated cultures, with a maximum of 1.21 and 1.0 g/L ethanol titre from sugarcane bagasse and rice husk, respectively. The serial acclimation experiments have increased the saccharification potentials of the organism towards the respective lignocellulosic substrates and also enhanced the bioethanol production.

  9. The impact of anode acclimation strategy on microbial electrolysis cell treating hydrogen fermentation effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohu; Zhang, Ruizhe; Qian, Yawei; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-07-01

    The impact of different anode acclimation methods for enhancing hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was investigated in this study. The anodes were first acclimated in microbial fuel cells using acetate, butyrate and corn stalk fermentation effluent (CSFE) as substrate before moving into MECs, respectively. Subsequently, CSFE was used as feedstock in all the three MECs. The maximum hydrogen yield with the anode pre-acclimated with butyrate (5.21±0.24L H2/L CSFE) was higher than that pre-acclimated with acetate (4.22±0.19L H2/L CSFE) and CSFE (4.55±0.14L H2/L CSFE). The current density (480±11A/m3) and hydrogen production rate (4.52±0.13m3/m3/d) with the anode pre-acclimated with butyrate were also higher that another two reactors. These results demonstrated that the anode biofilm pre-acclimated with butyrate has significant advantages in CSFE treatment and could improve the performance of hydrogen production in MEC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Multilocular adipocytes from muscovy ducklings differentiated in response to cold acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, H; Cohen-Adad, F; Duchamp, C; Rouanet, J L

    1986-01-01

    Morphological and functional aspects of adipose tissue from 6-week-old cold-acclimated muscovy ducklings reared at 4 degrees C ambient temperature (Ta) from the age of 1 week were examined for the occurrence of brown adipose tissue (b.a.t.) in order to explain non-shivering thermogenesis (n.s.t.) observed at this age. Metabolic rate and integrated muscle electrical activity (e.m.g.) were measured at different Ta (from -10 to +28 degrees C) in cold-acclimated and in control ducklings reared at thermoneutrality. The results confirm the existence of n.s.t. in 6-week-old cold-acclimated muscovy ducklings. In cold-acclimated ducklings, typical multilocular adipocytes were found in subcutaneous adipose deposits instead of the unilocular white adipocytes as in control ducklings. Mitochondria isolated from this differentiated tissue were less abundant than in b.a.t. of mammals. Their respiration rate was similar to the respiration rate of white adipose tissue mitochondria from control rats and much lower than the b.a.t. mitochondria rate from cold-acclimated rats. It is therefore unlikely that this differentiated adipose tissue contributes to the n.s.t. observed, an n.s.t. whose capacity reached 5.26 W/kg (+73.5% above resting metabolic rate) in cold-acclimated ducklings. The role of this differentiated adipose tissue in the metabolic adaptation to cold is discussed. Images Plate 4 Plate 1 Plate 2 Plate 3 PMID:3795059

  11. Interactions between rates of temperature change and acclimation affect latitudinal patterns of warming tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jessica L; Chown, Steven L; Janion-Scheepers, Charlene; Clusella-Trullas, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Critical thermal limits form an increasing component of the estimation of impacts of global change on ectotherms. Whether any consistent patterns exist in the interactive effects of rates of temperature change (or experimental ramping rates) and acclimation on critical thermal limits and warming tolerance (one way of assessing sensitivity to climate change) is, however, far from clear. Here, we examine the interacting effects of ramping rate and acclimation on the critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and minima (CTmin) and warming tolerance of six species of springtails from sub-tropical, temperate and polar regions. We also provide microhabitat temperatures from 26 sites spanning 5 years in order to benchmark environmentally relevant rates of temperature change. Ramping rate has larger effects than acclimation on CTmax, but the converse is true for CTmin. Responses to rate and acclimation effects are more consistent among species for CTmax than for CTmin. In the latter case, interactions among ramping rate and acclimation are typical of polar species, less marked for temperate ones, and reduced in species from the sub-tropics. Ramping rate and acclimation have substantial effects on estimates of warming tolerance, with the former being more marked. At the fastest ramping rates (>1.0°C/min), tropical species have estimated warming tolerances similar to their temperate counterparts, whereas at slow ramping rates (warming tolerance is much reduced in tropical species. Rates of temperate change in microhabitats relevant to the springtails are typically warming tolerance approach.

  12. Effect of pre-acclimation of granular activated carbon on microbial electrolysis cell startup and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBarge, Nicole; Yilmazel, Yasemin Dilsad; Hong, Pei-Ying; Logan, Bruce E

    2017-02-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can generate methane by fixing carbon dioxide without using expensive catalysts, but the impact of acclimation procedures on subsequent performance has not been investigated. Granular activated carbon (GAC) was used to pre-enrich electrotrophic methanogenic communities, as GAC has been shown to stimulate direct transfer of electrons between different microbial species. MEC startup times using pre-acclimated GAC were improved compared to controls (without pre-acclimation or without GAC), and after three fed batch cycles methane generation rates were similar (P>0.4) for GAC acclimated to hydrogen (22±9.3nmolcm -3 d -1 ), methanol (25±9.7nmolcm -3 d -1 ), and a volatile fatty acid (VFA) mix (22±11nmolcm -3 d -1 ). However, MECs started with GAC but no pre-acclimation had lower methane generation rates (13±4.1nmolcm -3 d -1 ), and MECs without GAC had the lowest rates (0.7±0.8nmolcm -3 d -1 after cycle 2). Microbes previously found in methanogenic MECs, or previously shown to be capable of exocellular electron transfer, were enriched on the GAC. Pre-acclimation using GAC is therefore a simple approach to enrich electroactive communities, improve methane generation rates, and decrease startup times in MECs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cellular changes associated with the acclimation of the intertidal sea anemone Actinia tenebrosa to ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos, Victor M; Lamare, Miles D; Peake, Barrie M; Burritt, David J

    2014-01-01

    To assess the relative importance of long- and short-term cellular defense mechanisms in seasonally UV-R-acclimated Actinia tenebrosa (Anthozoa, Actiniidae), individuals were exposed to summer doses of PAR, UV-A, UV-B and enhanced UV-B (20%) for a period of 4 days. Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) concentrations were quantified, while oxidative damage to lipids and proteins, and the activities or levels of the antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT, GR, GPOX and total glutathione were determined. Our results show that summer UV-R-acclimated individuals had a higher UV-R tolerance, with no significant increases in CPDs levels, than winter-acclimated sea anemones possibly due to higher MAA concentrations. Summer-acclimated individuals showed increased lipid and protein oxidation and GPOX activity only when they were exposed to UV-B at 20% above ambient UV-R levels. In contrast, winter-acclimated sea anemones showed elevated levels of oxidative damage, GPOX and SOD activities after exposure to UV-A or UV-B at ambient and elevated levels. Thus, this study indicates that long-term UV-R acclimation mechanisms such as the accumulation of MAAs could be more important than short-term increases in antioxidant defenses with respect to reducing indirect UV-R damage in intertidal sea anemones. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  14. Extraction, purification and identification of antifreeze proteins from cold acclimated malting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiangli; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Haiying; Wang, Li; Qian, Haifeng; Qi, Xiguang

    2015-05-15

    Antifreeze proteins from cold-acclimated malting barley were extracted by infiltration-centrifugation. The infiltration time was optimised, and its extraction effect was evaluated. The effect of cold acclimation on the accumulation of barley antifreeze proteins (BaAFPs) was assessed by comparing the thermal hysteresis activities (THA) of proteins extracted from both cold acclimated and non-cold acclimated barley grain. Ultra-filtration, ammonium precipitation and column chromatography were used successively to purify the BaAFPs, and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS was used for protein identification. The results showed that infiltration-centrifugation was more targeted than the traditional method, and 10h was the optimal infiltration time. THA was observed only after cold acclimation implied that AFPs only began to accumulate after cold acclimation. After purification, BaAFP-I was obtained at an electrophoresis level and its THA was 1.04°C (18.0 mg ml(-1)). The mass fingerprinting and sequencing results indicated the homology of the BaAFP-I to alpha-amylase inhibitor BDAI-1 (Hordeum vulgare). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Changes in freezing tolerance, plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity and fatty acid composition in Pinus resinosa needles during cold acclimation and de-acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martz, Françoise; Sutinen, Marja-Liisa; Kiviniemi, Sari; Palta, Jiwan P

    2006-06-01

    It has previously been suggested that plasma membrane ATPase (PM H+-ATPase, EC 3.6.1.3.) is a site of incipient freezing injury because activity increases following cold acclimation and there are published data indicating that activity of PM H+-ATPase is modulated by changes in lipids associated with the enzyme. To test and extend these findings in a tree species, we analyzed PM H+-ATPase activity and the fatty acid (FA) composition of glycerolipids in purified plasma membranes (PMs) prepared by the two-phase partition method from current-year needles of adult red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) trees. Freezing tolerance of the needles decreased from -56 degrees C in March to -9 degrees C in May, and increased from -15 degrees C in September to -148 degrees C in January. Specific activity of vanadate-sensitive PM H+-ATPase increased more than two-fold following cold acclimation, despite a concurrent increase in protein concentration. During de-acclimation, decreases in PM H+-ATPase activity and freezing tolerance were accompanied by decreases in the proportions of oleic (18:1) and linoleic (18:2) acids and increases in the proportions of palmitic (16:0) and linolenic (18:3) acids in total glycerolipids extracted from the plasma membrane fraction. This pattern of changes in PM H+-ATPase activity and the 18:1, 18:2 and 18:3 fatty acids was reversed during cold acclimation. In the PM fractions, changes in FA unsaturation, expressed as the double bond index (1 x 18:1 + 2 x 18:2 + 3 x 18:3), were closely correlated with changes in H+-ATPase specific activity (r2 = 0.995). Changes in freezing tolerance were well correlated with DBI (r2 = 0.877) and ATPase specific activity (r2 = 0.833) in the PM fraction. Total ATPase activity in microsomal fractions also closely followed changes in freezing tolerance (r2 = 0.969). We conclude that, as in herbaceous plants, simultaneous seasonal changes in PM H+-ATPase activity and fatty acid composition occur during cold acclimation and de-acclimation

  16. Thioredoxins Play a Crucial Role in Dynamic Acclimation of Photosynthesis in Fluctuating Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormählen, Ina; Zupok, Arkadiusz; Rescher, Josephin; Leger, Jochen; Weissenberger, Stefan; Groysman, Julia; Orwat, Anne; Chatel-Innocenti, Gilles; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Armbruster, Ute; Geigenberger, Peter

    2017-01-09

    Sunlight represents the energy source for photosynthesis and plant growth. When growing in the field, plant photosynthesis has to manage strong fluctuations in light intensities. Regulation based on the thioredoxin (Trx) system is believed to ensure light-responsive control of photosynthetic reactions in the chloroplast. However, direct evidence for a role of this system in regulating dynamic acclimation of photosynthesis in fluctuating conditions is largely lacking. In this report we show that the ferredoxin-dependent Trxs m1 and m2 as well as the NADPH-dependent NTRC are both indispensable for photosynthetic acclimation in fluctuating light intensities. Arabidopsis mutants with combined deficiency in Trxs m1 and m2 show wild-type growth and photosynthesis under constant light condition, while photosynthetic parameters are strongly modified in rapidly alternating high and low light. Two independent trxm1m2 mutants show lower photosynthetic efficiency in high light, but surprisingly significantly higher photosynthetic efficiency in low light. Our data suggest that a main target of Trx m1 and m2 is the NADP-malate dehydrogenase involved in export of excess reductive power from the chloroplast. The decreased photosynthetic efficiency in the high-light peaks may thus be explained by a reduced capacity of the trxm1m2 mutants in the rapid light activation of this enzyme. In the ntrc mutant, dynamic responses of non-photochemical quenching of excitation energy and plastoquinone reduction state both were strongly attenuated in fluctuating light intensities, leading to a massive decrease in PSII quantum efficiency and a specific decrease in plant growth under these conditions. This is likely due to the decreased ability of the ntrc mutant to control the stromal NADP(H) redox poise. Taken together, our results indicate that NTRC is indispensable in ensuring the full range of dynamic responses of photosynthesis to optimize photosynthesis and maintain growth in fluctuating

  17. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production from phenol in an acclimated consortium: Batch study and impacts of operational conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Wusiman, Apiredan; Liu, Xiang; Wan, Chunli; Lee, Duu-Jong; Tay, JooHwa

    2018-01-02

    Microbial intracellular biopolymer PHA was synthesized from toxic pollutant phenol by an acclimated consortium. Various operational conditions were experimented for their effects on biomass growth and PHA accumulation. Carbon to nitrogen ratios from 5 to 40 (w/w) showed little impact, as did the levels of Fe, Ca and Mg in a short term. Acidic pH inhibited both growth and PHA synthesis, and an optimal dissolved oxygen level of 1-4 mg L-1 was identified. Low temperature (7 °C) significantly slowed but did not totally repress microbial activities. A 2% NaCl shock retarded reactions and 4% NaCl caused irreversible damage. Various initial phenol (S0) and biomass concentrations (X0) were combined to study the effect of food to microbe (F/M) ratio. High S0 and F/M exerted toxicity, reducing reaction rates but generating higher ultimate PHA wt% in biomass. Increasing X0 alleviated phenol inhibition and improved productivity and carbon conversion from phenol. A pseudo-optimized F/M ratio of 0.2-0.4 and a maximum PHA% rate of 1.15% min-1 were identified under medium S0/high X0. This study is the first to systematically investigate the feasibility of toxic industrial waste as the carbon source for PHA production, and likely the only one indicating potential for scaling-up and industrialization. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Sr isotope tracing of multiple water sources in a complex river system, Noteć River, central Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zieliński, Mateusz, E-mail: mateusz.zielinski@amu.edu.pl [Institute of Geoecology and Geoinformation, Adam Mickiewicz University, Dzięgielowa 27, 61-680 Poznań (Poland); Dopieralska, Jolanta, E-mail: dopieralska@amu.edu.pl [Poznań Science and Technology Park, Adam Mickiewicz University Foundation, Rubież 46, 61-612 Poznań (Poland); Belka, Zdzislaw, E-mail: zbelka@amu.edu.pl [Isotope Laboratory, Adam Mickiewicz University, Dzięgielowa 27, 61-680 Poznań (Poland); Walczak, Aleksandra, E-mail: awalczak@amu.edu.pl [Isotope Laboratory, Adam Mickiewicz University, Dzięgielowa 27, 61-680 Poznań (Poland); Siepak, Marcin, E-mail: siep@amu.edu.pl [Institute of Geology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Maków Polnych 16, 61-606 Poznań (Poland); Jakubowicz, Michal, E-mail: mjakub@amu.edu.pl [Institute of Geoecology and Geoinformation, Adam Mickiewicz University, Dzięgielowa 27, 61-680 Poznań (Poland)

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic impact on surface waters and other elements in the environment was investigated in the Noteć River basin in central Poland. The approach was to trace changes in the Sr isotope composition ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) and concentration in space and time. Systematic sampling of the river water shows a very wide range of {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios, from 0.7089 to 0.7127. This strong variation, however, is restricted to the upper course of the river, whereas the water in the lower course typically shows {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr values around 0.7104–0.7105. Variations in {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr are associated with a wide range of Sr concentrations, from 0.14 to 1.32 mg/L. We find that strong variations in {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and Sr concentrations can be accounted for by mixing of two end-members: 1) atmospheric waters charged with Sr from the near-surface weathering and wash-out of Quaternary glaciogenic deposits, and 2) waters introduced into the river from an open pit lignite mine. The first reservoir is characterized by a low Sr content and high {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios, whereas mine waters display opposite characteristics. Anthropogenic pollution is also induced by extensive use of fertilizers which constitute the third source of Sr in the environment. The study has an important implication for future archeological studies in the region. It shows that the present-day Sr isotope signatures of river water, flora and fauna cannot be used unambiguously to determine the “baseline” for bioavailable {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr in the past. - Highlights: • Sr isotopes fingerprint water sources and their interactions in a complex river system. • Mine waters and fertilizers are critical anthropogenic additions in the river water. • Limited usage of environmental isotopic data in archeological studies. • Sr budget of the river is dynamic and temporary.

  19. The acclimative biogeochemical model of the southern North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kerimoglu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem models often rely on heuristic descriptions of autotrophic growth that fail to reproduce various stationary and dynamic states of phytoplankton cellular composition observed in laboratory experiments. Here, we present the integration of an advanced phytoplankton growth model within a coupled three-dimensional physical–biogeochemical model and the application of the model system to the southern North Sea (SNS defined on a relatively high resolution (∼ 1.5–4.5 km curvilinear grid. The autotrophic growth model, recently introduced by Wirtz and Kerimoglu (2016, is based on a set of novel concepts for the allocation of internal resources and operation of cellular metabolism. The coupled model system consists of the General Estuarine Transport Model (GETM as the hydrodynamical driver, a lower-trophic-level model and a simple sediment diagenesis model. We force the model system with realistic atmospheric and riverine fluxes, background turbidity caused by suspended particulate matter (SPM and open ocean boundary conditions. For a simulation for the period 2000–2010, we show that the model system satisfactorily reproduces the physical and biogeochemical states of the system within the German Bight characterized by steep salinity; nutrient and chlorophyll (Chl gradients, as inferred from comparisons against observation data from long-term monitoring stations; sparse in situ measurements; continuous transects; and satellites. The model also displays skill in capturing the formation of thin chlorophyll layers at the pycnocline, which is frequently observed within the stratified regions during summer. A sensitivity analysis reveals that the vertical distributions of phytoplankton concentrations estimated by the model can be qualitatively sensitive to the description of the light climate and dependence of sinking rates on the internal nutrient reserves. A non-acclimative (fixed-physiology version of the model predicted entirely

  20. The acclimative biogeochemical model of the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimoglu, Onur; Hofmeister, Richard; Maerz, Joeran; Riethmüller, Rolf; Wirtz, Kai W.

    2017-10-01

    Ecosystem models often rely on heuristic descriptions of autotrophic growth that fail to reproduce various stationary and dynamic states of phytoplankton cellular composition observed in laboratory experiments. Here, we present the integration of an advanced phytoplankton growth model within a coupled three-dimensional physical-biogeochemical model and the application of the model system to the southern North Sea (SNS) defined on a relatively high resolution (˜ 1.5-4.5 km) curvilinear grid. The autotrophic growth model, recently introduced by Wirtz and Kerimoglu (2016), is based on a set of novel concepts for the allocation of internal resources and operation of cellular metabolism. The coupled model system consists of the General Estuarine Transport Model (GETM) as the hydrodynamical driver, a lower-trophic-level model and a simple sediment diagenesis model. We force the model system with realistic atmospheric and riverine fluxes, background turbidity caused by suspended particulate matter (SPM) and open ocean boundary conditions. For a simulation for the period 2000-2010, we show that the model system satisfactorily reproduces the physical and biogeochemical states of the system within the German Bight characterized by steep salinity; nutrient and chlorophyll (Chl) gradients, as inferred from comparisons against observation data from long-term monitoring stations; sparse in situ measurements; continuous transects; and satellites. The model also displays skill in capturing the formation of thin chlorophyll layers at the pycnocline, which is frequently observed within the stratified regions during summer. A sensitivity analysis reveals that the vertical distributions of phytoplankton concentrations estimated by the model can be qualitatively sensitive to the description of the light climate and dependence of sinking rates on the internal nutrient reserves. A non-acclimative (fixed-physiology) version of the model predicted entirely different vertical profiles

  1. Thermal Acclimation and Adaptation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Niu, S.; Fei, S.; Yuan, W.; Zhang, Z.; Schimel, D.; Fluxnet Pis, .

    2010-12-01

    Ecosystem responses to temperature change are collectively determined by its constituents, which are plants, animals, microbes, and their interactions. It has been long documented that all plant, animals, and microbial carbon metabolism (photosynthesis, respiration) can acclimate and respond to changing temperatures, influencing the response of ecosystem carbon fluxes to climate change. Climate change also can induce competition between species with different thermal responses leading to changes in community composition. While a great deal of research has been done on species-level responses to temperature, it is yet to examine thermal acclimation of adaptation of ecosystem carbon processes to temperature change. With the advent of eddy flux measurements, it is possible to directly characterize the ecosystem-scale temperature response of carbon storage. In this study, we quantified the temperature response functions of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE), from which the responses of apparent optimal temperatures across broad spatial and temporal scales were examined. While temperature responses are normally parameterized in terms of the physiological variables describing photosynthesis and respiration, we focus on the apparent optimal behavior of NEE. Because the measurement integrated over multiple individuals and species within the footprint of the measurement (100s to 1000s of ha), it is challenging to interpret this measurement in terms of classical physiological variables such as the Q10. Rather we focus on the realized behavior of the ecosystem and its sensitivity to temperature. These empirical response functions can then be used as a benchmark for model evaluation and testing. Our synthesis of 656 site-years of eddy covariance data over the world shows that temperature response curves of NEE are parabolic, with their optima temperature strongly correlated with site growing season temperature across the globe and with annual mean temperature over years at

  2. Seasonal acclimation and latitudinal adaptation are of the same magnitude in Mytilus edulis and Mytilus trossulus mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrring, Jakob; Bundgård, Amanda Marie; Sejr, Mikael Kristian

    2017-01-01

    congeners of Mytilus (Mytilus edulis collected 56°N, and Mytilus trossulus collected 77°N) is related to differences in mitochondrial respiration. We further investigated the changes in mitochondrial respiration following long-term cold-water acclimation of M. edulis. We assessed mitochondrial respiration...... variation is, therefore, needed to better predict the effects of global warming on species distribution. Mussels in the genus Mytilus are known to display latitudinal variation in whole animal aerobic metabolism. Here we test the hypothesis that latitudinal variation in whole animal metabolic rate of two...... after five months of acclimation to 1 and 15 °C. At similar experimental temperatures, mitochondrial respiration in animals acclimated to 1 °C was higher compared to those acclimated to 15 °C. After five months of acclimation, 1 °C-acclimated M. edulis had similar mitochondrial respiration as 1 °C...

  3. Molecular programs induced by heat acclimation confer neuroprotection against TBI and hypoxic insults via cross-tolerance mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal eHorowitz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprotection following prolonged exposure to high ambient temperatures (heat acclimation HA develops via altered molecular programs such as cross-tolerance (Heat Acclimation -Neuroprotection Cross-Tolerance -HANCT. The mechanisms underlying cross-tolerance depend on enhanced on-demand protective pathways evolving during acclimation. The protection achieved is long lasting and limits the need for de novo recruitment of cytoprotective pathways upon exposure to novel stressors. Using mouse and rat acclimated phenotypes, we will focus on the impact of heat acclimation on Angiotensin II-AT2 receptors in neurogenesis and on HIF-1 as key mediators in spontaneous recovery and HANCT after traumatic brain injury (TBI. The neuroprotective consequences of heat acclimation on NMDA and AMPA receptors will be discussed using the global hypoxia model. A behavioral-molecular link will be crystallized. The differences between HANCT and consensus preconditioning will be reviewed.

  4. Effects of transportation, relocation, and acclimation on phenotypes and functional characteristics of peripheral blood lymphocytes in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehete, Pramod N; Shelton, Kathryn A; Nehete, Bharti P

    2017-01-01

    . These findings have implications on the research participation of transported and relocated nonhuman primates in immunologic research studies, suggesting that 30 days is not sufficient to ensure return to baseline immune homeostasis. These data should be considered when planning research studies in order......Nonhuman primates from domestic sources constitute a small, but critical, proportion of animals studied in research laboratories. Many of these nonhuman primates are raised at one facility and subsequently transported/relocated to another facility for research purposes. We examined the effects...... of transport, relocation, and acclimation on the phenotype and function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a group of rhesus monkeys that were transported by road for approximately 21 hours from one facility to another. Using a panel of human antibodies and a set of standardized human immune...

  5. Thermal preference, thermal resistance, and metabolic rate of juvenile Chinese pond turtles Mauremys reevesii acclimated to different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Dang, Wei; Geng, Jun; Lu, Hong-Liang

    2015-10-01

    The thermal acclimatory capacity of a particular species may determine its resilience to environmental change. Evaluating the physiological acclimatory responses of economically important species is useful for determining their optimal culture conditions. Here, juvenile Chinese three-keeled pond turtles (Mauremys reevesii) were acclimated to one of three different temperatures (17, 25 or 33°C) for four weeks to assess the effects of thermal acclimation on some physiological traits. Thermal acclimation significantly affected thermal resistance, but not thermal preference, of juvenile M. reevesii. Turtles acclimated to 17°C were less resistant to high temperatures than those acclimated to 25°C and 33°C. However, turtles increased resistance to low temperatures with decreasing acclimation temperature. The acclimation response ratio of the critical thermal minimum (CTMin) was lower than that of the critical thermal maximum (CTMax) for acclimation temperatures between 17 and 25°C, but slightly higher between 25 and 33°C. The thermal resistance range (i.e., the difference between CTMax and CTMin) was widest in turtles acclimated to the intermediate temperature (25°C), and narrowest in those acclimated to low temperature (17°C). The standard metabolic rate increased as body temperature and acclimation temperature increased, and the temperature quotient (Q10) between acclimation temperatures 17 and 25°C was higher than the Q10 between 25 and 33°C. Our results suggest that juvenile M. reevesii may have a greater resistance under mild thermal conditions resembling natural environments, and better physiological performance at relatively warm temperatures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Visualization of space competition and plume formation with complex potentials for multiple source flows : Some examples and novel application to Chao lava flow (Chile)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijermars, R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid displacement in a continuum pressured by a variable constellation of source flows can be visualized as solutions of line integrals. The algorithms are based on complex potentials that provide exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation and allow users to specify both the location and flux

  7. Gene regulation during cold stress acclimation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Sunkar, Ramanjulu

    2010-01-01

    Cold stress adversely affects plant growth and development and thus limits crop productivity. Diverse plant species tolerate cold stress to a varying degree, which depends on reprogramming gene expression to modify their physiology, metabolism, and growth. Cold signal in plants is transmitted to activate CBF-dependent (C-repeat/drought-responsive element binding factor-dependent) and CBF-independent transcriptional pathway, of which CBF-dependent pathway activates CBF regulon. CBF transcription factor genes are induced by the constitutively expressed ICE1 (inducer of CBF expression 1) by binding to the CBF promoter. ICE1-CBF cold response pathway is conserved in diverse plant species. Transgenic analysis in different plant species revealed that cold tolerance can be significantly enhanced by genetic engineering CBF pathway. Posttranscriptional regulation at pre-mRNA processing and export from nucleus plays a role in cold acclimation. Small noncoding RNAs, namely micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are emerging as key players of posttranscriptional gene silencing. Cold stress-regulated miRNAs have been identified in Arabidopsis and rice. In this chapter, recent advances on cold stress signaling and tolerance are highlighted.

  8. Organellar Gene Expression and Acclimation of Plants to Environmental Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leister, Dario; Wang, Liangsheng; Kleine, Tatjana

    2017-01-01

    Organelles produce ATP and a variety of vital metabolites, and are indispensable for plant development. While most of their original gene complements have been transferred to the nucleus in the course of evolution, they retain their own genomes and gene-expression machineries. Hence, organellar function requires tight coordination between organellar gene expression (OGE) and nuclear gene expression (NGE). OGE requires various nucleus-encoded proteins that regulate transcription, splicing, trimming, editing, and translation of organellar RNAs, which necessitates nucleus-to-organelle (anterograde) communication. Conversely, changes in OGE trigger retrograde signaling that modulates NGE in accordance with the current status of the organelle. Changes in OGE occur naturally in response to developmental and environmental changes, and can be artificially induced by inhibitors such as lincomycin or mutations that perturb OGE. Focusing on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and its plastids, we review here recent findings which suggest that perturbations of OGE homeostasis regularly result in the activation of acclimation and tolerance responses, presumably via retrograde signaling.

  9. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2004 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

    2009-03-31

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eighth season (1997-2004) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the sixth season (1999-2004) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progency for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies. In 2004

  10. Study of the Effect of SRT on Microbial Diversity in Laboratory-scale Sequencing Batch Reactors Using Acclimated and Non-Acclimated Seed

    KAUST Repository

    Tellez, Berenice

    2011-07-07

    Solids Retention Time (SRT) is an important design parameter in activated sludge wastewater treatment systems. In this study, the effect of SRT on the bacterial community structure and diversity was examined in replicate lab-scale activated sludge sequencing batch reactors were operated for a period of 8 weeks and seeded with acclimated or non-acclimated sludge. Four SBRs (acclimated) were set up as duplicates and operated at an SRT of 2 days, and another set of four SBRs (non-acclimated) were operated at an SRT of 10 days. To characterize the microbial community in the SBRs, 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was used to measure biodiversity and to assess the reproducibility and stability of the bacterial community structure in replicate reactors. Diversity results showed that SBRs operated at an SRT of 10 days are more diverse than SBRs operated at an SRT of 2 days. This suggests that engineering decision could enhance diversity in activated sludge systems. Cluster analysis based on phylogenetic information revealed that the bacterial community structure was not stable and replicated SBRs evolved differently.

  11. Acclimation process of cultivating Chlorella vulgaris in toxic excess sludge extract and its response mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Hualin; Chen, Xiurong; Zhuang, Youjun; Yu, Zeya; Zhou, TianJun

    2018-02-15

    Chlorella vulgaris was cultivated in the gradually increased proportion of toxic sludge extracts for acclimation, which was obtained from SBR treated synthetic wastewater containing mixed chlorophenols (2,4,6-trichlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol). The growth of C. vulgaris was obviously improved after acclimation with the cell number in the 100% sludge group was 22.75±0.85∗10 6 cellmL -1 , which was relatively more than the BG11 control group's (20.80±0.35∗10 6 cellmL -1 ) and apparently over the 100% sludge group (10.78±0.45∗10 6 cellmL -1 ). Compared with the sludge control sludge group, C. vulgaris in the acclimation group gained 24.1% and 18.2% more relative removal rate about TOC and ecotoxicity, respectively. Proteomics analysis showed that protein spots were more clear and centralized and the clarifications of the different protein spots narrowed from 8 to 5 after acclimation. Proteins related to oxidoreducase activity and energy metabolism were over expressed and C. vulgaris could select the metabolic pathways, especially enhanced pyruvate fermentation, TCA cycle, and glycolysis after acclimation, by over accumulating the corresponding vital enzymes. Conclusively, acclimation was a good method to improve the removal ability and growth of C. vulgaris and algae could acclimatize itself to grow upon the toxic sludge extracts by metabolic selection. We suppose acclimation process was a potential method for algae wastewater treatment and algae cultivation without or reduce dilution. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Leaf Structural Acclimation Amplifies Simulated Climate Warming in Response to Elevated Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovenock, M.; Swann, A. L. S.

    2016-12-01

    Many plants undergo structural acclimations, or changes in trait morphology, in response to elevated carbon dioxide in field and greenhouse manipulation experiments. These structural acclimations can alter plant functioning - changes in which, taken at the global scale, have been shown to dramatically impact climate. Vegetation modifies Earth's climate by controlling the fluxes of carbon, water, and energy. Of critical importance is a better understanding of how vegetation responses to climate change will feedback on climate. Yet, the climate impacts of plant structural acclimation remain to be tested and quantified. Here we show that one plant structural acclimation - a one third increase in leaf mass per area in response to elevated carbon dioxide in C3 plants globally - significantly impacts climate in earth system model experiments. Consideration of leaf structural acclimation decreases global net primary productivity (-6PgC/yr) compared to the control climate change simulation, representing a flux of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere of similar magnitude to current annual fossil fuel emissions (8PgC/yr). Additional terrestrial warming (+0.3°C globally), especially of the northern extratropics (+0.4°C), results from reduced evapotranspiration and enhanced absorption of solar radiation at the surface. Structural acclimation drives the productivity and evapotranspiration declines by decreasing the leaf area growth associated with carbon fertilization, as greater leaf mass per area increases the cost of building leaf area and productivity fails to fully compensate. Our results suggest that plant structural acclimations, such as leaf mass per area, should be considered in climate projections and provide additional motivation for ecological and physiological experiments that determine plant responses to environment.

  13. Acclimation to short-term low temperatures in two Eucalyptus globulus clones with contrasting drought resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa E Silva, F; Shvaleva, A; Broetto, F; Ortuño, M F; Rodrigues, M L; Almeida, M H; Chaves, M M; Pereira, J S

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that Eucalyptus globulus Labill. genotypes that are more resistant to dry environments might also exhibit higher cold tolerances than drought-sensitive plants. The effect of low temperatures was evaluated in acclimated and unacclimated ramets of a drought-resistant clone (CN5) and a drought-sensitive clone (ST51) of E. globulus. We studied the plants' response via leaf gas exchanges, leaf water and osmotic potentials, concentrations of soluble sugars, several antioxidant enzymes and leaf electrolyte leakage. Progressively lowering air temperatures (from 24/16 to 10/-2 degrees C, day/night) led to acclimation of both clones. Acclimated ramets exhibited higher photosynthetic rates, stomatal conductances and lower membrane relative injuries when compared to unacclimated ramets. Moreover, low temperatures led to significant increases of soluble sugars and antioxidant enzymes activity (glutathione reductase, ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutases) of both clones in comparison to plants grown at control temperature (24/16 degrees C). On the other hand, none of the clones, either acclimated or not, exhibited signs of photoinhibition under low temperatures and moderate light. The main differences in the responses to low temperatures between the two clones resulted mainly from differences in carbon metabolism, including a higher accumulation of soluble sugars in the drought-resistant clone CN5 as well as a higher capacity for osmotic regulation, as compared to the drought-sensitive clone ST51. Although membrane injury data suggested that both clones had the same inherent freezing tolerance before and after cold acclimation, the results also support the hypothesis that the drought-resistant clone had a greater cold tolerance at intermediate levels of acclimation than the drought-sensitive clone. A higher capacity to acclimate in a short period can allow a clone to maintain an undamaged leaf surface area along sudden frost events, increasing

  14. Dry season limnological conditions and basin geology exhibit complex relationships with δ13C and δ15N of carbon sources in four Neotropical floodplains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeinghaus, David J.; Manetta, Gislaine I.; Benedito, Evanilde

    2017-01-01

    Studies in freshwater ecosystems are seeking to improve understanding of carbon flow in food webs and stable isotopes have been influential in this work. However, variation in isotopic values of basal production sources could either be an asset or a hindrance depending on study objectives. We assessed the potential for basin geology and local limnological conditions to predict stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of six carbon sources at multiple locations in four Neotropical floodplain ecosystems (Paraná, Pantanal, Araguaia, and Amazon). Limnological conditions exhibited greater variation within than among systems. δ15N differed among basins for most carbon sources, but δ13C did not (though high within-basin variability for periphyton, phytoplankton and particulate organic carbon was observed). Although δ13C and δ15N values exhibited significant correlations with some limnological factors within and among basins, those relationships differed among carbon sources. Regression trees for both carbon and nitrogen isotopes for all sources depicted complex and in some cases nested relationships, and only very limited similarity was observed among trees for different carbon sources. Although limnological conditions predicted variation in isotope values of carbon sources, we suggest the resulting models were too complex to enable mathematical corrections of source isotope values among sites based on these parameters. The importance of local conditions in determining variation in source isotope values suggest that isotopes may be useful for examining habitat use, dispersal and patch dynamics within heterogeneous floodplain ecosystems, but spatial variability in isotope values needs to be explicitly considered when testing ecosystem models of carbon flow in these systems. PMID:28358822

  15. Dry season limnological conditions and basin geology exhibit complex relationships with δ13C and δ15N of carbon sources in four Neotropical floodplains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaia Alves, Gustavo H; Hoeinghaus, David J; Manetta, Gislaine I; Benedito, Evanilde

    2017-01-01

    Studies in freshwater ecosystems are seeking to improve understanding of carbon flow in food webs and stable isotopes have been influential in this work. However, variation in isotopic values of basal production sources could either be an asset or a hindrance depending on study objectives. We assessed the potential for basin geology and local limnological conditions to predict stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of six carbon sources at multiple locations in four Neotropical floodplain ecosystems (Paraná, Pantanal, Araguaia, and Amazon). Limnological conditions exhibited greater variation within than among systems. δ15N differed among basins for most carbon sources, but δ13C did not (though high within-basin variability for periphyton, phytoplankton and particulate organic carbon was observed). Although δ13C and δ15N values exhibited significant correlations with some limnological factors within and among basins, those relationships differed among carbon sources. Regression trees for both carbon and nitrogen isotopes for all sources depicted complex and in some cases nested relationships, and only very limited similarity was observed among trees for different carbon sources. Although limnological conditions predicted variation in isotope values of carbon sources, we suggest the resulting models were too complex to enable mathematical corrections of source isotope values among sites based on these parameters. The importance of local conditions in determining variation in source isotope values suggest that isotopes may be useful for examining habitat use, dispersal and patch dynamics within heterogeneous floodplain ecosystems, but spatial variability in isotope values needs to be explicitly considered when testing ecosystem models of carbon flow in these systems.

  16. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 transcriptome: acclimation to temperature, salinity, oxidative stress and mixotrophic growth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eLudwig

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium. It is a model organism for studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and has great potential for biotechnological applications. It exhibits an exceptional tolerance of high light irradiation and shows very rapid growth. The habitats from which this and closely related strains were isolated are subject to changes in several environmental factors, including light, nutrient supply, temperature, and salinity. In this study global transcriptome profiling via RNAseq has been used to perform a comparative and integrated study of global changes in cells grown at different temperatures, at different salinities and under mixotrophic conditions, when a metabolizable organic carbon source was present. Furthermore, the transcriptomes were investigated for cells that were subjected to a heat shock and that were exposed to oxidative stress. Lower growth temperatures caused relatively minor changes of the transcriptome; the most prominent changes affected fatty acid desaturases. A heat shock caused severe changes of the transcriptome pattern; transcripts for genes associated with major metabolic pathways declined and those for different chaperones increased dramatically. Oxidative stress, however, left the transcript pattern almost unaffected. When grown at high salinity, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 had increased expression of genes involved in compatible solute biosynthesis and showed increased mRNA levels for several genes involved in electron transport. Transcripts of two adjacent genes dramatically increased upon growth at high salinity; the respective proteins are putatively involved in coping with oxidative stress and in triggering ion channels. Only minor changes were observed when cells were grown at low salinity or when the growth medium was supplemented with glycerol. However, the transcriptome data suggest that cells must acclimate to excess reducing equivalents when a reduced C-source

  17. Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 Transcriptome: Acclimation to Temperature, Salinity, Oxidative Stress, and Mixotrophic Growth Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A

    2012-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium. It is a model organism for studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and has great potential for biotechnological applications. It exhibits an exceptional tolerance of high-light irradiation and shows very rapid growth. The habitats from which this and closely related strains were isolated are subject to changes in several environmental factors, including light, nutrient supply, temperature, and salinity. In this study global transcriptome profiling via RNAseq has been used to perform a comparative and integrated study of global changes in cells grown at different temperatures, at different salinities, and under mixotrophic conditions, when a metabolizable organic carbon source was present. Furthermore, the transcriptomes were investigated for cells that were subjected to a heat shock and that were exposed to oxidative stress. Lower growth temperatures caused relatively minor changes of the transcriptome; the most prominent changes affected fatty acid desaturases. A heat shock caused severe changes of the transcriptome pattern; transcripts for genes associated with major metabolic pathways declined and those for different chaperones increased dramatically. Oxidative stress, however, left the transcript pattern almost unaffected. When grown at high salinity, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 had increased expression of genes involved in compatible solute biosynthesis and showed increased mRNA levels for several genes involved in electron transport. Transcripts of two adjacent genes dramatically increased upon growth at high salinity; the respective proteins are putatively involved in coping with oxidative stress and in triggering ion channels. Only minor changes were observed when cells were grown at low salinity or when the growth medium was supplemented with glycerol. However, the transcriptome data suggest that cells must acclimate to excess reducing equivalents when a reduced C-source is present.

  18. Acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to ultraviolet radiation and its impact on chemical toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkaric, Muris; Xiao, Mao [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Behra, Renata [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Eggen, Rik I.L., E-mail: rik.eggen@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Toxicology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Systematic study of UVR acclimation and its impact on chemical toxicity in C. reinhardtii. • UVR acclimation is mediated through fast and reversible physiological defense mechanisms. • Pigment analysis suggests a role of lutein in UVR acclimation. • Co-tolerance to rose bengal suggests a role of singlet oxygen defense in UVR acclimation. • Knowledge on the toxic mechanism of chemicals needed to predict co-tolerance. - Abstract: The toxicity of chemical pollutants can be modulated under stressful environmental conditions, such as increased temperature, salinity or ultraviolet radiation (UVR), due to the interaction of effects during simultaneous stressor exposure. However, organisms may acclimate to such conditions by activation of physiological and biochemical defence mechanisms. In sequential exposures, organisms acclimated to environmental stressors may display an increased sensitivity or co-tolerance towards chemical pollutants. It has been suggested that co-tolerance might be expected for similarly acting stressors due to common defence mechanisms. To test this for combinations of UVR and chemical stressors, we first acclimatized the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to UVR and subsequently compared the sensitivity of UVR pre-exposed and control algae towards chemicals. Selected chemicals all act on photosynthesis and thus share a common physiological target, but display distinct toxicity mechanisms. Results showed that UVR pre-exposure for four days partially inhibited algal growth and photosynthesis, but also increased algal tolerance to higher UVR levels, confirming UVR acclimation. HPLC analysis of algal pigments indicated that UVR acclimation might in part be explained by the protective function of lutein while the contribution of UVR absorbing compounds was less clear. Challenge exposure to chemicals in the absence of UVR showed that acclimated algae were co-tolerant to the photosensitizer rose bengal, but not to the

  19. Deep Super-SAGE transcriptomic analysis of cold acclimation in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Abel; Caminero, Constantino; García, Pedro; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Hoffmeier, Klaus; Winter, Peter; Pérez de la Vega, Marcelino

    2017-06-30

    Frost is one of the main abiotic stresses limiting plant distribution and crop production. To cope with the stress, plants evolved adaptations known as cold acclimation or chilling tolerance to maximize frost tolerance. Cold acclimation is a progressive acquisition of freezing tolerance by plants subjected to low non-freezing temperatures which subsequently allows them to survive exposure to frost. Lentil is a cool season grain legume that is challenged by winter frost in some areas of its cultivation. To better understand the genetic base of frost tolerance differential gene expression in response to cold acclimation was investigated. Recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from the cross Precoz x WA8649041 were first classified as cold tolerant or cold susceptible according to their response to temperatures between -3 to -15 °C. Then, RILs from both extremes of the response curve were cold acclimated and the leaf transcriptomes of two bulks each of eight frost tolerant and seven cold susceptible RILs were investigated by Deep Super-SAGE transcriptome profiling. Thus, four RNA bulks were analysed: the acclimated susceptible, the acclimated tolerant and the respective controls (non-acclimated susceptible and non-acclimated tolerant). Approximately 16.5 million 26 nucleotide long Super-SAGE tags were sequenced in the four sets (between ~3 and 5.4 millions). In total, 133,077 different unitags, each representing a particular transcript isoform, were identified in these four sets. Tags which showed a significantly different abundance in any of the bulks (fold change ≥4.0 and a significant p-value <0.001) were selected and used to identify the corresponding lentil gene sequence. Three hundred of such lentil sequences were identified. Most of their known homologs coded for glycine-rich, cold and drought-regulated proteins, dormancy-associated proteins, proline-rich proteins (PRPs) and other membrane proteins. These were generally but not exclusively over-expressed in the

  20. Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLeod, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, were located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, was located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving

  1. Source estimation for propagation processes on complex networks with an application to delays in public transportation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manitz, J. (Juliane); Harbering, J. (Jonas); M.E. Schmidt (Marie); T. Kneib (Thomas); A. Schöbel (Anita)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe correct identification of the source of a propagation process is crucial in many research fields. As a specific application, we consider source estimation of delays in public transportation networks. We propose two approaches: an effective distance median and a backtracking method.

  2. Thermogenin amount and activity in hamster brown fat mitochondria: effect of cold acclimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundin, U.; Moore, G.; Nedergaard, J.; Cannon, B.

    1987-05-01

    To investigate the acclimation process in a hibernator, four different parameters of thermogenin amount and activity were investigated in brown adipose tissue mitochondria from cold-exposed and cold-acclimated Syrian hamsters. Hamsters, which are hibernators, have been considered to be primed for thermogenesis and thus not to show cold-acclimation effects, but here a significant increase in (/sup 3/H)GDP-binding capacity was observed, and this increase was paralleled by an increase in thermogenin antigen amount, as measured in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The transient nature of the effect of cold exposure on (/sup 3/H)GDP binding, characteristically observed with rat mitochondria, was not observed with hamster mitochondria, and the increase in (/sup 3/H)GDP binding occurred without a change in the dissociation constant. The increase in thermogenin amount was paralleled by an increase both in GDP-sensitive Cl/sup -/ permeability of the mitochondria and in GDP-sensitive respiration. It was established that it is the maximal activity of thermogenin that is rate limiting for thermogenesis in isolated mitochondria, provided that an optimal substrate is used (such as palmitoyl carnitine). Cold acclimation also increased the total amount of mitochondria in the tissue, leading totally to a sixfold increase in thermogenin content of the hamster. It is concluded that hamsters show the expected physiological, pharmacological, and biochemical signs of cold acclimation.

  3. Metabolic and cellular stress responses of catfish, Horabagrus brachysoma (Günther) acclimated to increasing temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvi, Rishikesh S; Das, Tilak; Debnath, Dipesh; Yengkokpam, Sona; Baruah, Kartik; Tiwari, Lalchand R; Pal, Asim K

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the metabolic and cellular stress responses in an endemic catfish Horabagrus brachysoma acclimated to ambient (26°C), 31, 33 and 36°C for 30 days. After acclimation, fish were sampled to investigate changes in the levels of blood glucose, tissue glycogen and ascorbic acid, activities of enzymes involved in glycolysis (LDH), citric acid cycle (MDH), gluconeogenesis (FBPase and G6Pase), pentose phosphate pathway (G6PDH), protein metabolism (AST and ALT), phosphate metabolism (ACP and ALP) and energy metabolism (ATPase), and HSP70 levels in various tissues. Acclimation to higher temperatures (33 and 36°C) significantly increased activities of LDH, MDH, ALP, ACP, AST, ALT and ATPase and blood glucose levels, whereas decreased the G6PDH enzyme activity and, tissue glycogen and ascorbic acid. Results indicated an overall increase in the carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism implying increased metabolic demands for maintaining homeostasis in fish acclimated to higher temperatures (33 and 36°C). We observed tissue specific response of HSP70 in H. brachysoma, with significant increase in gill and liver at 33 and 36°C, and in brain and muscle at 36°C, enabling cellular protection at higher acclimation temperatures. In conclusion, H. brachysoma adjusted metabolic and cellular responses to withstand increased temperatures, however, these responses suggest that the fish was under stress at 33°C or higher temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Light-Induced Acclimation of the Arabidopsis chlorina1 Mutant to Singlet Oxygen[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramel, Fanny; Ksas, Brigitte; Akkari, Elsy; Mialoundama, Alexis S.; Monnet, Fabien; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Mueller, Martin J.; Bouvier, Florence; Havaux, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is a reactive oxygen species that can function as a stress signal in plant leaves leading to programmed cell death. In microalgae, 1O2-induced transcriptomic changes result in acclimation to 1O2. Here, using a chlorophyll b–less Arabidopsis thaliana mutant (chlorina1 [ch1]), we show that this phenomenon can also occur in vascular plants. The ch1 mutant is highly photosensitive due to a selective increase in the release of 1O2 by photosystem II. Under photooxidative stress conditions, the gene expression profile of ch1 mutant leaves very much resembled the gene responses to 1O2 reported in the Arabidopsis mutant flu. Preexposure of ch1 plants to moderately elevated light intensities eliminated photooxidative damage without suppressing 1O2 formation, indicating acclimation to 1O2. Substantial differences in gene expression were observed between acclimation and high-light stress: A number of transcription factors were selectively induced by acclimation, and contrasting effects were observed for the jasmonate pathway. Jasmonate biosynthesis was strongly induced in ch1 mutant plants under high-light stress and was noticeably repressed under acclimation conditions, suggesting the involvement of this hormone in 1O2-induced cell death. This was confirmed by the decreased tolerance to photooxidative damage of jasmonate-treated ch1 plants and by the increased tolerance of the jasmonate-deficient mutant delayed-dehiscence2. PMID:23590883

  5. Rapid transgenerational acclimation of a tropical reef fish to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelson, J. M.; Munday, P. L.; McCormick, M. I.; Pitcher, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the capacity of species to acclimate and adapt to expected temperature increases is critical for making predictions about the biological impacts of global warming, yet it is one of the least certain aspects of climate change science. Tropical species are considered to be especially sensitive to climate change because they live close to their thermal maximum and exhibit limited capacity for acclimation. Here, we demonstrate that a tropical reef fish is highly sensitive to small increases in water temperature, but can rapidly acclimate over multiple generations. Acute exposure to elevated temperatures (+1.5°C and +3.0°C) predicted to occur this century caused a 15% and 30% respective decrease in individual's maximum ability to perform aerobic activities such as swimming or foraging, known as aerobic scope. However, complete compensation in aerobic scope occurred when both parents and offspring were reared throughout their lives at elevated temperature. Such acclimation could reduce the impact of warming temperatures and allow populations to persist across their current range. This study reveals the importance of transgenerational acclimation as a mechanism for coping with rapid climate change and highlights that single generation studies risk underestimating the potential of species to cope.

  6. Effects of elevated CO2 on fish behaviour undiminished by transgenerational acclimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Megan J.; Watson, Sue-Ann; Welsh, Justin Q.; McCormick, Mark I.; Munday, Philip L.

    2014-12-01

    Behaviour and sensory performance of marine fishes are impaired at CO2 levels projected to occur in the ocean in the next 50-100 years, and there is limited potential for within-generation acclimation to elevated CO2 (refs , ). However, whether fish behaviour can acclimate or adapt to elevated CO2 over multiple generations remains unanswered. We tested for transgenerational acclimation of reef fish olfactory preferences and behavioural lateralization at moderate (656 μatm) and high (912 μatm) end-of-century CO2 projections. Juvenile spiny damselfish, Acanthochromis polyacanthus, from control parents (446 μatm) exhibited an innate avoidance to chemical alarm cue (CAC) when reared in control conditions. In contrast, juveniles lost their innate avoidance of CAC and even became strongly attracted to CAC when reared at elevated CO2 levels. Juveniles from parents maintained at mid-CO2 and high-CO2 levels also lost their innate avoidance of CAC when reared in elevated CO2, demonstrating no capacity for transgenerational acclimation of olfactory responses. Behavioural lateralization was also disrupted for juveniles reared under elevated CO2, regardless of parental conditioning. Our results show minimal potential for transgenerational acclimation in this fish, suggesting that genetic adaptation will be necessary to overcome the effects of ocean acidification on behaviour.

  7. Impact of acclimation methods on microbial communities and performance of anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactors

    KAUST Repository

    Labarge, Nicole

    2016-10-17

    An anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (AFMBR) is a new and effective method for energy-efficient treatment of low strength wastewater, but the factors that affect performance are not well known. Different inocula and acclimation methods of the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the reactor were examined here to determine their impact on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and microbial community composition of domestic wastewater-fed AFMBRs. AFMBRs inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge (D) or domestic wastewater (W) and fed domestic wastewater, or inoculated with a microbiologically diverse anaerobic bog sediment and acclimated using methanol (M), all produced the same COD removal of 63 ± 12% using a diluted wastewater feed (100 ± 21 mg L−1 COD). However, an AFMBR with GAC inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and acclimated using acetate (A) showed significantly increased wastewater COD removal to 84 ± 6%. In addition, feeding the AFMBR with the M-acclimated GAC with an acetate medium for one week subsequently increased COD removal to 70 ± 6%. Microbial communities enriched on the GAC included Geobacter, sulfur-reducing bacteria, Syntrophaceae, and Chlorobiaceae, with reactor A having the highest relative abundance of Geobacter. These results showed that acetate was the most useful substrate for acclimation of GAC communities, and GAC harbors unique communities relative to those in the AFMBR influent and recirculated solution.

  8. Risk Management in Complex Construction Projects that Apply Renewable Energy Sources: A Case Study of the Realization Phase of the Energis Educational and Research Intelligent Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechowicz, Maria

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, one of the characteristic features of construction industry is an increased complexity of a growing number of projects. Almost each construction project is unique, has its project-specific purpose, its own project structural complexity, owner’s expectations, ground conditions unique to a certain location, and its own dynamics. Failure costs and costs resulting from unforeseen problems in complex construction projects are very high. Project complexity drivers pose many vulnerabilities to a successful completion of a number of projects. This paper discusses the process of effective risk management in complex construction projects in which renewable energy sources were used, on the example of the realization phase of the ENERGIS teaching-laboratory building, from the point of view of DORBUD S.A., its general contractor. This paper suggests a new approach to risk management for complex construction projects in which renewable energy sources were applied. The risk management process was divided into six stages: gathering information, identification of the top, critical project risks resulting from the project complexity, construction of the fault tree for each top, critical risks, logical analysis of the fault tree, quantitative risk assessment applying fuzzy logic and development of risk response strategy. A new methodology for the qualitative and quantitative risk assessment for top, critical risks in complex construction projects was developed. Risk assessment was carried out applying Fuzzy Fault Tree analysis on the example of one top critical risk. Application of the Fuzzy sets theory to the proposed model allowed to decrease uncertainty and eliminate problems with gaining the crisp values of the basic events probability, common during expert risk assessment with the objective to give the exact risk score of each unwanted event probability.

  9. Slowly developing drought stress increases photosynthetic acclimation of Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongyun; van Iersel, Marc W

    2011-10-01

    Our understanding of plant responses to drought has improved over the decades. However, the importance of the rate of drought imposition on the response is still poorly understood. To test the importance of the rate at which drought stress develops, whole-plant photosynthesis (P(net) ), respiration (R(dark) ), daily carbon gain (DCG), daily evapotranspiration (DET) and water use efficiency (WUE) of vinca (Catharanthus roseus), subjected to different drought imposition rates, were investigated. We controlled the rate at which the substrate dried out with an automated irrigation system that allowed pot weight to decrease gradually throughout the drying period. Fast, intermediate and slow drying treatments reached their final pot weight [500 g, substrate water content (θ) ≈ 0.10 m³ m(-3) ] after 3.1, 6.6 and 10 days, respectively. Although all drying treatments decreased P(net) and R(dark) , slow drying reduced P(net) and R(dark) less than fast drying. At a θ < 0.10 m³ m(-3) , DCG and DET in the slow drying treatment were reduced by ≈50%, whereas DCG and DET in the fast drying treatment were reduced by 85 and 70% at a θ of 0.16 m(3) m(-3) . Plants exposed to slow drought imposition maintained a high WUE, even at θ < 0.10 m³ m(-3) . Overall, physiological responses to low θ were less severe in plants subjected to slow drying as compared with fast drying, even though the final θ was lower for plants exposed to slow drying. This suggests that the rate at which drought stress develops has important implications for the level of acclimation that occurs. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  10. Unlocking the Constraints of Cyanobacterial Productivity: Acclimations Enabling Ultrafast Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Hans C.; McClure, Ryan S.; Hill, Eric A.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Chrisler, William B.; Romine, Margie F.; McDermott, Jason E.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Konopka, Allan E.; Fredrickson, James K.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2016-07-26

    putative biological principles that allow unicellular cyanobacteria to achieve ultrahigh growth rates through photophysiological acclimation and effective management of cellular resource under different growth regimes.

  11. Importance of Fluctuations in Light on Plant Photosynthetic Acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialet-Chabrand, Silvere; Matthews, Jack S A; Simkin, Andrew J; Raines, Christine A; Lawson, Tracy

    2017-04-01

    The acclimation of plants to light has been studied extensively, yet little is known about the effect of dynamic fluctuations in light on plant phenotype and acclimatory responses. We mimicked natural fluctuations in light over a diurnal period to examine the effect on the photosynthetic processes and growth of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). High and low light intensities, delivered via a realistic dynamic fluctuating or square wave pattern, were used to grow and assess plants. Plants subjected to square wave light had thicker leaves and greater photosynthetic capacity compared with fluctuating light-grown plants. This, together with elevated levels of proteins associated with electron transport, indicates greater investment in leaf structural components and photosynthetic processes. In contrast, plants grown under fluctuating light had thinner leaves, lower leaf light absorption, but maintained similar photosynthetic rates per unit leaf area to square wave-grown plants. Despite high light use efficiency, plants grown under fluctuating light had a slow growth rate early in development, likely due to the fact that plants grown under fluctuating conditions were not able to fully utilize the light energy absorbed for carbon fixation. Diurnal leaf-level measurements revealed a negative feedback control of photosynthesis, resulting in a decrease in total diurnal carbon assimilated of at least 20%. These findings highlight that growing plants under square wave growth conditions ultimately fails to predict plant performance under realistic light regimes and stress the importance of considering fluctuations in incident light in future experiments that aim to infer plant productivity under natural conditions in the field. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Acclimating international graduate students to professional engineering ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Byron; Austin, Katherine; Lawson, William; Gorsuch, Greta; Darwin, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    This article describes the education portion of an ongoing grant-sponsored education and research project designed to help graduate students in all engineering disciplines learn about the basic ethical principles, rules, and obligations associated with engineering practice in the United States. While the curriculum developed for this project is used for both domestic and international students, the educational materials were designed to be sensitive to the specific needs of international graduate students. In recent years, engineering programs in the United States have sought to develop a larger role for professional ethics education in the curriculum. Accreditation requirements, as well as pressures from the private sector, have helped facilitate this shift in focus. Almost half of all engineering graduate students in the U.S. are international students. Further, research indicates that the majority of these students will remain in the U.S. to work post-graduation. It is therefore in the interest of the profession that these students, coming from diverse backgrounds, receive some formal exposure to the professional and ethical expectations and norms of the engineering profession in the United States to help ensure that they have the knowledge and skills--non-technical as well as technical--required in today's engineering profession. In becoming acculturated to professional norms in a host country, international students face challenges that domestic students do not encounter; such as cultural competency, language proficiency, and acculturation stress. Mitigating these challenges must be a consideration in the development of any effective education materials. The present article discusses the project rationale and describes the development of on-line instructional materials aimed at helping international engineering graduate students acclimate to professional engineering ethics standards in the United States. Finally, a brief data summary of students' perceptions

  13. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2006 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

    2009-03-31

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the tenth season (1997-2006) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the eighth season (1999-2006) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2006

  14. Understanding the adaptive response in vertebrates: the phenomenon of ease and ease response during post-stress acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhash Peter, M C

    2013-01-15

    Vertebrates have evolved mechanisms to perceive stressors that arise either from their body or from the environment. Consequently, a state of stress and stress response occur in fish which is characterized by a disturbed physiological homeostasis. The pattern of stress response becomes complex as a result of neuroendocrine involvement and shows varied magnitudes in fishes depending on the nature and the severity of stressors. The integrated and compensatory physiological modifications in fishes during their early phase of adaptive response favor them to accommodate the imposed stressor through the process of stress acclimation. In contrast, with the direction of neuroendocrine signals, a phase of recovery often called post-stress acclimation occurs if the animal gets away from the stressor exposure. During this late phase of adaptive response, physiological modifications operate in favor of the animal that reduces the magnitude of stress response and finally to a phase of normality as animals possess the urge to correct its disrupted homeostasis. The phenomenon of ease and its response thus reduces the allostatic load, resets the homeostatic state through physiologic processes and corrects the stress-induced homeostatic disturbance with the aid of neuroendocrine signals. Ample evidences are now available to support this novel concept of ease and ease response where mitigation of the intensity of stress response occurs physiologically. Treatment of fish with melatonin or serotonin precursor tryptophan can modify the magnitude of stress response as evident in the pattern of tested physiological indices. In addition to cortisol, thyroid hormone as a major stress modifier hormone is involved in the regulation of ease response in fish probably due to the mechanisms involving inter-hormonal interference. Understanding the mechanisms of adaptive responses in vertebrates thus warranties more studies on the physiology of ease and its response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc

  15. Burkholderia stagnalis sp. nov. and Burkholderia territorii sp. nov., two novel Burkholderia cepacia complex species from environmental and human sources

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    De Smet, Birgit; Mayo, Mark; Peeters, Charlotte; Zlosnik, James E A; Spilker, Theodore; Hird, Trevor J; LiPuma, John J; Kidd, Timothy J; Kaestli, Mirjam; Ginther, Jennifer L; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul; Bell, Scott C; Jacobs, Jan A; Currie, Bart J; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Nine Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria were isolated during environmental surveys for the ecological niche of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the aetiological agent of melioidosis, in the Northern Territory of Australia...

  16. Leaf carotenoid concentrations and monoterpene emission capacity under acclimation of the light reactions of photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcar-Castell, A.; Baeck, J. (Dept. of Forest Ecology, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Penuelas, J.; Owen, S. M.; Llusia, J. (Centre de Recerca Ecologica i Aplicacions Forestals - CREAF, Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)); Munne-Bosch, S. (Departament de Biologia Vegetal Univ. de Barcelona (Spain))

    2009-07-01

    Factors controlling the seasonal dynamics in leaf monoterpene emission capacity are not yet well understood. In particular, temperature and light algorithms alone cannot explain the pattern of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during spring recovery of photosynthesis in boreal forests, suggesting further physiological controls. Higher isoprenoids, such as carotenoids, and VOCs share the initial steps of their synthesis pathways. Therefore, it could be expected that the pool size of leaf carotenoids and its acclimation interact with leaf monoterpene emission capacity. We examine this interaction in evergreen foliage using the non-storing Quercus ilex as a model species. We modified the light environment of a number of potted trees in order to induce acclimation in leaf carotenoids, and studied the effect on monoterpene emission capacity. The results indicate that monoterpene emission capacity and photosynthetic pigment metabolism are coupled in Q. ilex seedlings growing at or acclimating to different light levels. (orig.)

  17. Cold-acclimation increases the predatory efficiency of the aphidophagous coccinellid Adalia bipunctata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Christian Hougaard; Toft, Søren; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård

    2013-01-01

    in the laboratory. However, insects are known to acclimate via physiological adjustments to their thermal environment and performance is often higher at temperatures to which they are acclimated. Thus rearing A. bipunctata at 25 °C may not be optimal if they are to effectively manage aphid pests under different...

  18. New age (ca. 2970 Ma), mantle source composition and geodynamic constraints on the Archean Fiskenæsset anorthosite complex, SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polat, A; Frei, Robert; Scherstén, Anders

    2010-01-01

    rocks collectively yield an Sm–Nd errorchron age of 2973 ± 28 Ma (MSWD = 33), with an average initial eNd = + 3.3 ± 0.7, consistent with a long-term depleted mantle source. Regression of Pb isotope data define an age of 2945 ± 36 Ma (MSWD = 44); and the regression line intersects the average growth...... is proposed to explain the evolution of the Fiskenæsset Complex. Stage 1 represents the formation of depleted shallow mantle source > 3000 Ma (eNd = + 3.3 ± 0.7) for the complex. Stage 2 corresponds to the development of an intra-oceanic island arc between 3000–2950 Ma. Stage 3 is characterized...

  19. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Lostine River Operations and Maintenance 2007 Smolt Acclimation and Adult Return Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zollman, Richard L.; Eschler, Russell; Sealey, Shawn [Nez Perce Tribe

    2009-03-31

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), has implemented a Chinook salmon supplementation program (250,000 smolts) on the Lostine River, a tributary to the Grande Ronde River of Oregon. The Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation project, which involves supplementation of the Upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek in addition to the Lostine River, was established to prevent extirpation and increase the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to the Grande Ronde River. This report covers the eleventh season (1997-2007) of adult Chinook salmon broodstock collection in the Lostine River and the ninth season (1999-2007) of acclimation of resulting Lostine River progeny. Production of Lostine River spring Chinook salmon smolts currently occurs at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LGH). The Lostine River supplementation program utilizes two strategies to obtain egg source for production of smolts for supplementation: captive broodstock and conventional broodstock. The captive broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural juvenile spring Chinook salmon smolts from the Lostine River, (2) rearing those to adult and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for eventual acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. The conventional broodstock strategy involves (1) capture of natural and hatchery origin adults returning to the Lostine River, (2) holding those adults and spawning them, and (3) rearing the resultant progeny for acclimation and release back into the Lostine River. This report focuses on (1) the trapping and collection of adult spring Chinook salmon that return to the Lostine River, which provides the broodstock source for the conventional strategy and (2) the acclimation and release of juvenile spring Chinook salmon produced from the captive broodstock and conventional broodstock strategies In 2007

  20. Changes in heart rate variability during the induction and decay of heat acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouris, Andreas D; Poirier, Martin P; Bravi, Andrea; Wright-Beatty, Heather E; Herry, Christophe; Seely, Andrew J; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated the changes in core temperature, heart rate, and heart rate variability (HRV) during the induction and decay of heat acclimation. Ten males (23 ± 3 years; 79.5 ± 3.5 kg; 15.2 ± 4.5 percent body fat; 51.13 ± 4.61 mLO(2)∙kg(-1)∙min(-1) peak oxygen uptake) underwent a 14-day heat acclimation protocol comprising of 90-min cycling at ~50 % peak oxygen uptake at 40 °C and ~20 % relative humidity. Core temperature, heart rate, and 102 HRV measures were recorded during a heat tolerance test conducted at baseline (day 0) and at the end of the induction (day 14) and decay (day 28) phases. Heat acclimation resulted in significantly reduced core temperature [rectal (χ (2) = 1298.14, p rate (χ (2) = 1230.17, p heat acclimation-induced reductions in rectal temperature, esophageal temperature, and heart rate, respectively, were lost. Heat acclimation was accompanied by profound and broad changes in HRV: at the end of the induction phase, 75 of the 102 variability measures computed were significantly different (p Heat acclimation is accompanied by reduced core temperature, significant bradycardia, and marked alterations in HRV, which we interpret as being related to vagal dominance. The observed changes in core temperature persist for at least 2 weeks of non-exposure to heat, while the changes in heart rate and HRV decay faster and are only partly evident after 2 weeks of non-exposure to heat.

  1. Acclimation responses to high light by Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Malvaceae) leaves at different stages of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzavara, A K; Rocha, J S; Lourenço, G; Sanada, K; Medri, C; Bianchini, E; Pimenta, J A; Stolf-Moreira, R; Oliveira, H C

    2017-09-01

    The re-composition of deforested environments requires the prior acclimation of seedlings to full sun in nurseries. Seedlings can overcome excess light either through the acclimation of pre-existing fully expanded leaves or through the development of new leaves that are acclimated to the new light environment. Here, we compared the acclimation capacity of mature (MatL, fully expanded at the time of transfer) and newly expanded (NewL, expanded after the light shift) leaves of Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Malvaceae) seedlings to high light. The seedlings were initially grown under shade and then transferred to full sunlight. MatL and NewL were used for chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange analyses, pigment extraction and morpho-anatomical measurements. After the transfer of seedlings to full sun, the MatL persisted and acclimated to some extent to the new light condition, since they underwent alterations in some morpho-physiological traits and maintained a functional electron transport chain and positive net photosynthesis rate. However, long-term exposure to high light led to chronic photoinhibition in MatL, which could be related to the limited plasticity of leaf morpho-anatomical attributes. However, the NewL showed a high capacity to use the absorbed energy in photochemistry and dissipate excess energy harmlessly, attributes that were favoured by the high structural plasticity exhibited by these leaves. Both the maintenance of mature, photosynthetically active leaves and the production of new leaves with a high capacity to cope with excess energy were important for acclimation of G. ulmifolia seedlings. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  2. Acclimation of Solea senegalensis to different ambient temperatures: implications for thyroidal status and osmoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, Francisco J; Ruiz-Jarabo, Ignacio; Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Martín Del Río, María P; Flik, Gert; Mancera, Juan M; Klaren, Peter H M

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of thyroidal status and osmoregulatory capacities in juveniles from the teleost Solea senegalensis acclimated to different ambient temperatures. Juveniles, raised in seawater at 19°C, were acclimated for 3 weeks to temperatures of 12, 19 and 26°C. Since our preliminary observations showed that at 12°C feed intake was suppressed, our experimental design controlled for this factor. The concentration of branchial Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, estimated by measurements of enzyme activity at the optimum temperature of this enzyme (37°C), did not change. In contrast, an increase in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity (measured at 37°C), was observed in the kidney of 12°C-acclimated fish. In fish acclimated to 12°C, the hepatosomatic index had increased, which correlated with increased plasma levels of triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids. Plasma cortisol levels did not differ significantly between the experimental groups. In liver and gills, the amount of iodothyronine deiodinases that exhibit thyroid hormone outer ring deiodination was up-regulated only when fish did not feed. When assayed at the acclimation temperature, kidney deiodinase activities were similar, indicating a temperature-compensation strategy. 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) tissue concentrations in gills and kidney did not differ significantly between experimental groups. However, at 12°C, lower T3 tissue levels were measured in plasma and liver. We conclude that S. senegalensis adjusts its osmoregulatory system to compensate for the effects of temperature on electrolyte transport capacity. The organ-specific changes in thyroid hormone metabolism at different temperatures indicate the involvement of thyroid hormones in temperature acclimation.

  3. Embryonic developmental temperatures modulate thermal acclimation of performance curves in tadpoles of the frog Limnodynastes peronii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Seebacher

    Full Text Available Performance curves of physiological rates are not fixed, and determining the extent to which thermal performance curves can change in response to environmental signals is essential to understand the effect of climate variability on populations. The aim of this study was to determine whether and how temperatures experienced during early embryonic development affect thermal performance curves of later life history stages in the frog Limnodynastes peronii. We tested the hypotheses that a the embryonic environment affects mean trait values only; b temperature at which performance of tadpoles is maximal shifts with egg incubation temperatures so that performance is maximised at the incubation temperatures, and c incubation temperatures modulate the capacity for reversible acclimation in tadpoles. Growth rates were greater in warm (25°C compared to cold (15°C acclimated (6 weeks tadpoles regardless of egg developmental temperatures (15°C or 25°C, representing seasonal means. The breadth of the performance curve of burst locomotor performance (measured at 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30°C, representing annual range is greatest when egg developmental and acclimation temperatures coincide. The mode of the performance curves shifted with acclimation conditions and maximum performance was always at higher temperatures than acclimation conditions. Performance curves of glycolytic (lactate dehydrogenase activities and mitochondrial (citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase enzymes were modulated by interactions between egg incubation and acclimation temperatures. Lactate dehydrogenase activity paralleled patterns seen in burst locomotor performance, but oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial enzyme activities did not mirror growth or locomotor performance. We show that embryonic developmental conditions can modulate performance curves of later life-history stages, thereby conferring flexibilty to respond to environmental conditions later in life.

  4. General patterns of acclimation of leaf respiration to elevated temperatures across biomes and plant types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slot, Martijn; Kitajima, Kaoru

    2015-03-01

    Respiration is instrumental for survival and growth of plants, but increasing costs of maintenance processes with warming have the potential to change the balance between photosynthetic carbon uptake and respiratory carbon release from leaves. Climate warming may cause substantial increases of leaf respiratory carbon fluxes, which would further impact the carbon balance of terrestrial vegetation. However, downregulation of respiratory physiology via thermal acclimation may mitigate this impact. We have conducted a meta-analysis with data collected from 43 independent studies to assess quantitatively the thermal acclimation capacity of leaf dark respiration to warming of terrestrial plant species from across the globe. In total, 282 temperature contrasts were included in the meta-analysis, representing 103 species of forbs, graminoids, shrubs, trees and lianas native to arctic, boreal, temperate and tropical ecosystems. Acclimation to warming was found to decrease respiration at a set temperature in the majority of the observations, regardless of the biome of origin and growth form, but respiration was not completely homeostatic across temperatures in the majority of cases. Leaves that developed at a new temperature had a greater capacity for acclimation than those transferred to a new temperature. We conclude that leaf respiration of most terrestrial plants can acclimate to gradual warming, potentially reducing the magnitude of the positive feedback between climate and the carbon cycle in a warming world. More empirical data are, however, needed to improve our understanding of interspecific variation in thermal acclimation capacity, and to better predict patterns in respiratory carbon fluxes both within and across biomes in the face of ongoing global warming.

  5. Acclimation to hypoxia increases carbohydrate use during exercise in high-altitude deer mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Daphne S; Connaty, Alex D; Mahalingam, Sajeni; Wall, Nastashya; Cheviron, Zachary A; Storz, Jay F; Scott, Graham R; McClelland, Grant B

    2017-03-01

    The low O2 experienced at high altitude is a significant challenge to effective aerobic locomotion, as it requires sustained tissue O2 delivery in addition to the appropriate allocation of metabolic substrates. Here, we tested whether high- and low-altitude deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) have evolved different acclimation responses to hypoxia with respect to muscle metabolism and fuel use during submaximal exercise. Using F1 generation high- and low-altitude deer mice that were born and raised in common conditions, we assessed 1) fuel use during exercise, 2) metabolic enzyme activities, and 3) gene expression for key transporters and enzymes in the gastrocnemius. After hypoxia acclimation, highland mice showed a significant increase in carbohydrate oxidation and higher relative reliance on this fuel during exercise at 75% maximal O2 consumption. Compared with lowland mice, highland mice had consistently higher activities of oxidative and fatty acid oxidation enzymes in the gastrocnemius. In contrast, only after hypoxia acclimation did activities of hexokinase increase significantly in the muscle of highland mice to levels greater than lowland mice. Highland mice also responded to acclimation with increases in muscle gene expression for hexokinase 1 and 2 genes, whereas both populations increased mRNA expression for glucose transporters. Changes in skeletal muscle with acclimation suggest that highland mice had an increased capacity for the uptake and oxidation of circulatory glucose. Our results demonstrate that highland mice have evolved a distinct mode of hypoxia acclimation that involves an increase in carbohydrate use during exercise. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Effect of pre-acclimation of granular activated carbon on microbial electrolysis cell startup and performance

    KAUST Repository

    LaBarge, Nicole

    2016-09-09

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can generate methane by fixing carbon dioxide without using expensive catalysts, but the impact of acclimation procedures on subsequent performance has not been investigated. Granular activated carbon (GAC) was used to pre-enrich electrotrophic methanogenic communities, as GAC has been shown to stimulate direct transfer of electrons between different microbial species. MEC startup times using pre-acclimated GAC were improved compared to controls (without pre-acclimation or without GAC), and after three fed batch cycles methane generation rates were similar (P > 0.4) for GAC acclimated to hydrogen (22 ± 9.3 nmol cm− 3 d− 1), methanol (25 ± 9.7 nmol cm− 3 d− 1), and a volatile fatty acid (VFA) mix (22 ± 11 nmol cm− 3 d− 1). However, MECs started with GAC but no pre-acclimation had lower methane generation rates (13 ± 4.1 nmol cm− 3 d− 1), and MECs without GAC had the lowest rates (0.7 ± 0.8 nmol cm− 3 d− 1 after cycle 2). Microbes previously found in methanogenic MECs, or previously shown to be capable of exocellular electron transfer, were enriched on the GAC. Pre-acclimation using GAC is therefore a simple approach to enrich electroactive communities, improve methane generation rates, and decrease startup times in MECs. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Proteome dynamics of cold-acclimating Rhododendron species contrasting in their freezing tolerance and thermonasty behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Die, Jose V; Arora, Rajeev; Rowland, Lisa J

    2017-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of cold acclimation in rhododendron and in woody perennials in general, we used the 2D-DIGE technique to analyze the rhododendron proteome during the seasonal development of freezing tolerance. We selected two species varying in their cold acclimation ability as well as their thermonasty response (folding of leaves in response to low temperature). Proteins were extracted from leaves of non-acclimated (NA) and cold acclimated (CA) plants of the hardier thermonastic species, R. catawbiense (Cata.), and from leaves of cold acclimated plants of the less hardy, non-thermonastic R. ponticum (Pont.). All three protein samples (Cata.NA, Cata.CA, and Pont.CA) were labeled with different CyDyes and separated together on a single gel. Triplicate gels were run and protein profiles were compared resulting in the identification of 72 protein spots that consistently had different abundances in at least one pair-wise comparison. From the 72 differential spots, we chose 56 spots to excise and characterize further by mass spectrometry (MS). Changes in the proteome associated with the seasonal development of cold acclimation were identified from the Cata.CA-Cata.NA comparisons. Differentially abundant proteins associated with the acquisition of superior freezing tolerance and with the thermonastic response were identified from the Cata.CA-Pont.CA comparisons. Our results indicate that cold acclimation in rhododendron involves increases in abundance of several proteins related to stress (freezing/desiccation tolerance), energy and carbohydrate metabolism, regulation/signaling, secondary metabolism (possibly involving cell wall remodeling), and permeability of the cell membrane. Cold acclimation also involves decreases in abundance of several proteins involved in photosynthesis. Differences in freezing tolerance between genotypes can probably be attributed to observed differences in levels of proteins involved in these functions. Also differences in

  8. Tissue variation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation efficiency in cold-acclimated ducklings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salin, Karine; Teulier, Loïc; Rey, Benjamin; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Voituron, Yann; Duchamp, Claude; Roussel, Damien

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the oxidative phosphorylation efficiency of liver and gastrocnemius muscle mitochondria in thermoneutral and cold-acclimated ducklings. The yield of oxidative phosphorylation was lower in muscle than in liver mitochondria, a difference that was associated with a higher proton conductance in muscle mitochondria. Cold exposure did not affect oxidative phosphorylation efficiency or basal proton leak in mitochondria. We conclude that the basal proton conductance of mitochondria may regulate mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation efficiency, but is not an important contributor to thermogenic processes in cold-acclimated ducklings.

  9. IGF-I and branchial IGF receptor expression and localization during salinity acclimation in striped bass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbaek; Luckenbach, John Adam; Madsen, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    The initial response of the IGF-I system and the expression and cellular localization of IGF type-I receptor (IGF-IR) were studied in the gill of a euryhaline teleost during salinity acclimation. Exposure of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) to hyperosmotic and hypoosmotic challenges induced small...... in either plasma IGF-I, liver, or gill IGF-I mRNA, or gill IGF-IR mRNA levels. In a separate experiment, FW-acclimated fish were injected with saline or IGF-I prior to a 24-h SW challenge. Rapid regain of osmotic balance following SW transfer was hindered by IGF-I. Immunohistochemistry revealed...

  10. Combined effects of drought and cold acclimation on phospholipid fatty acid composition and cold-shock tolerance in the springtail Protaphorura fimata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Martin; Slotsbo, Stine

    2017-01-01

    -shock tolerance. Acclimation to mild drought (− 2.46 MPa) increased body fluid osmolality from 0.33 to 1.25 Osm at all acclimation temperatures (5, 10, 15, or 20 °C) likely due to accumulation of the compatible osmolytes, trehalose, and alanine. Interestingly, the expected positive effect of drought acclimation...

  11. Metabolic and hormonal acclimation to heat stress in domesticated ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabucci, U; Lacetera, N; Baumgard, L H; Rhoads, R P; Ronchi, B; Nardone, A

    2010-07-01

    a minor portion of the reduced milk yield from environmentally induced hyperthermic cows. How these metabolic changes are initiated and regulated is not known. It also remains unclear how these changes differ between short-term v. long-term heat acclimation to impact animal productivity and well-being. A better understanding of the adaptations enlisted by ruminants during heat stress is necessary to enhance the likelihood of developing strategies to simultaneously improve heat tolerance and increase productivity.

  12. Evaluation of a finite-element reciprocity method for epileptic EEG source localization: Accuracy, computational complexity and noise robustness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirvany, Yazdan; Rubæk, Tonny; Edelvik, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the performance of an EEG source localization method that combines a finite element method (FEM) and the reciprocity theorem.The reciprocity method is applied to solve the forward problem in a four-layer spherical head model for a large number of test dipoles...... with 10 mm electrode misplacement the localization error is 4.8 mm. The reciprocity EEG source localization speeds up the solution of the inverse problem with more than three orders of magnitude compared to the state-of-the-art methods.The reciprocity method has high accuracy for modeling the dipole...

  13. USAGE OF MODERN VITAMIN-MINERAL COMPLEXES AS SUPPLEMENTARY SOURCE OF ESSENTIAL POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS IN PEDIATRIC PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Trubnikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of childhood neurological disorders associated with significant mental overloads, prolonged work with computers, intensified ecological pressure and inappropriate nutrition has been increasing recently. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (particularly ω3 included into the composition of the modern vitamin-mineral complexes for children are to play the main corrective role in solving of this problem. Technological aspects of one of such complexes production process and assessment of its composition balance and nutrients’ concentrations are described in this article. The authors also give clinical cases of this medicine usage in children with symptoms of minimal cerebral dysfunction.

  14. Photosynthetic acclimation: state transitions and adjustment of photosystem stoichiometry--functional relationships between short-term and long-term light quality acclimation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzel, Lars; Bräutigam, Katharina; Pfannschmidt, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    In dense plant populations, individuals shade each other resulting in a low-light habitat that is enriched in far-red light. This light quality gradient decreases the efficiency of the photosynthetic light reaction as a result of imbalanced excitation of the two photosystems. Plants counteract such conditions by performing acclimation reactions. Two major mechanisms are known to assure efficient photosynthesis: state transitions, which act on a short-term timescale; and a long-term response, which enables the plant to re-adjust photosystem stoichiometry in favour of the rate-limiting photosystem. Both processes start with the perception of the imbalanced photosystem excitation via reduction/oxidation (redox) signals from the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Recent data in Arabidopsis indicate that initialization of the molecular processes in both cases involve the activity of the thylakoid membrane-associated kinase, STN7. Thus, redox-controlled phosphorylation events may not only adjust photosystem antenna structure but may also affect plastid, as well as nuclear, gene expression. Both state transitions and the long-term response have been described mainly in molecular terms, while the physiological relevance concerning plant survival and reproduction has been poorly investigated. Recent studies have shed more light on this topic. Here, we give an overview on the long-term response, its physiological effects, possible mechanisms and its relationship to state transitions as well as to nonphotochemical quenching, another important short-term mechanism that mediates high-light acclimation. Special emphasis is given to the functional roles and potential interactions between the different light acclimation strategies. A working model displays the various responses as an integrated molecular system that helps plants to acclimate to the changing light environment.

  15. Is Heat Generated from a Crematorium an Appropriate Source for District Heating? Student Teachers' Reasoning About a Complex Environmental Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekborg, Margareta

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on a longitudinal study on how science student teachers' reasoning about a complex environmental issue developed through a teacher education programme in mathematics and science for grades 1-7 (ages 7-13). Of special interest was to follow the ways in which student teachers used scientific knowledge in their reasoning. The issue…

  16. The temperature response of CO2 assimilation, photochemical activities and Rubisco activation in Camelina sativa, a potential bioenergy crop with limited capacity for acclimation to heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Salvucci, Michael E

    2012-11-01

    The temperature optimum of photosynthesis coincides with the average daytime temperature in a species' native environment. Moderate heat stress occurs when temperatures exceed the optimum, inhibiting photosynthesis and decreasing productivity. In the present study, the temperature response of photosynthesis and the potential for heat acclimation was evaluated for Camelina sativa, a bioenergy crop. The temperature optimum of net CO(2) assimilation rate (A) under atmospheric conditions was 30-32 °C and was only slightly higher under non-photorespiratory conditions. The activation state of Rubisco was closely correlated with A at supra-optimal temperatures, exhibiting a parallel decrease with increasing leaf temperature. At both control and elevated temperatures, the modeled response of A to intercellular CO(2) concentration was consistent with Rubisco limiting A at ambient CO(2). Rubisco activation and photochemical activities were affected by moderate heat stress at lower temperatures in camelina than in the warm-adapted species cotton and tobacco. Growth under conditions that imposed a daily interval of moderate heat stress caused a 63 % reduction in camelina seed yield. Levels of cpn60 protein were elevated under the higher growth temperature, but acclimation of photosynthesis was minimal. Inactivation of Rubisco in camelina at temperatures above 35 °C was consistent with the temperature response of Rubisco activase activity and indicated that Rubisco activase was a prime target of inhibition by moderate heat stress in camelina. That photosynthesis exhibited no acclimation to moderate heat stress will likely impact the development of camelina and other cool season Brassicaceae as sources of bioenergy in a warmer world.

  17. Limitation of using Angstrom exponent for source apportionment of black carbon in complex environments - A case study from the North West Indo- Gangetic plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, S.; Sinha, B.; Sinha, V.; Chandra, P.; Sarda Esteve, R.; Gros, V.

    2015-12-01

    Determining the contribution of different sources to the total BC is necessary for targeted mitigation. Absorption Angstrom exponent (αabs) measurements of black carbon (BC) have recently been introduced as a novel tool to apportion the contribution of biomass burning sources to BC. Two-component Aethalometer model for apportioning BC to biomass burning sources and fossil fuel combustion sources, which uses αabs as a generic indicator of the source type, is widely used for determining the contribution of the two types of sources to the total BC. Our work studies BC emissions in the highly-populated, anthropogenic emissions-dominated Indo-Gangetic Plain and demonstrates that the αabs cannot be used as a generic tracer for biomass burning emissions in a complex environment. Simultaneously collected high time resolution data from a 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE 42, Magee Scientific, USA) and a high sensitivity Proton Transfer Reaction- Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) installed at a sub-urban site in Mohali (Punjab), India, were used to identify a number of biomass combustion plumes during which BC enhancements correlated strongly with an increase in acetonitrile (a well-established biomass burning tracer) mixing ratio. Each type of biomass combustion is classified and characterized by distinct emission ratios of aromatic compounds and oxygenated VOCs to acetonitrile. The identified types of biomass combustion include two different types of crop residue burning (paddy and wheat), burning of leaf-litter, and garbage burning. Traffic (fossil-fuel burning) plumes were also selected for comparison. We find that the two-component Aethalometer source-apportionment method cannot be extrapolated to all types of biomass combustion and αabs of traffic plumes can be >1 in developing countries like India, where use of adulterated fuel in vehicles is common. Thus in a complex environment, where multiple anthropogenic BC sources and air masses of variable photochemical age

  18. Effects of acclimation temperature on thermal tolerance, locomotion performance and respiratory metabolism in Acheta domesticus L. (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenicht, M W; Clusella-Trullas, S; Boardman, L; Le Roux, C; Terblanche, J S

    2010-07-01

    The effects of acclimation temperature on insect thermal performance curves are generally poorly understood but significant for understanding responses to future climate variation and the evolution of these reaction norms. Here, in Acheta domesticus, we examine the physiological effects of 7-9 days acclimation to temperatures 4 degrees C above and below optimum growth temperature of 29 degrees C (i.e. 25, 29, 33 degrees C) for traits of resistance to thermal extremes, temperature-dependence of locomotion performance (jumping distance and running speed) and temperature-dependence of respiratory metabolism. We also examine the effects of acclimation on mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) enzyme activity. Chill coma recovery time (CRRT) was significantly reduced from 38 to 13min with acclimation at 33-25 degrees C, respectively. Heat knockdown resistance was less responsive than CCRT to acclimation, with no significant effects of acclimation detected for heat knockdown times (25 degrees C: 18.25, 29 degrees C: 18.07, 33 degrees C: 25.5min). Thermal optima for running speed were higher (39.4-40.6 degrees C) than those for jumping performance (25.6-30.9 degrees C). Acclimation temperature affected jumping distance but not running speed (general linear model, p=0.0075) although maximum performance (U(MAX)) and optimum temperature (T(OPT)) of the performance curves showed small or insignificant effects of acclimation temperature. However, these effects were sensitive to the method of analysis since analyses of T(OPT), U(MAX) and the temperature breadth (T(BR)) derived from non-linear curve-fitting approaches produced high inter-individual variation within acclimation groups and reduced variation between acclimation groups. Standard metabolic rate (SMR) was positively related to body mass and test temperature. Acclimation temperature significantly influenced the slope of the SMR-temperature reaction norms, whereas no variation in the intercept was found. The CCO

  19. Characteristics of total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations in an industrial complex in South Korea: impacts from local sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-S. Seo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations were measured every 5 min in Pohang, Gyeongsangbuk-do, Korea, during summer (17–23 August 2012, fall (9–17 October 2012, winter (22–29 January 2013, and spring (26 March–3 April 2013 to (1 characterize the hourly and seasonal variations of atmospheric TGM concentrations; (2 identify the relationships between TGM and co-pollutants; and (3 identify likely source directions and locations of TGM using the conditional probability function (CPF, conditional bivariate probability function (CBPF and total potential source contribution function (TPSCF. The TGM concentration was statistically significantly highest in fall (6.7 ± 6.4 ng m−3, followed by spring (4.8 ± 4.0 ng m−3, winter (4.5 ± 3.2 ng m−3 and summer (3.8 ± 3.9 ng m−3. There was a weak but statistically significant negative correlation between the TGM concentration and ambient air temperature (r = −0.08, p<0.05. Although the daytime temperature (14.7 ± 10.0 °C was statistically significantly higher than that in the nighttime (13.0 ± 9.8 °C (p<0.05, the daytime TGM concentration (5.3 ± 4.7 ng m−3 was statistically significantly higher than that in the nighttime (4.7 ± 4.7 ng m−3 (p<0.01, possibly due to local emissions related to industrial activities and activation of local surface emission sources. The observed ΔTGM ∕ ΔCO was significantly lower than that of Asian long-range transport, but similar to that of local sources in Korea and in US industrial events, suggesting that local sources are more important than those of long-range transport. CPF, CBPF and TPSCF indicated that the main sources of TGM were iron and manufacturing facilities, the hazardous waste incinerators and the coastal areas.

  20. Reliable Real-time Calculation of Heart-rate Complexity in Critically Ill Patients Using Multiple Noisy Waveform Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    pressure ( ABP )] provide independent measures of heart rate that may be suitable for estimation of HRC as well [6, 7]. Furthermore, the ABP is often...as from ABP and multiple ECG leads, during intensive care unit (ICU) monitoring. This approach automatically rejects degraded waveform data. We...made it more suitable for us to choose the MGH/MF Waveform Database over other sources. Using simultaneously acquired ECG and ABP wave- forms from

  1. How Growing Complexity of Consumer Choices and Drivers of Consumption Behaviour Affect Demand for Animal Source Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, B D; Grace, D C

    2015-12-01

    Many societies are spoiled for choice when they purchase meat and other livestock products, and around the globe food choice has grown dramatically in the last two decades. What is more, besides the cost and obvious health concerns influencing commodity section, an increasing proportion of choices is made to contribute to the achievement of certain ideals, such as natural resource management, climate change mitigation, animal welfare concerns and personal lifestyle. At the same time, human health considerations are becoming more important for consumption choices as richer societies, and increasingly the urban poor in low- and middle-income countries, face an unprecedented epidemic of over-consumption and associated diet-related non-communicable diseases. Animal source foods are considered significant contributors to this trend. This paper reviews this complicated arena, and explores the range of considerations that influence consumers' preferences for meat and other animal source foods. This paper also argues that deeper drivers of consumption behaviour of many foods may act in opposition to the articulated preferences for choices around animal source food consumption. We review how the returns to different causes are being valued, how emerging metrics are helping to manage and influence consumption behaviours, and draw conclusions regarding options which influence food choice.

  2. Thermal Plasticity of Photosynthesis: the Role of Acclimation in Forest Responses to a Warming Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunderson, Carla A [ORNL; O' Hara, Keiran H [ORNL; Campion, Christina M [ORNL; Walker, Ashley V [ORNL; Edwards, Nelson T [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The increasing air temperatures central to climate change predictions have the potential to alter forest ecosystem function and structure by exceeding temperatures optimal for carbon gain. Such changes are projected to threaten survival of sensitive species, leading to local extinctions, range migrations, and altered forest composition. This study investigated photosynthetic sensitivity to temperature and the potential for acclimation in relation to the climatic provenance of five species of deciduous trees, Liquidambar styraciflua, Quercus rubra, Quercus falcata, Betula alleghaniensis, and Populus grandidentata. Open-top chambers supplied three levels of warming (+0, +2, and +4 C above ambient) over 3 years, tracking natural temperature variability. Optimal temperature for CO2 assimilation was strongly correlated with daytime temperature in all treatments, but assimilation rates at those optima were comparable. Adjustment of thermal optima was confirmed in all species, whether temperatures varied with season or treatment, and regardless of climate in the species' range or provenance of the plant material. Temperature optima from 17 to 34 were observed. Across species, acclimation potentials varied from 0.55 C to 1.07 C per degree change in daytime temperature. Responses to the temperature manipulation were not different from the seasonal acclimation observed in mature indigenous trees, suggesting that photosynthetic responses should not be modeled using static temperature functions, but should incorporate an adjustment to account for acclimation. The high degree of homeostasis observed indicates that direct impacts of climatic warming on forest productivity, species survival, and range limits may be less than predicted by existing models.

  3. Endocrine and metabolic signaling in retroperitoneal white adipose tissue remodeling during cold acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Aleksandra; Korac, Aleksandra; Buzadzic, Biljana; Otasevic, Vesna; Stancic, Ana; Vucetic, Milica; Markelic, Milica; Velickovic, Ksenija; Golic, Igor; Korac, Bato

    2013-01-01

    The expression profiles of adiponectin, resistin, 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPK α ), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF-1 α ), and key enzymes of glucose and fatty acid metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation in rat retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (RpWAT) during 45-day cold acclimation were examined. After transient suppression on day 1, adiponectin protein level increased following sustained cold exposure. In parallel, on day 1, the protein level of HIF-1 α was strongly induced and AMPK α suppressed, while afterwards the reverse was seen. What is more, after an initial decrease on day 1, a sequential increase in pyruvate dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, cytochrome c oxidase, and ATP synthase and a decrease in acetyl-CoA carboxylase (from day 3) were observed. Similar to adiponectin, protein level of resistin showed a biphasic profile: it increased after days 1, 3, and 7 and decreased below the control after 21 days of cold-acclimation. In summary, the data suggest that adiponectin and resistin are important integrators of RpWAT metabolic response and roles it plays during cold acclimation. It seems that AMPK α mediate adiponectin effects on metabolic remodeling RpWAT during cold acclimation.

  4. Endocrine and Metabolic Signaling in Retroperitoneal White Adipose Tissue Remodeling during Cold Acclimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Jankovic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression profiles of adiponectin, resistin, 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α, and key enzymes of glucose and fatty acid metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation in rat retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (RpWAT during 45-day cold acclimation were examined. After transient suppression on day 1, adiponectin protein level increased following sustained cold exposure. In parallel, on day 1, the protein level of HIF-1α was strongly induced and AMPKα suppressed, while afterwards the reverse was seen. What is more, after an initial decrease on day 1, a sequential increase in pyruvate dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, cytochrome c oxidase, and ATP synthase and a decrease in acetyl-CoA carboxylase (from day 3 were observed. Similar to adiponectin, protein level of resistin showed a biphasic profile: it increased after days 1, 3, and 7 and decreased below the control after 21 days of cold-acclimation. In summary, the data suggest that adiponectin and resistin are important integrators of RpWAT metabolic response and roles it plays during cold acclimation. It seems that AMPKα mediate adiponectin effects on metabolic remodeling RpWAT during cold acclimation.

  5. The effect of heat acclimation on sweat microminerals: Artifact of surface contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat acclimation (HA) reportedly conveys conservation in sweat micromineral concentrations when sampled from arm sweat, but time course is unknown. The observation that comprehensive cleaning of the skin surface negates sweat micromineral reductions during prolonged sweating raises the question of w...

  6. Trait Acclimation Mitigates Mortality Risks of Tropical Canopy Trees under Global Warming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterck, Frank; Anten, Niels P.R.; Schieving, Feike; Zuidema, Pieter A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a heated debate about the effect of global change on tropical forests. Many scientists predict large-scale tree mortality while others point to mitigating roles of CO2 fertilization and – the notoriously unknown – physiological trait acclimation of trees. In this opinion article we provided

  7. Comparative genomics in ecological physiology: toward a more nuanced understanding of acclimation and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Andrew

    2012-03-15

    Organisms that live in variable environments must adjust their physiology to compensate for environmental change. Modern functional genomics technologies offer global top-down discovery-based tools for identifying and exploring the mechanistic basis by which organisms respond physiologically to a detected change in the environment. Given that populations and species from different niches may exhibit different acclimation abilities, comparative genomic approaches may offer more nuanced understanding of acclimation responses, and provide insight into the mechanistic and genomic basis of variable acclimation. The physiological genomics literature is large and growing, as is the comparative evolutionary genomics literature. Yet, expansion of physiological genomics experiments to exploit taxonomic variation remains relatively undeveloped. Here, recent advances in the emerging field of comparative physiological genomics are considered, including examples of plants, bees and fish, and opportunities for further development are outlined particularly in the context of climate change research. Elements of robust experimental design are discussed with emphasis on the phylogenetic comparative approach. Understanding how acclimation ability is partitioned among populations and species in nature, and knowledge of the relevant genes and mechanisms, will be important for characterizing and predicting the ecological and evolutionary consequences of human-accelerated environmental change.

  8. Stoichiometric Network Analysis of Cyanobacterial Acclimation to Photosynthesis-Associated Stresses Identifies Heterotrophic Niches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley E. Beck

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic acclimation to photosynthesis-associated stresses was examined in the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 using integrated computational and photobioreactor analyses. A genome-enabled metabolic model, complete with measured biomass composition, was analyzed using ecological resource allocation theory to predict and interpret metabolic acclimation to irradiance, O2, and nutrient stresses. Reduced growth efficiency, shifts in photosystem utilization, changes in photorespiration strategies, and differing byproduct secretion patterns were predicted to occur along culturing stress gradients. These predictions were compared with photobioreactor physiological data and previously published transcriptomic data and found to be highly consistent with observations, providing a systems-based rationale for the culture phenotypes. The analysis also indicated that cyanobacterial stress acclimation strategies created niches for heterotrophic organisms and that heterotrophic activity could enhance cyanobacterial stress tolerance by removing inhibitory metabolic byproducts. This study provides mechanistic insight into stress acclimation strategies in photoautotrophs and establishes a framework for predicting, designing, and engineering both axenic and photoautotrophic-heterotrophic systems as a function of controllable parameters.

  9. Salicylic acid and heat acclimation pretreatment protects Laminaria japonica sporophyte (Phaeophyceae) from heat stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Tang, Xuexi; Wang, You

    2010-07-01

    Possible mediatory roles of heat acclimation and salicylic acid in protecting the sporophyte of marine macroalga Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae) from heat stress were studied. Heat stress resulted in oxidative injury in the kelp blades. Under heat stress significant accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malonaldehyde (MDA), a membrane lipid peroxidation product, and a drastic decrease in chlorophyll a content were recorded. Activity of the enzymatic antioxidant system was drastically affected by heat stress. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was significantly increased while peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were greatly inhibited and, simultaneously, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase was activated while polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was inhibited. Both heat acclimation pretreatment and exogenous application of salicylic acid alleviated oxidative damage in kelp blades. Blades receiving heat acclimation pretreatment and exogenous salicylic acid prior to heat stress exhibited a reduced increase in H2O2 and MDA content, and a lower reduction in chlorophyll a content. Pretreatment with heat acclimation and salicylic acid elevated activities of SOD, POD, CAT, GPX and PPO. Considering these results collectively, we speculate that the inhibition of antioxidant enzymes is a possible cause of the heat-stress-induced oxidative stress in L. japonica, and enhanced thermotolerance may be associated, at least in part, with the elevated activity of the enzymatic antioxidant system.

  10. The Measurement of Human Body-Fluid Volumes: Resting Fluid Volumes Before and After Heat Acclimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    50 4L of 1 M hydrochloric acid , with 10 mL of liquid-scintillation cocktail (Starscint, Packard) added 15 min before samples were counted. TBW was...5 2.2.1 Experimental standardisation ...both the HSTs, and the combined exercise and heat-acclimation exposures. 2.2.1 Experimental standardisation Subjects were strictly and thoroughly

  11. Winter wheat morphology response to cold temperature stress during autumn acclimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligita Baležentienė

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. abilities depend on development during autumn acclimation. The plant ability of acclimation to low temperatures is closely associated with the photosynthesis level, leaf area index (LAI, root system development. This study investigated the effect of liquid humic fertilizers (LHF on biometric characteristics, namely LAI, root and shoot development. The fertilizers were applied in conventional and organic growth technologies of w. wheat to adapt to the low temperatures during autumn acclimation. Winter wheat «Širvinta 1 » was grown in different rotation fields of conventional (CF; Albi-EpihypogleyicLuvisol, LVg-p-w-ab and organic (OF; Hapli-EpihypogleyicLuvisol, LVg-p-w-ha farming of Training Farm at Aleksandras Stulginskis University (ASU during 2010–2011. The obtained results confirmed the significant LHF influence on enhancing winter wheat biometrical indices and seedling growth. Nonetheless, seed felting exhibited stronger effect on LAI (increased by 0.7-1.1 g m -1 day -1 in OF and 0.25-0.7 g m -1 day -1 in CF, root length (increased by 1166 mm in OF and 1182.55 mm in CF and area (increased by 72.45 mm 2 in OF and 588.7 mm 2 in CF during autumn acclimation rather than seedling spraying.

  12. Adaptations and mechanisms of human heat acclimation: Applications for competitive athletes and sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périard, J D; Racinais, S; Sawka, M N

    2015-06-01

    Exercise heat acclimation induces physiological adaptations that improve thermoregulation, attenuate physiological strain, reduce the risk of serious heat illness, and improve aerobic performance in warm-hot environments and potentially in temperate environments. The adaptations include improved sweating, improved skin blood flow, lowered body temperatures, reduced cardiovascular strain, improved fluid balance, altered metabolism, and enhanced cellular protection. The magnitudes of adaptations are determined by the intensity, duration, frequency, and number of heat exposures, as well as the environmental conditions (i.e., dry or humid heat). Evidence is emerging that controlled hyperthermia regimens where a target core temperature is maintained, enable more rapid and complete adaptations relative to the traditional constant work rate exercise heat acclimation regimens. Furthermore, inducing heat acclimation outdoors in a natural field setting may provide more specific adaptations based on direct exposure to the exact environmental and exercise conditions to be encountered during competition. This review initially examines the physiological adaptations associated with heat acclimation induction regimens, and subsequently emphasizes their application to competitive athletes and sports. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Difference in acclimation of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans by various substrates and its effect on coal desulfurization efficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Wei; Zhou, Li-Xiang; Yang, Xin-Ping; Wang, Shi-Mei

    2011-01-01

    In this study, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans LX5 was cultured in 9K medium with pyrite and ferrous sulfate as the substrates. Results showed that the number of A. ferrooxidans LX5 acclimated by pyrite for 20 d was 3.0 x 10(7) cell/mL in the liquid, and the oxidation activity to pyrite was stronger. A. ferrooxidans LX5 cultured for 48 h was 1.0 x 10(8) cell/mL in medium with FeSO4. Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) produced from A. ferrooxidans LX5 acclimated by pyrite was 2 395 microg/(10(10) cells) three times as much as that cultured with FeSO4. A high-sulfur coal desulfurization experiment were carried out with A. ferrooxidans LX5 domesticated respectively in medium with ferrous sulfate and pyrite. The results showed that the coal desulfurization rate was up to 72.4% after bioleaching for 13 d by A. ferrooxidans LX5 acclimated by pyrite, at the same time, the desulfurization rate was only 47.2% with A. ferrooxidans LX5 cultured with ferrous sulfate and reached 65.8% in 20 d. Therefore, the desulfurization efficiency can be improved of coal and shorten the desulfurization time when A. ferrooxidans LX5 acclimated with pyrite as the substrate.

  14. Long-term acclimation of anaerobic sludges for high-rate methanogenesis from LCFA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, S.A.; Cavaleiro, A.J.; Pereira, M.A.; Stams, A.J.M.; Alves, M.M.; Sousa, D.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of methanogens by long chain fatty acids (LCFA) and the low numbers of LCFA-degrading bacteria are limitations to exploit biogas production from fat-rich wastewaters. Generally reactors fail due to excessive LCFA accumulation onto the sludge. Here, long-term acclimation and

  15. Photosynthetic acclimation in relation to nitrogen allocation in cucumber leaves in response to changes in irradiance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trouwborst, G.; Hogewoning, S.W.; Harbinson, J.; Ieperen, van W.

    2011-01-01

    Leaves deep in canopies can suddenly be exposed to increased irradiances following e.g. gap formation in forests or pruning in crops. Studies on the acclimation of photosynthesis to increased irradiance have mainly focused on the changes in photosynthetic capacity (Amax), although actual irradiance

  16. Natural genetic variation for acclimation of photosynthetic light use efficiency to growth irradiance in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van R.; Aarts, M.G.M.; Harbinson, J.

    2015-01-01

    Plants are known to be able to acclimate their photosynthesis to the level of irradiance. Here we present the analysis of natural genetic variation for photosynthetic light use efficiency (FPSII) in response to five light environments among 12 genetically diverse Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. We

  17. Light acclimation, retrograde signalling, cell death and immune defences in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiński, Stanisław; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Wituszyńska, Weronika; Burdiak, Paweł

    2013-04-01

    This review confronts the classical view of plant immune defence and light acclimation with recently published data. Earlier findings have linked plant immune defences to nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-dependent recognition of pathogen effectors and to the role of plasma membrane-localized NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase (AtRbohD), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and salicylic acid (SA). However, recent results suggest that plant immune defence also depends on the absorption of excessive light energy and photorespiration. Rapid changes in light intensity and quality often cause the absorption of energy, which is in excess of that required for photosynthesis. Such excessive light energy is considered to be a factor triggering photoinhibition and disturbance in ROS/hormonal homeostasis, which leads to cell death in foliar tissues. We highlight here the tight crosstalk between ROS- and SA-dependent pathways leading to light acclimation, and defence responses leading to pathogen resistance. We also show that LESION SIMULATING DISEASE 1 (LSD1) regulates and integrates these processes. Moreover, we discuss the role of plastid-nucleus signal transduction, photorespiration, photoelectrochemical signalling and 'light memory' in the regulation of acclimation and immune defence responses. All of these results suggest that plants have evolved a genetic system that simultaneously regulates systemic acquired resistance (SAR), cell death and systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Oxygen Consumption and Swimming Performance in Hypoxia-Acclimated Rainbow Trout Salmo Gairdneri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    BUSHNELL, PG; STEFFENSEN, JF; JOHANSEN, K

    1984-01-01

    1. Swimming performance and oxygen consumption of normoxic (control) and hypoxia-acclimated (P002=40 mmHg) rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri Richardson, were monitored at >145, 60 and 40mmHg. 2. Maximum swimming velocity at 40mmHg was reduced from >54.8cm s-1 to 41.4cm s1 in controls and to 40.6 cm s......Hg did not significantly change oxygen consumption in control animals, although no fish (control or hypoxia acclimated) completed swimming trials at 54.8cm s-1 in 40mmHg. 5. Oxygen consumption of hypoxia-acclimated fish at 5.5cm s-1 and 40 mmHg was significantly higher than oxygen uptake in normoxia...... at the same speed. This relative increase was not maintained, however, as oxygen consumption at higher swimming speeds was similar to that in normoxia. 6. Blood studies showed that hypoxia-acclimated fish had lower ATP concentrations and P50 values. While these factors may increase the blood oxygen loading...

  19. Acclimation of Norway spruce photosynthetic apparatus to the combined effect of high irradiance and temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štroch, M.; Vrábl, D.; Podolinská, J.; Kalina, J.; Urban, Otmar; Špunda, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 167, č. 8 (2010), s. 597-605 ISSN 0176-1617 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/07/0759 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : diurnal courses * picea abies * thermal acclimation * thermal energy dissipation * xanthophyll cycle Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.677, year: 2010

  20. FTIR spectroscopy offers hints towards widespread molecular changes in cobalt-acclimated freshwater bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardas, Mehmet; Gozen, Ayse Gul; Severcan, Feride

    2014-10-01

    High concentrations of heavy metals can be toxic for bacteria. However, after prolonged exposure, bacteria can become acclimated and begin to be able to grow in the presence of heavy metals. Acclimation can involve alterations of metabolism and molecular structures. Our aim was to examine these alterations in cobalt-acclimated bacteria via attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy on viable samples. Bacillus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. isolated from a temperate shallow lake and a well-established strain of E. coli were investigated. Our results revealed consistent, wide-spread changes in cell membrane and cell wall dynamics of Bacillus sp. and E. coli, including a decrease in peptidoglycan content of Bacillus sp. and increased lipid ordering of the membrane in both bacteria. Furthermore, a decrease in RNA and protein concentrations of Bacillus sp. was measured. All three bacteria studied showed a decrease in conformational freedom of proteins following cobalt acclimation. Interestingly, both Bacillus sp. and E. coli showed slight but significant alterations in their DNA conformations which might imply a methylation-mediated memory formation leading to epigenetic modulation for cobalt adaptation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Short-term cold acclimation improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanssen, M.J.W.; Hoeks, J.; Brans, B.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Kersten, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Cold exposure may be a potential therapy for diabetes by increasing brown adipose tissue (BAT) mass and activity. Here we report that 10 d of cold acclimation (14–15 °C) increased peripheral insulin sensitivity by ~43% in eight type 2 diabetes subjects. Basal skeletal muscle GLUT4 translocation

  2. Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLeod, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving

  3. Photosynthesis-dependent physiological and genetic crosstalk between cold acclimation and cold-induced resistance to fungal pathogens in triticale (Triticosecale Wittm.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Wąsek, Iwona; Gołębiowska-Pikania, Gabriela; Dubas, Ewa; Żur, Iwona; Wędzony, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The breeding for resistance against fungal pathogens in winter triticale (Triticosecale Wittm.) continues to be hindered by a complexity of the resistance mechanisms, strong interaction with environmental conditions, and dependence on the plant genotype. We showed, that temperature below 4 °C induced the plant genotype-dependent resistance against the fungal pathogen Microdochium nivale. The mechanism involved, at least, the adjustment of the reactions in the PSII proximity and photoprotection, followed by an improvement of the growth and development. The genotypes capable to develop the cold-induced resistance, showed a higher maximum quantum yield of PSII and a more efficient integration of the primary photochemistry of light reactions with the dark reactions. Moreover, induction of the photoprotective mechanism, involving at least the peroxidases scavenging hydrogen peroxide, was observed for such genotypes. Adjustment of the photosynthesis and stress acclimation has enabled fast plant growth and avoidance of the developmental stages sensitive to fungal infection. The same mechanisms allowed the quick regrow of plants during the post-disease period. In contrast, genotypes that were unable to develop resistance despite cold hardening had less flexible balancing of the photoprotection and photoinhibition processes. Traits related to: photosynthesis-dependent cold-acclimation and cold-induced resistance; biomass accumulation and growth; as well as protection system involving peroxidases; were integrated also at a genetic level. Analysing 95 lines of the mapping population SaKa3006×Modus we determined region on chromosomes 5B and 7R shared within all tested traits. Moreover, similar expression pattern of a set of the genes related to PSII was determined with the metaanalysis of the multiple microarray experiments. Comparable results for peroxidases, involving APXs and GPXs and followed by PRXs, indicated a similar function during cold acclimation and defense

  4. The effects of a heat acclimation protocol in persons with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trbovich, Michelle B; Kiratli, Jenny B; Price, Mike J

    2016-12-01

    Persons without spinal cord injury (SCI) physiologically acclimate between seven to fourteen consecutive days of exercise in the heat. Decreased resting and exercise core temperature, decreased heart rate, increased plasma volume and increased thermal comfort during exercise are changes consistent with heat acclimation. Autonomic dysfunction after SCI impairs heat dissipation through sweating and vasodilation. The purpose of this study is to determine if seven consecutive days of exercise in the heat would result in physiologic changes consistent with heat acclimation in persons with SCI. Ten persons with SCI divided into two groups: tetraplegia (n=5) and paraplegia (n=5) exercised in 35°C using an arm ergometer at 50% Wpeak for 30min followed by 15min rest. This protocol was repeated over seven consecutive days. Heart rate (HR), skin temperature, aural temperature (Taur), rate of perceived exertion (RPE), rate of perceived thermal strain (RPTS), and plasma volume (PV) were measured throughout the protocol. There were no significant differences in resting Taur exercise Taur, mean skin temperature, HR, PV, RPE or RPTS over the 7 days for either the tetraplegic or paraplegic group. Participants with SCI did not demonstrate the ability to dissipate heat more efficiently over 7 days of exercise at 35°C. The lack of heat acclimation seen in persons with SCI has implications for the athlete and non-athlete alike. For the SCI athlete, inability to acclimate will impair performance and endurance especially in warm environments, compared to the person without SCI. For the SCI non-athlete, there is a greater risk of heat-related illness in warm environments that can negatively affect participation in outdoor activities and thus quality of life. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Effects of temperature acclimation on Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis) cardiac transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasundara, Nishad; Gardner, Luke D; Block, Barbara A

    2013-11-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms underpinning thermal plasticity of vertebrate hearts. Bluefin tuna hearts offer a unique model to investigate processes underlying thermal acclimation. Their hearts, while supporting an endothermic physiology, operate at ambient temperature, and are presented with a thermal challenge when migrating to different thermal regimes. Here, we examined the molecular responses in atrial and ventricular tissues of Pacific bluefin tuna acclimated to 14°C, 20°C, and 25°C. Quantitative PCR studies showed an increase in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase gene expression with cold acclimation and an induction of Na(+)/Ca(2+)-exchanger gene at both cold and warm temperatures. These data provide evidence for thermal plasticity of excitation-contraction coupling gene expression in bluefin tunas and indicate an increased capacity for internal Ca(2+) storage in cardiac myocytes at 14°C. Transcriptomic analysis showed profound changes in cardiac tissues with acclimation. A principal component analysis revealed that temperature effect was greatest on gene expression in warm-acclimated atrium. Overall data showed an increase in cardiac energy metabolism at 14°C, potentially compensating for cold temperature to optimize bluefin tuna performance in colder oceans. In contrast, metabolic enzyme activity and gene expression data suggest a decrease in ATP production at 25°C. Expression of genes involved in protein turnover and molecular chaperones was also decreased at 25°C. Expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response and programmed cell death suggest an increase in oxidative damage and apoptosis at 25°C, particularly in the atrium. These findings provide insights into molecular processes that may characterize cardiac phenotypes at upper thermal limits of teleosts.

  6. Complex Source and Radiation Behaviors of Small Elements of Linear and Matrix Flexible Ultrasonic Phased-Array Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory, V.; Lhémery, A.

    2008-02-01

    Inspection of irregular components is problematical: maladjustment of transducer shoes to surfaces causes aberrations. Flexible phased-arrays (FPAs) designed at CEA LIST to maximize contact are driven by adapted delay laws to compensate for irregularities. Optimizing FPA requires simulation tools. The behavior of one element computed by FEM is observed at the surface and its radiation experimentally validated. Efforts for one element prevent from simulating a FPA by FEM. A model is proposed where each element behaves as nonuniform source of stresses. Exact and asymptotic formulas for Lamb problem are used as convolution kernels for longitudinal, transverse and head waves; the latter is of primary importance for angle-T-beam inspections.

  7. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Lin X; Shelby, Megan L; Lestrange, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    This report will describe our recent studies of transition metal complex structural dynamics on the fs and ps time scales using an X-ray free electron laser source, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Ultrafast XANES spectra at the Ni K-edge of nickel(ii) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP) were measured...... on the low-energy shoulder of the edge, which is aided by the computation of X-ray transitions for postulated excited electronic states. The observed and computed inner shell to valence orbital transition energies demonstrate and quantify the influence of the electronic configuration on specific metal...... orbital energies. A strong influence of the valence orbital occupation on the inner shell orbital energies indicates that one should not use the transition energy from 1s to other orbitals to draw conclusions about the d-orbital energies. For photocatalysis, a transient electronic configuration could...

  8. The 2016 Kaikōura Earthquake Revealed by Kinematic Source Inversion and Seismic Wavefield Simulations: Slow Rupture Propagation on a Geometrically Complex Crustal Fault Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, C.; Kaneko, Y.; D'Anastasio, E.; Benites, R.; Fry, B.; Hamling, I. J.

    2017-11-01

    The 2016 Kaikōura (New Zealand) earthquake generated large ground motions and resulted in multiple onshore and offshore fault ruptures, a profusion of triggered landslides, and a regional tsunami. Here we examine the rupture evolution using two kinematic modeling techniques based on analysis of local strong-motion and high-rate GPS data. Our kinematic models capture a complex pattern of slowly (Vr < 2 km/s) propagating rupture from south to north, with over half of the moment release occurring in the northern source region, mostly on the Kekerengu fault, 60 s after the origin time. Both models indicate rupture reactivation on the Kekerengu fault with the time separation of 11 s between the start of the original failure and start of the subsequent one. We further conclude that most near-source waveforms can be explained by slip on the crustal faults, with little (<8%) or no contribution from the subduction interface.

  9. Atmospheric stability and PM10 concentrations at far distance from elevated point sources in complex terrain: worst-case episode study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoras, S; Triantafyllou, A G; Deligiorgi, D

    2006-09-01

    Atmospheric stability is the most important parameter affecting dilution of air pollutants. It plays a very important role in the investigation of parameters that affect ambient pollutant concentrations, especially in the case of complex terrain areas. In this study, the classification of atmospheric stability by Pasquill-Turner classes and any associated variation of ambient PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter<10 microm) concentrations for a region of complex terrain is investigated. Real experimental meteorological and PM10 data are used for a 2-year period from one observation station far distant from the main stack sources and they are related with the classified atmospheric stability categories in an hourly and monthly based distribution. A more detailed analysis is carried out during PM10 episodes for the same period in order to reveal the governing worst-case atmospheric conditions.

  10. The effects of diel-cycling hypoxia acclimation on the hypoxia tolerance, swimming capacity and growth performance of southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Han; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the effects of diel-cycling hypoxia acclimation on the hypoxia tolerance, swimming and growth performance of juvenile southern catfish, we initially measured the critical oxygen tension (P(crit)), oxygen thresholds of aquatic surface respiration (ASR) and loss of equilibrium (LOE) of diel-cycling hypoxia-acclimated (15 d, 7:00-21:00, dissolved oxygen level (DO) = 7.0 ± 0.2 mg L(-1); 21:00-7:00, DO = 3.0 ± 0.2 mg L(-1)) and non-acclimated (15 d, DO = 7.0 ± 0.2 mg L(-1)) southern catfish at 25 °C. We then measured the critical swimming speed (U(crit)) and metabolic rate (MR) of hypoxia-acclimated and non-acclimated fish (under both hypoxic and normoxic conditions). The feeding rate (FR), feeding efficiency (FE) and specific growth rate (SGR) of fish in hypoxia-acclimated and non-acclimated groups were also measured. The P(crit), ASR and LOE of hypoxia-acclimated fish were significantly lower than those of non-acclimated fish. Hypoxia acclimation resulted in a significantly higher U(crit) when the individuals swam in hypoxia. The U(crit), maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and metabolic scope (MS) of both the hypoxia-acclimated and non-acclimated fish all decreased with the decrease of DO. However, the U(crit), MMR and MS decreased by 31, 43 and 54%, respectively, in non-acclimated fish, whereas these values decreased by 15, 28 and 29%, respectively, in hypoxia-acclimated fish, which suggests that hypoxia-acclimated fish were less sensitive to the DO decrease. The FR, FE and SGR all decreased by 21, 20 and 45%, respectively, in the hypoxia-acclimated group compared to the non-acclimated group. This result suggests that diel-cycling hypoxia acclimation improved the hypoxia tolerance and aerobic swimming performance of southern catfish, whereas impaired the growth performance. The high hypoxia tolerance and physiological plasticity to hypoxia-acclimated southern catfish may be related to its lower maintenance energy expenditure, sit-and-wait lifestyle and

  11. Source tagging modeling study of heavy haze episodes under complex regional transport processes over Wuhan megacity, Central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Miaomiao; Tang, Xiao; Wang, Zifa; Gbaguidi, Alex; Liang, Shengwen; Hu, Ke; Wu, Lin; Wu, Huangjian; Huang, Zhen; Shen, Longjiao

    2017-12-01

    Wuhan as a megacity of Central China was suffering from severe particulate matter pollution according to previous observation studies, however, the mechanism behind the pollution formation especially the impact of regional chemical transport is still unclear. This study, carried out on the Nested Air Quality Prediction Modeling System (NAQPMS) coupled with an on-line source-tagging module, explores different roles regional transport had in two strong haze episodes over Wuhan in October 2014 and quantitatively assesses the contributions from local and regional sources to PM2.5 concentration. Validation of predictions based on observations shows modeling system good skills in reproducing key meteorological and chemical features. The first short-time haze episode occurred on 12 October under strong northerly winds, with a hourly PM2.5 peak of 180 μg m-3, and was found to be caused primarily by the long-range transport from the northern regions, which contributed 60.6% of the episode's PM2.5 concentration (versus a total of 32.7% from sources in and near Wuhan). The second episode lasted from the 15-20 October under stable regional large-scale synoptic conditions and weak winds, and had an hourly PM2.5 peak of 231.0 μg m-3. In this episode, both the long-distance transport from far regions and short-range transport from the Wuhan-cluster were the primary causes of the haze episode and account for 24.8% and 29.2% of the PM2.5 concentration respectively. Therefore, regional transport acts as a crucial driver of haze pollution over Wuhan through not only long-range transfer of pollutants, but also short-range aerosol movement under specific meteorological conditions. The present findings highlight the important role of regional transport in urban haze formation and indicate that the joint control of multi city-clusters are needed to reduce the particulate pollution level in Wuhan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The photosynthetic acclimation response of Lolium perenne to four years growth in a free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creasey, R. [Univ. of Essex (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    In this study, the photosynthetic responses of field grown Lolium perenne to ambient (354 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) and elevated (600 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) C{sub a} were measured. The experiment utilized the FACE facility at Eschikon, Switzerland; here the L. Perenne swards had been grown at two nitrogen treatments, with six cuts per year, for 4 years. The study revealed a significant decrease in Rubisco activity (Vcmax) in the low nitrogen FACE plots; this is consistent with the theories of source-sink imbalance resulting in feedback inhibition and down-regulation. Such negative acclimation was not wholly supported by diurnal investigations which revealed an average stimulation of 53.38% and 52.78% in the low and high nitrogen, respectively. However, light response curves and AI investigations also suggested down-regulation, especially in the low nitrogen. SI is expected to decrease in response to elevated C{sub a}, if any change is seen. This was indeed observed in the high nitrogen plots but for the low nitrogen a significant increase was found. Conclusions drawn from this project center around the implications of negative acclimation to future crop productivity. For instance, inter-specific differences in response to elevated C{sub a} may result in ecosystem changes and new management techniques may be necessary. However, real predictions cannot be made from leaf level studies alone as these may not represent the overall changes at the whole plant level.

  13. Unsaturated Lipids Change in Olive Tree Drupe and Seed during Fruit Development and in Response to Cold-Stress and Acclimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone D’Angeli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The olive tree is a plant of economic value for the oil of its drupe. It is a cultigen complex composed of genotypes with differences in cold-hardiness. About 90% of the oil is stored in oil bodies (OBs in the drupe during the oleogenic phase. Phenols and lipids contribute to oil quality, but the unsaturated fatty acid (FA fraction is emerging as the most important for quality, because of the very high content in oleic acid, the presence of ω6-linoleic acid and ω3-linolenic acid, and the very low saturated FA content. Another 10% of oil is produced by the seed. Differences in unsaturated FA-enriched lipids exist among seed coat, endosperm, and embryo. Olive oil quality is also affected by the environmental conditions during fruit growth and genotype peculiarities. Production of linoleic and α-linolenic acids, fruit growth, fruit and leaf responses to low temperatures, including cuticle formation, and cold-acclimation are related processes. The levels of unsaturated FAs are changed by FA-desaturase (FAD activities, involving the functioning of chloroplasts and endoplasmic reticulum. Cold induces lipid changes during drupe and seed development, affecting FADs, but its effect is related to the genotype capability to acclimate to the cold.

  14. Source of the great A.D. 1257 mystery eruption unveiled, Samalas volcano, Rinjani Volcanic Complex, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Franck; Degeai, Jean-Philippe; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Guillet, Sébastien; Robert, Vincent; Lahitte, Pierre; Oppenheimer, Clive; Stoffel, Markus; Vidal, Céline M; Surono; Pratomo, Indyo; Wassmer, Patrick; Hajdas, Irka; Hadmoko, Danang Sri; de Belizal, Edouard

    2013-10-15

    Polar ice core records attest to a colossal volcanic eruption that took place ca. A.D. 1257 or 1258, most probably in the tropics. Estimates based on sulfate deposition in these records suggest that it yielded the largest volcanic sulfur release to the stratosphere of the past 7,000 y. Tree rings, medieval chronicles, and computational models corroborate the expected worldwide atmospheric and climatic effects of this eruption. However, until now there has been no convincing candidate for the mid-13th century "mystery eruption." Drawing upon compelling evidence from stratigraphic and geomorphic data, physical volcanology, radiocarbon dating, tephra geochemistry, and chronicles, we argue the source of this long-sought eruption is the Samalas volcano, adjacent to Mount Rinjani on Lombok Island, Indonesia. At least 40 km(3) (dense-rock equivalent) of tephra were deposited and the eruption column reached an altitude of up to 43 km. Three principal pumice fallout deposits mantle the region and thick pyroclastic flow deposits are found at the coast, 25 km from source. With an estimated magnitude of 7, this event ranks among the largest Holocene explosive eruptions. Radiocarbon dates on charcoal are consistent with a mid-13th century eruption. In addition, glass geochemistry of the associated pumice deposits matches that of shards found in both Arctic and Antarctic ice cores, providing compelling evidence to link the prominent A.D. 1258/1259 ice core sulfate spike to Samalas. We further constrain the timing of the mystery eruption based on tephra dispersal and historical records, suggesting it occurred between May and October A.D. 1257.

  15. Regional groundwater flow in structurally-complex extended terranes: An evaluation of the sources of discharge at Ash Meadows, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushman, Michelle; Nelson, Stephen T.; Tingey, David; Eggett, Dennis

    2010-05-01

    SummaryAsh Meadows, Nevada, USA is a site of major groundwater discharge (˜38,000 L/min) in the arid Mojave Desert, and hosts a number of endemic and threatened wetland species. In addition to these resources, Ash Meadows may also represent the future discharge location of radionuclide-laden waters from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site. More importantly, however, Ash Meadows provides the opportunity to understand the controls on water transfer between basins through fractured bedrock. 4000+ solute analyses were assembled from the literature into a single database. The data were screened for spatial distribution, completeness, charge balance, and elevated temperatures (⩾20 °C and within regional flow systems), with 246 candidate up-gradient water remaining distributed among six potential source areas in addition to and Ash Meadows itself. These potential sources include both carbonate, volcanic and perhaps valley-fill aquifer systems. These waters were characterized by cluster analysis in order to sort similar waters in an objective fashion into potential flow paths and to establish representative endmember waters for inverse geochemical models and other modes of analysis. Isotopic tracers, both conservative and those reflecting water-rock interaction, all suggest that waters at Ash Meadows are derived by southward flow from volcanic terranes, parallel to the preferred permeability structure induced by active regional east-west extension. Solute balances support this conclusion. However, this runs counter to the prevailing model that waters at Ash Meadows are derived from easterly and northeasterly flows from the Spring Mountains and Pahranagat Valley areas by interbasin flow through a continuous fractured carbonate aquifer. This work suggests that carbonate aquifer systems in extended terranes are more compartmentalized than previously appreciated and that anisotropy in fracture permeability is key to compartmentalization and the control of flow

  16. Expert and crowd-sourced validation of an individualized sleep spindle detection method employing complex demodulation and individualized normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eRay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A spindle detection method was developed that: 1 extracts the signal of interest (i.e., spindle-related phasic changes in sigma relative to ongoing background sigma activity using complex demodulation, 2 accounts for variations of spindle characteristics across the night, scalp derivations and between individuals, and 3 employs a minimum number of sometimes arbitrary, user-defined parameters. Complex demodulation was used to extract instantaneous power in the spindle band. To account for intra- and inter-individual differences, the signal was z-score transformed using a 60s sliding window, per channel, over the course of the recording. Spindle events were detected with a z-score threshold corresponding to a low probability (e.g., 99th percentile. Spindle characteristics, such as amplitude, duration and oscillatory frequency, were derived for each individual spindle following detection, which permits spindles to be subsequently and flexibly categorized as slow or fast spindles from a single detection pass. Spindles were automatically detected in 15 young healthy subjects. Two experts manually identified spindles from C3 during Stage 2 sleep, from each recording; one employing conventional guidelines, and the other, identifying spindles with the aid of a sigma (11-16 Hz filtered channel. These spindles were then compared between raters and to the automated detection to identify the presence of true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. This method of automated spindle detection resolves or avoids many of the limitations that complicate automated spindle detection, and performs well compared to a group of non-experts, and importantly, has good external validity with respect to the extant literature in terms of the characteristics of automatically detected spindles.

  17. Assessment of multiple sources of anthropogenic and natural chemical inputs to a morphologically complex basin, Lake Mead, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael R.; Van Metre, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Lakes with complex morphologies and with different geologic and land-use characteristics in their sub-watersheds could have large differences in natural and anthropogenic chemical inputs to sub-basins in the lake. Lake Mead in southern Nevada and northern Arizona, USA, is one such lake. To assess variations in chemical histories from 1935 to 1998 for major sub-basins of Lake Mead, four sediment cores were taken from three different parts of the reservoir (two from Las Vegas Bay and one from the Overton Arm and Virgin Basin) and analyzed for major and trace elements, radionuclides, and organic compounds. As expected, anthropogenic contaminant inputs are greatest to Las Vegas Bay reflecting inputs from the Las Vegas urban area, although concentrations are low compared to sediment quality guidelines and to other USA lakes. One exception to this pattern was higher Hg in the Virgin Basin core. The Virgin Basin core is located in the main body of the lake (Colorado River channel) and is influenced by the hydrology of the Colorado River, which changed greatly with completion of Glen Canyon Dam upstream in 1963. Major and trace elements in the core show pronounced shifts in the early 1960s and, in many cases, gradually return to concentrations more typical of pre-1960s by the 1980s and 1990s, after the filling of Lake Powell. The Overton Arm is the sub-basin least effected by anthropogenic contaminant inputs but has a complex 137Cs profile with a series of large peaks and valleys over the middle of the core, possibly reflecting fallout from nuclear tests in the 1950s at the Nevada Test Site. The 137Cs profile suggests a much greater sedimentation rate during testing which we hypothesize results from greatly increased dust fall on the lake and Virgin and Muddy River watersheds. The severe drought in the southwestern USA during the 1950s might also have played a role in variations in sedimentation rate in all of the cores. ?? 2009.

  18. Local Proton Source in Electrocatalytic CO2 Reduction with [Mn(bpy-R)(CO)3 Br] Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Federico; Cometto, Claudio; Nencini, Luca; Barolo, Claudia; Sordello, Fabrizio; Minero, Claudio; Fiedler, Jan; Robert, Marc; Gobetto, Roberto; Nervi, Carlo

    2017-04-06

    The electrochemical behavior of fac-[Mn(pdbpy)(CO)3 Br] (pdbpy=4-phenyl-6-(phenyl-2,6-diol)-2,2'-bipyridine) (1) in acetonitrile under Ar, and its catalytic performances for CO2 reduction with added water, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE), and phenol are discussed in detail. Preparative-scale electrolysis experiments, carried out at -1.5 V versus the standard calomel electrode (SCE) in CO2 -saturated acetonitrile, reveal that the process selectivity is extremely sensitive to the acid strength, producing CO and formate in different faradaic yields. A detailed spectroelectrochemical (IR and UV/Vis) study under Ar and CO2 atmospheres shows that 1 undergoes fast solvolysis; however, dimer formation in acetonitrile is suppressed, resulting in an atypical reduction mechanism in comparison with other reported MnI catalysts. Spectroscopic evidence of Mn hydride formation supports the existence of different electrocatalytic CO2 reduction pathways. Furthermore, a comparative investigation performed on the new fac-[Mn(ptbpy)(CO)3 Br] (ptbpy=4-phenyl-6-(phenyl-3,4,5-triol)-2,2'-bipyridine) catalyst (2), bearing a bipyridyl derivative with OH groups in different positions to those in 1, provides complementary information about the role that the local proton source plays during the electrochemical reduction of CO2 . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Looking for simplicity in complex groundwater-surface water interfaces: A "simple" approach for determining hyporheic nitrate source-sink function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnetske, Jay

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater-surface water interfaces (GSIs) are characterized by complex hydrological and biogeochemical gradients that control the fate of many important ecosystem solutes, such as biologically-available nitrogen (N). However, this complexity limits our ability to predict their biogeochemical function across scales. Our research on N in GSIs strives to develop "simple" approaches that determine the biogeochemical function of stream GSIs (i.e., hyporheic and parafluvial zones), while recognizing the many sources of complexity. This research helps determine the relative role of the physical and biogeochemical controls on function across a range of temporal and spatial scales. For example, we used an advection, dispersion, and residence time model coupled with multiple Monod kinetic models to simulate the GSI concentrations of oxygen (O2), ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). These models when coupled with sensitivity analyses explored wide ranges of observed physical transport and biogeochemical kinetic conditions. These analyses revealed that GSI water residence time and O2 uptake rate (via respiration and/or nitrification) dictates GSI function as either a source or a sink of NO3 to surface waters. Furthermore, it showed that whether the GSI is a net NO3 source or net NO3 sink is determined by the ratio of the characteristic transport time to the characteristic reaction time of O2 (i.e., the Damköhler number, DaO2), where GSIs with DaO2 > 1 will be net denitrification environments. This coupling of the hydrological and biogeochemical limitations of N transformations across different spatiotemporal scales allowed us to explain the mechanisms behind the widely contrasting GSI functional results seen in previous field studies. Ultimately, these model results suggest that only estimates of residence times and O2 uptake rates are necessary to predict net nitrification-denitrification function thresholds in stream GSIs. Therefore, the DaO2

  20. Effects of acclimation temperature on thermal tolerance and membrane phospholipid composition in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Johannes; Tomcala, Ales; Sørensen, Jesper G

    2008-01-01

    Adaptative responses of ectothermic organisms to thermal variation typically involve the reorganization of membrane glycerophospholipids (GPLs) to maintain membrane function. We investigated how acclimation at 15, 20 and 25 degrees C during preimaginal development influences the thermal tolerance...

  1. Characterizing a Complex Source: The Role of Splay Faults in Seafloor Deformation During the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Elizabeth H.; Ulrich, Thomas; Gabriel, Alice-Agnes

    2017-04-01

    Failure along 1300 km of the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone on 26 December 2004 caused 8-10 minutes of violent shaking. The resulting M 9.1-9.3 megathrust earthquake generated a tsunami wave that was up to 30 m high along the northern coast of Sumatra. The height of this wave suggests slip on landward and possibly also seaward dipping faults dipping at a high angle to the megathrust. This is supported by evidence for activation of splay faults off the west coast of northern Sumatra from deep seismic reflection surveys, bathymetric data, and relocated seismicity. We review evidence for the presence of active splay faults along the southern extent of the rupture. We then evaluate the influence of two alternative splay fault geometries on surface uplift in physically realistic dynamic rupture simulations of the megathrust earthquake. To model the dynamic rupture process, we use SeisSol, a software package based on an ADER-DG scheme with high-order accuracy in space and time. An unstructured tetrahedral mesh accommodates the complex geometry of the non-planar megathrust and the potential splay faults. We compare seafloor displacements for three models: without splay faults, with one long forethrust dipping 45 degrees, and with two short forethrusts and two short backthrusts dipping 45 degrees. Only the long forethrust is activated, directly transferring 2 m of along dip slip into 2 m seafloor uplift. In contrast, 12 m of along dip slip on the 20 degree dipping megathrust results in only 2-3 m of seafloor uplift. These results are being used by colleagues at the University of Hamburg to compare tsunamis generated from the displacements in the framework of the ASCETE project ("Advanced Simulation of Coupled Earthquake and Tsunami Events", www.ascete.de).

  2. Global gene expression analysis of the muscle tissues of medaka acclimated to low and high environmental temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Daisuke; Koyama, Hiroki; Mizusawa, Nanami; Kan-No, Nobuhiro; Tan, Engkong; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo

    2017-12-01

    Medaka (Oryzias latipes) is a temperate eurythermal fish that is able to survive over a wide range of water temperatures ranging from near zero to over 30°C throughout the year; it maintains its normal physiological and biochemical processes through temperature acclimation. To determine the mechanisms involved in temperature acclimation of fish, the fast skeletal muscle tissues of medaka underwent global gene expression analysis using next-generation sequencing. Ten individuals were placed into two aquariums at 24°C. While the water temperature of one aquarium was decreased to 10°C, that of the other aquarium was increased to 30°C; these temperatures were subsequently maintained for 5weeks. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analyses revealed that 11 genes involved in energy metabolism and muscle atrophy were significantly highly expressed in the 10°C-acclimated fish. Meanwhile, significantly higher expression levels were observed for 20 genes encoding myofibrillar proteins and heat shock proteins in the 30°C-acclimated fish. Moreover, 1103 genes had at least fourfold differential expression between the acclimation groups. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analyses provided important information: although the expression of genes related to metabolic processes were activated, muscle atrophy occurred in the 10°C-acclimated fish, and muscle cells divided actively in the 30°C-acclimated fish and avoided thermal stress by expressing heat shock proteins. Therefore, RNA-Seq analyses with the available genome database will be useful for better understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the temperature acclimation of fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Elevated [CO2] modified the drought acclimation response in peanut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peanut agroecosystems play a key role in food production and are a major source of protein in many arid and semi-arid regions where extreme weather events are expected to increase in frequency. We are taking a systems-level approach to investigate the response of peanut to elevated [CO2], water defi...

  4. Effect of photoperiod prior to cold acclimation on freezing tolerance and carbohydrate metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Annick; Bipfubusa, Marie; Claessens, Annie; Rocher, Solen; Castonguay, Yves

    2017-11-01

    Cold acclimation proceeds sequentially in response to decreases in photoperiod and temperature. This study aimed at assessing the impact of photoperiod prior to cold acclimation on freezing tolerance and related biochemical and molecular responses in two alfalfa cultivars. The fall dormant cultivar Evolution and semi-dormant cultivar 6010 were grown in growth chambers under different photoperiods (8, 10, 12, 14 or 16h) prior to cold acclimation. Freezing tolerance was evaluated as well as carbohydrate concentrations, levels of transcripts encoding enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism as well as a K-3dehydrin, before and after cold acclimation. The fall dormant cultivar Evolution had a better freezing tolerance than the semi-dormant cultivar 6010. The effect of photoperiod prior to cold acclimation on the level of freezing tolerance differed between the two cultivars: an 8h-photoperiod induced the highest level of freezing tolerance in Evolution and the lowest in 6010. In Evolution, the 8h-induced superior freezing tolerance was associated with higher concentration of raffinose-family oligosaccharides (RFO). The transcript levels of sucrose synthase (SuSy) decreased whereas those of sucrose phosphatase synthase (SPS) and galactinol synthase (GaS) increased in response to cold acclimation in both cultivars. Our results indicate that RFO metabolism could be involved in short photoperiod-induced freezing tolerance in dormant alfalfa cultivars. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Response of microbial community structure to pre-acclimation strategies in microbial fuel cells for domestic wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Younghyun; Cho, Hyunwoo; Yu, Jaechul; Min, Booki; Kim, Hong Suck; Kim, Byung Goon; Lee, Taeho

    2017-06-01

    Microbial community structures and performance of air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) inoculated with activated sludge from domestic wastewater were investigated to evaluate the effects of three substrate pre-acclimation strategies: 1, serial pre-acclimation with acetate and glucose before supplying domestic wastewater; 2, one step pre-acclimation with acetate before supplying domestic wastewater; and 3, direct supply of domestic wastewater without any pre-acclimation. Strategy 1 showed much higher current generation (1.4mA) and Coulombic efficiency (33.5%) than strategies 2 (0.7mA and 9.4%) and 3 (0.9mA and 10.3%). Pyrosequencing showed that microbial communities were significantly affected by pre-acclimation strategy. Although Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum with all strategies, Actinobacteria was abundant when MFCs were pre-acclimated with glucose after acetate. Not only anode-respiring bacteria (ARB) in the genus Geobacter but also non-ARB belonging to the family Anaerolinaceae seemed to play important roles in air-cathode MFCs to produce electricity from domestic wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of heat acclimation on sitting orthostatic tolerance in the heat after 48 and 96 hour bed rest in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Matter, M., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate sitting orthostatic tolerance and determine potentially adverse signs and symptoms that would incapacitate subjects in a hot environment (Gemini reentry cabin temperature profile) after 48 hr and 96 hr of horizontal bed rest (BR), which simulated microgravity deconditioning. Six college men (23-29 yr) were allocated into two groups: heat acclimated (three subjects: No. 1- control, No. 2- 48 hr BR, and No. 3- 96 hr BR) and nonheat acclimated (three subjects: No. 4- control, No. 5- 48 hr BR, and No. 6- 96 hr BR). After BR they sat in an ambient temperature of 57 C (135 F) for 30 min which then was decreased to 49 C (120 F) for up to 480 min. Tolerance time in the heat with seated orthostatic stress was 480 min (subject No. 1) and 180 min (subject No. 4) in the two ambulatory men, but was reduced to 22-150 min in the four bed-rested men irrespective of their heat acclimation status. Although heat acclimation appeared to enhance tolerance and attenuate accompanying physiological responses, as well as ameliorate the frequency and intensity of adverse signs and symptoms at termination of exposure, tolerance was reduced in the bed-rest deconditioned subjects regardless of their acclimation level. Thus, these few collective findings do not indicate an unequivocal positive effect of acute heat acclimation on sitting orthostatic tolerance in acute bed-rest deconditioned subjects.

  7. The Effect of Acclimation to Sublethal Temperature on Subsequent Susceptibility of Sitophilus zeamais Mostchulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to High Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Jianhua; Zhang, Huina

    2016-01-01

    Heat treatment is a popular alternative to synthetic pesticides in disinfesting food-processing facilities and empty grain storages. Sitophilus zeamais Mostchulsky is one of the most cosmopolitan and destructive insects found in empty grain storage facilities and processing facilities. The effect of acclimation in S. zeamais adults to sublethal high temperature on their subsequent susceptibility to high temperatures was investigated. S. zeamais adults were acclimated to 36°C for 0 (as a control), 1, 3, and 5 h, and then were exposed at 43, 47, 51, and 55°C for different time intervals respectively. Acclimation to sublethal high temperature significantly reduced subsequent susceptibility of S. zeamais adults to lethal high temperatures of 43, 47, 51, and 55°C, although the mortality of S. zeamais adults significantly increased with increasing exposure time at lethal high temperatures. The mortality of S. zeamais adults with 1, 3, and 5 h of acclimation to 36°C was significantly lower than that of S. zeamais adults without acclimation when exposed to the same lethal high temperatures. The present results suggest that the whole facility should be heated to target lethal high temperature as soon as possible, avoiding decreasing the control effectiveness of heat treatment due to the acclimation in stored product insects to sublethal temperature.

  8. Developmental plasticity and acclimation both contribute to adaptive ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-03-26

    Mar 26, 2007 ... Such plasticity is seen in the numerous species of Bicyclus butterflies in Africa which exhibit seasonal polyphenism with sequential generations of adults with one or other of two alternative phenotypes. These differ not only in wing pattern but in many other traits. This divergence across a broad complex of ...

  9. Thermopreference, tolerance and metabolic rate of early stages juvenile Octopus maya acclimated to different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyola, Javier; Caamal-Monsreal, Claudia; Díaz, Fernando; Re, Denisse; Sánchez, Adolfo; Rosas, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Thermopreference, tolerance and oxygen consumption rates of early juveniles Octopus maya (O. maya; weight range 0.38-0.78g) were determined after acclimating the octopuses to temperatures (18, 22, 26, and 30°C) for 20 days. The results indicated a direct relationship between preferred temperature (PT) and acclimated temperature, the PT was 23.4°C. Critical Thermal Maxima, (CTMax; 31.8±1.2, 32.7±0.9, 34.8±1.4 and 36.5±1.0) and Critical Thermal Minima, (CTMin; 11.6±0.2, 12.8±0.6, 13.7±1.0, 19.00±0.9) increased significantly (Pmaya has an increased capability for adapting to moderate temperatures, and suggest increased culture potential in subtropical regions southeast of México. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Photosynthetic acclimation to enriched CO{sub 2} concentrations in Pinus Ponderosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, M.P. [California State Univ., Humbolt, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    By the middle of the 21st century earth`s ambient CO{sub 2} level is expected to increase two-fold ({approximately}350 umol/L). Higher levels of CO{sub 2} are expected to cause major changes in the morphological, physiological, and biochemical traits of the world`s vegetation. Therefore, we constructed an experiment designed to measure the long-term acclimation processes of Pinus Ponderosa. As a prominent forest conifer, Pinus Ponderosa is useful when assessing a large scale global carbon budget. Eighteen genetically variable families were exposed to 3 different levels of CO{sub 2} (350 umol/L, 525 umol/L, 700 umol/L), for three years. Acclimation responses were quantified by assays of photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, and chlorophyll pigment concentrations.

  11. Branchial Expression Patterns of Claudin Isoforms in Atlantic Salmon During Seawater Acclimation and Smoltification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian K; Kiilerich, Pia; Nilsen, Tom O

    2008-01-01

    In euryhaline teleosts, permeability changes in gill epithelia are essential during acclimation to changed salinity. This study examined expression patterns of branchial tight junction proteins called claudins, which are important determinants of ion selectivity and general permeability in epithe......In euryhaline teleosts, permeability changes in gill epithelia are essential during acclimation to changed salinity. This study examined expression patterns of branchial tight junction proteins called claudins, which are important determinants of ion selectivity and general permeability...... is an important component of cation selective channels while reduction in claudin 27a and 30 may change permeability conditions in favour of the ion secretory mode of the SW gill. Key words: osmoregulation, teleost, tight junction, epithelia, QPCR....

  12. Meet Spinky: An Open-Source Spindle and K-Complex Detection Toolbox Validated on the Open-Access Montreal Archive of Sleep Studies (MASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajnef, Tarek; O’Reilly, Christian; Combrisson, Etienne; Chaibi, Sahbi; Eichenlaub, Jean-Baptiste; Ruby, Perrine M.; Aguera, Pierre-Emmanuel; Samet, Mounir; Kachouri, Abdennaceur; Frenette, Sonia; Carrier, Julie; Jerbi, Karim

    2017-01-01

    Sleep spindles and K-complexes are among the most prominent micro-events observed in electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings during sleep. These EEG microstructures are thought to be hallmarks of sleep-related cognitive processes. Although tedious and time-consuming, their identification and quantification is important for sleep studies in both healthy subjects and patients with sleep disorders. Therefore, procedures for automatic detection of spindles and K-complexes could provide valuable assistance to researchers and clinicians in the field. Recently, we proposed a framework for joint spindle and K-complex detection (Lajnef et al., 2015a) based on a Tunable Q-factor Wavelet Transform (TQWT; Selesnick, 2011a) and morphological component analysis (MCA). Using a wide range of performance metrics, the present article provides critical validation and benchmarking of the proposed approach by applying it to open-access EEG data from the Montreal Archive of Sleep Studies (MASS; O’Reilly et al., 2014). Importantly, the obtained scores were compared to alternative methods that were previously tested on the same database. With respect to spindle detection, our method achieved higher performance than most of the alternative methods. This was corroborated with statistic tests that took into account both sensitivity and precision (i.e., Matthew’s coefficient of correlation (MCC), F1, Cohen κ). Our proposed method has been made available to the community via an open-source tool named Spinky (for spindle and K-complex detection). Thanks to a GUI implementation and access to Matlab and Python resources, Spinky is expected to contribute to an open-science approach that will enhance replicability and reliable comparisons of classifier performances for the detection of sleep EEG microstructure in both healthy and patient populations. PMID:28303099

  13. Meet Spinky: An Open-Source Spindle and K-Complex Detection Toolbox Validated on the Open-Access Montreal Archive of Sleep Studies (MASS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajnef, Tarek; O'Reilly, Christian; Combrisson, Etienne; Chaibi, Sahbi; Eichenlaub, Jean-Baptiste; Ruby, Perrine M; Aguera, Pierre-Emmanuel; Samet, Mounir; Kachouri, Abdennaceur; Frenette, Sonia; Carrier, Julie; Jerbi, Karim

    2017-01-01

    Sleep spindles and K-complexes are among the most prominent micro-events observed in electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings during sleep. These EEG microstructures are thought to be hallmarks of sleep-related cognitive processes. Although tedious and time-consuming, their identification and quantification is important for sleep studies in both healthy subjects and patients with sleep disorders. Therefore, procedures for automatic detection of spindles and K-complexes could provide valuable assistance to researchers and clinicians in the field. Recently, we proposed a framework for joint spindle and K-complex detection (Lajnef et al., 2015a) based on a Tunable Q-factor Wavelet Transform (TQWT; Selesnick, 2011a) and morphological component analysis (MCA). Using a wide range of performance metrics, the present article provides critical validation and benchmarking of the proposed approach by applying it to open-access EEG data from the Montreal Archive of Sleep Studies (MASS; O'Reilly et al., 2014). Importantly, the obtained scores were compared to alternative methods that were previously tested on the same database. With respect to spindle detection, our method achieved higher performance than most of the alternative methods. This was corroborated with statistic tests that took into account both sensitivity and precision (i.e., Matthew's coefficient of correlation (MCC), F1, Cohen κ). Our proposed method has been made available to the community via an open-source tool named Spinky (for spindle and K-complex detection). Thanks to a GUI implementation and access to Matlab and Python resources, Spinky is expected to contribute to an open-science approach that will enhance replicability and reliable comparisons of classifier performances for the detection of sleep EEG microstructure in both healthy and patient populations.

  14. Species-specific roles of sulfolipid metabolism in acclimation of photosynthetic microbes to sulfur-starvation stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Sato

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic organisms utilize sulfate for the synthesis of sulfur-compounds including proteins and a sulfolipid, sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. Upon ambient deficiency in sulfate, cells of a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, degrade the chloroplast membrane sulfolipid to ensure an intracellular-sulfur source for necessary protein synthesis. Here, the effects of sulfate-starvation on the sulfolipid stability were investigated in another green alga, Chlorella kessleri, and two cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. The results showed that sulfolipid degradation was induced only in C. kessleri, raising the possibility that this degradation ability was obtained not by cyanobacteria, but by eukaryotic algae during the evolution of photosynthetic organisms. Meanwhile, Synechococcus disruptants concerning sqdB and sqdX genes, which are involved in successive reactions in the sulfolipid synthesis pathway, were respectively characterized in cellular response to sulfate-starvation. Phycobilisome degradation intrinsic to Synechococcus, but not to Synechocystis, and cell growth under sulfate-starved conditions were repressed in the sqdB and sqdX disruptants, respectively, relative to in the wild type. Their distinct phenotypes, despite the common loss of the sulfolipid, inferred specific roles of sqdB and sqdX. This study demonstrated that sulfolipid metabolism might have been developed to enable species- or cyanobacterial-strain dependent processes for acclimation to sulfate-starvation.

  15.     Developmental acclimation affects clinal variation in stress resistance traits in Drosophila buzzatii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Loeschcke, Volker

    2010-01-01

      Patterns of clinal genetic variation in Drosophila are often characterized after rearing at constant temperatures. However, clinal patterns might change after acclimation if populations differ in their plastic response to fluctuating environments. We studied longevity, starvation and heat knock...... temperatures, especially in heat knock-down, for which clinal patterns disappeared when flies were reared at constant temperatures. This result emphasises the importance of determining whether populations originating from different environments differ in their plastic responses to stress....

  16. Endocrine and Metabolic Signaling in Retroperitoneal White Adipose Tissue Remodeling during Cold Acclimation

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Jankovic; Aleksandra Korac; Biljana Buzadzic; Vesna Otasevic; Ana Stancic; Milica Vucetic; Milica Markelic; Ksenija Velickovic; Igor Golic; Bato Korac

    2013-01-01

    The expression profiles of adiponectin, resistin, 5?-AMP-activated protein kinase ? (AMPK ? ), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 ? (HIF-1 ? ), and key enzymes of glucose and fatty acid metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation in rat retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (RpWAT) during 45-day cold acclimation were examined. After transient suppression on day 1, adiponectin protein level increased following sustained cold exposure. In parallel, on day 1, the protein level of HIF-1 ? was strongly induce...

  17. Acclimation temperature affects the metabolic response of amphibian skeletal muscle to insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ann M; Gleeson, Todd T

    2011-09-01

    Frog skeletal muscle mainly utilizes the substrates glucose and lactate for energy metabolism. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of insulin on the uptake and metabolic fate of lactate and glucose at rest in skeletal muscle of the American bullfrog, Lithobates catesbeiana, under varying temperature regimens. We hypothesize that lactate and glucose metabolic pathways will respond differently to the presence of insulin in cold versus warm acclimated frog tissues, suggesting an interaction between temperature and metabolism under varying environmental conditions. We employed radiolabeled tracer techniques to measure in vitro uptake, oxidation, and incorporation of glucose and lactate into glycogen by isolated muscles from bullfrogs acclimated to 5 °C (cold) or 25 °C (warm). Isolated bundles from Sartorius muscles were incubated at 5 °C, 15 °C, or 25 °C, and in the presence and absence of 0.05 IU/mL bovine insulin. Insulin treatment in the warm acclimated and incubated frogs resulted in an increase in glucose incorporation into glycogen, and an increase in intracellular [glucose] of 0.5 μmol/g (Pglycogen was reduced (Pglycogen synthesis, and a reduction in free intracellular glucose levels (Pmetabolism was attenuated or even reversed. Therefore, a significant interaction between insulin and acclimation condition in controlling skeletal muscle metabolism appears to exist. Our findings further suggest that one of insulin's actions in frog muscle is to increase glucose incorporation into glycogen, and to reduce reliance on lactate as the primary metabolic fuel. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of acclimation on water and electrolitic disbalance in soldiers during exertional heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radaković Sonja S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Exertional heat stress is a common problem in military services. The aim of this study was to examine changes in body water and serum concentrations of some electrolites in soldiers during exertional heat stress (EHST, as well as effects of 10-day passive or active acclimation in a climatic chamber. Methods. Forty male soldiers with high aerobic capacity, performed EHST either in cool (20 ºC, 16 ºC WBGT-wet bulb globe temperature, or hot (40 ºC, 25 ºC WBGT environment, unacclimatized, or after 10 days of passive or active acclimation. The subjects were allowed to drink tap water ad libitum during EHST. Mean skin (Tsk and tympanic (Tty temperatures and heart rates (HR measured physiological strain, while sweat rate (SwR, and serum concentrations of sodium, potassium and osmolality measured changes in water and electrolyte status. Blood samples were collected before and immediately after the EHST. Results. Exertional heat stress in hot conditions induced physiological heat stress (increase in Tty, HR, and SwR, with significant decrease in serum sodium concentration (140.6±1.52 before vs 138.5±1.0 mmol/l after EHST, p < 0.01 and osmolality (280.7±3.8 vs 277.5±2.6 mOsm/kg, p < 0.05 in the unacclimatized group. The acclimated soldiers suffered no such effects of exertional heat stress, despite almost the same degree of heat strain, measured by Tty, HR and SwR. Conclusion. In the trained soldiers, 10-day passive or active acclimation in a climatic chamber can prevent disturbances in water and electrolytic balance, i.e. decrease in serum sodium concentrations and osmolality induced by exertional heat stress.

  19. Acclimation to a dynamic irradiance regime changes excessive irradiance sensitivity of Emiliania huxleyi and Thalassiosira weissflogii

    OpenAIRE

    van De Poll, Willem H.; Visser, Ronald J. W.; Buma, Anita G. J.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of fluctuating irradiance regimes on excessive photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation sensitivity were assessed for Emiliania huxleyi (Lohman) and Thalassiosira weissflogii (Grunow) Fryxell and Hasle. Cultures acclimated to low irradiance were subjected to two irradiance regimes of equal daily dose: dynamic irradiance simulating vertical mixing within the water column and constant irradiance. For each regime two irradiance levels were studied. Growth ...

  20. Developmental acclimation to low or high humidity conditions affect starvation and heat resistance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-09-01

    Several Drosophila species originating from tropical humid localities are more resistant to starvation and heat stress than populations from high latitudes but mechanistic bases of such physiological changes are largely unknown. In order to test whether humidity levels affect starvation and heat resistance, we investigated developmental acclimation effects of low to high humidity conditions on the storage and utilization of energy resources, body mass, starvation survival, heat knockdown and heat survival of D. melanogaster. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity (85% RH) stored significantly higher level of lipids and showed greater starvation survival hours but smaller in body size. In contrast, lines reared at low humidity evidenced reduced levels of body lipids and starvation resistance. Starvation resistance and lipid storage level were higher in females than males. However, the rate of utilization of lipids under starvation stress was lower for lines reared under higher humidity. Adult flies of lines reared at 65% RH and acclimated under high or low humidity condition for 200 hours also showed changes in resistance to starvation and heat but such effects were significantly lower as compared with developmental acclimation. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity showed greater heat knockdown time and heat-shock survival. These laboratory observations on developmental and adult acclimation effects of low versus high humidity conditions have helped in explaining seasonal changes in resistance to starvation and heat of the wild-caught flies of D. melanogaster. Thus, we may suggest that wet versus drier conditions significantly affect starvation and heat resistance of D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamic changes in plant secondary metabolites during UV acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hectors, Kathleen; Van Oevelen, Sandra; Geuns, Jan; Guisez, Yves; Jansen, Marcel A K; Prinsen, Els

    2014-10-01

    Plants respond to environmental stress by synthesizing a range of secondary metabolites for defense purposes. Here we report on the effect of chronic ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the accumulation of plant secondary metabolites in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. In the natural environment, UV is a highly dynamic environmental parameter and therefore we hypothesized that plants are continuously readjusting levels of secondary metabolites. Our data show distinct kinetic profiles for accumulation of tocopherols, polyamines and flavonoids upon UV acclimation. The lipid-soluble antioxidant α-tocopherol accumulated fast and remained elevated. Polyamines accumulated fast and transiently. This fast response implies a role for α-tocopherol and polyamines in short-term UV response. In contrast, an additional sustained accumulation of flavonols took place. The distinct accumulation patterns of these secondary metabolites confirm that the UV acclimation process is a dynamic process, and indicates that commonly used single time-point analyses do not reveal the full extent of UV acclimation. We demonstrate that UV stimulates the accumulation of specific flavonol glycosides, i.e. kaempferol and (to a lesser extent) quercetin di- and triglycosides, all specifically rhamnosylated at position seven. All metabolites were identified by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC)-coupled tandem mass spectrometry. Some of these flavonol glycosides reached steady-state levels in 3-4 days, while concentrations of others are still increasing after 12  days of UV exposure. A biochemical pathway for these glycosides is postulated involving 7-O-rhamnosylation for the synthesis of all eight metabolites identified. We postulate that this 7-O-rhamnosylation has an important function in UV acclimation. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  2. Physiological flexibility and acclimation to food shortage in a heterothermic primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Cindy I; Perret, Martine; Théry, Marc; Henry, Pierre-Yves

    2011-02-15

    As ecosystems undergo changes worldwide, physiological flexibility is likely to be an important adaptive response to increased climate instability. Extreme weather fluctuations impose energetical constraints such as unpredictable food shortage. We tested how grey mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus) could adjust their daily heterothermy and locomotor activity to these 'energetic accidents' with a food restriction experiment. The experimental design consisted of acute calorie restriction (2 weeks, 80% restriction) in the middle of winter, after a fattening season with low (11 weeks, 40% restriction) versus high (ad libitum) food availability. This design aimed at simulating the combined effects of the quality of the fattening season (acclimation effect) and a sudden, severe food shortage during the lean season. Hour of start and duration of torpor were the most flexible components of energy savings, increasing in response to the acute food shortage with facilitation by chronic restriction (acclimation effect). Modulations of locomotor activity did not support the hypothesis of energy savings, as total locomotor activity was not reduced. Nonetheless, acutely restricted individuals modified their temporal pattern of locomotor activity according to former food availability. We provide the first experimental evidence of different temporal levels of flexibility of energy-saving mechanisms in a heterotherm exposed to food shortage. The acclimation effect of past food scarcity suggests that heterothermic organisms are better able to respond to unpredicted food scarcity during the lean season. The flexible control of energy expenditure conferred by heterothermy may facilitate the plastic response of heterothermic species to more frequent climatic hazards.

  3. Sodium and chloride transport in soft water and hard water acclimated zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, A M Z; Amstrup, J; Novak, I

    2003-01-01

    While the zebrafish is commonly used for studies of developmental biology and toxicology, very little is known about their osmoregulatory physiology. The present investigation of Na(+) and Cl(-) transport revealed that the zebrafish is able to tolerate extremely low ambient ion concentrations and...... inhibitor was more variable. Differential response of Na(+) uptake to amiloride depending on acclimation medium suggests that different Na(+) transport mechanisms are employed by zebrafish acclimated to soft and hard water....... and that this is achieved at least in part by a greatly enhanced apparent uptake capacity and affinity for both ions. Zebrafish maintain plasma and whole body electrolyte concentrations similar to most other freshwater teleosts even in deionized water containing only 35 microM NaCl, i.e soft water. We recorded an extremely...... low transport affinity constant (K(m)) of 8+/-1 microM for the active uptake of Cl(-) in soft water acclimated fish, while other transport kinetic parameters were in agreement with reports for other freshwater organisms. While both Na(+) and Cl(-) uptake in soft water clearly depends on apical proton...

  4. Forest trees filter chronic wind-signals to acclimate to high winds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnesoeur, Vivien; Constant, Thiéry; Moulia, Bruno; Fournier, Meriem

    2016-05-01

    Controlled experiments have shown that trees acclimate thigmomorphogenetically to wind-loads by sensing their deformation (strain). However, the strain regime in nature is exposed to a full spectrum of winds. We hypothesized that trees avoid overreacting by responding only to winds which bring information on local climate and/or wind exposure. Additionally, competition for light dependent on tree social status also likely affects thigmomorphogenesis. We monitored and manipulated quantitatively the strain regimes of 15 pairs of beech (Fagus sylvatica) trees of contrasting social status in an acclimated stand, and quantified the effects of these regimes on the radial growth over a vegetative season. Trees exposed to artificial bending, the intensity of which corresponds to the strongest wind-induced strains, enhanced their secondary growth by at least 80%. Surprisingly, this reaction was even greater - relatively - for suppressed trees than for dominant ones. Acclimated trees did not sense the different types of wind events in the same way. Daily wind speed peaks due to thermal winds were filtered out. Thigmomorphogenesis was therefore driven by intense storms. Thigmomorphogenesis is also likely to be involved in determining social status. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Redundant roles of photoreceptors and cytokinins in regulating photosynthetic acclimation to canopy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonman, A; Prinsen, E; Voesenek, L A C J; Pons, T L

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of photosynthetic acclimation to canopy density was investigated in tobacco canopies and in tobacco and Arabidopsis plants with part of their foliage experimentally shaded. Both species acclimated to canopy light gradients and partial shading by allocating photosynthetic capacity to leaves in high light and adjusting chloroplast organization to the local light conditions. An investigation was carried out to determine whether signalling mediated by photoreceptors, sugars, cytokinin, and nitrate is involved in and necessary for proper photosynthetic acclimation. No evidence was found for a role for sugars, or for nitrate. The distribution of cytokinins in tobacco stands of contrasting density could be explained in part by irradiance-dependent delivery of cytokinins through the transpiration stream. Functional studies using a comprehensive selection of Arabidopsis mutants and transgenics showed that normal wild-type responses to partial shading were retained when signalling mediated by photoreceptors or cytokinins was disrupted. This indicates that these pathways probably operate in a redundant manner. However, the reduction of the chlorophyll a/b ratio in response to local shade was completely absent in the Arabidopsis Ws-2 accession mutated in PHYTOCHROME D and in the triple phyAphyCphyD mutant. Moreover, cytokinin receptor mutants also showed a reduced response, suggesting a previously unrecognized function of phyD and cytokinins.

  6. Performance of phenol-acclimated activated sludge in the presence of various phenolic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jun-Wei; Tan, Je-Zhen; Seng, Chye-Eng

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of phenol-acclimated activated sludge in the presence of various phenolic compounds in the separated batch reactors. The phenol-acclimated activated sludge was observed to be capable of completely removing phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, and 4-chlorophenol. Nevertheless, in the presence of 2-chlorophenol and 3-chlorophenol merely at 50 mg/L, incomplete removal of these phenolic compounds were noticed. The specific oxygen uptake rate patterns obtained for phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, and 4-chlorophenol could be used to approximate the end point of these phenolic compounds removal as well as to monitor the growth of biomass. As the 2-chlorophenol and 3-chlorophenol were only partially removed in the mixed liquor, the patterns of specific oxygen uptake rate attained for these phenolic compounds were not feasible for the similar estimation. The calculated toxicity percentages show the toxicity effects of phenolic compounds on the phenol-acclimated activated sludge followed the order of 2-chlorophenol ≈ 3-chlorophenol > 4-chlorophenol > o-cresol ≈ m-cresol > phenol.

  7. Exercise- and methylcholine-induced sweating responses in older and younger men: effect of heat acclimation and aerobic fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Y.; Havenith, George; Kenney, W. Larry; Loomis, Joseph L.; Buskirk, Elsworth R.

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of aging and aerobic fitness on exercise- and methylcholine-induced sweating responses during heat acclimation. Five younger [Y group - age: 23+/-1 (SEM) years; maximal oxygen consumption (V.O2max): 47+/-3 ml.kg-1.min-1], four highly fit older (HO group - 63+/-3 years; 48+/-4 ml.kg-1.min-1) and five normally fit older men (NO group - 67+/-3 years; 30+/-1 ml.kg-1.min-1) who were matched for height, body mass and percentage fat, were heat acclimated by daily cycle exercise ( 35% V.O2max for 90 min) in a hot (43°C, 30% RH) environment for 8 days. The heat acclimation regimen increased performance time, lowered final rectal temperature (Tre) and percentage maximal heart rate (%HRmax), improved thermal comfort and decreased sweat sodium concentration similarly in all groups. Although total body sweating rates (M.sw) during acclimation were significantly greater in the Y and HO groups than in the NO group (Pgroup), the M.sw did not change in all groups with the acclimation sessions. Neither were local sweating rates (m.sw) on chest, back, forearm and thigh changed in all groups by the acclimation. The HO group presented greater forearm m.sw (30-90 min) values and the Y group had greater back and thigh m.sw (early in exercise) values, compared to the other groups (PHO>NO, and on the forearm Y=HO>NO. No group differences were observed for activated sweat gland density at any site. The SGO at the respective sites increased in the post-acclimation test regardless of group (Pgroups than in the Y group. These findings suggest that heat tolerance and the improvement with acclimation are little impaired not only in highly fit older but also normally fit older men, when the subjects exercised at the same relative exercise intensity. Furthermore, the changes induced by acclimation appear associated with an age-related decrease in V.O2max. However methylcholine-activated SGO and the magnitude of improvement of SGO with

  8. Effects of heat acclimation on hand cooling efficacy following exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Elizabeth L; Vandermark, Lesley W; Pryor, J Luke; Pryor, Riana R; VanScoy, Rachel M; Denegar, Craig R; Huggins, Robert A; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-05-01

    This study examined the separate and combined effects of heat acclimation and hand cooling on post-exercise cooling rates following bouts of exercise in the heat. Seventeen non-heat acclimated (NHA) males (mean ± SE; age, 23 ± 1 y; mass, 75.30 ± 2.27 kg; maximal oxygen consumption [VO2 max], 54.1 ± 1.3 ml·kg-1·min-1) completed 2 heat stress tests (HST) when NHA, then 10 days of heat acclimation, then 2 HST once heat acclimated (HA) in an environmental chamber (40°C; 40%RH). HSTs were 2 60-min bouts of treadmill exercise (45% VO2 max; 2% grade) each followed by 10 min of hand cooling (C) or no cooling (NC). Heat acclimation sessions were 90-240 min of treadmill or stationary bike exercise (60-80% VO2 max). Repeated measures ANOVA with Fishers LSD post hoc (α < 0.05) identified differences. When NHA, C (0.020 ± 0.003°C·min-1) had a greater cooling rate than NC (0.013 ± 0.003°C·min-1) (mean difference [95%CI]; 0.007°C [0.001,0.013], P = 0.035). Once HA, C (0.021 ± 0.002°C·min-1) was similar to NC (0.025 ± 0.002°C·min-1) (0.004°C [-0.003,0.011], P = 0.216). Hand cooling when HA (0.021 ± 0.002°C·min-1) was similar to when NHA (0.020 ± 0.003°C·min-1) (P = 0.77). In conclusion, when NHA, C provided greater cooling rates than NC. Once HA, C and NC provided similar cooling rates.

  9. Pets as the main source of two zoonotic species of the Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex in Switzerland, Arthroderma vanbreuseghemii and Arthroderma benhamiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouot, Stéphane; Mignon, Bernard; Fratti, Marina; Roosje, Petra; Monod, Michel

    2009-02-01

    In cases of highly inflammatory dermatophytosis in humans, it is important to identify the possible source of animal transmission in order to prevent recurrence, family outbreaks or rapidly progressing epidemics. A survey of dermatophytes in pets during a 14-month period in Switzerland revealed, in addition to Microsporum canis, two different species of the Trichophyton mentagrophytes complex, Arthroderma benhamiae and Arthroderma vanbreuseghemii, all causing inflammatory dermatophytoses. Arthroderma benhamiae was only and frequently isolated from guinea pigs. Arthroderma vanbreuseghemii was isolated mainly from European short hair cats, but also from dogs and in one case from a pure-bred cat. Ninety-three percent of the cats carrying A. vanbreuseghemii were hunters and all had skin lesions. In contrast, cats with skin lesions that were strictly indoors were found to be almost exclusively infected by M. canis. Therefore, it can be suspected that infection with A. vanbreuseghemii occurred during hunting and that the natural source of this dermatophyte is either soil or an animal other than the cat, most probably a rodent.

  10. Detection and Localization of Transient Sources: Comparative Study of Complex-Lag Distribution Concept Versus Wavelets and Spectrogram-Based Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Gottin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection and localization of transient signals is nowadays a typical point of interest when we consider the multitude of existing transient sources, such as electrical and mechanical systems, underwater environments, audio domain, seismic data, and so forth. In such fields, transients carry out a lot of information. They can correspond to a large amount of phenomena issued from the studied problem and important to analyze (anomalies and perturbations, natural sources, environmental singularities, …. They usually occur randomly as brief and sudden signals, such as partial discharges in electrical cables and transformers tanks. Therefore, motivated by advanced and accurate analysis, efficient tools of transients detection and localization are of great utility. Higher order statistics, wavelets and spectrogram distributions are well known methods which proved their efficiency to detect and localize transients independently to one another. However, in the case of a signal composed by several transients physically related and with important energy gap between them, the tools previously mentioned could not detect efficiently all the transients of the whole signal. Recently, the generalized complex time distribution concept has been introduced. This distribution offers access to highly concentrated representation of any phase derivative order of a signal. In this paper, we use this improved phase analysis tool to define a new concept to detect and localize dependant transients taking regard to the phase break they cause and not their amplitude. ROC curves are calculated to analyze and compare the performances of the proposed methods.

  11. Using nitrogen concentration and isotopic composition in lichens to spatially assess the relative contribution of atmospheric nitrogen sources in complex landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, P; Barros, C; Augusto, S; Pereira, M J; Máguas, C; Branquinho, C

    2017-11-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) is an important driver of global change, causing alterations in ecosystem biodiversity and functionality. Environmental assessments require monitoring the emission and deposition of both the amount and types of Nr. This is especially important in heterogeneous landscapes, as different land-cover types emit particular forms of Nr to the atmosphere, which can impact ecosystems distinctively. Such assessments require high spatial resolution maps that also integrate temporal variations, and can only be feasibly achieved by using ecological indicators. Our aim was to rank land-cover types according to the amount and form of emitted atmospheric Nr in a complex landscape with multiple sources of N. To do so, we measured and mapped nitrogen concentration and isotopic composition in lichen thalli, which we then related to land-cover data. Results suggested that, at the landscape scale, intensive agriculture and urban areas were the most important sources of Nr to the atmosphere. Additionally, the ocean greatly influences Nr in land, by providing air with low Nr concentration and a unique isotopic composition. These results have important consequences for managing air pollution at the regional level, as they provide critical information for modeling Nr emission and deposition across regional as well as continental scales. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tracing source terranes using U-Pb-Hf isotopic analysis of detrital zircons: provenance of the Orhanlar Unit of the Palaeotethyan Karakaya subduction-accretion complex, NW Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustaömer, Timur; Ayda Ustaömer, Petek; Robertson, Alastair; Gerdes, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Sandstones of the Late Palaeozoic-Early Mesozoic Karakaya Complex are interpreted to have accumulated along an active continental margin related to northward subduction of Palaeotethys. The age of deposition and provenance of the sandstones are currently being determined using radiometric dating of detrital zircons, coupled with dating of potential source terranes. Our previous work shows that the U-Pb-Hf isotopic characteristics of the sandstones of all but one of the main tectonostratigraphic units of the Karakaya Complex are compatible with a provenance that was dominated by Triassic and Permo-Carboniferous magmatic arc-type rocks, together with a minor contribution from Lower to Mid-Devonian igneous rocks (Ustaömer et al. 2015). However, one of the tectono-stratigraphic units, the Orhanlar Unit, which occurs in a structurally high position, differs in sedimentary facies and composition from the other units of the Karakaya Complex. Here, we report new isotopic age data for the sandstones of the Orhanlar Unit and also from an extensive, associated tectonic slice of continental metamorphic rocks (part of the regional Sakarya Terrane). Our main aim is to assess the provenance of the Orhanlar Unit sandstones in relation to the tectonic development of the Karakaya Complex as a whole. The Orhanlar Unit is composed of shales, sandstone turbidites and debris-flow deposits, which include blocks of Devonian radiolarian chert and Carboniferous and Permian neritic limestones. The sandstones are dominated by rock fragments, principally volcanic and plutonic rocks of basic-to-intermediate composition, metamorphic rocks and chert, together with common quartz, feldspar and mica. This modal composition contrasts significantly with the dominantly arkosic composition of the other Karakaya Complex sandstones. The detrital zircons were dated by the U-Pb method, coupled with determination of Lu-Hf isotopic compositions using a laser ablation microprobe attached to a multicollector

  13. Effects of prolonged acclimation to cold on the extra--and intracellular acid-base status in the land snail Helix lucorum (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staikou, A; Stiakakis, M; Michaelidis, B

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of prolonged acclimation to cold on the acid-base status of extra- and intracellular fluids in the land snail Helix lucorum. For this purpose, acid-base parameters in the hemolymph and tissues were determined. In addition, the buffer values of hemolymph and tissues were determined in order to examine whether they change in the snails during acclimation to cold. According to the results presented, there is an inverse pH-temperature relationship in the hemolymph within the first day of acclimation, which is consistent with alphastat regulation. The Pco2 decreased, and pH in the hemolymph (pH(e)) increased by 0.32 U within the first day of acclimation to cold, which corresponds to a change of 0.013 U degrees C(-1). After the first day of acclimation, Pco2 increased in the hemolymph, resulting in a significant drop in pH(e) by 90 d of acclimation to cold. Acclimation of snails to low temperatures did not change the buffer value of the hemolymph. Also, intracellular pH (pH(i)) and intracellular buffer values remained stable during acclimation to cold for prolonged periods. The latter results in conjunction with those obtained by the in vitro determination of the passive component of intracellular fluids indicate an active regulation of pH(i) in H. lucorum during acclimation to cold.

  14. Exogenous thyroid hormones regulate the activity of citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase in warm- but not cold-acclimated lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Megan A; Regish, Amy M; McCormick, Stephen D; Manzon, Richard G

    2017-06-01

    Thermal acclimation is known to elicit metabolic adjustments in ectotherms, but the cellular mechanisms and endocrine control of these shifts have not been fully elucidated. Here we examined the relationship between thermal acclimation, thyroid hormones and oxidative metabolism in juvenile lake whitefish. Impacts of thermal acclimation above (19°C) or below (8°C) the thermal optimum (13°C) and exposure to exogenous thyroid hormone (60µg T4/g body weight) were assessed by quantifying citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activities in liver, red muscle, white muscle and heart. Warm acclimation decreased citrate synthase activity in liver and elevated both citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activities in red muscle. In contrast, induction of hyperthyroidism in warm-acclimated fish stimulated a significant increase in liver citrate synthase and heart cytochrome c oxidase activities, and a decrease in the activity of both enzymes in red muscle. No change in citrate synthase or cytochrome c oxidase activities was observed following cold acclimation in either the presence or absence of exogenous thyroid hormones. Collectively, our results indicate that thyroid hormones influence the activity of oxidative enzymes more strongly in warm-acclimated than in cold-acclimated lake whitefish, and they may play a role in mediating metabolic adjustments observed during thermal acclimation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Exogenous thyroid hormones regulate the activity of citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase in warm- but not cold-acclimated lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Megan A.; Regish, Amy M.; McCormick, Stephen; Manzon, Richard G.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal acclimation is known to elicit metabolic adjustments in ectotherms, but the cellular mechanisms and endocrine control of these shifts have not been fully elucidated. Here we examined the relationship between thermal acclimation, thyroid hormones and oxidative metabolism in juvenile lake whitefish. Impacts of thermal acclimation above (19 °C) or below (8 °C) the thermal optimum (13 °C) and exposure to exogenous thyroid hormone (60 µg T4/g body weight) were assessed by quantifying citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activities in liver, red muscle, white muscle and heart. Warm acclimation decreased citrate synthase activity in liver and elevated both citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activities in red muscle. In contrast, induction of hyperthyroidism in warm-acclimated fish stimulated a significant increase in liver citrate synthase and heart cytochrome c oxidase activities, and a decrease in the activity of both enzymes in red muscle. No change in citrate synthase or cytochrome c oxidase activities was observed following cold acclimation in either the presence or absence of exogenous thyroid hormones. Collectively, our results indicate that thyroid hormones influence the activity of oxidative enzymes more strongly in warm-acclimated than in cold-acclimated lake whitefish, and they may play a role in mediating metabolic adjustments observed during thermal acclimation.

  16. Complex derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido; Georg, Co-Pierre; May, Robert; Stiglitz, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    The intrinsic complexity of the financial derivatives market has emerged as both an incentive to engage in it, and a key source of its inherent instability. Regulators now faced with the challenge of taming this beast may find inspiration in the budding science of complex systems.

  17. Differential Mechanisms of Photosynthetic Acclimation to Light and Low Temperature in Arabidopsis and the Extremophile Eutrema salsugineum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Nityananda; Bray, Geoffrey E.; Grisnich, Anna; Moffatt, Barbara A.; Gray, Gordon R.

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms are able to sense energy imbalances brought about by the overexcitation of photosystem II (PSII) through the redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, estimated as the chlorophyll fluorescence parameter 1-qL, also known as PSII excitation pressure. Plants employ a wide array of photoprotective processes that modulate photosynthesis to correct these energy imbalances. Low temperature and light are well established in their ability to modulate PSII excitation pressure. The acquisition of freezing tolerance requires growth and development a low temperature (cold acclimation) which predisposes the plant to photoinhibition. Thus, photosynthetic acclimation is essential for proper energy balancing during the cold acclimation process. Eutrema salsugineum (Thellungiella salsuginea) is an extremophile, a close relative of Arabidopsis thaliana, but possessing much higher constitutive levels of tolerance to abiotic stress. This comparative study aimed to characterize the photosynthetic properties of Arabidopsis (Columbia accession) and two accessions of Eutrema (Yukon and Shandong) isolated from contrasting geographical locations at cold acclimating and non-acclimating conditions. In addition, three different growth regimes were utilized that varied in temperature, photoperiod and irradiance which resulted in different levels of PSII excitation pressure. This study has shown that these accessions interact differentially to instantaneous (measuring) and long-term (acclimation) changes in PSII excitation pressure with regard to their photosynthetic behaviour. Eutrema accessions contained a higher amount of photosynthetic pigments, showed higher oxidation of P700 and possessed more resilient photoprotective mechanisms than that of Arabidopsis, perhaps through the prevention of PSI acceptor-limitation. Upon comparison of the two Eutrema accessions, Shandong demonstrated the greatest PSII operating efficiency (ΦPSII) and P700 oxidizing

  18. Short- and long-term acclimation patterns of the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae) along a depth gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Kristina; Thiel, Martin; Hagen, Wilhelm; Graeve, Martin; Gómez, Iván; Jofre, David; Hofmann, Laurie C; Tala, Fadia; Bischof, Kai

    2016-04-01

    The giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera, is exposed to highly variable irradiance and temperature regimes across its geographic and vertical depth gradients. The objective of this study was to extend our understanding of algal acclimation strategies on different temporal scales to those varying abiotic conditions at various water depths. Different acclimation strategies to various water depths (0.2 and 4 m) between different sampling times (Jan/Feb and Aug/Sept 2012; long-term acclimation) and more rapid adjustments to different depths (0.2, 2 and 4 m; short-term acclimation) during 14 d of transplantation were found. Adjustments of variable Chl a fluorescence, pigment composition (Chl c, fucoxanthin), and the de-epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle pigments were responsible for the development of different physiological states with respect to various solar radiation and temperature climates. Interestingly, the results indicated that phlorotannins are important during long-term acclimation while antioxidants have a crucial role during short-term acclimation. Furthermore, the results suggested that modifications in total lipids and fatty acid compositions apparently also might play a role in depth acclimation. In Aug/Sept (austral winter), M. pyrifera responded to the transplantation from 4 m to 0.2 m depth with a rise in the degree of saturation and a switch from shorter- to longer-chain fatty acids. These changes seem to be essential for the readjustment of thylakoid membranes and might, thus, facilitate efficient photosynthesis under changing irradiances and temperatures. Further experiments are needed to disentangle the relative contribution of solar radiation, temperature and also other abiotic parameters in the observed physiological changes. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  19. Effect of thermal acclimation on organ mass, tissue respiration, and allometry in Leichhardtian river prawns Macrobrachium tolmerum (Riek, 1951).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispin, Taryn S; White, Craig R

    2013-01-01

    Changes to an animal's abiotic environment-and consequent changes in the allometry of metabolic rate in the whole animal and its constituent parts-has considerable potential to reveal important patterns in both intraspecific and interindividual variation of metabolic rates. This study demonstrates that, after 6 wk of thermal acclimation at replicate treatments of 16°, 21°, and 25°C, standard metabolic rate (SMR) scales allometrically in Leichhardtian river prawns Macrobrachium tolmerum ([Formula: see text]) and that the scaling exponent and normalization constant of the relationship between SMR and body mass is not significantly different among acclimation treatments when measured at 21°C. There is, however, significant variation among individuals in whole-animal metabolic rate. We hypothesized that these observations may arise because of changes in the metabolic rate and allometry of metabolic rate or mass of organ tissues within the animal. To investigate this hypothesis, rates of oxygen consumption in a range of tissues (gills, gonads, hepatopancreas, chelae muscle, tail muscle) were measured at 21°C and related to the body mass (M) and whole-animal SMR of individual prawns. We demonstrate that thermal acclimation had no effect on organ and tissue mass, that most organ and tissue (gills, gonads, hepatopancreas) respiration rates do not change with acclimation temperature, and that residual variation in the allometry of M. tolmerum SMR is not explained by differences in organ and tissue mass and respiration rates. These results suggest that body size and ambient temperature may independently affect metabolic rate in this species. Both chelae and tail muscle, however, exhibited a reduction in respiration rate in animals acclimated to 25° relative to those acclimated to 16° and 21°C. This reduction in respiration rates of muscle at higher temperatures is evidence of a tissue-specific acclimation response that was not detectable at the whole-animal level.

  20. Temperature response of photosynthesis in C3, C4, and CAM plants: temperature acclimation and temperature adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Wataru; Hikosaka, Kouki; Way, Danielle A

    2014-02-01

    Most plants show considerable capacity to adjust their photosynthetic characteristics to their growth temperatures (temperature acclimation). The most typical case is a shift in the optimum temperature for photosynthesis, which can maximize the photosynthetic rate at the growth temperature. These plastic adjustments can allow plants to photosynthesize more efficiently at their new growth temperatures. In this review article, we summarize the basic differences in photosynthetic reactions in C3, C4, and CAM plants. We review the current understanding of the temperature responses of C3, C4, and CAM photosynthesis, and then discuss the underlying physiological and biochemical mechanisms for temperature acclimation of photosynthesis in each photosynthetic type. Finally, we use the published data to evaluate the extent of photosynthetic temperature acclimation in higher plants, and analyze which plant groups (i.e., photosynthetic types and functional types) have a greater inherent ability for photosynthetic acclimation to temperature than others, since there have been reported interspecific variations in this ability. We found that the inherent ability for temperature acclimation of photosynthesis was different: (1) among C3, C4, and CAM species; and (2) among functional types within C3 plants. C3 plants generally had a greater ability for temperature acclimation of photosynthesis across a broad temperature range, CAM plants acclimated day and night photosynthetic process differentially to temperature, and C4 plants was adapted to warm environments. Moreover, within C3 species, evergreen woody plants and perennial herbaceous plants showed greater temperature homeostasis of photosynthesis (i.e., the photosynthetic rate at high-growth temperature divided by that at low-growth temperature was close to 1.0) than deciduous woody plants and annual herbaceous plants, indicating that photosynthetic acclimation would be particularly important in perennial, long-lived species that

  1. Field-Grown Grapevine Berries Use Carotenoids and the Associated Xanthophyll Cycles to Acclimate to UV Exposure Differentially in High and Low Light (Shade) Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Chandré; Young, Philip R.; Eyéghé-Bickong, Hans A.; Vivier, Melané A.

    2016-01-01

    Light quantity and quality modulate grapevine development and influence berry metabolic processes. Here we studied light as an information signal for developing and ripening grape berries. A Vitis vinifera Sauvignon Blanc field experiment was used to identify the impacts of UVB on core metabolic processes in the berries under both high light (HL) and low light (LL) microclimates. The primary objective was therefore to identify UVB-specific responses on berry processes and metabolites and distinguish them from those responses elicited by variations in light incidence. Canopy manipulation at the bunch zone via early leaf removal, combined with UVB-excluding acrylic sheets installed over the bunch zones resulted in four bunch microclimates: (1) HL (control); (2) LL (control); (3) HL with UVB attenuation and (4) LL with UVB attenuation. Metabolite profiles of three berry developmental stages showed predictable changes to known UV-responsive compound classes in a typical UV acclimation (versus UV damage) response. Interestingly, the berries employed carotenoids and the associated xanthophyll cycles to acclimate to UV exposure and the berry responses differed between HL and LL conditions, particularly in the developmental stages where berries are still photosynthetically active. The developmental stage of the berries was an important factor to consider in interpreting the data. The green berries responded to the different exposure and/or UVB attenuation signals with metabolites that indicate that the berries actively managed its metabolism in relation to the exposure levels, displaying metabolic plasticity in the photosynthesis-related metabolites. Core processes such as photosynthesis, photo-inhibition and acclimation were maintained by differentially modulating metabolites under the four treatments. Ripe berries also responded metabolically to the light quality and quantity, but mostly formed compounds (volatiles and polyphenols) that have direct antioxidant and/or

  2. The acclimation of Chlorella to high-level nitrite for potential application in biological NOx removal from industrial flue gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianpei; Xu, Gang; Rong, Junfeng; Chen, Hui; He, Chenliu; Giordano, Mario; Wang, Qiang

    2016-05-20

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are the components of fossil flue gas that give rise to the greatest environmental concerns. This study evaluated the ability of the green algae Chlorella to acclimate to high level of NOx and the potential utilization of Chlorella strains in biological NOx removal (DeNOx) from industrial flue gases. Fifteen Chlorella strains were subject to high-level of nitrite (HN, 176.5 mmolL(-1) nitrite) to simulate exposure to high NOx. These strains were subsequently divided into four groups with respect to their ability to tolerate nitrite (excellent, good, fair, and poor). One strain from each group was selected to evaluate their photosynthetic response to HN condition, and the nitrite adaptability of the four Chlorella strains were further identified by using chlorophyll fluorescence. The outcome of our experiments shows that, although high concentrations of nitrite overall negatively affect growth and photosynthesis of Chlorella strains, the degree of nitrite tolerance is a strain-specific feature. Some Chlorella strains have an appreciably higher ability to acclimate to high-level of nitrite. Acclimation is achieved through a three-step process of restrict, acclimate, and thriving. Notably, Chlorella sp. C2 was found to have a high tolerance and to rapidly acclimate to high concentrations of nitrite; it is therefore a promising candidate for microalgae-based biological NOx removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Cold acclimation in warmer extended autumns impairs freezing tolerance of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) and timothy (Phleum pratense).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmannsdottir, Sigridur; Jørgensen, Marit; Rapacz, Marcin; Østrem, Liv; Larsen, Arild; Rødven, Rolf; Rognli, Odd Arne

    2017-07-01

    The effect of variable autumn temperatures in combination with decreasing irradiance and daylength on photosynthesis, growth cessation and freezing tolerance was investigated in northern- and southern-adapted populations of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) and timothy (Phleum pratense) intended for use in regions at northern high latitudes. Plants were subjected to three different acclimation temperatures; 12, 6 and 9/3°C (day/night) for 4 weeks, followed by 1 week of cold acclimation at 2°C under natural light conditions. This experimental setup was repeated at three different periods during autumn with decreasing sums of irradiance and daylengths. Photoacclimation, leaf elongation and freezing tolerance were studied. The results showed that plants cold acclimated during the period with lowest irradiance and shortest day had lowest freezing tolerance, lowest photosynthetic activity, longest leaves and least biomass production. Higher acclimation temperature (12°C) resulted in lower freezing tolerance, lower photosynthetic activity, faster leaf elongation rate and higher biomass compared with the other temperatures. Photochemical mechanisms were predominant in photoacclimation. The northern-adapted populations had a better freezing tolerance than the southern-adapted except when grown during the late autumn period and at the highest temperature; then there were no differences between the populations. Our results indicate that the projected climate change in the north may reduce freezing tolerance in grasses as acclimation will take place at higher temperatures and shorter daylengths with lower irradiance. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  4. Plant Growth under Natural Light Conditions Provides Highly Flexible Short-Term Acclimation Properties toward High Light Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Tobias; Paul, Suman; Melzer, Michael; Dörmann, Peter; Jahns, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Efficient acclimation to different growth light intensities is essential for plant fitness. So far, most studies on light acclimation have been conducted with plants grown under different constant light regimes, but more recent work indicated that acclimation to fluctuating light or field conditions may result in different physiological properties of plants. Thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) was grown under three different constant light intensities (LL: 25 μmol photons m−2 s−1; NL: 100 μmol photons m−2 s−1; HL: 500 μmol photons m−2 s−1) and under natural fluctuating light (NatL) conditions. We performed a thorough characterization of the morphological, physiological, and biochemical properties focusing on photo-protective mechanisms. Our analyses corroborated the known properties of LL, NL, and HL plants. NatL plants, however, were found to combine characteristics of both LL and HL grown plants, leading to efficient and unique light utilization capacities. Strikingly, the high energy dissipation capacity of NatL plants correlated with increased dynamics of thylakoid membrane reorganization upon short-term acclimation to excess light. We conclude that the thylakoid membrane organization and particularly the light-dependent and reversible unstacking of grana membranes likely represent key factors that provide the basis for the high acclimation capacity of NatL grown plants to rapidly changing light intensities. PMID:28515734

  5. Predictive Big Data Analytics: A Study of Parkinson’s Disease Using Large, Complex, Heterogeneous, Incongruent, Multi-Source and Incomplete Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Heavner, Ben; Tang, Ming; Glusman, Gustavo; Chard, Kyle; Darcy, Mike; Madduri, Ravi; Pa, Judy; Spino, Cathie; Kesselman, Carl; Foster, Ian; Deutsch, Eric W.; Price, Nathan D.; Van Horn, John D.; Ames, Joseph; Clark, Kristi; Hood, Leroy; Hampstead, Benjamin M.; Dauer, William; Toga, Arthur W.

    2016-01-01

    Background A unique archive of Big Data on Parkinson’s Disease is collected, managed and disseminated by the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI). The integration of such complex and heterogeneous Big Data from multiple sources offers unparalleled opportunities to study the early stages of prevalent neurodegenerative processes, track their progression and quickly identify the efficacies of alternative treatments. Many previous human and animal studies have examined the relationship of Parkinson’s disease (PD) risk to trauma, genetics, environment, co-morbidities, or life style. The defining characteristics of Big Data–large size, incongruency, incompleteness, complexity, multiplicity of scales, and heterogeneity of information-generating sources–all pose challenges to the classical techniques for data management, processing, visualization and interpretation. We propose, implement, test and validate complementary model-based and model-free approaches for PD classification and prediction. To explore PD risk using Big Data methodology, we jointly processed complex PPMI imaging, genetics, clinical and demographic data. Methods and Findings Collective representation of the multi-source data facilitates the aggregation and harmonization of complex data elements. This enables joint modeling of the complete data, leading to the development of Big Data analytics, predictive synthesis, and statistical validation. Using heterogeneous PPMI data, we developed a comprehensive protocol for end-to-end data characterization, manipulation, processing, cleaning, analysis and validation. Specifically, we (i) introduce methods for rebalancing imbalanced cohorts, (ii) utilize a wide spectrum of classification methods to generate consistent and powerful phenotypic predictions, and (iii) generate reproducible machine-learning based classification that enables the reporting of model parameters and diagnostic forecasting based on new data. We evaluated several

  6. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lin X.; Shelby, Megan L.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Jackson, Nicholas E.; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Mara, Michael W.; Stickrath, Andrew B.; Zhu, Diling; Lemke, Henrik; Chollet, Matthieu; Hoffman, Brian M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    This report will describe our recent studies of transition metal complex structural dynamics on the fs and ps time scales using an X-ray free electron laser source, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Ultrafast XANES spectra at the Ni K-edge of nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP) were successfully measured for optically excited state at a timescale from 100 fs to 50 ps, providing insight into its sub-ps electronic and structural relaxation processes. Importantly, a transient reduced state Ni(I) (π, 3dx2-y2) electronic state is captured through the interpretation of a short-lived excited state absorption on the low-energy shoulder of the edge, which is aided by the computation of X-ray transitions for postulated excited electronic states. The observed and computed inner shell to valence orbital transition energies demonstrate and quantify the influence of electronic configuration on specific metal orbital energies. A strong influence of the valence orbital occupation on the inner shell orbital energies indicates that one should not use the transition energy from 1s to other orbitals to draw conclusions about the d-orbital energies. For photocatalysis, a transient electronic configuration could influence d-orbital energies up to a few eV and any attempt to steer the reaction pathway should account for this to ensure that external energies can be used optimally in driving desirable processes. NiTMP structural evolution and the influence of the porphyrin macrocycle conformation on relaxation kinetics can be likewise inferred from this study.

  7. Ecohydrological responses of dense canopies to environmental variability: 2. Role of acclimation under elevated CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewry, D. T.; Kumar, P.; Long, S.; Bernacchi, C.; Liang, X.-Z.; Sivapalan, M.

    2010-12-01

    The ability to accurately predict land-atmosphere exchange of mass, energy, and momentum over the coming century requires the consideration of plant biochemical, ecophysiological, and structural acclimation to modifications of the ambient environment. Amongst the most important environmental changes experienced by terrestrial vegetation over the last century has been the increase in ambient carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, with a projected doubling in CO2 from preindustrial levels by the middle of this century. This change in atmospheric composition has been demonstrated to significantly alter a variety of leaf and plant properties across a range of species, with the potential to modify land-atmosphere interactions and their associated feedbacks. Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) technology has provided significant insight into the functioning of vegetation in natural conditions under elevated CO2, but remains limited in its ability to quantify the exchange of CO2, water vapor, and energy at the canopy scale. This paper addresses the roles of ecophysiological, biochemical, and structural plant acclimation on canopy-scale exchange of CO2, water vapor, and energy through the application of a multilayer canopy-root-soil model (MLCan) capable of resolving changes induced by elevated CO2 through the canopy and soil systems. Previous validation of MLCan flux estimates were made for soybean and maize in the companion paper using a record of six growing seasons of eddy covariance data from the Bondville Ameriflux site. Observations of leaf-level photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and surface temperature collected at the SoyFACE experimental facility in central Illinois provide a basis for examining the ability of MLCan to capture vegetation responses to an enriched CO2 environment. Simulations of control (370 [ppm]) and elevated (550 [ppm]) CO2 environments allow for an examination of the vertical variation and canopy-scale responses of vegetation states and fluxes

  8. Relative crystallinity of plant biomass: studies on assembly, adaptation and acclimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darby Harris

    Full Text Available Plant biomechanical design is central to cell shape, morphogenesis, reproductive performance and protection against environmental and mechanical stress. The cell wall forms the central load bearing support structure for plant design, yet a mechanistic understanding of its synthesis is incomplete. A key tool for studying the structure of cellulose polymorphs has been x-ray diffraction and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Relative crystallinity index (RCI is based on the x-ray diffraction characteristics of two signature peaks and we used this technique to probe plant assembly, adaptation and acclimation. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize the dynamics of cellulose synthase in transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a homozygous YFP::CESA6. Assembly: RCI values for stems and roots were indistinguishable but leaves had 23.4 and 21.6% lower RCI than stems and roots respectively. Adaptation: over 3-fold variability in RCI was apparent in leaves from 35 plant species spanning Ordovician to Cretaceous periods. Within this study, RCI correlated positively with leaf geometric constraints and with mass per unit area, suggestive of allometry. Acclimation: biomass crystallinity was found to decrease under conditions of thigmomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis. Further, in etiolated pea hypocotyls, RCI values also decreased compared to plants that were grown in light, consistent with alterations in FTIR cellulose fingerprint peaks and live cell imaging experiments revealing rapid orientation of the YFP::cellulose synthase-6 array in response to light. Herein, results and technical challenges associated with the structure of the cell wall that gives rise to sample crystallinity are presented and examined with respect to adaptation, acclimation and assembly in ecosystem-level processes.

  9. High-temperature sensitivity and its acclimation for photosynthetic electron reactions of desert succulents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetti, M.B.; Nobel, P.S. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1987-08-01

    Photosynthetic electron reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increase in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60{degree}C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30{degree}C/20{degree}C, treatment at 50{degree}C cause these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30{degree}C/20{degree}C to 45{degree}C/35{degree}C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3{degree}C to 8{degree}C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45{degree}C/35{degree}C plants treated at 60{degree}C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plants so far reported.

  10. Copper uptake kinetics and regulation in a marine fish after waterborne copper acclimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang Fei; Zhong Huan [AMCE and Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [AMCE and Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2009-09-14

    The uptake kinetics and regulation of copper in a marine predatory fish, the black sea bream Acanthopagrus schlegeli after acclimation to waterborne Cu were examined, using radiotracer techniques. The dissolved Cu uptake followed a linear pattern during the time of exposure, and the calculated uptake rate constant was 6.24 L kg{sup -1} day{sup -1}. The efflux rate constant was 0.091 day{sup -1} following dietary uptake of Cu, and the dietary assimilation efficiency (AE) of Cu varied between 1.7% and 10.9% after the fish were fed with three types of prey (oysters, clams and brine shrimp). After the fish were acclimated at a nominal concentration of 50 {mu}g Cu L{sup -1} for 14 days, the Cu uptake rate and efflux rate constant did not change significantly, but the Cu body concentrations and metallothionein (MT) concentrations in fish tissues increased significantly. Subcellular Cu distributions were also modified. Significant MT induction was observed in response to increased Cu tissue concentrations, indicating that MT rather than the uptake kinetics may play a primary role in Cu regulation during waterborne Cu acclimation in this marine fish. Moreover, the high Cu efflux may also be important in Cu regulation during long-term exposure. Our modeling calculations indicated that dietary uptake was likely to be the main route for Cu bioaccumulation in the fish, and the relative contribution of waterborne and dietary uptake depended on the bioconcentration factor (BCF) of the prey and ingestion rate of fish.

  11. Sensitivity and Acclimation of Three Canopy-Forming Seaweeds to UVB Radiation and Warming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Xiao

    Full Text Available Canopy-forming seaweeds, as primary producers and foundation species, provide key ecological services. Their responses to multiple stressors associated with climate change could therefore have important knock-on effects on the functioning of coastal ecosystems. We examined interactive effects of UVB radiation and warming on juveniles of three habitat-forming subtidal seaweeds from Western Australia-Ecklonia radiata, Scytothalia dorycarpa and Sargassum sp. Fronds were incubated for 14 days at 16-30°C with or without UVB radiation and growth, health status, photosynthetic performance, and light absorbance measured. Furthermore, we used empirical models from the metabolic theory of ecology to evaluate the sensitivity of these important seaweeds to ocean warming. Results indicated that responses to UVB and warming were species specific, with Sargassum showing highest tolerance to a broad range of temperatures. Scytothalia was most sensitive to elevated temperature based on the reduced maximum quantum yields of PSII; however, Ecklonia was most sensitive, according to the comparison of activation energy calculated from Arrhenius' model. UVB radiation caused reduction in the growth, physiological responses and thallus health in all three species. Our findings indicate that Scytothalia was capable of acclimating in response to UVB and increasing its light absorption efficiency in the UV bands, probably by up-regulating synthesis of photoprotective compounds. The other two species did not acclimate over the two weeks of exposure to UVB. Overall, UVB and warming would severely inhibit the growth and photosynthesis of these canopy-forming seaweeds and decrease their coverage. Differences in the sensitivity and acclimation of major seaweed species to temperature and UVB may alter the balance between species in future seaweed communities under climate change.

  12. Sensitivity and Acclimation of Three Canopy-Forming Seaweeds to UVB Radiation and Warming

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Xi

    2015-12-02

    Canopy-forming seaweeds, as primary producers and foundation species, provide key ecological services. Their responses to multiple stressors associated with climate change could therefore have important knock-on effects on the functioning of coastal ecosystems. We examined interactive effects of UVB radiation and warming on juveniles of three habitat-forming subtidal seaweeds from Western Australia–Ecklonia radiata, Scytothalia dorycarpa and Sargassum sp. Fronds were incubated for 14 days at 16–30°C with or without UVB radiation and growth, health status, photosynthetic performance, and light absorbance measured. Furthermore, we used empirical models from the metabolic theory of ecology to evaluate the sensitivity of these important seaweeds to ocean warming. Results indicated that responses to UVB and warming were species specific, with Sargassum showing highest tolerance to a broad range of temperatures. Scytothalia was most sensitive to elevated temperature based on the reduced maximum quantum yields of PSII; however, Ecklonia was most sensitive, according to the comparison of activation energy calculated from Arrhenius’ model. UVB radiation caused reduction in the growth, physiological responses and thallus health in all three species. Our findings indicate that Scytothalia was capable of acclimating in response to UVB and increasing its light absorption efficiency in the UV bands, probably by up-regulating synthesis of photoprotective compounds. The other two species did not acclimate over the two weeks of exposure to UVB. Overall, UVB and warming would severely inhibit the growth and photosynthesis of these canopy-forming seaweeds and decrease their coverage. Differences in the sensitivity and acclimation of major seaweed species to temperature and UVB may alter the balance between species in future seaweed communities under climate change.

  13. Characterization of the peripheral thyroid system of gilthead seabream acclimated to different ambient salinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Jarabo, I; Klaren, P H M; Louro, B; Martos-Sitcha, J A; Pinto, P I S; Vargas-Chacoff, L; Flik, G; Martínez-Rodríguez, G; Power, D M; Mancera, J M; Arjona, F J

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are involved in many developmental and physiological processes, including osmoregulation. The regulation of the thyroid system by environmental salinity in the euryhaline gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) is still poorly characterized. To this end seabreams were exposed to four different environmental salinities (5, 15, 40 and 55ppt) for 14days, and plasma free thyroid hormones (fT3, fT4), outer ring deiodination and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities in gills and kidney, as well as other osmoregulatory and metabolic parameters were measured. Low salinity conditions (5ppt) elicited a significant increase in fT3 (29%) and fT4 (184%) plasma concentrations compared to control animals (acclimated to 40ppt, natural salinity conditions in the Bay of Cádiz, Spain), while the amount of pituitary thyroid stimulating hormone subunit β (tshb) transcript abundance remained unchanged. In addition, plasma fT4 levels were positively correlated to renal and branchial deiodinase type 2 (dio2) mRNA expression. Gill and kidney T4-outer ring deiodination activities correlated positively with dio2 mRNA expression and the highest values were observed in fish acclimated to low salinities (5 and 15ppt). The high salinity (55ppt) exposure caused a significant increase in tshb expression (65%), but deiodinase gene expression (dio1 and dio2) and activity did not change and were similar to controls (40ppt). In conclusion, acclimation to different salinities led to changes in the peripheral regulation of thyroid hormone metabolism in seabream. Therefore, thyroid hormones are involved in the regulation of ion transport and osmoregulatory physiology in this species. The conclusions derived from this study may also allow aquaculturists to modulate thyroid metabolism in seabream by adjusting culture salinity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential remodeling of the lipidome during cold acclimation in natural accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenkolbe, Thomas; Giavalisco, Patrick; Zuther, Ellen; Seiwert, Bettina; Hincha, Dirk K; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2012-12-01

    Freezing injury is a major factor limiting the geographical distribution of plant species and the growth and yield of crop plants. Plants from temperate climates are able to increase their freezing tolerance during exposure to low but non-freezing temperatures in a process termed cold acclimation. Damage to cellular membranes is the major cause of freezing injury in plants, and membrane lipid composition is strongly modified during cold acclimation. Forward and reverse genetic approaches have been used to probe the role of specific lipid-modifying enzymes in the freezing tolerance of plants. In the present paper we describe an alternative ecological genomics approach that relies on the natural genetic variation within a species. Arabidopsis thaliana has a wide geographical range throughout the Northern Hemisphere with significant natural variation in freezing tolerance that was used for a comparative analysis of the lipidomes of 15 Arabidopsis accessions using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to Fourier-transform mass spectrometry, allowing the detection of 180 lipid species. After 14 days of cold acclimation at 4°C the plants from most accessions had accumulated massive amounts of storage lipids, with most of the changes in long-chain unsaturated triacylglycerides, while the total amount of membrane lipids was only slightly changed. Nevertheless, major changes in the relative amounts of different membrane lipids were also evident. The relative abundance of several lipid species was highly correlated with the freezing tolerance of the accessions, allowing the identification of possible marker lipids for plant freezing tolerance. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Acclimation of shade-tolerant and light-resistant Tradescantia species to growth light: chlorophyll a fluorescence, electron transport, and xanthophyll content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanin, Vladimir I; Trubitsin, Boris V; Patsaeva, Svetlana V; Ptushenko, Vasily V; Solovchenko, Alexei E; Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we have compared the photosynthetic characteristics of two contrasting species of Tradescantia plants, T. fluminensis (shade-tolerant species), and T. sillamontana (light-resistant species), grown under the low light (LL, 50-125 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) or high light (HL, 875-1000 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) conditions during their entire growth period. For monitoring the functional state of photosynthetic apparatus (PSA), we measured chlorophyll (Chl) a emission fluorescence spectra and kinetics of light-induced changes in the heights of fluorescence peaks at 685 and 740 nm (F 685 and F 740). We also compared the light-induced oxidation of P700 and assayed the composition of carotenoids in Tradescantia leaves grown under the LL and HL conditions. The analyses of slow induction of Chl a fluorescence (SIF) uncovered different traits in the LL- and HL-grown plants of ecologically contrasting Tradescantia species, which may have potential ecophysiological significance with respect to their tolerance to HL stress. The fluorometry and EPR studies of induction events in chloroplasts in situ demonstrated that acclimation of both Tradescantia species to HL conditions promoted faster responses of their PSA as compared to LL-grown plants. Acclimation of both species to HL also caused marked changes in the leaf anatomy and carotenoid composition (an increase in Violaxanthin + Antheraxantin + Zeaxanthin and Lutein pools), suggesting enhanced photoprotective capacity of the carotenoids in the plants grown in nature under high irradiance. Collectively, the results of the present work suggest that the mechanisms of long-term PSA photoprotection in Tradescantia are based predominantly on the light-induced remodeling of pigment-protein complexes in chloroplasts.

  16. High light acclimation in the secondary plastids containing diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum is triggered by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Bernard; Sturm, Sabine; Rogato, Alessandra; Gruber, Ansgar; Sachse, Matthias; Falciatore, Angela; Kroth, Peter G; Lavaud, Johann

    2013-02-01

    In diatoms, the process of energy-dependent chlorophyll fluorescence quenching (qE) has an important role in photoprotection. Three components are essential for qE: (1) the light-dependent generation of a transthylakoidal proton gradient; (2) the deepoxidation of the xanthophyll diadinoxanthin (Dd) into diatoxanthin (Dt); and (3) specific nucleus-encoded antenna proteins, called Light Harvesting Complex Protein X (LHCX). We used the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum to investigate the concerted light acclimation response of the qE key components LHCX, proton gradient, and xanthophyll cycle pigments (Dd+Dt) and to identify the intracellular light-responsive trigger. At high-light exposure, the up-regulation of three of the LHCX genes and the de novo synthesis of Dd+Dt led to a pronounced rise of qE. By inhibiting either the conversion of Dd to Dt or the translation of LHCX genes, qE amplification was abolished and the diatom cells suffered from stronger photoinhibition. Artificial modification of the redox state of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool via 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and 5-dibromo-6-isopropyl-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone resulted in a disturbance of Dd+Dt synthesis in an opposite way. Moreover, we could increase the transcription of two of the four LHCX genes under low-light conditions by reducing the PQ pool using 5-dibromo-6-isopropyl-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone. Altogether, our results underline the central role of the redox state of the PQ pool in the light acclimation of diatoms. Additionally, they emphasize strong evidence for the existence of a plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling mechanism in an organism with plastids that derived from secondary endosymbiosis.

  17. High Light Acclimation in the Secondary Plastids Containing Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum is Triggered by the Redox State of the Plastoquinone Pool1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Bernard; Sturm, Sabine; Rogato, Alessandra; Gruber, Ansgar; Sachse, Matthias; Falciatore, Angela; Kroth, Peter G.; Lavaud, Johann

    2013-01-01

    In diatoms, the process of energy-dependent chlorophyll fluorescence quenching (qE) has an important role in photoprotection. Three components are essential for qE: (1) the light-dependent generation of a transthylakoidal proton gradient; (2) the deepoxidation of the xanthophyll diadinoxanthin (Dd) into diatoxanthin (Dt); and (3) specific nucleus-encoded antenna proteins, called Light Harvesting Complex Protein X (LHCX). We used the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum to investigate the concerted light acclimation response of the qE key components LHCX, proton gradient, and xanthophyll cycle pigments (Dd+Dt) and to identify the intracellular light-responsive trigger. At high-light exposure, the up-regulation of three of the LHCX genes and the de novo synthesis of Dd+Dt led to a pronounced rise of qE. By inhibiting either the conversion of Dd to Dt or the translation of LHCX genes, qE amplification was abolished and the diatom cells suffered from stronger photoinhibition. Artificial modification of the redox state of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool via 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and 5-dibromo-6-isopropyl-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone resulted in a disturbance of Dd+Dt synthesis in an opposite way. Moreover, we could increase the transcription of two of the four LHCX genes under low-light conditions by reducing the PQ pool using 5-dibromo-6-isopropyl-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone. Altogether, our results underline the central role of the redox state of the PQ pool in the light acclimation of diatoms. Additionally, they emphasize strong evidence for the existence of a plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling mechanism in an organism with plastids that derived from secondary endosymbiosis. PMID:23209128

  18. Metabolic acclimation of tetraploid and hexaploid wheats by cold stress-induced carbohydrate accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahryar, Negin; Maali-Amiri, Reza

    2016-10-01

    Metabolic acclimation of plants to cold stress may be of great importance for their growth, survival and crop productivity. The accumulation carbohydrates associated with cold tolerance (CT), transcript levels for genes encoding related enzymes along with damage indices were comparatively studied in three genotypes of bread and durum wheats differing in sensitivity. Two (Norstar, bread wheat and Gerdish, durum wheat) were tolerant and the other, SRN (durum wheat), was susceptible to cold stress. During cold stress (-5°C for 24h), the contents of electrolyte leakage index (ELI) in Norstar and then Gerdish plants were lower than that of SRN plants, particularly in cold acclimated (CA) plants (4°C for 14days), confirming lethal temperature 50 (LT50) under field conditions. Increased carbohydrate abundances in the cases of sucrose, glucose, fructose, hexose phosphates, fructan, raffinose, arabinose resulted in different intensities of oxidative stress in bread (Norstar) plants compared to durum plants (SRN and Gerdish) plants as well as in CA plants compared to non-acclimated (NA) ones under cold, indicating metabolic/regulatory capacity along with a decrease in ELI content and enhanced defense activities. A significant decrease in these carbohydrates, particularly sucrose, under cold in NA plants showed an elevated level of cell damage (confirmed by ELI) compared to CA plants. On the other hand, an increase in hexose phosphates, particularly in NA plants, indicated sucrose degradation along with greater production of glucose and fructose compared to CA plants. Under such conditions, a significant increase in transcript levels of sucrose synthase and acidic invertase confirmed these results. Under cold, the high ABA-containing genotypes like Norstar and then Gerdish, which were obvious in CA plants, partly induced relative acclimation of cells for acquisition of CT compared to SRN. These results reveal an important role of carbohydrate metabolism in creating CT in

  19. Effect of acclimation to high ambient temperature of pigs selected for residual feed intake

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Paulo Henrique Reis Furtado

    2011-01-01

    Thirty-six Large White castrate males belonging to two divergent lines in residual feed intake, with average initial body weight of 50.5 ± 0.9 kg and approximately 92 days of age, were used to evaluate the effects of acclimation to high temperature on the performance, thermoregulatory responses and blood parameters of pigs divergently selected for low and high residual feed intake. The experiment was conducted in two successive replicates of 18 animals each. The first replicate was composed b...

  20. Cortisol regulates nitric oxide synthase in freshwater and seawater acclimated rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerber, Lucie; Madsen, Steffen S; Jensen, Frank B

    2017-01-01

    Cortisol and nitric oxide (NO) are regulators of ion transport and metabolic functions in fish. In the gill, they show opposite effects on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity: cortisol stimulates NKA activity while NO inhibits NKA activity. We hypothesized that cortisol may impact NO production...... in osmoregulatory tissues by regulating NO synthase (NOS) expression. We evaluated the influence of cortisol treatment on mRNA expression of Nos1 and Nos2 in gill, kidney and middle intestine of both freshwater (FW) and seawater (SW) acclimated rainbow trout and found both tissue- and salinity-dependent effects...

  1. WCS120 protein family and proteins soluble upon boiling in cold-acclimated winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitamvas, P.; Saalbach, Gerhard; Prasil, I.T.

    2007-01-01

    The amount of proteins soluble upon boiling (especially WCS120 proteins) and the ability to develop frost tolerance (FT) after cold acclimation was studied in two frost-tolerant winter wheat cultivars, Mironovskaya 808 and Bezostaya 1. Protein get Not analysis, mass spectrometry (MS) and image...... analysis of total sample of proteins soluble upon boiling showed seven COR proteins in the CA samples and only three COR proteins in the NA samples of cultivar Mironovskaya 808 (MIR). In conclusion, the Level of the accumulation of WCS120, WCS66 and WCS40 distinguished our two frost-tolerant winter wheat...

  2. The mechanism of the acclimation of Nannochloropsis oceanica to freshwater deduced from its transcriptome profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Yang, Guanpin

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we compared the transcriptomes of Nannochloropsis oceanica cultured in f/2 medium prepared with sea-water and freshwater, respectively, aiming to understand the acclimation mechanism of this alga to freshwater. Differentially expressed genes were mainly assigned to the degradation of cell components, ion transportation, and ribosomal biogenesis. These findings indicate that the algal cells degrade its components (mainly amino acids and fatty acids) to yield excessive energy (ATP) to maintain cellular ion (mainly K+ and Ca2+) homeostasis, while the depletion of amino acids and ATP, and the reduction of ribosomes attenuate the protein translation and finally slow down the cell growth.

  3. Data on the density of xanthophores in a whole scale of goldfish acclimated to white or black background color

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanta Mizusawa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Expression of genes for melanotropic peptides and their receptors for morphological color change in goldfish Carassius auratus” (Mizusawa et al., In press [1]. This article describes data on the density of xanthophores in the scales of goldfish acclimated to white or black background color. To determine the effects of acclimation history during long-term background color adaptation, fish were transferred from a white tank to a white or black tank and vice versa halfway through the acclimation process. To observe xanthophores, the iridophore layer was scraped from the scale and the pteridine/carotenoid pigments were aggregated. The number of xanthophores was calculated after image processing.

  4. Temperature acclimation and heat tolerance of photosynthesis in Norwegian Saccharina latissima (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogn Andersen, Guri; Pedersen, Morten Foldager; Nielsen, Søren Laurentius

    2013-01-01

    . We investigated the potential for thermal acclimation and heat tolerance in S. latissima collected from three locations along the south coast of Norway. Plants were kept in laboratory cultures at three different growth temperatures (10, 15, and 20°C) for 4–6 weeks, after which their photosynthetic...... is a cold-temperate species, and increasing seawater temperature has been suggested as one of the major causes of the decline. Several studies have shown that S. latissima can acclimate to a wide range of temperatures. However, local adaptations may render the extrapolation of existing results inappropriate...... performance, fluorescence parameters, and pigment concentrations were measured. S. latissima obtained almost identical photosynthetic characteristics when grown at 10 and 15°C, indicating thermal acclimation at these temperatures. In contrast, plants grown at 20°C suffered substantial tissue deterioration...

  5. Iron-sulfur proteins are the major source of protein-bound dinitrosyl iron complexes formed in Escherichia coli cells under nitric oxide stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Aaron P; Duan, Xuewu; Huang, Hao; Ding, Huangen

    2011-06-01

    Protein-bound dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) have been observed in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells under nitric oxide (NO) stress. The identity of proteins that bind DNICs, however, still remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that iron-sulfur proteins are the major source of protein-bound DNICs formed in Escherichia coli cells under NO stress. Expression of recombinant iron-sulfur proteins, but not proteins without iron-sulfur clusters, almost doubles the amount of protein-bound DNICs formed in E. coli cells after NO exposure. Purification of recombinant proteins from the NO-exposed E. coli cells further confirms that iron-sulfur proteins, but not proteins without iron-sulfur clusters, are modified, forming protein-bound DNICs. Deletion of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins IscA and SufA to block the [4Fe-4S] cluster biogenesis in E. coli cells largely eliminates the NO-mediated formation of protein-bound DNICs, suggesting that iron-sulfur clusters are mainly responsible for the NO-mediated formation of protein-bound DNICs in cells. Furthermore, depletion of the "chelatable iron pool" in wild-type E. coli cells effectively removes iron-sulfur clusters from proteins and concomitantly diminishes the NO-mediated formation of protein-bound DNICs, indicating that iron-sulfur clusters in proteins constitute at least part of the chelatable iron pool in cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Invasive cyprinid fish in Europe originate from the single introduction of an admixed source population followed by a complex pattern of spread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Simon

    Full Text Available The Asian cyprinid fish, the topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva, was introduced into Europe in the 1960s. A highly invasive freshwater fish, it is currently found in at least 32 countries outside its native range. Here we analyse a 700 base pair fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene to examine different models of colonisation and spread within the invasive range, and to investigate the factors that may have contributed to their invasion success. Haplotype and nucleotide diversity of the introduced populations from continental Europe was higher than that of the native populations, although two recently introduced populations from the British Isles showed low levels of variability. Based on coalescent theory, all introduced and some native populations showed a relative excess of nucleotide diversity compared to haplotype diversity. This suggests that these populations are not in mutation-drift equilibrium, but rather that the relative inflated level of nucleotide diversity is consistent with recent admixture. This study elucidates the colonisation patterns of P. parva in Europe and provides an evolutionary framework of their invasion. It supports the hypothesis that their European colonisation was initiated by their introduction to a single location or small geographic area with subsequent complex pattern of spread including both long distance and stepping-stone dispersal. Furthermore, it was preceded by, or associated with, the admixture of genetically diverse source populations that may have augmented its invasive-potential.

  7. ZnS, CdS and HgS Nanoparticles via Alkyl-Phenyl Dithiocarbamate Complexes as Single Source Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Ajibade

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of II-VI semiconductor nanoparticles obtained by the thermolysis of certain group 12 metal complexes as precursors is reported. Thermogravimetric analysis of the single source precursors showed sharp decomposition leading to their respective metal sulfides. The structural and optical properties of the prepared nanoparticles were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM UV-Vis and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the prepared ZnS nanoparticles have a cubic sphalerite structure; the CdS indicates a hexagonal phase and the HgS show the presence of metacinnabar phase. The TEM image demonstrates that the ZnS nanoparticles are dot-shaped, the CdS and the HgS clearly showed a rice and spherical morphology respectively. The UV-Vis spectra exhibited a blue-shift with respect to that of the bulk samples which is attributed to the quantum size effect. The band gap of the samples have been calculated from absorption spectra and werefound to be about 4.33 eV (286 nm, 2.91 eV (426 nm and 4.27 eV (290 nm for the ZnS, CdS and HgS samples respectively.

  8. Acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to irradiance in tree canopies in relation to leaf nitrogen concentration and leaf mass per unit area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meir, P.; Kruijt, B.; Broadmeadow, M.; Barbosa, E.; Kull, O.; Carswell, F.; Nobre, A.; Jarvis, P.G.

    2002-01-01

    The observation of acclimation in leaf photosynthetic capacity to differences in growth irradiance has been widely used as support for a hypothesis that enables a simplification of some soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) photosynthesis models. The acclimation hypothesis requires that

  9. Effects of both ecdysone and the acclimation to low temperature, on growth and metabolic rate of juvenile freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (Decapoda, Parastacidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk Chaulet

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Growth, metabolic rate, and energy reserves of Cherax quadricarinatus (von Martens, 1868 juveniles were evaluated in crayfish acclimated for 16 weeks to either 25ºC (temperature near optimum or 20ºC (marginal for the species. Additionally, the modulating effect of ecdsyone on acclimation was studied. After 12 weeks of exposure, weight gain of both experimental groups acclimated to 25ºC (control: C25, and ecdysone treated: E25 was significantly higher than that of those groups acclimated to 20ºC (C20 and E20. A total compensation in metabolic rate was seen after acclimation from 25ºC to 20ºC; for both the control group and the group treated with ecdysone. A Q10value significantly higher was only observed in the group acclimated to 20ºC and treated with ecdysone. A reduction of glycogen reserves in both hepatopancreas and muscle, as well as a lower protein content in muscle, was seen in both groups acclimated to 20ºC. Correspondingly, glycemia was always higher in these groups. Increased lipid levels were seen in the hepatopancreas of animals acclimated to 20ºC, while a higher lipid level was also observed in muscle at 20ºC, but only in ecdysone-treated crayfish.

  10. Induction of DREB2A pathway with repression of E2F, Jasmonic acid biosynthetic and photosynthesis pathways in cold acclimation specific freeze resistant wheat crown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter wheat lines can achieve cold acclimation (development of tolerance to freezing temperatures) and vernalization (delay in transition from vegetative to reproductive phase) in response to low non-freezing temperatures. To describe cold acclimation specific processes and pathways, we utilized co...

  11. Heat acclimation responses of an ultra-endurance running group preparing for hot desert-based competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ricardo J S; Crockford, Michael J; Moore, Jonathan P; Walsh, Neil P

    2014-01-01

    Heat acclimation induces adaptations that improve exercise tolerance in hot conditions. Here we report novel findings into the effects of ultra-marathon specific exercise load in increasing hot ambient conditions on indices of heat acclimation. Six male ultra-endurance runners completed a standard pre-acclimation protocol at 20°C ambient temperature (T amb), followed by a heat acclimation protocol consisting of six 2 h running exercise-heat exposures (EH) at 60% VO2max on a motorised treadmill in an environmental chamber. Three EH were performed at 30°C T amb, followed by another three EH at 35°C T amb. EH were separated by 48 h within T amb and 72 h between T amb. Nude body mass (NBM), blood and urine samples were collected pre-exercise; while NBM and urine were collected post-exercise. Rectal temperature (T re), heart rate (HR), thermal comfort rating (TCR) and rating of perceived exertion were measured pre-exercise and monitored every 5 min during exercise. Water was provided ad libitum during exercise. Data were analysed using a repeated measures and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), with post hoc Tukey's HSD. Significance was accepted as Pheat acclimation in all ultra-endurance runners. Further, heat acclimation responses occurred with increasing EH to 35°C T amb. Preventing exertional heat illnesses and optimising performance outcomes in ultra-endurance runners may occur with exposure to at least 2 h of exercise-heat stress on at least two occasions in the days leading up to multi-stage ultra-marathon competition in the heat.

  12. Ascorbic Acid Biosynthesis and Brackish Water Acclimation in the Euryhaline Freshwater White-Rimmed Stingray, Himantura signifer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Z H Wong

    Full Text Available L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase (Gulo catalyzes the last step of ascorbic acid biosynthesis, which occurs in the kidney of elasmobranchs. This study aimed to clone and sequence gulonolactone oxidase (gulo from the kidney of the euryhaline freshwater stingray, Himantura signifer, and to determine the effects of acclimation from freshwater to brackish water (salinity 20 on its renal gulo mRNA expression and Gulo activity. We also examined the effects of brackish water acclimation on concentrations of ascorbate, dehydroascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the kidney, brain and gill. The complete cDNA coding sequence of gulo from the kidney of H. signifer contained 1323 bp coding for 440 amino acids. The expression of gulo was kidney-specific, and renal gulo expression decreased significantly by 67% and 50% in fish acclimated to brackish water for 1 day and 6 days, respectively. There was also a significant decrease in renal Gulo activity after 6 days of acclimation to brackish water. Hence, brackish water acclimation led to a decrease in the ascorbic acid synthetic capacity in the kidney of H. signifer. However, there were significant increases in concentrations of ascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the gills (after 1 or 6 days, and a significant increase in the concentration of ascorbate and a significant decrease in the concentration of dehydroascorbate in the brain (after 1 day of fish acclimated to brackish water. Taken together, our results indicate that H. signifer might experience greater salinity-induced oxidative stress in freshwater than in brackish water, possibly related to its short history of freshwater invasion. These results also suggest for the first time a possible relationship between the successful invasion of the freshwater environment by some euryhaline marine elasmobranchs and the ability of these elasmobranchs to increase the capacity of ascorbic acid synthesis in response to hyposalinity stress.

  13. Elevated temperature and acclimation time affect metabolic performance in the heavily exploited Nile perch of Lake Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyboer, Elizabeth A; Chapman, Lauren J

    2017-10-15

    Increasing water temperatures owing to anthropogenic climate change are predicted to negatively impact the aerobic metabolic performance of aquatic ectotherms. Specifically, it has been hypothesized that thermal increases result in reductions in aerobic scope (AS), which lead to decreases in energy available for essential fitness and performance functions. Consequences of warming are anticipated to be especially severe for warm-adapted tropical species as they are thought to have narrow thermal windows and limited plasticity for coping with elevated temperatures. In this study we test how predicted warming may affect the aerobic performance of Nile perch (Lates niloticus), a commercially harvested fish species in the Lake Victoria basin of East Africa. We measured critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and key metabolic variables such as AS and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) across a range of temperatures, and compared responses between acute (3-day) exposures and 3-week acclimations. CTmax increased with acclimation temperature; however, 3-week-acclimated fish had higher overall CTmax than acutely exposed individuals. Nile perch also showed the capacity to increase or maintain high AS even at temperatures well beyond their current range; however, acclimated Nile perch had lower AS compared with acutely exposed fish. These changes were accompanied by lower EPOC, suggesting that drops in AS may reflect improved energy utilization after acclimation, a finding that is supported by improvements in growth at high temperatures over the acclimation period. Overall, the results challenge predictions that tropical species have limited thermal plasticity, and that high temperatures will be detrimental because of limitations in AS. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. The metabolic, locomotor and sex-dependent effects of elevated temperature on Trinidadian guppies: limited capacity for acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Nicolas J; Breckels, Ross D; Neff, Bryan D

    2012-10-01

    Global warming poses a threat to many ectothermic organisms because of the harmful effects that elevated temperatures can have on resting metabolic rate (RMR) and body size. This study evaluated the thermal sensitivity of Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) by describing the effects of developmental temperature on mass, burst speed and RMR, and investigated whether these tropical fish can developmentally acclimate to their thermal conditions. These traits were measured following exposure to one of three treatments: 70 days at 23, 25, 28 or 30°C (acclimated groups); 6 h at 23, 28 or 30°C following 70 days at 25°C (unacclimated groups); or 6 h at 25°C following 70 days in another 25°C tank (control group). Body mass was lower in warmer temperatures, particularly amongst females and individuals reared at 30°C. The burst speed of fish acclimated to each temperature did not differ and was marginally higher than that of unacclimated fish, indicative of complete compensation. Conversely, acclimated and unacclimated fish did not differ in their RMR at each temperature. Amongst the acclimated groups, RMR was significantly higher at 30°C, indicating that guppies may become thermally limited at this temperature as a result of less energy being available for growth, reproduction and locomotion. Like other tropical ectotherms, guppies appear to be unable to adjust their RMR through physiological acclimation and may consequently be susceptible to rising temperatures. Also, because larger females have higher fecundity, our data suggest that fecundity will be reduced in a warmer climate, potentially decreasing the viability of guppy populations.

  15. Occupancy and Functional Architecture of the Pigment Binding Sites of Photosystem II Antenna Complex Lhcb5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballottari, Matteo; Mozzo, Milena; Croce, Roberta; Morosinotto, Tomas; Bassi, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Lhcb5 is an antenna protein that is highly conserved in plants and green algae. It is part of the inner layer of photosystem II antenna system retained in high light acclimated plants. To study the structure-function relation and the role of individual pigments in this complex, we (i) "knocked out"

  16. Pigment binding sites occupancy and functional architecture of the Photosystem II antenna complex Lhcb5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballottari, M.; Mozzo, M.; Croce, R.; Morosinotto, T.; Bassi, R.

    2009-01-01

    Lhcb5 is an antenna protein that is highly conserved in plants and green algae. It is part of the inner layer of photosystem II antenna system retained in high light acclimated plants. To study the structure-function relation and the role of individual pigments in this complex, we (i) "knocked out"

  17. Acclimation of photosynthetic characteristics of the moss Pleurozium schreberi to among-habitat and within-canopy light gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, M; Niinemets, U

    2010-09-01

    Light availability varies strongly among moss habitats and within the moss canopy, and vertical variation in light within the canopy further interacts with the age gradient. The interacting controls by habitat and canopy light gradient and senescence have not been studied extensively. We measured light profiles, chlorophyll (Chl), carotenoid (Car) and nitrogen (N) concentrations, and photosynthetic electron transport capacity (J(max)) along habitat and canopy light gradients in the widespread, temperate moss Pleurozium schreberi to separate sources of variation in moss chemical and physiological traits. We hypothesised that this species, like typical feather mosses with both apical and lateral growth, exhibits greater plasticity in the canopy than between habitats due to deeper within-canopy light gradients. For the among-habitat light gradient, Chl, Chl/N and Chl/Car ratio increased with decreasing light availability, indicating enhanced light harvesting in lower light and higher capacity for photoprotection in higher light. N and J(max) were independent of habitat light availability. Within the upper canopy, until 50-60% above-canopy light, changes in moss chemistry and photosynthetic characteristics were analogous to patterns observed for the between-habitat light gradient. In contrast, deeper canopy layers reflected senescence of moss shoots, with pigment and nitrogen concentrations and photosynthetic capacity decreasing with light availability. Thus, variation in chemical and physiological traits within the moss canopy is a balance between acclimation and senescence. This study demonstrates extensive light-dependent variation in moss photosynthetic traits, but also that between-habitat and within-canopy light gradient affects moss physiology and chemistry differently.

  18. A model of canopy photosynthesis incorporating protein distribution through the canopy and its acclimation to light, temperature and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ian R.; Thornley, John H. M.; Frantz, Jonathan M.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The distribution of photosynthetic enzymes, or nitrogen, through the canopy affects canopy photosynthesis, as well as plant quality and nitrogen demand. Most canopy photosynthesis models assume an exponential distribution of nitrogen, or protein, through the canopy, although this is rarely consistent with experimental observation. Previous optimization schemes to derive the nitrogen distribution through the canopy generally focus on the distribution of a fixed amount of total nitrogen, which fails to account for the variation in both the actual quantity of nitrogen in response to environmental conditions and the interaction of photosynthesis and respiration at similar levels of complexity. Model A model of canopy photosynthesis is presented for C3 and C4 canopies that considers a balanced approach between photosynthesis and respiration as well as plant carbon partitioning. Protein distribution is related to irradiance in the canopy by a flexible equation for which the exponential distribution is a special case. The model is designed to be simple to parameterize for crop, pasture and ecosystem studies. The amount and distribution of protein that maximizes canopy net photosynthesis is calculated. Key Results The optimum protein distribution is not exponential, but is quite linear near the top of the canopy, which is consistent with experimental observations. The overall concentration within the canopy is dependent on environmental conditions, including the distribution of direct and diffuse components of irradiance. Conclusions The widely used exponential distribution of nitrogen or protein through the canopy is generally inappropriate. The model derives the optimum distribution with characteristics that are consistent with observation, so overcoming limitations of using the exponential distribution. Although canopies may not always operate at an optimum, optimization analysis provides valuable insight into plant acclimation to environmental

  19. Refolding of β-stranded class I chitinases of Hippophae rhamnoides enhances the antifreeze activity during cold acclimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Gupta

    Full Text Available Class I chitinases hydrolyse the β-1,4-linkage of chitin and also acquire antifreeze activity in some of the overwintering plants during cold stress. Two chitinases, HrCHT1a of 31 kDa and HrCHT1b of 34 kDa, were purified from cold acclimated and non-acclimated seabuckthorn seedlings using chitin affinity chromatography. 2-D gels of HrCHT1a and HrCHT1b showed single spots with pIs 7.0 and 4.6 respectively. N-terminal sequence of HrCHT1b matched with the class I chitinase of rice and antifreeze proteins while HrCHT1a could not be sequenced as it was N-terminally blocked. Unlike previous reports, where antifreeze activity of chitinase was cold inducible, our results showed that antifreeze activity is constitutive property of class I chitinase as both HrCHT1a and HrCHT1b isolated even from non-acclimated seedlings, exhibited antifreeze activity. Interestingly, HrCHT1a and HrCHT1b purified from cold acclimated seedlings, exhibited 4 and 2 times higher antifreeze activities than those purified from non-acclimated seedlings, suggesting that antifreeze activity increased during cold acclimation. HrCHT1b exhibited 23-33% higher hydrolytic activity and 2-4 times lower antifreeze activity than HrCHT1a did. HrCHT1b was found to be a glycoprotein; however, its antifreeze activity was independent of glycosylation as even deglycosylated HrCHT1b exhibited antifreeze activity. Circular dichroism (CD analysis showed that both these chitinases were rich in unusual β-stranded conformation (36-43% and the content of β-strand increased (∼11% during cold acclimation. Surprisingly, calcium decreased both the activities of HrCHT1b while in case of HrCHT1a, a decrease in the hydrolytic activity and enhancement in its antifreeze activity was observed. CD results showed that addition of calcium also increased the β-stranded conformation of HrCHT1a and HrCHT1b. This is the first report, which shows that antifreeze activity is constitutive property of class I chitinase

  20. Refolding of β-stranded class I chitinases of Hippophae rhamnoides enhances the antifreeze activity during cold acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Deswal, Renu

    2014-01-01

    Class I chitinases hydrolyse the β-1,4-linkage of chitin and also acquire antifreeze activity in some of the overwintering plants during cold stress. Two chitinases, HrCHT1a of 31 kDa and HrCHT1b of 34 kDa, were purified from cold acclimated and non-acclimated seabuckthorn seedlings using chitin affinity chromatography. 2-D gels of HrCHT1a and HrCHT1b showed single spots with pIs 7.0 and 4.6 respectively. N-terminal sequence of HrCHT1b matched with the class I chitinase of rice and antifreeze proteins while HrCHT1a could not be sequenced as it was N-terminally blocked. Unlike previous reports, where antifreeze activity of chitinase was cold inducible, our results showed that antifreeze activity is constitutive property of class I chitinase as both HrCHT1a and HrCHT1b isolated even from non-acclimated seedlings, exhibited antifreeze activity. Interestingly, HrCHT1a and HrCHT1b purified from cold acclimated seedlings, exhibited 4 and 2 times higher antifreeze activities than those purified from non-acclimated seedlings, suggesting that antifreeze activity increased during cold acclimation. HrCHT1b exhibited 23-33% higher hydrolytic activity and 2-4 times lower antifreeze activity than HrCHT1a did. HrCHT1b was found to be a glycoprotein; however, its antifreeze activity was independent of glycosylation as even deglycosylated HrCHT1b exhibited antifreeze activity. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis showed that both these chitinases were rich in unusual β-stranded conformation (36-43%) and the content of β-strand increased (∼11%) during cold acclimation. Surprisingly, calcium decreased both the activities of HrCHT1b while in case of HrCHT1a, a decrease in the hydrolytic activity and enhancement in its antifreeze activity was observed. CD results showed that addition of calcium also increased the β-stranded conformation of HrCHT1a and HrCHT1b. This is the first report, which shows that antifreeze activity is constitutive property of class I chitinase and cold

  1. High-Throughput Small-Molecule Crystallography at the ‘Belok’ Beamline of the Kurchatov Synchrotron Radiation Source: Transition Metal Complexes with Azomethine Ligands as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Lazarenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper concisely describes capabilities of the ‘Belok’ beamline at the Kurchatov synchrotron radiation source, related to high-throughput small-molecule X-ray crystallography. As case examples, a series of four novel transition metal complexes with azomethine ligands were selected. The complexes demonstrate somewhat unexpected changes in the coordination geometry and nuclearity in response to the introduction of substituents in the ligand’s periphery.

  2. Thermoregulatory responses during thermal acclimation in pigs divergently selected for residual feed intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Paulo Henrique Reis Furtado; Noblet, Jean; Jaguelin-Peyraud, Yolande; Gilbert, Hélène; Mormède, Pierre; de Oliveira Donzele, Rita Flavia Miranda; Donzele, Juarez Lopes; Renaudeau, David

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance and thermoregulatory responses during acclimation to high ambient temperature (Ta) of pigs from two lines selected for high (RFI+) or low (RFI-) residual feed intake with the hypothesis that RFI- pigs producing less heat would better tolerate high Ta. Pigs (50 kg initial body weight; 17 per line among which 10 of them were catheterized) were individually housed in a climatic-controlled room where Ta was maintained at 24.2 ± 0.4 °C during 7 days and thereafter at 30.4 ± 0.7 °C during 14 days. Irrespective of Ta, RFI- pigs had lower feed intake (ADFI) and similar average daily gain (ADG) than RFI+ pigs. Whatever the line, ADFI, ADG, and feed efficiency decreased with increased Ta. Overall, the Ta increase resulted in an increase in rectal temperature (RT), skin temperature (ST), and respiratory rate (RR) within the first 24-48 h and, subsequently, in a decrease followed by stabilization. The RT decrease during acclimation occurred 24 h earlier in RFI- pigs than in RFI+. Thyroid hormones and cortisol decreased at high Ta and it was similar in both lines. Based on performance and RT, ST, and RR responses, it seems that selection for low RFI tends to ameliorate pigs' tolerance to high Ta. Nevertheless, this selection does not induce significant differences between lines in endocrine and metabolite responses during thermal stress.

  3. Disease and thermal acclimation in a more variable and unpredictable climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffel, Thomas R.; Romansic, John M.; Halstead, Neal T.; McMahon, Taegan A.; Venesky, Matthew D.; Rohr, Jason R.

    2013-02-01

    Global climate change is shifting the distribution of infectious diseases of humans and wildlife with potential adverse consequences for disease control. As well as increasing mean temperatures, climate change is expected to increase climate variability, making climate less predictable. However, few empirical or theoretical studies have considered the effects of climate variability or predictability on disease, despite it being likely that hosts and parasites will have differential responses to climatic shifts. Here we present a theoretical framework for how temperature variation and its predictability influence disease risk by affecting host and parasite acclimation responses. Laboratory experiments conducted in 80 independent incubators, and field data on disease-associated frog declines in Latin America, support the framework and provide evidence that unpredictable temperature fluctuations, on both monthly and diurnal timescales, decrease frog resistance to the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Furthermore, the pattern of temperature-dependent growth of the fungus on frogs was opposite to the pattern of growth in culture, emphasizing the importance of accounting for the host-parasite interaction when predicting climate-dependent disease dynamics. If similar acclimation responses influence other host-parasite systems, as seems likely, then present models, which generally ignore small-scale temporal variability in climate, might provide poor predictions for climate effects on disease.

  4. Thermal acclimation of photosynthesis: a comparison of boreal and temperate tree species along a latitudinal transect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillaway, Dylan N; Kruger, Eric L

    2010-06-01

    Common gardens were established along a approximately 900 km latitudinal transect to examine factors limiting geographical distributions of boreal and temperate tree species in eastern North America. Boreal representatives were trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.), while temperate species were eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr ex. Marsh var. deltoides) and sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.). The species were compared with respect to adjustments of leaf photosynthetic metabolism along the transect, with emphasis on temperature sensitivities of the maximum rate of ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylation (E(V)) and regeneration (E(J)). During leaf development, the average air temperature (T(growth)) differed between the coolest and warmest gardens by 12 degrees C. Evidence of photosynthetic thermal acclimation (metabolic shifts compensating for differences in T(growth)) was generally lacking in all species. Namely, neither E(V) nor E(J) was positively related to T(growth). Correspondingly, the optimum temperature (T(opt)) of ambient photosynthesis (A(sat)) did not vary significantly with T(growth). Modest variation in T(opt) was explained by the combination of E(V) plus the slope and curvature of the parabolic temperature response of mesophyll conductance (g(m)). All in all, species differed little in photosynthetic responses to climate. Furthermore, the adaptive importance of photosynthetic thermal acclimation was overshadowed by g(m)'s influence on A(sat)'s temperature response.

  5. Diet affects resting, but not basal metabolic rate of normothermic Siberian hamsters acclimated to winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, Jakub P; Wojciechowski, Michał S; Jefimow, Małgorzata

    2011-12-01

    We examined the effect of different dietary supplements on seasonal changes in body mass (m(b)), metabolic rate (MR) and nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) capacity in normothermic Siberian hamsters housed under semi-natural conditions. Once a week standard hamster food was supplemented with either sunflower and flax seeds, rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA), or mealworms, rich in saturated and monounsaturated FA. We found that neither of these dietary supplements affected the hamsters' normal winter decrease in m(b) and fat content nor their basal MR or NST capacity. NST capacity of summer-acclimated hamsters was lower than that of winter-acclimated ones. The composition of total body fat reflected the fat composition of the dietary supplements. Resting MR below the lower critical temperature of the hamsters, and their total serum cholesterol concentration were lower in hamsters fed a diet supplemented with mealworms than in hamsters fed a diet supplemented with seeds. These results indicate that in mealworm-fed hamsters energy expenditure in the cold is lower than in animals eating a seed-supplemented diet, and that the degree of FA unsaturation of diet affects energetics of heterotherms, not only during torpor, but also during normothermy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Coordinated Regulations of mRNA Synthesis and Decay during Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis Cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Arae, Toshihiro

    2017-04-18

    Plants possess a cold acclimation system to acquire freezing tolerance through pre-exposure to non-freezing low temperatures. The transcriptional cascade of C-repeat binding factors (CBFs)/dehydration response element-binding factors (DREBs) is considered a major transcriptional regulatory pathway during cold acclimation. However, little is known regarding the functional significance of mRNA stability regulation in the response of gene expression to cold stress. The actual level of individual mRNAs is determined by a balance between mRNA synthesis and degradation. Therefore, it is important to assess the regulatory steps to increase our understanding of gene regulation. Here, we analyzed temporal changes in mRNA amounts and half-lives in response to cold stress in Arabidopsis cell cultures based on genome-wide analysis. In this mRNA decay array method, mRNA half-life measurements and microarray analyses were combined. In addition, temporal changes in the integrated value of transcription rates were estimated from the above two parameters using a mathematical approach. Our results showed that several cold-responsive genes, including Cold-regulated 15a, were relatively destabilized, whereas the mRNA amounts were increased during cold treatment by accelerating the transcription rate to overcome the destabilization. Considering the kinetics of mRNA synthesis and degradation, this apparently contradictory result supports that mRNA destabilization is advantageous for the swift increase in CBF-responsive genes in response to cold stress.

  7. [Thermal preference and avoidance in cladoceran Daphnia magna strauss (Crustacea, Cladocera) acclimated to constant temperature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbitskiĭ, V B; Verbitskaia, T I

    2012-01-01

    The final preferable temperature (FPT) and avoidance temperature (AT) were determined in parthenogenetic females of the crustacean Daphnia magna Strauss. The animals were preliminary acclimated to constant temperature of 23.4 degrees C followed by keeping them in a thermo-gradient device for 24 days. It was revealed that daphnia select FPT with overshoot. In the first four days, daphnia selected temperatures 0.6-1.6 degrees C higher than the acclimation temperature and 4-7.4 degrees C higher than FPT. Two zones of FPT are revealed: the first zone by the time of 5-13 days (17.6 +/- 1.2 degrees C); the second, by 16-24 days (20 +/- 1.5 degrees C). The dynamics of AT diapason followed the dynamics of FPT. Two zones of the AT plateau were observed: over five to 17 days (temperatures 25.8 degrees C were avoided) and for 21-24 days (< 8.5 degrees C and 26 degrees C).

  8. THE RELIABILITY OF ADOLESCENT THERMOREGULATORY RESPONSES DURING A HEAT ACCLIMATION PROTOCOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Williams

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the between trial variation of thermoregulatory measures during a heat acclimation protocol. Eight 14-16 y old boys completed three bouts of 20-min cycling at 45 % peak VO2 in a hot environment (35.1 ± 1.2 °C and 46. 4 ± 1.0 % relative humidity on two occasions separated by a minimum of 24 h. Reliability was assessed through analysis of within-subject variation, the change in the mean, and retest correlation for measurements of aural temperature (Tau, mean skin temperature (Tsk, heart rate (HR and oxygen uptake (VO2. Between trial differences were low for Tau, Tskbout1, Tskbout2and3 and HR with coefficients of variation 0.6 %, 1.5 %, 0.5 % and 4.0 %, respectively. The results demonstrate good reliability that will allow future investigators to precisely determine the extent of heat acclimation protocols in relation to the measurement error

  9. The responses of tropical forest species to global climate change: acclimate, adapt, migrate, or go extinct?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Machovina

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the face of ongoing and future climate change, species must acclimate, adapt or shift their geographic distributions (i.e., "migrate" in order to avoid habitat loss and eventual extinction. Perhaps nowhere are the challenges posed by climate change more poignant and daunting than in tropical forests, which harbor the majority of Earth’s species and are facing especially rapid rates of climate change relative to current spatial or temporal variability. Due to the rapid changes in climate predicted for the tropics, coupled with the apparently low capacities of tropical tree species to either acclimate or adapt to sustained changes in environmental conditions, it is believed that the greatest hope for avoiding the loss of biodiversity in tropical forest is species migrations. This is supported by the fact that topical forests responded to historic changes in climate (e.g., post glacial warming through distributional shifts. However, a great deal of uncertainty remains as to if tropical plant and tree species can migrate, and if so, if they can migrate at the rates required to keep pace with accelerating changes in multiple climatic factors in conjunction with ongoing deforestation and other anthropogenic disturbances. In order to resolve this uncertainty, as will be required to predict, and eventually mitigate, the impacts of global climate change on tropical and global biodiversity, more basic data is required on the distributions and ecologies of tens of thousands of plants species in combination with more directed studies and large-scale experimental manipulations.

  10. Effects of elevated temperature on coral reef fishes: loss of hypoxia tolerance and inability to acclimate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Göran E; Ostlund-Nilsson, Sara; Munday, Philip L

    2010-08-01

    Water temperature is expected to rise on coral reefs due to global warming. Here, we have examined if increased temperature reduces the hypoxia tolerance of coral reef fish (measured as critical [O(2)]), and if temperature acclimation in adults can change the resting rate of O(2) consumption and critical [O(2)]. Two common species from Lizard Island (Great Barrier Reef, Australia) were tested, Doederlein's cardinalfish (Ostorhinchus doederleini) and lemon damselfish (Pomacentrus moluccensis). In both species, a 3 degrees C rise in water temperature caused increased oxygen consumption and reduced hypoxia tolerance, changes that were not reduced by acclimation to the higher temperature for 7 to 22 days. Critical [O(2)] increased by 71% in the cardinalfish and by 23% in the damselfish at 32 degrees C compared to 29 degrees C. The higher oxygen needs are likely to reduce the aerobic scope, which could negatively affect the capacity for feeding, growth and reproduction. The reduced hypoxia tolerance may force the fishes out of their nocturnal shelters in the coral matrix, exposing them to predation. The consequences for population and species survival could be severe unless developmental phenotypic plasticity within generations or genetic adaptation between generations could produce individuals that are more tolerant to a warmer future. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Flavonoids are determinants of freezing tolerance and cold acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Elisa; Tohge, Takayuki; Zuther, Ellen; Fernie, Alisdair R; Hincha, Dirk K

    2016-09-23

    In plants from temperate climates such as Arabidopsis thaliana low, non-freezing temperatures lead to increased freezing tolerance in a process termed cold acclimation. This process is accompanied by massive changes in gene expression and in the content of primary metabolites and lipids. In addition, most flavonols and anthocyanins accumulate upon cold exposure, along with most transcripts encoding transcription factors and enzymes of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. However, no evidence for a functional role of flavonoids in plant freezing tolerance has been shown. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis using qRT-PCR for transcript, LC-MS for flavonoid and GC-MS for primary metabolite measurements, and an electrolyte leakage assay to determine freezing tolerance of 20 mutant lines in two Arabidopsis accessions that are affected in different steps of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. This analysis provides evidence for a functional role of flavonoids in plant cold acclimation. The accumulation of flavonoids in the activation tagging mutant line pap1-D improved, while reduced flavonoid content in different knock-out mutants impaired leaf freezing tolerance. Analysis of the different knock-out mutants suggests redundancy of flavonoid structures, as the lack of flavonols or anthocyanins could be compensated by other compound classes.

  12. Acclimation of Hydrilla verticillata to sediment anoxia in vegetation restoration in eutrophic waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Dai, Yanran; Rui, Shengyang; Cui, Naxin; Zhong, Fei; Cheng, Shuiping

    2015-12-01

    Sediment anoxia generally results from intense organic enrichment and is a limiting factor in the restoration of vegetation in eutrophic waters. To investigate the effect of sediment anoxia on a typical pollution-tolerant submerged macrophyte species, Hydrilla verticillata, and acclimation mechanisms in the plant, a gradient of sediment anoxia was simulated with additions of sucrose to the sediment, which can stimulate increased concentrations of total nitrogen, NH4(+) and Fe in pore water. H. verticillata growth was significantly affected by highly anoxic conditions, as indicated by reduced total biomass in the 0.5 and 1% sucrose treatments. However, slight anoxia (0.1% sucrose addition) promoted growth, and the shoot biomass was 22.64% higher than in the control. In addition to morphologic alterations, H. verticillata showed physiological acclimations to anoxia, including increased anaerobic respiration and changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolism in roots. The soluble protein and soluble carbohydrate contents in roots of the 1% treatment were both significantly higher compared with those in the control. The increase in alcohol dehydrogenase activity and pyruvate content in the roots suggested that H. verticillata has a well-developed capacity for anaerobic fermentation. This study suggests that highly anoxic sediments inhibit the growth of H. verticillata and the species has a degree of tolerance to anoxic conditions. Further in situ investigations should be conducted on the interactions between sediment conditions and macrophytes to comprehensively evaluate the roles of sediment in the restoration of vegetation in eutrophic waters.

  13. Body mass, Thermogenesis and energy metabolism in Tupaia belangeri during cold acclimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-long Zhu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the relationship between energy strategies and environmental temperature, basal metabolic rate (BMR, nonshivering thermogenesis (NST, the total protein contents, mitochondrial protein contents, state and state respiratory ability, cytochrome C oxidase activity Ⅲ Ⅳ of liver, heart, diaphragm, gastrocnemius and brown adipose tissue (BAT, serum leptin level and serum thyroid hormone levels were measured in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri during cold exposure (5±1oC for 1 day, 7 days,14days,21 days. The results showed that body mass increased, BMR and NST increased, the change of liver mitochondrial protein content was more acutely than total protein. The mitochondrial protein content of heart and BAT were significantly increased during cold-exposed, however the skeletal muscle more moderate reaction. The state Ⅲ and state Ⅳ mitochondrial respiration of these tissues were enhanced significantly than the control. The cytochrome C oxidase activity with cold acclimation also significantly increased except the gastrocnemius. Liver, muscle, BAT, heart and other organs were concerned with thermoregulation during the thermal regulation process above cold-exposed. There is a negative correlation between leptin level and body mass. These results suggested that T. belangeri enhanced thermogenic capacity during cold acclimation, and leptin participated in the regulation of energy balance and body weight in T. belangeri.

  14. Thermoregulation in cold- and noncold-acclimated rats cold exposed in hypergravic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Horwitz, B. A.; Monson, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of hypergravity on thermoregulation processes is investigated experimentally in rats. Hooded male Long-Evans rats were kept for 6 weeks at 5 or 23 C (cold-acclimated and noncold-acclimated groups, CA and NCA) prior to testing. One test protocol comprised sequential 1-h exposures to 23 C at 1 G, 23 C at 3 G (in a 2.1-m radius centrifuge; -Gx), 8 C at 3 G, 8 C at 1 G, and finally 23 C at 1 G, with continuous measurement of the oxygen consumption. In a second protocol, restrained rats were exposed to 23 C at 1 G, 23 C at 3 G, and 10 C at 3 G, and core temperature changes were monitored. The results are presented in graphs and a table. Oxygen consumption doubled in both CA and NCA rats on exposure to cold at 1 G, but at 3 G NCA consumption decreased while CA consumption remained high. The CA rats were also more able to maintain core temperature at 3 G than the NCA rats. These differences are attributed to the nonshivering thermogenic processes developed in CA rats, which appear to be unaffected by hypergravity.

  15. Dietary fatty acid metabolism of brown adipose tissue in cold-acclimated men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondin, Denis P; Tingelstad, Hans C; Noll, Christophe; Frisch, Frédérique; Phoenix, Serge; Guérin, Brigitte; Turcotte, Éric E; Richard, Denis; Haman, François; Carpentier, André C

    2017-01-30

    In rodents, brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in producing heat to defend against the cold and can metabolize large amounts of dietary fatty acids (DFA). The role of BAT in DFA metabolism in humans is unknown. Here we show that mild cold stimulation (18 °C) results in a significantly greater fractional DFA extraction by BAT relative to skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue in non-cold-acclimated men given a standard liquid meal containing the long-chain fatty acid PET tracer, 14(R,S)-[(18)F]-fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid ((18)FTHA). However, the net contribution of BAT to systemic DFA clearance is comparatively small. Despite a 4-week cold acclimation increasing BAT oxidative metabolism 2.6-fold, BAT DFA uptake does not increase further. These findings show that cold-stimulated BAT can contribute to the clearance of DFA from circulation but its contribution is not as significant as the heart, liver, skeletal muscles or white adipose tissues.

  16. Conceptualizing the regional hydrology of a complex low relief terrain: Climate - geology interactions on sink-source dynamics of Western Boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devito, K. J.; Mendoza, C. A.; Petrone, R. M.; Landhäusser, S.; Silins, U.; Qualizza, C.; Gignac, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Western Boreal Plain (WBP) eco-region of western Canada is experiencing unprecedented industrial development for forest, oil and gas resources, stressing the need to assess and understand the sink and source areas of regional water flow. This requires the development of models that can be use to predict and mitigate the impacts of land use changes on water quantity and quality. The WBP is characterized by low relief, hummocky terrain with complexes of forestland and wetlands, especially peatlands. A paired aspen forest harvest experiment (HEAD2) was conducted on adjacent pond-peatland-aspen forestland complexes of a moraine landform, ubiquitous throughout the WBP, to determine the influence of aspen vegetated forestlands and harvesting relative to wetlands on local and regional water cycling. Reductions in transpiration and interception following aspen harvest resulted in some increase in soil moisture. However, excess water was largely absorbed into deep moraine substrates and resulted in groundwater recharge with little or no lateral flow to adjacent wetlands and aquatic systems. As a result of high soil and groundwater storage there was no observable difference in runoff from the harvested catchment compared to the adjacent reference (uncut) catchment confirming that in most years runoff originates from the wetland (peatland) rather than forestland hydrologic units. Furthermore, soil moisture increases were short lived due to rapid redevelopment of leaf area as result of high-density regeneration of aspen through root suckering. Recovery of transpiration and interception to near pre-harvest conditions occurred within 3 years. Climate cycles, primarily inter-annual variation in snow pack, can overwhelm the influence of aspen harvest in the WBP, as during the harvest experiment large water table rises were observed in both the uncut and the harvested forestlands. This study illustrates that forestlands on deep moraine hummocky substrates of the WBP act

  17. Plant acclimation impacts carbon allocation to isoprene emissions: evidence from past to future CO2 levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Hugo J.; van der Laan, Annick; Dekker, Stefan C.; Holzinger, Rupert

    2016-04-01

    Isoprene (C5H8) is produced in plant leaves as a side product of photosynthesis, whereby approximately 0.1-2.0% of the photosynthetic carbon uptake is released back into the atmosphere via isoprene emissions. Isoprene biosynthesis is thought to alleviate oxidative stress, specifically in warm, dry and high-light environments. Moreover, isoprene biosynthesis is influenced by atmospheric CO2 concentrations in the short term (weeks) via acclimation in photosynthetic biochemistry. In order to understand the effects of CO2-induced climate change on carbon allocation in plants it is therefore important to quantify how isoprene biosynthesis and emissions are effected by both short-term responses and long-term acclimation to rising atmospheric CO2 levels. A promising development for modelling CO2-induced changes in isoprene emissions is the Leaf-Energetic-Status model (referred to as LES-model hereafter, see Harrison et al., 2013 and Morfopoulos et al., 2014). This model simulates isoprene emissions based on the hypothesis that isoprene biosynthesis depends on the imbalance between the photosynthetic electron supply of reducing power and the electron demands of carbon fixation. In addition to environmental conditions, this imbalance is determined by the photosynthetic electron transport capacity (Jmax) and the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco (V cmax). Here we compare predictions of the LES-model with observed isoprene emission responses of Quercus robur (pedunculate oak) specimen that acclimated to CO2 levels representative of the last glacial, the present and the end of this century (200, 400 and 800 ppm, respectively) for two growing seasons. Plants were grown in walk-in growth chambers with tight control of light, temperature, humidity and CO2 concentrations. Photosynthetic biochemical parameters V cmax and Jmax were determined with a Licor LI-6400XT photosynthesis system. The relationship between photosynthesis and isoprene emissions was measured by coupling

  18. An RNA-seq transcriptome analysis of orthophosphate-deficient white lupin reveals novel insights into phosphorus acclimation in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the most limiting macronutrients in soils for plant growth and development. However, the whole genome molecular mechanisms contributing to plant acclimation to Pi-deficiency remains largely unknown. White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) has evolved unique adaptation systems for gro...

  19. Daily Acclimation Handling Does Not Affect Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation or Cause Chronic Sleep Deprivation in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecsey, Christopher G.; Wimmer, Mathieu E. J.; Havekes, Robbert; Park, Alan J.; Perron, Isaac J.; Meerlo, Peter; Abel, Ted

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Gentle handling is commonly used to perform brief sleep deprivation in rodents. It was recently reported that daily acclimation handling, which is often used before behavioral assays, causes alterations in sleep, stress, and levels of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits prior to

  20. Morphological acclimation and growth of ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) advance regeneration following overstory harvesting in a Mississippi River floodplain forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander Sinz; Emmile S. Gardiner; Brian R. Lockhart; Ray A. Souter

    2011-01-01

    Stand-level growth responses and plant-level patterns of biomass accumulation and distribution were examined to learn how stand structure influences morphological acclimation and growth of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) advance regeneration following overstory harvesting. Nine, 20-ha plots that received clearcut harvesting (100% basal area removal), partial...

  1. COMPARISON OF MAIZE INBRED LINES DIFFERING IN LOW-TEMPERATURE TOLERANCE - EFFECT OF ACCLIMATION AT SUBOPTIMAL TEMPERATURE ON CHLOROPLAST FUNCTIONING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERHEUL, MJ; VANHASSEL, PR; STAMP, P

    Acclimation to optimal or suboptimal temperature may influence photosynthetic properties of different maize genotypes in distinct ways. In this study, leaf growth and chloroplast functioning of the second leaves of Penjalinan, an inbred line used in warm tropical regions (CS) and Z7, an inbred line

  2. Acclimation of foliar respiration and photosynthesis in response to experimental warming in a temperate steppe in northern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Chi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thermal acclimation of foliar respiration and photosynthesis is critical for projection of changes in carbon exchange of terrestrial ecosystems under global warming. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A field manipulative experiment was conducted to elevate foliar temperature (Tleaf by 2.07°C in a temperate steppe in northern China. Rd/Tleaf curves (responses of dark respiration to Tleaf, An/Tleaf curves (responses of light-saturated net CO2 assimilation rates to Tleaf, responses of biochemical limitations and diffusion limitations in gross CO2 assimilation rates (Ag to Tleaf, and foliar nitrogen (N concentration in Stipa krylovii Roshev. were measured in 2010 (a dry year and 2011 (a wet year. Significant thermal acclimation of Rd to 6-year experimental warming was found. However, An had a limited ability to acclimate to a warmer climate regime. Thermal acclimation of Rd was associated with not only the direct effects of warming, but also the changes in foliar N concentration induced by warming. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Warming decreased the temperature sensitivity (Q10 of the response of Rd/Ag ratio to Tleaf. Our findings may have important implications for improving ecosystem models in simulating carbon cycles and advancing understanding on the interactions between climate change and ecosystem functions.

  3. [2, 4, 6-Trichlorophenol Mineralization Promoted by Anaerobic Reductive Dechlorination of Acclimated Sludge and Extracellular Respiration Dechlorination Pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jia-xiu; Li, Ling; Sheng, Fan-fan; Guo, Cui-xiang; Zhang, Yong-ming; Li, Zu-yuan; Wang, Tian-li

    2015-10-01

    In anaerobic conditions, the acclimation of activated sludge was studied with sodium lactate as the electron donor and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol as the electron acceptor. Metabolic characteristics of dechlorination were the focus of this study. The result showed highly efficient dechlorination on 2, 4, 6-trichlorophenol that the conversion rate reached to 100% in 9 - 24 h when initial concentrations of sodium lactate and 2,4, 6-trichlorophenol were 20 mmol x L(-1) and 40 - 80 μmol x L(-1), respectively. The intermediate product 2,4-dichlorophenol was found in low concentration (anaerobic metabolism were degraded by aerobic sludge, among which 4-chlorophenol (initial concentration of 33 mol x L(-1)) removal rate was up to 100% under aerobic conditions. The acclimated bacteria can rapidly transfer Fe(III) and humus (AQDS) into reductive Fe(II) and AQH2DS which indicated that the dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria was enriched in the acclimated sludge. The electron mediator [Fe(III) and AQDS] significantly accelerated the dechlorination rate. The acclimated sludge could perform extracellular respiration dechlorination with electron mediators.

  4. Shorebirds' seasonal adjustments in thermogenic capacity are reflected by changes in body mass : How preprogrammed and instantaneous acclimation work together

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vezina, Francois; Dekinga, Anne; Piersma, Theunis

    Phenotypic flexibility in shorebirds has been studied mainly in the context of adjustments to migration and to quality of food; little is known on how birds adjust their phenotype to harsh winter conditions. We showed earlier that red knot (Calidris canutus islandica) can acclimate to cold by

  5. Shorebirds' Seasonal Adjustments in Thermogenic Capacity Are Reflected by Changes in Body Mass: How Preprogrammed and Instantaneous Acclimation Work Together

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vézina, F.; Dekinga, A.; Piersma, T.; Vézina, F.

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypic flexibility in shorebirds has been studied mainly in the context of adjustments to migration and to quality of food; little is known on how birds adjust their phenotype to harsh winter conditions. We showed earlier that red knot (Calidris canutus islandica) can acclimate to cold by

  6. Expression dynamics of HSP90 and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms during heat stress acclimation in Tharparkar cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharati, Jaya; Dangi, S. S.; Bag, S.; Maurya, V. P.; Singh, G.; Kumar, P.; Sarkar, M.

    2017-08-01

    Six male Tharparkar cattle of 2-3 years old were selected for the study. After 15-day acclimation at thermoneutral zone (TNZ) in psychrometric chamber, animals were exposed at 42 °C for 6 h up to 23 days followed by 12 days of recovery period. Blood samples were collected during control period at TNZ (days 1, 5, and 12), after heat stress exposure (day 1, immediate heat stress acclimation (IHSA); days 2 to 10, short-term heat stress acclimation (STHSA); days 15 to 23, long-term heat stress acclimation (LTHSA); days 7 and 12, recovery period), and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated for RNA and protein extraction. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in PBMCs were determined by qPCR and western blot, respectively. Samples at TNZ were taken as control. The mRNA expression of HSP90, iNOS, and eNOS was significantly upregulated ( P culture study was conducted to study transcriptional abundance of HSP90, iNOS, and eNOS at different temperature-time combinations. The present findings indicate that HSP90, iNOS, and eNOS could possibly play an important role in mitigating thermal insults and confer thermotolerance during long-term heat stress exposure in Tharparkar cattle.

  7. High-light acclimation in Quercus robur L.seedlings upon over-topped a shaded environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna M. Jensen; Emile S. Gardiner; Kevin C. Vaughn

    2012-01-01

    High developmental plasticity at the seedling-level during acclimation to the light environment may be an important determinant of seedling establishment and growth in temperate broadleaf forests, especially in dense understories where spatial light availability can vary greatly. Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) seedlings were raised beneath a...

  8. Cold acclimation reduces predation rate and reproduction but increases cold- and starvation tolerance in the predatory mite Gaeolaelaps aculeifer Canestrini

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Overgaard, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    due to trade-offs. We investigated effects of thermal acclimation on predation, reproduction, starvation tolerance, and locomotor activity in the predatory mite Gaeolaelaps aculeifer Canestrini at 10, 15, and 20 °C after seven days of exposure to either of the same three temperatures, following...

  9. Acclimation of Foliar Respiration and Photosynthesis in Response to Experimental Warming in a Temperate Steppe in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yonggang; Xu, Ming; Shen, Ruichang; Yang, Qingpeng; Huang, Bingru; Wan, Shiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Thermal acclimation of foliar respiration and photosynthesis is critical for projection of changes in carbon exchange of terrestrial ecosystems under global warming. Methodology/Principal Findings A field manipulative experiment was conducted to elevate foliar temperature (Tleaf) by 2.07°C in a temperate steppe in northern China. Rd/Tleaf curves (responses of dark respiration to Tleaf), An/Tleaf curves (responses of light-saturated net CO2 assimilation rates to Tleaf), responses of biochemical limitations and diffusion limitations in gross CO2 assimilation rates (Ag) to Tleaf, and foliar nitrogen (N) concentration in Stipa krylovii Roshev. were measured in 2010 (a dry year) and 2011 (a wet year). Significant thermal acclimation of Rd to 6-year experimental warming was found. However, An had a limited ability to acclimate to a warmer climate regime. Thermal acclimation of Rd was associated with not only the direct effects of warming, but also the changes in foliar N concentration induced by warming. Conclusions/Significance Warming decreased the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of the response of Rd/Ag ratio to Tleaf. Our findings may have important implications for improving ecosystem models in simulating carbon cycles and advancing understanding on the interactions between climate change and ecosystem functions. PMID:23457574

  10. Cold acclimation and low temperature resistance in cotton: Gossypium hirsutum phospholipase Dalpha isoforms are differentially regulated by temperature and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargiotidou, Anastasia; Kappas, Ilias; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Galanopoulou, Dia; Farmaki, Theodora

    2010-06-01

    Phospholipase Dalpha (PLDalpha) was isolated from cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and characterized. Two PLDalpha genes were identified in the allotetraploid genome of G. hirsutum, derived from its diploid progenitors, G. raimondii and G. arboreum. The genes contained three exons and two introns. The translated products shared a 98.6% homology and were designated as GrPLDalpha and GaPLDalpha. Their ORFs encoded a polypeptide of 807 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 91.6 kDa sharing an 81-82% homology with PLDalpha1 and PLDalpha2 from A. thaliana. A possible alternative splicing event was detected at the 5' untranslated region which, however, did not result in alternative ORFs. Cold stress (10 degrees C or less) resulted in gene induction which was suppressed below control levels (25 degrees C or 22 degrees C growth temperature) when plants were acclimated at 17 degrees C before applying the cold treatment. Differences in the expression levels of the isoforms were recorded under cold acclimation, and cold stress temperatures. Expression was light regulated under growth, acclimation, and cold stress temperatures. Characterization of the products of lipid hydrolysis by the endogenous PLDalpha indicated alterations in lipid species and a variation in levels of the signalling molecule phosphatidic acid (PA) following acclimation or cold stress.

  11. Grapevine acclimation to water deficit: the adjustment of stomatal and hydraulic conductance differs from petiole embolism vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Uri; Bonel, Andrea Giulia; David-Schwartz, Rakefet; Degu, Asfaw; Fait, Aaron; Cochard, Hervé; Peterlunger, Enrico; Herrera, Jose Carlos

    2017-06-01

    Drought-acclimated vines maintained higher gas exchange compared to irrigated controls under water deficit; this effect is associated with modified leaf turgor but not with improved petiole vulnerability to cavitation. A key feature for the prosperity of plants under changing environments is the plasticity of their hydraulic system. In the present research we studied the hydraulic regulation in grapevines (Vitis vinifera L.) that were first acclimated for 39 days to well-watered (WW), sustained water deficit (SD), or transient-cycles of dehydration-rehydration-water deficit (TD) conditions, and then subjected to varying degrees of drought. Vine development under SD led to the smallest leaves and petioles, but the TD vines had the smallest mean xylem vessel and calculated specific conductivity (k ts). Unexpectedly, both the water deficit acclimation treatments resulted in vines more vulnerable to cavitation in comparison to WW, possibly as a result of developmental differences or cavitation fatigue. When exposed to drought, the SD vines maintained the highest stomatal (g s) and leaf conductance (k leaf) under low stem water potential (Ψs), despite their high xylem vulnerability and in agreement with their lower turgor loss point (ΨTLP). These findings suggest that the down-regulation of k leaf and g s is not associated with embolism, and the ability of drought-acclimated vines to maintain hydraulic conductance and gas exchange under stressed conditions is more likely associated with the leaf turgor and membrane permeability.

  12. Time course of physiological and psychological responses in humans during a 20-day severe-cold-acclimation programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Brazaitis

    Full Text Available The time course of physiological and psychological markers during cold acclimation (CA was explored. The experiment included 17 controlled (i.e., until the rectal temperature reached 35.5°C or 170 min had elapsed; for the CA-17 session, the subjects (n = 14 were immersed in water for the same amount of time as that used in the CA-1 session head-out water immersions at a temperature of 14°C over 20 days. The data obtained in this study suggest that the subjects exhibited a thermoregulatory shift from peripheral-to-central to solely central input thermoregulation, as well as from shivering to non-shivering thermogenesis throughout the CA. In the first six CA sessions, a hypothermic type of acclimation was found; further CA (CA-7 to CA-16 led to a transitional shift to a hypothermic-insulative type of acclimation. Interestingly, when the subjects were immersed in water for the same time as that used in the CA-1 session (CA-17, the CA led to a hypothermic type of acclimation. The presence of a metabolic type of thermogenesis was evident only under thermoneutral conditions. Cold-water immersion decreased the concentration of cold-stress markers, reduced the activity of the innate immune system, suppressed specific immunity to a lesser degree and yielded less discomfort and cold sensation. We found a negative correlation between body mass index and Δ metabolic heat production before and after CA.

  13. Phenotypic flexibility in cutaneous water loss and lipids of the stratum corneum in house sparrows (Passer domesticus) following acclimation to high and low humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Garcia, Agusti; Cox, Robert M; Williams, Joseph B

    2008-01-01

    Resistance to water-vapor diffusion through the skin is thought to be conferred by lipids in the stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis. We tested the effect of ambient humidity on cutaneous water loss (CWL) and lipid composition of the SC by acclimating house sparrows (Passer domesticus) to either a dry (6.5 g/m(3) absolute humidity) or a humid (31 g/m(3)) environment for 3 wk at a thermoneutral temperature (30 degrees C). Sparrows in the dry-acclimated group reduced CWL by 36% compared with those in the humid environment. Relative to initial values, both groups of sparrows decreased CWL, 45% in the dry-acclimated group and 23% in the humid group, suggesting that temperature is also an important stimulus for CWL apart from humidity. Both groups of acclimated sparrows decreased quantities of cholesterol, free fatty acids, and cerebrosides and increased the proportion of ceramides in their SC. Lipid amounts or proportions in the SC did not differ between dry- and humid-acclimated sparrows, but the free fatty acid : ceramide ratio was significantly lower in dry-acclimated birds. Also, lipid composition was only correlated with CWL in dry-acclimated sparrows, suggesting that structural changes to SC lipids are more tightly linked to CWL regulation in response to low humidity. Our results demonstrate phenotypic flexibility in CWL and lipid composition of the SC and provide support for a functional relationship between these traits.

  14. Cardiac Molecular-Acclimation Mechanisms in Response to Swimming-Induced Exercise in Atlantic Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Vicente; Grisdale-Helland, Barbara; Helland, Ståle J.; Torgersen, Jacob; Kristensen, Torstein; Claireaux, Guy; Farrell, Anthony P.; Takle, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac muscle is a principal target organ for exercise-induced acclimation mechanisms in fish and mammals, given that sustained aerobic exercise training improves cardiac output. Yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying such cardiac acclimation have been scarcely investigated in teleosts. Consequently, we studied mechanisms related to cardiac growth, contractility, vascularization, energy metabolism and myokine production in Atlantic salmon pre-smolts resulting from 10 weeks exercise-training at three different swimming intensities: 0.32 (control), 0.65 (medium intensity) and 1.31 (high intensity) body lengths s−1. Cardiac responses were characterized using growth, immunofluorescence and qPCR analysis of a large number of target genes encoding proteins with significant and well-characterized function. The overall stimulatory effect of exercise on cardiac muscle was dependent on training intensity, with changes elicited by high intensity training being of greater magnitude than either medium intensity or control. Higher protein levels of PCNA were indicative of cardiac growth being driven by cardiomyocyte hyperplasia, while elevated cardiac mRNA levels of MEF2C, GATA4 and ACTA1 suggested cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In addition, up-regulation of EC coupling-related genes suggested that exercised hearts may have improved contractile function, while higher mRNA levels of EPO and VEGF were suggestive of a more efficient oxygen supply network. Furthermore, higher mRNA levels of PPARα, PGC1α and CPT1 all suggested a higher capacity for lipid oxidation, which along with a significant enlargement of mitochondrial size in cardiac myocytes of the compact layer of fish exercised at high intensity, suggested an enhanced energetic support system. Training also elevated transcription of a set of myokines and other gene products related to the inflammatory process, such as TNFα, NFκB, COX2, IL1RA and TNF decoy receptor. This study provides the first characterization of the

  15. Cardiac molecular-acclimation mechanisms in response to swimming-induced exercise in Atlantic salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Castro

    Full Text Available Cardiac muscle is a principal target organ for exercise-induced acclimation mechanisms in fish and mammals, given that sustained aerobic exercise training improves cardiac output. Yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying such cardiac acclimation have been scarcely investigated in teleosts. Consequently, we studied mechanisms related to cardiac growth, contractility, vascularization, energy metabolism and myokine production in Atlantic salmon pre-smolts resulting from 10 weeks exercise-training at three different swimming intensities: 0.32 (control, 0.65 (medium intensity and 1.31 (high intensity body lengths s(-1. Cardiac responses were characterized using growth, immunofluorescence and qPCR analysis of a large number of target genes encoding proteins with significant and well-characterized function. The overall stimulatory effect of exercise on cardiac muscle was dependent on training intensity, with changes elicited by high intensity training being of greater magnitude than either medium intensity or control. Higher protein levels of PCNA were indicative of cardiac growth being driven by cardiomyocyte hyperplasia, while elevated cardiac mRNA levels of MEF2C, GATA4 and ACTA1 suggested cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In addition, up-regulation of EC coupling-related genes suggested that exercised hearts may have improved contractile function, while higher mRNA levels of EPO and VEGF were suggestive of a more efficient oxygen supply network. Furthermore, higher mRNA levels of PPARα, PGC1α and CPT1 all suggested a higher capacity for lipid oxidation, which along with a significant enlargement of mitochondrial size in cardiac myocytes of the compact layer of fish exercised at high intensity, suggested an enhanced energetic support system. Training also elevated transcription of a set of myokines and other gene products related to the inflammatory process, such as TNFα, NFκB, COX2, IL1RA and TNF decoy receptor. This study provides the first

  16. Thermal acclimation and nutritional history affect the oxidation of different classes of exogenous nutrients in Siberian hamsters, Phodopus sungorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Marshall D; Voigt, Christian C; Jefimow, Małgorzata; Wojciechowski, Michał S

    2014-11-01

    During acclimatization to winter, changes in morphology and physiology combined with changes in diet may affect how animals use the nutrients they ingest. To study (a) how thermal acclimation and (b) nutritional history affect the rates at which Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) oxidize different classes of dietary nutrients, we conducted two trials in which we fed hamsters one of three (13) C-labeled compounds, that is, glucose, leucine, or palmitic acid. We predicted that under acute cold stress (3 hr at 2°C) hamsters previously acclimated to cold temperatures (10°C) for 3 weeks would have higher resting metabolic rate (RMR) and would oxidize a greater proportion of dietary fatty acids than animals acclimated to 21°C. We also investigated how chronic nutritional stress affects how hamsters use dietary nutrients. To examine this, hamsters were fed four different diets (control, low protein, low lipid, and low-glycemic index) for 2 weeks. During cold challenges, hamsters previously acclimated to cold exhibited higher thermal conductance and RMR, and also oxidized more exogenous palmitic acid during the postprandial phase than animals acclimated to 21°C. In the nutritional stress trial, hamsters fed the low protein diet oxidized more exogenous glucose, but not more exogenous palmitic acid than the control group. The use of (13) C-labeled metabolic tracers combined with breath testing demonstrated that both thermal and nutritional history results in significant changes in the extent to which animals oxidize dietary nutrients during the postprandial period. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cold-hardening during long-term acclimation in a freeze-tolerant woolly bear caterpillar, Pyrrharctia isabella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shu-Xia; Lee, Richard E

    2016-01-01

    The banded woolly bear caterpillar, Pyrrharctia isabella (Lepidoptera: Erebidae), overwinters in leaf litter and survives freezing under natural conditions. Following 18 weeks of cold acclimation at 5°C, all caterpillars could survive 1 week of continuous freezing at -20°C or seven cycles of freezing-thawing at -20°C, but none survived freezing at -80°C. Field-collected caterpillars had a temperature of crystallization of -7.7±0.5°C that decreased significantly to -9.5±0.6°C after 12 weeks of acclimation at 5°C. Hemolymph levels of free proline, total amino acids and proteins reached a peak during the first 4 weeks of acclimation; concomitantly, hemolymph osmolality increased markedly during this interval (from 364 to 1282 mosmol kg(-1)). In contrast, hemolymph pH decreased during the first 4 weeks of acclimation before this trend reversed and pH values gradually returned to initial values. However, pH reached its peak value following 1 week at -20°C, but decreased after longer periods of freezing. During cold acclimation, cholesterol levels decreased in the hemolymph and the membrane fraction of fat body but not in other tissues. Lethal freezing at -80°C reduced cell survival in foregut tissue and caused leakage of free proline, total amino acids and proteins from tissues into the hemolymph. The addition of glycerol to the bathing medium reduced freezing injury in fat body cells, as evidenced by reduced leakage of amino acids and proteins. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Infective Juveniles of the Entomopathogenic Nematode, Steinernema feltiae Produce Cryoprotectants in Response to Freezing and Cold Acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farman; Wharton, David A

    2015-01-01

    Steinernema feltiae is a moderately freeze-tolerant entomopathogenic nematode which survives intracellular freezing. We have detected by gas chromatography that infective juveniles of S. feltiae produce cryoprotectants in response to cold acclimation and to freezing. Since the survival of this nematode varies with temperature, we analyzed their cryoprotectant profiles under different acclimation and freezing regimes. The principal cryoprotectants detected were trehalose and glycerol with glucose being the minor component. The amount of cryoprotectants varied with the temperature and duration of exposure. Trehalose was accumulated in higher concentrations when nematodes were acclimated at 5°C for two weeks whereas glycerol level decreased from that of the non-acclimated controls. Nematodes were seeded with a small ice crystal and held at -1°C, a regime that does not produce freezing of the nematodes but their bodies lose water to the surrounding ice (cryoprotective dehydration). This increased the levels of both trehalose and glycerol, with glycerol reaching a higher concentration than trehalose. Nematodes frozen at -3°C, a regime that produces freezing of the nematodes and results in intracellular ice formation, had elevated glycerol levels while trehalose levels did not change. Steinernema feltiae thus has two strategies of cryoprotectant accumulation: one is an acclimation response to low temperature when the body fluids are in a cooled or supercooled state and the infective juveniles produce trehalose before freezing. During this process a portion of the glycerol is converted to trehalose. The second strategy is a rapid response to freezing which induces the production of glycerol but trehalose levels do not change. These low molecular weight compounds are surmised to act as cryoprotectants for this species and to play an important role in its freezing tolerance.

  19. Infective Juveniles of the Entomopathogenic Nematode, Steinernema feltiae Produce Cryoprotectants in Response to Freezing and Cold Acclimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farman Ali

    Full Text Available Steinernema feltiae is a moderately freeze-tolerant entomopathogenic nematode which survives intracellular freezing. We have detected by gas chromatography that infective juveniles of S. feltiae produce cryoprotectants in response to cold acclimation and to freezing. Since the survival of this nematode varies with temperature, we analyzed their cryoprotectant profiles under different acclimation and freezing regimes. The principal cryoprotectants detected were trehalose and glycerol with glucose being the minor component. The amount of cryoprotectants varied with the temperature and duration of exposure. Trehalose was accumulated in higher concentrations when nematodes were acclimated at 5°C for two weeks whereas glycerol level decreased from that of the non-acclimated controls. Nematodes were seeded with a small ice crystal and held at -1°C, a regime that does not produce freezing of the nematodes but their bodies lose water to the surrounding ice (cryoprotective dehydration. This increased the levels of both trehalose and glycerol, with glycerol reaching a higher concentration than trehalose. Nematodes frozen at -3°C, a regime that produces freezing of the nematodes and results in intracellular ice formation, had elevated glycerol levels while trehalose levels did not change. Steinernema feltiae thus has two strategies of cryoprotectant accumulation: one is an acclimation response to low temperature when the body fluids are in a cooled or supercooled state and the infective juveniles produce trehalose before freezing. During this process a portion of the glycerol is converted to trehalose. The second strategy is a rapid response to freezing which induces the production of glycerol but trehalose levels do not change. These low molecular weight compounds are surmised to act as cryoprotectants for this species and to play an important role in its freezing tolerance.

  20. Development of bone in chick embryos from Cobb 500 breeder hens fed diets supplemented with zinc, manganese, and copper from inorganic and amino acid-complexed sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, A; Vieira, S L; Angel, C R; Bos-Mikich, A; Lothhammer, N; Taschetto, D; Cruz, R F A; Ward, T L

    2013-02-01

    Sources of Zn, Mn, and Cu (IZMC) as sulfates or as amino acid complexes (OZMC) were used to supplement Cobb 500 breeder hen diets. Experimental treatments consisted of diets supplemented with 1) 100, 100, and 10 mg/kg of Zn, Mn, and Cu, respectively, from IZMC (control); 2) 60, 60, and 3 mg/kg of Zn, Mn, and Cu, respectively, from IZMC plus 40, 40, and 7 mg/kg of Zn, Mn, and Cu, respectively, from OZMC (ISO); and 3) a diet with 100, 100, and 10 mg/kg of Zn, Mn, and Cu, respectively, from IZMC as in control plus 40, 40, and 7 mg/kg of supplemental Zn, Mn, and Cu from OZMC (on top). Ten replications of 20 females and 2 males were used per treatment. Eggs from breeders at 30, 40, 50 and 60 wk of age were incubated, and 5 embryos per replicate were collected at 10 (E10), 14 (E14), and 18 (E18) d of incubation. Midshaft width and calcification were measured for left tibia and femur stained with Alcian Blue and Alizarin Red S. At hatch, the left tibia of 5 chicks per replicate was sampled for histological evaluation of the diaphysis and distal epiphysis. Feeding the ISO treatment compared with the control diet increased the Zn (P < 0.05) but not Mn and Cu content of the yolk and albumen blend. At E14, the ISO and on-top treatments had a trend to increase tibia calcification at the rates of 1.6 and 1%, respectively (P < 0.1). The E18 ISO and on-top treatments had 2% thicker tibia compared with the control, regardless of hen age (P < 0.05). Also, at E18, calcification of tibia and femur was higher from hens fed the on-top treatment (P < 0.05). The chicks from the ISO and on-top groups had increased tibia moment of inertia (P < 0.01) at day of hatch. Broiler breeder hens consuming OZMC associated with IZMC produced embryos and hatching chicks with improvements in selected bone mineralization parameters.

  1. Critical Aspects of Heme-Peroxo-Cu Complex Structure and Nature of Proton Source Dictate Metal-O(peroxo) Breakage versus Reductive O-O Cleavage Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Suzanne M; Garcia-Bosch, Isaac; Schaefer, Andrew W; Sharma, Savita K; Siegler, Maxime A; Solomon, Edward I; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2017-01-11

    The 4H(+)/4e(-) reduction of O2 to water, a key fuel-cell reaction also carried out in biology by oxidase enzymes, includes the critical O-O bond reductive cleavage step. Mechanistic investigations on active-site model compounds, which are synthesized by rational design to incorporate systematic variations, can focus on and resolve answers to fundamental questions, including protonation and/or H-bonding aspects, which accompany electron transfer. Here, we describe the nature and comparative reactivity of two low-spin heme-peroxo-Cu complexes, LS-4DCHIm, [(DCHIm)F8Fe(III)-(O2(2-))-Cu(II)(DCHIm)4](+), and LS-3DCHIm, [(DCHIm)F8Fe(III)-(O2(2-))-Cu(II)(DCHIm)3](+) (F8 = tetrakis(2,6-difluorophenyl)-porphyrinate; DCHIm = 1,5-dicyclohexylimidazole), toward different proton (4-nitrophenol and [DMF·H(+)](CF3SO3(-))) (DMF = dimethyl-formamide) or electron (decamethylferrocene (Fc*)) sources. Spectroscopic reactivity studies show that differences in structure and electronic properties of LS-3DCHIm and LS-4DCHIm lead to significant differences in behavior. LS-3DCHIm is resistant to reduction, is unreactive toward weakly acidic 4-NO2-phenol, and stronger acids cleave the metal-O bonds, releasing H2O2. By contrast, LS-4DCHIm forms an adduct with 4-NO2-phenol, which includes an H-bond to the peroxo O-atom distal to Fe (resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy and DFT). With addition of Fc* (2 equiv overall required), O-O reductive cleavage occurs, giving water, Fe(III), and Cu(II) products; however, a kinetic study reveals a one-electron rate-determining process, ket = 1.6 M(-1) s(-1) (-90 °C). The intermediacy of a high-valent [(DCHIm)F8Fe(IV)═O] species is thus implied, and separate experiments show that one-electron reduction-protonation of [(DCHIm)F8Fe(IV)═O] occurs faster (ket2 = 5.0 M(-1) s(-1)), consistent with the overall postulated mechanism. The importance of the H-bonding interaction as a prerequisite for reductive cleavage is highlighted.

  2. Pre-anthesis high temperature acclimation alleviates the negative effects of post-anthesis heat stress on stem stored carbohydrates remobilization and grain starch accumulation in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiao; Cai, Jian; Liu, Fulai

    2012-01-01

    The potential role of pre-anthesis high temperature acclimation in alleviating the negative effects of post-anthesis heat stress on stem stored carbohydrate remobilization and grain starch accumulation in wheat was investigated. The treatments included no heat-stress (CC), heat stress at pre...... had much higher starch content, and caused less modified B-type starch granule size indicators than the CH plants. Our results indicated that, compared with the non-acclimated plants, the pre-anthesis high temperature acclimation effectively enhanced carbohydrate remobilization from stems to grains...

  3. Acclimation of a terrestrial plant to submergence facilitates gas exchange under water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mommer, L.; Pedersen, O.; Visser, E. J. W.

    2004-01-01

    Flooding imposes stress upon terrestrial plants since it severely hampers gas exchange rates between the shoot and the environment. The resulting oxygen deficiency is considered to be the major problem for submerged plants. Oxygen microelectrode studies have, however, shown that aquatic plants...... maintain relatively high internal oxygen pressures under water, and even may release oxygen via the roots into the sediment, also in dark. Based on these results, we challenge the dogma that oxygen pressures in submerged terrestrial plants immediately drop to levels at which aerobic respiration is impaired....... The present study demonstrates that the internal oxygen pressure in the petioles of Rumex palustris plants under water is indeed well above the critical oxygen pressure for aerobic respiration, provided that the air-saturated water is not completely stagnant. The beneficial effect of shoot acclimation...

  4. Selection, acclimation, training, and preparation of dogs for the research setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, LaVonne D

    2006-01-01

    Dogs have made and will continue to make valuable contributions as animal models in biomedical research. A comprehensive approach from time of breeding through completion of in-life usage is necessary to ensure that high-quality dog models are used in studies. This approach ensures good care and minimizes the impact of interanimal variability on experimental results. Guidance related to choosing and developing high-quality laboratory dogs and managing canine research colonies is provided in this article. Ensuring that dogs are healthy, well adapted, and cooperative involves good communication between vendors, veterinarians, care staff, and researchers to develop appropriate dog husbandry programs. These programs are designed to minimize animal stress and distress from the postweaning period through the transfer and acclimation period within the research facility. Canine socialization and training programs provided by skilled personnel, together with comprehensive veterinary health programs, can further enhance animal welfare and minimize interanimal and group variability in studies.

  5. Foraging response and acclimation of ambush feeding and feeding-current feeding copepods to toxic dinoflagellates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jiayi; Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Copepods exposed to toxic algae in “black box” incubation experiments show highly varied responses, but the mechanisms cannot be revealed from such experiments and the implications to copepod and phytoplankton population dynamics consequently not evaluated. Here, we use direct video observations...... reticulatum. We hypothesize (1) that ambush feeders are less affected by toxic algae than feeding-current feeders, (2) that copepods acclimate to the toxic algae, and (3) that phytoplankton cells previously exposed to copepod cues elicit stronger responses. Both copepod species consumed the toxic algae...... the copepods to survive harmful algal blooms. However, the implications to algal population dynamics are species/strains specific, with only prey selection providing the toxic algae with a competitive advantage...

  6. Physiological properties of eel haemoglobin: hypoxic acclimation, phosphate effects and multiplicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, R E; Lykkeboe, G; Johansen, K

    1976-02-01

    Unlike the whole body oxygen affinity, which adapts readily to environmental oxygen tensions, haemoglobins, prepared from normoxic- and hypoxic-accimated eels (Anguilla anguilla) show no adaptive changes in oxygenation properties or in multiplicity. Hypoxic acclimation is, howeveer, accompanied by a strong decrease in red cell nucleoside triphosphates, particularly guanosine triphospphate (GTP), which depresses oxygen affinity of the composite and component haemoglobins more strongly than does the concurring ATP. The effects of pH, temperature and salts on the oxygenation properties of the (isolated) haemoglobins are reported, discussed in relation to the varying environmetal conditions encountered by eels, and compared with data on American and Japanese eels (A. rostrata and A. juponica, respectively.

  7. Acclimation of Pistacia integerrima trees to frost in semi-arid environments depends on autumn's drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Or; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2017-03-01

    Main conclusion Cold acclimation is revealed through induced stem respiration during pre-winter frost of native Pistacia integerrima trees in continental semi-arid environments. Semi-arid environments challenge vegetation by simultaneous abiotic stresses. In this study, we examine the combined effects of water stress and frost on the physiology of Pistacia integerrima stems. This species is native to semi-arid environments where drought and frost frequently co-occur. We quantified carbohydrates and proline in P. integerrima stems responding to frost and experiencing water potentials between -0.2 and -1.8 MPa. We report that dehydrated trees (i.e., Ψstem semi-arid environments.

  8. A Preliminary Assessment of Barotrauma Injuries and Acclimation Studies for Three Fish Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Richard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walker, Ricardo W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephenson, John R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Fish that pass hydro structures either through turbine passage, deep spill, or other deep pathways can experience rapid decreases in pressure that can result in barotrauma. In addition to morphology and physiology of the fish’s swim bladder, the severity of barotrauma is directly related to the volume of undissolved gas in fish prior to rapid decompression and the lowest pressure the fish experience as they pass hydro structures (termed the “nadir”). The volume of undissolved gas in fish is influenced by the depth of acclimation (the pressure at which the fish is neutrally buoyant); therefore, determining the depth where fish are neutrally buoyant is a critical precursor to determining the relationship between pressure changes and injury or mortality.

  9. No Inbreeding depression for low temperature developmental acclimation across multiple drosophila species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Loeschcke, Volker; Bilde, Trine

    2011-01-01

    is highly species specific, and differs among ecotypes (e.g., tropical and widespread species). Apart from being exposed to thermal stress many small and fragmented populations face genetic challenges due to, for example, inbreeding. Inbreeding has been shown to reduce inherent resistance levels toward...... stressful temperatures, but whether adaptation to thermal stress through plastic responses also is affected by inbreeding is so far not clear. In this study, we test inherent cold resistance and the ability to respond plastically to temperature changes through developmental cold acclimation in inbred...... and outbred lines of five tropical and five widespread Drosophila species. Our results confirm that tropical species have lower cold resistance compared to widespread species, and show that (1) inbreeding reduces inherent cold resistance in both tropical and widespread species, (2) inbreeding does not affect...

  10. CO2 acclimation impacts leaf isoprene emissions: evidence from past to future CO2 levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Hugo; van der Laan, Annick; Dekker, Stefan; Holzinger, Rupert

    2017-04-01

    Isoprene is emitted by many plant species as a side-product of photosynthesis. Once in the atmosphere, isoprene exhibits climate forcing through various feedback mechanisms. In order to quantify the climate feedbacks of biogenic isoprene emission it is crucial to establish how isoprene emissions are effected by plant acclimation to rising atmospheric CO2 levels. A promising development for modelling CO2-induced changes in isoprene emissions is the Leaf-Energetic-Status model (referred to as LES-model hereafter, see Harrison et al., 2013 and Morfopoulos et al., 2014). This model simulates isoprene emissions based on the hypothesis that isoprene biosynthesis depends on the imbalance between the photosynthetic electron supply of reducing power and the electron demands of carbon fixation. The energetic imbalance is critically related to the photosynthetic electron transport capacity (Jmax) and the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco (Vcmax). Here we compare predictions of the LES-model with observed isoprene emission responses of Quercus robur (pedunculate oak) specimen that acclimated to CO2 growth conditions representative of the last glacial, the present and the end of this century (200, 400 and 800 ppm, respectively) for two growing seasons. These plants were grown in walk-in growth chambers with tight control of light, temperature, humidity and CO2 concentrations. Photosynthetic biochemical parameters Vcmax and Jmax were determined with a Licor LI-6400XT photosynthesis system. The relationship between photosynthesis and isoprene emissions was measured by coupling the photosynthesis system with a Proton-Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer. Our empirical results support the LES-model and show that the fractional allocation of carbon to isoprene biosynthesis is reduced in response to both short-term and long-term CO2 increases. In the short term, an increase in CO2 stimulates photosynthesis through an increase in the leaf interior CO2

  11. Does supporting multiple student strategies lead to greater learning and motivation? Investigating a source of complexity in the architecture of intelligent tutoring systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalkens, Maaike; Aleven, Vincent; Taatgen, Niels

    Intelligent tutoring systems (ITS) support students in learning a complex problem-solving skill. One feature that makes an ITS architecturally complex, and hard to build, is support for strategy freedom, that is, the ability to let students pursue multiple solution strategies within a given problem.

  12. Nitrogen metabolism of two contrasting poplar species during acclimation to limiting nitrogen availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2013-01-01

    To investigate N metabolism of two contrasting Populus species in acclimation to low N availability, saplings of slow-growing species (Populus popularis, Pp) and a fast-growing species (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa, Pg) were exposed to 10, 100, or 1000 μM NH4NO3. Despite greater root biomass and fine root surface area in Pp, lower net influxes of NH4 + and NO3 – at the root surface were detected in Pp compared to those in Pg, corresponding well to lower NH4 + and NO3 – content and total N concentration in Pp roots. Meanwhile, higher stable N isotope composition (δ15N) in roots and stronger responsiveness of transcriptional regulation of 18 genes involved in N metabolism were found in roots and leaves of Pp compared to those of Pg. These results indicate that the N metabolism of Pp is more sensitive to decreasing N availability than that of Pg. In both species, low N treatments decreased net influxes of NH4 + and NO3 –, root NH4 + and foliar NO3 – content, root NR activities, total N concentration in roots and leaves, and transcript levels of most ammonium (AMTs) and nitrate (NRTs) transporter genes in leaves and genes involved in N assimilation in roots and leaves. Low N availability increased fine root surface area, foliar starch concentration, δ15N in roots and leaves, and transcript abundance of several AMTs (e.g. AMT1;2) and NRTs (e.g. NRT1;2 and NRT2;4B) in roots of both species. These data indicate that poplar species slow down processes of N acquisition and assimilation in acclimation to limiting N supply. PMID:23963674

  13. Effect of food restriction on energy budget in warm-acclimated striped hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Chi, Qing-Sheng; Zhao, Liang; Zhu, Qiao-Xia; Cao, Jing; Wang, De-Hua

    2015-08-01

    The capacity of small mammals to sustain periods of food shortage largely depends on the adaptive regulation of energy budget in response to the decrease in food supply. In addition to food availability, ambient temperature (Ta) is an important factor affecting the rates of both energy intake and expenditure. To examine the effect of Ta on energy strategy and the capacity to sustain food shortage, striped hamsters were exposed to a warm condition (30°C) and were then restricted to 70% of ad libitum food intake. Body mass, energy intake and expenditure and physiological markers indicative of thermogenesis were measured. Warm exposure had no effect on body mass and digestibility, but decreased energy intake, basal metabolic rate and maximum nonshivering thermogenesis. The mitochondria protein content, cytochrome c oxidase activity and uncoupling protein 1 level of brown adipose tissue were significantly lower in hamsters at 30°C than at 21°C. Food restriction induced a significant decrease in body mass, but the decreased body mass was attenuated at 30°C relative to 21°C. This suggests that striped hamsters could not compensate for the limited food supply by decreasing daily energy expenditure at 21°C, whereas they could at 30°C. The significant reductions in the rates of metabolism and thermogenesis in warm-acclimated hamsters increase the capacity to cope with food shortage. Although, it remains uncertain whether this response represents some generalized evolutionary adaptation, the Ta-dependent adjustment in the capacity to survive food restriction may reflect that warm acclimation plays an important role in adaptive regulation of both physiology and behavior in response to the variations of food availability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid transcriptional acclimation following transgenerational exposure of oysters to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Priscila; Anderson, Kelli; Thompson, Emma L; Melwani, Aroon; Parker, Laura M; Ross, Pauline M; Raftos, David A

    2016-10-01

    Marine organisms need to adapt in order to cope with the adverse effects of ocean acidification and warming. Transgenerational exposure to CO2 stress has been shown to enhance resilience to ocean acidification in offspring from a number of species. However, the molecular basis underlying such adaptive responses is currently unknown. Here, we compared the transcriptional profiles of two genetically distinct oyster breeding lines following transgenerational exposure to elevated CO2 in order to explore the molecular basis of acclimation or adaptation to ocean acidification in these organisms. The expression of key target genes associated with antioxidant defence, metabolism and the cytoskeleton was assessed in oysters exposed to elevated CO2 over three consecutive generations. This set of target genes was chosen specifically to test whether altered responsiveness of intracellular stress mechanisms contributes to the differential acclimation of oyster populations to climate stressors. Transgenerational exposure to elevated CO2 resulted in changes to both basal and inducible expression of those key target genes (e.g. ecSOD, catalase and peroxiredoxin 6), particularly in oysters derived from the disease-resistant, fast-growing B2 line. Exposure to CO2 stress over consecutive generations produced opposite and less evident effects on transcription in a second population that was derived from wild-type (nonselected) oysters. The analysis of key target genes revealed that the acute responses of oysters to CO2 stress appear to be affected by population-specific genetic and/or phenotypic traits and by the CO2 conditions to which their parents had been exposed. This supports the contention that the capacity for heritable change in response to ocean acidification varies between oyster breeding lines and is mediated by parental conditioning. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Response of chaparral shrubs to below-freezing temperatures: acclimation, ecotypes, seedlings vs. adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorse, G C; Ewers, F W; Davis, S D

    1998-09-01

    Leaf death due to freezing was examined for four, co-occurring species of chaparral shrubs from the Santa Monica Mountains of southern California, Rhus laurina (= Malosma laurina), R. ovata, Ceanothus megacarpus, and C. spinosus. Measurements were made on seedlings vs. adults for all species, and for Rhus spp. in winter vs. summer, and at a warm vs. a cold site. We used four methods to determine the temperature for 50% change in activity or cell death (LT(50)) of leaves: (1) electrical conductivity (electrolyte leakage into a bathing solution), (2) photosynthetic fluorescent capacity (Fv/Fm), (3) percentage of palisade mesophyll cells stained by fluorescein diacetate vital stain, and (4) visual score of leaf color (Munsell color chart). In all four species seedlings were found to be more sensitive to freezing temperatures than were adults by 1°-3°C. For adults the LT(50) ranged from -5°C for Rhus laurina in the summer to -16°C for Rhus ovata in the winter. The LT(50) of R. ovata located at a colder inland site was 4C lower than R. ovata at the warmer coastal site just 4 km apart, suggesting ecotypic differences between R. ovata at the two sites. Both R. laurina and R. ovata underwent significant winter hardening. At the cold site, R. ovata acclimated by 6°C on average, while R. laurina acclimated by only 3°C. These results were consistent with species distributions and with field observations of differential shoot dieback between these two congeneric species after a natural freeze-thaw event in the Santa Monica Mountains.

  16. Phospholipids profile in chloroplasts of Coffea spp. genotypes differing in cold acclimation ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti-Campos, Paula; Pais, Isabel P; Partelli, Fábio L; Batista-Santos, Paula; Ramalho, José C

    2014-02-15

    Environmental temperature change may induce modifications in membrane lipid properties and composition, which account for different physiological responses among plant species. Coffee plants, as many tropical species, are particularly sensitive to cold, but genotypes can present differences that can be exploited to improve crop management and breeding. This work intended to highlight the changes promoted by low non-freezing temperatures (chilling) in phospholipid (PL) composition of chloroplast membranes of genotypes from two Coffea species, Coffea arabica cv. Catuaí (moderately tolerant) and Coffea canephora cv. Conilon (Clone 153, more susceptible), and relate them with cold sensitivity differences. Such evaluation was performed considering a gradual temperature decrease, chilling (4 °C) exposure and a recovery period under rewarming conditions. Catuaí presented an earlier acclimation response than Clone 153 (CL 153). It displayed a higher metabolic activity during acclimation (total fatty acids and total PL increases) and chilling (phosphatidylglycerol increases), and an overall better recovery. Catuaí also showed the highest phosphatidylglycerol unsaturation (higher double bond index) after chilling, in contrast with CL 153 (gradual unsaturation decrease). Higher unsaturation degree in Catuaí than in CL 153 was also observed for phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol, resulting, mainly, from raises in unsaturated C18:2 and C18:3. It is suggested that an enhanced PL synthesis and turnover induced by a gradual cold exposure, as well as unsaturation increases in major PL classes, is related to decreased Catuaí susceptibility to low temperatures and strongly contributes to sustain photosynthetic activity in this genotype under chilling conditions, as reported in previous work by this team. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Involvement of nitrogen and cytokinins in photosynthetic acclimation to elevated CO₂ of spring wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Diego; Morcuende, Rosa; Del Pozo, Alejandro; Martínez-Carrasco, Rafael; Pérez, Pilar

    2013-10-15

    Acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to elevated CO₂ involves a decrease of the leaf Rubisco content. In the present study, it was hypothesized that nitrogen uptake and partitioning within the leaf and among different aboveground organs affects the down-regulation of Rubisco. Given the interdependence of nitrogen and cytokinin signals at the whole plant level, it is also proposed that cytokinins affect the nitrogen economy of plants under elevated CO₂, and therefore the acclimatory responses. Spring wheat received varying levels of nitrogen and cytokinin in field chambers with ambient (370 μmol mol⁻¹) or elevated (700 μmol mol⁻¹) atmospheric CO₂. Gas exchange, Rubisco, soluble protein and nitrogen contents were determined in the top three leaves in the canopy, together with total nitrogen contents per shoot. Growth in elevated CO₂ induced decreases in photosynthetic capacity only when nitrogen supply was low. However, the leaf contents of Rubisco, soluble protein and total nitrogen on an area basis declined in elevated CO₂ regardless of nitrogen supply. Total nitrogen in the shoot was no lower in elevated than ambient CO₂, but the fraction of this nitrogen located in flag and penultimate leaves was lower in elevated CO₂. Decreased Rubisco: chlorophyll ratios accompanied losses of leaf Rubisco with CO₂ enrichment. Cytokinin applications increased nitrogen content in all leaves and nitrogen allocation to senescing leaves, but decreased Rubisco contents in flag leaves at anthesis and in all leaves 20 days later, together with the amount of Rubisco relative to soluble protein in all leaves at both growth stages. The results suggest that down regulation of Rubisco in leaves at elevated CO₂ is linked with decreased allocation of nitrogen to the younger leaves and that cytokinins cause a fractional decrease of Rubisco and therefore do not alleviate acclimation to elevated CO₂. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Whole plant acclimation responses by finger millet to low nitrogen stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis Luc Goron

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The small grain cereal, finger millet (FM, Eleusine coracana L. Gaertn, is valued by subsistence farmers in India and East Africa as a low-input crop. It is reported by farmers to require no added nitrogen, or only residual N, to produce grain. Exact mechanisms underlying the acclimation responses of FM to low N are largely unknown, both above and below ground. In particular, the responses of FM roots and root hairs to N or any other nutrient have not previously been reported. Given its low N requirement, FM also provides a rare opportunity to study long-term responses to N starvation in a cereal. The objective of this study was to survey the shoot and root morphometric responses of FM, including root hairs, to low N stress. Plants were grown in pails in a semi-hydroponic system on clay containing extremely low background N, supplemented with N or no N. To our surprise, plants grown without deliberately added N grew to maturity, looked relatively normal and produced healthy seed heads. Plants responded to the low N treatment by decreasing shoot, root and seed head biomass. These declines under low N were associated with decreased shoot tiller number, crown root number, total crown root length and total lateral root length, but with no consistent changes in root hair traits. Changes in tiller and crown root number appeared to coordinate the above and below ground acclimation responses to N. We discuss the remarkable ability of FM to grow to maturity without deliberately added N. The results suggest that FM should be further explored to understand this trait. Our observations are consistent with indigenous knowledge from subsistence farmers in Africa and Asia that this crop can survive extreme environments.

  19. Phycoerythrin-specific bilin lyase-isomerase controls blue-green chromatic acclimation in marine Synechococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Animesh; Biswas, Avijit; Blot, Nicolas; Partensky, Frédéric; Karty, Jonathan A; Hammad, Loubna A; Garczarek, Laurence; Gutu, Andrian; Schluchter, Wendy M; Kehoe, David M

    2012-12-04

    The marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus is the second most abundant phytoplanktonic organism in the world's oceans. The ubiquity of this genus is in large part due to its use of a diverse set of photosynthetic light-harvesting pigments called phycobiliproteins, which allow it to efficiently exploit a wide range of light colors. Here we uncover a pivotal molecular mechanism underpinning a widespread response among marine Synechococcus cells known as "type IV chromatic acclimation" (CA4). During this process, the pigmentation of the two main phycobiliproteins of this organism, phycoerythrins I and II, is reversibly modified to match changes in the ambient light color so as to maximize photon capture for photosynthesis. CA4 involves the replacement of three molecules of the green light-absorbing chromophore phycoerythrobilin with an equivalent number of the blue light-absorbing chromophore phycourobilin when cells are shifted from green to blue light, and the reverse after a shift from blue to green light. We have identified and characterized MpeZ, an enzyme critical for CA4 in marine Synechococcus. MpeZ attaches phycoerythrobilin to cysteine-83 of the α-subunit of phycoerythrin II and isomerizes it to phycourobilin. mpeZ RNA is six times more abundant in blue light, suggesting that its proper regulation is critical for CA4. Furthermore, mpeZ mutants fail to normally acclimate in blue light. These findings provide insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling an ecologically important photosynthetic process and identify a unique class of phycoerythrin lyase/isomerases, which will further expand the already widespread use of phycoerythrin in biotechnology and cell biology applications.

  20. The effect of heat acclimation on sweat microminerals: artifact of surface contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Matthew R; Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Chinevere, Troy; Lacher, Craig P; Lukaski, Henry C; Montain, Scott J

    2013-10-01

    Heat acclimation (HA) reportedly conveys conservation in sweat micromineral concentrations when sampled from arm sweat, but time course is unknown. The observation that comprehensive cleaning of the skin surface negates sweat micromineral reductions during prolonged sweating raises the question of whether the reported HA effect is real or artifact of surface contamination. To measure sweat mineral concentrations serially during HA and determine if surface contamination plays a role in the reported mineral reductions. Calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), magnesium (Mg), and zinc (Zn) were measured in sweat obtained from 17 male volunteers using an arm bag on Day 1, 5, and 10 of a HA protocol. To study the role of contamination, sweat was simultaneously (n = 10 subjects) sampled twice daily from a cleaned site (WASH) and unclean site (NO WASH) on the scapular surface. Sweat Ca, Cu, and Mg from Arm Bag trended progressively downward from Day 1 to Day 10 of HA (p = .10-0.25). Micromineral concentrations from the WASH site did not change between Day 1, 5, or 10 (Ca = 0.30 ± 0.12 mmol/L, Cu 0.41 ± 0.53 μmol/L; Zn 1.11 ± 0.80 μmol/L). Surface contamination can confound sweat mineral estimates, as sweat Ca and Cu from NO WASH site were initially higher than WASH (p Heat acclimation does not confer reductions in sweat Ca, Cu, Mg, or Zn. When the skin surface is not cleaned, mineral residue inflates initial sweat mineral concentrations. Earlier reports of micromineral reductions during HA may have been confounded by interday cleaning variability.

  1. Antioxidant metabolism during acclimation of Begonia x erythrophylla to high light levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burritt, David J; Mackenzie, Susan

    2003-06-01

    This study examined the influence of high light levels on antioxidant metabolism and the photosynthetic properties of Begonia x erythrophylla leaves. The pigment composition of shaded leaves and those developing in full sunlight was typical of shade- and sun-leaves, respectively. After 28 d in full sunlight, the preformed leaves of shade plants transferred to full sunlight (transferred-leaves) showed photo-bleaching with lower Chl (a + b) content and Chl a : Chl b ratios than shade-leaves, with Chl (a + b) : carotenoid ratios not significantly different. The variable/maximal fluorescence (Fv/Fm) of sun-leaves was not significantly different from that of shade-leaves, but transferred-leaves had reduced Fv : Fm ratios. Light response curves for the electron transport rate (ETR), the oxidation state of photosystem II (qP) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) showed significant differences between the three leaf types, with transferred-leaves not able to acclimate completely to full sunlight, having lower ETR, qP and NPQ values at high light levels than sun-leaves. Transfer to full sunlight caused a rapid increase in H2O2 and lipid hyperoxides, and a slight increase in protein oxidation. Ascorbate and glutathione levels decreased rapidly, as did the size of the total glutathione pool and, in addition to the general oxidation of proteins, rapid decreases in both the initial and total activities of chloroplastic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were observed. These results suggest that a more oxidizing cellular environment is the likely cause of the photo-bleaching observed upon transfer of shade-leaves to full sunlight. Acclimation of transferred-leaves to full sunlight involved gradual increases in the activities of enzymes involved in antioxidant metabolism, including superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, ascorbate peroxidase, dehydroascorbate reductase and monodehydroascorbate reductase, but the levels of

  2. SINGLET OXYGEN RESISTANT 1 links reactive electrophile signaling to singlet oxygen acclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Beat B; Ledford, Heidi K; Wakao, Setsuko; Huang, ShihYau Grace; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Koller, Andreas; Eggen, Rik I L; Niyogi, Krishna K

    2012-05-15

    Acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells to low levels of singlet oxygen, produced either by photoreactive chemicals or high light treatment, induces a specific genetic response that strongly increases the tolerance of the algae to subsequent exposure to normally lethal singlet oxygen-producing conditions. The genetic response includes the increased expression of various oxidative stress response and detoxification genes, like the glutathione peroxidase homologous gene GPXH/GPX5 and the σ-class glutathione-S-transferase gene GSTS1. To identify components involved in the signal transduction and activation of the singlet oxygen-mediated response, a mutant selection was performed. This selection led to the isolation of the singlet oxygen resistant 1 (sor1) mutant, which is more tolerant to singlet oxygen-producing chemicals and shows a constitutively higher expression of GPXH and GSTS1. Map-based cloning revealed that the SOR1 gene encodes a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, which controls its own expression and the expression of a large number of oxidative stress response and detoxification genes. In the promoter region of many of these genes, a highly conserved 8-bp palindromic sequence element was found to be enriched. This element was essential for GSTS1 induction by increased levels of lipophilic reactive electrophile species (RES), suggesting that it functions as an electrophile response element (ERE). Furthermore, GSTS1 overexpression in sor1 requires the ERE, although it is unknown whether it occurs through direct binding of SOR1 to the ERE. RES can be formed after singlet oxygen-induced lipid peroxidation, indicating that RES-stimulated and SOR1-mediated responses of detoxification genes are part of the singlet oxygen-induced acclimation process in C. reinhardtii.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Accumulated Proteins in Cucumber (Cucumis sativus Fruit Peel in Response to Pre-storage Cold Acclimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Harvested fruits are still living organs and respond to environmental stimuli. Low temperature storage is effective in extending life of harvested fruit, but it may also cause chilling injury. Cold acclimation has been shown to induce chilling tolerance in plants, but what proteomic changes caused by cold acclimation are related to defense against chilling stress remains largely unclear. Here, 3 d of pre-storage cold acclimation (PsCA at 10°C reduced chilling injury and secondary disease severity in cucumber stored at 5°C by 51 and 94%, respectively, compared with the control which was directly stored at 5°C. Proteomic analysis of cucumber peel identified 21 significant differentially-accumulated proteins (SDAPs right after PsCA treatment and 23 after the following cold storage (PsCA+CS. These proteins are mainly related to stress response and defense (SRD, energy metabolism, protein metabolism, signal transduction, primary metabolism, and transcription. The SRD proteins, which made up 37% of the 21 and 47% of the 23, respectively, represented the largest class of SDAPs, and all but one protein were up-regulated, suggesting accumulation of proteins involved in defense response is central feature of proteomic profile changes brought about by PsCA. In fruit just after PsCA treatment, the identified SDAPs are related to responses to various stresses, including chilling, salt stress, dehydration, fungi, bacteria, insects, and DNA damage. However, after prolonged cold storage, the targeted proteins in acclimated fruit were narrowed down in scope to those involved in defense against chilling and pathogens. The change patterns at the transcription level of the majority of the up-regulated differentially-accumulated proteins were highly consistent with those at protein level. Taken all, the results suggest that the short-time cold acclimation initiated comprehensive defense responses in cucumber fruit at first, while the long term storage thereafter

  4. Complexes of Ge(IV)- and Sn(IV)-fluorides with cyclic and acyclic carbenes: bis(dialkylamino)-difluoromethylenes as carbene sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Tobias; Bassil, Bassem S; Röschenthaler, Gerd-Volker

    2012-01-16

    Carbene complexes of Ge(IV)- and Sn(IV)-fluorides have been synthesized by oxidative addition of 2,2-difluoro-1,3-dimethylimidazolidine and bis(dimethylamino)difluoromethane to GeCl(2)•dioxane and SnF(2). Chloride analogs of the Ge(IV) complexes were also isolated. All compounds were characterized in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

  5. Acclimation to different thermal conditions in a northerly wintering shorebird is driven by body mass-related changes in organ size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vezina, Francois; Jalvingh, Kirsten M.; Dekinga, Anne; Piersma, Theunis

    2006-01-01

    Seasonal acclimatization and experimental acclimation to cold in birds typically results from increased shivering endurance and elevated thermogenic capacity leading to improved resistance to cold. A wide array of physiological adjustments, ranging from biochemical transformations to organ mass

  6. The effects of feeding on the swimming performance and metabolic response of juvenile southern catfish, Silurus meridionalis, acclimated at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xu; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Peng, Jiang-Lan; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2010-02-01

    To test whether the effects of feeding on swimming performance vary with acclimation temperature in juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis), we investigated the specific dynamic action (SDA) and swimming performance of fasting and feeding fish at acclimation temperatures of 15, 21, 27, and 33 degrees C. Feeding had no effect on the critical swimming speeding (U(crit)) of fish acclimated at 15 degrees C (p=0.66), whereas it elicited a 12.04, 18.70, and 20.98% decrease in U(crit) for fish acclimated at 21, 27 and 33 degrees C, respectively (pcatfish's central cardio-respiratory, periph