WorldWideScience

Sample records for accident management programmes

  1. The screening approach for review of accident management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misak, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture the screening approach for review of accident management programmes are presented. It contains objective trees for accident management: logic structure of the approach; objectives and safety functions for accident management; safety principles

  2. The DOE technology development programme on severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhold, R.J.; Moore, R.A.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a programme in technology development aimed at resolving the technical issues in severe accident management strategies for advanced and evolutionary light water reactors (LWRs). The key objective of this effort is to achieve a robust defense-in-depth at the interface between prevention and mitigation of severe accidents. The approach taken towards this goal is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM). Applications of ROAAM to the severe accident management strategy for the US AP600 advanced LWR have been effective both in enhancing the design and in achieving acceptance of the conclusions and base technology developed in the course of the work. This paper presents an overview of that effort and its key technical elements

  3. Accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, R.J.; Monty, B.S.; Liparulo, N.J.; Desaedeleer, G.

    1989-01-01

    The foundation of the framework for a Severe Accident Management Program is the contained in the Probabilistic Safety Study (PSS) or the Individual Plant Evaluations (IPE) for a specific plant. The development of a Severe Accident Management Program at a plant is based on the use of the information, in conjunction with other applicable information. A Severe Accident Management Program must address both accident prevention and accident mitigation. The overall Severe Accident Management framework must address these two facets, as a living program in terms of gathering the evaluating information, the readiness to respond to an event. Significant international experience in the development of severe accident management programs exist which should provide some direction for the development of Severe Accident Management in the U.S. This paper reports that the two most important elements of a Severe Accident Management Program are the Emergency Consultation process and the standards for measuring the effectiveness of individual Severe Accident Management Programs at utilities

  4. Accident management for severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, R.A.; Pratt, W.T.; Lehner, J.; Leonard, M.; Disalvo, R.; Sheron, B.

    1988-01-01

    The management of severe accidents in light water reactors is receiving much attention in several countries. The reduction of risk by measures and/or actions that would affect the behavior of a severe accident is discussed. The research program that is being conducted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission focuses on both in-vessel accident management and containment and release accident management. The key issues and approaches taken in this program are summarized. 6 refs

  5. Management of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    The definition and the multidimensionality aspects of accident management have been reviewed. The suggested elements in the development of a programme for severe accident management have been identified and discussed. The strategies concentrate on the two tiered approaches. Operative management utilizes the plant's equipment and operators capabilities. The recovery managment concevtrates on preserving the containment, or delaying its failure, inhibiting the release, and on strategies once there has been a release. The inspiration for this paper was an excellent overview report on perspectives on managing severe accidents in commercial nuclear power plants and extending plant operating procedures into the severe accident regime; and by the most recent publication of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) considering the question of risk reduction and source term reduction through accident prevention, management and mitigation. The latter document concludes that 'active development of accident management measures by plant personnel can lead to very large reductions in source terms and risk', and goes further in considering and formulating the key issue: 'The most fruitful path to follow in reducing risk even further is through the planning of accident management.' (author)

  6. Management of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The definition and the multidimensionality aspects of accident management have been reviewed. The suggested elements in the development of a programme for severe accident management have been identified and discussed. The strategies concentrate on the two tiered approaches. Operative management utilizes the plant's equipment and operators capabilities. The recovery management concentrates on preserving the containment, or delaying its failure, inhibiting the release, and on strategies once there has been a release. The inspiration for this paper was an excellent overview report on perspectives on managing severe accidents in commercial nuclear power plants and extending plant operating procedures into the severe accident regime; and by the most recent publication of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) considering the question of risk reduction and source term reduction through accident prevention, management and mitigation. The latter document concludes that active development of accident management measures by plant personnel can lead to very large reductions in source terms and risk, and goes further in considering and formulating the key issue: The most fruitful path to follow in reducing risk even further is through the planning of accident management

  7. International programme on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident (IPHECA). Report of the management committee meeting Geneva 16-17 March 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA) have been initiated in mid-1991 following its endorsement by the Forty-fourth World Health Assembly in resolution WHA44.36. The report of the Management Committee Meeting outlines the progress made in the implementation of the Programme, and summarises the scientific information obtained to date on the health effects and planned future activities. Status reports were provided by the representatives of Belarus, Russia, Ukraine and the WHO Secretariat. The major projects under the programme include Thyroid project, Hematology project, Dosimetry and Communication Support Services, Brain Damage in utero project and Epidemiological Registry project. 4 tabs

  8. Guidelines for the review of accident management programmes in nuclear power plants. Reference document for the IAEA safety service missions on review of accident management programmes in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Similarly as for other IAEA safety services, the objectives of accident management safety service are to assist the Member States in ensuring and enhancing the safety of NPPs. In particular, the objective is to assist at the utility and NPP (i.e. licensee) level in effective plant specific AMP preparation, development and implementation. However, assistance can also be provided to the regulatory body in its reviewing of AMPs. Objectives of the safety service can be summarized as follows: To explain to licensee personnel principles and possible approaches in effective implementation of AMP based on experience world-wide; To give opportunities to experts from the host plant to broaden their experience and knowledge in the field; To perform an objective assessment of the status in various phases of AMP implementation, compared with international experience and practices; To provide the licensee with suggestions and assistance for improvements in various stages of AMP implementation. The objective of the IAEA safety services is to offer two options to respond to individual requirements. These options include missions to review accident analysis needed for accident management and missions to review the whole AMP. Review of accident analysis for accident management (RAAAM): this review is intended to check completeness and quality of accident analysis covering BDBA and severe accidents. The review should be typically performed prior to use of accident analysis for development of AMP. It is considered that 2 experts and 1 IAEA team leader in one-week mission can perform the review. Detailed guidelines for review of analysis are provided in Section 2. Reference is also made to another IAEA Safety Report (Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-1) which is devoted to guidance for accident analysis of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Review of AMP (RAMP): this review of AMP, which is in particular appropriate prior to its implementation, is intended to check its quality, consistency

  9. International programme on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A memorandum of understanding between the WHO and the Ministry of Health of the USSR was signed in April 1990, calling for the development of a long-term international programme to monitor and mitigate the health effects of the Chernobyl accident. This document reports on progress made to date in terms of technical management and coordination and financial aspects of the programme. It also provides information on future activities and discusses related issues

  10. Accident and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, V.; Moellenbach, K.; Heinonen, R.; Jakobsson, S.; Kukko, T.; Berg, Oe.; Larsen, J.S.; Westgaard, T.; Magnusson, B.; Andersson, H.; Holmstroem, C.; Brehmer, B.; Allard, R.

    1988-06-01

    There is an increasing potential for severe accidents as the industrial development tends towards large, centralised production units. In several industries this has led to the formation of large organisations which are prepared for accidents fighting and for emergency management. The functioning of these organisations critically depends upon efficient decision making and exchange of information. This project is aimed at securing and possibly improving the functionality and efficiency of the accident and emergency management by verifying, demonstrating, and validating the possible use of advanced information technology in the organisations mentioned above. With the nuclear industry in focus the project consists of five main activities: 1) The study and detailed analysis of accident and emergency scenarios based on records from incidents and rills in nuclear installations. 2) Development of a conceptual understanding of accident and emergency management with emphasis on distributed decision making, information flow, and control structure sthat are involved. 3) Development of a general experimental methodology for evaluating the effects of different kinds of decision aids and forms of organisation for emergency management systems with distributed decision making. 4) Development and test of a prototype system for a limited part of an accident and emergency organisation to demonstrate the potential use of computer and communication systems, data-base and knowledge base technology, and applications of expert systems and methods used in artificial intelligence. 5) Production of guidelines for the introduction of advanced information technology in the organisations based on evaluation and validation of the prototype system. (author)

  11. Accident management information needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, D.J.; Ward, L.W.; Nelson, W.R.; Meyer, O.R. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-04-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Accident Management Research Program, a methodology has been developed for identifying the plant information needs necessary for personnel involved in the management of an accident to diagnose that an accident is in progress, select and implement strategies to prevent or mitigate the accident, and monitor the effectiveness of these strategies. This report describes the methodology and presents an application of this methodology to a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with a large dry containment. A risk-important severe accident sequence for a PWR is used to examine the capability of the existing measurements to supply the necessary information. The method includes an assessment of the effects of the sequence on the measurement availability including the effects of environmental conditions. The information needs and capabilities identified using this approach are also intended to form the basis for more comprehensive information needs assessment performed during the analyses and development of specific strategies for use in accident management prevention and mitigation. 3 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Accident management information needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.J.; Ward, L.W.; Nelson, W.R.; Meyer, O.R.

    1990-04-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Accident Management Research Program, a methodology has been developed for identifying the plant information needs necessary for personnel involved in the management of an accident to diagnose that an accident is in progress, select and implement strategies to prevent or mitigate the accident, and monitor the effectiveness of these strategies. This report describes the methodology and presents an application of this methodology to a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with a large dry containment. A risk-important severe accident sequence for a PWR is used to examine the capability of the existing measurements to supply the necessary information. The method includes an assessment of the effects of the sequence on the measurement availability including the effects of environmental conditions. The information needs and capabilities identified using this approach are also intended to form the basis for more comprehensive information needs assessment performed during the analyses and development of specific strategies for use in accident management prevention and mitigation. 3 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  13. Strategy generation in accident management support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirola, M.

    1995-01-01

    An increased interest for research in the field of Accident Management can be noted. Several international programmes have been started in order to be able to understand the basic physical and chemical phenomena in accident conditions. A feasibility study has shown that it would be possible to design and develop a computerized support system for plant staff in accident situations. To achieve this goal the Halden Project has initiated a research programme on Computerized Accident Management Support (CAMS project). The aim is to utilize the capabilities of computerized tools to support the plant staff during the various accident stages. The system will include identification of the accident state, assessment of the future development of the accident and planning of accident mitigation strategies. A prototype is developed to support operators and the Technical Support Centre in decision making during serious accident in nuclear power plants. A rule based system has been built to take care of the strategy generation. This system assists plant personnel in planning control proposals and mitigation strategies from normal operation to severe accident conditions. The ideal of a safety objective tree and knowledge from the emergency procedures have been used. Future prediction requires good state identification of the plant status and some knowledge about the history of some critical variables. The information needs to be validated as well. Accurate calculations in simulators and a large database including all important information form the plant will help the strategy planning. (author). 12 refs, 2 figs

  14. Cosyma a new programme package for accident consequence assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, G.N.

    1991-01-01

    This report gives details of a new programme package for accident consequence assessment, prepared under the CEC's Maria programme (Methods for assessing the radiological impact of accidents) initiated in 1982 to review and build on the nuclear accident consequence assessment methods in use within the European Community

  15. Requirements for a multifunctional decision support system within accident and emergency management organizations exemplified by the Joint Nordic Programme: NKA/INF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, O.

    1988-01-01

    The increasing potential for severe accidents as industries develop larger centralized production units has led to the formation of large organizations prepared for accident and emergency management. One important task within these organizations will be information management. Insufficient access to information and expert knowledge, combined with a stressful working situation, may lead to incorrect or poor decisions during an emergency. The aim of the joint Nordic five year (1985-89) research programme NKA/INF is to improve the efficiency of accident and emergency management. This will be achieved by developing and evaluating a prototype decision support system for various organizations in their information retrieval and decision making tasks. Functions for both on-site and off-site organizations during an emergency situation are specified, including identification of important communication paths. The system structure must be flexible in order easily to modify or add new features. This is emphasized by choosing an object oriented programming approach and representing data and knowledge in a structure facilitating incremental system development. A variety of functions for data presentation, message passing, diagnosis and procedures in emergency situations are described. Since this type of system will not be in daily use, the man-machine interface and dialogue features should be made as self-explanatory and informative as possible for the various users. Thus the various screen layouts will be designed to match the different user categories with respect to data types and level of detail, as shown in the examples. The system will be designed to assist the user in parallel tasks. To achieve this, several windows will be visible at the same time. It is expected that this will yield a better overview as well. Experiments with the prototype system on different emergency scenarios are planned for the end of 1988. (author). Poster presentation. 5 refs, 2 figs

  16. EPRI research on accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehlberg, R.N.; Chao, J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper discusses Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts regarding severe reactor accident management and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMAEX), activities. (EPRI) Electric Power Research Institute accident management program consists of the two products just mentioned plus one related to severe accident plant status information and the MAAP 4.0 computer code. These are briefly discussed

  17. Accident management on french PWRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queniart, D.

    1990-06-01

    After a brief recall of French safety rationale, the reactor operation and severe accident management is given. The research and development aimed at developing accident management procedures and emergency organization in France for the case of a NPP accident are also given

  18. Accident management approach in Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazaryan, K.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture the accident management approach in Armenian NPP (ANPP) Unit 2 is described. List of BDBAs had been developed by OKB Gydropress in 1994. 13 accident sequences were included in this list. The relevant analyses had been performed in VNIIAES and the 'Guidelines on operator actions for beyond design basis accident (BDBA) management at ANPP Unit 2' had been prepared. These instructions are discussed

  19. NNP Life Management Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hervia Ruperez, F.

    1996-01-01

    Around the world, power station owners are increasingly concerned to optimise Plant Life Management. In response, they are setting up Life Management programmes, of more or less ambitious scope and depth. Strategic, economic and security concerns and the close link between life extension work and the improved maintenance practices that are so important today, will increase and global these programmes for monitoring and conservation or mitigation of ageing. These programmes are all based on knowledge of the precise condition of all components and population with the greatest effect on the economics and safety of the plant, and trends in changes in their condition. (Author)

  20. Severe accident management. Prevention and Mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Effective planning for the management of severe accidents at nuclear power plants can produce both a reduction in the frequency of such accidents as well as the ability to mitigate their consequences if and when they should occur. This report provides an overview of accident management activities in OECD countries. It also presents the conclusions of a group of international experts regarding the development of accident management methods, the integration of accident management planning into reactor operations, and the benefits of accident management

  1. International programme on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Two years ago the World Health Assembly approved the establishment of the International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA). The Programme, set up under the auspices of WHO, provides support to the health authorities in Belarus, the Russian Federation and the Ukraine in dealing with the aftermath of the accident, and is intended to serve as a unifying framework for all international health-related activities arising from the accident carried out in the three countries. This document outlines the Programme's objectives, structure, accomplishments and future plans. As a background, it also provides a brief overview of the accident and of its current and potential impact on health in the three countries. 5 figs, 1 tab

  2. The European Programme Manager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larson, Anne; Bergman, E.; Ehlers, S.

    The publication is a result of a cooperation between organisations in six European countries with the aim to develop a common European education for programme managers. It contains of a description of the different elements of the education together with a number of case-studies from the counties...

  3. International programme on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A memorandum of understanding between the WHO and the Ministry of Health of the USSR was signed in April 1990, calling for the development of a long-term international programme to monitor and mitigate the health effects of the Chernobyl accident. This report examines the scientific, organizational and financial aspects of the programme and describes the action taken by the WHO for its development

  4. Strategy generator in computerized accident management support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirola, M.

    1994-02-01

    An increased interest for research in the field of accident management of nuclear power plants can be noted. Several international programmes have been started in order to be able to understand the basic physical and chemical phenomena in accident conditions. A feasibility study has shown that it would be possible to design and develop a computerized support system for plant staff in accident situations. To achieve this goal the Halden Project has initiated a research programme on Computerized Accident Management Support (CAMS project). The aim is to utilize the capabilities of computerized tools to support the plant staff during the various accident stages. The system will include identification of the accident state, assessment of the future development of the accident and planning of accident mitigation strategies. A prototype is developed to support operators and the Technical Support Centre in decision making during serious accidents in nuclear power plants. A rule based system has been built to take care of the strategy generation. This system assists plant personnel in planning control proposals and mitigation strategies from normal operation to severe accident conditions. The idea of a safety objective tree and knowledge from the emergency procedures have been used. Future prediction requires good state identification of the plant status and some knowledge about the history of some critical variables. The information needs to be validated as well. Accurate calculations in simulators and a large database including all important information from the plant will help the strategy planning. (orig.). (40 refs., 20 figs.)

  5. The Fukushima radiation accident: consequences for radiation accident medical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meineke, Viktor; Dörr, Harald

    2012-08-01

    The March 2011 radiation accident in Fukushima, Japan, is a textbook example of a radiation accident of global significance. In view of the global dimensions of the accident, it is important to consider the lessons learned. In this context, emphasis must be placed on consequences for planning appropriate medical management for radiation accidents including, for example, estimates of necessary human and material resources. The specific characteristics of the radiation accident in Fukushima are thematically divided into five groups: the exceptional environmental influences on the Fukushima radiation accident, particular circumstances of the accident, differences in risk perception, changed psychosocial factors in the age of the Internet and globalization, and the ignorance of the effects of ionizing radiation both among the general public and health care professionals. Conclusions like the need for reviewing international communication, interfacing, and interface definitions will be drawn from the Fukushima radiation accident.

  6. Severe accident analysis methodology in support of accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesmans, B.; Auglaire, M.; Snoeck, J.

    1997-01-01

    The author addresses the implementation at BELGATOM of a generic severe accident analysis methodology, which is intended to support strategic decisions and to provide quantitative information in support of severe accident management. The analysis methodology is based on a combination of severe accident code calculations, generic phenomenological information (experimental evidence from various test facilities regarding issues beyond present code capabilities) and detailed plant-specific technical information

  7. Accident management insights after the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, Didier; Viktorov, Alexandre; Tuomainen, Minna; Ducamp, Francois; Chevalier, Sophie; Guigueno, Yves; Tasset, Daniel; Heinrich, Marcus; Schneider, Matthias; Funahashi, Toshihiro; Hotta, Akitoshi; Kajimoto, Mitsuhiro; Chung, Dae-Wook; Kuriene, Laima; Kozlova, Nadezhda; Zivko, Tomi; Aleza, Santiago; Jones, John; McHale, Jack; Nieh, Ho; Pascal, Ghislain; ); Nakoski, John; Neretin, Victor; Nezuka, Takayoshi; )

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident, that took place on 11 March 2011, initiated a significant number of activities at the national and international levels to reassess the safety of existing NPPs, evaluate the sufficiency of technical means and administrative measures available for emergency response, and develop recommendations for increasing the robustness of NPPs to withstand extreme external events and beyond design basis accidents. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is working closely with its member and partner countries to examine the causes of the accident and to identify lessons learnt with a view to the appropriate follow-up actions to be taken by the nuclear safety community. Accident management is a priority area of work for the NEA to address lessons being learnt from the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP following the recommendations of Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA), Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), and Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). Considering the importance of these issues, the CNRA authorised the formation of a task group on accident management (TGAM) in June 2012 to review the regulatory framework for accident management following the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. The task group was requested to assess the NEA member countries needs and challenges in light of the accident from a regulatory point of view. The general objectives of the TGAM review were to consider: - enhancements of on-site accident management procedures and guidelines based on lessons learnt from the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident; - decision-making and guiding principles in emergency situations; - guidance for instrumentation, equipment and supplies for addressing long-term aspects of accident management; - guidance and implementation when taking extreme measures for accident management. The report is built on the existing bases for capabilities to respond to design basis

  8. Regulatory approach to accident management in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, L.

    1989-01-01

    The Swedish accident management program includes the following components: definition of overall safety and radiation protection objectives for the program; definition of appropriate accident management strategies to reach these objectives, based on plant-specific severe accident analysis; development and installation of appropriate accident management systems and associated management procedure; definition of roles and resposibilities for plant staff involved in accident management and implementation of appropriate training programs. The discussion of these components tries to highlight the basic technical concepts and approaches and the underlying safety philosophy rather than going into design details. 5 figs., 7 refs

  9. The management of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelce, J.; Brignon, P.

    1987-01-01

    In considering severe accidents in water power reactors, a major problem that arises is how to manage them in such a way that the situation can be controlled as well as possible, from the aspects both of preventing serious damage to the core of limiting the discharge of radioactivity. A number of countries have announced provisions in the field of accident management, some already set up, others planned, but these mainly apply to preventing damage to the core. Part of this report deals with this aspect, to show that there is a fairly wide consensus on how problems should be approached. Attitudes vary, on the other hand, in the approach to mitigate radioactive release. In fact, few countries have proposed concrete steps to manage severe accidents in the final stages when the core is seriously damaged. Since it is difficult to compare different approaches, only the French approach is described. This description is however very brief, because in the five or six years since it was defined, the approach has been presented many times. The stress is placed more on the comments which this type of approach suggests, to make the subsequent general discussion easier

  10. Stress in accident and post-accident management at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, P.; Dubreuil, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of the Chernobyl nuclear accident on the psychology of the affected population have been much discussed. The psychological dimension has been advanced as a factor explaining the emergence, from 1990 onwards, of a post-accident crisis in the main CIS countries affected. This article presents the conclusions of a series of European studies, which focused on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. These studies show that the psychological and social effects associated with the post-accident situation arise from the interdependency of a number of complex factors exerting a deleterious effect on the population. We shall first attempt to characterise the stress phenomena observed among the population affected by the accident. Secondly, we will be presenting an anlysis of the various factors that have contributed to the emerging psychological and social features of population reaction to the accident and in post-accident phases, while not neglecting the effects of the pre-accident situation on the target population. Thirdly, we shall devote some initial consideration to the conditions that might be conducive to better management of post-accident stress. In conclusion, we shall emphasise the need to restore confidence among the population generally. (Author)

  11. Spent fuel pool accident analysis and accident management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Gil; Cho, Cheon Hwey [ACT CO., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Sung, Joon Young; Maeng, Yun Hwan [Handong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The spent fuel pool(SFP) in unit 4 of the Fukushima Daiichi NPPs was damaged by an extreme seismic event and subsequent flooding by a tsunami. In order to investigate a progression of spent fuel pool accident scenarios, the well-defined MELCOR 1.8.6 code input deck was prepared and validated by experimental data of the OECD/NEA Sandia Fuel Project. Based on the validated MELCOR code input, three types of spent fuel pool accident scenarios were analyzed. In the complete loss of coolant accident (LOCA) scenarios, sensitivity studies were conducted to identify the modeling boundary conditions to initiate a zirconium fire in the spent fuel assemblies. A series of MELCOR code calculations were performed to investigate a consequence of each SFP accident scenario. Based on findings from the calculations, the recommended operator actions were proposed to manage the SFP accident progressions.

  12. HTR-10 severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yuanhui; Sun Yuliang

    1997-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTR-10) is under construction at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology site northwest of Beijing. This 10 MW thermal plant utilizes a pebble bed high temperature gas cooled reactor for a large range of applications such as electricity generation, steam and district heat generation, gas turbine and steam turbine combined cycle and process heat for methane reforming. The HTR-10 is the first high temperature gas cooled reactor to be licensed in China. This paper describes the safety characteristics and design criteria for the HTR-10 as well as the accident management and analysis required for the licensing process. (author)

  13. Accident Management in VVER-1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. D'Auria

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the investigation study on accident management in VVER-1000 reactor type conducted in the framework of a European Commission funded project. The mentioned study involved both experimental and computational fields. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the main findings from the execution of a wide-range analysis focused on AM in VVER-1000 with main regard to the qualification of computational tools and the proposal for an optimal AM strategy for this kind of NPP.

  14. Management and Communication programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2005-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the launch of three new courses in the Management and Communication programme: 1.     Managing Time (Open to all Staff Members) The objectives are: To enhance your personal effectiveness through better organisation skills To acquire ways of making the most of your time through improved work habits To reduce stress For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/S8E_e.asp 2.     Service Orientation (Open to all Staff Members working in a service-related function) The objectives are: To understand the key elements in an effective client/service provider relationship To develop a client focused approach to providing services For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/serv_e.asp 3.   Introduction to Leadership (Open to Staff in Career Paths E & above, including newly appointed supervisors and Secti...

  15. Management and Communication programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2005-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the launch of three new courses in the Management and Communication programme: 1.     Managing Time (Open to all Staff Members) The objectives are: To enhance your personal effectiveness through better organisation skills To acquire ways of making the most of your time through improved work habits To reduce stress For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/S8E_e.asp 2.     Service Orientation (Open to all Staff Members working in a service-related function) The objectives are: To understand the key elements in an effective client/service provider relationship To develop a client focused approach to providing services For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/serv_e.asp 3.   Introduction to Leadership (Open to Staff in Career Paths E & above, including newly appointed supervisors and Sect...

  16. Containment severe accident management - selected strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duco, J.; Royen, J.; Rohde, J.; Frid, W.; De Boeck, B.

    1994-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) organized in June 1994, in collaboration with the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI), a Specialist Meeting on Selected Containment Severe Accident Management Strategies, to discuss their feasibility, effectiveness, benefits and drawbacks, and long-term impact. The meeting focused on water reactors, mainly on existing systems. The technical content covered topics such as general aspects of accident management strategies in OECD Member countries, hydrogen management techniques and other containment accident management strategies, surveillance and protection of the containment function. The main conclusions of the meeting are summarized in the paper. (author)

  17. Energy Management Programmes for Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-05

    The IEA Policy Pathway publications provide details on how to implement specific recommendations drawn from the IEA 25 Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations. This Policy Pathway, jointly produced by the International Energy Agency and the Institute for Industrial Productivity, develops the critical steps for policy makers implementing energy management programmes for industry. Optimising energy use in industry is essential to improve industrial competitiveness and achieve wider societal goals such as energy security, economic recovery and development, climate change mitigation and environmental protection. While there is significant potential to decrease energy consumption in this sector, opportunities to improve energy efficiency are still under-exploited. Energy management programmes have shown to be instrumental in addressing many of the barriers that inhibit wide-scale uptake of energy management in industry. The Policy Pathway builds on lessons learned from country experiences and provides actionable guidance on how to plan and design, implement, evaluate and monitor energy management programmes for industry.

  18. Relationship between accidents and road user behaviour : an integral research programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, P.C. & Horst, A.R.A. van der

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of accident statistics and the study of road user behaviour are the traditional methods of road safety research. Neither of these involve direct observation of accidents. A research programme has been designed to gain insight in the generation process of traffic accidents as well as to

  19. Management & communication programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2006-01-01

    Calendar of courses for September to December 2006 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum 2nd semester 2006 Titres Dates Langue Quality Management 18, 19 September Bilingual Managing Teams 19, 20, 21 September English Communiquer efficacement - résidentiel 20, 21, 22 septembre Bilingue Personal Awareness & Impact 26, 27, 28 September Bilingual Introduction to Leadership 4, 5, 6 October Bilingue IProject Scheduling & Costing 12, 13 October English CDP-SL part 1 17, 18, 19 October English Personal Awareness & Impact 23, 24 October Bilingual Communicating to Convince 23, 24, 25 October Bilingual CDP-GL part 2 25, 26, 27 October English CDP-GL part 1 22, 23, 24 November Bilingual Risk Management 20, 21 December Bilingual Communication curriculum 2nd semester 2006 Titres Dates Langue Techniques d'exposé et de présentation 18, 19 septembre + 16 octobre Français Communi...

  20. Competences and life management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunatti, S.; Bergara, A.; Ranalli, J.; Versaci, R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The nuclear industry is, at present, at a crucial juncture, where it has to decide about the future of the first generation of nuclear plants, which are approaching the end of their licensed service life. At the same time, long term experience and new advances have established that it is possible to extend the life of nuclear plants beyond their initially licensed life by another 20-30 years. Extending the operating life of existing nuclear plants will help to reduce the short term need for new generating capacity - without new capital costs. However, these extensions must take place in the context of careful safety analysis and monitoring of equipment ageing concerns. A nuclear power plant must be managed in a safe and efficient manner throughout all the life cycle stages from design through decommissioning. The consequences of management decisions about nuclear power plants can have profound economic impacts for the nuclear power plant owner, and possibly for the national economy. In addition, the consequence of a major failure or accident can have catastrophic national socio-economic effects that may be felt internationally. The safe and effective management of a nuclear power plant therefore requires dramatically different perspectives in time from the majority of other industries. The impact of some decisions extends beyond the normal strategic perspective of both owners and governments. The integration of activities for ageing management, safety management and business management of a nuclear power plant are an essential element of 'life cycle management'. The loss of information at any stage of a nuclear power plants life deprives people, at later stages, of knowledge that could be important to safe, economic completion of work or which could aid the analysis of problems and options. It is costly to go through the learning process again, with a risk of potential events or incidents, programme delays, physical injury and increased regulatory

  1. Accident knowledge and emergency management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, B.; Groenberg, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    The report contains an overall frame for transformation of knowledge and experience from risk analysis to emergency education. An accident model has been developed to describe the emergency situation. A key concept of this model is uncontrolled flow of energy (UFOE), essential elements are the state, location and movement of the energy (and mass). A UFOE can be considered as the driving force of an accident, e.g., an explosion, a fire, a release of heavy gases. As long as the energy is confined, i.e. the location and movement of the energy are under control, the situation is safe, but loss of confinement will create a hazardous situation that may develop into an accident. A domain model has been developed for representing accident and emergency scenarios occurring in society. The domain model uses three main categories: status, context and objectives. A domain is a group of activities with allied goals and elements and ten specific domains have been investigated: process plant, storage, nuclear power plant, energy distribution, marine transport of goods, marine transport of people, aviation, transport by road, transport by rail and natural disasters. Totally 25 accident cases were consulted and information was extracted for filling into the schematic representations with two to four cases pr. specific domain. (au) 41 tabs., 8 ills.; 79 refs.

  2. Accident knowledge and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, B.; Groenberg, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    The report contains an overall frame for transformation of knowledge and experience from risk analysis to emergency education. An accident model has been developed to describe the emergency situation. A key concept of this model is uncontrolled flow of energy (UFOE), essential elements are the state, location and movement of the energy (and mass). A UFOE can be considered as the driving force of an accident, e.g., an explosion, a fire, a release of heavy gases. As long as the energy is confined, i.e. the location and movement of the energy are under control, the situation is safe, but loss of confinement will create a hazardous situation that may develop into an accident. A domain model has been developed for representing accident and emergency scenarios occurring in society. The domain model uses three main categories: status, context and objectives. A domain is a group of activities with allied goals and elements and ten specific domains have been investigated: process plant, storage, nuclear power plant, energy distribution, marine transport of goods, marine transport of people, aviation, transport by road, transport by rail and natural disasters. Totally 25 accident cases were consulted and information was extracted for filling into the schematic representations with two to four cases pr. specific domain. (au) 41 tabs., 8 ills.; 79 refs

  3. Use of simulators in severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. nuclear utility industry is moving in a deliberate fashion through a coordinated industry severe accident working group to study and augment, where appropriate, the existing utility organizational and emergency planning structure to address accident and severe accident management. Full-scope simulators are used extensively to train licensed operators for their initial license examinations and continually thereafter in licensed operator requalification training and yearly examinations. The goal of the training (both initial and requalification) is to ensure that operators possess adequate knowledge, skills and abilities to prevent an event from progressing to core damage. The use of full-scope simulators in severe accident management training is in large part viewed by the industry as being premature. The working group study has not progressed to the point where the decision to employ full-scope simulators can be logically considered. It is not however premature to consider part-task or work station simulators as invaluable research tools to support the industry's study. These simulators could be employed, subject to limitations in the current state of knowledge regarding severe accident progression and phenomenological responses, in the validation and verification (V and V) of severe accident models or codes as they are developed. The U.S. nuclear utility industry has made substantial strides in the past 12 years in the accident prevention, mitigation and management arena. These strides are a product of the industry's preference for a logical and systematic approach to change. (orig.)

  4. NPP Krsko Severe Accident Management Guidelines Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalina, Mario; Spalj, Srdjan; Glaser, Bruno; Jalovec, Robi; Jankovic, Gordan

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant Krsko (NEK) has decided to take steps for upgrade of safety measures to prevent severe accidents, and to improve the means to successfully mitigate their consequences. The content of the program for the NEK Safety Upgrade is consistent with the nuclear industry response to Fukushima accident, which revealed many new insights into severe accidents. Therefore, new strategies and usage of new systems and components should be integrated into current NEK Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG's). SAMG's are developed to arrest the progression of a core damage accident and to limit the extent of resulting releases of fission products. NEK new SAMG's revision major changes are made due to: replacement of Electrical Recombiners by Passive Autocatalytic Recombiners (PARs) and the installation of Passive Containment Filtered Vent System (PCFV); to handle a fuel damage situation in Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) and to assess risk of core damage situation during shutdown operation. (authors)

  5. Aspects of accident management in Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dascalu, N.

    1999-01-01

    As a general conclusion, the accident management system as implemented at Cerna voda NPP is expected to be appropriate for handling a severe accident, should it occur, in such a way that the environmental radiological consequences would be insignificant and radiation exposure of the personnel be within recommendations. It is recognized, however, that continued development and verification of the system as well as effective personnel training programs are essential to maintain the safety level achieved. (author)

  6. Use of analytical aids for accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of analytical aids by utility technical support teams can enhance the staff's ability to manage accidents. Since instrumentation is exposed to environments beyond design-basis conditions, instruments may provide ambiguous information or may even fail. While it is most likely that many instruments will remain operable, their ability to provide unambiguous information needed for the management of beyond-design-basis events and severe accidents is questionable. Furthermore, given these limitation in instrumentation, the need to ascertain and confirm current plant status and forecast future behavior to effectively manage accidents at nuclear facilities requires a computational capability to simulate the thermal and hydraulic behavior in the primary, secondary, and containment systems. With the need to extend the current preventive approach in accident management to include mitigative actions, analytical aids could be used to further enhance the current capabilities at nuclear facilities. This need for computational or analytical aids is supported based on a review of the candidate accident management strategies discussed in NUREG/CR-5474. Based on the review of the NUREG/CR-5474 strategies, two major analytical aids are considered necessary to support the implementation and monitoring of many of the strategies in this document. These analytical aids include (1) An analytical aid to provide reactor coolant and secondary system behavior under LOCA conditions. (2) An analytical aid to predict containment pressure and temperature response with a steam, air, and noncondensable gas mixture present

  7. Level 2 PSA methodology and severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the work was to review current Level 2-PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) methodologies and practices and to investigate how Level 2-PSA can support severe accident management programmes, i.e. the development, implementation, training and optimisation of accident management strategies and measures. For the most part, the presented material reflects the state in 1996. Current Level 2 PSA results and methodologies are reviewed and evaluated with respect to plant type specific and generic insights. Approaches and practices for using PSA results in the regulatory context and for supporting severe accident management programmes by input from level 2 PSAs are examined. The work is based on information contained in: PSA procedure guides, PSA review guides and regulatory guides for the use of PSA results in risk informed decision making; plant specific PSAs and PSA related literature exemplifying specific procedures, methods, analytical models, relevant input data and important results, use of computer codes and results of code calculations. The PSAs are evaluated with respect to results and insights. In the conclusion section, the present state of risk informed decision making, in particular in the level 2 domain, is described and substantiated by relevant examples

  8. Development of Krsko Severe Accident Management Database (SAMD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic, I.; Kocnar, R.

    1996-01-01

    Severe Accident Management is a framework to identify and implement the Emergency Response Capabilities that can be used to prevent or mitigate severe accidents and their consequences. Krsko Severe Accident Management Database documents the severe accident management activities which are developed in the NPP Krsko, based on the Krsko IPE (Individual Plant Examination) insights and Generic WOG SAMGs (Westinghouse Owners Group Severe Accident Management Guidance). (author)

  9. Stepwise Reconstruction PROGRAMME of Bohunice V 1 NPP with Regard to SEVERE ACCIDENT Prevention and Mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehne, M.; Kerak, M.; Severa, M.

    1997-01-01

    Accident Management means - generally speaking - all measures taken to 'rectum the plant to a safe state and mitigate the consequences of accidents' in the design basis as well as the beyond design basis realm. Sometimes accident management is interpreted as reforming in particular to those actions which are taken to cope with beyond design basis accidents, i.e. in very unlikely situations. The objectives of the measures depend on the category of the accident: design basis accident: * to keep systems and the plant within the licensed limits beyond design basis accident: * to prevent severe core damage, especially at high pressure in the reactor pressurize vessel and or * to mitigate the consequences of severe accidents for the environment The system use is different: design basis accident: * operation of systems within design limits beyond design basis accident: * best use of all available systems even beyond their design limits assuming best estimate conditions for components and systems. With respect to the different system uses it is expedient to distinguish between measures to control accidents under design basis accident conditions or to manage beyond design basis accidents. The evaluation of a safety concept should give precedence to the systems fundamental roles in the design basis realm. beyond design basis -accident management should be seen as an additional, last-resort tool to cope with scenarios in the beyond design basis realm and should therefore be treated separately as a supplement to the 'normal' design basis measures

  10. Relationship between accidents and road user behaviour : an integral research programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, P. & Horst, A.R.A. van der

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of accident statistics and the study of road user behaviour are the traditional methods of road safety research. Neither of these involve direct observation of accidents. A research programme has been designed in order to: (1) gain insight into the generation process of traffic

  11. Use of NUREG-1150 and IPEs in accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauersberger

    1992-01-01

    The fundamental objective of the accident management program is to assure, in the event of a severe accident at a nuclear plant, that the effectiveness of personnel and equipment is maximized in preventing or mitigating the consequences of the accident. This document studies the use of NUREG-1150 and IPEs in accident management. Figs

  12. Chernobyl reactor accident: medical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, G.K.

    1996-01-01

    Chernobyl reactor accident on 26th April, 1986 is by far the worst radiation accident in the history of the nuclear industry. Nearly 500 plant personnel and rescue workers received doses varying from 1-16 Gy. Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) was seen only in the plant personnel. 499 individuals were screened for ARS symptoms like nausea, vomitting, diarrhoea and fever. Complete blood examination was done which showed initial granulocytosis followed by granulocytopenia and lymphocytopenia. Cytogenetic examinations were confirmatory in classifying the patients on the basis of the doses received. Two hundred and thirty seven cases of ARS were hospitalised in the first 24-36 hrs. No member of general public suffered from ARS. There were two immediate deaths and subsequently 28 died in hospital and one of the cases died due to myocardial infarction, making a total of 31 deaths. The majority of fatal cases had whole body doses of about 6 Gy, besides extensive skin burns. Two cases of radiation burns had thermal burns also. Treatment of ARS consisted of isolation, barrier nursing, replacement therapy with fluid electrolytes, platelets and RBC transfusions and antibiotic therapy for bacterial, fungal and viral infections. Bone marrow transplantations were given to 13 cases out of which 11 died due to various causes. Radiation burns due to beta, gamma radiations were seen in 56 cases and treated with dressings, surgical excision, skin grafting and amputation. Oropharangeal syndrome, producing extensive mucous in the oropharynx, was first seen in Chernobyl. The patients were treated with saline wash of the mouth. The patients who had radioactive contamination due to radioactive iodine were given stable iodine, following wash with soap, water and monitored. Fourteen survivors died subsequently due to other causes. Late health effects seen so far include excess of thyroid cancer in the children and psychological disorders due to stress. No excess leukemia has been reported so

  13. Development of severe accident management advisory and training simulator (SAMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, K.-S.; Kim, K.-R.; Jung, W.-D.; Ha, J.-J.

    2002-01-01

    The most operator support systems including the training simulator have been developed to assist the operator and they cover from normal operation to emergency operation. For the severe accident, the overall architecture for severe accident management is being developed in some developed countries according to the development of severe accident management guidelines which are the skeleton of severe accident management architecture. In Korea, the severe accident management guideline for KSNP was recently developed and it is expected to be a central axis of logical flow for severe accident management. There are a lot of uncertainties in the severe accident phenomena and scenarios and one of the major issues for developing a operator support system for a severe accident is the reduction of these uncertainties. In this paper, the severe accident management advisory system with training simulator, SAMAT, is developed as all available information for a severe accident are re-organized and provided to the management staff in order to reduce the uncertainties. The developed system includes the graphical display for plant and equipment status, the previous research results by knowledge-base technique, and the expected plant behavior using the severe accident training simulator. The plant model used in this paper is oriented to severe accident phenomena and thus can simulate the plant behavior for a severe accident. Therefore, the developed system may make a central role of the information source for decision-making for a severe accident management, and will be used as the training simulator for severe accident management

  14. Spreading of Excellence in SARNET Network on Severe Accidents: The Education and Training Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Paci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The SARNET2 (severe accidents Research NETwork of Excellence project started in April 2009 for 4 years in the 7th Framework Programme (FP7 of the European Commission (EC, following a similar first project in FP6. Forty-seven organisations from 24 countries network their capacities of research in the severe accident (SA field inside SARNET to resolve the most important remaining uncertainties and safety issues on SA in water-cooled nuclear power plants (NPPs. The network includes a large majority of the European actors involved in SA research plus a few non-European relevant ones. The “Education and Training” programme in SARNET is a series of actions foreseen in this network for the “spreading of excellence.” It is focused on raising the competence level of Master and Ph.D. students and young researchers engaged in SA research and on organizing information/training courses for NPP staff or regulatory authorities (but also for researchers interested in SA management procedures.

  15. Criticality accidents in solution (CRAC and SILENE programmes) and complementary studies of accidents; radiation dosimetry in human organism during the CRAC programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbry, M.; Dousset, M.

    C.R.A.C. (CRiticality occurring ACcidentally) programme is intended to study experimentally the development of a criticality accident as it could occur when handling solutions of fissile material as well as the radiological consequences of such an accident. The fissile matter solutions have been chosen (a) for practical considerations of use and (b) because the probability of an accident occurring seems greater with this type of environment, as the known accidents have shown. The programme is twofold: study of accident physics: form of the evolution (peak, plateau, oscillations, boil up of solutions) the most probable maximum power, minimal power, flux and radiation spectra emitted, freed energy, associated effects, radiolysis, constraints, etc., study of radiological consequences: area dosimetry, individual dosimetry, radiobiological studies, etc. Additional criticality Accident experiments have been and continue to be made on the SILENE reactor in the following principal domains: determination of the emission rate of gaseous fission products and aerosols, area dosimetry and health dosimetry in the presence of shields around the core to vary the neutron and gamma components of the radiation field. Improvement in the knowledge of certain particular aspects of the power excursion, radiolysis gas and pressure wave, experiments of the ''boiling'' type [fr

  16. Implementation of severe accident management measures - Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the meeting were: 1) to exchange information on activities in the area of SAM implementation and on the rationale for such actions, 2) to monitor progress made, 3) to identify cases of agreement or disagreement, 4) to discuss future orientations of work, 5) to make recommendations to the CSNI. Session summaries prepared by the Chairpersons and discussed by the whole writing group are given in Annex. During the first session, 'SAM Programmes Implementation', papers from one regulator and several utilities and national research institutes were presented to outline the status of implementation of SAM programmes in countries like Switzerland, Russia, Spain, Finland, Belgium and Korea. Also, the contribution of SAM to the safety of Japanese plants (in terms of core damage frequency) was quantified in a paper. One paper gave an overview on the situation regarding SAM implementation in Europe. The second session, 'SAM Approach', provided background and bases for Severe Accident Management in countries like Sweden, Japan, Germany and Switzerland, as well as for hardware features in advanced light water reactor designs, such as the European Pressurised Reactor (EPR), regarding Severe Accident Management. The third session, 'SAM Mitigation Measures', was about hardware measures, in particular those oriented towards hydrogen mitigation where fundamentally different approaches have been taken in Scandinavian countries, France, Germany and Korea. Three papers addressed specific contributions from research to provide a broader basis for the assumptions made in certain computer codes used for the assessment of plant risk arising from beyond-design accident sequences. The fourth session, 'Implementation of SAM Measures on VVER-1000 Reactors', was about the status of work on Severe Accident Management implementation in VVER reactors of existing design and in a new plant currently under construction. The overall picture is that Severe Accident Management has been

  17. Summary and conclusions: Specialist Meeting on Severe Accident Management Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    During the first session of this meeting, regulators, research groups, designers/owners' groups and some utilities discussed the critical decisions in SAM (Severe Accident Management), how these decisions were addressed and implemented in generic SAM guidelines, what equipment and instrumentation was used, what are the differences in national approaches, etc. During the second session, papers were presented by utility specialists that described approaches chosen for specific implementation of the generic guidelines, the difficulties encountered in the implementation process and the perceived likelihood of success of their SAM programme in dealing with severe accidents. The third and final sessions was dedicated to discussing what are the remaining uncertainties and open questions in SAM. Experts from several OECD countries presented significant perspectives on remaining open issues

  18. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    A recently completed Oak Ridge effort proposes two management strategies for mitigation of the events that might occur in-vessel after the onset of significant core damage in a BWR severe accident. While the probability of such an accident is low, there may be effective yet inexpensive mitigation measures that could be implemented employing the existing plant equipment and requiring only additions to the plant emergency procedures. In this spirit, accident management strategies have been proposed for use of a borated solution for reactor vessel refill should control blade damage occur during a period of temporary core dryout and for containment flooding to maintain the core debris within the reactor vessel if injection systems cannot be restored. The proposed strategy for poisoning of the water used for vessel reflood should injection systems be restored after control blade damage has occurred has great promise, using only the existing plant equipment but employing a different chemical form for the boron poison. The dominant BWR severe accident sequence is Station Blackout and without means for mechanical stirring or heating of the storage tank, the question of being able to form the poisoned solution under accident conditions becomes of supreme importance. On the other hand, the proposed strategy for drywell flooding to cool the reactor vessel bottom head and prevent the core and structure debris from escaping to the drywell holds less promise. This strategy does, however, have potential for future plant designs in which passive methods might be employed to completely submerge the reactor vessel under severe accident conditions without the need for containment venting

  19. Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    As an early response to the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident, the Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) Bureau decided to focus on the following issues as an initial response of the joint program after having direct communications with the Japanese official participants in April 2011: - Management of high radiation area worker doses: It has been decided to make available the experience and information from the Chernobyl accident in terms of how emergency worker / responder doses were legally and practically managed, - Personal protective equipment for highly-contaminated areas: It was agreed to collect information about the types of personnel protective equipment and other equipment (e.g. air bottles, respirators, air-hoods or plastic suits, etc.), as well as high-radiation area worker dosimetry use (e.g. type, number and placement of dosimetry) for different types of emergency and high-radiation work situations. Detailed information was collected on dose criteria which are used for emergency workers /responders and their basis, dose management criteria for high dose/dose rate areas, protective equipment which is recommended for emergency workers / responders, recommended individual monitoring procedures, and any special requirement for assessment from the ISOE participating nuclear utilities and regulatory authorities and made available for Japanese utilities. With this positive response of the ISOE official participants and interest in the situation in Fukushima, the Expert Group on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management (EG-SAM) was established by the ISOE Management Board in May 2011. The overall objective of the EG-SAM is to contribute to occupational exposure management (providing a view on management of high radiation area worker doses) within the Fukushima plant boundary with the ISOE participants and to develop a state-of-the-art ISOE report on best radiation protection management practices for proper radiation

  20. Road accident rates: strategies and programmes for improving road traffic safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniewicz, K; Goniewicz, M; Pawłowski, W; Fiedor, P

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, the problem of road accident rates is one of the most important health and social policy issues concerning the countries in all continents. Each year, nearly 1.3 million people worldwide lose their life on roads, and 20-50 million sustain severe injuries, the majority of which require long-term treatment. The objective of the study was to identify the most frequent, constantly occurring causes of road accidents, as well as outline actions constituting a basis for the strategies and programmes aiming at improving traffic safety on local and global levels. Comparative analysis of literature concerning road safety was performed, confirming that although road accidents had a varied and frequently complex background, their causes have changed only to a small degree over the years. The causes include: lack of control and enforcement concerning implementation of traffic regulation (primarily driving at excessive speed, driving under the influence of alcohol, and not respecting the rights of other road users (mainly pedestrians and cyclists), lack of appropriate infrastructure and unroadworthy vehicles. The number of fatal accidents and severe injuries, resulting from road accidents, may be reduced through applying an integrated approach to safety on roads. The strategies and programmes for improving road traffic should include the following measures: reducing the risk of exposure to an accident, prevention of accidents, reduction in bodily injuries sustained in accidents, and reduction of the effects of injuries by improvement of post-accident medical care.

  1. Manual for the classification and prioritization of risks due to major accidents in process and related industries. Inter-Agency programme on the assessment and management of health and environmental risks from energy and other complex industrial systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The IAEA, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) decided in 1986 to join forces in order to promote the use of integrated areas wide approaches to risk management. The Inter-Agency Programme brings together expertise in health, the environment, industry and energy, all vital for effective risk management. The purpose of the Inter-Agency Programme is to develop a broad approach to the identification, prioritization and minimization of industrial hazards in a given geographical area. This is one of a series of publications intended to be issued on behalf of the four participating UN organizations. This is the first revision of the original report, distributed in December 1993. The revision was undertaken in the light of experience with the original edition and was prompted by the wish to add the results of a practical case study and some new developments. 13 figs, 23 tabs

  2. Artificial intelligence applications in accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    For nuclear power plant accident management, there are some addition concerns: linking AI systems to live data streams must be mastered; techniques for processing sensor inputs with varying data quality need to be provided; systems responsiveness to changing plant conditions and multiple user requests should, in general, be improved; there is a need for porting applications from specialized AI machines onto conventional computer hardware without incurring unacceptable performance penalties; human factors guidelines are required for new user interfaces in AI applications; methods for verification and validation of AI-based systems must be developed; and, finally, there is a need for proven methods to evaluate use effectiveness and firmly establish the benefits of AI-based accident management systems. (orig./GL)

  3. Application of NUREG-1150 methods and results to accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.; Sype, T.; Camp, A.; Maloney, K.

    1991-01-01

    The use of NUREG-1150 and similar probabilistic risk assessments in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and industry risk management programs is discussed. Risk management is more comprehensive than the commonly used term accident management. Accident management includes strategies to prevent vessel breach, mitigate radionuclide releases from the reactor coolant system, and mitigate radionuclide releases to the environment. Risk management also addresses prevention of accident initiators, prevention of core damage, and implementation of effective emergency response procedures. The methods and results produced in NUREG-1150 provide a framework within which current risk management strategies can be evaluated, and future risk management programs can be developed and assessed. Examples of the use of the NUREG-1150 framework for identifying and evaluating risk management options are presented. All phases of risk management are discussed, with particular attention given to the early phases of accidents. Plans and methods for evaluating accident management strategies that have been identified in the NRC accident management program are discussed

  4. Application of NUREG-1150 methods and results to accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.; Sype, T.; Camp, A.; Maloney, K.

    1990-01-01

    The use of NUREG-1150 and similar Probabilistic Risk Assessments in NRC and industry risk management programs is discussed. ''Risk management'' is more comprehensive than the commonly used term ''accident management.'' Accident management includes strategies to prevent vessel breach, mitigate radionuclide releases from the reactor coolant system, and mitigate radionuclide releases to the environment. Risk management also addresses prevention of accident initiators, prevention of core damage, and implementation of effective emergency response procedures. The methods and results produced in NUREG-1150 provide a framework within which current risk management strategies can be evaluated, and future risk management programs can be developed and assessed. Examples of the use of the NUREG-1150 framework for identifying and evaluating risk management options are presented. All phases of risk management are discussed, with particular attention given to the early phases of accidents. Plans and methods for evaluating accident management strategies that have been identified in the NRC accident management program are discussed. 2 refs., 3 figs

  5. Developing a knowledge base for the management of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.; Jenkins, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Prior to the accident at Three Mile Island, little attention was given to the development of procedures for the management of severe accidents, that is, accidents in which the reactor core is damaged. Since TMI, however, significant effort has been devoted to developing strategies for severe accident management. At the same time, the potential application of artificial intelligence techniques, particularly expert systems, to complex decision-making tasks such as accident diagnosis and response has received considerable attention. The need to develop strategies for accident management suggests that a computerized knowledge base such as used by an expert system could be developed to collect and organize knowledge for severe accident management. This paper suggests a general method which could be used to develop such a knowledge base, and how it could be used to enhance accident management capabilities

  6. ADAM: An Accident Diagnostic,Analysis and Management System - Applications to Severe Accident Simulation and Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavisca, M.J.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Esmaili, H.; Schulz, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Accident Diagnostic, Analysis and Management (ADAM) computer code has been developed as a tool for on-line applications to accident diagnostics, simulation, management and training. ADAM's severe accident simulation capabilities incorporate a balance of mechanistic, phenomenologically based models with simple parametric approaches for elements including (but not limited to) thermal hydraulics; heat transfer; fuel heatup, meltdown, and relocation; fission product release and transport; combustible gas generation and combustion; and core-concrete interaction. The overall model is defined by a relatively coarse spatial nodalization of the reactor coolant and containment systems and is advanced explicitly in time. The result is to enable much faster than real time (i.e., 100 to 1000 times faster than real time on a personal computer) applications to on-line investigations and/or accident management training. Other features of the simulation module include provision for activation of water injection, including the Engineered Safety Features, as well as other mechanisms for the assessment of accident management and recovery strategies and the evaluation of PSA success criteria. The accident diagnostics module of ADAM uses on-line access to selected plant parameters (as measured by plant sensors) to compute the thermodynamic state of the plant, and to predict various margins to safety (e.g., times to pressure vessel saturation and steam generator dryout). Rule-based logic is employed to classify the measured data as belonging to one of a number of likely scenarios based on symptoms, and a number of 'alarms' are generated to signal the state of the reactor and containment. This paper will address the features and limitations of ADAM with particular focus on accident simulation and management. (authors)

  7. International programme to mitigate the health effects of the Chernobyl accident: Establishment of an international centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    In April 1990, an agreement was signed between the WHO and the USSR Ministry of Health to set up a long-term international programme to assist the populations affected by the Chernobyl accident, as well as to increase the body of scientific knowledge about radiation effects. This report outlines the contents of the agreement and describes the action taken by the WHO to implement the programme

  8. Risk impact of two accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.; Camp, A.

    1992-01-01

    This report probabilistic Risk Assessment is used to evaluate two accident management strategies: intentionally depressurizing the reactor coolant system of a pressurized water reactor to prevent containment-pressurization during high pressure melt ejection, and flooding the containment of a boiling water reactor to prevent or delay vessel breach. Sensitivity studies indicated that intentional depressurization would not provide a significant risk reduction at Surry. A preliminary evaluation of the containment flooding strategy indicated that it might prove beneficial for some plants, but that further strategy development would be needed to fully evaluate the strategy-

  9. Main post-accident management stakes: IRSN's point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre Oudiz

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Off site management of a radiological crisis covers two phases which need to be clearly distinguished even if there are links between them: emergency phase and recovery phase (also called late or post-accident phase). The presentation will deal with the latter, rather neglected up until recently, but conveying special attention from now on in France and at the international level. It is clear now that the long term management of a radiological or nuclear crisis cannot be reduced to merely site decontamination. Actually, environmental decontamination considerations would be only one amongst other essential economical, social, health, psychological, cultural, and symbolical concerns. This is why off site management of a radiological crisis requires innovative governance, in order to challenge such a complexity. This need for challenge led IRSN to have on the go technical developments and new governance modes reflection. 1) Technical developments: they deal with implementing an organisation, a set of methods, a platform of technical tools which would allow the stakeholders to carry out efficiently their mission during the recovery phase. For example, countermeasures for agricultural and urban rehabilitation are developed within the framework of the 6. PCRDT EURANOS programme. Teams from several countries are involved in common elaboration of rehabilitation strategies based on the best available knowledge. Besides this, simple operational decision aiding tools for the stakeholders (local administration, elected representatives, professional agricultural groups, etc.) are currently developed by IRSN within the framework of the nuclear post-accident exercises. IRSN is also involved in doctrinal reflections about the respective roles of radioactive measurements in the environment and radiological consequences calculation during emergency and recovery phases. Criteria for emergency countermeasures withdrawal are also currently under

  10. Accident management strategy focusing on the software area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taminami, Tatsuya; Ono, Akira

    1996-01-01

    Tokyo Electric Power Company has already conducted individual plant examination (IPE) and worked out specific accident management strategies. In addition to hardware projects which will be carried out in due order from now on, we have studied the software aspects of accident management, including personnel education and training in relevant subjects. Based on the results of these studies, a decision has been made on the work sharing between the main control room (MCR) and technical support center (TSC) in implementing accident management. We have also decided on a improvement of guidelines and manuals, such as emergency operation procedures (EOP) and accident management guidelines (AMG), and on a basic policy on personnel education and training in accident management. Following this decision, our future efforts will be focused on improving software measures in combination with hardware measures to work out a well-balanced accident management program. (author)

  11. Emergency room management of radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Emergency room management of radioactively contaminated patients who have an associated medical injury requiring immediate attention must be handled with care. Radioactive contamination of the skin of a worker is not a medical emergency and is usually dealt with at the plant. Effective preplanning and on-the-scene triage will allow the seriously injured and contaminated patients to get the medical care they need with a minimum of confusion and interference. Immediate medical and surgical priorities always take precedence over radiation injuries and radioactive contamination. Probably the most difficult aspect of emergency management is the rarity of such accidents and hence the unfamiliarity of the medical staff with the appropriate procedures. The authors discuss how the answer to these problems is preplanning, having a simple and workable procedure and finally having 24-h access to experts

  12. ATHLET validation using accident management experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teschendorff, V.; Glaeser, H.; Steinhoff, F. [Gasellschaft fuer Anlagen - und Reaktorsicherheit (GSR) mbH, Garching (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    The computer code ATHLET is being developed as an advanced best-estimate code for the simulation of leaks and transients in PWRs and BWRs including beyond design basis accidents. The code has features that are of special interest for applications to small leaks and transients with accident management, e.g. initialisation by a steady-state calculation, full-range drift-flux model, and dynamic mixture level tracking. The General Control Simulation Module of ATHLET is a flexible tool for the simulation of the balance-of-plant and control systems including the various operator actions in the course of accident sequences with AM measures. The systematic validation of ATHLET is based on a well balanced set of integral and separate effect tests derived from the CSNI proposal emphasising, however, the German combined ECC injection system which was investigated in the UPTF, PKL and LOBI test facilities. PKL-III test B 2.1 simulates a cool-down procedure during an emergency power case with three steam generators isolated. Natural circulation under these conditions was investigated in detail in a pressure range of 4 to 2 MPa. The transient was calculated over 22000 s with complicated boundary conditions including manual control actions. The calculations demonstrations the capability to model the following processes successfully: (1) variation of the natural circulation caused by steam generator isolation, (2) vapour formation in the U-tubes of the isolated steam generators, (3) break-down of circulation in the loop containing the isolated steam generator following controlled cool-down of the secondary side, (4) accumulation of vapour in the pressure vessel dome. One conclusion with respect to the suitability of experiments simulating AM procedures for code validation purposes is that complete documentation of control actions during the experiment must be available. Special attention should be given to the documentation of operator actions in the course of the experiment.

  13. Management of Radioactive Waste after a Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, Per; Laurent, Gerard; Rindo, Hiroshi; Georges, Christine; Ito, Eiichiro; Yamada, Norikazu; Iablokov, Iuri; Kilochytska, Tatiana; Jefferies, Nick; Byrne, Jim; Siemann, Michael; Koganeya, Toshiyuki; Aoki, Hiroomi

    2016-01-01

    The NEA Expert Group on Fukushima Waste Management and Decommissioning R and D (EGFWMD) was established in 2014 to offer advice to the authorities in Japan on the management of large quantities of on-site waste with complex properties and to share experiences with the international community and NEA member countries on ongoing work at the Fukushima Daiichi site. The group was formed with specialists from around the world who had gained experience in waste management, radiological contamination or decommissioning and waste management R and D after the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents. This report provides technical opinions and ideas from these experts on post-accident waste management and R and D at the Fukushima Daiichi site, as well as information on decommissioning challenges. Chapter 1 provides general descriptions and a short introduction to nuclear accidents or radiological contaminations; for instance the Chernobyl NPP accident, the Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident and the Windscale fire accident. Chapter 2 provides experiences on regulator-implementer interaction in both normal and abnormal situations, including after a nuclear accident. Chapter 3 provides experiences on stakeholder involvement after accidents. These two chapters focus on human aspects after an accident and provide recommendations on how to improve communication between stakeholders so as to resolve issues arising after unexpected nuclear accidents. Chapters 4, 5 and 6 provide information on technical issues related to waste management after accidents. Chapter 4 focuses on the physical and chemical nature of the waste, Chapter 5 on radiological characterisation, and Chapter 6 on waste classification and categorisation. The persons involved in waste management after an accident should address these issues as soon as possible after the accident. Chapters 7 and 8 also focus on technical issues but with a long-term perspective of the waste direction in the future. Chapter 7 relates

  14. Large Break LOCA Accident Management Strategies for Accidents With Large Containment Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sdouz, Gert

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this work is the investigation of the influence of different accident management strategies on the thermal-hydraulics in the containment during a Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident with a large containment leak from the beginning of the accident. The increasing relevance of terrorism suggests a closer look at this kind of severe accidents. Normally the course of severe accidents and their associated phenomena are investigated with the assumption of an intact containment from the beginning of the accident. This intact containment has the ability to retain a large part of the radioactive inventory. In these cases there is only a release via a very small leakage due to the un-tightness of the containment up to cavity bottom melt through. This paper represents the last part of a comprehensive study on the influence of accident management strategies on the source term of VVER-1000 reactors. Basically two different accident sequences were investigated: the 'Station Blackout'- sequence and the 'Large Break LOCA'. In a first step the source term calculations were performed assuming an intact containment from the beginning of the accident and no accident management action. In a further step the influence of different accident management strategies was studied. The last part of the project was a repetition of the calculations with the assumption of a damaged containment from the beginning of the accident. This paper concentrates on the last step in the case of a Large Break LOCA. To be able to compare the results with calculations performed years ago the calculations were performed using the Source Term Code Package (STCP), hydrogen explosions are not considered. In this study four different scenarios have been investigated. The main parameter was the switch on time of the spray systems. One of the results is the influence of different accident management strategies on the source term. In the comparison with the sequence with intact containment it was

  15. Verification of accident management strategies at the Forsmark plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenhielm, G.; Engqvist, A.; Ingemarsson, K.F.; Andersson, T.

    1992-01-01

    Due to government requirements severe accident mitigating measures were implemented at the Swedish State Power Board nuclear power plants in 1988. These measures included protection against early containment impairment, highly redundant containment spray and filtered venting of the containment. We also developed accident management strategies and corresponding documents to counteract a severe accident situation. This paper describes the accident management strategies and documents at the Forsmark nuclear power plant, the verification process of the basic approach, and our ongoing program for further development and verification of the accident management program. In summary: From the beginning it was emphasized that it was not only mitigating measures implemented, it was an accident mitigation program, including new EOP's and education and training. This program was implemented, as required by the Swedish government in the end of 1988. Since that time the accident management strategy has been validated, verified and further developed. As a general conclusion, the implemented accident management program has reached a fair degree of completeness at the Forsmark plant. It is expected that in the case a hypothetical accident would occur the envisaged strategy would handle the accident in such a way that the radiological consequences would be insignificant and radiation exposure to the personnel would be within ICRP recommendations. To reach and keep this goal it is imperative that a mental preparedness is always present. This is achieved with a continuous education, training and analyses

  16. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after core degradation has occurred) of postulated BWR severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for additional assessment. The first is a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertains to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose is to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies have been performed during 1991 under the auspices of the Detailed Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Strategies Program. This paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies and the potential for their success. 33 refs., 9 figs

  17. Assessment of light water reactor accident management programs and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammersley, R.J.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an assessment of the current light water reactor experience regarding accident management programs and associated technology developments. This assessment for light water reactor (LWR) designs is provided as a resource and reference for the development of accident management capabilities for the production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The specific objectives of this assessment are as follows: 1. Perform a review of the NRC, utility, and industry (NUMARC, EPRI) accident management programs and implementation experience. 2. Provide an assessment of the problems and opportunities in developing an accident management program in conjunction or following the Individual Plant Examination process. 3. Review current NRC, utility, and industry technological developments in the areas of computational tools, severe accident predictive tools, diagnostic aids, and severe accident training and simulation

  18. Severe accident management guidelines (SAMGs) for German NPPs; Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGS) fuer deutsche KKW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Martin; Tietsch, Wolfgang [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Mannheim (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The US NRC declared in consequence of the Three Mile Island accident the severe accident management to be an unresolved safety issue. In the following years worldwide the development of generic management guidelines was started aimed to implement preventive measures to prevent core damage and mitigation measures to reduce the accident consequences into the emergency manuals of nuclear power plants. The PWROG (pressurized water reactor owners group) SAMGs were developed by Westinghouse that are meanwhile implemented in US NPPs but also in Europe, incl. reactors with VVER, KWU or Framatome design. The authors describe the concept of the emergency manuals implemented in German NPPs and the differences to the SAMG concept. SAMGs include a complete strategy to minimize the consequences of severe accidents, independent of the plant status, including the risk of component failures. Measures to bring the meltdown to an end have not priority. The implementation of SAMGs into the German emergency manuals needs clear criteria for the transition from preventive measures (aimed to stabilize the reactor) to mitigation measures (minimization of fission product release). Several examples are discussed.

  19. A structured approach to individual plant evaluation and accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klopp, G.T.

    1991-01-01

    The current requirements for the performance of individual plant evaluations (IPE's) include the derivation of accident management insights as and if they occur in the course of finalizing an IPE. The development of formal, structured accident management programs is, however, explicitly excluded from current IPE requirements. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is following the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) efforts to establish the framework(s) for accident management program development and plants to issue requirements on such development at a later date. The Commonwealth Edison program consists of comprehensive level 2 PRA's which address the requirements for IPE's and which go beyond those requirements. From the start of the IPE efforts, it was firmly held, within Edison, that the best way to fully and economically extract a viable accident management program from an IPE was to integrate the two efforts from the start and include the accident management program development as a required IPE product

  20. Using MARS to assist in managing a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raines, J.C.; Hammersley, R.J.; Henry, R.E.

    2004-01-01

    During an accident, information about the current and possible future states of the plant provides guidance for accident managers in evaluating which actions should be taken. However, depending upon the nature of the accident and the stress levels imposed on the plant staff responding to the accident the current and future plant assessments may be very difficult or nearly impossible to perform without supplemental training and/or appropriate tools. The MAAP Accident Response System (MARS) has been developed as a calculational aid to assist the responsible accident management individuals. Specifically MARS provides additional insights on the current and possible future states of the plant during an accident including the influence of operator actions. In addition to serving as a calculational aid, the MARS software can be an effective means for providing supplemental training. The MARS software uses engineering calculations to perform an integral assessment of the plant status including a consistency assessment of the available instrumentation. In addition, it uses the Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) to provide near term predictions of the plant response if corrective actions are taken. This paper will discuss the types of information that are beneficial to the accident manager and how MARS addresses each. The MARS calculational functions include: instrumentation, validation and simulation, projected operator response based on the EOPs, as well as estimated timing and magnitude of in-plant and off-site radiation dose releases. Each of these items is influential in the management of a severe accident. (author)

  1. A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastenberg, W.E. [ed.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering] [and others

    1993-09-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed.

  2. A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K.

    1993-09-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed

  3. Policy Pathways: Energy Management Programmes for Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-06

    The IEA Policy Pathway publications provide details on how to implement specific recommendations drawn from the IEA 25 Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations. This Policy Pathway, jointly produced by the International Energy Agency and the Institute for Industrial Productivity, develops the critical steps for policy makers implementing energy management programmes for industry. Optimising energy use in industry is essential to improve industrial competitiveness and achieve wider societal goals such as energy security, economic recovery and development, climate change mitigation and environmental protection.While there is significant potential to decrease energy consumption in this sector, opportunities to improve energy efficiency are still under-exploited. Energy management programmes have shown to be instrumental in addressing many of the barriers that inhibit wide-scale uptake of energy management in industry. The Policy Pathway builds on lessons learned from country experiences and provides actionable guidance on how to plan and design, implement, evaluate and monitor energy management programmes for industry.

  4. Indian programme on radioactive waste management

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences ... The primary objective of radioactive waste management is protection of human health, environment and future generation. This article describes, briefly, the Indian programme on management of different radioactive wastes arising in the entire nuclear fuel cycle adhering to this ...

  5. Indian programme on radioactive waste management

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The primary objective of radioactive waste management is protection of human health, environment and future generation. This article describes, briefly, the Indian programme on management of different radioactive wastes arising in the entire nuclear fuel cycle adhering to this objective.

  6. Indian programme on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattal, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of radioactive waste management is protection of human health, environment and future generation. This article describes, briefly, the Indian programme on management of different radioactive wastes arising in the entire nuclear fuel cycle adhering to this objective. (author)

  7. Application of simulation techniques for accident management training in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    Many IAEA Member States operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) are at present developing accident management programmes (AMPs) for the prevention and mitigation of severe accidents. However, the level of implementation varies significantly between NPPs. The exchange of experience and best practices can considerably contribute to the quality, and facilitate the implementation of AMPs at the plants. Various IAEA activities assist countries in the area of accident management. Several publications have been developed which provide guidance and support in establishing accident management at NPPs. The defence in depth concept in nuclear safety requires that, although highly unlikely, beyond design basis and severe accident conditions should also be considered, in spite of the fact that they were not explicitly addressed in the original design of currently operating nuclear power plants (NPPs). Defence in depth is physically achieved by means of four successive barriers (fuel matrix, cladding, primary coolant boundary, and containment) that prevent the release of radioactive material. These barriers are protected by a set of design measures at three levels, including prevention of abnormal operation and failures (level 1), control of abnormal operation and detection of failures (level 2) and control of accidents within the design basis (level 3). Should these first three levels fail to ensure the structural integrity of the core, additional efforts are made at the fourth level of defence in depth in order to further reduce the risks. The objective at level 4 is to ensure that both the likelihood of an accident entailing significant core damage (severe accident) and the magnitude of radioactive releases following a severe accident are kept as low as reasonably achievable. The term 'accident management' refers to the overall range of capabilities of a NPP and its personnel to both prevent and mitigate accident situations that could lead to severe fuel damage in the reactor

  8. The management of individuals involved in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T.N.

    1991-01-01

    The author defines the objectives and the coverage of two radiation accident courses presented in 1990 by the US Radiation Emergency Assistance Centre and Training Site of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities together with some Australian Medical institutions. It is estimated that the courses, directed towards physicians, radiotherapists and nurses gave plenty practical advices and details on how to go about radiation accident managements. A manual on handling radiation accidents is also to be prepared after the courses

  9. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007
Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Management Curriculum / curriculum Management Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 10, 11, 12 September, (full) Managing by Project (English) 9, 10 October (2 places disponibles) Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 15, 16, 17 October, (full) Introduction to Leadership (English) 17, 18, 19 October, (full) Quality Management (Bilingual) 18, 19 October (10 places available) Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (full) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (full) Risk Management (English) 13, 14 December (6 places available) Communication Curriculum / curriculum communication Stress Management (English) 25, 26 September (6 places...

  10. C.E.C. research on environmental consequences of nuclear accidents - policy and programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardi, F.; Graziani, G.

    1988-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident has given a new impact to the actions of the Commission of the European Communities on Radiation Protection. During the last year the Council of Ministers has adopted: - a decision on early information exchange between Member States and the Commission in the event of a radiological emergency, - a decision on the adhesion of the Community to the International Conventional on early notification of nuclear accidents, - a regulation on a first set of maximum permissible levels of radioactivity in foodstuffs following a nuclear accident, - a special regulation on radioactivity levels of imported agricultural products for the next two years. Several other decisions are in preparation, such as the completion of the regulation of radioactivity in foodstuffs, the revision of the basic safety standards, a directive on the information of the public in the case of an accident, etc.. Scientific research supports the Commission policy by providing the scientific background and rationale for decisions and recommendations. The shared-cost 1985-1989 Radiation Protection Programme was underway at the time of the Chernobyl accident, and several running actions were modified to account for the new situation

  11. Development of an accident management expert system for containment assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.; Sebo, D.E.; Haney, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRSC) is sponsoring a program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop an accident management expert system. The intended users of the system are the personnel of the NRC Operations Center in Washington, D.C. The expert system will be used to help NRC personnel monitor and evaluate the status and management of the containment during a severe reactor accident. The knowledge base will include severe accident knowledge regarding the maintenance of the critical safety functions, especially containment integrity, during an accident. This paper summarizes the concepts that have been developed for the accident management expert system, and the plans that have been developed for its implementation

  12. International Nuclear Management Programmes -- INMP-- (VNMU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    • INMP is an IAEA-facilitated collaboration for universities to provide master’s degree programs in nuclear management, targeting managers or future managers working in the nuclear sector. • There are currently no full master’s degree programmes specializing in management for the nuclear sector. • Managers at NPP are typically engineers with few chances of formal management education. • In newcomer countries to nuclear energy, working towards the introduction of nuclear power, often lack technical or managerial experience in nuclear energy

  13. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007 Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier.   Management Curriculum / curriculum Management NEW COURSE - Dealing with Conflict, 5 & 12 October (6 places available) Managing by Project (English) 9, 10 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 15, 16, 17 October\t(Full) Introduction to Leadership (English) 17, 18, 19 October\t(Full) Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (1 place available) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Risk Management (English) 13, 14 December (6 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercice) - 
Session to be scheduled from November 2007 to January 2008 &...

  14. Sustainable integration of EU research in severe accident phenomenology and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dorsselaere, Jean-Pierre; Albiol, Thierry; Chaumont, Bernard; Haste, Tim; Journeau, Christophe; Meyer, Leonhard; Sehgal, Bal Raj; Schwinges, Bernd; Beraha, David; Annunziato, Alessandro; Zeyen, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The SARNET network gathers most worldwide actors involved in severe accident research. → It defines common research programmes for resolving the most important pending safety issues. → It optimises the use of the available European resources and constitutes sustainable research groups. → It disseminates the knowledge on severe accidents through education courses. → Knowledge produced is capitalized through physical models in the ASTEC simulation code. - Abstract: In order to optimise the use of the available means and to constitute sustainable research groups in the European Union, the Severe Accident Research NETwork of Excellence (SARNET) has gathered, between 2004 and 2008, 51 organizations representing most of the actors involved in severe accident (SA) research in Europe plus Canada. This project was co-funded by the European Commission (EC) under the 6th Euratom Framework Programme. Its objective was to resolve the most important pending issues for enhancing, in regard of SA, the safety of existing and future nuclear power plants (NPPs). SARNET tackled the fragmentation that existed between the national R and D programmes, in defining common research programmes and developing common computer codes and methodologies for safety assessment. The Joint Programme of Activities consisted in: -Implementing an advanced communication tool for accessing all project information, fostering exchange of information, and managing documents; - Harmonizing and re-orienting the research programmes, and defining new ones; -Analyzing the experimental results provided by research programmes in order to elaborate a common understanding of relevant phenomena; -Developing the ASTEC code (integral computer code used to predict the NPP behaviour during a postulated SA) by capitalizing in terms of physical models the knowledge produced within SARNET; - Developing scientific databases, in which the results of research experimental programmes are stored in a common

  15. Management of severe pelvic injury following road traffic accident in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 34 year old woman involved in road traffic accident with severe anterior and posterior pelvic fractures with associated soft tissue injury was referred from Wa Regional Hospital 18 hours after the accident to Tania Specialist Hospital in Tamale. Emergency resuscitative measures such as catheterization and management of ...

  16. ACCIDENT PHENOMENA OF RISK IMPORTANCE PROJECT - Continued RESEARCH CONCERNING SEVERE ACCIDENT PHENOMENA AND MANAGEMENT IN Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolandson, S.; Mueller, F.; Loevenhielm, G.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1988 all reactors in Sweden have mitigating measures, such as filtered vents, implemented. In parallel with the work of implementing these measures, a cooperation effort (RAMA projects) between the Swedish utilities and the Nuclear Power Inspectorate was performed to acquire sufficient knowledge about severe accident research work. The on-going project has the name Accident Phenomena of Risk Importance 3. In this paper, we will give background information about severe accident management in Sweden. In the Accident Phenomena of Risk Importance 3 project we will focus on the work concerning coolability of melted core in lower plenum which is the main focus of the In-vessel Coolability Task Group within the Accident Phenomena of Risk Importance 3 project. The Accident Phenomena of Risk Importance 3 project has joined on international consortium and the in-vessel cooling experiments are performed by Fauske and Associates, Inc. in Burr Ridge, Illinois, United States America, Sweden also intends to do one separate experiment with one instrument penetration we have in Swedish/Finnish BWR's. Other parts of the Accident Phenomena of Risk Importance 3 project, such as support to level 2 studies, the research at Royal Institute of Technology and participation in international programs, such as Cooperative Severe Accident Research Program, Advanced Containment Experiments and PHEBUS will be briefly described in the paper

  17. Accident management for PWRs in France and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heili, F.; Lecomte, C.; L'Homme, A.

    1991-11-01

    The results of risk analyses, research and particularly the two severe accidents in the nuclear power plants TMI-2 and Chernobyl let to a worldwide re-examination of all aspects dealing with the capability to cope with severe accidents. Strategies have been developed or are under development providing actions that can be taken to prevent severe accidents or to mitigate their consequences. Those strategies are investigated and discussed using the term 'accident management'. The purpose of this report is to present the respective views in France and Germany and to point out differences and commonalties of the approaches. This report also includes proposals for further work

  18. On preparation for accident management in LWR power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear Safety Commission received the report from Reactor Safety General Examination Committee which investigated the policy of executing the preparation for accident management. The basic policy on the preparation for accident management was decided by Nuclear Safety Commission in May, 1992. This Examination Committee investigated the policy of executing the preparation for accident management, which had been reported from the administrative office, and as the result, it judged the policy as adequate, therefore, the report is made. The course to the foundation of subcommittee is reported. The basic policy of the examination on accident management by the subcommittee conforming to the decision by Nuclear Safety Commission, the measures of accident management which were extracted for BWR and PWR facilities, the examination of the technical adequacy of selecting accident sequences in BWR and PWR facilities and the countermeasures to them, the adequacy of the evaluation of the possibility of executing accident management measures and their effectiveness and the adequacy of the evaluation of effect to existing safety functions, the preparation of operation procedure manual, and education and training plan are reported. (K.I.)

  19. The management of severe accidents in modern pressure tube reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.K.; Santamaura, P.; Blahnik, C.; Snell, V.G.; Duffey, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced new reactor designs resist severe accidents through a balance between prevention and mitigation. This balance is achieved by designing to ensure that such accidents are very rare; and by limiting core damage progression and releases from the plant in the event of such rare accidents. These design objectives are supported by a suitable combination of probabilistic safety analysis, engineering judgment and experimental and analytical study. This paper describes the approach used for the Advanced CANDU Reactor TM -1000 (ACR-1000) design, which includes provisions to both prevent and mitigate severe accidents. The paper describes the use of PSA as a 'design assist' tool; the analysis of core damage progression pathways; the definition of the core damage states; the capability of the mitigating systems to stop and control severe accident events; and the severe accident management opportunities for consequence reduction. (author)

  20. Sustainable integration of EU research in severe accident phenomenology and management (SARNET2 project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dorsselaere, Jean-Pierre; Albiol, Thierry; Chaumont, Bernard; Haste, Tim; Journeau, Christophe; Meyer, Leonhard; Sehgal, Bal Raj; Schwinges, Bernd; Beraha, David; Annunziato, Alessandro; Zeyen, Roland

    2010-01-01

    In order to optimise the use of the available means and to constitute sustainable research groups in the European Union, the Severe Accident Research NETwork of Excellence (SARNET) has gathered 51 organisations representing most of the actors involved in Severe Accident (SA) research in Europe plus Canada. This project was co-funded by the European Commission (EC) under the 6th Euratom Framework Programme. Its objective was to resolve the most important pending issues for enhancing, in regard of SA, the safety of existing and future Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). SARNET tackled the fragmentation that existed between the national R and D programmes, in defining common research programmes and developing common computer codes for safety assessment. The Joint Programme of Activities consisted in: (i) Implementing an advanced communication tool for accessing all project information, fostering exchange of information, and managing documents; (ii) Harmonizing and re-orienting the research programmes, and defining new ones; (iii) Analyzing the experimental results provided by research programmes in order to elaborate a common understanding of relevant phenomena; (iv) Developing the ASTEC code (integral computer code used to predict the NPP behaviour during a postulated SA) by integrating the knowledge produced within SARNET; (v) Developing Scientific Databases, in which the results of research experimental programmes are stored in a common format; (vi) Developing a common methodology for Probabilistic Safety Assessment of NPPs; (vii) Developing short courses and writing a text book on Severe Accidents for students and researchers; (viii) Promoting personnel mobility amongst various European organizations. This paper presents the major achievements after four and a half years of operation of the network, in terms of knowledge gained, of improvements of the ASTEC reference code, of dissemination of results and of integration of the research programmes conducted by the various

  1. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007 Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Management Curriculum / curriculum Management Managing by Project (English)\t9, 10 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact (English)\t15, 16, 17 October, (Full) Introduction to Leadership (English)\t17, 18, 19 October, (Full) Managing Teams (English)\t13, 14, 15 November\t(1 place available)) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual)\t20, 21, 22 November (Full) Risk Management (English)\t13, 14 December (6 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercice) Session to be scheduled from November 2007 to January 2008 Communication Curriculum / curriculum communication Stress Management (English)\t25, 26 September (4 p...

  2. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from October to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Leadership - 2 October, 29 October + 1 December - (full) CDP-SL for new supervisors, part 1 - 5, 6, 7 October - (2 places available) Introduction to Leadership - 7, 8, 9 October - (4 places available) Voice your Leadership - 13, 14 October - (full) Managing Teams - 10, 11, 12 November - (7 places available) Risk Management - 17, 18 November - (6 places available) Dealing with Conflict - 20, 27 November - (5 places available) CDP pour nouveaux superviseurs, part 1 - 30 novembre, 1, 2 décembre - (4 places disponibles) Communication Curriculum Making presentations - 14, 15 October + 9 November - (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe - 19, 20 octobre - (7 places disponibles) Gestion du stress - 20, 21 octobre - (8 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement - 21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novemb...

  3. Decision-making guide for management of agriculture in the case of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reales, N.; Fourrie, L.; Quinio, C.; Grastilleur, Ch.

    2008-01-01

    For several years, agricultural and nuclear professionals in France have been working on how to manage the agricultural situation in the event of a nuclear accident. This work resulted in measures at both the national (Aube nuclear safety exercises in 2003, INEX3 in 2005) and international levels (EURATOM Programmes). Following on from the European FARMING (FP5) and EURANOS (FP6) works, ACTA', IRSN and six agricultural technical institutes which are specialized in agricultural production and processing network (arable crop [especially cereals, maize, pulses, potatoes and forage crops], fruits and vegetables, vine and wine, livestock farming [cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry]), created a resource adapted to the French context: the Decision-aiding Tool for the Management of Agriculture in case of a Nuclear Accident. Devised for the Ministry of Agriculture services supporting state officials in a radiation emergency, this manual focuses on the early phase following the accident when the state of emergency would make discussion on countermeasures with a large stakeholder panel impossible. Supported by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries and the French Nuclear Safety Authority, this project increased knowledge of post-accident management strategies and made an important contribution to the national think tank set up within the framework of the French Steering Committee for managing the post-event phase of a nuclear accident (CODIRPA). This article describes how the manual evolved throughout the project and the development of new resources. (authors)

  4. Decision-making guide for management of agriculture in the case of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourrie, Laetitia; Grosjean, Francois; Adam, Didier; Pretet, Caroline; Michel, Aurelie; Fostier, Bernard; Bertrand, Sophie; Cessac, Bruno; Reales, Nicolas IRSN; Aubert, Claude

    2007-05-01

    For several years, agricultural and nuclear professionals in France have been working on how to manage the agricultural situation in the event of a nuclear accident. This work resulted in measures at both the national (Aube nuclear safety exercises in 2003, INEX3 in 2005) and international levels (EURATOM Programmes). Following on from the European FARMING (FP5) and EURANOS (FP6) works, ACTA', IRSN and six agricultural technical institutes which are specialized in agricultural production and processing network (arable crop [especially cereals, maize, pulses, potatoes and forage crops], fruits and vegetables, vine and wine, livestock farming [cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry]), created a resource adapted to the French context: the Decision-aiding Tool for the Management of Agriculture in case of a Nuclear Accident. Devised for the Ministry of Agriculture services supporting state officials in a radiation emergency, this manual focuses on the early phase following the accident when the state of emergency would make discussion on countermeasures with a large stakeholder panel impossible. Supported by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries and the French Nuclear Safety Authority, this project increased knowledge of post-accident management strategies and made an important contribution to the national think tank set up within the framework of the French Steering Committee for managing the post-event phase of a nuclear accident (CODIRPA). This article describes how the manual evolved throughout the project and the development of new resources

  5. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from November to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (4 places available) CDP pour nouveaux superviseurs, part 1\t30 novembre, 1, 2 décembre (2 places disponibles) Managing by Project\t1, 2 December (full) Communication Curriculum Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (complet) Managing Stress\t10, 11 November (6 places available) Communicating Effectively\t11, 12 November + 8, 9 December (4 places available) Orientation service\t12, 13 novembre (5 places disponibles) Gestion du stress\t17, 18 novembre (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à une réunion de travail\t9, 10, 11 décembre (3 places disponibles) If you are interested in attending any of the above course sessions, please talk to your supervisor and/or your DTO, and apply electronically via EDH from the course description p...

  6. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (2 places available) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (6 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (full) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (3 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (complet) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (complet) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1 place disponible) Serv...

  7. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (5 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (2 places available) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (8 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (2 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (1 place disponible) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1...

  8. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (2 places available) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (6 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (full) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (3 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (complet) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (complet) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1 place disponible) Service Orientation/Orienta...

  9. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Calendar of courses for February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Management Curriculum Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 3, 4, 5 February (part 1) + 13, 14 May 2009 (part 2) (full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2) 24, 25, 26 February (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (2 places available) Quality Management 25, 26 March (10 places available) Introduction to Leadership 1, 2, 3 April (3 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact 5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (8 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (4 places available) Communication Curriculum Managing stress\t23, 24 February (6 places available) Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (2 places available) Négociation efficace\t17, 18 mar...

  10. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 3, 4, 5 February (part 1) + 13, 14 May 2009 (part 2)\t(full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2) 24, 25, 26 February (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (2 places available) Quality Management\t25, 26 March (10 places available) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (3 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (8 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (4 places available) Communication Curriculum Managing stress\t23, 24 February (6 places available) Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (2 places available) Négociation efficace\t17, 18 mars (6 places d...

  11. Applying Functional Modeling for Accident Management of Nuclear Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten; Zhang, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    The paper investigate applications of functional modeling for accident management in complex industrial plant with special reference to nuclear power production. Main applications for information sharing among decision makers and decision support are identified. An overview of Multilevel Flow...

  12. Applying Functional Modeling for Accident Management of Nucler Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten; Zhang, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    The paper investigates applications of functional modeling for accident management in complex industrial plant with special reference to nuclear power production. Main applications for information sharing among decision makers and decision support are identified. An overview of Multilevel Flow...

  13. Strategy-oriented display concept to assist severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwangsub; Ha, Jaejoo

    2000-01-01

    The Critical Function Monitoring System (CFMS) is a typical Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS) to assist the operation of Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants during normal and emergency operation, and SPDS for severe accident is being developed in Korea. When the existing CFMS is used under a severe accident situation, some problems are expected from: (1) different design basis, i.e. prevention of core melt vs. protection of radiation release to environment, (2) different parameters for decision-making, and (3) different domain and depth of information to restore the plant. To resolve the above problems, a concept, 'Strategy-Oriented Information Display' concept, for displaying information for severe accident management is developed in this paper. Whereas the existing SPDS structure is based on the critical safety function, the developed concept is based on the severe accident management strategy. The display for each strategy includes the plant parameters to check the status of plant and component with the logical or graphical views necessary for executing the strategy. As the application of the proposed concept, KAERI is developing a display system, the prototype severe accident SPDS, Severe Accident Management Display System (SAMDIS), to assist plant personnel for executing Korean Severe Accident Management Guidelines. CFMS is developed for a general display suitable to all situations with various displays. On the contrary, SAMDIS provides all the relevant information on one screen based on the proposed concept. The SAMDIS screen shows more extensive area than CFMS and thus plant personnel can recognize the overall plant status at a glance. This concept is quite effective when used with severe accident management guidelines because of the relatively macroscopic characteristics of a severe accident management strategy. (author)

  14. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (2 places available) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Quality Management\t12, 13 May (6 places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (2 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t30 June + 1 July (6 places available) Communicating to Convince\t22, 23 June (7 places available) Communication Curriculum Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (3 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 mai + 23 juin + 7 juillet (3 places disponibles) Making presentations\t13, 14 May + 11 June (Full) Writing of Successful FP7 Proposals\t26 May (20 places available) Communicating Effectively\t8, 29 May + 22, 23 June (2 places available) If you are interested in attending any of the above course sessio...

  15. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Calendar of courses for October to December 2008 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Management Curriculum Introduction to Leadership\t15, 16, 17 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 October (full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2)\t11, 12, 13 November (full) Risk Management\t13, 14 November (5 places available) Managing Teams\t18, 19, 20 November (2 places available) Communicating to Convince\t19, 20 November (5 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 25, 26, 27 November (part 1) + 3, 4 March 2009 (part 2) (full) Core Development Package pour nouveaux superviseurs et chefs de section (3 + 2 jours) 9, 10, 11 décembre (partie 1) + 21, 22 avril 2009 (partie 2) (full) Communication Curriculum Communicating Effectively\t21, 22 October + 27, 28 November (4 places available)\tCommuniquer efficacement\t23, 24 octobre + 2...

  16. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Quality Management\t25, 26 March\t(6 places available) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (2 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (1 place available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (3 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars (4 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (9 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (4 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (6 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Nég...

  17. Discussion on several issues of the accidents management of nuclear power plants in operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Xuewu; Wang Zhe; Zhang Yingzhen

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses several issues of the accident management of nuclear power plants in operation, for example: the necessity, implementation principle of accident management and accident management program etc. For conducting accident management for beyond design basis accidents, this article thinks that the accident management program should be developed and implemented to ensure that the plant and its personnel with responsibilities for accident management are adequately prepared to take effective on-site actions to prevent or mitigate the consequences of severe accident. (authors)

  18. Programme on spent fuel management in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, M.P.; Rao, M.K.; Prasad, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    The Indian Atomic Energy Programme aims at harnessing the natural resources in the most optimal manner. To achieve this end, a three phase Nuclear Power Programme was devised in the early days of establishment of the Department of Atomic Energy. It envisages the utilization of the modest uranium reserves and rich thorium deposits in the country. The limited natural reserves of fuel materials have prompted India to pay increased attention to the back end of the fuel cycle, which consists of Reprocessing and Waste Management. The spent fuel is valued in India as a source for fuel and is treated accordingly, to recover the important fissile materials. Thus, the route of reprocessing of spent fuel in order to recycle uranium and plutonium in future reactors was opted for. Today, India possesses the capability and facilities, catering to the entire fuel cycle, i.e., starting from the mining of the ore, through fabrication of fuel and its application in reactors, to reprocessing of the spent fuel and appropriate waste management. With the third Reprocessing Plant almost ready for commissioning and second and third waste Immobilization Plants under constructions, the Spent Fuel Management Programme has come of age in India. This paper presents an overview of the status of the spent fuel management programme and its future perspective. (author)

  19. Development of Krsko Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizel, F.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture development of severe accident management guidances for Krsko NPP are described. Author deals with the history of severe accident management and implementation of issues (validation, review of E-plan and other aspects SAMG implementation guidance). Methods of Westinghouse owners group, of Combustion Engineering owners group, of Babcock and Wilcox owners group, of the BWR owners group, as well as application of US SAMG methodology in Europe and elsewhere are reviewed

  20. Severe Accident Management Strategy for EU-APR1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Do Hyun; Kim, Yong Soo; Yoon, Sun Hong

    2013-01-01

    In EU-APR1400, the dedicated instrumentation and mitigation features for SAM are being developed to keep the integrity of containment and to prevent the uncontrolled release of fission products. In this paper, SAM strategy for EU-APR1400 was introduced in stages. It is still under development and finally the Severe Accident Management Guidance will be completed based on this SAM Strategy. Severe accidents in a nuclear power plant are defined as certain unlikely event sequences involving significant core damage with the potential to lead to significant releases according to EUR 2.1.4.4. Even though the probability of severe accidents is extremely low, the radiation release may cause serious effect on people as well as environment. Severe Accident Management (SAM) encompasses those actions which could be considered in recovering from a severe accident and preventing or mitigating the release of fission products to the environment. Whether those actions are successful or not, depending on a progression status of a severe accident to mitigate the consequences of severe accident phenomena to limit the release of radioactive materials keeping the leak tightness of the Primary Containment, and finally to restore transient severe accident progression into a controlled and safe states

  1. Non-cancer health effects of the Chernobyl accident and special health care programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mettler, F.A.

    2008-01-01

    In September 2004, the Expert Group on Health of the Chernobyl Forum specifically focused on non-cancer diseases and mortality associated with the Chernobyl accident as well as on medical follow-up. The group considered the following topics: cataracts, cardiovascular disease, cytogenetic markers, immunological effects, reproductive effects and children's health, psychological and mental effects, mortality due to the accident, and medical programmes and medical monitoring. The issues of potential cataracts at low doses as well as follow-up of liquidators disease incidence and mortality should be continued. Cytogenetic effects may be used to assess doses above 0.2 Gy but are unlikely to be useful at lower doses. There is no clear evidence of radiation-related adverse clinical effects on the immune system of the general public or on hereditary or reproductive outcomes (particularly congenital malformations). Lifespan reduction and death rates of the general public are higher in both contaminated and clean areas than in other countries as is infant mortality, but these are not felt to be radiation related. Although the major potential radiation-related health effect is felt to be the cancer risk, screening programmes are not felt to be useful when absorbed doses are in the range of tens of mGy or lower. Psychological effects are real and represent the biggest public health impact of the accident. These will need continuing attention for the foreseeable future. While the paper is focused entirely on potential adverse effects of the accident, one should recognize the efforts of the Governments of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine to protect and take care of the affected populations. (author)

  2. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(5 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (7 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (5 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à un...

  3. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (1 place available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (3 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(4 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (8 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (6 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou par...

  4. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(5 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (7 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (5 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à une réunion de travail/Chairing ...

  5. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (7 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (2 places disponibles) Core Development Pac...

  6. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (12 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (4 places disponibles) Core Development Pa...

  7. Identification of the operating crew's information needs for accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.; Hanson, D.J.; Ward, L.W.; Solberg, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    While it would be very difficult to predetermine all of the actions required to mitigate the consequences of every potential severe accident for a nuclear power plant, development of additional guidance and training could improve the likelihood that the operating crew would implement effective sever-accident management measures. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an Accident Management Research Program that emphasizes the application of severe-accident research results to enhance the capability of the plant operating crew to effectively manage severe accidents. One element of this program includes identification of the information needed by the operating crew in severe-accident situations. This paper discusses a method developed for identifying these information needs and its application. The methodology has been applied to a generic reactor design representing a PWR with a large dry containment. The information needs were identified by systematically determining what information is needed to assess the health of the critical functions, identify the presence of challenges, select strategies, and assess the effectiveness of these strategies. This method allows the systematic identification of information needs for a broad range of severe-accident scenarios and can be validated by exercising the functional models for any specific event sequence

  8. Quality Management in Slovenian Education Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Alič

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Product and service quality, effective process management, continuous improvement and innovation are some essential conditions for making a successful business. They are often emphasised by managers of successful organizations, by authors of professional and scientific papers and even by politicians and journalists. Quality management standards and models, such as ISO 9001 and EFQM model appeared in assistance to the needs of organisations to assure stable product and service quality, to improve it and to make the production process and its supporting processes effective. It has been 28 years since the standard ISO 9001 appeared. Now it is the most widely spread global standard implemented in more than 1.100.000 organizations worldwide. If quality management was proved to be an important approach to make organizations operate better and thus to contribute to well-being of the society, it would be expected that it is somehow included in our regular school programmes on all the levels. We expect that learning and living quality approaches in childhood and youth would be the least costly way to improve the culture of quality in the society and to implement it in our organizations as well. The paper gives some insight in the situation by searching for quality management related programmes and approaches in our primary, secondary and tertiary school programmes. The purpose of this paper is only to highlight the issue of teaching for quality in our regular education programmes – just to become aware of it and to find some improvement opportunities. There should be still some more detailed research on this topic to give strong suggestions.

  9. Usage of geotechnologies for risk management in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.A.A.; Marques, F.A.P.; Murta, Y.L.

    2017-01-01

    Through the use of geotechnologies an important tool can be created for risk management in radiation accidents. With the use of the QGIS software (Las Palmas version), it is shown its applicability in situations of radiological emergency, as in the case of the accident with cesium-137 in Goiânia. The work analyses the risk of a possible accident with the deposit of cesium wastes that still remains in the region, aiming to protect the population with the best exit routes and forms of allocation of the residents

  10. An international co-ordinated research programme on nuclear accident dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flakus, F.N.

    1977-01-01

    Where fissile materials are being processed in quantities exceeding the minimum critical amounts, a radiation risk to workers arises from the possibility of criticality excursions. Despite the fact that techniques for preventing the occurende of such accidental excursions have reached very high standards it is generally agreed that the availability of suitable nuclear accident dosimetry (NAD) systems is very important. Following the recommendations of an Advisory Group meeting on NAD, the IAEA had established in 1969 an international coordinated research programme on NAD systems and elaborating standarized systems. A large number of research groups from 14 Member States throughout the world participated in this co-ordinated work. Since 1970 four international multilaboratory intercomparison experiments on NAD have been organized and the response of a variety of dosimeters examined in different neutron spectra under simulated accident conditions at Valduc (France), Oak Ridge (USA), Vinca (Yugoslavia) and Harwell (UK). The results achieved in these intercomparison studies show that NAD systems have been substantially improved and that several systems are available now in a number of laboratories throughout the world that perform within the criteria laid down by the initiating advisory group in 1969. A compendium of neutron leakage spectra has also been elaborated for facilitating the determination of dose from readings of detectors exposed to various neutron fields in criticality accidents

  11. Self-management education programmes for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Féline P B; van der Burg, Lennart R A; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Osborne, Richard H; Johnston, Renea V; Pitt, Veronica

    2014-01-15

    Self-management education programmes are complex interventions specifically targeted at patient education and behaviour modification. They are designed to encourage people with chronic disease to take an active self-management role to supplement medical care and improve outcomes. To assess the effectiveness of self-management education programmes for people with osteoarthritis. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PyscINFO, SCOPUS and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trial Registry Platform were searched, without language restriction, on 17 January 2013. We checked references of reviews and included trials to identify additional studies. Randomised controlled trials of self-management education programmes in people with osteoarthritis were included. Studies with participants receiving passive recipients of care and studies comparing one type of programme versus another were excluded. In addition to standard methods we extracted components of the self-management interventions using the eight domains of the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ), and contextual and participant characteristics using PROGRESS-Plus and the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ). Outcomes included self-management of osteoarthritis, participant's positive and active engagement in life, pain, global symptom score, self-reported function, quality of life and withdrawals (including dropouts and those lost to follow-up). We assessed the quality of the body of evidence for these outcomes using the GRADE approach. We included twenty-nine studies (6,753 participants) that compared self-management education programmes to attention control (five studies), usual care (17 studies), information alone (four studies) or another intervention (seven studies). Although heterogeneous, most interventions included elements of skill and technique acquisition (94%), health-directed activity (85%) and self-monitoring and insight (79

  12. Recent Developments in Level 2 PSA and Severe Accident Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Ming Leang; Shepherd, Charles; Gauntt, Randall; Landgren, Vickie; Van Dorsselaere, Jean Pierre; Chaumont, Bernard; Raimond, Emmanuel; Magallon, Daniel; Prior, Robert; Mlady, Ondrej; Khatib-Rahbar, Mohsen; Lajtha, Gabor; Tinkler, Charles; Siu, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    In 1997, CSNI WGRISK produced a report on the state of the art in Level 2 PSA and severe accident management - NEA/CSNI/R(1997)11. Since then, there have been significant developments in that more Level 2 PSAs have been carried out worldwide for a variety of nuclear power plant designs including some that were not addressed in the original report. In addition, there is now a better understanding of the severe accident phenomena that can occur following core damage and the way that they should be modelled in the PSA. As requested by CSNI in December 2005, the objective of this study was to produce a report that updates the original report and gives an account of the developments that have taken place since 1997. The aim has been to capture the most significant new developments that have occurred rather than to provide a full update of the original report, most of which is still valid. This report is organised using the same structure as the original report as follows: Chapter 2: Summary on state of application, results and insights from recent Level 2 PSAs. Chapter 3: Discussion on key severe accident phenomena and modelling issues, identification of severe accident issues that should be treated in Level 2 PSAs for accident management applications, review of severe accident computer codes and the use of these codes in Level 2 PSAs. Chapter 4: Review of approaches and practices for accident management and SAM, evaluation of actions in Level 2 PSAs. Chapter 5: Review of available Level 2 PSA methodologies, including accident progression event tree / containment event tree development. Chapter 6: Aspects important to quantification, including the use of expert judgement and treatment of uncertainties. Chapter 7: Examples of the use of the results and insights from the Level 2 PSA in the context of an integrated (risk informed) decision making process

  13. Management of older patients presenting after a fall - an accident ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. It is common for older patients to present to accident and emergency (AE) departments after a fall. Management should include assessment and treatment of the injuries and assessment and correction of underlying risk factors in order to prevent recurrent falls. Objectives. To determine management of older ...

  14. Severe Accident Management System On-line Network SAMSON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, Eugene B.

    2004-01-01

    SAMSON is a computational tool used by accident managers in the Technical Support Centers (TSC) and Emergency Operations Facilities (EOF) in the event of a nuclear power plant accident. SAMSON examines over 150 status points monitored by nuclear power plant process computers during a severe accident and makes predictions about when core damage, support plate failure, and reactor vessel failure will occur. These predictions are based on the current state of the plant assuming that all safety equipment not already operating will fail. SAMSON uses expert systems, as well as neural networks trained with the back propagation learning algorithms to make predictions. Training on data from an accident analysis code (MAAP - Modular Accident Analysis Program) allows SAMSON to associate different states in the plant with different times to critical failures. The accidents currently recognized by SAMSON include steam generator tube ruptures (SGTRs), with breaks ranging from one tube to eight tubes, and loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs), with breaks ranging from 0.0014 square feet (1.30 cm 2 ) in size to breaks 3.0 square feet in size (2800 cm 2 ). (author)

  15. Development of Parameter Network for Accident Management Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pak, Sukyoung; Ahemd, Rizwan; Heo, Gyunyoung; Kim, Jung Taek; Park, Soo Yong; Ahn, Kwang Il

    2013-01-01

    When a severe accident happens, it is hard to obtain the necessary information to understand of internal status because of the failure or damage of instrumentation and control systems. We learned the lessons from Fukushima accident that internal instrumentation system should be secured and must have ability to react in serious conditions. While there might be a number of methods to reinforce the integrity of instrumentation systems, we focused on the use of redundant behavior of plant parameters without additional hardware installation. Specifically, the objective of this study is to estimate the replaced value which is able to identify internal status by using set of available signals when it is impossible to use instrumentation information in a severe accident, which is the continuation of the paper which was submitted at the last KNS meeting. The concept of the VPN was suggested to improve the quality of parameters particularly to be logged during severe accidents in NPPs using a software based approach, and quantize the importance of each parameter for further maintenance. In the future, we will continue to perform the same analysis to other accident scenarios and extend the spectrum of initial conditions so that we are able to get more sets of VPNs and ANN models to predict the behavior of accident scenarios. The suggested method has the uncertainty underlain in the analysis code for severe accidents. However, In case of failure to the safety critical instrumentation, the information from the VPN would be available to carry out safety management operation

  16. Severe accident management at South Africa's Koeberg plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, R.P.; Wolvaardt, F.P.; Holderbaum, D.F.; Lutz, R.J.; Taylor, J.J.; Hodgson, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    Between the middle of 1993 and the end of 1995, Westinghouse and Eskom implemented plant specific Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs) at the Koeberg Nuclear Power Plant in South Africa. Prior to this project, Koeberg, like many plants, had emergency operating procedures which contain guidance for plant personnel to perform preventive accident management measures in event of an accident. There was, however, no structured guidance on recovery from an event which progresses past core damage -mitigative accident management. The SAMGs meet this need. In this paper, the Westinghouse approach to severe accident management is outlined, and the Koeberg implementation project described. A few key issues which arose during implementation are discussed, including plant instrumentation, flooding of the reactor pit, organisation and training of the Technical Support Centre staff, and impact of SAMG on risk. The means by which both generic and plant-specific SAMG have been validated is also summarised. In the next few years, many LWR owners will be implementing SAMG. In the U.S. all plants are in the process of developing SAMG. The Koeberg project is believed to be the first plant specific implementation of the WOG SAMG worldwide, and this paper has hopefully provided insights into some of the implementation issues for those about to undertake similar projects. (author)

  17. Enhancing AP1000 reactor accident management capabilities for long term accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Pingting; Liu Mengying; Duan Chengjie; Liao Yehong

    2015-01-01

    Passive safety actions are considered as main measures under severe accident in AP1000 power plant. However, risk is still existed. According to PSA, several probable scenarios for AP1000 nuclear power plant are analyzed in this paper with MAAP the severe accident analysis code. According to the analysis results, several deficiencies of AP1000 severe accident management are found. The long term cooling and containment depressurization capability for AP1000 power plant appear to be most important factors under such accidents. Then, several temporary strategies for AP1000 power plant are suggested, including PCCWST temporary water supply strategy after 72h, temporary injection strategy for IRWST, hydrogen relief action in fuel building, which would improve the safety of AP1000 power plant. At last, assessments of effectiveness for these strategies are performed, and the results are compared with analysis without these strategies. The comparisons showed that correct actions of these strategies would effectively prevent the accident process of AP1000 power plant. (author)

  18. Application of NUREG-1150 methods and results to accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.E.; Sype, T.T.; Camp, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    The risk from five nuclear power plants was examined during the NUREG-1150 program. When the analyses of the plants were complete, an effort was undertaken to examine the implications of NUREG-1150 for accident management initiatives. The framework provided by the NUREG-1150 analysis presented a means within which current accident management strategies could be evaluated and future accident management strategies could be developed and assessed. Five separate but interrelated phases of risk management were considered: (1) prevention of accident initiators, (2) prevention of core damage, (3) implementation of an effective emergency response, (4) prevention of vessel breach and mitigation of radionuclide releases from the reactor coolant system, and (5) retention of fission products in the containment and other surrounding buildings. A risk-based methodology was developed to identify and evaluate risk management options for each of these five phases. The methodology was demonstrated through quantitative examples for the first two phases of risk management listed above. In addition, the reduction in risk for several currently implemented risk management strategies at operating plants was quantified

  19. Concept and objectives of accident management in LWR type plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herttrich, P.M.; Hicken, E.F.

    1990-01-01

    For the sake of putting the previous protection and prevention concept in its proper place, it is shown, first of all, on which basis the prevention against damages required according to the state of the art in science and technology was proved under the licensing practice applied so far. Secondly, the previous practice of dynamic upgrading of safety engineering and risk prevention is explained. The introduction of accident management measures is a consequent continuation of this practice. Concrete approaches and objectives of accident management are outlined; an overview of scientific and technical foundations for the development, assessment and introduction of accident management measures is given, and finally the most important organizational and procedural aspects are dealt with. (orig./DG) [de

  20. Concern on accident management for the Korea next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seok, Ho; Lim, Hakkyu; Kang, Sun-Koo

    1997-01-01

    The Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) is under development to be built after year 2000 in Korea. To enhance its capability of preventing and/or mitigating severe accidents, various safety features are incorporated in its design. Some of them are designed against severe accidents and can be operated based on accident management program (AMP) for the KNGR. In this study, the potential capability of the Safety Depressurization System (SDS) and the Shutdown Cooling System (SCS) to mitigate the consequence of severe accidents was examined by using the MAAP 4.02 code as a preliminary step of the AMP development for the KNGR. The concerned accident sequences are small break loss of coolant accidents (SB LOCAs) with a failure of high pressure safety injection system (HPSIS) and a total loss of feedwater (TLOFW). In the level 1 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of the KNGR, the operation of the SDS and SCS was not considered because the failures of the HPSIS and the aggressive secondary side cooling result in core damage based on the success criteria of the level 1 PSA. The analysis results show that the SDS can depressurize the RCS below the shutoff head of the shutdown cooling system (SCS) prior to reactor vessel failure. Although core uncovery and core damage occur early due to the opening of the SDS valves, the MAAP calculation results show that the SCS can reflood the damaged core and that core damage and reactor vessel failure can be mitigated or prevented by the feed-and-bleed operation with those systems. From the analysis results, therefore, it seems that the operation of the SDS and SCS can provide a means of mitigating accident consequences and can be employed as an effective accident management strategy for the KNGR. 5 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  1. A systematic process for developing and assessing accident management plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S.; Meyer, O.R.; Ward, L.W.

    1991-04-01

    This document describes a four-phase approach for developing criteria recommended for use in assessing the adequacy of nuclear power plant accident management plans. Two phases of the approach have been completed and provide a prototype process that could be used to develop an accident management plan. Based on this process, a preliminary set of assessment criteria are derived. These preliminary criteria will be refined and improved when the remaining steps of the approach are completed, that is, after the prototype process is validated through application. 9 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs

  2. The computer aided education and training system for accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Kubota, Ryuji; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Sakuma, Hitoshi

    1999-01-01

    The education and training system for Accident Management was developed by the Japanese BWR group and Hitachi Ltd. The education and training system is composed of two systems. One is computer aided instruction (CAI) education system and the education and training system with computer simulations. Both systems are designed to be executed on personal computers. The outlines of the CAI education system and the education and training system with simulator are reported below. These systems provides plant operators and technical support center staff with the effective education and training for accident management. (author)

  3. A systems approach to the management of radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, L.L.; Berk, H.W.; Teates, C.D.; Larkham, N.E.; Friesen, E.J.; Edlich, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    Management of radiation accident patients should have a multidisciplinary approach that includes all health professionals as well as members of public safety agencies. Emergency plans for radiation accidents include detection of the ionizing radiation, patient evacuation, resuscitation, and decontamination. The resuscitated patient should be transported to a radiation control area located outside but adjacent to the emergency department. Ideally this area is accessed through an entrance separate from that used for the main flow of daily emergency department patients. The hospital staff, provided with protective clothing, dosimeters, and preprinted guidelines, continues the resuscitation and definitive care of the patient. This system approach to the management of radiation accidents may be tailored to meet the specific needs of other emergency medical systems

  4. PSA use in accident management studies in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Mitsumasa

    1994-01-01

    The safety of NPPs in Japan is secured by stringent safety regulations based on the deterministic method, minimizing the possibility a severe accident to a technologically negligible level. PSA is not required in the current regulatory procedures. Accident management based on PSA is a 'knowledge-based' action dependent on utilities' technical knowledge aimed at further reduction of the risk which is kept small enough by existing measures. The paper discusses the following three kinds of PSAs that have been conducted practically and efficiently on NPPs to provide supplemental information about their safety characteristics in addition to the deterministic evaluation used in the regulatory safety review: PSAs on typical NPPs, PSAs on all NPPs to examine candidates for accident management, and PSAs as part of periodic safety review (PSR). 1 fig., 5 tabs

  5. Severe accident management (SAM), operator training and instrumentation capabilities - Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Workshop on Operator Training for Severe Accident Management (SAM) and Instrumentation Capabilities During Severe Accidents was organised in collaboration with Electricite de France (Service Etudes et Projets Thermiques et Nucleaires). There were 34 participants, representing thirteen OECD Member countries, the Russian Federation and the OECD/NEA. Almost half the participants represented utilities. The second largest group was regulatory authorities and their technical support organisations. Basically, the Workshop was a follow-up to the 1997 Second Specialist Meeting on Operator Aids for Severe Accident Management (SAMOA-2) [Reports NEA/CSNI/R(97)10 and 27] and to the 1992 Specialist Meeting on Instrumentation to Manage Severe Accidents [Reports NEA/CSNI/R(92)11 and (93)3]. It was aimed at sharing and comparing progress made and experience gained from these two meetings, emphasizing practical lessons learnt during training or incidents as well as feedback from instrumentation capability assessment. The objectives of the Workshop were therefore: - to exchange information on recent and current activities in the area of operator training for SAM, and lessons learnt during the management of real incidents ('operator' is defined hear as all personnel involved in SAM); - to compare capabilities and use of instrumentation available during severe accidents; - to monitor progress made; - to identify and discuss differences between approaches relevant to reactor safety; - and to make recommendations to the Working Group on the Analysis and Management of Accidents and the CSNI (GAMA). The Workshop was organised into five sessions: - 1: Introduction; - 2: Tools and Methods; - 3: Training Programmes and Experience; - 4: SAM Organisation Efficiency; - 5: Instrumentation Capabilities. It was concluded by a Panel and General Discussion. This report presents the summary and conclusions: the meeting confirmed that only limited information is needed for making required decisions

  6. Investigation on accident management measures for VVER-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tusheva, P.; Schaefer, F.; Rohde, U.; Reinke, N.

    2009-01-01

    A consequence of a total loss of AC power supply (station blackout) leading to unavailability of major active safety systems which could not perform their safety functions is that the safety criteria ensuring a secure operation of the nuclear power plant would be violated and a consequent core heat-up with possible core degradation would occur. Currently, a study which examines the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of the plant during the early phase of the scenario is being performed. This paper focuses on the possibilities for delay or mitigation of the accident sequence to progress into a severe one by applying Accident Management Measures (AMM). The strategy 'Primary circuit depressurization' as a basic strategy, which is realized in the management of severe accidents is being investigated. By reducing the load over the vessel under severe accident conditions, prerequisites for maintaining the integrity of the primary circuit are being created. The time-margins for operators' intervention as key issues are being also assessed. The task is accomplished by applying the GRS thermal-hydraulic system code ATHLET. In addition, a comparative analysis of the accident progression for a station blackout event for both a reference German PWR and a reference VVER-1000, taking into account the plant specifics, is being performed. (authors)

  7. OSSA - An optimized approach to severe accident management: EPR application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvage, E. C.; Prior, R.; Coffey, K.; Mazurkiewicz, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    There is a recognized need to provide nuclear power plant technical staff with structured guidance for response to a potential severe accident condition involving core damage and potential release of fission products to the environment. Over the past ten years, many plants worldwide have implemented such guidance for their emergency technical support center teams either by following one of the generic approaches, or by developing fully independent approaches. There are many lessons to be learned from the experience of the past decade, in developing, implementing, and validating severe accident management guidance. Also, though numerous basic approaches exist which share common principles, there are differences in the methodology and application of the guidelines. AREVA/Framatome-ANP is developing an optimized approach to severe accident management guidance in a project called OSSA ('Operating Strategies for Severe Accidents'). There are still numerous operating power plants which have yet to implement severe accident management programs. For these, the option to use an updated approach which makes full use of lessons learned and experience, is seen as a major advantage. Very few of the current approaches covers all operating plant states, including shutdown states with the primary system closed and open. Although it is not necessary to develop an entirely new approach in order to add this capability, the opportunity has been taken to develop revised full scope guidance covering all plant states in addition to the fuel in the fuel building. The EPR includes at the design phase systems and measures to minimize the risk of severe accident and to mitigate such potential scenarios. This presents a difference in comparison with existing plant, for which severe accidents where not considered in the design. Thought developed for all type of plants, OSSA will also be applied on the EPR, with adaptations designed to take into account its favourable situation in that field

  8. Development of Integrated Evaluation System for Severe Accident Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, K. R.; Park, S. H.; Park, S. Y.; Park, J. H.; Song, Y. M.; Ahn, K. I.; Choi, Y

    2007-06-15

    The objective of the project is twofold. One is to develop a severe accident database (DB) for the Korean Standard Nuclear Power plant (OPR-1000) and a DB management system, and the other to develop a localized computer code, MIDAS (Multi-purpose IntegrateD Assessment code for Severe accidents). The MELCOR DB has been constructed for the typical representative sequences to support the previous MAAP DB in the previous phase. The MAAP DB has been updated using the recent version of MAAP 4.0.6. The DB management system, SARD, has been upgraded to manage the MELCOR DB in addition to the MAAP DB and the network environment has been constructed for many users to access the SARD simultaneously. The integrated MIDAS 1.0 has been validated after completion of package-wise validation. As the current version of MIDAS cannot simulate the anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) sequence, point-kinetics model has been implemented. Also the gap cooling phenomena after corium relocation into the RPV can be modeled by the user as an input parameter. In addition, the subsystems of the severe accident graphic simulator are complemented for the efficient severe accident management and the engine of the graphic simulator was replaced by the MIDAS instead of the MELCOR code. For the user's convenience, MIDAS input and output processors are upgraded by enhancing the interfacial programs.

  9. Development of Integrated Evaluation System for Severe Accident Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, K. R.; Park, S. H.; Park, S. Y.; Park, J. H.; Song, Y. M.; Ahn, K. I.; Choi, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The objective of the project is twofold. One is to develop a severe accident database (DB) for the Korean Standard Nuclear Power plant (OPR-1000) and a DB management system, and the other to develop a localized computer code, MIDAS (Multi-purpose IntegrateD Assessment code for Severe accidents). The MELCOR DB has been constructed for the typical representative sequences to support the previous MAAP DB in the previous phase. The MAAP DB has been updated using the recent version of MAAP 4.0.6. The DB management system, SARD, has been upgraded to manage the MELCOR DB in addition to the MAAP DB and the network environment has been constructed for many users to access the SARD simultaneously. The integrated MIDAS 1.0 has been validated after completion of package-wise validation. As the current version of MIDAS cannot simulate the anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) sequence, point-kinetics model has been implemented. Also the gap cooling phenomena after corium relocation into the RPV can be modeled by the user as an input parameter. In addition, the subsystems of the severe accident graphic simulator are complemented for the efficient severe accident management and the engine of the graphic simulator was replaced by the MIDAS instead of the MELCOR code. For the user's convenience, MIDAS input and output processors are upgraded by enhancing the interfacial programs

  10. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl: programme 3: Health consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirmarche, M.; Kellerer, A.M.; Bazyka, D.

    2006-01-01

    - Goals: The main objectives of the health programme are collection and validation of existing data on cancer and non cancer diseases in the most highly contaminated regions of Ukraine, Russia and Belarus, common scientific expertise on main health indicators and reliable dosimetry, and finally communication of the results to the scientific community and to the public. - General Tasks: 1- Comparison between high and low exposed regions, 2- Description of trends over time, 3- Consideration of specific age groups. This methodological approach is applied on Solid cancer incidence and leukaemia incidence in different regions in Ukraine, Belarus and Russia, With a special focus on thyroid cancer in young exposed ages. - Thyroid cancer: Those exposed in very young ages continue to express a relatively high excess of thyroid cancer even though they have now reached the age group 15-29. Those exposed as young adults show a small increase, at least partly due to better screening conditions - Leukemia: Description of leukemia trends for various age groups show no clear difference between exposed and unexposed regions when focusing on those exposed at very young ages. The rates of childhood leukemia before and after the accident show no evidence of any increase (oblasts in Belarus over 1982-1998). - Specific studies: Incidence of congenital malformations in Belarus; Infant mortality and morbidity in the most highly contaminated regions; Potential effects of prenatal irradiation on the brain as a result of the Chernobyl accident; Nutritional status of population living in regions with different levels of contamination; Dosimetry of Chernobyl clean-up workers; Radiological passports in contaminated settlements. - Congenital malformations: As a national register was existing since the 1980's and gives the possibility to compare trends before and after the accident, results of congenital malformations describe large results collected over Belarus, There is no evidence of a

  11. Hydrogen control technical basis report for severe accident management guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Seong Wan; Kim, J. T.; Kim, S. B.

    2005-04-01

    When EPRI wrote the background report on the severe accident management guideline, there were two kinds of hydrogen systems, the hydrogen recombiners and igniters. Today, advanced nuclear power plants is adopting the passive autocatalytic recombiners and/or igniters. The items on the hydrogen control systems adopted in APWR are considered in Candidate High-level Actions. AICC and DDT in Candidate High-level Actions are considered. In chapter 3, the model on the type and performance of PARs is added in phenomena of accident progress. The technical background on the AICC and DDT occurrence evaluation method is described. The influence of the spray system on the detonation is added

  12. Severe accident analysis to verify the effectiveness of severe accident management guidelines for large pressurized heavy water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokhale, O.S., E-mail: onkarsg@barc.gov.in; Mukhopadhyay, D., E-mail: dmukho@barc.gov.in; Lele, H.G., E-mail: hglele@barc.gov.in; Singh, R.K., E-mail: rksingh@barc.gov.in

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The progression of severe accident initiated from high pressure scenario of station black out has been analyzed using RELAP5/SCDAP. • The effectiveness of SAMG actions prescribed has been established through analysis. • The time margin available to invoke the SAMG action has been specified. - Abstract: The pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) contains both inherent and engineered safety features that help the reactor become resistant to severe accident and its consequences. However in case of a low frequency severe accident, despite the safety features, procedural action should be in place to mitigate the accident progression. Severe accident analysis of such low frequency event provides insight into the accident progression and basis to develop the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG). Since the order of uncertainty in the progression path of severe accident is very high, it is necessary to study the consequences of the SAMG actions prescribed. The paper discusses severe accident analysis for large PHWRs for multiple failure transients involving a high pressure scenario (initiation event like SBO with loss of emergency core cooling system and loss of moderator cooling). SAMG actions prescribed for such a scenario include water injection into steam generator, calandria vessel or calandria vault at different stages of accident. The effectiveness of SAMG actions prescribed has been investigated. It is found that there is sufficient time margin available to the operator to execute these SAMG actions and the progression of severe accident is arrested in all the three cases.

  13. Camelias: a tool for the management of a complex set of γ spectrometry stations for the on-line monitoring of a reactor severe accident simulation in the framework of the Phebus FP programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantera, L.; Cornu, B.

    2003-01-01

    During a PHEBUS PF experiment, the on-line fission product release measurement is carried out by a set of seven γ stations supervised by a computer network. These stations generate about 20000 spectra for each experiment. These spectra are obtained under complex experimental conditions (high count rate, constrained nuclear environment and large diversity of configuration). The objective is to perform a quantitative γ-spectrometry analysis. The possibly complex use of self-attenuation models as well as the large volume of data to be treated led its to consider a flexible and generic method to manage the whole set of stations. The γ station calibration is carried out on-site. For each case, the developed methodology strictly uses the same approach for collecting data during the calibration phase, for calculations and for the software environment: that is the CAMELIAS application. The on-site calibration methodology is based on the use of a linear reference source allowing to reduce the 3D calculations to 2D calculations to obtain the reference efficiency function and the collimation function. Additional calculations then allow computing the efficiency function associated with the actual source. To centralize and to guarantee the coherence of the large volume of data collected during the calibration phase, we use a relational database management system. The computation of the self-attenuation coefficients associated with the actual source is performed by considering a simple model of self-attenuation along a straight line. The method, which can be generalized, is further applied to the delayed analysis of samplings and experimental devices of all the programs managed by the laboratory. (authors)

  14. Use of decision trees for evaluating severe accident management strategies in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclerar Engineering; Lee, Yongjin; Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). School of Energy Systems Engineering

    2016-07-15

    Accident management strategies are defined to innovative actions taken by plant operators to prevent core damage or to maintain the sound containment integrity. Such actions minimize the chance of offsite radioactive substance leaks that lead to and intensify core damage under power plant accident conditions. Accident management extends the concept of Defense in Depth against core meltdown accidents. In pressurized water reactors, emergency operating procedures are performed to extend the core cooling time. The effectiveness of Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG) became an important issue. Severe accident management strategies are evaluated with a methodology utilizing the decision tree technique.

  15. Peace programme for evaluating the impact of accidents contaminating the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brechignac, F.; Vallejo, R.; Sauras, T.; Casadesus, J.; Thiry, Y.; Waegeneers, N.; Forsberg, S.; Shaw, G.; Madoz-Escande, C.; Gonze, M.A. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, IPSN, 92 (France)

    2000-07-01

    The Chernobyl accident, which led to substantial release of radioactive materials in the atmosphere, demonstrated that large environmental areas may be contaminated by fall-out deposition of radioactivity. In particular, contamination by Cs and Sr of agro-ecosystems where food production is taking place is most susceptible to contribute to population radiation dose. Nuclear safety analysis shows that, although very small, the probability of an accident occurring on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) cannot be completely set aside. In such a situation, decision making and management of the contaminated agricultural surfaces largely depend on our ability to predict how, and to which extent, the initial contamination may lead to polluted foodstuffs. Furthermore, the efficiency of the prediction models relies on our level of understanding of the mechanisms governing the transfer of radionuclides in the soil-plant system. Unraveling these mechanisms from in situ observations of environmental areas contaminated by past events is difficult due to the lack of control on both, the contamination itself, which happened in a critical situation, and the natural environment, which is highly variable, temporally and spatially. Such conditions prevent a clear identification of the most relevant parameters influencing the radionuclides transfer and thereby the prediction goal. In particular, current transfer factors introduced in prediction models suffer from unresolved and poorly documented variabilities. This is why IPSN developed a unique research facility capable of generating, in closed and controlled environmental conditions, a mini-accident with release of radioactive aerosols on small-scale, but realistic, samples of crops. These crops are conducted on undisturbed soil monoliths, featuring several soil types from various European countries, managed in lysimeters with advanced water movement control, and placed in greenhouses where three typical climates can be reproduced

  16. Peace programme for evaluating the impact of accidents contaminating the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechignac, F.; Vallejo, R.; Sauras, T.; Casadesus, J.; Thiry, Y.; Waegeneers, N.; Forsberg, S.; Shaw, G.; Madoz-Escande, C.; Gonze, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident, which led to substantial release of radioactive materials in the atmosphere, demonstrated that large environmental areas may be contaminated by fall-out deposition of radioactivity. In particular, contamination by Cs and Sr of agro-ecosystems where food production is taking place is most susceptible to contribute to population radiation dose. Nuclear safety analysis shows that, although very small, the probability of an accident occurring on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) cannot be completely set aside. In such a situation, decision making and management of the contaminated agricultural surfaces largely depend on our ability to predict how, and to which extent, the initial contamination may lead to polluted foodstuffs. Furthermore, the efficiency of the prediction models relies on our level of understanding of the mechanisms governing the transfer of radionuclides in the soil-plant system. Unraveling these mechanisms from in situ observations of environmental areas contaminated by past events is difficult due to the lack of control on both, the contamination itself, which happened in a critical situation, and the natural environment, which is highly variable, temporally and spatially. Such conditions prevent a clear identification of the most relevant parameters influencing the radionuclides transfer and thereby the prediction goal. In particular, current transfer factors introduced in prediction models suffer from unresolved and poorly documented variabilities. This is why IPSN developed a unique research facility capable of generating, in closed and controlled environmental conditions, a mini-accident with release of radioactive aerosols on small-scale, but realistic, samples of crops. These crops are conducted on undisturbed soil monoliths, featuring several soil types from various European countries, managed in lysimeters with advanced water movement control, and placed in greenhouses where three typical climates can be reproduced

  17. Olympic Dam operations - environmental management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This is the 3rd Annual Report pertaining to the Olympic Dam Operations Environmental Management Programme and covers the period 1st March, 1989 to 28th February, 1990. The monitoring programe has provided detailed assessment of meteorological data, vegetation, fauna, soil stability, soil salinity, hydrogeology and well-fields both inside and outside the operations area. Mine site rehabilitation is considered to be progressing satisfactorily. Out of the 851 drill pad sites 72% have been rehabilitated to the stage where natural soil stability and plant cover has been achieved. Drill pad sites that have received good rainfall within one year of being ripped have rehabilitated very succesfully. Sites that receive no significant rainfall for more than two years, particularly on dune slopes may require re-ripping before successful regeneration can occur. To improve the drill pad site rehabilitation monitoring programme it is recommended that 200 drill sites be analysed each year. Air emission and solid waste data are also presented. This program is considered to be particularly successful in relation to SO 2 assessment. 90 tabs., 63 figs., ills

  18. Management of a radiological emergency. Experience feedback and post-accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubiau, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    In France, the organization of crisis situations and the management of radiological emergency situations are regularly tested through simulation exercises for a continuous improvement. Past severe accidents represent experience feedback resources of prime importance which have led to deep changes in crisis organizations. However, the management of the post-accident phase is still the object of considerations and reflections between the public authorities and the intervening parties. This document presents, first, the nuclear crisis exercises organized in France, then, the experience feedback of past accidents and exercises, and finally, the main aspects to consider for the post-accident management of such events: 1 - Crisis exercises: objectives, types (local, national and international exercises), principles and progress, limits; 2 - Experience feedback: real crises (major accidents, other recent accidental situations or incidents), crisis exercises (experience feedback organization, improvements); 3 - post-accident management: environmental contamination and people exposure, management of contaminated territories, management of populations (additional protection, living conditions, medical-psychological follow up), indemnification, organization during the post-accident phase; 4 - conclusion and perspectives. (J.S.)

  19. Major accident prevention through applying safety knowledge management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalatpour, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Many scattered resources of knowledge are available to use for chemical accident prevention purposes. The common approach to management process safety, including using databases and referring to the available knowledge has some drawbacks. The main goal of this article was to devise a new emerged knowledge base (KB) for the chemical accident prevention domain. The scattered sources of safety knowledge were identified and scanned. Then, the collected knowledge was formalized through a computerized program. The Protégé software was used to formalize and represent the stored safety knowledge. The domain knowledge retrieved as well as data and information. This optimized approach improved safety and health knowledge management (KM) process and resolved some typical problems in the KM process. Upgrading the traditional resources of safety databases into the KBs can improve the interaction between the users and knowledge repository.

  20. Accident management strategies for VVER-1000 reactors. Part 1: text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sdouz, G.; Sonneck, G.; Pachole, M.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the effect of different accident management strategies on the onset, development and end of the core-concrete-interaction as well as on the containment integrity for a TMLB'-type sequence in a Pressurized Water Reactor of the type VVER- 1000. Using the computer code MARCH3 the following strategies were investigated: (1) One or more Spray and LP ECC Systems available with and without coolers after 10 hours (2) Inclusion of the reactor pressure vessel testing facility room to the cavity (3) Containment venting (4) External water supply and (5) Different electric power restoration times. The results show that some of these accident management measures will maintain the containment integrity and reduce the source term drastically, others will reduce the source term rate. For some measures final conclusions can only be given after complete source term calculations have been performed. (authors)

  1. Challenges to a successful waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bars, Y.

    2005-01-01

    I have chosen to testify about my personal experience as a practitioner in the development and implementation of sensitive public policies and about some of the lessons I have learnt in various related fields. Those fields do not only include Andra, but also the exchanges from which I benefit within EDRAM, the club (that I currently chair) of agency directors responsible for those programmes, as well as within the Forum for Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) of the DECD/NEA. Last but not least, I would also introduce some lessons from my previous activities in the city planning, and in the management of water projects. In order to succeed, a sound policy relating to a sustainable radioactive-waste management must be able to take up a certain number of challenges. Three of those challenges seem essential to me: combining the technical and social aspects of the issue; organizing a suitable context in which the definition and the implementation of the policy will take place; and achieving a solid implementation locally. (author)

  2. Application of high-order uncertainty for severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Donghan; Ha, Jaejoo

    1998-01-01

    The use of probability distribution to represent uncertainty about point-valued probabilities has been a controversial subject. Probability theorists have argued that it is inherently meaningless to be uncertain about a probability since this appears to violate the subjectivists' assumption that individual can develop unique and precise probability judgments. However, many others have found the concept of uncertainty about the probability to be both intuitively appealing and potentially useful. Especially, high-order uncertainty, i.e., the uncertainty about the probability, can be potentially relevant to decision-making when expert's judgment is needed under very uncertain data and imprecise knowledge and where the phenomena and events are frequently complicated and ill-defined. This paper presents two approaches for evaluating the uncertainties inherent in accident management strategies: 'a fuzzy probability' and 'an interval-valued subjective probability'. At first, this analysis considers accident management as a decision problem (i.e., 'applying a strategy' vs. 'do nothing') and uses an influence diagram. Then, the analysis applies two approaches above to evaluate imprecise node probabilities in the influence diagram. For the propagation of subjective probabilities, the analysis uses the Monte-Carlo simulation. In case of fuzzy probabilities, the fuzzy logic is applied to propagate them. We believe that these approaches can allow us to understand uncertainties associated with severe accident management strategy since they offer not only information similar to the classical approach using point-estimate values but also additional information regarding the impact from imprecise input data

  3. Molten Corium-Concrete Interaction Behavior Analyses for Severe Accident Management in CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.; Kim, D. H.; Song, Y. M.

    2014-01-01

    After the last few severe accidents, the importance of accident management in nuclear power plants has increased. Many countries, including the United States (US) and Canada, have focused on understanding severe accidents in order to identify ways to further improve the safety of nuclear plants. It has been recognized that severe accident analyses of nuclear power plants will be beneficial in understanding plant-specific vulnerabilities during severe accidents. The objectives of this paper are to describe the molten corium behavior to identify a plant response with various concrete specific components. Accident analyses techniques using ISSAC can be useful tools for MCCI behavior in severe accident mitigation

  4. Analysis of the reasons of recently some radioactive source accidents and suggestions for management countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Yongjie; Feng Youcai; Song Chenxiu; Gao Huibin; Xing Jinsong; Pang Xinxin; Wang Xiaoqing; Wei Hong

    2007-01-01

    The article introduces recently some radioactive source accidents in China, and analyses the reasons of the accidents. Some important issues existed in the process of implementing new regulation were summarized, and some suggestions for managing radioactive sources are made. (authors)

  5. Wet weather highway accident analysis and skid resistance data management system (volume II : user's manual).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The objectives and scope of this research are to establish an effective methodology for wet weather accident analysis and to develop a database management system to facilitate information processing and storage for the accident analysis process, skid...

  6. Wet weather highway accident analysis and skid resistance data management system (volume I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    The objectives and scope of this research are to establish an effective methodology for wet weather accident analysis and to develop a database management system to facilitate information processing and storage for the accident analysis process, skid...

  7. A Study on the Requisite Information for Severe Accident Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sunhee; Ahn, Kwang-Il; Kim, Jae-Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Related this research on arranging the requisite information for severe accident management, the documents of various forms in each country as well as the domestic literature are secured and analyzed. The analyzed information is arranged up to a detailed level. For the secured documents, the issued organizations and the issued purpose are diverse. Thus, the contents of the secured documents are also diverse according to the reactor type, and the purpose and standards of the classification are also diverse. Moreover, terminologies with same meaning are not unified. These various documents are analyzed to arrange the requisite information for severe accident management. Based on the documents of a related severe accident, the major information was analyzed. The information is different according to the reactor type, classification standard, and classification standard of the safety function. Thus the information is classified variously. In this study, based on the analysis results of the documents described these information, the major information and parameters are examined as safety function. And the results of parameters and information including the safety function and the detail information are induced.

  8. The Swedish programme for radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjurstroem, S.; Forsstroem, H.

    1986-10-01

    The following systems and facilities are currently in operation and under implementation: a sea transportation system for all kinds of nuclear waste, a central facility for interim storage of spent fuel (CLAB) and a central underground repository for final disposal of low and medium level reactor waste (SFR). For the remaining steps - final disposal of highly active and longlived radioactive residues - a concept, based on encapsulation of the fuel elements in copper canisters and final storage of the canisters in a repository situated 500 m down in crystalline rock (KBS-3), has been developed and approved by the government in accordance with the Swedish nuclear legislation. Although a feasible method for final disposal of the highly active residues has been shown, the Swedish legislation requires that research be carried out to reach the best possible base for the final decision around the year 2000. In parallel with this a geological investigation programme is carried out to find a suitable site for a final repository. The final site selection is foreseen at the end of the 1990's. All costs for the management of radioactive waste from the nuclear power plants are carried by a fee determined annually. The fee is 0.019 SEK/kWh for 1986

  9. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1991-07-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  10. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1992-07-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  11. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1993-06-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  12. Specific features of RBMK severe accidents progression and approach to the accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskij, V.P.; Nikitin, Yu.M.; Petrov, A.A.; Potapov, A.A.; Cherkashov, Yu.M.

    2001-01-01

    Fundamental construction features of the LWGR facilities (absence of common external containment shell, disintegrated circulation circuit and multichannel reactor core, positive vapor reactivity coefficient, high mass of thermally capacious graphite moderator) predetermining development of assumed heavy non-projected accidents and handling them are treated. Rating the categories of the reactor core damages for non-projected accidents and accident types producing specific grope of damages is given. Passing standard non-projected accidents, possible methods of attack accident consequences, as well as methods of calculated analysis of non-projected accidents are demonstrated [ru

  13. Overview of training methodology for accident management at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    Many IAEA Member States operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) are at present developing accident management programmes (AMPs) for the prevention and mitigation of severe accidents. However, the level of implementation varies significantly between NPPs. The exchange of experience and best practices can considerably contribute to the quality and facilitate the implementation of AMPs at the plants. The main objective of this publication is to describe available material and technical support tools that can be used to support training of the personnel involved in the accident management (AM), and to highlight the current status of their application. The focus is on those operator aids that can help the plant personnel to take correct actions during an emergency to prevent and mitigate consequences of a severe accident. The second objective is to describe the available material for the training courses of those people who are responsible of the AMP development and implementation of an individual plant. The third objective is to collect a compact set of information on various aspects of AM training into a single publication. In this context, the AM personnel includes both the plant staff responsible for taking the decision and actions concerning preventive and mitigative AM and the persons involved in the management of off-site releases. Thus, the scope of this publication is on the training of personnel directly involved in the decisions and execution of the SAM actions during progression of an accident. The integration of training into the AMP development and implementation is summarized. The technical AM support tools and material are defined as operator aids involving severe accident guidelines, various computational aids and computerized tools. The operator aids make also an essential part of the training tools. The simulators to be applied for the AM training have been developed or are under development by various organizations in order to support the training on

  14. programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aid for AIDS (AfA) is a disease management programme (DIVIPI available to beneficiaries and employees of contracted medical funds and ... the challenges alluded to in the first article, including late enrolment and the measurement of survival, especially in patients with ... I the HIV prevalence and incidence (new infections].

  15. Improvement of Severe Accident Analysis Computer Code and Development of Accident Management Guidance for Heavy Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Ko Ryu; Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, See Darl; Song, Yong Mann; Choi, Young; Jin, Young Ho

    2005-03-15

    The objective of the project is to develop a generic severe accident management guidance(SAMG) applicable to Korean PHWR and the objective of this 3 year continued phase is to construct a base of the generic SAMG. Another objective is to improve a domestic computer code, ISAAC (Integrated Severe Accident Analysis code for CANDU), which still has many deficiencies to be improved in order to apply for the SAMG development. The scope and contents performed in this Phase-2 are as follows: The characteristics of major design and operation for the domestic Wolsong NPP are analyzed from the severe accident aspects. On the basis, preliminary strategies for SAM of PHWR are selected. The information needed for SAM and the methods to get that information are analyzed. Both the individual strategies applicable for accident mitigation under PHWR severe accident conditions and the technical background for those strategies are developed. A new version of ISAAC 2.0 has been developed after analyzing and modifying the existing models of ISAAC 1.0. The general SAMG applicable for PHWRs confirms severe accident management techniques for emergencies, provides the base technique to develop the plant specific SAMG by utility company and finally contributes to the public safety enhancement as a NPP safety assuring step. The ISAAC code will be used inevitably for the PSA, living PSA, severe accident analysis, SAM program development and operator training in PHWR.

  16. Finnish Research Programme on Nuclear Waste Management (KYT). Framework Programme for 2002-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasilainen, K.

    2002-12-01

    The new Finnish research programme on nuclear waste management (KYT) will be conducted in 2002 - 2005. This framework programme describes the starting point, the basic aims and the organisation of the research programme. The starting point of the KYT programme is derived from the present state and future challenges of Finnish nuclear waste management. The research programme is funded mainly by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Posiva Oy, Fortum Oyj, Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO), and the National Technology Agency (Tekes). As both regulators and implementors are involved, the research programme concentrates on neutral research topics that must be studied in any case. Methods and tools for experimental and theoretical studies fall in this category. State of the art -reviews on relevant topics also create national know-how. Topics that directly belong to licensing activities of nuclear waste management are excluded from the research programme. KYT carries out technical studies that increase national know-how in the area of nuclear waste management. The aim is to maintain and develop basic expertise needed in the operations derived from the national nuclear waste management plan. The studies have been divided into strategic studies and studies enhancing the long-term safety of spent nuclear fuel disposal. Strategic studies support the overall feasibility of Finnish nuclear waste management. These studies include basic options and overall safety principles related to nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear waste management. In addition, general cost estimates as well as general safety considerations related to transportations, low- and medium level wastes, and decommissioning are included in strategic studies. Studies supporting the long-term safety of spent fuel disposal include issues related to performance assessment methodology, release of radionuclides from the repository, behaviour of bedrock and groundwater

  17. Severe accident research and management in Nordic Countries - A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, W.

    2002-01-01

    The report describes the status of severe accident research and accident management development in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark. The emphasis is on severe accident phenomena and issues of special importance for the severe accident management strategies implemented in Sweden and in Finland. The main objective of the research has been to verify the protection provided by the accident mitigation measures and to reduce the uncertainties in risk dominant accident phenomena. Another objective has been to support validation and improvements of accident management strategies and procedures as well as to contribute to the development of level 2 PSA, computerised operator aids for accident management and certain aspects of emergency preparedness. Severe accident research addresses both the in-vessel and the ex-vessel accident progression phenomena and issues. Even though there are differences between Sweden and Finland as to the scope and content of the research programs, the focus of the research in both countries is on in-vessel coolability, integrity of the reactor vessel lower head and core melt behaviour in the containment, in particular the issues of core debris coolability and steam explosions. Notwithstanding that our understanding of these issues has significantly improved, and that experimental data base has been largely expanded, there are still important uncertainties which motivate continued research. Other important areas are thermal-hydraulic phenomena during reflooding of an overheated partially degraded core, fission product chemistry, in particular formation of organic iodine, and hydrogen transport and combustion phenomena. The development of severe accident management has embraced, among other things, improvements of accident mitigating procedures and strategies, further work at IFE Halden on Computerised Accident Management Support (CAMS) system, as well as plant modifications, including new instrumentation. Recent efforts in Sweden in this area

  18. Ineffective programme management on the delivery of health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Programme management remains a challenging management practice in the Northern Cape Department of Health (NCDoH), particularly when a health facility project has to integrate the components of construction management and operations management in order to attain the benefits of strategic importance.

  19. Dose management programmes at Kaiga Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, P.; Prabhakaran, V.; Managavi, Sadashiv B.; Danannavar, Veerendra; Biju, P.; Manoj Kumar, M.; Shrikrishna, U.V.

    2001-01-01

    Kaiga Generating Station (KGS) has two units of pressurized heavy water reactors of 220 MWe each capacity. KGS-2 started power generation since 1999 and KGS-1 since 2000. Several programmes such as assessment of radioactive condition, training on radiological safety aspects, job planning in radioactive areas, etc. are conducted periodically to implement an effective dose control programmes in KGS. These efforts are briefly discussed in this report. Facilities and techniques to implement ALARA programs are also highlighted in this report. (author)

  20. Management of area-wide integrated pest management programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, V.A.; Vreysen, M.J.B.; Reyes Flores, J.; Regidor Fernandez, E.E.; Teruya, T.; Barnes, B.; Gomez Riera, P.; Lindquist, D.; Loosjes, M.

    2005-01-01

    Effective management of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique (SIT) is key to success. Programme planning includes collection of baseline data and a feasibility assessment. The optimal management structure is where the programme can be implemented effectively and flexibly, independent of government politics, bureaucracy, and even corruption that impede timely goal achievement. Ideally, programmes include both public and private management, and require strong and steady financial support. Governments and donors are the most common sources of funds, but a mixture of public, community, and private funds is now the trend. Interrupted cash flow severely restrains programme performance. Physical support of programme operations must be reliable, and led by a maintenance professional. It is essential to have full-time, well-paid, and motivated staff led by a programme manger with technical and management experience. Programme failure is usually due to poor management and inadequate public support, and not to poor technology. (author)

  1. Nuclear Malaysia Disaster Management-Japan Nuclear Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Asraf Fahlawi Wafa Syed Mohd Ghazi

    2011-01-01

    Japan worst Nuclear Accident tragedy due to the earthquake and tsunami, were shocking the world. Malaysia also feels the impact from this disaster. Nuclear Malaysia personnel was mobilize to perform the radiation and contamination monitoring at Malaysian Airport (KLIA and KKIA), environmental monitoring and sampling at Kudat, Sabah, contamination screening centre at Block 13 and also at National Radiology Emergency Centre at AELB. This paper will discuss how this disaster management being performs and its challenge and also the number or personnel and man-hours involved within 1st month after the tragedy. (author)

  2. Health effects of the Chernobyl accident and special health care programmes. Report of the UN Chernobyl Forum Expert Group 'Health'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.; Repacholi, M.; Carr, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Twenty years have passed since the worst nuclear reactor accident in the world occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine. The radioactive contamination which resulted from the explosion and fire in the first few days spread over large areas of neighbouring Belarus and the Russian Federation, with most of the fallout in Belarus. While national and local authorities did not immediately disclose the scale of the accident, the mitigation measures, such as distribution of potassium iodine pills, food restriction, and mass evacuation from areas where the radioactive contamination was greatest, undoubtedly reduced the health impact of the radiation exposure and saved many lives. The accident caused severe social and economic disruption and had significant environmental and health impact. This was aggravated by the political and economical changes in the three affected states related to the break-down of the Soviet Union. In the aftermath of the accident the international scientific and medical community collaborated closely with national experts dealing with health effects of the accident in the affected countries. There is a substantial body of international collaborative projects on the situation, which should lead to advancement in radiation sciences. However, considerable speculation and disinformation remains about the possible health impact of the accident for the millions of affected people. To address the health, environmental and socioeconomic consequences of the Chernobyl accident, the United Nations in 2003 launched an Inter-Agency initiative, the Chernobyl Forum. The Forum's Secretariat, led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and several other international organizations collaborated with the governments of the affected countries. The purpose of the Chernobyl Forum was to review the consequences of the accident, issue technical reports and, based

  3. Emergency Management of Maritime Accidents in the Yangtze River: Problems, Practice and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Ping Yan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Maritime accidents have received considerable attentions due to the enormous property damage, casualties and serious environmental pollution. This paper first makes statistical analysis of the different types of maritime accidents in the period of 2012 to 2014 in the Yangtze River. Second, the problems of emergency management of maritime accidents are also proposed from the analysis of the major accident “Eastern Star”.. Afterwards, four practice cases, including decision support for maritime accidents, emergency resource allocation, emergency simulation system and effectiveness of emergency management, are introduced to present the insights gained from these practices. Last, in order to address these problems, this paper proposes that an artificial societies, Computational experiments, and Parallel execution (ACP approach should be introduced to establish an improved management system for maritime accidents in the future, and an ACP based maritime accident emergency management framework is proposed.

  4. Specialist meeting on selected containment severe accident management strategies. Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The CSNI Specialist Meeting on Selected Containment Severe Accident Management Strategies held in Stockholm, Sweden in June 1994 was organised by the Task Group on Containment Aspects of Severe Accident Management (CAM) of CSNI's Principal Working Group on the Confinement of Accidental Radioactive Releases (PWG4) in collaboration with the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI). Conclusions and recommendations are given for each of the sessions of the workshops: Containment accident management strategies (general aspects); hydrogen management techniques and other containment accident management techniques; surveillance and protection of containment function

  5. French regulatory requirements concerning severe accidents in PWRs and associated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Homme, A.; Pelce, J.

    1986-07-01

    This report gives a global view of the French reactor safety approach; aspects in relation with severe accidents are pointed out: safety goals regarding population, and safety goals regarding plant design. Ultimate or U procedures involving physical phenomena of severe accidents are then described. R. and D. programs have been defined with regard to the priorities resulting from this approach [fr

  6. Main post-accident management stakes: IRSN's point of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre Oudiz [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (France)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Off site management of a radiological crisis covers two phases which need to be clearly distinguished even if there are links between them: emergency phase and recovery phase (also called late or post-accident phase). The presentation will deal with the latter, rather neglected up until recently, but conveying special attention from now on in France and at the international level. It is clear now that the long term management of a radiological or nuclear crisis cannot be reduced to merely site decontamination. Actually, environmental decontamination considerations would be only one amongst other essential economical, social, health, psychological, cultural, and symbolical concerns. This is why off site management of a radiological crisis requires innovative governance, in order to challenge such a complexity. This need for challenge led IRSN to have on the go technical developments and new governance modes reflection. 1) Technical developments: they deal with implementing an organisation, a set of methods, a platform of technical tools which would allow the stakeholders to carry out efficiently their mission during the recovery phase. For example, countermeasures for agricultural and urban rehabilitation are developed within the framework of the 6. PCRDT EURANOS programme. Teams from several countries are involved in common elaboration of rehabilitation strategies based on the best available knowledge. Besides this, simple operational decision aiding tools for the stakeholders (local administration, elected representatives, professional agricultural groups, etc.) are currently developed by IRSN within the framework of the nuclear post-accident exercises. IRSN is also involved in doctrinal reflections about the respective roles of radioactive measurements in the environment and radiological consequences calculation during emergency and recovery phases. Criteria for emergency countermeasures withdrawal are also currently under

  7. Health consequences of the Chernobyl accident. Results of the IPHECA pilot projects and related national programmes. Scientific report. International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Since the Chernobyl accident, massive efforts have been made by the governmental authorities to mitigate the effects, to provide diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation to those affected and to investigate the effects on health which had occurred. Vast amounts of resources have and continue to be expended in supporting these efforts. In 1991, WHO officially joined this effort through the establishment by the World Health Assembly of the International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA). The objectives of this Programme were: to contribute to the efforts to alleviate the health consequences of the accident by assisting health authorities in Belarus, Russian Federation and Ukraine; to consolidate the experience gained from treatment of over-exposure and from various practical interventions and thereby improve medical preparedness for the future; and to acquire data in the fields of radiation epidemiology and medical response to disasters. IPHECA initially concentrated on five priority areas, and pilot projects were developed for implementation in Belarus, Russian Federation and Ukraine for each: thyroid, haematology, brain damage in-utero, epidemiological registry and oral health (only in Belarus). This publication is intended to fulfil a number of purposes. It provides an account of what was accomplished during the pilot phase of IPHECA. It discusses the protocols which were developed and used, summarizes the investigations which were carried out and reports on the instrumentation, supplies and training programmes which were provided. The publication also describes and discusses the results which have been obtained to date and identifies the still existing gaps in knowledge

  8. Generalities on nuclear accidents and their short-dated and middle-dated management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    All the nuclear activities present a radiation risk. The radiation exposure of the employees or the public, may occur during normal activity or during an accident. The IRSN realized a document on this radiation risk and the actions of protection. The sanitary and medical aspects of a radiation accident are detailed. The actions of the population protection during an accident and the post accident management are also discussed. (A.L.B.)

  9. Development of Human Factor Management Requirements and Human Error Classification for the Prevention of Railway Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Sang Log; Park, Chan Woo; Shin, Seung Ryoung

    2008-08-01

    Railway accident analysis results show that accidents cased by human factors are not decreasing, whereas H/W related accidents are steadily decreasing. For the efficient management of human factors, many expertise on design, conditions, safety culture and staffing are required. But current safety management activities on safety critical works are focused on training, due to the limited resource and information. In order to improve railway safety, human factors management requirements for safety critical worker and human error classification is proposed in this report. For this accident analysis, status of safety measure on human factor, safety management system on safety critical worker, current safety planning is analysis

  10. Development of Human Factor Management Requirements and Human Error Classification for the Prevention of Railway Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Sang Log; Park, Chan Woo; Shin, Seung Ryoung [Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    Railway accident analysis results show that accidents cased by human factors are not decreasing, whereas H/W related accidents are steadily decreasing. For the efficient management of human factors, many expertise on design, conditions, safety culture and staffing are required. But current safety management activities on safety critical works are focused on training, due to the limited resource and information. In order to improve railway safety, human factors management requirements for safety critical worker and human error classification is proposed in this report. For this accident analysis, status of safety measure on human factor, safety management system on safety critical worker, current safety planning is analysis.

  11. Development of the severe accident risk information database management system SARD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Kwang Il; Kim, Dong Ha

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this report is to introduce essential features and functions of a severe accident risk information management system, SARD (Severe Accident Risk Database Management System) version 1.0, which has been developed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, and database management and data retrieval procedures through the system. The present database management system has powerful capabilities that can store automatically and manage systematically the plant-specific severe accident analysis results for core damage sequences leading to severe accidents, and search intelligently the related severe accident risk information. For that purpose, the present database system mainly takes into account the plant-specific severe accident sequences obtained from the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs), base case analysis results for various severe accident sequences (such as code responses and summary for key-event timings), and related sensitivity analysis results for key input parameters/models employed in the severe accident codes. Accordingly, the present database system can be effectively applied in supporting the Level 2 PSA of similar plants, for fast prediction and intelligent retrieval of the required severe accident risk information for the specific plant whose information was previously stored in the database system, and development of plant-specific severe accident management strategies.

  12. International programme on the health effects of the Chernobyl accidents (IPHECA). Protocol for the pilot project ''Thyroid''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The protocol document for the Thyroid Project of International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accidents (IPHECA) describes the main aims of the project, namely 1) to detect and describe selected diseases of the thyroid among children and adolescents in population centres assigned earlier as ''strictly controlled zones'' and, 2) to determine, if possible, the link between the prevalence of the diseases and radiation doses received by the thyroid. Population to be investigated, medical and laboratory examinations and advanced diagnostics for thyroid diseases to be undertaken are enlisted in the protocol

  13. The response of the radionuclide monitoring programme for agricultural products in Great Britain to the accident at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of the radiation monitoring and control programme of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in Great Britain is to ensure the safety of foodstuffs. The particular responsibility of my department within the Ministry is the analysis of agricultural products for the presence of radionuclides entering the human food chain from atmospheric releases. The Ministry also has a laboratory which monitors the marine environment. This presentation describes the surveillance programme for agricultural foodstuffs and show how it was used to monitor the deposition from the Chernobyl accident, and shows some of the monitoring data obtained and indicate how the information was used in formulating protective measures. It also mentions future plans

  14. Relationships between accident investigations, risk analysis, and safety management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms-Ringdahl, Lars

    2004-01-01

    Several different approaches to achieve safety are in common use, and examples are accident investigations (AI), risk analysis (RA), and safety management systems (SMS). The meaning of these concepts and their practical applications vary quite a lot, which might cause confusion. A summary of definitions is presented. A general comparison is made of application areas and methodology. A proposal is made how to indicate parameters of variation. At one end of the scale there are organisations, which are highly organised in respect to safety. At the other end are small companies with informal safety routines. Although the three concepts differ in a number of respects, there are many links between them which is illustrated in a model. A number of relations have been described mainly concerned with more advanced organisations. Behind the practical safety work, there are varying sets of more or less explicit explanations and theories on safety and accident causation. Depending on the theory applied, the relations between approaches can be more or less clear and essential

  15. Program for accident and incident management support, AIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putra, M.A.

    1993-12-01

    A prototype of an advisory computer program is presented which could be used in monitoring and analyzing an ongoing incident in a nuclear power plant. The advisory computer program, called the Accident and Incident Management Support (AIMS), focuses on processing a set of data that is to be transmitted from a nuclear power plant to a national or regional emergency center during an incident. The AIMS program will assess the reactor conditions by processing the measured plant parameters. The applied model of the power plant contains a level of complexity that is comparable with the simplified plant model that the power plant operator uses. A standardized decay heat function and a steam water property library is used in the integral balance equations for mass and energy. A simulation of the station blackout accident of the Borssele plant is used to test the program. The program predicts successively: (1) the time of dryout of the steam generators, (2) the time of saturation of the primary system, and (3) the onset of core uncovery. The coolant system with the actual water levels will be displayed on the screen. (orig./HP)

  16. Role of the man-machine interface in accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oewre, Fridtjov

    2001-01-01

    First, this paper gives a short general review on important safety issues in the field of man-machine interaction as expressed by important nuclear safety organisations. Then follows a summary discussion on what constitutes a modern Man-Machine Interface (MMI) and what is normally meant with accident management and accident management strategies. Furthermore, the paper focuses on three major issues in the context of accident management. First, the need for reliable information in accidents and how this can be obtained by additional computer technology. Second, the use of procedures is discussed, and basic MMI aspects of computer support for procedure presentation are identified followed by a presentation of a new approach on how to computerise procedures. Third, typical information needs for characteristic end-users in accidents, such as the control room operators, technical support staff and plant emergency teams, is discussed. Some ideas on how to apply virtual reality technology in accident management is also presented

  17. Decision-making guide for management of agriculture in the case of a nuclear accident; Guide d'aide a la decision pour la gestion du milieu agricole en cas d'accident nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reales, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Clamart (France); Fourrie, L. [Association De Coordination Technique Agricole, 75 - Paris (France); Quinio, C.; Grastilleur, Ch. [Ministere de l' Agriculture et de la Peche, 75 - Paris (France). Direction Generale de l' Alimentation

    2008-07-15

    For several years, agricultural and nuclear professionals in France have been working on how to manage the agricultural situation in the event of a nuclear accident. This work resulted in measures at both the national (Aube nuclear safety exercises in 2003, INEX3 in 2005) and international levels (EURATOM Programmes). Following on from the European FARMING (FP5) and EURANOS (FP6) works, ACTA', IRSN and six agricultural technical institutes which are specialized in agricultural production and processing network (arable crop [especially cereals, maize, pulses, potatoes and forage crops], fruits and vegetables, vine and wine, livestock farming [cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry]), created a resource adapted to the French context: the Decision-aiding Tool for the Management of Agriculture in case of a Nuclear Accident. Devised for the Ministry of Agriculture services supporting state officials in a radiation emergency, this manual focuses on the early phase following the accident when the state of emergency would make discussion on countermeasures with a large stakeholder panel impossible. Supported by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries and the French Nuclear Safety Authority, this project increased knowledge of post-accident management strategies and made an important contribution to the national think tank set up within the framework of the French Steering Committee for managing the post-event phase of a nuclear accident (CODIRPA). This article describes how the manual evolved throughout the project and the development of new resources. (authors)

  18. The management of risk to society from potential accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, F.R.; Garlick, A.R.; Hayns, M.R.; Taig, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    The main report of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) Working Group on Risks to Society from Potential Major Accidents is presented. It is the outcome of a study by AEA Technology, the trading name of the UKAEA, in support of its own decision-making on risk management of the nuclear plants and laboratories it controls. The principles underlying decisions on social risk are of much broader applicability, however. The report is prefaced by an Executive Summary which is intended to be a stand-alone summary of the results of the study. The topics covered include: an examination of the nature of risk; the distinction to be drawn between individual and societal risk; existing risks; risk estimation; goals and targets as defined in terms of acceptance, tolerability and comparison between risks; regulations relating to risk targets; risk management decisions in theory and practice; societal risk management. A final chapter brings together the conclusions and recommendations from the preceding nine with respect to risk estimation, evaluation, management and overall approach. Two appendices deal with cost benefit analysis and provide a glossary and acronyms. (UK)

  19. Accidents - Chernobyl accident; Accidents - accident de Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  20. CATHARE Assessment of PACTEL LOCA Experiments with Accident Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luben Sabotinov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the analysis results of three PACTEL experiments, carried out with the advanced thermal-hydraulic system computer CATHARE 2 code as a part of the second work package WP2 (analytical work of the EC project “Improved Accident Management of VVER nuclear power plants” (IMPAM-VVER. The three LOCA experiments, conducted on the Finnish test facility PACTEL (VVER-440 model, represent 7.4% cold leg breaks with combination of secondary bleed and primary bleed and feed and different actuation modes of the passive safety injection. The code was used for both defining and analyzing the experiments, and to assess its capabilities in predicting the associated complex VVER-related phenomena. The code results are in reasonable agreement with the measurements, and the important physical phenomena are well predicted, although still further improvement and validation might be necessary.

  1. Influence diagrams and decision trees for severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, W.W.J.; Seebregts, A.J.; Bedford, T.J.

    1996-08-01

    A review of relevent methodologies based on Influence Diagrams (IDs), Decision Trees (DTs), and Containment Event Trees (CETs) was conducted to assess the practicality of these methods for the selection of effective strategies for Severe Accident Management (SAM). The review included an evaluation of some software packages for these methods. The emphasis was on possible pitfalls of using IDs and on practical aspects, the latter by performance of a case study that was based on an existing Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). The study showed that the use of a combined ID/DT model has advantages over CET models, in particular when conservatisms in the Level 2 PSA have been identified and replaced by fair assessments of the uncertainties involved. It is recommended to use ID/DT models as complementary to CET models. (orig.)

  2. A database system for the management of severe accident risk information, SARD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, K. I.; Kim, D. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce main features and functions of a PC Windows-based database management system, SARD, which has been developed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute for automatic management and search of the severe accident risk information. Main functions of the present database system are implemented by three closely related, but distinctive modules: (1) fixing of an initial environment for data storage and retrieval, (2) automatic loading and management of accident information, and (3) automatic search and retrieval of accident information. For this, the present database system manipulates various form of the plant-specific severe accident risk information, such as dominant severe accident sequences identified from the plant-specific Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) and accident sequence-specific information obtained from the representative severe accident codes (e.g., base case and sensitivity analysis results, and summary for key plant responses). The present database system makes it possible to implement fast prediction and intelligent retrieval of the required severe accident risk information for various accident sequences, and in turn it can be used for the support of the Level 2 PSA of similar plants and for the development of plant-specific severe accident management strategies.

  3. Nuclear knowledge management in radioactive waste management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetere, Claudia L.; Gomiz, Pablo R.; Lavalle, Myriam; Masset, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    In late 2007, the Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) group of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), understanding the need to preserve knowledge related with radioactive waste, formulated the CONRRaD Project with the aim of developing and implementing a sustainable knowledge management system. The CONRRaD Project was highly focused on minimising the loss of radioactive waste management knowledge related to processes and facilities as a consequence of staff ageing and retiring, promoting transfer and preservation so as to ensure that future generations interpret and improve the management of waste, protecting the environment and people's health. The National Programme for Radioactive Waste Management (NPRWM) has the responsibility of maintaining a documented record system to preserve the knowledge that is available and relates to the facilities for radioactive wastes treatment, conditioning, packaging, storing and disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. The STOReR system has been designed with the aim of ensuring traceability through all the steps of radioactive waste management from generation to storage or disposal. Apart from upgrading an application in use since 2001, the new software includes improvements in the inventory calculations according to the current regulations. Basically, the system consists of two applications. One application called PAGE is on the Net and it is available for the producers. These producers are the facilities that generate radioactive waste as a consequence of their normal operation. PAGE enables the producers to access all the services provided by AGE more easily. Not only are producers the users of PAGE, but there are also authorised owners of radioactive sources and devices because AGE provides transitory or permanent storage of these elements. The other application called STOReR is the main one which provides the capabilities needed to support the whole system, such as the databases storage and management. STORe

  4. Indian programme on radioactive waste management

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    India has achieved self-reliance in the management of all types of radioactive waste arising dur- ing the operation of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Decades of safe and successful operation of our waste management facilities are testimony to the Indian waste management practices being on par with international standards ...

  5. Guide to Effective Purchasing. Operational Management Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frediani, Pam

    This manual is intended to help create and sustain good relations between purchasers and suppliers of foods and related products. It is designed to guide anyone involved in the purchasing function: purchasing officers and managers in medium and large establishments, food and beverage managers, catering managers, chefs, caterers, restaurateurs,…

  6. Designing a portfolio management programme to optimize cash-flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassom, D.

    1996-01-01

    The design and implementation of any portfolio management programme must, by definition, be tailored to the drivers and particular objectives of the company owning the assets. This paper will concentrate on one of the most important driving forces, namely managing cash-flow. Five key steps are required to achieve an effective portfolio management programme: 1. establish targets/goals; 2. describe and value the assets in your company's portfolio; 3. identify and catalogue potential 'customers'; 4. construct appropriate deal structures and other strategies to achieve your targets; 5. work hard and do deals. (author)

  7. Workshop proceedings of ISAMM 2009: Implementation of severe accident management measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guentay, S.

    2010-10-01

    achieved at the end of the workshop was that significant progress has been made in many countries since the 2001 OECD workshop on Severe Accident Management. It is also noted that the workshop objective of prompting more interaction between probabilistic and deterministic analysts has been achieved, based on the breadth of papers submitted and the discussions that took place regarding the interface of these two approaches. A guide published by the International Atomic Energy Authority IAEA contains detailed recommendations for all steps in developing accident management guidelines. In addition, two safety guides on PSA have been approved by the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS) and are expected to be published by the end of 2009. The Safety Guides on PSA provide recommendations for performing or managing a Level 1 and Level 2 PSA and for using the PSA to support the safe design and operation of nuclear power plant. Numerous initiatives at different levels (national, European, international) are quoted as being currently in progress in order to define standards and/or best practices for the development of Level 2 PSA. Progress made in SAM programmes concerning low power and shutdown states is commented on and it is noted that several utilities have already developed Level 2 PSAs for shutdown and low power severe accident situations. The importance of validation and training of SAM measures was stressed. Recommendations resulting from the conference are presented and discussed

  8. Workshop proceedings of ISAMM 2009: Implementation of severe accident management measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guentay, S. (ed.) [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Thermal Hydraulics, ViIligen (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    achieved at the end of the workshop was that significant progress has been made in many countries since the 2001 OECD workshop on Severe Accident Management. It is also noted that the workshop objective of prompting more interaction between probabilistic and deterministic analysts has been achieved, based on the breadth of papers submitted and the discussions that took place regarding the interface of these two approaches. A guide published by the International Atomic Energy Authority IAEA contains detailed recommendations for all steps in developing accident management guidelines. In addition, two safety guides on PSA have been approved by the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS) and are expected to be published by the end of 2009. The Safety Guides on PSA provide recommendations for performing or managing a Level 1 and Level 2 PSA and for using the PSA to support the safe design and operation of nuclear power plant. Numerous initiatives at different levels (national, European, international) are quoted as being currently in progress in order to define standards and/or best practices for the development of Level 2 PSA. Progress made in SAM programmes concerning low power and shutdown states is commented on and it is noted that several utilities have already developed Level 2 PSAs for shutdown and low power severe accident situations. The importance of validation and training of SAM measures was stressed. Recommendations resulting from the conference are presented and discussed

  9. The link between off-site-emergency planning and plant-internal accident management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, H.; Goertz, R.

    1995-02-01

    A variety of accident management measures has been developed and implemented in the German nuclear power plants. They constitute a fourth level of safety in the defence-in-depth concept. The containment venting system is an important example. A functioning link with well defined lines of communication between plant-internal accident management and off-site disaster emergency planning has been established.

  10. TEACHING METHODS IN MBA AND LIFELONG LEARNING PROGRAMMES FOR MANAGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarošová, Eva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Teaching methods in MBA and Lifelong Learning Programmes (LLP for managers should be topically relevant in terms of content as well as the teaching methods used. In terms of the content, the integral part of MBA and Lifelong Learning Programmes for managers should be the development of participants’ leadership competencies and their understanding of current leadership concepts. The teaching methods in educational programmes for managers as adult learners should correspond to the strategy of learner-centred teaching that focuses on the participants’ learning process and their active involvement in class. The focus on the participants’ learning process also raises questions about whether the programme’s participants perceive the teaching methods used as useful and relevant for their development as leaders. The paper presents the results of the analysis of the responses to these questions in a sample of 54 Czech participants in the MBA programme and of lifelong learning programmes at the University of Economics, Prague. The data was acquired based on written or electronically submitted questionnaires. The data was analysed in relation to the usefulness of the teaching methods for understanding the concepts of leadership, leadership skills development as well as respondents’ personal growth. The results show that the respondents most valued the methods that enabled them to get feedback, activated them throughout the programme and got them involved in discussions with others in class. Implications for managerial education practices are discussed.

  11. Policy elements for post-accident management in the event of nuclear accident. Document drawn up by the Steering Committee for the Management of the Post-Accident Phase of a Nuclear Accident (CODIRPA). Final version - 5 October 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Pursuant to the Inter-ministerial Directive on the Action of the Public Authorities, dated 7 April 2005, in the face of an event triggering a radiological emergency, the National directorate on nuclear safety and radiation protection (DGSNR), which became the Nuclear safety authority (ASN) in 2006, was tasked with working the relevant Ministerial offices in order to set out the framework and outline, prepare and implement the provisions needed to address post-accident situations arising from a nuclear accident. In June 2005, the ASN set up a Steering committee for the management of the post-accident phase in the event of nuclear accident or a radiological emergency situation (CODIRPA), put in charge of drafting the related policy elements. To carry out its work, CODIRPA set up a number of thematic working groups from 2005 on, involving in total several hundred experts from different backgrounds (local information commissions, associations, elected officials, health agencies, expertise agencies, authorities, etc.). The working groups reports have been published by the ASN. Experiments on the policy elements under construction were carried out at the local level in 2010 across three nuclear sites and several of the neighbouring municipalities, as well as during national crisis drills conducted since 2008. These works gave rise to two international conferences organised by ASN in 2007 and 2011. The policy elements prepared by CODIRPA were drafted in regard to nuclear accidents of medium scale causing short-term radioactive release (less than 24 hours) that might occur at French nuclear facilities equipped with a special intervention plan (PPI). They also apply to actions to be carried out in the event of accidents during the transport of radioactive materials. Following definitions of each stage of a nuclear accident, this document lists the principles selected by CODIRPA to support management efforts subsequent to a nuclear accident. Then, it presents the main

  12. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission nineteenth water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2, Severe accident research; Severe accident policy implementation; Accident management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, A.J. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 83 papers out of the 108 that were presented at the Nineteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 28--30, 1991. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 14 different papers presented by researchers from Canada, Germany, France, Japan, Sweden, Taiwan, and USSR. This document, Volume 2, presents papers on: Severe accident research; Severe accident and policy implementation; and Accident management. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  13. A preliminary study for the implementation of general accident management strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Soo Hyung; Kim, Soo Hyung; Jeong, Young Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    To enhance the safety of nuclear power plants, implementation of accident management has been suggested as one of most important programs. Specially, accident management strategies are suggested as one of key elements considered in development of the accident management program. In this study, generally applicable accident management strategies to domestic nuclear power plants are identified through reviewing several accident management programs for the other countries and considering domestic conditions. Identified strategies are as follows; 1) Injection into the Reactor Coolant System, 2) Depressurize the Reactor Coolant System, 3) Depressurize the Steam Generator, 4) Injection into the Steam Generator, 5) Injection into the Containment, 6) Spray into the Containment, 7) Control Hydrogen in the Containment. In addition, the systems and instrumentation necessary for the implementation of each strategy are also investigated. 11 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  14. A preliminary study for the implementation of general accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Soo Hyung; Kim, Soo Hyung; Jeong, Young Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung

    1997-01-01

    To enhance the safety of nuclear power plants, implementation of accident management has been suggested as one of most important programs. Specially, accident management strategies are suggested as one of key elements considered in development of the accident management program. In this study, generally applicable accident management strategies to domestic nuclear power plants are identified through reviewing several accident management programs for the other countries and considering domestic conditions. Identified strategies are as follows; 1) Injection into the Reactor Coolant System, 2) Depressurize the Reactor Coolant System, 3) Depressurize the Steam Generator, 4) Injection into the Steam Generator, 5) Injection into the Containment, 6) Spray into the Containment, 7) Control Hydrogen in the Containment. In addition, the systems and instrumentation necessary for the implementation of each strategy are also investigated

  15. Development of the methodology and approaches to validate safety and accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmolov, V.G.

    1997-01-01

    The article compares the development of the methodology and approaches to validate the nuclear power plant safety and accident management in Russia and advanced industrial countries. It demonstrates that the development of methods of safety validation is dialectically related to the accumulation of the knowledge base on processes and events during NPP normal operation, transients and emergencies, including severe accidents. The article describes the Russian severe accident research program (1987-1996), the implementation of which allowed Russia to reach the world level of the safety validation efforts, presents future high-priority study areas. Problems related to possible approaches to the methodological accident management development are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of the Finnish nuclear waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    In response to a request from Finland in November 1992, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) set up a Team of four experts (representatives from Belgium, Canada, Germany and Switzerland) to review the Finnish nuclear waste management programme within the auspices of IAEA's Waste Management programme (WATRP). During the early summer of 1993, the Team reviewed a large amount of documentation supplied by the Finnish industry, government and research organizations. The radioactive waste management programme areas within the Team's terms of reference included: (1) work being done in siting and building a conditional facility for spent nuclear fuel and siting and constructing a co-located repository, (2) the plans and activities for conditioning and disposing of the low and intermediate level waste from Finland's NPPs and (3) the plans for decommissioning Finland's reactors when that becomes necessary. The evaluation work and the recommendations of the Team are detailed in the report

  17. Aspects of risk analysis application to estimation of nuclear accidents and tests consequences and intervention management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demin, V.F.; Hedemann-Jensen, P.; Rolevich, I.V.; Schneider, T.S.; Sobolev, B.G.

    1996-01-01

    For assessment of accident consequences and a post-accident management a risk analysis methodology and data bank (BARD) with allowance for radiation and non-radiation risk causes should be developed and used. Aspects of these needs and developments are considered. Some illustrative results of health risk estimation made with BARD for the Bryansk region territory with relatively high radioactive contamination from the Chernobyl accident are presented

  18. A stress management programme for Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vega, E; Fernandez-Rodriguez, C

    2004-04-01

    The present study was designed to assess the effectiveness of techniques of behavioural assessment and treatment of Crohn's disease (CD). On the assumption that stress events have a pronounced influence on the life of Crohn's patients, we proposed stress management treatment. This is intended to control stress and improve patients' personal and social competence. Forty-five patients with Crohn's disease were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups, two experimental groups: stress management and self-directed stress management, and a control group: conventional medical treatment. The subjects underwent eight individual sessions which were specific to each condition. All subjects completed symptom monitoring diaries. The subjects who received training in stress management experienced a significant post-treatment reduction of tiredness (P stress management experienced a significant reduction in tiredness (P < 0.1) and abdominal pain (P < 0.5). No significant changes were observed in symptomatology in the conventional medical treatment group. Similar results were obtained in the 12 month follow-up.

  19. International Nuclear Management Academy Requirements for University Master’s Programmes in Nuclear Technology Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosbois, J. de; Hirose, H.; Adachi, F.; Liu, L.; Hanamitsu, K.; Kosilov, A.; Roberts, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The development of any national nuclear energy programme is dependent on the successful development of qualified human resources, through a sustainable nuclear education and training programmes supported by government and industry. Among the broad range of specialists needed for the continued safe and economic utilization of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, are a most vital component—managers. The International Nuclear Management Academy (INMA) is an IAEA facilitated collaboration framework in which universities provide master’s degree programmes focusing on the management aspect for the nuclear sector. INMA master’s programmes in Nuclear Technology Management (NTM) specify a common set of competency requirements that graduates should acquire to prepare them to become competent managers. This paper presents an overview of the INMA collaboration framework and the requirements for partner universities to implement master’s programmes in Nuclear Technology Management. (author

  20. Regulatory requirements on accident management and emergency preparedness - concept of nuclear and radiation safety during beyond-design-basis accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanke, R.

    2002-01-01

    Actual practice the and proposals for further activities in the field of Accident Management (AM) in the member countries of the Co-operation Forum of WWER regulators and in Western countries have been assessed. Further the results of the last working group on AM , the overview of interactions of severe accident research and the regulatory positions in various countries, IAEA reports, practice in Switzerland and Finland, were taken into consideration. From this information, the working group derived recommendations on Accident Management. The general proposals correspond to the present state of the art on AM. They do not describe the whole spectra of recommendations on AM for NPPs with WWER reactors. A basis for the implementation of an AM program is given, which could be extended in a follow-up working group. The developments and research concerning AM have to be continued. The positions of various countries with regard to the 'Interactions of severe accident research and the regulatory positions' are given. On the basis of the working group proposals, the WWER regulators could set regulatory requirements and support further developments of AM strategies, making use of the benefits of common features of NPPs with WWER reactors. Concerted actions in the field of AM between the WWER regulators would bundle the development of a unified concept of recommendations and speed up the implementation of AM measures in order to minimise the risks involved in nuclear power generation

  1. Management training programmes: the influence of managerial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the influence of managerial status, gender and age on learning effectiveness of managers in work organizations. The ex-post-facto research design was adopted for the study. A total of 110 respondents participated in the study. The data for the study were collected using a set of questionnaire titled ...

  2. Network-Embedded Management and Applications Understanding Programmable Networking Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Wolter, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Despite the explosion of networking services and applications in the past decades, the basic technological underpinnings of the Internet have remained largely unchanged. At its heart are special-purpose appliances that connect us to the digital world, commonly known as switches and routers. Now, however, the traditional framework is being increasingly challenged by new methods that are jostling for a position in the next-generation Internet. The concept of a network that is becoming more programmable is one of the aspects that are taking center stage. This opens new possibilities to embed software applications inside the network itself and to manage networks and communications services with unprecedented ease and efficiency. In this edited volume, distinguished experts take the reader on a tour of different facets of programmable network infrastructure and application exploit it. Presenting the state of the art in network embedded management and applications and programmable network infrastructure, the book c...

  3. The Radioactive Waste Management Programme in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beceiro, A. R.; Vico, E.

    2000-01-01

    In 1984 the Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos (ENRESA) was set up in order to be responsible for all radioactive waste management activities in the country. ENRESA is a state-owned company, the shareholders of which are CIEMAT (Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, formerly (JEN) and SEPI (Sociedad Estatal de Participaciones Industriales), both institutions dependent on the Ministry of Industry and Energy. ENRESA has a broad scope of responsibilities, including not only the management of L/ILW, HLW and spent fuel but also the decommissioning of nuclear installations, as well as the rehabilitation of uranium mining and milling facilities when required. The policy on radioactive waste management is defined by the Government, and the strategies are developed by ENRESA in accordance with the General Radioactive Waste Management Plan. This Plan is a strategic document which must be submitted yearly by ENRESA to the Government, for its approval when the Ministry of Industry and Energy decided so. The plan, in general terms, contains the main aspects related to waste generation and forecasts, as well as the strategies and technical solutions to be prepared, along with the associated economic and financial aspects. ENRESA's activities are financed by the waste producers. On the one hand the nucleoelectric sector pays a percentage fee on all the electricity sales, while small producers pay tariffs according to the services provided, both are approved by the Government. The fifth General Radioactive Waste Plan, approved by the Government in July 1999, is currently in force and contains the strategies for the management of radioactive wastes and decommissioning of nuclear installations in Spain. (author)

  4. The radioactive waste management programme in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beceiro, Alvaro R.; Vico, Elena

    2002-01-01

    In 1984 the Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos (ENRESA) was set up in order to be responsible for all radioactive waste management activities in the country. ENRESA is a state-owned company, the shareholders of which are CIEMAT (Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, formerly (JEN) and SEPI (Sociedad Estatal de Participaciones Industriales), both institutions dependent on the Spanish Government. ENRESA has a broad scope of responsibilities, including not only the management of L/ILW, HLW and spent fuel but also the decommissioning of nuclear installations, as well as the rehabilitation of uranium mining and milling facilities when required. The policy on radioactive waste management is defined by the Government, and the strategies are developed by ENRESA in accordance with the General Radioactive Waste Management Plan. This Plan is a strategic document which must be submitted yearly by ENRESA to the Government, for its approval when the Ministry of Economy decided so. The plan, in general terms, contains the main aspects related to waste generation and forecasts, as well as the strategies and technical solutions to be prepared, along with the associated economic and financial aspects. ENRESA's activities are financed by the waste producers. On the one hand the nucleoelectric sector pays a percentage fee on all the electricity sales, while small producers pay tariffs according to the services provided, both are approved by the Government. The Fifth General Radioactive Waste Plan, approved by the Government in July 1999, is currently in force and contains the strategies for the management of radioactive wastes and decommissioning of nuclear installations in Spain. (author)

  5. Management of Adult Education Programme in Abia State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adult Education is the instruction or controlled experiences for the mature person so that he/she may attain social, economic, cultural, political or technical competence or individual development. The importance of management in adult education programme cannot be over emphasized because of the vital role it plays in ...

  6. Rethinking Leadership Learning in Postgraduate Public Management Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Ian; Raine, John

    2013-01-01

    Leadership forms a key component of the curriculum of most Master of Public Administration and other public management programmes, usually doing so on the basis of assumptions that leadership is (a) both a subject and a responsibility that all such students might expect to embrace in the course of their careers; and (b) in some respects at least,…

  7. The Winds of Change: Higher Education Management Programmes in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausits, Attila; Pellert, Ada

    2009-01-01

    Amid the Bologna Process and as a direct effect of it, European higher education institutions have to rethink their core institutional policies in order to effectively deal with the increasing demands and needs of their "customers" and society at large. The higher education management programmes across Europe, with some specific needs…

  8. Management, administrative and operational causes of the accident: Chernobyl nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastas, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident, which occurred in April 1986, was the result of management, administrative, operational, technical and design flaws. The accident released millions of curies of mixed fission products including 70-100 PBq of 137 Cs. At the time of the accident, science, engineering and safety in the former Soviet Union were dominated by an atmosphere of politics, group think and 'dingoes tending the sheep'. This corrupted safety culture exacerbated the poor design of the reactor. The results of this study strongly suggest that the cultural, political, managerial and operational attributes of the Soviet 'system' performed in a synergistic manner to significantly contribute to the initiation of the accident. (authors)

  9. Experience of the Spanish radioactive management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beceiro, A.R.; Zuloaga, P.; Espejo, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The important results achieved in the last 12 years , since the ENRESA inception, are reported. The establishment and start-up of the low and intermediate level waste management system (waste acceptance criteria and verification laboratories, waste collection and transport systems and conditioning facilities, temporary storage and disposal) is capable of managing wastes of these categories forecast to be produced in Spain up to the year 2013. The capacity to store temporarily the spent fuel on site at the operating NPPs is being increased to met practically the needs up to end of these plants' operating lifetime. This is being achieved through the re-racking of spent fuel pools and the use of metallic casks, depending on the technical possibilities of each plant. These increase in the capacity for spent fuel temporary storage will allow work on geological prospecting and technology development to progress over the next two decades, prior to construction of a geological disposal facility. All these tasks are being carried out in accordance with the established program initiated in 1987 which is requiring important technological financial and communication-related efforts. The financial, technological and waste management means required for dismantling of nuclear installations at the end of their operating lifetime have been established; thus, for instance, the works involved in dismantling and tailing dyke remodeling at the disused uranium mill in Andujar were completed. The engineering project for the dismantling of the Vandellos I NPP is going ahead according to schedule and was submitted to the Authorities during the first half of 1994, the starting of work being expected for the end of 1997. This overall set of results represents an appreciable improvement in Spain's capacity to solve environmental problems and a substantial reduction in the potential risk associated with the radioactive wastes accumulation. (authors)

  10. Comparison of Management Oversight and Risk Tree and Tripod-Beta in Excavation Accident Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadfam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Accident investigation programs are a necessary part in identification of risks and management of the business process. Objectives One of the most important features of such programs is the analysis technique for identifying the root causes of accidents in order to prevent their recurrences. Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP was used to compare management oversight and risk tree (MORT with Tripod-Beta in order to determine the superior technique for analysis of fatal excavation accidents in construction industries. Materials and Methods MORT and Tripod-Beta techniques were used for analyzing two major accidents with three main steps. First, these techniques were applied to find out the causal factors of the accidents. Second, a number of criteria were developed for the comparison of the techniques and third, using AHP, the techniques were prioritized in terms of the criteria for choosing the superior one. Results The Tripod-Beta investigation showed 41 preconditions and 81 latent causes involved in the accidents. Additionally, 27 root causes of accidents were identified by the MORT analysis. Analytical hierarchy process (AHP investigation revealed that MORT had higher priorities only in two criteria than Tripod-Beta. Conclusions Our findings indicate that Tripod-Beta with a total priority of 0.664 is superior to MORT with the total priority of 0.33. It is recommended for future research to compare the available accident analysis techniques based on proper criteria to select the best for accident analysis.

  11. The philosophy of severe accident management in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baratta, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The US NRC has put forth the initial steps in what is viewed as the resolution of the severe accident issue. Underlying this process is a fundamental philosophy that if followed will likely lead to an order of magnitude reduction in the risk of severe accidents. Thus far, this philosophy has proven cost effective through improved performance. This paper briefly examines this philosophy and the next step in closure of the severe accident issue, the IPE. An example of the authors experience with determinist. (author)

  12. Recent results from CEC cost sharing research programme on LWR fuel behaviour under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairbairn, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    The present structure and intentions of the CEC sponsored cost sharing programme for LWR safety research are outlined. Detailed results are reported for two projects from this programme. The first project concerns experimental data on the thermohydraulic effects of flow diversion around ballooned fuel rods. Data are presented on single and two phase heat transfer in an electrically heated rod bundle. Detailed photographic data on droplet behaviour are also given. The second project is an investigation of the effects of zircaloy oxidation on rewetting during reflood. It is shown that as oxide thickness increases from 1μm to 76μm that rewet rates can increase by up to 40%. A systematic effect of oxidation on rewet temperatures is also noted. (author)

  13. International programme on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident. Report by the Director-General. Executive Board 95. session, provisional agenda item 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA) have been initiated in mid-1991 following its endorsement by the Forty-fourth World Health Assembly in resolution WHA44.36. This report by the Director General outlines the progress made in the implementation of the Programme, and summarises the scientific information obtained to date on the health effects and planned future activities. The major projects under the programme include Thyroid project, Hematology project, Dosimetry and Communication Support Services, Brain Damage in utero project and Epidemiological Registry project

  14. Developing a national programme of flood risk management measures: Moldova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsbottom David

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A Technical Assistance project funded by the European Investment Bank has been undertaken to develop a programme of flood risk management measures for Moldova that will address the main shortcomings in the present flood management system, and provide the basis for long-term improvement. Areas of significant flood risk were identified using national hydraulic and flood risk modelling, and flood hazard and flood risk maps were then prepared for these high risk areas. The flood risk was calculated using 12 indicators representing social, economic and environmental impacts of flooding. Indicator values were combined to provide overall estimates of flood risk. Strategic approaches to flood risk management were identified for each river basin using a multi-criteria analysis. Measures were then identified to achieve the strategic approaches. A programme of measures covering a 20-year period was developed together with a more detailed Short-Term Investment Plan covering the first seven years of the programme. Arrangements are now being made to implement the programme. The technical achievements of the project included national hydrological and hydraulic modelling covering 12,000 km of river, the development of 2-dimensional channel and floodplain hydraulic models from a range of topographic and bathymetric data, and an integrated flood risk assessment that takes account of both economic and non-monetary impacts.

  15. Solid waste accident analysis in support of the Savannah River Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, W.J.; Crumm, A.T.; Kearnaghan, D.P.; Rabin, M.S.; Rossi, D.E.

    1994-07-01

    The potential for facility accidents and the magnitude of their impacts are important factors in the evaluation of the solid waste management addressed in the Environmental Impact Statement. The purpose of this document is to address the potential solid waste management facility accidents for comparative use in support of the Environmental Impact Statement. This document must not be construed as an Authorization Basis document for any of the SRS waste management facilities. Because of the time constraints placed on preparing this accident impact analysis, all accident information was derived from existing safety documentation that has been prepared for SRS waste management facilities. A list of facilities to include in the accident impact analysis was provided as input by the Savannah River Technology Section. The accident impact analyses include existing SRS waste management facilities as well as proposed facilities. Safety documentation exists for all existing and many of the proposed facilities. Information was extracted from this existing documentation for this impact analysis. There are a few proposed facilities for which safety analyses have not been prepared. However, these facilities have similar processes to existing facilities and will treat, store, or dispose of the same type of material that is in existing facilities; therefore, the accidents can be expected to be similar

  16. Medical management of radiological accidents in non-specialized clinics: mistakes and lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jikia, D.

    2009-01-01

    In 1996-2002 three radiological accidents were developed in Georgia. There were some people injured in those accidents. During medical management of the injured some mistakes and errors were revealed both in diagnostics and scheme of the treatment. The goal of this article is to summarize medical management of the mentioned radiological accidents, to estimate reasons of mistakes and errors, to present the lessons drawn in result of Georgia radiological accidents. There was no clinic with specialized profile and experience. Accordingly due to having no relevant experience late diagnosis can be considered as the main error. It had direct influence on the patients' health and results of treatment. Lessons to be drawn after analyzing Georgian radiological accidents: 1. informing medical staff about radiological injuries (pathogenesis, types, symptoms, clinical course, principles of treatment and etc.); 2. organization of training and meetings in non-specialized clinics or medical institutions for medical staff; 3. preparation of informational booklets and guidelines.(author)

  17. Simulator drills for the management of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.

    1989-01-01

    The present state of deliberations on the simulation of severe accidents is presented and applied to a training philosophy. The special characteristics of 'severe' accidents are addressed and, falling under this category, the 'psychological structure of the man-machine-situation' is examined. The valid rules for drilling 'post-RESA-conduct' (RESA = fast reactor shut down) and the monitoring of safety goals are introduced. 2 figs., 1 tab

  18. Post-Accident Waste Management in Ukraine : Challenges and Steps Needed to Resolve the Accident Waste Problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilochytska, T.; Zinkevich, L.; Shybetskyi, I.; Krone, J.

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: • Solving the problem of management of “Chernobyl waste” requires: - a systematic review of the existing norms and regulations with respect to best international practice of radioactive waste management; - improvement of the existing classification / characterization of radioactive waste with a focus on disposal; - improvement of the safety assessment approaches for licensing the disposal of accident waste, taking into account relevant safety features and site specific conditions; - involving of international experience and support to plan and perform safety related activity on the Shelter Object transformation

  19. Initial medical management of criticality accident victim; Conduite a tenir aux victimes d'un accident de criticite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miele, A.; Bebaron-Jacobs, L

    2005-07-01

    The extremely severe criticality accidents known to this day, and the subsequent deaths recorded (Sarov 1997 and Tokai Mura 1999), demonstrate the need for sustained surveillance and constant adapted training for the teams in charge of irradiated and/or contaminated victims. The aim of this work group, composed of occupational health services and associated medical biology laboratories, is to present, in leaflet format, the essential data on the documentation and the conduct to be held when facing the victims of a criticality accident. The studies of this work group confirm the difficulties involved in managing this type of accident, both from the dosimetric evaluation point of view and from the therapeutic management point of view. That is why several research themes and perspectives are developed. During the different phases of victim triage, the recommendations given on these leaflets describe the operational conducts to be held. This work will have to be updated according to the evolution in knowledge and means: short and long term effects of exposure to neutrons, multi-competence hospital cooperation, expertise networks related to dosimetric reconstitution. (authors)

  20. Aspects of Knowledge Management Programme Implementation into Management System of NPP Operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudakov, V.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper deals with the implementation of KM tools and approaches in NPPs of Slovenské elektrárne. The case study emphasizes the importance of KM programme introduction into the existing management system of the company taking into account sustainability and successful of the programme and demonstrates some practical examples. (author

  1. Appendix: Data management and data archive for the HYREX Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Roberts

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the mid 1980s, changes in political imperatives plus technological changes in computer hardware and software have heightened the awareness of the economic value and importance of quality datasets to scientific research. The Natural Environment Research Council’s (NERC interdisciplinary Thematic and Special Topic Programmes have highlighted the need for a coherent data management policy to provide and preserve these quality datasets for posterity. The Hydrological Radar EXperiment (HYREX Special Topic Programme brought together multi-disciplinary researchers from UK public sector laboratories and universities. In this paper, the HYREX data management strategy, its problems and its solutions are discussed. The HYREX data archive, situated at NERC’s British Atmospheric Data Centre, is described. Keywords: radar, data, archive, web, storm, flood

  2. Second Specialist Meeting on operator aids for severe accident management: summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The second OECD Specialist Meeting on operator aids for severe accident management (SAMOA-2) was held in Lyon, France (1997), and was attended by 33 specialists representing ten OECD member countries. As for SAMOA-1, the scope of SAMOA-2 was limited to operator aids for accident management which were in operation or could be soon. The meeting concentrated on the management of accidents beyond the design basis, including tools which might be extended from the design basis range into the severe accident area. Relevant simulation tools for operator training were also part of the scope of the meeting. 20 papers were presented; there were two demonstrations of computerized systems (the ATLAS analysis simulator developed by GRS, and EDF's 'Simulateur Post Accidentels' (SIPA). The three sessions dealt with operator aids for control rooms, operator aids for technical support centres, and simulation tools for operator training. The various papers for each session are summarized

  3. Effective Management Tools in Implementing Operational Programme Administrative Capacity Development

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen – Elena DOBROTĂ; Claudia VASILCA

    2015-01-01

    Public administration in Romania and the administrative capacity of the central and local government has undergone a significant progress since 2007. The development of the administrative capacity deals with a set of structural and process changes that allow governments to improve the formulation and implementation of policies in order to achieve enhanced results. Identifying, developing and using management tools for a proper implementation of an operational programme dedicated to consolidat...

  4. Sisifo-gas a computerised system to support severe accident training and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.; Buedo, J.L.; Borondo, L.; Lopez, N.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) will have to be prepared to face the management of severe accidents, through the development of Severe Accident Guides and sophisticated systems of calculation, as a supporting to the decision-making. SISIFO-GAS is a flexible computerized tool, both for the supporting to accident management and for education and training in severe accident. It is an interactive system, a visual and an easily handle one, and needs no specific knowledge in MAAP code to make complicate simulations in conditions of severe accident. The system is configured and adjusted to work in a BWR/6 technology plant with Mark III Containment, as it is Cofrentes NPP. But it is easily portable to every other kind of reactor, having the level 2 PSA (probabilistic safety analysis) of the plant to be able to establish the categories of the source term and the most important sequences in the progression of the accident. The graphic interface allows following in a very intuitive and formative way the evolution and the most relevant events in the accident, in the both system's way of work, training and management. (authors)

  5. Medical management of radiation accidents: capabilities and deployment principles of the Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörr, Harald; Meineke, Viktor

    2012-10-01

    Radiation accidents are fortunately infrequent occurrences, but since their consequences can be very serious as in the Chernobyl and the Fukushima nuclear accidents, medical management of radiation accidents is of great importance. Besides several other tasks, medical management of radiation accidents is one of the key tasks of the Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology. Within a Task Force Unit for medical chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) Defense, the institute provides designated personnel who will perform clinical investigations on the scene and will liaise with the institute, where different methods for biological dosimetry and dose reconstruction will be performed. The most important aspects of efficient medical management of radiation accidents are diagnosis of radiation-induced health damage, determination of the cause, dealing with contamination/incorporation, pathophysiological and therapeutic principles, preparatory planning, national and international cooperation and training. Military and non-military institutions have to work closely together when it comes to radiation accidents and since national resources are limited and could be exhausted, international networks can help to ensure medical treatment for radiation accident victims.

  6. Development of nuclear power plant simulator for an accident management design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shota; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Tsuji, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    An accident management is very important for nuclear reactor safety to prevent core damage and a large amount of radioactive release in severe accidents taking place in Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power site. We are aiming at developing nuclear power plant simulator for an accident management design. For this purpose, THYDE-NEU developed by JAEA was selected as a candidate simulation code because it is open source code and has a high simulation capability dealing with severe accidents. For confirming the availability of simulation code, mitigation analysis about the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident has been carried out. TMI accident was caused by the following three events; stuck-open of pressurizer relief valve (loss of coolant), closing outlet valve of auxiliary feed water and stop of ECCS operation based on misjudgment. We analyzed three mitigation scenarios about the three events and compared simulation results of the scenarios. This analysis shows that a short time recovery from loss of coolant event is very important to prevent core damage and THYDE-NEU code has a high performance to design accident management programs. (author)

  7. Radioactive waste management after NPP accident: Post-Chernobyl experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhalevich, A.; Grebenkov, A.

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the Chernobyl NPP accident a very large amount of so-called 'Chernobyl waste' were generated in the territory of Belarus, which was contaminated much more than all other countries. These wastes relate mainly to two following categories: low-level waste (LLW) and new one 'Conventionally Radioactive Waste' (CRW). Neither regulations nor technology and equipment were sufficiently developed for such an amount and kind of waste before the accident. It required proper decisions in respect of regulations, treatment, transportation, disposal of waste, etc. (author)

  8. Example of severe accident management guidelines validation and verification using full scope simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajnc, B.; Basic, I.; Spiler, J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG) is to provide guidelines to mitigate and control beyond design bases accidents. These guidelines are to be used by the technical support center that is established at the plant within one hour after the beginning of the accident as a technical support for the main control room operators. Since some of the accidents can progress very fast there are also two guidelines provided for the main control room operators. The first one is to be used if the core damage occurs and the TSC is not established yet and the second one after technical support center become operational. After SG replacement and power uprate in year 2000, NPP Krsko developed Rev.1 of these procedures, which have been validated and verified during one-week effort. Plant specific simulator capable of simulating severe accidents was extensively used.(author)

  9. Research and technology programmes supporting waste management in BNFL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairhall, G.A.; Horner, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Waste Management is a major activity of BNFL in the UK and at various locations internationally. To support these activities extensive programmes of Research and Technology have been undertaken for many years. This involves practical studies involving active and non-active work at laboratory and pilot plant scale. Extensive use is also made of theoretical and modelling techniques. Current work is aimed at underpinning and improving current operations supporting the design and safety cases of new plant and addressing waste management activities of the future including decommissioning. (authors)

  10. Managing major chemical accidents in China: Towards effective risk information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, G.; Zhang, L.; Lu, Y.; Mol, A.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical industries, from their very inception, have been controversial due to the high risks they impose on safety of human beings and the environment. Recent decades have witnessed increasing impacts of the accelerating expansion of chemical industries and chemical accidents have become a major

  11. Populations protection and territories management in nuclear emergency and post-accident situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourrel, M.; Calmon, Ph.; Calvez, M.; Chambrette, V.; Champion, D.; Devin, P.; Godino, O.; Lombard, J.; Rzepka, J.P.; Schneider, Th.; Verhaeghe, B.; Cogez, E.; Kayser, O.; Guenon, C.; Jourdain, J.R.; Bouchot, E.; Murith, Ch.; Lochard, J.; Cluchier, A.; Vandecasteele, Ch.; Pectorin, X.; Dubiau, Ph.; Gerphagnon, O.; Roche, H.; Cessac, B.; Cochard, A.; Machenaud, G.; Jourdain, J.R.; Pirard, Ph.; Leger, M.; Bouchot, E.; Demet, M.; Charre, J.P.; Poumadere, M.; Cogez, E.

    2010-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Twenty seven presentations out of 29 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - radiological and dosimetric consequences in nuclear accident situation: impact on the safety approach and protection stakes (E. Cogez); 2 - organisation of public authorities in case of emergency and in post-event situation (in case of nuclear accident or radiological terror attack in France and abroad), (O. Kayser); 3 - ORSEC plan and 'nuclear' particular intervention plan (PPI), (C. Guenon); 4 - thyroid protection by stable iodine ingestion: European perspective (J.R. Jourdain); 5 - preventive distribution of stable iodine: presentation of the 2009/2010 public information campaign (E. Bouchot); 6 - 2009/2010 iodine campaign: presentation and status (O. Godino); 7 - populations protection in emergency and post-accident situation in Switzerland (C. Murith); 8 - CIPR's recommendations on the management of emergency and post-accident situations (J. Lochard); 9 - nuclear exercises in France - status and perspectives (B. Verhaeghe); 10 - the accidental rejection of uranium at the Socatri plant: lessons learnt from crisis management (D. Champion); 11 - IRE's radiological accident of August 22, 2008 (C. Vandecasteele); 12 - presentation of the CEA's crisis national organisation: coordination centre in case of crisis, technical teams, intervention means (X. Pectorin); 13 - coordination and realisation of environmental radioactivity measurement programs, exploitation and presentation of results: status of IRSN's actions and perspectives (P. Dubiau); 14 - M2IRAGE - measurements management in the framework of geographically-assisted radiological interventions in the environment (O. Gerphagnon and H. Roche); 15 - post-accident management of a nuclear accident - the CODIRPA works (I. Mehl-Auget); 16 - nuclear post-accident: new challenges of crisis expertise (D. Champion); 17 - aid guidebooks

  12. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies

  13. Application of probabilistic methods to accident analysis at waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banz, I.

    1986-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment is a technique used to systematically analyze complex technical systems, such as nuclear waste management facilities, in order to identify and measure their public health, environmental, and economic risks. Probabilistic techniques have been utilized at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, to evaluate the probability of a catastrophic waste hoist accident. A probability model was developed to represent the hoisting system, and fault trees were constructed to identify potential sequences of events that could result in a hoist accident. Quantification of the fault trees using statistics compiled by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) indicated that the annual probability of a catastrophic hoist accident at WIPP is less than one in 60 million. This result allowed classification of a catastrophic hoist accident as ''not credible'' at WIPP per DOE definition. Potential uses of probabilistic techniques at other waste management facilities are discussed

  14. Finnish Research Programme on Nuclear Waste Management KYT2014. Framework Programme for the Research Period 2011-2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The objective of KYT2014 (Finnish Research Programme on Nuclear Waste Management), run by the Ministry of Employment and the Economy, is to ensure the sufficient and comprehensive availability of the nuclear technological expertise and other capabilities required by the authorities when comparing different nuclear waste management ways and implementation methods. Research required for the supervision of nuclear waste management falls under other public authority programmes, whereas that related to the planning, implementation and development of nuclear waste management falls under research programmes conducted by licensees as part of their nuclear waste management obligation. The Framework Programme for 2011-2014 was prepared by a working group appointed by the Ministry of Employment and the Economy. The contents of the KYT2014 Research Programme comprise key research subjects in terms of national expertise. These include new and alternative nuclear waste management technologies, research into the safety of nuclear waste management and sociological research related to the issue. Through these research programmes, the aim is to assemble extensive, coordinated safety research wholes, particularly with respect to research on the capacity of buffer and filler materials in final disposal, the long-term durability of the final disposal canister, and safety case. Traditional projects, whether lasting one or several years, are also suitable for the Research Programme. The KYT2014 research programme serves as a discussion and communication forum between authorities, organisations engaged in nuclear waste management and research institutions, creating the preconditions for utilising limited research resources. It also strives to ensure a diverse and interdisciplinary research team for research projects. Another aim is to help secure the continuous availability of essential national expertise, while promoting scientific and high-level competence, and enhancing general

  15. Air traffic management accident risk, part 1: the limits of realistic modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Brooker, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The prime goal of the Air Traffic Management (ATM) system is to control accident risk. Some key questions are posed, including: What do design safety targets really mean and imply for risk modelling? In what circumstances can future accident risk really be modelled with sufficient precision? If risk cannot be estimated with precision, then how is safety to be assured with traffic growth and operational/technical changes? This paper endeavours to answer these questions by an ...

  16. Effective Management Tools in Implementing Operational Programme Administrative Capacity Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen – Elena DOBROTĂ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Public administration in Romania and the administrative capacity of the central and local government has undergone a significant progress since 2007. The development of the administrative capacity deals with a set of structural and process changes that allow governments to improve the formulation and implementation of policies in order to achieve enhanced results. Identifying, developing and using management tools for a proper implementation of an operational programme dedicated to consolidate a performing public administration it was a challenging task, taking into account the types of interventions within Operational Programme Administrative Capacity Development 2007 – 2013 and the continuous changes in the economic and social environment in Romania and Europe. The aim of this article is to provide a short description of the approach used by the Managing Authority for OPACD within the performance management of the structural funds in Romania between 2008 and 2014. The paper offers a broad image of the way in which evaluations (ad-hoc, intermediate and performance were used in different stages of OP implementation as a tool of management.

  17. Support calculations for management of PRISE leakage accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matejovic, P.; Vranka, L. [Nuclear Power Plants Research Inst. Vuje, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1997-12-31

    Accidents involving primary-to-secondary leakage (PRISE) caused by rupture of one or a few tubes are well known design basis events in both, western and VVER NPPs. Operating experience and in-service inspections of VVER-440 units have demonstrated also the potential for large PRISE leaks in the case of the steam generator (SG) primary collector cover lift-up (Rovno NPP). Without performing any countermeasure for limitation of SG collector cover lift-up, a full opening results in PRISE leak with an equivalent diameter 107 mm. Although this accident was not considered in the original design, this event is usually analysed as DBA too. Different means are available for detection and mitigation of PRISE leakage in NPPs currently in operation (J.Bohunice V-1 and V-2) or under construction (Mochovce) in Slovakia. 8 refs.

  18. Causal Factors and Adverse Events of Aviation Accidents and Incidents Related to Integrated Vehicle Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Jones, Sharon M.; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Leone, Karen M.; Sandifer, Carl E.

    2011-01-01

    Causal factors in aviation accidents and incidents related to system/component failure/malfunction (SCFM) were examined for Federal Aviation Regulation Parts 121 and 135 operations to establish future requirements for the NASA Aviation Safety Program s Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project. Data analyzed includes National Transportation Safety Board (NSTB) accident data (1988 to 2003), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) incident data (1988 to 2003), and Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) incident data (1993 to 2008). Failure modes and effects analyses were examined to identify possible modes of SCFM. A table of potential adverse conditions was developed to help evaluate IVHM research technologies. Tables present details of specific SCFM for the incidents and accidents. Of the 370 NTSB accidents affected by SCFM, 48 percent involved the engine or fuel system, and 31 percent involved landing gear or hydraulic failure and malfunctions. A total of 35 percent of all SCFM accidents were caused by improper maintenance. Of the 7732 FAA database incidents affected by SCFM, 33 percent involved landing gear or hydraulics, and 33 percent involved the engine and fuel system. The most frequent SCFM found in ASRS were turbine engine, pressurization system, hydraulic main system, flight management system/flight management computer, and engine. Because the IVHM Project does not address maintenance issues, and landing gear and hydraulic systems accidents are usually not fatal, the focus of research should be those SCFMs that occur in the engine/fuel and flight control/structures systems as well as power systems.

  19. An exercise on clean-up actions in an urban environment after a nuclear accident. Report of the NKS EKO 4 programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, S.; Haemaelaeinen, R.; Naadland, E.; Roed, J.; Salo, A.; Sinkko, K.

    1996-03-01

    The EKO 4/c working group of the environmental effects and emergency preparedness programme (EKO) of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research (NKS) organised a decision conference on August 30th and 31st, 1995 in Stockholm, Sweden. The meeting was designed to be attended by those responsible for planning and deciding on protective actions in the Nordic countries after a nuclear accident. Issues concerning clean-up strategies in an urban environment after a hypothetical and very severe reactor accident were discussed at the meeting. The objectives of the meeting were to provide a shared understanding between the decision makers and the radiation protection community on concerns and issues related to decision on protective actions after a nuclear accident. (6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.)

  20. Facility accident considerations in the US Department of Energy Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.

    1994-01-01

    A principal consideration in developing waste management strategies is the relative importance of Potential radiological and hazardous releases to the environment during postulated facility accidents with respect to protection of human health and the environment. The Office of Environmental Management (EM) within the US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently formulating an integrated national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of existing and future wastes at DOE sites. As part of this process, a Programmatic Environmental impact Statement (PEIS) is being prepared to evaluate different waste management alternatives. This paper reviews analyses that have been Performed to characterize, screen, and develop source terms for accidents that may occur in facilities used to store and treat the waste streams considered in these alternatives. Preliminary results of these analyses are discussed with respect to the comparative potential for significant releases due to accidents affecting various treatment processes and facility configurations. Key assumptions and sensitivities are described

  1. Severe accident management instrumentation in the Finnish NPP's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomisto, H. (Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)); Felin, A. (Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)); Lucander, A. (Teollisuuden Voima Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland)); Tuuri, J. (Teollisuuden Voima Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland)); Koski, S. (Teollisuuden Voima Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland))

    1992-07-01

    The developmental stage of the severe accident management program of the Loviisa plant (VVER-440) has recently allowed the definition of instrumentation needs. The paper is aimed at discussing the principal approaches, how the plant-specific instrumentation needs have been derived from the safety functions of the severe accident management in each case. A distinction is made between the instrumentation that is of crucial importance for performing a correct management measure and the instrumentation needed for monitoring the success. New instrumentation is rather strictly limited to those ensuring the safety functions. (orig.)

  2. WASTE-ACC: A computer model for analysis of waste management accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabelssi, B.K.; Folga, S.; Kohout, E.J.; Mueller, C.J.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1996-12-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory has developed WASTE-ACC, a computational framework and integrated PC-based database system, to assess atmospheric releases from facility accidents. WASTE-ACC facilitates the many calculations for the accident analyses necessitated by the numerous combinations of waste types, waste management process technologies, facility locations, and site consolidation strategies in the waste management alternatives across the DOE complex. WASTE-ACC is a comprehensive tool that can effectively test future DOE waste management alternatives and assumptions. The computational framework can access several relational databases to calculate atmospheric releases. The databases contain throughput volumes, waste profiles, treatment process parameters, and accident data such as frequencies of initiators, conditional probabilities of subsequent events, and source term release parameters of the various waste forms under accident stresses. This report describes the computational framework and supporting databases used to conduct accident analyses and to develop source terms to assess potential health impacts that may affect on-site workers and off-site members of the public under various DOE waste management alternatives

  3. Development of a site-wide accident management center for the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heal, D.W.; Britt, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    In 1990, the Safety Analysis Group at the Savannah River Site (SRS) began development of an Accident Management program. The program was designed to provide a total system which would meet the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Performance Criteria, in regard to severe accident management, in the most effective manner. This paper will present two significant changes in the current SRS Accident Management program which will be used to meet these expanded needs. The first and most significant change will be to expand the diversity of the groups involved in the Accident Management process. In the future, organizations such as Environmental Safety, Health ampersand Quality Assurance, Emergency Planning, Site Management, Human Factors, Risk Assessment, and many others will work as an integrated team to solve facility problems. Organizations such as Materials Technology, Equipment Engineering and many of the laboratories on site will be utilized as support groups to increase the technical capability for specific accident analyses. This phase of the program is currently being structured, and should be operational by January of 1993

  4. Analysis of Incident and Accident Reports and Risk Management in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Yoshimasa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    A review of accident and incident reports. To analyze prevalence, characteristics, and details of perioperative incidents and accidents in patients receiving spine surgery. In our institution, a clinical error that potentially results in an adverse event is usually submitted as an incident or accident report through a web database, to ensure anonymous and blame-free reporting. All reports are analyzed by a medical safety management group. These reports contain valuable data for management of medical safety, but there have been no studies evaluating such data for spine surgery. A total of 320 incidents and accidents that occurred perioperatively in 172 of 415 spine surgeries were included in the study. Incidents were defined as events that were "problematic, but with no damage to the patient," and accidents as events "with damage to the patient." The details of these events were analyzed. There were 278 incidents in 137 surgeries and 42 accidents in 35 surgeries, giving prevalence of 33% (137/415) and 8% (35/415), respectively. The proportion of accidents among all events was significantly higher for doctors than non-doctors [68.0% (17/25) vs. 8.5% (25/295), P < 0.01] and in the operating room compared with outside the operating room [40.5% (15/37) vs. 9.5% (27/283), P < 0.01]. There was no significant difference in years of experience among personnel involved in all events. The major types of events were medication-related, line and tube problems, and falls and slips. Accidents also occurred because of a long-term prone position, with complications such as laryngeal edema, ulnar nerve palsy, and tooth damage. Surgery and procedures in the operating room always have a risk of complications. Therefore, a particular effort is needed to establish safe management of this environment and to provide advice on risk to the doctor and medical care team. 4.

  5. Communication and Monitoring- Necessary Processes for Managing and Measuring Conflicts, Absenteeism, Fluctuation and Work Accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Tănăsescu Dorina Antoneta; Florea Nicoleta Valentina; Tănăsescu Irina Antoaneta

    2015-01-01

    In any organizations, between employees, between employees and management are inevitabily appearing conflicts, absenteeism, personnel fluctuation and work accidents (CAFA factors). To diminish the impact of these social dysfunctions, organizations must pay attention to the effective managing and monitoring using performance indicators and an effective communication process and implementing a good plan of evaluation.

  6. Communication and Monitoring- Necessary Processes for Managing and Measuring Conflicts, Absenteeism, Fluctuation and Work Accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tănăsescu Dorina Antoneta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In any organizations, between employees, between employees and management are inevitabily appearing conflicts, absenteeism, personnel fluctuation and work accidents (CAFA factors. To diminish the impact of these social dysfunctions, organizations must pay attention to the effective managing and monitoring using performance indicators and an effective communication process and implementing a good plan of evaluation.

  7. A Masters Programme in Telecommunications Management Demand-Based Curriculum design

    OpenAIRE

    Gharaibeh, Khaled M.; Kaylani, Hazem; Murphy, Noel; Brennan, Conor; Itradat, Awni; Al-Bataineh, Mohammed; Aloqlah, Mohammed; Salhieh, Loay; Altarazi, Safwan; Rawashdeh, Nathir; Bas Cerdá, María Del Carmen; Conchado Peiró, Andrea; Al-Zoubi, Asem; Harb, Bassam; Salameh, Haythem Bany

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a curriculum design approach for a Masters Programme in Telecommunications Management based on demand data obtained from surveying the needs of potential students of the proposed programme. Through online surveys disseminated at telecom companies in Jordan, it was possible to measure the demand for such a programme and to determine the required programme contents and specifications. The curriculum design is based on definition of programme outcomes and on using...

  8. Simulation of operator's actions during severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktorov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Implementing accident management counter measures or actions to mitigate consequences of a severe accident is essential to reduce radiological risks to the public and environment. Station-specific severe accident management guidelines (SAMGs) have been developed and implemented at all Canadian nuclear power plants. Following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident certain enhancements were introduced to the SAMG, namely consideration of multi-units accidents, events involving spent fuel pools, incorporation of capability offered by the portable emergency mitigating equipment, and so on. To evaluate the adequacy and usability of the SAMGs, CNSC staff initiated a number of activities including a desktop review of SAMG documentation, evaluation of SAMG implementation through exercises and interviews with station staff, and independent verification of SAMG action effectiveness. This paper focuses on the verification of SAMG actions through analytical simulations. The objectives of the work are two-folds: (a) to understand the effectiveness of SAMG-specified mitigation actions in addressing the safety challenges and (b) to check for potential negative effects of the action. Some sensitivity calculations were performed to help understanding of the impact from actions that rely on the partially effective equipment or limited material resources. The severe accident computer code MAAP4-CANDU is used as a tool in this verification. This paper will describe the methodology used in the verification of SAMG actions and some results obtained from simulations. (author)

  9. Applying of Reliability Techniques and Expert Systems in Management of Radioactive Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldaihan, S.; Alhbaib, A.; Alrushudi, S.; Karazaitri, C.

    1998-01-01

    Accidents including radioactive exposure have variety of nature and size. This makes such accidents complex situations to be handled by radiation protection agencies or any responsible authority. The situations becomes worse with introducing advanced technology with high complexity that provide operator huge information about system working on. This paper discusses the application of reliability techniques in radioactive risk management. Event tree technique from nuclear field is described as well as two other techniques from nonnuclear fields, Hazard and Operability and Quality Function Deployment. The objective is to show the importance and the applicability of these techniques in radiation risk management. Finally, Expert Systems in the field of accidents management are explored and classified upon their applications

  10. Risk management: Role of societal factors in major industrial accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovden, J.; Rausand, M.; Sergeev, G.

    1995-01-01

    The paper discusses factors influencing the occurrence of major accidents in complex technological systems. Societal factors are identified as most significant in this context. Important types of societal factors are pin-pointed and discussed. The safety situation in the former Soviet Union and in today's Russian is described. The calamities at Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, and partly also Bhopal are discussed, and the role of societal factors identified. A main point of view is that it is not surprising that these catastrophes happened in the then existing conditions. What is surprising is that they did not happen earlier exclamation point

  11. Medical management of two accidents by ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda C, G.

    1991-01-01

    Two cases of accidents of occupationally exposed personnel are presented, the first one was an accidental sharp exhibition to whole body that a 27 year-old worker suffered when being exposed to a source of Iridium 192 of 94 Curies. For this case it was diagnosed an hematopoiesis syndrome that it was responded to the handling prescribe until him recovery. The second case, a radiologist technical 22 year-old that was irradiated with a source of Iridium 192 of 79 Curies. The treatment consisted on cleaning, antibiotics, analgesic and inert ointment, being achieved recovery after several weeks

  12. Triage and medical management of criticality accident victims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Flury-Herard, A.; Cavadore, D.

    2002-01-01

    The criticality accident is the result of an uncontrolled chain fission reaction initiated when the quantities of nuclear materials (uranium or plutonium)present accidentally exceed a given limit called the c ritical mass . As soon as the critical state is exceeded, the chain reaction increases exponentially. The result is a fast increase in the number of fission events which occur within the fissile medium. This phenomenon results in a release of energy mainly in the form of heat, accompanied by the intense emission of neutron and gamma radiation and the release of fission gases (Barby, 1983)

  13. Impact of an occupation-based self-management programme on chronic disease management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, Lynn

    2013-02-01

    There is a need for the development and evaluation of occupational therapy interventions enabling participation and contributing to self-management for individuals with multiple chronic conditions. This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility and potential impact of an occupation-based self-management programme for community living individuals with multiple chronic conditions.

  14. Review of current status for designing severe accident management support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwang Sub

    2000-05-01

    The development of operator support system (OSS) is ongoing in many other countries due to the complexity both in design and in operation for nuclear power plant. The computerized operator support system includes monitoring of some critical parameters, early detection of plant transient, monitoring of component status, plant maintenance, and safety parameter display, and the operator support system for these areas are developed and are being used in some plants. Up to now, the most operator support system covers the normal operation, abnormal operation, and emergency operation. Recently, however, the operator support system for severe accident is to be developed in some countries. The study for the phenomena of severe accident is not performed sufficiently, but, based on the result up to now, the operator support system even for severe accident will be developed in this study. To do this, at first, the current status of the operator support system for normal/abnormal/emergency operation is reviewed, and the positive aspects and negative aspects of systems are analyzed by their characteristics. And also, the major items that should be considered in designing the severe accident operator support system are derived from the review. With the survey of domestic and foreign operator support systems, they are reviewed in terms of the safety parameter display system, decision-making support system, and procedure-tracking system. For the severe accident, the severe accident management guideline (SAMG) which is developed by Westinghouse is reviewed; the characteristics, structure, and logical flow of SAMG are studied. In addition, the critical parameters for severe accident, which are the basis for operators decision-making in severe accident management and are supplied to the operators and the technical support center, are reviewed, too

  15. Four African Nations Agree to Water Management Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Seeking to improve their management of water resources, four northeast African nations today agreed at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to establish a long-term framework for utlizing a key underground water system. Chad, Egypt, Libya and Sudan signed a Strategic Action Programme (SAP) that aims to optimize the equitable use of the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System, a huge water resource that lies beneath the four nations. The SAP also commits the countries to strengthen and build upon a previously existing regional coordination mechanism, in part by establishing a new Joint Authority for the Nubian Aquifer System. The Programme lays the groundwork for improving cooperation among the four arid nations and for strengthening their capacity to monitor and manage the aquifer effectively. With growing populations and decreasing water availability from other sources in the region, the aquifer is under mounting pressure. Removing water without a clear understanding of transboundary and other implications threatens water quality and has the potential to harm biodiversity and accelerate land degradation. The agreement resulted from a joint Technical Cooperation project of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the IAEA. ''I congratulate all involved on this significant achievement,'' said IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano. ''Water is a key resource, and effective management and use of such water resources is essential for the future. The agreement of the Strategic Action Programme is the result of real cooperation between the four States, the Agency and UNDP-GEF. I am confident that this Programme will be a success and will benefit the people of the region. This positive project experience benefits strengthened and expanded cooperation between the IAEA and the UNDP-GEF.'' ''UNDP would like to congratulate the

  16. How to manage forest environments after a nuclear accident? Lessons learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-03-01

    Based on several published studies, this report proposes a synthetic overview of observations made on the fate of radionuclides in contaminated forests, like in forest environments which represent a great part of highly contaminated areas about Chernobyl and Fukushima. It appears that the main characteristics of forest ecosystems impacted by radioactive fallouts are different (there is no 'red' (dead) forest around Fukushima), that processes governing the fate of radionuclides in forest ecosystems imply a high remanence of radioactive contamination in these environments. It also appears that the interception of radioactive fallouts by the canopy and radionuclide transfers towards the litter and the soil are the most important processes during the early phase and during the first months after the accident. Thus, the soil becomes the main reservoir in which radio-caesium can be found. Some studies outline that the management of contaminated forest ecosystems after the Fukushima accident differs from that applied in the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Others notice that the fire risk is higher in the Chernobyl exclusion zone

  17. Mental health effects from radiological accidents and their social management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenot, J.; Charron, S.; Verger, P. [Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

    2000-05-01

    Mental health effects resulting from exposure to radiation have been identified principally in the context of large radiological accidents. They cover an extended scope of manifestations in relation with the notion of stress: increase of some hormones, modifications in mental concentration, symptoms of anxiety and depression, psycho-somatic diseases, deviation behaviours, and, on the long term, a possible post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The main results come from the Three Mile Island, Goiania, and Chernobyl accidents and several modifying factors have been identified. Considering those facts, diverse social responses can be brought to reduce the detriment to affected individuals and communities. Medical treatments are necessary for persons who suffer from pathological diseases. In most cases, a structured public health follow-up is required to establish the seriousness of the health problems, to forecast the extent of medical and psychological assistance, and to inform people who express fears and worries. Social assistance is always valuable under various forms: financial compensations, preferential medical care, and particular advantages concerning working and living conditions. If this social assistance is necessary and helpful, it also induces a loss in personal adjustment capability and initiative capacity. To overcome those negative impacts, some guidelines to authorities' action can be set up. But the best approach, not excluding the previous ones, remains problem solving at the local level through community responsibilization; some instructive examples come from the Chernobyl experience. (author)

  18. Mental health effects from radiological accidents and their social management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenot, J.; Charron, S.; Verger, P.

    2000-01-01

    Mental health effects resulting from exposure to radiation have been identified principally in the context of large radiological accidents. They cover an extended scope of manifestations in relation with the notion of stress: increase of some hormones, modifications in mental concentration, symptoms of anxiety and depression, psycho-somatic diseases, deviation behaviours, and, on the long term, a possible post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The main results come from the Three Mile Island, Goiania, and Chernobyl accidents and several modifying factors have been identified. Considering those facts, diverse social responses can be brought to reduce the detriment to affected individuals and communities. Medical treatments are necessary for persons who suffer from pathological diseases. In most cases, a structured public health follow-up is required to establish the seriousness of the health problems, to forecast the extent of medical and psychological assistance, and to inform people who express fears and worries. Social assistance is always valuable under various forms: financial compensations, preferential medical care, and particular advantages concerning working and living conditions. If this social assistance is necessary and helpful, it also induces a loss in personal adjustment capability and initiative capacity. To overcome those negative impacts, some guidelines to authorities' action can be set up. But the best approach, not excluding the previous ones, remains problem solving at the local level through community responsibilization; some instructive examples come from the Chernobyl experience. (author)

  19. Five Years Progress on Waste Management of Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Shigeo; Katoh, Kazuyuki; Okano, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: • A huge amount of off-site specified waste is planned to be managed by constructing and operating interim storage facilities. However, there still needs a lot of initiatives to recover the 1F nuclear accident. • On-site management of solid waste generated by the accident should be sustained as long-term key activities, such as safe storage, characterization, processing and disposal of various wastes. • Effective collaborations among NDF, TEPCO, IRID, JAEA, other domestic and international organizations and companies are strongly requested to tackle challenging projects on 1F decommissioning.

  20. Management of Industrial Processes with Programmable Logic Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Tufoi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In a modern economy, automation (the control is primarily to raise the competitiveness of a product, either directly through price or quality, or indirectly through the improvement of working conditions of staff productive. The control of industrial processes involves the management of dynamic systems that have continuous states. These systems are described by differential equations and, in general, analog inputs and outputs. Management of these systems is achieved, in general, with classical automation, by automation or with analog computers which contains modules with input / output analog performance. If states, inputs and outputs of a system can be modeled using binary variables, then these systems can be driven with Programmable Logic Controller.

  1. Radiological protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations resulting from a nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2013-01-01

    In environmental remediation after nuclear accidents, radioactive wastes have to be appropriately managed in existing exposure situations with contamination resulting from the emission of radionuclides by such accidents. In this paper, a framework of radiation protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations for application to the practical and reasonable waste management in contaminated areas, referring to related ICRP recommendations was proposed. In the proposed concept, intermediate reference levels for waste management are adopted gradually according to the progress of the reduction in the existing ambient dose in the environment on the basis of the principles of justification and optimisation by taking into account the practicability of the management of radioactive waste and environmental remediation. It is essential to include the participation of relevant stakeholders living in existing exposure situations in the selection of reference levels for the existing ambient dose and waste management.

  2. Proceedings of the first OECD (NEA) CSNI-Specialist Meeting on Instrumentation to Manage Severe Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnenkalb, Martin

    1992-07-01

    OECD member countries have adopted various accident management measures and procedures. To initiate these measures and control their effectiveness, information on the status of the plant and on accident symptoms is necessary. This information includes physical data (pressure, temperatures, hydrogen concentrations, etc.) but also data on the condition of components such as pumps, valves, power supplies, etc. In response to proposals made by the CSNI - PWG 4 Task Group on Containment Aspects of Severe Accident Management (CAM) and endorsed by PWG 4, CSNI has decided to sponsor a Specialist Meeting on Instrumentation to Manage Severe Accidents. The knowledge-basis for the Specialist Meeting was the paper on 'Instrumentation for Accident Management in Containment'. This technical document (NEA/CSNI/R(92)4) was prepared by the CSNI - Principle Working Group Number 4 of experts on January 1992. The Specialist Meeting was structured in the following sessions: I. Information Needs for Managing Severe Accidents, II. Capabilities and Limitations of Existing Instrumentation, III. Unconventional Use and Further Development of Instrumentation, IV. Operational Aids and Artificial Intelligence. The Specialist Meeting concentrated on existing instrumentation and its possible use under severe accident conditions; it also examined developments underway and planed. Desirable new instrumentation was discussed briefly. The interactions and discussions during the sessions were helpful to bring different perspectives to bear, thus sharpening the thinking of all. Questions were raised concerning the long-term viability of current (or added) instrumentation. It must be realized that the subject of instrumentation to manage severe accidents is very new, and that no international meeting on this topic was held previously. One of the objectives was to bring this important issue to the attention of both safety authorities and experts. It could be seen from several of the presentations and from

  3. Waste management assessment and technical review programme. WATRP. An international peer review service for radioactive waste management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency provides international peer review services in radioactive waste management to those Member States that have established radioactive waste management programmes. Such services are provided within Waste Management Assessment and Technical Review Programme (WATRP). The main objective of WATRP is to provide international expertise and information on a requested subject in the field of radioactive waste management and to validate that programmes and activities are sound and performing well. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. iROCS: Integrated accident management framework for coping with beyond-design-basis external events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jaewhan; Park, Soo-Yong; Ahn, Kwang-Il; Yang, Joon-Eon

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An integrated mitigating strategy to cope with extreme external events, iROCS, is proposed. • The strategy aims to preserve the integrity of the reactor vessel as well as core cooling. • A case study for an extreme damage state is performed to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of candidate mitigation strategies under an extreme event. - Abstract: The Fukushima Daiichi accident induced by the Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, poses a new challenge to the nuclear society, especially from an accident management viewpoint. This paper presents a new accident management framework called an integrated, RObust Coping Strategy (iROCS) to cope with beyond-design-basis external events (BDBEEs). The iROCS approach is characterized by classification of various plant damage conditions (PDCs) that might be impacted by BDBEEs and corresponding integrated coping strategies for each of PDCs, aiming to maintain and restore core cooling (i.e., to prevent core damage) and to maintain the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel if it is judged that core damage may not be preventable in view of plant conditions. From a case study for an extreme damage condition, it showed that candidate accident management strategies should be evaluated from the viewpoint of effectiveness and feasibility against accident scenarios and extreme damage conditions of the site, especially when employing mobile or portable equipment under BDBEEs within the limited time available to achieve desired goals such as prevention of core damage as well as a reactor vessel failure.

  5. iROCS: Integrated accident management framework for coping with beyond-design-basis external events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jaewhan; Park, Soo-Yong; Ahn, Kwang-Il, E-mail: kiahn@kaeri.re.kr; Yang, Joon-Eon

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • An integrated mitigating strategy to cope with extreme external events, iROCS, is proposed. • The strategy aims to preserve the integrity of the reactor vessel as well as core cooling. • A case study for an extreme damage state is performed to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of candidate mitigation strategies under an extreme event. - Abstract: The Fukushima Daiichi accident induced by the Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, poses a new challenge to the nuclear society, especially from an accident management viewpoint. This paper presents a new accident management framework called an integrated, RObust Coping Strategy (iROCS) to cope with beyond-design-basis external events (BDBEEs). The iROCS approach is characterized by classification of various plant damage conditions (PDCs) that might be impacted by BDBEEs and corresponding integrated coping strategies for each of PDCs, aiming to maintain and restore core cooling (i.e., to prevent core damage) and to maintain the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel if it is judged that core damage may not be preventable in view of plant conditions. From a case study for an extreme damage condition, it showed that candidate accident management strategies should be evaluated from the viewpoint of effectiveness and feasibility against accident scenarios and extreme damage conditions of the site, especially when employing mobile or portable equipment under BDBEEs within the limited time available to achieve desired goals such as prevention of core damage as well as a reactor vessel failure.

  6. Development of Severe Accident Management Strategies for Shin-Kori 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youngseung; Kim, Hyeongtaek; Shin, Jungmin

    2013-01-01

    Shin-Kori units 3 and 4 are new reactors under construction as an APR 1400 type reactor. The plants which considered coping with severe accident from design phase are different from other operating plants in view of severe accident management strategies. The purpose of this paper is to establish optimal strategies for Shin-Kori 3 and 4. A scheme for optimized severe accident management was drawn up with the object of achieving core cooling, containment integrity, and decreased release of fission product. Shin-Kori units 3 and 4 are a new reactor and designed to add mitigating systems for coping with severe accident such as ECSBS, PAR, and CFS. Also the plants are reflected as a part of Fukushima followup measures The strategies of SAMG for Shin-Kori 3 and 4 were developed. The strategic approach was based on the concept of defense in depth. Firstly, strategies for core cooling were chosen such as RCS depressurization, injection to SG, injection to RCS, and injection to reactor cavity. Secondly, the plans for containment integrity were developed for controlling pressure and hydrogen in containment. Lastly, reduced release of fission product was considered for protection of the public after containment failure. The achieved strategies meet the needs of effective methods for severe accident management and enhancement of safety

  7. Safety Up-Gradation of PFBR in Wake of Fukushima Accident - Severe Accident Management Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Prabhat

    2013-01-01

    Factors that were reviewed and underwent tightened controls: • Ensuring reactor shut down and maintenance of shutdown state; • Ensuring core and spent fuel cooling; • Avoidance of water entry into any vital areas that could affect functioning of important equipment; • Training of operator to respond to situation not entirely conceived in advance; • Strengthening of support systems for operator to act swiftly; • Management actions to address psychological issues associated with calamities

  8. Management of radioactive wastes - an overview of the Indian programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K.T.; Sunder Rajan, N.S.; Balu, K.; Khan, A.A.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the management of radioactive wastes with particular reference to the Indian Nuclear Programme is presented. The initial design philosophy of the radwaste management system is discussed in relation to accepting a calculated, minimum discharge of radioactivity to the environment. A brief report of the operational experience with the low and intermediate level radwaste systems is given. Factors that influence the review of the present philosophy for future adoption are presented. Some methods being developed for decreasing release of the radioactivity to the environment are discussed. Among techniques considered are solar evaporation, delay and decay of fission rare gases from power reactors and concentration and storage of Kr 85 from fuel reprocessing plants. Problems in the management of high level and alph-bearing wastes are discussed with particular reference to the nature of the waste generated and the policy under implementation for their management. The matrices, solidification processes, modes of interim storage and criteria for selection of site for ultimate dispensation of the solidified high level wastes in geological formations are described. An approach towards the solution of the probelm of management of alpha-bearing waste is also presented

  9. Medical management of the victims of Goiana 137 Cs accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao-Mello, C.E.; Farina, R.; Oliveira, A.R.; Valverde, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    In September 1987, a radiation accident happened in Gioania due to the theft of a shielded source of 137 Cs. Fifty persons were involved showing whole-body and local acute irradiation and also external and/or internal contamination mainly due to ingestion or absorption of 137 Cs. Fourteen of fifty developed severe bone marrow depression characterized by neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. None were submitted to bone marrow transplantation. Eight of fourteen received intravenously GM-CSF. Four of the fourteen died due to hemorrhage and infection. For those with significant internal contamination, Prussian blue was administered (1.5 to 10.0 gm/per day). Besides blue, other measures were taken to increase decorporation of 137 Cs including diuretics, water overload and ergometric exercises. Radiation induced skin injuries were observed in 28 patients and were treated conservatively. 6 patients required surgical intervention. (author)

  10. An Am-Be neutron source Accident and its management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Guang; Wang Xinyong; Wu Zhenghan

    1988-01-01

    An 241 Am-Be neutron source for inaustrial use was lost in a county of Guangdong Province in April, 1982. A school boy picked up and brought it to his home. The source was broken and 10 people were contaminated with radioactive substance. The boy (X) received the highest external irradiation, with chest dose of 0.12 Sv and hand dose of 0.32 Sv. His brother (Y) incurred the heaviest internal contamination by 241 Am, about 3.3 x 10 3 Bq. Decorporation was carried out in four persons including Y, and the excretion of 241 Am in stools and urine was increased significantly. With the medical examination performed upon these persons one and half years after the accident, no positive findings induced by radiation were found except the increase of chromosomal aberration rate in lymphocytes

  11. The program of international intercomparison of accident dosimetry; Le programme d'intercomparaison internationale de dosimetrie d'accident 10-12 juin 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    The French institute of radioprotection and nuclear safety (IRSN) has carried out in June 2002 an international intercomparison program for the testing of the physical and biological accident dosimetry techniques. The intercomparison is jointly organized by the IRSN and the OECD-NEA with the sustain of the European commission and the collaboration of the CEA centre of Valduc (France). About 30 countries have participated to this program. Each country has supplied its own dosimeters and biological samples which have been irradiated using the Silene reactor of CEA-Valduc or a {sup 60}Co source. These experiments allow to test the new dosimetric techniques that have been developed since the previous intercomparison program (1993) and to confirm or improve the performances of older techniques. Aside from the intercomparison exercise, this report makes a status of the known radiological accidents and of the effects of high doses of ionizing radiations on human health (symptoms, therapeutics). It explains the phenomenology of criticality accidents, the prevention means, and the history of such accidents up to the Tokai-Mura one in 1999. Finally, the dosimetry of criticality is presented with its physical and biological techniques. (J.S.)

  12. Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management. EG-SAM Interim Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    As an early response to the Fukushima NPP accident, the ISOE Bureau decided to focus on the following issues as an initial response of the joint program after having direct communications with the Japanese official participants in April 2011; - Management of high radiation area worker doses: It has been decided to make available the experience and information from the Chernobyl accident in terms of how emergency worker / responder doses were legally and practically managed, - Personal protective equipment for highly-contaminated areas: It was agreed to collect information about the types of personnel protective equipment and other equipment (e.g. air bottles, respirators, air-hoods or plastic suits, etc.), as well as high-radiation area worker dosimetry use (e.g. type, number and placement of dosimetry) for different types of emergency and high-radiation work situations. Detailed information was collected on dose criteria which are used for emergency workers/responders and their basis, dose management criteria for high dose/dose rate areas, protective equipment which is recommended for emergency workers / responders, recommended individual monitoring procedures, and any special requirement for assessment from the ISOE participating nuclear utilities and regulatory authorities and made available for Japanese utilities. With this positive response of the ISOE actors and interest in the situation in Fukushima, the Expert Group on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management (EG-SAM) was established by the ISOE Management Board in May 2011. The overall objective of the EG-SAM is to contribute to occupational exposure management (providing a view on management of high radiation area worker doses) within the Fukushima plant boundary with the ISOE participants and to develop a state-of-the- art ISOE report on best radiation protection management practices for proper radiation protection job coverage during severe accident initial response and recovery

  13. Operational programs for national radioactive waste and spent fuel management programme in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, Nadja; Kralj, Metka; Mele, Irena

    2007-01-01

    The first separate National Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Programme (National Programme) was prepared in Slovenia in 2005 as a supplementary part of the National Environmental Action Programme and was adopted in February 2006 by the Slovenian Parliament. The new National Programme includes all topics being relevant for the management of the radioactive waste and spent fuel which are produced in Slovenia, from the legislation and identification of different waste streams, to the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and management of (TE)NORM in the near future from 2006 up to the 2015. The National Programme identified the existing and possible future problems and proposed the technical solutions and action plans for two distinctive periods: 2006-2009 and 2010- 2015. According to the requirement of Act on Protection against Ionising Radiation and Nuclear Safety the national Agency for Radwaste Management (ARAO) prepared the operational programmes for the four year period with technical details on implementation of the National programme. ARAO gained the detailed plans of different involved holders and proposed 9 operational programmes with aims, measures, individual organizations in charge, expenses and resources for each of the programmes. The Operational programmes were already reviewed by the Ministry of Environment and Physical Planning and are under acceptance. The orientation of the radioactive waste management according to the National Programme and operational activities within additional limitations based on the strategical decisions of Slovenian Government is presented in the paper. (authors)

  14. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Water management. A core task of the Wismut remediation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Michael; Meyer, Juergen; Jenk, Ulf; Kassahun, Andrea; Schramm, Andrea; Baacke, Delf; Forbrig, Norbert; Metschies, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Water management and conventional technical water treatment are by far the most cost-intensive long-term tasks of the Wismut remediation programme. Over the medium term, there is no viable alternative to the operation of active systems to catch and treat contaminated mine waters at the Ronneburg, Schlema, Koenigstein, Poehla, Seelingstaedt and Heimsdorf sites. Based on the status quo this paper outlines the key issues of the Wismut GmbH water management strategy over the medium and long term. lt is focused primarily on achieving protection goals for potentially impacted water bodies in the surroundings of Wismut sites and on optimising associated remediation expenditure as well as on creating the prerequisites for achieving low post-remedial care and maintenance or walk-away system status over the long term. The topic of this paper is the presentation of priority tasks related to future water management at Wismut sites in Saxony and Thuringia. The reflections are based on experiences and lessons learned and take into account current statutory management requirements referring to ground and surface water bodies affected by Wismut. The paper is based on a presentation made at the International Mining Symposium WISSYM 2015 on 2nd September 2015 in Bad Schlema, Germany.

  16. Development of measures for RBMK-1500 Accident management in the case of loss of long-term core cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uspuras, E; Kaliatka, A.

    2004-01-01

    Results of the Level 1 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) have shown that in topography of the risk, transients dominate above accidents with the loss of the coolant accidents. PSA has shown that failure of the core long-term cooling is the main contributor to frequency of the core damage. However, the transition to the condition of the reactor core due to loss of the long-term cooling specifies potential opportunities for the management of the accident consequences. This paper presents the detail thermal-hydraulic analysis of the long-term core cooling accidents, performed using the RELAP5 model of Ignalina NPP reactor primary circuit and plant safety systems. Different ways of potential accident management are discussed. On the basis of this analysis the accidents management strategy was developed. (author)

  17. The technical requirements concerning severe accident management in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Kamata, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake with a magnitude of 9.0 (The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake) occurred on March 11, 2011, and the beyond design-basis tsunami descended on the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant by the earthquake. Eventually, the core cooling systems of the units 1, 2 and 3 could not operate stably, they all suffered severe accident, and hydrogen explosions were triggered in the reactor buildings of units 1, 3 and 4. In the light of these circumstances, Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) decided to establish a standard that consolidates the concept of maintaining and improving severe accident management. In the SAM standard, the combination of hardware and software measures based on the risk assessment enables a scientific and rational approach to apply to scenarios of various severe accidents including low-frequency, high-impact events, and assures safety with functionality and flexibility. The SAM standard is already established in March, 2014. After publication of the SAM standard, with regard to effectiveness assessment for accident management and treatment of the uncertainty of severe accident analysis code, for example, the detailed guideline will be prepared as appendices of the standard. (author)

  18. Acquired brain injury self-management programme: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Denise; Silverberg, Noah D; Barlow, Susan; Miller, William C; Moffat, Jacqui

    2012-01-01

    Traditional rehabilitation is not well suited to individuals with chronic mild symptoms following an acquired brain injury. To address this, this study adapted a supported self-management programme (SMP) for this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential effectiveness of this novel SMP. Retrospective case series with repeated measures. Fifty-three participants with chronic mild symptoms following an acquired brain injury (primarily mild traumatic brain injury) completed an SMP. The intervention involved eight coaching sessions with each an occupational therapist and psychologist, carried out in the community and based on SMP principles. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure was administered at baseline, discharge and 3- and 9-month follow-up. This measure yielded scores for performance and satisfaction with daily functioning, covering the domains of self-care, productivity and leisure. A complete case analysis of programme completers revealed that participants' ratings of their occupational performance and satisfaction improved markedly between baseline and discharge from the SMP. This set of outcome measures remained stable between discharge and the two follow-up points. This pilot study suggests that SMPs may improve daily functioning in individuals with chronic mild ABI symptoms. More methodologically robust clinical trials are warranted.

  19. Workshop on iodine aspects of severe accident management. Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    Following a recommendation of the OECD Workshop on the Chemistry of Iodine in Reactor Safety held in Wuerenlingen (Switzerland) in June 1996 [Summary and Conclusions of the Workshop, Report NEA/CSNI/R(96)7], the CSNI decided to sponsor a Workshop on Iodine Aspects of Severe Accident Management, and their planned or effective implementation. The starting point for this conclusion was the realization that the consolidation of the accumulated iodine chemistry knowledge into accident management guidelines and procedures remained, to a large extent, to be done. The purpose of the meeting was therefore to help build a bridge between iodine research and the application of its results in nuclear power plants, with particular emphasis on severe accident management. Specifically, the Workshop was expected to answer the following questions: - what is the role of iodine in severe accident management? - what are the needs of the utilities? - how can research fulfill these needs? The Workshop was organized in Vantaa (Helsinki), Finland, from 18 to 20 May 1999, in collaboration with Fortum Engineering Ltd. It was attended by forty-six specialists representing fifteen Member countries and the European Commission. Twenty-eight papers were presented. These included four utility papers, representing the views of Electricite de France (EDF), Teollisuuden Voima Oy and Fortum Engineering Ltd (Finland), the Nuclear Energy Institute (USA), and Japanese utilities. The papers were presented in five sessions: - iodine speciation; - organic compound control; - iodine control; - modeling; - iodine management; A sixth session was devoted to a general discussion on iodine management under severe accident conditions. This report summarizes the content of the papers and the conclusions of the workshop

  20. Geographic Information System (GIS) capabilities in traffic accident information management: a qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Valinejadi, Ali; Goodarzi, Afshin; Safari, Ameneh; Hemmat, Morteza; Majdabadi, Hesamedin Askari; Mohammadi, Ali

    2017-06-01

    Traffic accidents are one of the more important national and international issues, and their consequences are important for the political, economical, and social level in a country. Management of traffic accident information requires information systems with analytical and accessibility capabilities to spatial and descriptive data. The aim of this study was to determine the capabilities of a Geographic Information System (GIS) in management of traffic accident information. This qualitative cross-sectional study was performed in 2016. In the first step, GIS capabilities were identified via literature retrieved from the Internet and based on the included criteria. Review of the literature was performed until data saturation was reached; a form was used to extract the capabilities. In the second step, study population were hospital managers, police, emergency, statisticians, and IT experts in trauma, emergency and police centers. Sampling was purposive. Data was collected using a questionnaire based on the first step data; validity and reliability were determined by content validity and Cronbach's alpha of 75%. Data was analyzed using the decision Delphi technique. GIS capabilities were identified in ten categories and 64 sub-categories. Import and process of spatial and descriptive data and so, analysis of this data were the most important capabilities of GIS in traffic accident information management. Storing and retrieving of descriptive and spatial data, providing statistical analysis in table, chart and zoning format, management of bad structure issues, determining the cost effectiveness of the decisions and prioritizing their implementation were the most important capabilities of GIS which can be efficient in the management of traffic accident information.

  1. A Masters Programme in Telecommunications Management--Demand-Based Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, Khaled M.; Kaylani, Hazem; Murphy, Noel; Brennan, Conor; Itradat, Awni; Al-Bataineh, Mohammed; Aloqlah, Mohammed; Salhieh, Loay; Altarazi, Safwan; Rawashdeh, Nathir; del Carmen Bas Cerdá, María; Conchado Peiró, Andrea; Al-Zoubi, Asem; Harb, Bassam; Bany Salameh, Haythem

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a curriculum design approach for a Masters Programme in Telecommunications Management based on demand data obtained from surveying the needs of potential students of the proposed programme. Through online surveys disseminated at telecom companies in Jordan, it was possible to measure the demand for such a programme and to…

  2. Improving Educational Objectives of the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Programme at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldowaisan, Tariq; Allahverdi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process of developing programme educational objectives (PEOs) for the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering programme at Kuwait University, and the process of deployment of these PEOs. Input of the four constituents of the programme, faculty, students, alumni, and employers, is incorporated in the development and…

  3. Towards flexible programmes in higher professional education: An operations-management approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Ad

    2007-01-01

    Schellekens, A. (2004). Towards flexible programmes in higher professional education: An operations-management approach. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Open University of the Netherlands, The Netherlands.

  4. Impact of the effect of economic crisis and the targeted motorcycle safety programme on motorcycle-related accidents, injuries and fatalities in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, T H; Umar, R S Radin; Zulkaurnain, S; Kulanthayan, S

    2005-03-01

    In 1997, a Motorcycle Safety Programme (MSP) was introduced to address the motorcycle-related accident problem. The MSP was specifically targeted at motorcyclists. In addition to the MSP, the recent economic recession has significantly contributed to a reduction of traffic-related incidents. This paper examines the effects of the recent economic crisis and the MSP on motorcycle-related accidents, casualties and fatalities in Malaysia. The autocorrelation integrated moving average model with transfer function was used to evaluate the overall effects of the interventions. The variables used in developing the model were gross domestic product and MSPs. The analysis found a 25% reduction in the number of motorcycle-related accidents, a 27% reduction in motorcycle casualties and a 38% reduction in motorcycle fatalities after the implementation of MSP. Findings indicate that the MSP has been one of the effective measures in reducing motorcycle safety problems in Malaysia. Apart from that, the performance of the country's economy was also found to be significant in explaining the number of motorcycle-related accidents, casualties and fatalities in Malaysia.

  5. Evaluating disease management programme effectiveness: an introduction to instrumental variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ariel; Adams, John L

    2006-04-01

    This paper introduces the concept of instrumental variables (IVs) as a means of providing an unbiased estimate of treatment effects in evaluating disease management (DM) programme effectiveness. Model development is described using zip codes as the IV. Three diabetes DM outcomes were evaluated: annual diabetes costs, emergency department (ED) visits and hospital days. Both ordinary least squares (OLS) and IV estimates showed a significant treatment effect for diabetes costs (P = 0.011) but neither model produced a significant treatment effect for ED visits. However, the IV estimate showed a significant treatment effect for hospital days (P = 0.006) whereas the OLS model did not. These results illustrate the utility of IV estimation when the OLS model is sensitive to the confounding effect of hidden bias.

  6. Conclusions of the specialist meeting on operator AIDS for severe accident management and training (SAMOA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The scope of the Specialist Meeting was limited to operator aids for accident management which were in operation or could be soon. Moreover, the meeting concentrated on the management of accidents beyond the design basis, including tools which might be extended from the design basis range into the severe accident area. Relevant simulation tools for operator training were also part of the scope of the meeting. The presentations showed that the design and implementation of operator aids were closely related to the organisation adopted by the user, whether it was a utility or a governmental agency. The most common organisation is to share the management of severe accidents among two groups of people: the operating team in the Control Room (CR) and a team of specialists in a Technical Support Centre (TSC). The CR is in charge of the operation of the plant in all conditions using a set of procedures and guidelines, while the experts in the TSC are able to produce in-depth analyses of the plant state and its evolution. The responsibility is shared between the CR and the TSC during accident progression. The TSC acts as a support for the CR for reactor operation and takes charge of the predictions of radioactive releases (source term, accident progression, release and dispersion of radioactive substances, as well as the interaction with public authorities). But this type of organisation is not general and the differences can induce different approaches in the design of operator aids. The first session was dedicated to operator aids for control rooms, the second session to operator aids for technical support centres

  7. Uncertainty quantification for accident management using ACE surrogates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varuttamaseni, A.; Lee, J. C.; Youngblood, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    The alternating conditional expectation (ACE) regression method is used to generate RELAP5 surrogates which are then used to determine the distribution of the peak clad temperature (PCT) during the loss of feedwater accident coupled with a subsequent initiation of the feed and bleed (F and B) operation in the Zion-1 nuclear power plant. The construction of the surrogates assumes conditional independence relations among key reactor parameters. The choice of parameters to model is based on the macroscopic balance statements governing the behavior of the reactor. The peak clad temperature is calculated based on the independent variables that are known to be important in determining the success of the F and B operation. The relationship between these independent variables and the plant parameters such as coolant pressure and temperature is represented by surrogates that are constructed based on 45 RELAP5 cases. The time-dependent PCT for different values of F and B parameters is calculated by sampling the independent variables from their probability distributions and propagating the information through two layers of surrogates. The results of our analysis show that the ACE surrogates are able to satisfactorily reproduce the behavior of the plant parameters even though a quasi-static assumption is primarily used in their construction. The PCT is found to be lower in cases where the F and B operation is initiated, compared to the case without F and B, regardless of the F and B parameters used. (authors)

  8. A programme management approach for supporting a transition to integrated flood management in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijke, J.S.; Van Herk, S.; Zevenbergen, C.; Ashley, R.

    2012-01-01

    In the Netherlands and many other developed countries, flood management is transitioning from sectoral engineering approaches to more integrated approaches. The 2.3 billion Euro Room for the River programme plays an important role in this transition, because it is the first large scale

  9. Learning Lessons from TMI to Fukushima and Other Industrial Accidents: Keys for Assessing Safety Management Practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dechy, N.; Rousseau, J.-M.; Dien, Y.; Montmayeul, R.; Llory, M.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the paper is to discuss and to argue about transfer, from an industrial sector to another industrial sector, of lessons learnt from accidents. It will be achieved through the discussion of some theoretical foundations and through the illustration of examples of application cases in assessment of safety management practices in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The nuclear energy production industry has faced three big ones in 30 years (TMI, Chernobyl, Fukushima) involving three different reactor technologies operated in three quite different cultural, organizational and regulatory contexts. Each of those accident has been the origin of questions, but also generator of lessons, some changing the worldview (see Wilpert and Fahlbruch, 1998) of what does cause an accident in addition to the engineering view about the importance of technical failures (human error, safety culture, sociotechnical interactions). Some of their main lessons were implemented such as improvements of human-machine interfaces ergonomics, recast of some emergency operating procedures, severe accident mitigation strategies and crisis management. Some lessons did not really provide deep changes. It is the case for organizational lessons such as, organizational complexity, management of production pressures, regulatory capture, and failure to learn, etc.

  10. Regulatory Research of the PWR Severe Accident. Information Needs and Instrumentation for Hydrogen Control and Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gun Chul; Suh, Kune Y.; Lee, Jin Yong; Lee, Seung Dong [Seoul Nat' l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    The current research is concerned with generation of basic engineering data needed in the process of developing hydrogen control guidelines as part of accident management strategies for domestic nuclear power plants and formulating pertinent regulatory requirements. Major focus is placed on identification of information needs and instrumentation methods for hydrogen control and management in the primary system and in the containment, development of decision-making trees for hydrogen management and their quantification, the instrument availability under severe accident conditions, critical review of relevant hydrogen generation model and phenomena In relation to hydrogen behavior, we analyzed the severe accident related hydrogen generation in the UCN 3{center_dot}4 PWR with modified hydrogen generation model. On the basis of the hydrogen mixing experiment and related GASFLOW calculation, the necessity of 3-dimensional analysis of the hydrogen mixing was investigated. We examined the hydrogen control models related to the PAR(Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner) and performed MAAP4 calculation in relation to the decision tree to estimate the capability and the role of the PAR during a severe accident.

  11. Use of a fuzzy decision-making method in evaluating severe accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jae, M.; Moon, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    In developing severe accident management strategies, an engineering decision would be made based on the available data and information that are vague, imprecise and uncertain by nature. These sorts of vagueness and uncertainty are due to lack of knowledge for the severe accident sequences of interest. The fuzzy set theory offers a possibility of handling these sorts of data and information. In this paper, the possibility to apply the decision-making method based on fuzzy set theory to the evaluation of the accident management strategies at a nuclear power plant is scrutinized. The fuzzy decision-making method uses linguistic variables and fuzzy numbers to represent the decision-maker's subjective assessments for the decision alternatives according to the decision criteria. The fuzzy mean operator is used to aggregate the decision-maker's subjective assessments, while the total integral value method is used to rank the decision alternatives. As a case study, the proposed method is applied to evaluating the accident management strategies at a nuclear power plant

  12. Proceedings of the second OECD specialist meeting on operator aids for severe accident management - SAMOA-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The second OECD Specialist Meeting on Operator Aids for Severe Accident Management (SAMOA-2) was organized in Lyon, France from 8 to 10 September 1997 in collaboration with the Thermal and Nuclear Studies and Project Department (SEPTEN) of Electricite de France. It was attended by 33 specialists representing ten OECD Member countries, the OECD Halden Reactor Project, the Commission of the European Communities, and the Russian Federation. The scope of SAMOA-2 was limited to operator aids for accident management which were in operation or could be soon. The meeting concentrated on the management of accidents beyond the design basis, including tools which might be extended from the design basis range into the severe accident area. Relevant simulation tools for operator training were also part of the scope of the meeting. Twenty papers were presented during the meeting, grouped into three sessions. Session 1: operator aids for control rooms; Session 2: operator aids for technical support centres; session 3: simulation tools for operator training. There were two demonstrations of computerized systems: the ATLAS analysis simulator developed by GRS, and EDF's 'Simulateurs Post Accidentels' (SIPA). There was also a video demonstration of the Full Scope Simulator developed by a joint Russian-U.S. team for the Leningrad nuclear power

  13. Knowledge data base for severe accident management of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    For the safety enhancement of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), continuous efforts are very important to take in the up-to-date scientific and technical knowledge positively and to reflect them into the safety regulation. The purpose of the present study is to gather effectively the scientific and technical knowledge about the severe accident (SA) phenomena and the accident management (AM) for prevention and mitigation of SA, and to take in the experimental data by participating in the international cooperative experiments regarding the important SA phenomena and the effectiveness of AM. Based on those data and knowledge, JNES is developing and improving severe accident analysis models to maintain the SA analysis codes and the AM knowledge base for assessment of the NPPs in Japan. The activities in fiscal year 2012 are as follows; Analytical study on OECD/NEA projects such as MCCI, SERENA and SFP projects, and support in making regulation for SA. (author)

  14. RBMK-1500 accident management for loss of long-term core cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uspuras, E.; Kaliatka, A.

    2001-01-01

    Results of the Level 1 probabilistic safety assessment of the Ignalina NPP has shown that in topography of the risk, transients dominate above the accidents with LOCAs and failure of the core long-term cooling are the main factors to frequency of the core damage. Previous analyses have shown, that after initial event, as a rule, the reactivity control, as well as short-term and intermediate cooling are provided. However, the acceptance criteria of the long-term cooling are not always carried out. It means that from this point of view the most dangerous accident scenarios are the scenarios related to loss of the core long-term cooling. On the other hand, the transition to the core condition due to loss of the long-term cooling specifies potential opportunities for the management of the accident consequences. Hence, accident management for the mitigation of the accident consequences should be considered and developed. The most likely initiating event, which probably leads to the loss of long term cooling accident, is station blackout. The station blackout is the loss of normal electrical power supply for local needs with an additional failure on start-up of all diesel generators. In the case of loss of electrical power supply MCPs, the circulating pumps of the service water system and MFWPs are switched-off. At the same time, TCV of both turbines are closed. Failure of diesel generators leads to the non-operability of the ECCS long-term cooling subsystem. It means the impossibility to feed MCC by water. The analysis of the station blackout for Ignalina NPP was performed using RELAP5 code. (author)

  15. Developing a Minimum Data Set for an Information Management System to Study Traffic Accidents in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali; Ahmadi, Maryam; Gharagozlu, Alireza

    2016-03-01

    Each year, around 1.2 million people die in the road traffic incidents. Reducing traffic accidents requires an exact understanding of the risk factors associated with traffic patterns and behaviors. Properly analyzing these factors calls for a comprehensive system for collecting and processing accident data. The aim of this study was to develop a minimum data set (MDS) for an information management system to study traffic accidents in Iran. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed in 2014. Data were collected from the traffic police, trauma centers, medical emergency centers, and via the internet. The investigated resources for this study were forms, databases, and documents retrieved from the internet. Forms and databases were identical, and one sample of each was evaluated. The related internet-sourced data were evaluated in their entirety. Data were collected using three checklists. In order to arrive at a consensus about the data elements, the decision Delphi technique was applied using questionnaires. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaires were assessed by experts' opinions and the test-retest method, respectively. An (MDS) of a traffic accident information management system was assigned to three sections: a minimum data set for traffic police with six classes, including 118 data elements; a trauma center with five data classes, including 57 data elements; and a medical emergency center, with 11 classes, including 64 data elements. Planning for the prevention of traffic accidents requires standardized data. As the foundation for crash prevention efforts, existing standard data infrastructures present policymakers and government officials with a great opportunity to strengthen and integrate existing accident information systems to better track road traffic injuries and fatalities.

  16. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl: programme 2: REDAC, the radioecological database after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville-Cavelin, G.; Biesold, H.; Chabanyuk, V.

    2006-01-01

    Goals: to built a database for integrating the results of programme 'Radioecology' of the French-German Initiative: Ecological portrait, initial contamination, wastes management, soil-plants and animals transfer, transfer by runoff and in the aquatic environment, countermeasures in urban and natural and agricultural environments. Specific methodology: original 'Project Solutions Framework': Information system developed as a soft integrated portal, Geo-information system: all spatial data geo-coded. DB structure: Publications: all classical informations, original data; Products: storage of open publications of the Project; Processes: management of the Project and Sub-projects; Services: information and software objects, help; Basics: information on system and organizational development. - Soft integration: cartography system: Map from 'Ecological portrait' integrated with thematic databases, Loaded in a special category (by IS Geo Internet Map Server); Cartographical functions: navigation, scaling, extracting, layer management, Databases arrangement independent of map system architecture. - Soft integration: portlets and DDB: Portlets = mini-applications for business functions and processes, made of web parts; Digital Dashboards (DDB) Portlets + web parts DDB sites = collections of DDB, adjustable by users. - General conclusions: REDAC, powerful and useful radioecological tool: All elements easily accessible through the original tool, ProSF, developed by IS Geo; Relations constructed between the documents (files, databases, documentation, reports,...); All elements structured by a meta-information; Mechanisms of search; Global radioecological glossary; Spatial data geo-coded; Processes, tools and methodology suitable for similar projects; Data useful for scientific studies, modelling, operational purposes, communication with mass media. - Outlook: Addition of functionality, support and maintenance Strong integration: Thematic integration = merging of all DB in an

  17. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl: programme 2: REDAC, the radioecological database after the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville-Cavelin, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Environment and Emergency Operations Div. - Dept. for the Study of Radionuclide Behaviour in Ecosystems, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Biesold, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Braunschweig (Germany); Chabanyuk, V. [Chornobyl Center (CC), Kiev regoin (Ukraine)

    2006-07-01

    Goals: to built a database for integrating the results of programme 'Radioecology' of the French-German Initiative: Ecological portrait, initial contamination, wastes management, soil-plants and animals transfer, transfer by runoff and in the aquatic environment, countermeasures in urban and natural and agricultural environments. Specific methodology: original 'Project Solutions Framework': Information system developed as a soft integrated portal, Geo-information system: all spatial data geo-coded. DB structure: Publications: all classical informations, original data; Products: storage of open publications of the Project; Processes: management of the Project and Sub-projects; Services: information and software objects, help; Basics: information on system and organizational development. - Soft integration: cartography system: Map from 'Ecological portrait' integrated with thematic databases, Loaded in a special category (by IS Geo Internet Map Server); Cartographical functions: navigation, scaling, extracting, layer management, Databases arrangement independent of map system architecture. - Soft integration: portlets and DDB: Portlets = mini-applications for business functions and processes, made of web parts; Digital Dashboards (DDB) Portlets + web parts DDB sites = collections of DDB, adjustable by users. - General conclusions: REDAC, powerful and useful radioecological tool: All elements easily accessible through the original tool, ProSF, developed by IS Geo; Relations constructed between the documents (files, databases, documentation, reports,...); All elements structured by a meta-information; Mechanisms of search; Global radioecological glossary; Spatial data geo-coded; Processes, tools and methodology suitable for similar projects; Data useful for scientific studies, modelling, operational purposes, communication with mass media. - Outlook: Addition of functionality, support and maintenance Strong integration: Thematic

  18. IAEA Perspectives and Programme on Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosbois, J. de

    2016-01-01

    Full text: There are many challenging issues facing Member States with respect to knowledge management. Each country’s situation and history with nuclear technology is different and strategic issues and immediate priorities are not the same. Member States recognize nuclear technology is inherently complex and requires advanced specialization and expertise. Maintaining a competent workforce is always of concern, especially in organizations with an aging workforce. Countries making major transitions such as gearing up for new build construction or decommissioning projects face particular challenges. Licensed nuclear facilities operate under a range of different organizational business models. For example, some rely heavily on outsourced and external services, and different approaches are needed to ensure critical knowledge is available and maintained. For countries phasing out nuclear power, critical knowledge must be maintained to ensure decommissioning and environmental remediation of sites is done in a responsible manner. Newcomer countries have the difficult challenge of building up their needed workforce competencies to be ready in time to support construction and commissioning schedules. The capture, preservation, transfer and overall management of design knowledge over the technology lifecycle is another important issue that is needed to ensure both the economics and safety of nuclear facilities over their lifetimes, and is especially important to ensure life extension and refurbishment projects can be implemented cost effectively. This presentation will present an overall perspective of the major knowledge management challenges and issues facing the nuclear sector and provide an overview of the IAEA’s nuclear knowledge management programme and initiatives that support Member States in addressing them. (author

  19. Construction Project Administration and Management for Mitigating Work Zone Accidents and Fatalities: An Integrated Risk Management Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this research is to mitigate the risk of highway accidents (crashes) and fatalities in work zones. The approach of this research has been to address the mitigation of work zone crashes through the creation of a formal risk management mode...

  20. Status of the Real-time On-line Decision Support (RODOS) system for off-site emergency management after nuclear and radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskov, W.; Ehrhardt, J.; Landman, C.; Pasler-Sauer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Under the auspices of its EURATOM Research Framework Programmes, the European Commission (EC) has supported the development of the comprehensive decision support system RODOS (Real-time On-line Decision Support) for off-site emergency management after nuclear accidents for more than a decade. Many national research programmes, research institutes and industrial collaborators contributed to the project, in particular the German Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Reactor Safety (B MU). The RODOS system can be applied to accidental releases into the atmosphere and various aquatic environments within and across Europe. It provides coherent support before, during and after such a release to assist analysis of the situation and decision making about short and long-term countermeasures for mitigating the consequences with respect to health, the environment, and the economy. Appropriate interfaces exist with local and national radiological monitoring data systems, meteorological measurements and forecasts, and for the adaptation to local, regional and national conditions in Europe. Within the European Integrated Project EURANOS of the sixth Framework Programme, the RODOS system is being enhanced, among others, for radiological emergencies such as dirty bombs attacks, transport accidents and satellite crashes by extensions of the nuclide list, the source term characteristics and the atmospheric dispersion model

  1. Evaluation of a communication and stress management training programme for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lone; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Boivin, Jackey

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates a patient education programme focussed on improving communication and stress management skills among couples in fertility treatment.......This study evaluates a patient education programme focussed on improving communication and stress management skills among couples in fertility treatment....

  2. Cost Analysis of Chronic Disease Self-Management Programmes Being Delivered in South Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Timothy F.; Palmer, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic disease accounts for the majority of healthcare costs. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) has been shown to be effective in reducing the burden of chronic disease. Objectives: The objective of this study was to measure the cost of delivering the Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) in order to…

  3. Construction safety: Can management prevent all accidents or are workers responsible for their own actions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotten, G.B.; Jenkins, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    The construction industry has struggled for many years with the answer to the question posed in the title: Can Management Prevent All Accidents or Are Workers Responsible for Their Own Actions? In the litigious society that we live, it has become more important to find someone open-quotes at faultclose quotes for an accident than it is to find out how we can prevent it from ever happening again. Most successful companies subscribe to the theme that open-quotes all accidents can be prevented.close quotes They institute training and qualification programs, safe performance incentives, and culture-change-driven directorates such as the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP); yet we still see construction accidents that result in lost time, and occasionally death, which is extremely costly in the shortsighted measure of money and, in real terms, impact to the worker''s family. Workers need to be properly trained in safety and health protection before they are assigned to a job that may expose them to safety and health hazards. A management committed to improving worker safety and health will bring about significant results in terms of financial savings, improved employee morale, enhanced communities, and increased production. But how can this happen, you say? Reduction in injury and lost workdays are the rewards. A decline in reduction of injuries and lost workdays results in lower workers'' compensation premiums and insurance rates. In 1991, United States workplace injuries and illnesses cost public and private sector employers an estimated $62 billion in workers'' compensation expenditures

  4. The Community's R and D programme on the management and storage of radioactive waste. Shared-cost action programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMenamin, T.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1975 the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) has been operating a series of shared-cost action programmes in the field of radioactive waste management with the primary objective of developing methods to protect the public and the environment against the potential hazards of radioactive waste. Member States with small, as well as sizeable, nuclear programmes have been taking part. The choice and type of topics for the programme have depended largely on the work being carried out nationally by these countries with the programmes acting as a support and extension to national projects. To this end they have acted as a catalyst in encouraging and promoting cross-border cooperation and have provided a unique opportunity to compare results and ideas leading to improved quality and efficiency. The list of publications covers reports, proceedings, communications and information leaflets produced and published in the framework of the cost-sharing research programmes of the Commission of the European Communities on radioactive waste management and disposal. The list, which is regularly updated, includes: reports of contractors on research supported by the Commission; reports on research in coordinated actions, assembled and edited by the Commission staff or on behalf of the Commission; proceedings of meetings, conferences and workshops organized and edited by the Commission staff; scientific reports, communications, annual progress reports and information leaflets produced and edited by the Commission staff. Not included are contributions of contractors and staff to national or international meetings, workshops, conferences and expert groups

  5. Reducing Wildlife Damage with Cost-Effective Management Programmes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl R Krull

    Full Text Available Limiting the impact of wildlife damage in a cost effective manner requires an understanding of how control inputs change the occurrence of damage through their effect on animal density. Despite this, there are few studies linking wildlife management (control, with changes in animal abundance and prevailing levels of wildlife damage. We use the impact and management of wild pigs as a case study to demonstrate this linkage. Ground disturbance by wild pigs has become a conservation issue of global concern because of its potential effects on successional changes in vegetation structure and composition, habitat for other species, and functional soil properties. In this study, we used a 3-year pig control programme (ground hunting undertaken in a temperate rainforest area of northern New Zealand to evaluate effects on pig abundance, and patterns and rates of ground disturbance and ground disturbance recovery and the cost effectiveness of differing control strategies. Control reduced pig densities by over a third of the estimated carrying capacity, but more than halved average prevailing ground disturbance. Rates of new ground disturbance accelerated with increasing pig density, while rates of ground disturbance recovery were not related to prevailing pig density. Stochastic simulation models based on the measured relationships between control, pig density and rate of ground disturbance and recovery indicated that control could reduce ground disturbance substantially. However, the rate at which prevailing ground disturbance was reduced diminished rapidly as more intense, and hence expensive, pig control regimes were simulated. The model produced in this study provides a framework that links conservation of indigenous ecological communities to control inputs through the reduction of wildlife damage and suggests that managers should consider carefully the marginal cost of higher investment in wildlife damage control, relative to its marginal conservation

  6. Thyroid cancer in Belarus after Chernobyl: International thyroid project. International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident has demonstrated what was always known but perhaps has not been as fully acknowledged as it might, namely that national or other geographical boundaries are no defence against radioactive fallout. Much (some 2.2 millions) of the approximately 10 million population of Belarus have been, and are still being, exposed to the radiation resulting from the accident. The most obvious adverse effect of the radiation is on the condition of the thyroid system in children. Now, only just over eight years after the accident, we are experiencing an increase in childhood thyroid cancer which is particularly marked in those closest to the site of the accident. In young children thyroid cancer is an extremely rare condition and thus although at present the numbers of cases (more than 250 since the accident) is not large in absolute terms it is a sufficiently important development to capture the interest of the international medical and scientific community and to give rise to considerable apprehension as to the future development of the outbreak. Although this increase in thyroid cancer has not been definitively attributed to the Chernobyl accident, and indeed a major aim of this project is to elucidate the cause of the cancer, the fact of the exposure of the population of Belarus to the isotopes of iodine at the time of accident, and what we have learned from the experience in the Marshall Islands following the testing of the first hydrogen bomb on Bikini Atoll lead us to consider the accident as the most likely cause of the increase. Belarus is a relatively small and newly independent country. By any standards the Chernobyl accident was a technological disaster of enormous proportions causing damage to the environment over vast land areas. Necessarily it must be a major concern for us and an issue to be considered in the planning of our future. Its impact on the future health of our nation must be assessed as objectively and dispassionately as possible and

  7. Severe accident management; the approach in the USA. Applications of US methods in Europe. Other approaches in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vayssier, G.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture severe accident management, applications of US methods in Europe are presented. Author deals with historical perspective, US industry position to core melt accidents, method of Westinghouse owners group, method of Combustion Engineering owners group, method of Babcock and Wilcox Owners group, interaction with/inspection by the USNRC and with assessment of US SAMG methods

  8. Conservative Management of Theca Lutein Cyst Accident: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Bai Prabhu T

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Theca lutein cysts can occur in 20-25% of molar pregnancies. These cysts can undergo complications such as torsion, rupture, and haemorrhage. As these are functional cysts, when there are complications such as torsion they can be managed conservatively by aspirating the cysts under ultrasound guidance or by detorsion at the time of laparoscopy. By simple detorsion, ovaries can be preserved in 80-90% of cases. In order to prevent recurrence adnexal fixation can be undertaken by plicating the ovarian ligament.

  9. Generalities on nuclear accidents and their short-dated and middle-dated management; Generalites sur les accidents nucleaires et leur gestion a court terme et a long terme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    All the nuclear activities present a radiation risk. The radiation exposure of the employees or the public, may occur during normal activity or during an accident. The IRSN realized a document on this radiation risk and the actions of protection. The sanitary and medical aspects of a radiation accident are detailed. The actions of the population protection during an accident and the post accident management are also discussed. (A.L.B.)

  10. Risk management and role of schools of the Tokai-village radiation accident in 1999. Safety education and risk management before and during the radiation accident from the standpoint of school nurse teachers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akisaka, Masafumi; Nakamura, Tomoko; Satake, Tsuyoshi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate safety education and risk management in the neighborhood schools before and during the radiation accident in the Tokai-village in 1999 from the standpoint of school nurse teachers. Eighty-six school nurse teachers from 44 elementary, 25 junior-high, 14 high and 3 handicapped children's schools were surveyed within neighboring towns and villages. The main results were as follows: There had been few risk management systems against the potential radiation accidents including safety education, radiological monitoring and protection in all of the neighboring schools. There were no significant difference in risk management systems among the schools before the accident, though the anxiety rates of school children were significantly higher in the schools nearest to the accident site. Some radiation risk management systems must be established in neighboring schools including safety education, radiological monitoring and protection. (author)

  11. The Management of innovation: Lessons from a Danish Development Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lennie

    1997-01-01

    The paper reports from an ongoing Danish development programme entitled "Process and Product Development in the Building Industry". The programme is a joint initiatvie, initiated by the Ministry of Housing and Building and the Ministry of Busines and Industry. In a competition in 1994 four consor...

  12. Comprehensive Health Risk Management after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, S

    2016-04-01

    Five years have passed since the Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on 11 March 2011. Countermeasures aimed at human protection during the emergency period, including evacuation, sheltering and control of the food chain were implemented in a timely manner by the Japanese Government. However, there is an apparent need for improvement, especially in the areas of nuclear safety and protection, and also in the management of radiation health risk during and even after the accident. Continuous monitoring and characterisation of the levels of radioactivity in the environment and foods in Fukushima are now essential for obtaining informed consent to the decisions on living in the radio-contaminated areas and also on returning back to the evacuated areas once re-entry is allowed; it is also important to carry out a realistic assessment of the radiation doses on the basis of measurements. Until now, various types of radiation health risk management projects and research have been implemented in Fukushima, among which the Fukushima Health Management Survey is the largest health monitoring project. It includes the Basic Survey for the estimation of external radiation doses received during the first 4 months after the accident and four detailed surveys: thyroid ultrasound examination, comprehensive health check-up, mental health and lifestyle survey, and survey on pregnant women and nursing mothers, with the aim to prospectively take care of the health of all the residents of Fukushima Prefecture for a long time. In particular, among evacuees of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident, concern about radiation risk is associated with psychological stresses. Here, ongoing health risk management will be reviewed, focusing on the difficult challenge of post-disaster recovery and resilience in Fukushima. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Management of the radioactive wastes arising from the accident in Goiania, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezrahi, A.; Xavier, A.

    1989-01-01

    The radiological accident that occurred during the month of September, 1987, in Goiania, Brazil, involving a 50,9 TBq (1375 Ci) of a Caesium-137 source has led to the contamination of a large number of individuals and several urban area. The objective of the present article is to describe the waste management program that was implemented in order to deal with the c.a. 3340 m 3 of wastes generated as a result of decontamination works performed

  14. A system of safety management practices and worker engagement for reducing and preventing accidents: an empirical and theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Jan K; Yorio, Patrick L

    2014-07-01

    The overall research objective was to theoretically and empirically develop the ideas around a system of safety management practices (ten practices were elaborated), to test their relationship with objective safety statistics (such as accident rates), and to explore how these practices work to achieve positive safety results (accident prevention) through worker engagement. Data were collected using safety manager, supervisor and employee surveys designed to assess and link safety management system practices, employee perceptions resulting from existing practices, and safety performance outcomes. Results indicate the following: there is a significant negative relationship between the presence of ten individual safety management practices, as well as the composite of these practices, with accident rates; there is a significant negative relationship between the level of safety-focused worker emotional and cognitive engagement with accident rates; safety management systems and worker engagement levels can be used individually to predict accident rates; safety management systems can be used to predict worker engagement levels; and worker engagement levels act as mediators between the safety management system and safety performance outcomes (such as accident rates). Even though the presence of safety management system practices is linked with incident reduction and may represent a necessary first-step in accident prevention, safety performance may also depend on mediation by safety-focused cognitive and emotional engagement by workers. Thus, when organizations invest in a safety management system approach to reducing/preventing accidents and improving safety performance, they should also be concerned about winning over the minds and hearts of their workers through human performance-based safety management systems designed to promote and enhance worker engagement. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Medical and psychological aspects of crisis management during a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drottz-Sjoeberg, B.M.

    1993-06-01

    Crisis handling in most kinds of disasters is affected by e.g. the information situation, prior experience and preparedness, availability of resources, efficiency of leadership and coordination, and type of disaster. A nuclear accident creates a situation which differs from many 'normal' disasters and natural catastrophes, for example with respects to the invisible nature of radiation and radioactive contamination and thus the dependence on access to specific technical equipment and expertise, and to information about the radiation situation. The scope of the accident, and the existing levels of radiation, define subsequent actions; information policies and existing channels of communication lay the foundation for public reactions. The present paper explores some examples of public reactions, and crisis handling of some previous radiation accidents on the basis of two dimensions, i.e. degree of information availability and degree of impact or 'environmental damage'. The examples include the radiation accidents in the Chelyabinsk region in the southern Urals, at Three Mile Island, USA, at Chernobyl in the Ukraine, and in Goiania, Brazil. It is concluded that public reactions differ as a function of existing expectations, and the crisis handling is more affected by the existing organizational and social structures than by needs and reactions of potential victims. Another conclusion is that pre-disaster preparedness regarding public information, and organization of countermeasures, are crucial to the outcome of a successful crisis handling and for enhancing public trust in crisis management. 39 refs, 2 figs

  16. Medical and psychological aspects of crisis management during a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drottz-Sjoeberg, B.M.

    1993-06-01

    Crisis handling in most kinds of disasters is affected by e.g. the information situation, prior experience and preparedness, availability of resources, efficiency of leadership and coordination, and type of disaster. A nuclear accident creates a situation which differs from many `normal` disasters and natural catastrophes, for example with respects to the invisible nature of radiation and radioactive contamination and thus the dependence on access to specific technical equipment and expertise, and to information about the radiation situation. The scope of the accident, and the existing levels of radiation, define subsequent actions; information policies and existing channels of communication lay the foundation for public reactions. The present paper explores some examples of public reactions, and crisis handling of some previous radiation accidents on the basis of two dimensions, i.e. degree of information availability and degree of impact or `environmental damage`. The examples include the radiation accidents in the Chelyabinsk region in the southern Urals, at Three Mile Island, USA, at Chernobyl in the Ukraine, and in Goiania, Brazil. It is concluded that public reactions differ as a function of existing expectations, and the crisis handling is more affected by the existing organizational and social structures than by needs and reactions of potential victims. Another conclusion is that pre-disaster preparedness regarding public information, and organization of countermeasures, are crucial to the outcome of a successful crisis handling and for enhancing public trust in crisis management. 39 refs, 2 figs.

  17. Development of Evaluation Technology for Hydrogen Combustion in containment and Accident Management Code for CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. B.; Kim, D. H.; Song, Y. M.

    2011-08-01

    For a licensing of nuclear power plant(NPP) construction and operation, the hydrogen combustion and hydrogen mitigation system in the containment is one of the important safety issues. Hydrogen safety and its control for the new NPPs(Shin-Wolsong 1 and 2, Shin-Ulchin 1 and 2) have been evaluated in detail by using the 3-dimensional analysis code GASFLOW. The experimental and computational studies on the hydrogen combustion, and participations of the OEDE/NEA programs such as THAI and ISP-49 secures the resolving capabilities of the hydrogen safety and its control for the domestic nuclear power plants. ISAAC4.0, which has been developed for the assessment of severe accident management at CANDU plants, was already delivered to the regulatory body (KINS) for the assessment of the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) for Wolsong units 1 to 4, which are scheduled to be submitted to KINS. The models for severe accident management strategy were newly added and the graphic simulator, CAVIAR, was coupled to addition, the ISAAC computer code is anticipated as a platform for the development and maintenance of Wolsong plant risk monitor and Wolsong-specific SAMG

  18. Combining Neural Methods and Knowledge-Based Methods in Accident Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Sirola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accident management became a popular research issue in the early 1990s. Computerized decision support was studied from many points of view. Early fault detection and information visualization are important key issues in accident management also today. In this paper we make a brief review on this research history mostly from the last two decades including the severe accident management. The author’s studies are reflected to the state of the art. The self-organizing map method is combined with other more or less traditional methods. Neural methods used together with knowledge-based methods constitute a methodological base for the presented decision support prototypes. Two application examples with modern decision support visualizations are introduced more in detail. A case example of detecting a pressure drift on the boiling water reactor by multivariate methods including innovative visualizations is studied in detail. Promising results in early fault detection are achieved. The operators are provided by added information value to be able to detect anomalies in an early stage already. We provide the plant staff with a methodological tool set, which can be combined in various ways depending on the special needs in each case.

  19. Technical, organizational and human-centered requirements for the purpose of accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berning, A.; Fassmann, W.; Preischl, W.

    1998-01-01

    A catalog of ergonomic recommendations for organizational measures and design of paper documented work aids for accident management situations in nuclear power plants was developed. Attention was given to provide recommendations meeting practical needs and being sufficiently flexible to allow plant specific [aptation. A weight was assigned to each recommendation indicating its importance. The development of the recommendations was based on the state of the art concerning research and practical experience. Results from walk-/talk-through experiments, training and exercises, discussions with on-site experts, and investigations of emergency manuals from German and foreign nuclear power plants were taken into account. The catalog is founded on a bro[ knowledge base covering important aspects. The catalog is intended for qualitative evaluation and design of organizational measures and procedures. The catalog shall assure high quality. The project further provides an important contribution to the standardization of organizational and human centered demands concerning accident management procedures. Thus it can contribute to develop general regulations regarding ergonomic design of accident management measures. (orig.) [de

  20. The management of cardiovascular disease in the Netherlands: analysis of different programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane M.; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Walters, Bethany H.; Adams, Samantha A.; Bal, Roland; Huijsman, Robbert; Rutten-Van Mölken, Maureen P.M.H.; Nieboer, Anna P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Disease management programmes are increasingly used to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of chronic care delivery. But, disease management programme development and implementation is a complex undertaking that requires effective decision-making. Choices made in the earliest phases of programme development are crucial, as they ultimately impact costs, outcomes and sustainability. Methods To increase our understanding of the choices that primary healthcare practices face when implementing such programmes and to stimulate successful implementation and sustainability, we compared the early implementation of eight cardiovascular disease management programmes initiated and managed by healthcare practices in various regions of the Netherlands. Using a mixed-methods design, we identified differences in and challenges to programme implementation in terms of context, patient characteristics, disease management level, healthcare utilisation costs, development costs and health-related quality of life. Results Shifting to a multidisciplinary, patient-centred care pathway approach to disease management is demanding for organisations, professionals and patients, and is especially vulnerable when sustainable change is the goal. Funding is an important barrier to sustainable implementation of cardiovascular disease management programmes, although development costs of the individual programmes varied considerably in relation to the length of the development period. The large number of professionals involved in combination with duration of programme development was the largest cost drivers. While Information and Communication Technology systems to support the new care pathways did not directly contribute to higher costs, delays in implementation indirectly did. Conclusions Developing and implementing cardiovascular disease management programmes is time-consuming and challenging. Multidisciplinary, patient-centred care demands multifaceted changes in routine care. As

  1. The management of cardiovascular disease in the Netherlands: analysis of different programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane M; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Walters, Bethany H; Adams, Samantha A; Bal, Roland; Huijsman, Robbert; Rutten-Van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Nieboer, Anna P

    2013-01-01

    Disease management programmes are increasingly used to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of chronic care delivery. But, disease management programme development and implementation is a complex undertaking that requires effective decision-making. Choices made in the earliest phases of programme development are crucial, as they ultimately impact costs, outcomes and sustainability. To increase our understanding of the choices that primary healthcare practices face when implementing such programmes and to stimulate successful implementation and sustainability, we compared the early implementation of eight cardiovascular disease management programmes initiated and managed by healthcare practices in various regions of the Netherlands. Using a mixed-methods design, we identified differences in and challenges to programme implementation in terms of context, patient characteristics, disease management level, healthcare utilisation costs, development costs and health-related quality of life. Shifting to a multidisciplinary, patient-centred care pathway approach to disease management is demanding for organisations, professionals and patients, and is especially vulnerable when sustainable change is the goal. Funding is an important barrier to sustainable implementation of cardiovascular disease management programmes, although development costs of the individual programmes varied considerably in relation to the length of the development period. The large number of professionals involved in combination with duration of programme development was the largest cost drivers. While Information and Communication Technology systems to support the new care pathways did not directly contribute to higher costs, delays in implementation indirectly did. Developing and implementing cardiovascular disease management programmes is time-consuming and challenging. Multidisciplinary, patient-centred care demands multifaceted changes in routine care. As care pathways become more complex, they

  2. A Masters Programme in telecommunications management - demand-based curriculum design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, Khaled M.; Kaylani, Hazem; Murphy, Noel; Brennan, Conor; Itradat, Awni; Al-Bataineh, Mohammed; Aloqlah, Mohammed; Salhieh, Loay; Altarazi, Safwan; Rawashdeh, Nathir; Bas Cerdá, María del Carmen; Conchado Peiró, Andrea; Al-Zoubi, Asem; Harb, Bassam; Bany Salameh, Haythem

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a curriculum design approach for a Masters Programme in Telecommunications Management based on demand data obtained from surveying the needs of potential students of the proposed programme. Through online surveys disseminated at telecom companies in Jordan, it was possible to measure the demand for such a programme and to determine the required programme contents and specifications. The curriculum design is based on definition of programme outcomes and on using a house of quality approach (HOQ) to determine the list of courses required in the programme. Surveyed competencies are mapped to a long list of proposed courses in a HOQ in order to determine the importance of each of these courses. A final list of core and elective courses is then developed considering the contribution to programme outcomes and the academic standards.

  3. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management 'sharing practices and experiences'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the Workshop on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management was to share practices and experiences in approaches to severe accident management. The workshop: provided an international forum for information and experience exchange amongst nuclear electricity utilities and national regulatory authorities on approaches to, and issues in severe accident management, including national and international implications. Focus was placed on sharing practices and experiences in many countries on approaches to severe accident management; identified best occupational radiation protection approaches in strategies, practices, as well as limitations for developing effective management. This included experiences in various countries; identified national experiences to be incorporated into the final version of ISOE EG-SAM report. The workshop included a series of plenary presentations that provided participants with an overview of practices and experiences in severe accident management from various countries. Furthermore, by taking into account the structure of the interim report, common themes and issues were discussed in follow-up breakout sessions. Sessions included invited speakers, moderated by designated experts, allowing participants to discuss their national experiences and possible inputs into the report. The outcomes of the breakout sessions were presented in plenary by the respective moderators followed by an open discussion, with a view towards elaborating ways forward to achieve more effective severe accident management. This document brings together the abstracts and the slides of the available presentations

  4. Accident analysis for high-level waste management alternatives in the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1994-01-01

    A comparative generic accident analysis was performed for the programmatic alternatives for high-level waste (HLW) management in the US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). The key facilities and operations of the five major HLW management phases were considered: current storage, retrieval, pretreatment, treatment, and interim canister storage. A spectrum of accidents covering the risk-dominant accidents was analyzed. Preliminary results are presented for HLW management at the Hanford site. A comparison of these results with those previously advanced shows fair agreement

  5. Characteristics of Hydrogen Monitoring Systems for Severe Accident Management at a Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, V. G.; Yeghoyan, E. A.; Grigoryan, A. D.; Petrosyan, A. P.; Movsisyan, M. R.

    2018-02-01

    One of the main objectives of severe accident management at a nuclear power plant is to protect the integrity of the containment, for which the most serious threat is possible ignition of the generated hydrogen. There should be a monitoring system providing information support of NPP personnel, ensuring data on the current state of a containment gaseous environment and trends in its composition changes. Monitoring systems' requisite characteristics definition issues are considered by the example of a particular power unit. Major characteristics important for proper information support are discussed. Some features of progression of severe accident scenarios at considered power unit are described and a possible influence of the hydrogen concentration monitoring system performance on the information support reliability in a severe accident is analyzed. The analysis results show that the following technical characteristics of the combustible gas monitoring systems are important for the proper information support of NPP personnel in the event of a severe accident at a nuclear power plant: measured parameters, measuring ranges and errors, update rate, minimum detectable concentration of combustible gas, monitoring reference points, environmental qualification parameters of the system components. For NPP power units with WWER-440/270 (230) type reactors, which have a relatively small containment volume, the update period for measurement results is a critical characteristic of the containment combustible gas monitoring system, and the choice of monitoring reference points should be focused not so much on the definition of places of possible hydrogen pockets but rather on the definition of places of a possible combustible mixture formation. It may be necessary for the above-mentioned power units to include in the emergency operating procedures measures aimed at a timely heat removal reduction from the containment environment if there are signs of a severe accident phase

  6. An Approach to Description of Accident Causation and Identification of Preconditions for Effective Risk Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens; Svedung, Inge

    The ultimate objectives of the present study is to better understand the mechanisms of major accidents in the present dynamic and technological society. From this understanding, guides to improved strategies for industrial risk management is sought. In this approach, risk management is considered...... "safety control" must be established from a control theory point of view? The report discusses these issues on the basis of the present rapid evolution of new cognitive approaches to the study of decision making in action and dynamic, learning organizations, and the rapid change of modern information...

  7. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis L Kodner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each. It started during the first phase at Massachusetts General Hospital, a major academic medical centre in Boston, Massachusetts in collaboration with Massachusetts General Physicians Organisation. During the second phase, the programme expanded to two more affiliated sites in and around the Boston area, including a community hospital, as well as incorporated several modifications primarily focused on the management of transitions to post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities. At the close of the demonstration in July 2012, Mass General Massachusetts General Care Management Program became a component of a new Pioneer accountable care organisation (ACO. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program is focused on individuals meeting defined eligibility criteria who are offered care that is integrated by a case manager embedded in a primary care practice. The demonstration project showed substantial cost savings compared to fee-for-service patients served in the traditional Medicare system but no impact on hospital readmissions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program does not rest upon a “whole systems” approach to integrated care. It is an excellent example of how an innovative care co-ordination programme can be implemented in an existing health-care organisation without making fundamental changes in its underlying structure or the way in which direct patient care services are paid for. The accountable care organisation version of the Massachusetts General Care Management Program

  8. Nuclear power plant ageing management programmes in foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simola, K.; Laakso, K.; Pekkonen, A.

    1992-09-01

    The report describes ageing studies of nuclear power plants and research programmes on plant life extension in foreign countries. Ageing studies are aimed to ascertain that the availability and safety of components and structures can be maintained throughout the plant lifetime. In life extension programmes the purpose is to evaluate the technical and economical possibilities to extend the plant lifetime beyond the originally planned operation period, without reducing the plant safety. The main emphasis of the report is put on the ageing and life extension programmes in the United States. Besides the U.S. studies, research on plant life extension possibilities conducted in France and Japan are also described. Examples of studies performed in other nuclear energy producing countries are given. These examples are mainly related to the development of maintenance programmes and techniques

  9. Identification and initial assessment of candidate BWR late-phase in-vessel accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    Work sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) to identify and perform preliminary assessments of candidate BWR [boiling water reactor] in-vessel accident management strategies was completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during fiscal year 1990. Mitigative strategies for containment events have been the subject of a companion study at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The focus of this Oak Ridge effort was the development of new strategies for mitigation of the late phase events, that is, the events that would occur in-vessel after the onset of significant core damage. The work began with an investigation of the current status of BWR in-vessel accident management procedures and proceeded through a preliminary evaluation of several candidate new strategies. The steps leading to the identification of the candidate strategies are described. The four new candidate late-phase (in-vessel) accident mitigation strategies identified by this study and discussed in the report are: (1) keep the reactor vessel depressurized; (2) restore injection in a controlled manner; (3) inject boron if control blade damage has occurred; and (4) containment flooding to maintain core and structural debris in-vessel. Additional assessments of these strategies are proposed

  10. Evaluation of Coolant Injection Procedure in the Severe Accident Management Strategy of APR1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yongjin; Lim, Kukhee; Song, Sungchu; Lee, Sukho; Hwang, Taesuk

    2013-01-01

    A coolant injection strategy in the severe accident management guideline (SAMG) of APR1400 relates to immediate coolant injection into RCS (Reactor Coolant System) or injection following the recovery of secondary coolant inventory. This strategy could play important role in accident mitigation and radiological consequences. In this study, appropriateness of the strategy was evaluated using MELCOR1.8.6 and several sensitivity studies of the key parameters were performed. Analysis for APR1400 using MELCOR 1.8.6 was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of accident management strategies and the following conclusions were identified. Sequential operation of secondary and RCS injection may not be the best strategy and the simultaneous injection of secondary and RCS injection could be more preferable. At least, the RCS injection should start before complete drainage of water in the safety injection tank using mobile pumps. In this study, the effectiveness of timing of operator action has been examined and the amount of injection flowrate needs to be studied in the future

  11. Quantifying human and organizational factors in accident management using decision trees: the HORAAM method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumont, G.; Menage, F.; Schneiter, J.R.; Spurgin, A.; Vogel, A

    2000-11-01

    In the framework of the level 2 Probabilistic Safety Study (PSA 2) project, the Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection (IPSN) has developed a method for taking into account Human and Organizational Reliability Aspects during accident management. Actions are taken during very degraded installation operations by teams of experts in the French framework of Crisis Organization (ONC). After describing the background of the framework of the Level 2 PSA, the French specific Crisis Organization and the characteristics of human actions in the Accident Progression Event Tree, this paper describes the method developed to introduce in PSA the Human and Organizational Reliability Analysis in Accident Management (HORAAM). This method is based on the Decision Tree method and has gone through a number of steps in its development. The first one was the observation of crisis center exercises, in order to identify the main influence factors (IFs) which affect human and organizational reliability. These IFs were used as headings in the Decision Tree method. Expert judgment was used in order to verify the IFs, to rank them, and to estimate the value of the aggregated factors to simplify the quantification of the tree. A tool based on Mathematica was developed to increase the flexibility and the efficiency of the study.

  12. The integration of studio cycling into a worksite stress management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Matthew M; Soyring, Jason E; Jenkins, Sarah M; Daniels, Denise C; Berkland, Bridget E; Werneburg, Brooke L; Hagen, Philip T; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Warren, Beth A; Olsen, Kerry D

    2014-04-01

    High stress is a prevalent problem in the worksite. To reduce stress, improve productivity, reduce absenteeism, and lower healthcare costs, many companies offer exercise classes or stress management programmes. Although physical activity is an important component of stress management, few worksites have integrated physical activity into their comprehensive stress reduction programmes. The purpose of this single-arm pilot project was to examine the potential effectiveness of an integrated exercise (studio cycling) and cognitive-behavioural stress management programme. Eighty-four adults, 75% female, mostly aged 40+ years, participated in an integrated 12-week cycling studio and cognitive-behavioural stress management programme. Participants experienced a significant and clinically meaningful reduction on the Perceived Stress Scale (p manage stress at the programme's end and at a 1-month follow-up. Participants also reported having significantly improved overall health, improved nutritional habits, higher physical activity level, greater confidence in their ability to follow a healthy diet, higher spiritual well-being, improved sleep, receiving more support for maintaining healthy living and improved quality of life at the completion of the 12-week programme and 1-month follow-up. These findings provide further support for an integrated exercise and stress management programme. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Self-management programmes in temporomandibular disorders : results from an international Delphi process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durham, J.; Al-Baghdadi, M.; Baad-Hansen, L.; Breckons, M.; Goulet, J.P.; Lobbezoo, F.; List, T.; Michelotti, A.; Nixdorf, D.R.; Peck, C.C.; Raphael, K.; Schiffman, E.; Steele, J.G.; Story, W.; Ohrbach, R.

    2016-01-01

    Self-management (SM) programmes are commonly used for initial treatment of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The programmes described in the literature, however, vary widely with no consistency in terminology used, components of care or their definitions. The aims of this study were

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of a Community-Based Exercise Programme in COPD Self-Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerink, Marlies; Effing, Tanja; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; van der Valk, Paul; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; van der Palen, Job

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Information regarding cost-effectiveness of community-based exercise programmes in COPD is scarce. Therefore, we have investigated whether a community-based exercise programme is a cost-effective component of self-management for patients with COPD after 2 years of follow-up. Methods:

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of a Community-Based Exercise Programme in COPD Self-Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerink, M.; Effing, T.; Kerstjens, H.A.; Valk, P. van der; Brusse-Keizer, M.; Zielhuis, G.A.; Palen, J. van der

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Information regarding cost-effectiveness of community-based exercise programmes in COPD is scarce. Therefore, we have investigated whether a community-based exercise programme is a cost-effective component of self-management for patients with COPD after 2 years of follow-up. METHODS:

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of a Community-Based Exercise Programme in COPD Self-Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerink, Marlies; Effing, T.W.; Kerstjens, Huib A.M.; van der Valk, Paul; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; Zielhuis, Gerhard; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Information regarding cost-effectiveness of community-based exercise programmes in COPD is scarce. Therefore, we have investigated whether a community-based exercise programme is a cost-effective component of self-management for patients with COPD after 2 years of follow-up. Methods:

  17. A telecare programme for self-management of COPD exacerbations and promotion of an active lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabak, Monique; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; Ommeren, Clara; Kotte, Hayke; Weltevreden, Paul; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The Condition Coach (CoCo) is a technology-supported care programme for self-management of COPD exacerbations and for promotion of an active lifestyle. The objective is to investigate the added value of the telecare programme in terms of clinical changes compared to usual care, and in

  18. Continuous Improvement in the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Programme at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldowaisan, Tariq; Allahverdi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process employed by the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering programme at Kuwait University to continuously improve the programme. Using a continuous improvement framework, the paper demonstrates how various qualitative and quantitative analyses methods, such as hypothesis testing and control charts, have been…

  19. Navigating the Turbulent Waters of Academia: The Leadership Role of Programme Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkinas, Tricia; Cartan, Greg

    2015-01-01

    The focus of our paper is the leadership role of programme managers in the higher education sector. In particular, we highlight the complex and paradoxical nature of the programme leader's role, and provide an insight into leadership in this challenging and dynamic environment. We identify cognitive and behavioural complexity as necessary…

  20. Stake-holder involvement in the management of rural areas after an accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisbet, A.F.

    2001-01-01

    Widespread contamination of the food chain following a nuclear accident could have considerable consequences for European farming and food industries. For the purposes of contingency planning it is important to bring together the many and diverse stakeholders who would be involved in intervention so that strategies can be developed for maintaining agricultural production and food safety. This type of approach has been successfully implemented in the UK through the setting up of the Agriculture and Food Countermeasures Working Group. Building on this initiative, the European Commission under the auspices of its 5. Framework Programme is funding a thematic network in which similar stakeholder groups are being established in four other Member States. These national groups contain individuals involved in making policy decisions within government departments and agencies, regulatory authorities, the water, milk and farming industries, the retail trade and consumer groups, as well as individuals with specialist expertise. The stakeholder network will provide a European focus for tackling future nuclear accidents and assist in the harmonization of policies and strategies between Member States. This paper gives an overview of the approaches being adopted and discusses the achievements and expected benefits of stakeholder engagement. (author)

  1. Construction safety: Can management prevent all accidents or are workers responsible for their own actions?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotten, G.B.; Jenkins, S.L.

    1997-10-01

    The construction industry has struggled for many years with the answer to the question posed in the title: Can Management Prevent All Accidents or Are Workers Responsible for Their Own Actions? In the litigious society that we live, it has become more important to find someone {open_quotes}at fault{close_quotes} for an accident than it is to find out how we can prevent it from ever happening again. Most successful companies subscribe to the theme that {open_quotes}all accidents can be prevented.{close_quotes} They institute training and qualification programs, safe performance incentives, and culture-change-driven directorates such as the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP); yet we still see construction accidents that result in lost time, and occasionally death, which is extremely costly in the shortsighted measure of money and, in real terms, impact to the worker`s family. Workers need to be properly trained in safety and health protection before they are assigned to a job that may expose them to safety and health hazards. A management committed to improving worker safety and health will bring about significant results in terms of financial savings, improved employee morale, enhanced communities, and increased production. But how can this happen, you say? Reduction in injury and lost workdays are the rewards. A decline in reduction of injuries and lost workdays results in lower workers` compensation premiums and insurance rates. In 1991, United States workplace injuries and illnesses cost public and private sector employers an estimated $62 billion in workers` compensation expenditures.

  2. Radiological accidents potentially important to human health risk in the U.S. Department of Energy waste management program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Nabelssi, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Jackson, R. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Human health risks as a consequence of potential radiological releases resulting from plausible accident scenarios constitute an important consideration in the US Department of Energy (DOE) national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes. As part of this program, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) is currently preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that evaluates the risks that could result from managing five different waste types. This paper (1) briefly reviews the overall approach used to assess process and facility accidents for the EM PEIS; (2) summarizes the key inventory, storage, and treatment characteristics of the various DOE waste types important to the selection of accidents; (3) discusses in detail the key assumptions in modeling risk-dominant accidents; and (4) relates comparative source term results and sensitivities.

  3. Safety culture and accident analysis-A socio-management approach based on organizational safety social capital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Suman

    2007-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges for organizations in today's competitive business environment is to create and preserve a self-sustaining safety culture. Typically, Key drivers of safety culture in many organizations are regulation, audits, safety training, various types of employee exhortations to comply with safety norms, etc. However, less evident factors like networking relationships and social trust amongst employees, as also extended networking relationships and social trust of organizations with external stakeholders like government, suppliers, regulators, etc., which constitute the safety social capital in the Organization-seem to also influence the sustenance of organizational safety culture. Can erosion in safety social capital cause deterioration in safety culture and contribute to accidents? If so, how does it contribute? As existing accident analysis models do not provide answers to these questions, CAMSoC (Curtailing Accidents by Managing Social Capital), an accident analysis model, is proposed. As an illustration, five accidents: Bhopal (India), Hyatt Regency (USA), Tenerife (Canary Islands), Westray (Canada) and Exxon Valdez (USA) have been analyzed using CAMSoC. This limited cross-industry analysis provides two key socio-management insights: the biggest source of motivation that causes deviant behavior leading to accidents is 'Faulty Value Systems'. The second biggest source is 'Enforceable Trust'. From a management control perspective, deterioration in safety culture and resultant accidents is more due to the 'action controls' rather than explicit 'cultural controls'. Future research directions to enhance the model's utility through layering are addressed briefly

  4. Study on entry criteria for severe accident management during hot leg LBLOCAs in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Longfei; Zhang, Dafa; Wang, Shaoming

    2007-01-01

    The risk of Large Break Loss of Coolant Accidents (LBLOCA) has been considered an important safety issue since the beginning of the nuclear power industry. The rapid depressurization occurs in the primary coolant circuit when a large break appears in a Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR).Then the coolant temperature reaches saturation at a very low pressure. The core outlet fluid temperatures maybe not reliable indicators of the core damage states at a such lower pressure. The problem is how to decide the time for water injection in the SAM (Severe Accident Management). An alternative entry criterion is the fluid temperature just above the hot channel in which the fluid temperature showed maximum among all the channels. For that reason, a systematic study of entry criterion of SAM for different hot leg break sizes in a 3-loop PWR has been started using the detailed system thermal hydraulic and severe accident analysis code package, RELAP/SCDAPSIM. Best estimate calculations of the large break LOCA of 15 cm, 20 cm and 25 cm without accident managements and in the case of high-pressure safety injection as the accident management were performed in this paper. The analysis results showed that the core exit temperatures are not reliable indicators of the peak core temperatures and core damage states once peak core temperatures reach 1500 K, and the proposed entry criteria for SAM at the time when the core outlet temperature reaches 900 K is not effective to prevent core melt. Then other analyses were performed with a parameter of fluid temperature just above the hot channel. The latter analysis showed that earlier water injection when the fluid temperature just above the hot channel reaches 900 K is effective to prevent further core melt. Since fuel surface and hot channel have spatial distribution and depend on a period of cycle operation, a series of thermocouples are required to install just above the fuel assembly. The maximum exit temperature of 900 K that captured by

  5. Nuclear waste management programme 2003 for the Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    A joint company Posiva Oy founded by nuclear energy producing Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) and Fortum Power and Heat Oy coordinates the research work of the companies on nuclear waste management in Finland. In Posiva's Nuclear Waste Management Programme 2003, an account of the nuclear waste management measures of TVO and Fortum is given as required by the sections 74 and 75 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. At first, nuclear waste management situation and the programme of activities are reported. The nuclear waste management research for the year 2003 and more generally for the years 2003-2007 is presented

  6. Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziakova, M.

    1998-01-01

    Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes is described for the following job positions: reactor operator; turbine operator; reactor maintenance worker; pump maintenance worker; chemistry foreman; health physics foreman; electric maintenance worker

  7. ''RESURS'' - The Russian scientific-technical programme for NPP equipment lifetime monitoring, estimation, prediction and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emelyanov, V.

    1994-01-01

    RESURS programme is described implementation of which will allow to work out regulatory-methodological basis providing legal and technical solution of NPP equipment lifetime management, prediction, monitoring and estimation problems

  8. Assisting emergency operating procedures execution with AMAS, an Accident Management Advisor System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarro, S.; Milici, T.; Wu, J.S.; Apostolakis, G.

    2004-01-01

    In an accident situation, because any decisions that the operators make will depend on how instrumentation readings are ultimately interpreted, the issue of instrument uncertainty is of paramount importance. This uncertainty exists because instrument readings may not be available in the desired form - i.e., only indirect readings for a parameter of interest may exist, with uncertainty on which physical models may be used to deduce its value from these indirect indications -, or because readings may be coming from instruments whose accuracy and reliability in the face of the severe conditions produced by the accident are far from what may be expected under normal operating conditions. In following the EOPs, the operators must rely on instrumentation whose readings may not reflect the real situation. The Accident Management Advisor System (AMAS) is a decision aid intended to supplement plant Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) by accounting for instrumentation uncertainty, and by alerting the operators if they are on the wrong procedures, or otherwise performing an action that is not optimal in terms of preventing core damage. In AMAS, the availability and reliability of certain important instrument readings is treated in probabilistic, rather than deterministic terms. This issue is discussed in greater detail later in the paper, since it relates to one of the key characteristics of the AMAS decision aid. (author)

  9. Depressurization as an accident management strategy to minimize the consequences of direct containment heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.J.; Golden, D.W.; Chambers, R.; Miller, J.D.; Hallbert, B.P.; Dobbe, C.A.

    1990-10-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) have identified severe accidents for nuclear power plants that have the potential to cause failure of the containment through direct containment heating (DCH). Prevention of DCH or mitigation of its effects may be possible using accident management strategies that intentionally depressurize the reactor coolant system (RCS). The effectiveness of intentional depressurization during a station blackout TMLB' sequence was evaluated considering the phenomenological behavior, hardware performance, and operational performance. Phenomenological behavior was calculated using the SCDAP/RELAP5 severe accident analysis code. Two strategies to mitigate DCH by depressurization of the RCS were considered. One strategy, called early depressurization, assumed that the reactor head vent and pressurizer power-operated relief valves (PORVs) were latched open at steam generator dryout. The second strategy, called late depression, assumed that the head vent and PORVs were latched open at a core exit temperature of ∼922 K (1200 degree F). Depressurization of the RCS to a low value that may mitigate DCH was predicted prior to reactor pressure vessel breach for both early and late depressurization. The strategy of late depressurization is preferred over early depressurization because there are greater opportunities to recover plant functions prior to core damage and because failure uncertainties are lessened. 22 refs., 38 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Depressurization as an accident management strategy to minimize the consequences of direct containment heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, D.J.; Golden, D.W.; Chambers, R.; Miller, J.D.; Hallbert, B.P.; Dobbe, C.A. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) have identified severe accidents for nuclear power plants that have the potential to cause failure of the containment through direct containment heating (DCH). Prevention of DCH or mitigation of its effects may be possible using accident management strategies that intentionally depressurize the reactor coolant system (RCS). The effectiveness of intentional depressurization during a station blackout TMLB' sequence was evaluated considering the phenomenological behavior, hardware performance, and operational performance. Phenomenological behavior was calculated using the SCDAP/RELAP5 severe accident analysis code. Two strategies to mitigate DCH by depressurization of the RCS were considered. One strategy, called early depressurization, assumed that the reactor head vent and pressurizer power-operated relief valves (PORVs) were latched open at steam generator dryout. The second strategy, called late depression, assumed that the head vent and PORVs were latched open at a core exit temperature of {approximately}922 K (1200{degree}F). Depressurization of the RCS to a low value that may mitigate DCH was predicted prior to reactor pressure vessel breach for both early and late depressurization. The strategy of late depressurization is preferred over early depressurization because there are greater opportunities to recover plant functions prior to core damage and because failure uncertainties are lessened. 22 refs., 38 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Talent Management Programmes at British, American and Canadian Universities: Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boichenko, Maryna

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with the peculiarities of talent management programmes implementation at the top British, American and Canadian universities. The essence of the main concepts of research--talent and talent management--has been revealed. Talent management is referred to as the systematic attraction, identification, development, engagement,…

  12. Preparation of the National Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Programme in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralj, M.; Zeleznik, N.; Mele, I.; Veselic, M.

    2006-01-01

    The first separate National Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Programme (National Programme) was prepared in Slovenia in 2005, as a separate part of the National Environmental Action Programme that was adopted in June 2005. In the previous National Environmental Action Programme from the year 1999, the radioactive waste and spent fuel management was mentioned only briefly in the paragraph on radiation and nuclear safety with two main objectives: to provide an effective management of radioactive waste, and to keep the environmental ionising radiation under control. The new National Programme from 2005 includes all topics being relevant for the management of the radioactive waste and spent fuel, from the legislation and identification of different waste streams in Slovenia, to the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and management of (TE)NORM. It deals also with the relevant actors in the radioactive waste management, communication and information activities, and the financial aspects of the radioactive waste and spent fuel management. The National Programme was already adopted by the Slovenian Government in October 2005 and will go to Parliament proceedings. The Technical bases for the National Programme was prepared by ARAO and presented to the government in the beginning of 2005. The frames for this document were taken from relevant strategic documents: the Programme of decommissioning the nuclear power plant Krsko and the radioactive waste and spent fuel management, prepared in 2004 by Slovenian and Croatian experts (ARAO and APO), the Proposal of LILW Management Strategy (1999), the Strategy of Spent Fuel Management (1996), and the Resolution on the National Energy Programme (2004). ARAO made a detailed study on the amount and types of radioactive waste produced in Slovenia and future arising with emphasis on the minimization on radioactive waste production. It considered all producers of LILW and

  13. Quantification of a decision-making failure probability of the accident management using cognitive analysis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Ohtani, Masanori; Fujita, Yushi

    2002-01-01

    In the nuclear power plant, much knowledge is acquired through probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of a severe accident, and accident management (AM) is prepared. It is necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of AM using the decision-making failure probability of an emergency organization, operation failure probability of operators, success criteria of AM and reliability of AM equipments in PSA. However, there has been no suitable qualification method for PSA so far to obtain the decision-making failure probability, because the decision-making failure of an emergency organization treats the knowledge based error. In this work, we developed a new method for quantification of the decision-making failure probability of an emergency organization using cognitive analysis model, which decided an AM strategy, in a nuclear power plant at the severe accident, and tried to apply it to a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant. As a result: (1) It could quantify the decision-making failure probability adjusted to PSA for general analysts, who do not necessarily possess professional human factors knowledge, by choosing the suitable value of a basic failure probability and an error-factor. (2) The decision-making failure probabilities of six AMs were in the range of 0.23 to 0.41 using the screening evaluation method and in the range of 0.10 to 0.19 using the detailed evaluation method as the result of trial evaluation based on severe accident analysis of a typical PWR plant, and a result of sensitivity analysis of the conservative assumption, failure probability decreased about 50%. (3) The failure probability using the screening evaluation method exceeded that using detailed evaluation method by 99% of probability theoretically, and the failure probability of AM in this study exceeded 100%. From this result, it was shown that the decision-making failure probability was more conservative than the detailed evaluation method, and the screening evaluation method satisfied

  14. Optimization of the Severe Accident Management Strategy for Domestic Plants and Validation Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. B.; Kim, H. D.; Koo, K. M.; Park, R. J.; Hong, S. H.; Cho, Y. R.; Kim, J. T.; Ha, K. S.; Kang, K. H

    2007-04-15

    nuclear power plants, a technical basis report and computational aid tools were developed in parallel with the experimental and analytical works for the resolution of the uncertain safety issues. ELIAS experiments were carried out to quantify the boiling heat removal rate at the upper surface of a metallic layer for precise evaluations on the effect of a late in-vessel coolant injection. T-HERMES experiments were performed to examine the two-phase natural circulation phenomena through the gap between the reactor vessel and the insulator in the APR1400. Detailed analyses on the hydrogen control in the APR1400 containment were performed focused on the effect of spray system actuation on the hydrogen burning and the evaluation of the hydrogen behavior in the IRWST. To develop the technical basis report for the severe accident management, analyses using SCDAP/RELAP5 code were performed for the accident sequences of the OPR1000. Based on the experimental and analytical results performed in this study, the computational aids for the evaluations of hydrogen flammability in the containment, criteria of the in-vessel corium cooling, criteria of the external reactor vessel cooling were developed. An ASSA code was developed to validate the signal from the instrumentations during the severe accidents and to process the abnormal signal. Since ASSA can perform the signal processing from the direct input of the nuclear power plant during the severe accident, it can be platform of the computational aids. In this study, the ASSA was linked with the computaional aids for the hydrogen flammability.

  15. Optimization of the Severe Accident Management Strategy for Domestic Plants and Validation Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. B.; Kim, H. D.; Koo, K. M.; Park, R. J.; Hong, S. H.; Cho, Y. R.; Kim, J. T.; Ha, K. S.; Kang, K. H.

    2007-04-01

    nuclear power plants, a technical basis report and computational aid tools were developed in parallel with the experimental and analytical works for the resolution of the uncertain safety issues. ELIAS experiments were carried out to quantify the boiling heat removal rate at the upper surface of a metallic layer for precise evaluations on the effect of a late in-vessel coolant injection. T-HERMES experiments were performed to examine the two-phase natural circulation phenomena through the gap between the reactor vessel and the insulator in the APR1400. Detailed analyses on the hydrogen control in the APR1400 containment were performed focused on the effect of spray system actuation on the hydrogen burning and the evaluation of the hydrogen behavior in the IRWST. To develop the technical basis report for the severe accident management, analyses using SCDAP/RELAP5 code were performed for the accident sequences of the OPR1000. Based on the experimental and analytical results performed in this study, the computational aids for the evaluations of hydrogen flammability in the containment, criteria of the in-vessel corium cooling, criteria of the external reactor vessel cooling were developed. An ASSA code was developed to validate the signal from the instrumentations during the severe accidents and to process the abnormal signal. Since ASSA can perform the signal processing from the direct input of the nuclear power plant during the severe accident, it can be platform of the computational aids. In this study, the ASSA was linked with the computaional aids for the hydrogen flammability

  16. The development and demonstration of integrated models for the evaluation of severe accident management strategies - SAMEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, M.L.; Peers, K.; Kersting, E.; Fassmann, W.; Tuomisto, H.; Lundstroem, P.; Helle, M.; Gustavsson, V.; Jacobsson, P.

    2001-01-01

    This study is concerned with the further development of integrated models for the assessment of existing and potential severe accident management (SAM) measures. This paper provides a brief summary of these models, based on Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) methods and the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM) approach, and their application to a number of case studies spanning both preventive and mitigative accident management regimes. In the course of this study it became evident that the starting point to guide the selection of methodology and any further improvement is the intended application. Accordingly, such features as the type and area of application and the confidence requirement are addressed in this project. The application of an integrated ROAAM approach led to the implementation, at the Loviisa NPP, of a hydrogen mitigation strategy, which requires substantial plant modifications. A revised level 2 PSA model was applied to the Sizewell B NPP to assess the feasibility of the in-vessel retention strategy. Similarly the application of PSA based models was extended to the Barseback and Ringhals 2 NPPs to improve the emergency operating procedures, notably actions related to manual operations. A human reliability analysis based on the Human Cognitive Reliability (HCR) and Technique For Human Error Rate (THERP) models was applied to a case study addressing secondary and primary bleed and feed procedures. Some aspects pertinent to the quantification of severe accident phenomena were further examined in this project. A comparison of the applications of PSA based approach and ROAAM to two severe accident issues, viz hydrogen combustion and in-vessel retention, was made. A general conclusion is that there is no requirement for further major development of the PSA and ROAAM methodologies in the modelling of SAM strategies for a variety of applications as far as the technical aspects are concerned. As is demonstrated in this project, the

  17. A review of the management of oral drug overdose in the Accident and Emergency Department of the Royal Brisbane Hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgkinson, D W; Jellett, L B; Ashby, R H

    1991-01-01

    Two-hundred and eighty-nine patients who made a total of 323 presentations to the Royal Brisbane Hospital Accident and Emergency Department with a known or suspected oral drug overdose were reviewed. The majority of patients (76%) could be managed in a 24 h Accident and Emergency observation unit. Activated charcoal given orally or via a nasogastric tube was the recommended method of preventing further absorption of an ingested drug. The use of syrup of ipecac was not encouraged and orogastri...

  18. Helping HSE Team in Learning from Accident by Using the Management Oversight and Risk Tree Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Mohammadfam

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: The analysis using MORT method helped the organization with learning lessons from the accident especially at the management level. In order to prevent the similar and dissimilar accidents, the inappropriate informational network within the organization, inappropriate operational readiness, lack of proper implementation of work permit, the inappropriate and lack of updated technical information systems regarding equipments and working process, and the inappropriate barriers should be considered in a special way.

  19. Introducing innovation in a management development programme for a UK primary care organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul; Hampson, Libby; Scott, Jonathan; Bower, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the introduction of innovation as part of a management development programme at a primary care organisation, a legal form known as a Primary Care Trust (PCT), in the UK. The paper draws on experience of managing a successful management development programme for a PCT. The report of the case study analyses the key events that took place between 2008 and 2010, from direct observation, surveys, discussion and documentary evidence. The Northern PCT has partnerships with a number of educational providers to deliver their leadership and management development programmes. A close working relationship had developed and the programme is bespoke - hence it is current and of practical use to the UK's National Health Service (NHS). In addition, there are regular meetings, with module leaders gaining a firsthand understanding of the organisation's needs and aspirations. This has resulted in a very focused and personalised offering and a genuine involvement in the programme and individuals concerned. The research was conducted among a relatively small sample, and there is a lack of previous literature evidence to make significant comparisons. The paper identifies key implications for practitioners and educators in this area. This paper is one of few to investigate innovation and improvement in the NHS, and is unique in that it uses the lenses of a management development programme to explore this important, and under-researched, topic.

  20. Radioactive Waste Management In The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone - 25 Years Since The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities of the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, and in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program. The brief overview of the radioactive waste issues in the ChEZ presented in this article demonstrates that management of radioactive waste resulting from a beyond-designbasis accident at a nuclear power plant becomes the most challenging and the costliest effort during the mitigation and remediation activities. The costs of these activities are so high that the provision of radioactive waste final disposal facilities compliant with existing radiation safety requirements becomes an intolerable burden for the current generation of a single country, Ukraine. The nuclear accident at the Fukushima-1 NPP strongly indicates that accidents at nuclear sites may occur in any, even in a most technologically advanced country, and the Chernobyl experience shows that the scope of the radioactive waste management activities associated with the mitigation of such accidents may exceed the capabilities of a single country. Development of a special international program for broad international cooperation in accident related radioactive waste management activities is required to handle these issues. It would also be reasonable to consider establishment of a dedicated international fund for mitigation of accidents at nuclear sites, specifically, for handling radioactive waste problems in the ChEZ. The experience of handling Chernobyl radioactive waste management issues, including large volumes of radioactive soils and complex structures

  1. Malaria control through municipalities in the Philippines: struggling with the mandate of decentralized health programme management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espino, Fe; Beltran, Maylene; Carisma, Brian

    2004-01-01

    This is a study on the management of the decentralized malaria control programme in Maharlika, Lipunan, a municipality in rural Philippines. The theoretical assumption is that the malaria control programme must be viewed as a system and that success of reform in malaria control depends upon the understanding of management issues by municipal officials. Through interviews, and documents and archival reviews, a framework for describing the dynamics of municipal management of the malaria control programme was developed. The overall finding was that the administrative management system was not functioning optimally: (a) planning and budgeting systems are not helpful; (b) malaria data do not inform planning; and (c) local financial resources are not utilized for malaria control. The underlying causes were: the absence of a clear statement from national offices regarding decentralization of health services, and the management processes, as stipulated in the Local Government Code, were not responsive to the needs of the municipality.

  2. Patient level cost of diabetes self-management education programmes: an international evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Gerardine; O'Donnell, Shane; Quigley, Etáin; Cullen, Kate; Gibney, Sarah; Levin-Zamir, Diane; Ganahl, Kristin; Müller, Gabriele; Muller, Ingrid; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Chang, Wushou Peter; Van Den Broucke, Stephan

    2017-06-04

    The objective of this study was to examine the value of time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) in understanding the process and costs of delivering diabetes self-management education (DSME) programmes in a multicountry comparative study. Outpatient settings in five European countries (Austria, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, UK) and two countries outside Europe, Taiwan and Israel. Providers of DSME programmes across participating countries (N=16) including healthcare professionals, administrators and patients taking part in DSME programmes. Primary measure: time spent by providers in the delivery of DSME and resources consumed in order to compute programme costs. Secondary measures: self-report measures of behavioural self-management and diabetes disease/health-related outcomes. We found significant variation in costs and the processes of how DSME programmes are provided across and within countries. Variations in costs were driven by a combination of price variances, mix of personnel skill and efficiency variances. Higher cost programmes were not found to have achieved better relative outcomes. The findings highlight the value of TDABC in calculating a patient level cost and potential of the methodology to identify process improvements in guiding the optimal allocation of scarce resources in diabetes care, in particular for DSME that is often underfunded. This study is the first to measure programme costs using estimates of the actual resources used to educate patients about managing their medical condition and is the first study to map such costs to self-reported behavioural and disease outcomes. The results of this study will inform clinicians, managers and policy makers seeking to enhance the delivery of DSME programmes. The findings highlight the benefits of adopting a TDABC approach to understanding the drivers of the cost of DSME programmes in a multicountry study to reveal opportunities to bend the cost curve for DSME. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  3. A strategy to the development of a human error analysis method for accident management in nuclear power plants using industrial accident dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Kim, Jae Whan; Jung, Won Dae; Ha, Jae Ju

    1998-06-01

    This technical report describes the early progress of he establishment of a human error analysis method as a part of a human reliability analysis(HRA) method for the assessment of the human error potential in a given accident management strategy. At first, we review the shortages and limitations of the existing HRA methods through an example application. In order to enhance the bias to the quantitative aspect of the HRA method, we focused to the qualitative aspect, i.e., human error analysis(HEA), during the proposition of a strategy to the new method. For the establishment of a new HEA method, we discuss the basic theories and approaches to the human error in industry, and propose three basic requirements that should be maintained as pre-requisites for HEA method in practice. Finally, we test IAD(Industrial Accident Dynamics) which has been widely utilized in industrial fields, in order to know whether IAD can be so easily modified and extended to the nuclear power plant applications. We try to apply IAD to the same example case and develop new taxonomy of the performance shaping factors in accident management and their influence matrix, which could enhance the IAD method as an HEA method. (author). 33 refs., 17 tabs., 20 figs.

  4. A strategy to the development of a human error analysis method for accident management in nuclear power plants using industrial accident dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Kim, Jae Whan; Jung, Won Dae; Ha, Jae Ju

    1998-06-01

    This technical report describes the early progress of he establishment of a human error analysis method as a part of a human reliability analysis(HRA) method for the assessment of the human error potential in a given accident management strategy. At first, we review the shortages and limitations of the existing HRA methods through an example application. In order to enhance the bias to the quantitative aspect of the HRA method, we focused to the qualitative aspect, i.e., human error analysis(HEA), during the proposition of a strategy to the new method. For the establishment of a new HEA method, we discuss the basic theories and approaches to the human error in industry, and propose three basic requirements that should be maintained as pre-requisites for HEA method in practice. Finally, we test IAD(Industrial Accident Dynamics) which has been widely utilized in industrial fields, in order to know whether IAD can be so easily modified and extended to the nuclear power plant applications. We try to apply IAD to the same example case and develop new taxonomy of the performance shaping factors in accident management and their influence matrix, which could enhance the IAD method as an HEA method. (author). 33 refs., 17 tabs., 20 figs

  5. The management of musculoskeletal pain and disfunction from traffic accidents polytrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Adriana Farago

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available After complex orthopaedic-surgical treatment of car crash polytrauma, we face multilevel patient problems, from algodisfunctional to psychological consequences, which are very difficult to manage. Aim of the study: identifying the optimal ways to approach cases of polytrauma with major functional and psychological implications. Material and Methods: We present the cases of two female patients, 19 and 18-year-old, victims of major road accidents that required car extrication. The accidents resulted in minor craniocerebral trauma, weight bearing bones and pelvis fractures, musculoskeletal and skin avulsion, and neurogenic bladder with catheterization. They underwent repeated orthopedic-surgical interventions and plastic surgery after which they were referred to functional rehabilitation. In the rehabilitation department we were confronted with anxious, uncooperative patients, with a very high level of somatic pain, incapable of actively mobilizing in the bed plan, one of them, within the limits of physical resources, presenting agitation and night aggressiveness. Results: After the complex clinical evaluation we initiated the rehabilitation treatment. The initial rehabilitation results were minimal because of the pain threshold, high levels of anxiety and fatigue due to insomnia. We asked for psychological evaluation and counseling and we organized 6 short daily exercise sessions, then four longer ones, so as not to exceed the patients' momentary resources. The level of difficulty of the kinetic training was progressively increased, being constantly adapted to the daily training gains of the patients. The aggressive outbursts in one of the patients were related to the dread of darkness and loneliness at night, as a consequence of incarceration from the night road accident. In 4 weeks we gained independence for eating, spontaneous urination, bedside independent mobilization, verticalisation and walking with a frame for short distances. Conclusions

  6. Development of the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) for Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3, 4, 5 and 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeong T.; Yoo, Hojong; Lim, Hyuk Soon; Park, Jong W.; Lim, Woosang; Oh, Seung Jong; Chung, Chang Hyun; Lee, Byung Chul

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development process of the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) for Units 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant. The units are Korean Standard Nuclear Power (KSNP) plant, 1000 MWe class pressurized water reactor (PWR) with two loops of primary coolant system. The severe accident management guidelines for the units have been completed in 2002. The generic severe accident management guidance for Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant has been used as the basis when developing Ulchin severe accident management guideline. Result of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for each unit was reviewed to integrate its insight into the SAMG. It indicates that each unit has a balanced design to any specific initiating events for core damage. Seven severe accident management strategies are applied in Ulchin SAMG. Seven strategies are (1) Inject into the steam generator (2) De-pressurize the RCS (3) Inject into the RCS (4) Inject into the containment (5) Control the fission product release into environment (6) Control the containment pressure and temperature and (7) Control hydrogen concentration in the containment. The range and capability of essential instrument for performing the strategies are assessed. Computational aids are developed to complement the unavailable instrument during the accident and to assist the operator's decision choosing strategies. To examine the ability of the SAMG to fulfill its intended function, small loss of coolant accident (SLOCA) with the failure of safety injection was selected as a reference scenario. The scenario was analyzed using MAAP code. The evaluation of the SAMG using this sequence has been successfully completed. (authors)

  7. Use of an influence diagram and fuzzy probability for evaluating accident management in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Donghan; Okrent, D.; Kastenberg, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper develops a new approach for evaluating severe accident management strategies. At first, this approach considers accident management as a decision problem (i.e., ''applying a strategy'' vs. ''do nothing'') and uses influence diagrams. This approach introduces the concept of a ''fuzzy probability'' in the evaluation of an influence diagram. When fuzzy logic is applied, fuzzy probabilities in an influence diagram can be easily propagated to obtain results. In addition, the results obtained provide not only information similar to the classical approach using point-estimate values, but also additional information regarding the impact from imprecise input data. The proposed methodology is applied to the evaluation of the drywell flooding strategy for a long-term station blackout sequence in the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant. The results show that the drywell flooding strategy seems to be beneficial for preventing reactor vessel breach. It is also effective for reducing the probability of the containment failure for both liner melt-through and late overpressurization. Even though there exists uncertainty in the results, ''flooding'' is preferred to ''do nothing'' when evaluated in terms of expected consequences, i.e., early and late fatalities

  8. Application of a theoretical framework to foster a cardiac-diabetes self-management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C-J Jo; Chang, A M

    2014-09-01

    This paper analyses and illustrates the application of Bandura's self-efficacy construct to an innovative self-management programme for patients with both type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. Using theory as a framework for any health intervention provides a solid and valid foundation for aspects of planning and delivering such an intervention; however, it is reported that many health behaviour intervention programmes are not based upon theory and are consequently limited in their applicability to different populations. The cardiac-diabetes self-management programme has been specifically developed for patients with dual conditions with the strategies for delivering the programme based upon Bandura's self-efficacy theory. This patient group is at greater risk of negative health outcomes than that with a single chronic condition and therefore requires appropriate intervention programmes with solid theoretical foundations that can address the complexity of care required. The cardiac-diabetes self-management programme has been developed incorporating theory, evidence and practical strategies. This paper provides explicit knowledge of the theoretical basis and components of a cardiac-diabetes self-management programme. Such detail enhances the ability to replicate or adopt the intervention in similar or differing populations and/or cultural contexts as it provides in-depth understanding of each element within the intervention. Knowledge of the concepts alone is not sufficient to deliver a successful health programme. Supporting patients to master skills of self-care is essential in order for patients to successfully manage two complex, chronic illnesses. Valuable information has been provided to close the theory-practice gap for more consistent health outcomes, engaging with patients for promoting holistic care within organizational and cultural contexts. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  9. Accident information needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.J.; Arcieri, W.C.; Ward, L.W.

    1992-01-01

    A Five-step methodology has been developed to evaluate information needs for nuclear power plants under accident conditions and the availability of plant instrumentation during severe accidents. Step 1 examines the credible accidents and their relationships to plant safety functions. Step 2 determines the information personnel involved in accident management will need to understand plant behavior. Step 3 determines the capability of the instrumentation to function properly under severe accident conditions. Step 4 determines the conditions expected during the identified severe accidents. Step 5 compares the instrument capabilities and the severe accident conditions to evaluate the availability of the instrumentation to supply needed plant information

  10. Guidelines for integrated risk assessment and management in large industrial areas. Inter-Agency programme on the assessment and management of health and environmental risks from energy and other complex industrial systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The IAEA, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) within the framework of the Awareness and Preparedness for Emergencies at Local Level (APELL), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) decided in 1986 to join forces in order to promote the use of integrated area wide approaches to risk management. An Inter-Agency Programme, which brings together expertise in health the environment, industry and energy, all vital for effective risk management, was established. The Inter-Agency Programme on the assessment and Management of Health and Environmental Risks from Energy and Other Complex Industrial Systems aims at promoting and facilitating the implementation of integrated risk assessment and management for large industrial areas. This initiative includes the compilation of procedures and methods for environmental and public health risk assessment, the transfer of knowledge and experience amongst countries in the application of these procedures and the implementation of an integrated approach to risk management. The purpose of the Inter-Agency Programme is to develop a broad approach to the identification, prioritization and minimization of industrial hazards in a given geographical area. The UN organizations sponsoring this programme have been involved for several years in activities aimed at assessment and management of environmental and health risks, prevention of major accidents and emergency preparedness. These Guidelines have been developed on the basis of experience from these activities to assist in the planning and conduct of regional risk management projects. They provide a reference framework for the undertaking of integrated health and environmental risk assessment for large industrial areas and for the formulation of appropriate risk management strategies

  11. Severe accident management at the Loviisa NPP - Application of integrated ROAAM and PSA level 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siltanen, S.; Routamo, T.; Tuomisto, H.; Lundstrom, P.

    2007-01-01

    The Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM) was developed for assessment and management of rare, high consequence hazards. The purpose of most ROAAM applications has been to solve major, isolated severe accident issues related to early containment failure such as Mark-I Liner Attack and Direct Containment Heating. In addition to ROAAM in the issue resolution context, the so called Integrated ROAAM approach can be used to provide an overall frame of safety evaluation that allows determination of whether an adequate level of safety has been achieved for a plant. Integrated ROAAM approach brings together quantifications of probabilistic elements based on statistical inference and treatment of deterministic elements based on identification of dominant physics, for severe accident phenomenology, in a well defined and clearly structured way. Fortum, as an owner of the Loviisa NPP, used the Integrated ROAAM approach when developing and implementing a comprehensive severe accident management (SAM) strategy for the Loviisa NPP. The SAM strategy is based on unique features of this VVER-440 plant with ice condenser containment and it includes hardware modifications at the plant, substantial new I and C qualified for severe accident conditions, new SAM guidelines, a SAM Handbook, revision of emergency preparedness organization, and versatile training approaches. It could be argued that the resolution of individual severe accident issues is not sufficient for assessing the overall safety of a nuclear power plant, and thus the ROAAM (in an issue resolution context) is not performing the same function as a PSA study (level 2 included). Actually the Integrated ROAAM approach takes on even a more ambitious task than the PSA, since it determines how a balance can be achieved between accident prevention and mitigation of containment-threatening physical phenomena. Thus it provides a tool for implementing a sound diverse defence-in-depth strategy at a plant. Integrated

  12. MANAGEMENT & COMMUNICATION: Programme of Seminars September to December 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. MANAGEMENT & COMMUNICATION Nathalie Dumeaux tel. 78144 management.communication@cern.ch Situation : 13.10.2003 Dates Days Places Available Bilingual seminars Interpersonal Communication (Module 1-CM) 21, 22, 23 October 3 non* Managing a CERN unit - to be a Manager (Module 2) 28, 29 October 2 non Quality Management 10, 11, 12 November 3 oui Managing a CERN unit - to be a Manager (Module 3) 11, 12 November 2 non Risk Management 11, 12 December 2 oui Seminars In English Communicating Effectively (first part) 12, 13 November & 4...

  13. Status of the RODOS system for off-site emergency management after nuclear and radiological accidents and its enhancement under the EURANOS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Under the auspices of its Euratom Research Framework Programmes, the European Commission (EC) has supported the development of the RODOS (Real-time On-line Decision Support) system for off-site emergency management after nuclear accidents for more than a decade. Significant additional funds have been provided by many national RTD programmes, research institutes and industrial collaborators. In particular, the German Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Reactor Safety (BMU) financially contributed to the project with emphasis on early emergency response. As a result of these collaborative actions, a comprehensive decision support system (RODOS) has been developed which can be applied generally within and across Europe. The current version of the system has been, or is being, installed in national emergency centres in several European countries for (pre-operational) use (Germany, Finland, Spain, Portugal, Austria, the Netherlands, Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, Ukraine, Slovenia, and the Czech Republic). Installation is foreseen or under consideration in Switzerland, Greece, Romania, Bulgaria, and Russia within the next few years. RODOS provides coherent support at all stages of an accident (i.e., before, during and after a release), including the long term management and restoration of contaminated areas. The system is able to support decisions about the introduction of a wide range of potentially useful countermeasures (e.g., sheltering and evacuation of people, distribution of iodine tablets, food restrictions, agricultural countermeasures, relocation, decontamination, restoration, etc.) mitigating the consequences of an accident with respect to health, the environment, and the economy. It can be applied to accidental releases into the atmosphere and into various aquatic environments. Appropriate interfaces exist with local and national radiological monitoring data, meteorological measurements and forecasts, and for adaptation to local, regional

  14. Radiation protection management in Fukushima Daiichi NPS and post-accident measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahira, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station was hit by the big earthquake and tsunami, which caused the station black out and subsequent loss of cooling functions for reactor and spent fuel pools (SFPs). Consequently the fuels were damaged, hydrogen explosion blew off top of the reactor buildings and radioactive materials were released to the atmosphere and the ocean. Tsunami and power loss caused many difficulties of monitoring, dose management, and radiation protection of workers. For example, the radiation management system was down and about 5,000 Alarm Pocket Dosimeters (APDs) and their battery chargers could not be used. Due to the insufficient number of APDs, one representative of each working team had a dosimeter under the limited conditions. Through the accident, we got following lessons learned; (1) Reinforcing monitoring posts, (2) Preparing more radiation protection equipment, (3) Establishing emergency access control centre, and (4) Education and training in radiation protection. (author)

  15. Radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of radiation accidents over a 50 year period shows that simple cases, where the initiating events were immediately recognised, the source identified and under control, the medical input confined to current handling, were exceptional. In many cases, the accidents were only diagnosed when some injuries presented by the victims suggested the radiological nature of the cause. After large-scale accidents, the situation becomes more complicated, either because of management or medical problems, or both. The review of selected accidents which resulted in severe consequences shows that most of them could have been avoided; lack of regulations, contempt for rules, human failure and insufficient training have been identified as frequent initiating parameters. In addition, the situation was worsened because of unpreparedness, insufficient planning, unadapted resources, and underestimation of psychosociological aspects. (author)

  16. Management & Communication - Programme of Seminars September to December 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2003-01-01

    Situation : 23.09.2003 Dates Days Available Séminaires bilingues/Bilingual seminars Managing a CERN unit - to be a Manager/ Gérer une unité au CERN - Etre Manager (Module 1) 7, 8, 9, 10 octobre 3 non Communication interpersonnelle/ Interpersonal Communication (Module 1-CM) 21, 22, 23 octobre 3 non Managing a CERN unit - to be a Manager/ Gérer une unité au CERN - Etre Manager (Module 2) 28, 29 octobre 2 non Gestion de la qualité/Quality Management 10, 11, 12 novembre 3 oui Managing a CERN unit - to be a Manager/ Gérer une unité au CERN - Etre Manager (Module 3) 11, 12 novembre 2 non Gestion des risques /Risk Management 11, 12 décembre 2 oui Seminars In English Communicating Effectively (first part) 12, 13 November 4 yes Communicating Effectively (second part) 11, 12 December Communicating effectively in your team 19, 20 November 2 no Performance Appraisal Training MAPS 26, 27, 28 November 3 yes Managing by Project 3, 4 December 3 n...

  17. Public sector's research programme on spent fuel management in Finland supporting the authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.; Rasilainen, K.

    2000-01-01

    A multiphase research program launched in 1989 to support Finnish authorities in their activities concerning spent fuel management is reviewed. The Finnish program for spent fuel management has so far managed to keep its original time schedule at least partly due to clearly defined responsibilities between the nuclear energy producing industry and the authorities. It appears that the public sector's research programme has been successful in its supporting role, because authorities have had good possibilities to adjust the emphasis and volume of the research programme from the very beginning. (author)

  18. Design programmes to maximise participant engagement: a predictive study of programme and participant characteristics associated with engagement in paediatric weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, James; Griffiths, Claire; Pringle, Andy; Gately, Paul

    2016-07-19

    Approximately 50% of paediatric weight management (WM) programme attendees do not complete their respective programmes. High attrition rates compromise both programme effectiveness and cost-efficiency. Past research has examined pre-intervention participant characteristics associated with programme (non-)completion, however study samples are often small and not representative of multiple demographics. Moreover, the association between programme characteristics and participant engagement is not well known. This study examined participant and programme characteristics associated with engagement in a large, government funded, paediatric WM programme. Engagement was defined as the family's level of participation in the WM programme. Secondary data analysis of 2948 participants (Age: 10.44 ± 2.80 years, BMI: 25.99 ± 5.79 kg/m(2), Standardised BMI [BMI SDS]: 2.48 ± 0.87 units, White Ethnicity: 70.52%) was undertaken. Participants attended a MoreLife programme (nationwide WM provider) between 2009 and 2014. Participants were classified into one of five engagement groups: Initiators, Late Dropouts, Low- or High- Sporadic Attenders, or Completers. Five binary multivariable logistic regression models were performed to identify participant (n = 11) and programmatic (n = 6) characteristics associated with an engagement group. Programme completion was classified as ≥70% attendance. Programme characteristics were stronger predictors of programme engagement than participant characteristics; particularly small group size, winter/autumn delivery periods and earlier programme years (proxy for scalability). Conversely, participant characteristics were weak predictors of programme engagement. Predictors varied between engagement groups (e.g. Completers, Initiators, Sporadic Attenders). 47.1% of participants completed the MoreLife programme (mean attendance: 59.4 ± 26.7%, mean BMI SDS change: -0.15 ± 0.22 units), and 21% of those who signed onto the

  19. Evaluating disease management programme effectiveness: an introduction to the regression discontinuity design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ariel; Adams, John L; Roberts, Nancy

    2006-04-01

    Although disease management (DM) has been in existence for over a decade, there is still much uncertainty as to its effectiveness in improving health status and reducing medical cost. The main reason is that most programme evaluations typically follow weak observational study designs that are subject to bias, most notably selection bias and regression to the mean. The regression discontinuity (RD) design may be the best alternative to randomized studies for evaluating DM programme effectiveness. The most crucial element of the RD design is its use of a 'cut-off' score on a pre-test measure to determine assignment to intervention or control. A valuable feature of this technique is that the pre-test measure does not have to be the same as the outcome measure, thus maximizing the programme's ability to use research-based practice guidelines, survey instruments and other tools to identify those individuals in greatest need of the programme intervention. Similarly, the cut-off score can be based on clinical understanding of the disease process, empirically derived, or resource-based. In the RD design, programme effectiveness is determined by a change in the pre-post relationship at the cut-off point. While the RD design is uniquely suitable for DM programme evaluation, its success will depend, in large part, on fundamental changes being made in the way DM programmes identify and assign individuals to the programme intervention.

  20. University Lawyers: A Study of Legal Risk, Risk Management and Role in Work Integrated Learning Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Craig; Klopper, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Work integrated learning (WIL) is in growing demand by multiple stakeholders within the higher education sector in Australia. There are significant and distinct legal risks to universities associated with WIL programmes. University lawyers, along with WIL administrators and university management, are responsible for managing legal risk. This…

  1. Postgraduate Programmes on Environmental Water Resources Engineering and Management in Greek Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latinopoulos, Pericles; Angelidis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    The management of complex water problems is nowadays being practised through new ways and approaches. Therefore, water engineers, planners and managers should be appropriately educated through modern undergraduate curricula and by well-designed postgraduate specialisation programmes. Within this framework, a study of the specific characteristics…

  2. Developing international alumni activities in Mikkeli University of Applied Sciences : Case Business Management degree programme

    OpenAIRE

    Honkaniemi, Meri

    2014-01-01

    My thesis focuses on international alumni activities in Mikkeli University of Applied Sciences. My aim was to find development ideas and recommendations for the international side of the alumni activities. I intended to offer realistic suggestions enough in order to make them work in practice too. I put also my effort on finding recommendations for Business Management programme, because I wanted to make sure that international alumni activities get attention in degree programme level too. ...

  3. Integrated dementia care in The Netherlands: a multiple case study of case management programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkman, Mirella M N; Ligthart, Suzanne A; Huijsman, Robbert

    2009-09-01

    The number of dementia patients is growing, and they require a variety of services, making integrated care essential for the ability to continue living in the community. Many healthcare systems in developed countries are exploring new approaches for delivering health and social care. The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse a new approach in extensive case management programmes concerned with long-term dementia care in The Netherlands. The focus is on the characteristics, and success and failure factors of these programmes.A multiple case study was conducted in eight regional dementia care provider networks in The Netherlands. Based on a literature study, a questionnaire was developed for the responsible managers and case managers of the eight case management programmes. During 16 semistructured face-to-face interviews with both respondent groups, a deeper insight into the dementia care programmes was provided. Project documentation for all the cases was studied. The eight programmes were developed independently to improve the quality and continuity of long-term dementia care. The programmes show overlap in terms of their vision, tasks of case managers, case management process and the participating partners in the local dementia care networks. Differences concern the targeted dementia patient groups as well as the background of the case managers and their position in the local dementia care provider network. Factors for success concern the expert knowledge of case managers, investment in a strong provider network and coherent conditions for effective inter-organizational cooperation to deliver integrated care. When explored, caregiver and patient satisfaction was high. Further research into the effects on client outcomes, service use and costs is recommended in order to further analyse the impact of this approach in long-term care. To facilitate implementation, with a focus on joint responsibilities of the involved care providers, policy

  4. The design of PSB-VVER experiments relevant to accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Nevo, Alessandro; D'auria, Francesco; Mazzini, Marino; Bykov, Michael; Elkin, Ilya V.; Suslov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Experimental programs carried-out in integral test facilities are relevant for validating the best estimate thermal-hydraulic codes, which are used for accident analyses, design of accident management procedures, licensing of nuclear power plants, etc. The validation process, in fact, is based on well designed experiments. It consists in the comparison of the measured and calculated parameters and the determination whether a computer code has an adequate capability in predicting the major phenomena expected to occur in the course of transient and/or accidents. University of Pisa was responsible of the numerical design of the 12 experiments executed in PSB-VVER facility, operated at Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center (Russia), in the framework of the TACIS 2.03/97 Contract 3.03.03 Part A, EC financed. The paper describes the methodology adopted at University of Pisa, starting form the scenarios foreseen in the final test matrix until the execution of the experiments. This process considers three key topics: a) the scaling issue and the simulation, with unavoidable distortions, of the expected performance of the reference nuclear power plants; b) the code assessment process involving the identification of phenomena challenging the code models; c) the features of the concerned integral test facility (scaling limitations, control logics, data acquisition system, instrumentation, etc.). The activities performed in this respect are discussed, and emphasis is also given to the relevance of the thermal losses to the environment. This issue affects particularly the small scaled facilities and has relevance on the scaling approach related to the power and volume of the facility. (author)

  5. Research and managing institutions in Ukraine concerning the radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasvit, O.

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents temporal changes of the national organizations in managing the Chernobyl accident and its activities. The National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine started its activity from the first days after the accident. In 1990 a special executive body, the State committee of Chernobyl Affairs was established in Ukraine to manage the whole activity to overcome the Chernobyl problems. In 1991 it was rearranged into the Ministry of Chernobyl Affairs. In 1996 a new Ministry of Ukraine on Emergences and Affairs of Population Protection from the Consequences of Chernobyl Catastrophe(MEA) was founded on the basis of the Min. Chernobyl and Headquarters Staff of Civil Defence. The National Commission on Radiological Protection of Ukraine (NCRPU) belongs to the Parliament structure. NCRPU is responsible for approval of radiological safety standards and derived regulations. Very often the regulation approved are stricter than the international recommendations. There is an essential lack of attention within the Parliament to the activity of NCRPU. Ministry of Health is responsible for all kinds of medical care for the people suffering from the Chernobyl Catastrophe. In order to provide permanent medical service, a nation-wide scheme has been worked out. Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine is the leading scientific institute of the Academy of Medical Sciences. The State scientific Center of Environmental Radio geochemistry was created in 1996 on the basis of the two departments of the Institute of Geochemistry. The Center was created in order to improve coordination and managing of scientific researches on the behavior of artificial and natural radionuclides and chemical substances in the environment etc.. The Chernobyl Scientific-Technical center for International Research was created in March,1996. The Ukrainian Scientific Hygienic Center of Ministry of Health was created in 1989 and included two institutions. The subjects, the direction of research works

  6. The central role of national programme management for the achievement of malaria elimination: a cross case-study analysis of nine malaria programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Gueye, Cara; Newby, Gretchen; Tulloch, Jim; Slutsker, Laurence; Tanner, Marcel; Gosling, Roland D

    2016-09-22

    A malaria eradication goal has been proposed, at the same time as a new global strategy and implementation framework. Countries are considering the strategies and tools that will enable progress towards malaria goals. The eliminating malaria case-study series reports were reviewed to identify successful programme management components using a cross-case study analytic approach. Nine out of ten case-study reports were included in the analysis (Bhutan, Cape Verde, Malaysia, Mauritius, Namibia, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Turkey, Turkmenistan). A conceptual framework for malaria elimination programme management was developed and data were extracted and synthesized. Findings were reviewed at a consultative workshop, which led to a revision of the framework and further data extraction and synthesis. Success factors of implementation, programme choices and changes, and enabling factors were distilled. Decentralized programmes enhanced engagement in malaria elimination by sub-national units and communities. Integration of the malaria programme into other health services was also common. Decentralization and integration were often challenging due to the skill and experience levels of newly tasked staff. Accountability for programme impact was not clarified for most programmes. Motivation of work force was a key factor in maintaining programme quality but there were few clear, detailed strategies provided. Different incentive schemes targeted various stakeholders. Training and supervision, although not well described, were prioritized by most programmes. Multi-sectoral collaboration helped some programmes share information, build strategies and interventions and achieve a higher quality of implementation. In most cases programme action was spurred by malaria outbreaks or a new elimination goal with strong leadership. Some programmes showed high capacity for flexibility through introduction of new strategies and tools. Several case-studies described methods for monitoring

  7. Managing Errors to Reduce Accidents in High Consequence Networked Information Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganter, J.H.

    1999-02-01

    Computers have always helped to amplify and propagate errors made by people. The emergence of Networked Information Systems (NISs), which allow people and systems to quickly interact worldwide, has made understanding and minimizing human error more critical. This paper applies concepts from system safety to analyze how hazards (from hackers to power disruptions) penetrate NIS defenses (e.g., firewalls and operating systems) to cause accidents. Such events usually result from both active, easily identified failures and more subtle latent conditions that have resided in the system for long periods. Both active failures and latent conditions result from human errors. We classify these into several types (slips, lapses, mistakes, etc.) and provide NIS examples of how they occur. Next we examine error minimization throughout the NIS lifecycle, from design through operation to reengineering. At each stage, steps can be taken to minimize the occurrence and effects of human errors. These include defensive design philosophies, architectural patterns to guide developers, and collaborative design that incorporates operational experiences and surprises into design efforts. We conclude by looking at three aspects of NISs that will cause continuing challenges in error and accident management: immaturity of the industry, limited risk perception, and resource tradeoffs.

  8. Lessons learned from the CEOG generic accident management guidelines confirmation (validation) exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Y.F.; Schneider, R.E.; Greene, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    In July 1995, the CE Owner's Group completed and issued Revision 0 of the Generic Accident Management Guidelines (AMG's) to the owners group task participants. This guidance provides a structured mechanism for the plant staff at CE utilities to respond to accidents that beyond the plant design basis and, possibly, the Emergency Operating Procedures. Prior to final issue of the generic AMGs, the CEOG conducted an AMG Confirmation Exercise to establish the ability of the AMGs to fulfill this important role. The specific objectives of the AMG Confirmation Exercise were to (1) clarify the interactions and transitions between the AMG/Technical Support Center (TSC) and the EOPS/Operations Personnel (2) validate the adequacy of the AMG data collection and plant condition diagnostic evaluation process and (3) assess the feasibility of the mechanical material and recommendations contained in the AMG's. The purpose of paper is to provide a detailed description of the AMG Confirmation Exercise as well as important lessons learned during the planning and implementation of the exercise. In addition, a discussion will be presented pertaining to the relationship between the AMG's (incumbent to the Technical Support Center) and the plants Emergency Operating Procedures (incumbent to the Control Room Operations Staff)

  9. Physical dose reconstruction in case of radiological accidents: an asset for the victims' management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huet, Christelle; Trompier, Francois; Clairand, Isabelle; Bottollier-Depois, Jean-Francois

    2008-01-01

    In most cases of radiological accidents caused by an external source, the irradiation is heterogeneous, even for a whole body irradiation. Therefore, more than a whole body dose, estimating the dose distribution in the victim's organism is essential to assess biological damages. This dose distribution can be obtained by physical dosimetric reconstruction methods. The laboratory has developed several techniques based on experimental and numerical dose reconstruction and retrospective dosimetry by ESR in order to assess as accurately as possible and as quickly as possible the dose received and especially its distribution throughout the organism so that the physicians may fine tune their diagnosis and prescribe the most suitable treatment. These last years, these techniques were applied several times and each time the results obtained proved to be essential for the physicians in charge of the victims in order to define the therapeutic strategy. This article proposes a review of the physical dose reconstructions performed in the laboratory for recent radiological accidents focusing on the complementarity of the methods and the gain for the victims' management. (author)

  10. The Effect of Containment Filtered Venting System on the Severe Accident Management Strategies of the CANDU6 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Youngho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In March, 2011, Fukushima daichi nuclear power plants experienced a long term station blackout and severe core damages and released a large amount of radioactive materials outside of the plants. After this accident Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC) decided to install a filtered containment venting system (CFVS) at all the operating nuclear power plants in Korean. To comply with NSSC's request, Wolsong Unit 1 has installed a CFVS. Current severe accident management guidance, which does not consider a CFVS has 6 severe accident management strategies for CANDU6 plant. These strategies are inject in to the primary heat transport system (PHTS), inject in to the calandria, inject into the calandria vault, reduce fission product releases, control containment conditions, reduce containment hydrogen. The CFVS is designed to open and to close isolation valves by an operator. An operator opens the CFVS isolation valve when the containment pressure exceeds the design pressure (124 kPa(g)) and closes isolation valves when the containment pressure decreases below 50 kPa(g). The operation of the CFVS not only influences the current strategies (adds a means of controlling containment conditions) but also requires the new strategies. This paper discusses the necessity of the new strategies, such as the prevention of containment vacuum and the injection into the containment. The necessity of the additional severe accident management strategies for CANDU6 plants which installed a CFVS is evaluated. The operation of a CFVS affects the water inventory in the basement also, but not significantly. The SBO accident requires the water injection into the containment at least 4 days after an accident initiation if a passive spray system fails. If a spray system operates, then the injection into the containment is required more than 10 days after an accident initiation even though a CFVS operates.

  11. Safety culture and accident analysis-A socio-management approach based on organizational safety social capital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Suman [Risk Analyst (India)]. E-mail: sumanashokrao@yahoo.co.in

    2007-04-11

    One of the biggest challenges for organizations in today's competitive business environment is to create and preserve a self-sustaining safety culture. Typically, Key drivers of safety culture in many organizations are regulation, audits, safety training, various types of employee exhortations to comply with safety norms, etc. However, less evident factors like networking relationships and social trust amongst employees, as also extended networking relationships and social trust of organizations with external stakeholders like government, suppliers, regulators, etc., which constitute the safety social capital in the Organization-seem to also influence the sustenance of organizational safety culture. Can erosion in safety social capital cause deterioration in safety culture and contribute to accidents? If so, how does it contribute? As existing accident analysis models do not provide answers to these questions, CAMSoC (Curtailing Accidents by Managing Social Capital), an accident analysis model, is proposed. As an illustration, five accidents: Bhopal (India), Hyatt Regency (USA), Tenerife (Canary Islands), Westray (Canada) and Exxon Valdez (USA) have been analyzed using CAMSoC. This limited cross-industry analysis provides two key socio-management insights: the biggest source of motivation that causes deviant behavior leading to accidents is 'Faulty Value Systems'. The second biggest source is 'Enforceable Trust'. From a management control perspective, deterioration in safety culture and resultant accidents is more due to the 'action controls' rather than explicit 'cultural controls'. Future research directions to enhance the model's utility through layering are addressed briefly.

  12. Future strategic directions for radioactive waste management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    The NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC) has identified six strategic areas as priorities for work in the coming years. These strategic areas, listed in this paper, are described in a NEA publication (Strategic Areas in Waste Management: the viewpoint and work orientations of the NEA RWMC

  13. Effect of Occupational Health and Safety Management System on Work-Related Accident Rate and Differences of Occupational Health and Safety Management System Awareness between Managers in South Korea's Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok J. Yoon

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Both work-related accident and fatal accident rates were found to be significantly reduced by implementing OHSMS in this study. The differences of OHSMS awareness between site general managers and OHS managers were identified through a survey. The effect of these differences on safety and other benefits warrants further research with proper data collection.

  14. Publicly administrated nuclear waste management research programme 1994-1996. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuori, S. [ed.] [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-09-01

    The main objective of the JYT-programme has been to provide the authorities with independent information and research results relevant for the safety of nuclear waste management. The main emphasis in this research programme has been devoted to the final disposal of spent fuel. The whole area of the research programme has been subdivided into following main topic areas: (1) bedrock structure and stability, rock investigation methods and characteristics and flow of ground water, (2) release of radionuclides from a repository and subsequent transport in the bedrock, (3) performance and safety assessment of repositories and other phases of nuclear waste management, (4) natural analogue studies, (5) waste management technology and costs and (6) socio political and other societal issues and environmental impact assessment.

  15. Publicly administrated nuclear waste management research programme 1994-1996. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1997-09-01

    The main objective of the JYT-programme has been to provide the authorities with independent information and research results relevant for the safety of nuclear waste management. The main emphasis in this research programme has been devoted to the final disposal of spent fuel. The whole area of the research programme has been subdivided into following main topic areas: (1) bedrock structure and stability, rock investigation methods and characteristics and flow of ground water, (2) release of radionuclides from a repository and subsequent transport in the bedrock, (3) performance and safety assessment of repositories and other phases of nuclear waste management, (4) natural analogue studies, (5) waste management technology and costs and (6) socio political and other societal issues and environmental impact assessment

  16. Management & Communication: Programme of Seminars September to December 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2004-01-01

    Situation : 13.07.2004 Bilingual seminars Dates Days Places Available Project Management 13, 14, 15 September 3 oui Introduction to Management 20, 21, 22 September 3 oui Managing by project 28, 29 September 2 oui Project Management Case study 8 October 1 oui Communication Techniques - 1 20, 21, 22 October 3 oui Quality Management 8, 9 November 2 oui Risk Management 6, 7 December 2 oui Seminars in English Communicating effectively 20 September, 1 october + 2, 3 November 4 yes Communicating effectively in your team 14, 15 October 2 yes Séminaires en Français Communiquer efficacement 21, 22 septembre + 12, 13 octobre 4 oui Techniques d'exposé et de présentation 27, 28 septembre + 18 octobre 3 oui Animer ou participer à une réunion de travail 15, 16, 17 novembre 3 oui * If you are interested in a seminar where there are no places available, please fill in an application form and we will contact you as soon as a new session is organised. MANAGEMENT & COMMUNICA...

  17. Utilization technique of 'radiation management manual in medical field (2012).' What should be learnt from the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Toru

    2014-01-01

    From the abstract of contents of the 'Radiation management manual in medical field (2012),' the utilization technique of the manual is introduced. Introduced items are as follows: (1) Exposure management; exposure management for radiation medical workers, patients, and citizens in the medical field, and exposure management for radiation workers and citizens involved in the emergency work related to the Fukushima nuclear accident, (2) Health management; health management for radiation medical workers, (3) Radiation education: Education/training for radiation medical workers, and radiation education for health care workers, (4) Accident and emergency measures; emergency actions involved in the radiation accidents and radiation medicine at medical facilities

  18. Management of remanent lifetime. Short-term benefits of the maintenance evaluation and improvement programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainero Garcia, J.

    1993-01-01

    Remanent Lifetime Management, which is scientifically based on knowing the degradatory phenomena associated with aging, today allows us to optimize plant life through a long-term maintenance strategy combining preventive maintenance and condition monitoring programmes. Within a project for Remanent Lifetime Management (RLM), the determination of methods of control and mitigation of degradations due to aging depends on the programme of Maintenance Evaluation and Improvement (MEI). This programme, underpinned by the analysis of degradatory phenomena to which plant components are subjected, evaluates current maintenance practices and defines the complementary actions which would facilitate establishment of a long-term strategy to control aging. Together with this main objective of the RLM project, the MEI programme achieves short-term benefits since, right from the beginning, it offers solutions to mitigate and guard against degradations in crucial plant components, and generally sets out a programme to control aging. The MEI programme further serves as a tool to reach the final objectives of the new 10CFR50.65 rule, 'Requirements for Maintenance Programs for NPPs'. The MEI always offers the option should the Utility Owner decide to extend plant life. (author)

  19. Contract Management Monitoring And Evaluation Of Ghana School Feeding Programme At Atwima Kwanwoma District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Osei Mensah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ghana School Feeding Programme was introduced at Atwima Kwanwoma District and other parts of the country in 2008 to alleviate hunger and to provide good nutrition for pupils in the public basic schools. Caterers were given contract to provide food to the school pupils on every school-going day under Ghana school feeding programme. Some years have lapsed and there is the need to look back and evaluate this programme taking into consideration the award and management of those contracts. The study also examined how the programme is monitored and evaluated. Data was collected from 80 respondents comprising 29 school pupils and 51 other actors through the use of questionnaire and interview guide It was realised that caterers who are well experience in catering services were awarded contracts based on their past experience and financial abilities through submission of their certificates but not necessarily through bidding. The main component of managing the caterers contract included monitoring payment of debt and problems solving as well as supervision through visiting the schools on quarterly basis. The programme has helped to increase enrolment and retaining pupils in school. It was found out that food giving to the pupils was not served on time not regularly bases and was not sufficient to the pupils as well. The health component of the programme has not been successful as expected. It is recommended that fruits and variety of foods need to be introduced together with de-worming the pupils.

  20. Evaluation of programme for energy management in buildings; Evaluering av program for energiledelse i bygg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Enova SF needed to evaluate the programmes for energy management for greater and smaller building owners. The question was: What has been the impact of the Buildings Network and the energy management programmes for greater and smaller building owners on energy conservation and economic life , and are the programmes operated efficiently? The buildings which participated in the Buildings Network in 1996 - 2002 had an average reduction of the energy consumption of about 7 per cent, which is somewhat less than the supposed potential of 10 per cent. There is some uncertainty in this calculation and the true figure is probably 1 or 2 per cent higher. Whether this energy conservation tendency has continued after Enova took over the responsibility for the programme in 2002 is too early to measure. It is very probable that the public support to the projects has triggered off the saving, that is, there has been few free riders. After 2002, Enova has made the programme more efficient and the cost per building has been halved in the period 2001 - 2003. But some of the original infrastructure of the programme has been discontinued.

  1. Ineffective programme management on the delivery of health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    coordinate[s] and integrate[s] management of cross- functional portfolios of projects and normal operations that bring about strategic transformation, innovative continuous improvement and customer service excellence in organisations, with the ...

  2. Information systems for administration, clinical documentation and quality assurance in an Austrian disease management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Peter; Truskaller, Thomas; Rakovac, Ivo; Bruner, Fritz; Zanettin, Dominik; Pieber, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    5.9% of the Austrian population is affected by diabetes mellitus. Disease Management is a structured treatment approach that is suitable for application to the diabetes mellitus area and often is supported by information technology. This article describes the information systems developed and implemented in the Austrian disease management programme for type 2 diabetes. Several workflows for administration as well as for clinical documentation have been implemented utilizing the Austrian e-Health infrastructure. De-identified clinical data is available for creating feedback reports for providers and programme evaluation.

  3. Management of evacuation in case of fire accidents in chemical industrial areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reniers, G.L.L.; Pauwels, N.; Audenaert, A.; Ale, B.J.M.; Soudan, K.

    2007-01-01

    Trade-offs between economic and safety arguments exist in the operation of chemical installations, should knock-on calamities induced by fire accidents occur: a sudden installation shutdown might result in substantial economic losses, but may be needed to ensure safety. Due to the very rare nature of domino effect risks induced decision problems an adequate evacuation decision aid model to be used by plant safety management does, to the best of the authors' knowledge, not exist. This paper develops a tentative approach to calculate the economic gains and/or losses linked to the decision problem whether or not, and when, to evacuate chemical installation(s) threatened by possible domino effect risks. The proposed model is illustrated by a case-study based on empirical data

  4. Update of severe accident management guidelines at Point Lepreau Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, D.; Robertson, S., E-mail: dmullin@nbpower.com, E-mail: srobertson@nbpower.com [New Brunswick Power Corporation, Point Lepreau Generating Station, NB (Canada); Wilson, D.J., E-mail: wilsondj@nbnet.nb.ca [Atlantic Nuclear Inc., Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    In response to the events at Fukushima Dai'ichi, the CANDU Owners Group (COG) embarked on Joint Project JP4426 to update the overall framework for Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG) to reflect lessons learned. This includes enhancements to consider SAMG in the shutdown/low power state, more extensive consideration of Spent (Irradiated) Fuel Bay (SFB) events and to address plant habitability issues. Point Lepreau is in the process of applying the COG methodologies in developing site-specific basis documents and revisions to SAM guidance documents. The paper will also describe SAMG for the Canister site, emergency procedure revisions to deal with extreme natural events and recommendations for evacuation of protective zones based on plant state criteria. (author)

  5. Information and communication technologies, a tool for risk prevention and accident management on sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Lépy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine ice melting topic is a repetitive phenomenon in alarmist speeches on climate change. The present positive evolution of air temperatures has in all probability many impacts on the environment and more or less directly on societies. Face to the temperature elevation, the ice pack is undergone to an important temporal variability of ice growth and melting. Human populations can be exposed to meteorological and ice hazards engendering a societal risk. The purpose of this paper is to better understand how ICT get integrated into the risk question through the example of the Bay of Bothnia in the northern extremity of the Baltic Sea. The study deals with the way that Finnish society, advanced in the ICT field, faces to new technology use in risk prevention and accident management on sea ice.

  6. Human factors issues in severe accident management: Training for decision-making under stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumaw, R.J.; Roth, E.M.; Schoenfeld, I.

    1994-01-01

    Training for operator and other technical positions in the commercial nuclear power industry traditionally has focused on mastery of the formal procedures used to control plant systems and processes. However, there is a growing awareness that the decision-making tasks required for selecting appropriate control actions, in addition to guidance from formal procedures, also involve cognitive activities commonly referred to as judgment or reasoning. A project was completed to address the nature of the cognitive skills that may be important to decision-making in the nuclear power plant environment, especially during severe accident management. The project identified a model of decision-making that could account for both rule-based and knowledge-based decision-making and used it to identify cognitive skills for both individuals and operational crews. This analysis was then used to identify existing training techniques for cognitive skills and the general characteristics of successful training techniques

  7. Severe Accident Management Guidance for Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (Development Outline)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo-Yong; Jin, Young-Ho; Kim, See-Darl; Song, Yong-Mann

    2006-12-15

    A generic severe accident management guidance (SAMG), which is applicable to Korean Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR), has been developed. This report is the first part of generic SAMG (total 3 parts) for Wolsong plants. The report consists of the development outline of the SAMG: strategies from PSA of Wolsong plants, strategies based on defense in depth, introduce of individual guidance, instrument and information analysis, user's guides, interface with emergency operation procedure and with radiation emergency plan, development of plant specific guidance, overview of Wolsong plant's design, background for set points. The plant specific guidance can be developed by the utility based on a series of these reports.

  8. Designing and implementing a geographical information system: A guide for managers of area-wide pest management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-04-01

    Over the past two decades, the use of computer software and mapping methods known as geographical information systems (GIS) has been adopted by an ever growing variety of professionals. Every activity that deals with location dependent information can use GIS, and agriculture is no exception. The potential of GIS and remote sensing (RS) to facilitate the planning and implementation of areawide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes is enormous but unfortunately, these methods are still much underused. AW-IPM programmes, especially those that integrate the sterile insect technique (SIT) with other surveillance and control methods, would benefit considerably by drawing on GIS/RS. These programmes are often implemented over large areas of even tens of thousands of square kilometres, where surveillance methods are deployed and large data sets are systematically generated on a daily basis. The acquisition of geo-referenced data sets on pest presence/absence, relative abundance, disease prevalence, crop damage, etc., that will allow accurate spatial and temporal analysis is important for proper and timely decision making to efficiently plan and implement any operational pest management programme. Animal health and plant protection officials and pest control programme managers might be intuitively aware of the importance of employing GIS as an analytical tool. However, they often lack a deeper understanding of its capabilities. Since GIS is a desk exercise using computers, data analysis is often left to the computer staff without proper directives from the programme managers on programmatic needs. This is unfortunate as it will usually NOT bring the desired GIS-processed information to the decision makers. This manual targets area-wide pest control programme administrators and managers of FAO and IAEA Member States in an attempt to demonstrate the type of data processing and spatial analysis that can be expected of GIS. The manual does not aim to provide

  9. Interpreting Financial Results. Financial Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Jan; And Others

    One of a series of three self-instructional units, these materials are aimed at helping British hotel and catering managers improve profits and/or reduce costs in their areas of responsibility. Following an introduction and a paragraph on how to use the unit, section 1 covers how to use management information. The section includes these trainee…

  10. Accident management following loss-of-coolant accidents during cooldown in a Westinghouse two-loop PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haste, T.J.; Birchley, J.; Richner, M.

    2010-01-01

    Operation of pressurised water reactors involves shutdown periods for refuelling and maintenance. In preparation for this, the reactor system is cooled down, depressurised and partially drained. Although reactor coolant pressure is lower than during full-power operation, there remains the possibility of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), with a certain but low probability. While the decay heat to be removed is lower than that from a LOCA at full power, the reduced availability of safety systems implies a risk of failing to maintain core cooling, and hence of core damage. This is recognised though probabilistic safety analyses (PSA), which identify low but non-negligible contributions to core damage frequency from accidents during cooldown and shutdown. Analyses are made for a typical two-loop Westinghouse PWR of the consequences of a range of LOCAs during hot and intermediate shutdown, 4 and 5 h after reactor shutdown respectively. The accumulators are isolated, while power to some of the pumped safety injection systems (SIs) is racked out. The study assesses the effectiveness of the nominally assumed SIs in restoring coolant inventory and preventing core damage, and the margin against core damage where their actuation is delayed. The calculations use the engineering-level MELCOR1.8.5 code, supplemented by the SCDAPSIM and SCDAP/RELAP5 codes, which provide a more detailed treatment of coolant system thermal hydraulics and core behaviour. Both treatments show that the core is readily quenched, without damage, by the nominal SI which assumes operation of only one pump. Margins against additional scenario and model uncertainties are assessed by assuming a delay of 900 s (the time needed to actuate the remaining pumps) and a variety of assumptions regarding models and the number of pumps available in conjunction with both MELCOR and versions of SCDAP. Overall, the study provides confidence in the inherent robustness of the plant design with respect to LOCA during

  11. A first assessment of the psychic and social effects of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heriard Dubreuil, G.

    1994-01-01

    A synthesis has been made of a series of surveys carried out in Ukraine in 1992 and 1993 on the psychic and social consequences of the Chernobyl accident, within the framework of the ''Evaluation programme of the consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear accident'' of the Commission of the European communities. The main results demonstrate the strength of the post-accident dynamics of the accident, more than 7 years later. Some 3 millions people were directly affected in their everyday life by the post-accident management which resulted in many perverse effects on the social and psychic levels. Economically, each year, financing of the post-accident management system requires nearly 1/6 of the Ukraine budget. Politically speaking, Chernobyl is still a major stake for the various actors of the institutional transition process underway since the disappearance of the soviet system. The article shows the systemic complexity of the local situation and the many explanatory factors (physical, sanitary, political, cultural, historical) at the origin of the post-accident dynamics. A systemic modelling of the interactions between these factors is presented. It makes it possible to better define the contributions of both accident and post-accident stages to the process that has led to the present situation. It shows out the close connections between the different accident stages and the need, from the very beginning of an accident, to take into account the mid-and long-term consequences arising from the accident management. (author). 11 refs., 3 figs

  12. Best Practices in the Management of an Operating Experience Programme at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-08-01

    The IAEA Fundamental Safety Principles (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1) state the need for operating organizations to establish a programme for the feedback and analysis of operating experience in nuclear power plants. Such a programme ensures that operating experience is analysed, events important to safety are reviewed in depth, lessons learned are disseminated to the staff of the organization and to the relevant national and international organizations and corrective actions are effectively implemented. In IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) and Peer Review of the effectiveness of the Operational Safety Performance Experience Review (PROSPER) missions, weaknesses in the management of operating experience (OE) programmes have been identified as one of the root causes of the recurrence of events. This publication has been developed to provide advice and assistance to nuclear installation managers and related institutions, including contractors and support organizations, to strengthen and enhance the management of their OE processes. In this publication, a number of barriers to the successful management of an OE programme have been identified. Managers are encouraged to review and evaluate these barriers with a view to identifying and eliminating them within their own organizations

  13. Management & Communication: Programme of Seminars January to March 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an "application for training" form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. MANAGEMENT & COMMUNICATION Nathalie Dumeaux tel. 78144 management.communication@cern.ch Situation : 20.01.2004 DatesDaysPlaces Available** Bilingual seminars Communication Techniques-1/Techniques de communication-1 16, 17, 18 March 3 non Project Management/Gestion de projet 17, 18, 19 March 3 oui Seminars in English Communicating effectively 22, 23 January & 19, 20 February 4 yes Performance Appraisal MAPS 4, 5, 6 February 3 yes Performance Appraisal -MAPS 11, 12, 13 February 3 yes Séminaires en Français Formation à l'entreti...

  14. Management & communication: Programme of Seminars October to December 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Situation : 11.10.2004 Bilingual seminar Dates Days Places available Communication Techniques - 1 20, 21, 22 October 3 oui Quality Management 8, 9 November 2 oui Risk Management 6, 7 December 2 oui Project Management - Case Study 22 November 1 oui Seminars in English Communicating effectively in your team 14, 15 October 2 yes Performance Appraisal - MAPS 24, 25, 26 November 3 yes Performance Appraisal - MAPS 8, 9, 10 December 3 yes Séminaires en Français Appréciation des performances - MAPS 1, 2, 3 d&eacut...

  15. Quality assurance in military medical research and medical radiation accident management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotz, Mark E; Meineke, Viktor

    2012-08-01

    The provision of quality radiation-related medical diagnostic and therapeutic treatments cannot occur without the presence of robust quality assurance and standardization programs. Medical laboratory services are essential in patient treatment and must be able to meet the needs of all patients and the clinical personnel responsible for the medical care of these patients. Clinical personnel involved in patient care must embody the quality assurance process in daily work to ensure program sustainability. In conformance with the German Federal Government's concept for modern departmental research, the international standard ISO 9001, one of the relevant standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), is applied in quality assurance in military medical research. By its holistic approach, this internationally accepted standard provides an excellent basis for establishing a modern quality management system in line with international standards. Furthermore, this standard can serve as a sound basis for the further development of an already established quality management system when additional standards shall apply, as for instance in reference laboratories or medical laboratories. Besides quality assurance, a military medical facility must manage additional risk events in the context of early recognition/detection of health risks of military personnel on deployment in order to be able to take appropriate preventive and protective measures; for instance, with medical radiation accident management. The international standard ISO 31000:2009 can serve as a guideline for establishing risk management. Clear organizational structures and defined work processes are required when individual laboratory units seek accreditation according to specific laboratory standards. Furthermore, international efforts to develop health laboratory standards must be reinforced that support sustainable quality assurance, as in the exchange and comparison of test results within

  16. How to effectively manage crisis situation in the early phase of a radiological accident?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borysiewicz, M.; Potempski, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In the early phase of accident reasonable decisions should be undertaken in a short time, where often there is still an uncertainty in assessment of radiological situation. The following key factors are of important meaning in a process of working out an optimized decision: (a) accurate information on accident, (b) proper assessment of current status and prognosis of development of radiological situation, (c) proper information on availability of means needed for emergency action like rescue teams, technical and medical equipment, means of transport etc., (d) reliable and fast communication system between decision makers, persons responsible for management of crisis situation, rescue teams and people in affected areas. All these elements can be supported by more or less computerized systems. The first two (a) and (b), depend, in general, on radiological monitoring and decision support systems, using pre-defined scenarios and sometimes sophisticated methods for assessment of radiological situation. The element (c) is very often supported by GIS-like systems available at crisis centres. The last issue however is, to much extent, a question of proper organization of decision making process and management during emergency action. lt seems also that often there are some kind of gaps between items (a)e) and (c)/(d) or maybe particularly between (d) and other factors mentioned above. Hence, there is still a need for more integrated approach. lt should be also mentioned that the last element (d) is usually the weakest point in the whole system. This is often caused by not clear organization and division of responsibilities between persons engaged in the decision making process and management. The problem of communication has also some technical aspects. This can be solved by using more advanced techniques like satellite technologies and centralized computer communication systems of new generation, which allows for fast and reliable sending and receiving messages

  17. Lessons learned from post-accident management at Chernobyl: the P.a.r.e.x. project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heriard Dubreuil, G.; Lochard, J.; Bataille, C.; Ollagnon, H.; Baude, St.

    2008-01-01

    Return of experience on Chernobyl post-accident management: the PAREX study Belarus is the country the most affected by the Chernobyl fallouts and is among the most significant experiences in the nuclear post-accident field. Despite specificities inherent to the political and social situation in Belarus, the experience of post-accidental management in this country holds a wealth of lessons in the perspective of preparation to a post-accidental situation in the French and European context. Through the PAREX project (2005-2006), the French Nuclear Safety Authority analysed the return of experience of Chernobyl post-accident management from 1986 to 2005 in order to draw its lessons in the perspective of a preparation policy. The study was led by a group of experts and involved the participation of a pluralistic group of about thirty participants (public authorities, local governments, NGOs, experts, operators). PAREX highlighted the complexity of a situation of long-lasting radioactive contamination (diversity of stakeholders and of dimensions at stake: health, environment, economy, society...). Beyond traditional public crisis management tools and frameworks, post-accident strategies also involves in the longer term a territorial and social response, which relies on local capacities of initiative. Preparation to such process requires experimenting new modes of operation that allow a diversity of local actors to take part to the response to a situation of contamination and to the surveillance system, with the support of public authorities. The conclusions of PAREX include a set of recommendations in this perspective. (authors)

  18. Development of a taxonomy of performance influencing factors for human reliability assessment of accident management tasks and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Whan; Jung, Won Dae; Kang, Dae Il; Ha, Jae Joo

    1999-06-01

    In this study, a new PIF taxonomy for HRA of the tasks during emergency operation and accident management situations. We collected the existing PIF taxonomies as many as possible. Then, we analyzed the trend in the selection of PIFs, the frequency of use between PIFs in HRA methods, and the level of definition of PIFs, in order to reflect these characteristics into the development of a new PIF taxonomy. Next, we analyzed the principal task context during accident management to draw the context specific PIFs. Afterwards, we established several criteria for the selection of the appropriate PIFs for HRA under emergency operation and accident management situations. Finally, the final PIF taxonomy containing the subitems for assessing each PIF was constructed based on the results of the previous steps and the selection criteria. The final result ofthis study is the new PIF taxonomy for HRA of the tasks during emergency operation and accident management situations. The selected 11 PIFs in the study are as follows: training and experience, availability and quality of information, status and trend of critical parameters, status of safety system/component, time pressure, working environment features, team cooperation and communication, plant policy and safety culture. (author). 35 refs., 23 tabs.

  19. Development of a taxonomy of performance influencing factors for human reliability assessment of accident management tasks and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Whan; Jung, Won Dae; Kang, Dae Il; Ha, Jae Joo

    1999-06-01

    In this study, a new PIF taxonomy for HRA of the tasks during emergency operation and accident management situations. We collected the existing PIF taxonomies as many as possible. Then, we analyzed the trend in the selection of PIFs, the frequency of use between PIFs in HRA methods, and the level of definition of PIFs, in order to reflect these characteristics into the development of a new PIF taxonomy. Next, we analyzed the principal task context during accident management to draw the context specific PIFs. Afterwards, we established several criteria for the selection of the appropriate PIFs for HRA under emergency operation and accident management situations. Finally, the final PIF taxonomy containing the subitems for assessing each PIF was constructed based on the results of the previous steps and the selection criteria. The final result of this study is the new PIF taxonomy for HRA of the tasks during emergency operation and accident management situations. The selected 11 PIFs in the study are as follows: training and experience, availability and quality of information, status and trend of critical parameters, status of safety system/component, time pressure, working environment features, team cooperation and communication, plant policy and safety culture. (author). 35 refs., 23 tabs

  20. A Necessary Evil: The Experiences of Managers Implementing Downsizing Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Ernesto; D'Cruz, Premilla

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a phenomenological study, which describes the experiences of human resource (HR) managers implementing a downsizing program in a steel manufacturing organization in India. Data were collected through conversational interviews. Following van Manens sententious analytic approach, the core theme of a necessary…

  1. Management of the MCH/FP programme in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzur-e-mowla, Q

    1989-12-01

    During the span of 3 5-year plans in Bangladesh, the emphasis of its population program has shifted from a population control program to a population welfare program to a maternal and child health-based family planning program. Certain lessons may be learned from the management situation now in operation in the field in Bangladesh. A way must be found out of the situation in which the personnel are placed under the control of one authority but are responsible, for technical supervision and guidance, to another. If effective functional integration between health and family planning remains elusive, existing management mechanisms should at least promote team work and prepare the ground for future integration. Existing conflicts in the line of supervision and accountability must be done away with by bringing about necessary changes in management. Since non-governmental organizations could perform an increasingly greater and more significant role in the program, an effective coordination mechanism between them and government should be developed. The management of the information, education, and communication program should be organized on a new and more imaginative basis to respond to rapidly changing circumstances.

  2. Managing Language Diversity and Second Language Programmes in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyne, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the status of community languages and school language programs in Australia, amid changing public policy, makes suggestions for managing linguistic diversity, and considers what happens when a community language becomes a desired commodity for the whole population. Considers historical context for development of pluralistic policies in…

  3. Mitigation of Hydrogen Hazards in Severe Accidents in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-07-01

    Consideration of severe accidents in nuclear power plants is an essential component of the defence in depth approach in nuclear safety. Severe accidents have very low probabilities of occurring, but may have significant consequences resulting from the degradation of nuclear fuel. The generation of hydrogen and the risk of hydrogen combustion, as well as other phenomena leading to overpressurization of the reactor containment in case of severe accidents, represent complex safety issues in relation to accident management. The combustion of hydrogen, produced primarily as a result of heated zirconium metal reacting with steam, can create short term overpressure or detonation forces that may exceed the strength of the containment structure. An understanding of these phenomena is crucial for planning and implementing effective accident management measures. Analysis of all the issues relating to hydrogen risk is an important step for any measure that is aimed at the prevention or mitigation of hydrogen combustion in reactor containments. The main objective of this publication is to contribute to the implementation of IAEA Safety Standards, in particular, two IAEA Safety Requirements: Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. These Requirements publications discuss computational analysis of severe accidents and accident management programmes in nuclear power plants. Specifically with regard to the risk posed by hydrogen in nuclear power reactors, computational analysis of severe accidents considers hydrogen sources, hydrogen distribution, hydrogen combustion and control and mitigation measures for hydrogen, while accident management programmes are aimed at mitigating hydrogen hazards in reactor containments.

  4. An Innovative Supply Chain Management Programme Structure: Broadening the SCM Skill Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okongwu, Uche

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a matrix structure for training Supply Chain Management (SCM) professionals. It is an innovative programme structure that combines two approaches: cross-border and inter-organisational. It enables the students to comprehend complex and specific business environments and to understand the diverse nature of SCM systems in both…

  5. Why do managers allocate resources to workplace health promotion programmes in countries with national health coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Angela M; Sharp, David J

    2007-06-01

    There is extensive evidence that worksite health promotion (WHP) programmes reduce healthcare costs and improve employee productivity. In many countries, a large proportion of healthcare costs are borne by the state. While the full benefits of WHP are still created, they are shared between employers and the state, even though the employer bears the full (after-tax) cost. Employers therefore have a lower incentive to implement WHP activity. We know little about the beliefs of managers with decision responsibility for the approval and implementation of WHP programmes in this context. This article reports the results of a study of the attitudes of Canadian senior general managers (GMs) and human resource managers (HRMs) in the auto parts industry in Ontario, Canada towards the consequences of increasing discretionary spending on WHP, using Structural Equation Modelling and the Theory of Planned Behaviour. We identified factors that explain managers' intentions to increase discretionary spending on wellness programmes. While both senior GMs and HRMs are motivated primarily by their beliefs that WHP reduces indirect costs of health failure, GMs were also motivated by their moral responsibility towards employees (but surprisingly HRMs were not). Importantly, HRMs, who usually have responsibility for WHP, felt constrained by a lack of power to commit resources. Most importantly, we found no social expectation that organizations should provide WHP programmes. This has important implications in an environment where the adoption of WHP is very limited and cost containment within the healthcare system is paramount.

  6. Chinese Postgraduate Choices When Considering a UK Business and Management Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, Yihan; Swift, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This research investigated Chinese students' decision making processes for enrolling on a postgraduate taught business and management programme in a UK university, based on structured interviews, followed by a survey of just over 450 respondents. The validity and reliability of the research instrument were assessed prior to issuing the survey.…

  7. Monitoring and Evaluation of an Early Childhood Development Programme: Implications for Leadership and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Sarah; Papatheodorou, Theodora; James, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The article aims to discuss preliminary findings from a participatory monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework, used in a community-based early childhood development (ECD) programme in KwaZulu-Natal South Africa, and their implications for leadership and management. The purposes of the M&E were for LETCEE, the implementing organization,…

  8. The changing student profile at Service, Hospitality and Tourism Management Programme in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøy, Anna

    2014-01-01

    of a short-cycle higher education programme in Hospitality and Tourist management in Denmark. The findings indicate that the international students (originating from countries of East Central Europe and the Baltics) demonstrate more passive classroom behaviour and experience more challenges in implementing...

  9. Enhanced safety features of CHASHMA NPP UNIT-2 to encounter selected severe accidents, various challenges involved to prove the adequacy of severe accidents prevention/mitigation measures and to write management guidelines with one possible solution to these challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Z.; Minhaj, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes enhanced safety features of Chashma Nuclear Power Plant Unit-2 (C-2), a 325 MWe PWR to encounter selected severe accidents and discusses various challenges involved to prove the adequacy of severe accidents encountering measures and to write severe accident management guidelines (SAMGs) in compliance with the recently introduced national regulations based on the new IAEA nuclear safety standards. C-2 is being built by China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) for Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). Its twin, Unit-1 (C-1) also a 325 MWe PWR, was commissioned in 2000. Nuclear power safety with reference to severe accidents should be treated as a global issue and therefore the developed countries should include the people of developing countries in nuclear power industry's various severe accidents based research and development programs. The implementation of this idea may also deliver few other useful and mutually beneficial byproducts. (author)

  10. Radioactive waste management in the Chernobyl exclusion zone: 25 years since the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskolkov, Boris Y; Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Zinkevich, Lubov I; Proskura, Nikolai I; Farfán, Eduardo B; Jannik, G Timothy

    2011-10-01

    Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities in the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste-related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and, in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program.

  11. RD and D-Programme 2004. Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste, including social science research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    SKB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co), which is owned by the companies that operate the Swedish nuclear power plants, has been assigned the task of managing and disposing of the spent nuclear fuel from the reactors. The Nuclear Activities Act requires a programme of comprehensive research and development and other measures that are needed to manage and dispose of nuclear waste in a safe manner and to decommission and dismantle the nuclear power plants. SKB is now presenting RD and D-Programme 2004 in fulfilment of this requirement. The programme describes SKB's plans for the period 2005-2010. The period of immediate concern is 2005-2007. The level of detail for the three subsequent years is naturally lower.The programme provides a basis for designing systems for safe management and disposal of the radioactive waste from the nuclear power plants. SKB's plan is to implement deep disposal of the spent fuel in accordance with the KBS-3 method. In the RD and D-Programme we describe our activities and planning for this line of action and the work that is being conducted on alternative methods. Review of the programme can contribute valuable outside viewpoints. The regulatory authorities and the Government can clarify how they look upon different parts of the programme and stipulate guidelines for the future. Municipalities and other stakeholders can, after studying the programme, offer their viewpoints to SKB, the regulatory authorities or the Government.The goal for the period up to the end of 2008 is to be able to submit permit applications for the encapsulation plant and the deep repository. This RD and D-Programme therefore differs from the preceding ones in that it concentrates on questions relating to technology development for these facilities. The programmes for safety assessment and research on the long-term processes that take place in the deep repository are then linked together with the programmes for technology development. Another new

  12. RD and D-Programme 2004. Programme for research, development and demonstration of methods for the management and disposal of nuclear waste, including social science research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-09-01

    SKB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co), which is owned by the companies that operate the Swedish nuclear power plants, has been assigned the task of managing and disposing of the spent nuclear fuel from the reactors. The Nuclear Activities Act requires a programme of comprehensive research and development and other measures that are needed to manage and dispose of nuclear waste in a safe manner and to decommission and dismantle the nuclear power plants. SKB is now presenting RD and D-Programme 2004 in fulfilment of this requirement. The programme describes SKB's plans for the period 2005-2010. The period of immediate concern is 2005-2007. The level of detail for the three subsequent years is naturally lower.The programme provides a basis for designing systems for safe management and disposal of the radioactive waste from the nuclear power plants. SKB's plan is to implement deep disposal of the spent fuel in accordance with the KBS-3 method. In the RD and D-Programme we describe our activities and planning for this line of action and the work that is being conducted on alternative methods. Review of the programme can contribute valuable outside viewpoints. The regulatory authorities and the Government can clarify how they look upon different parts of the programme and stipulate guidelines for the future. Municipalities and other stakeholders can, after studying the programme, offer their viewpoints to SKB, the regulatory authorities or the Government.The goal for the period up to the end of 2008 is to be able to submit permit applications for the encapsulation plant and the deep repository. This RD and D-Programme therefore differs from the preceding ones in that it concentrates on questions relating to technology development for these facilities. The programmes for safety assessment and research on the long-term processes that take place in the deep repository are then linked together with the programmes for technology development. Another

  13. Applying hierarchical loglinear models to nonfatal underground coal mine accidents for safety management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onder, Mustafa; Onder, Seyhan; Adiguzel, Erhan

    2014-01-01

    Underground mining is considered to be one of the most dangerous industries and mining remains the most hazardous occupation. Categorical analysis of accident records may present valuable information for preventing accidents. In this study, hierarchical loglinear analysis was applied to occupational injuries that occurred in an underground coal mine. The main factors affecting the accidents were defined as occupation, area, reason, accident time and part of body affected. By considering subfactors of the main factors, multiway contingency tables were prepared and, thus, the probabilities that might affect nonfatal injuries were investigated. At the end of the study, important accident risk factors and job groups with a high probability of being exposed to those risk factors were determined. This article presents important information on decreasing the number accidents in underground coal mines.

  14. Technical, environmental and regulatory aspects of waste management and their reflection in the IAEA programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, D.K.

    1982-01-01

    Within the IAEA training course on waste management this paper is intended to overview technological, radiological, encironmental, regulatory and institutional aspects of importance in establishing a waste management policy for nuclear power programmes; the objectives and results of IAEA activities in this field; and some current issues from a national and international perspective with special consideration on the needs of countries embarking on nuclear power. (orig./RW)

  15. Influence of occupational safety management on the incidence rate of occupational accidents in the Spanish industrial and ornamental stone mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmiquel, Lluís; Rossell, Josep M; Vintró, Carla; Freijo, Modesto

    2014-01-01

    Mines are hazardous and workers can suffer many types of accidents caused by fire, flood, explosion or collapse. Injury incidence rates in mining are considerably higher than those registered by other economic sectors. One of the main reasons for this high-level incidence rate is the existence of a large number of dangerous workplaces. This work analyzes the influence that occupational safety management had on the accidents that took place in Spanish mining of industrial and ornamental stone during the period 2007-2008. Primary data sources are: (a) Results from a statistical study of the occupational health and safety management practices of 71 quarries defined by a questionnaire of 41 items; and (b) Occupational accidents registered in the Spanish industrial and ornamental stone mining throughout the period 2007-2008. The obtained results indicate that workplaces with a low average score in the analysis of occupational safety management have a higher incidence rate of accidents. Studies on mining workplaces are very important to help detect occupational safety concerns. Results from this study help raise awareness and will encourage the adoption of appropriate measures to improve safety.

  16. Making Financial Decisions. Financial Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Jan; And Others

    One of a series of three self-instructional units, these materials are aimed at helping British hotel and catering managers improve profits and/or reduce costs in their areas of responsibility. Following a paragraph on how to use the unit and an introduction, section 1 covers control levels as the framework for making decisions. The section…

  17. Staff Retention. Personnel Management Module. Operational Management Programme. Increasing Opportunities for Supervisors and Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jennifer

    This self-instructional unit for supervisors and managers in the British hotel and catering industry is based on the view that problems in staff recruitment and retention are directly linked to the level of job satisfaction. The document begins with an introduction and advice on how to use the unit. Five sections cover the following topics: (1)…

  18. Using intervention mapping (IM) to develop a self-management programme for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detaille, S.I.; Gulden, J.W.J. van der; Engels, J.A.; Heerkens, Y.H.; Dijk, F.J. van

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management programme (CDSMP) of Stanford University to help employees with a

  19. A qualitative evaluation of a comprehensive self-management programme for COPD patients: effectiveness from the patients' perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monninkhof, E.M.; Aa, M. van der; Valk, P.D.L.P.M. van der; Palen, J.A.M. van der; Zielhuis, G.A.; Koning, K.; Pieterse, M.

    2004-01-01

    The COPE self-management programme, including a self-management education course, self-treatment of exacerbations and a fitness programme, appeared to have no significant effect on health related quality of life (HRQoL) as measured by the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). This is in

  20. A Qualitative Evaluation of a Comprehensive Self-management Programme for COPD Patients: Effectiveness form the Patients' Perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monninkhof, Evelyn; van der Aa, Maaike; van der Valk, Paul; van der Palen, J.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Zielhuis, Gerhard; Koning, K.H.; Pieterse, Marcel E.

    2004-01-01

    The COPE self-management programme, including a self-management education course, self-treatment of exacerbations and a fitness programme, appeared to have no significant effect on health related quality of life (HRQoL) as measured by the St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). This is in

  1. Public relations and political support in area-wide integrated pest management programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, V.A.; Regidor Fernandez, E.E.; Reyes Flores, J.; Teruya, T.; Barnes, B.; Gomez Riera, P.; Lindquist, D.; Reuben, R.

    2005-01-01

    The public relations component of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique (SIT) has a large impact on programme success. Full-time professionals should direct public relations activities and secure vital political support from governments and community organizations. Good communication among programme staff, and between programme staff and the public, is required to maintain participation and support, and to keep the work goal-oriented even when some programme activities are controversial. The media can be valuable and effective partners by informing the public about the real facts and activities of a programme, especially if this is done in a non-technical and straightforward way. Ongoing research support improves the programme technology, provides technical credibility on contentious issues, and solves operational problems. Programme failure can result from poor public relations and inadequate public support. (author)

  2. Towards Developing an Initial Programme Theory: Programme Designers and Managers Assumptions on the Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Club Programme in Primary Health Care Facilities in the Metropolitan Area of Western Cape Province, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukumbang, Ferdinand C.; van Belle, Sara; Marchal, Bruno; van Wyk, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background The antiretroviral adherence club intervention was rolled out in primary health care facilities in the Western Cape province of South Africa to relieve clinic congestion, and improve retention in care, and treatment adherence in the face of growing patient loads. We adopted the realist evaluation approach to evaluate what aspects of antiretroviral club intervention works, for what sections of the patient population, and under which community and health systems contexts, to inform guidelines for scaling up of the intervention. In this article, we report on a step towards the development of a programme theory—the assumptions of programme designers and health service managers with regard to how and why the adherence club intervention is expected to achieve its goals and perceptions on how it has done so (or not). Methods We adopted an exploratory qualitative research design. We conducted a document review of 12 documents on the design and implementation of the adherence club intervention, and key informant interviews with 12 purposively selected programme designers and managers. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes attributed to the programme actors, context, mechanisms, and outcomes. Using the context-mechanism-outcome configurational tool, we provided an explanatory focus of how the adherence club intervention is roll-out and works guided by the realist perspective. Results We classified the assumptions of the adherence club designers and managers into the rollout, implementation, and utilisation of the adherence club programme, constructed around the providers, management/operational staff, and patients, respectively. Two rival theories were identified at the patient-perspective level. We used these perspectives to develop an initial programme theory of the adherence club intervention, which will be tested in a later phase. Conclusion The perspectives of the programme designers and managers provided an important step towards developing

  3. Towards Developing an Initial Programme Theory: Programme Designers and Managers Assumptions on the Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Club Programme in Primary Health Care Facilities in the Metropolitan Area of Western Cape Province, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand C Mukumbang

    Full Text Available The antiretroviral adherence club intervention was rolled out in primary health care facilities in the Western Cape province of South Africa to relieve clinic congestion, and improve retention in care, and treatment adherence in the face of growing patient loads. We adopted the realist evaluation approach to evaluate what aspects of antiretroviral club intervention works, for what sections of the patient population, and under which community and health systems contexts, to inform guidelines for scaling up of the intervention. In this article, we report on a step towards the development of a programme theory-the assumptions of programme designers and health service managers with regard to how and why the adherence club intervention is expected to achieve its goals and perceptions on how it has done so (or not.We adopted an exploratory qualitative research design. We conducted a document review of 12 documents on the design and implementation of the adherence club intervention, and key informant interviews with 12 purposively selected programme designers and managers. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes attributed to the programme actors, context, mechanisms, and outcomes. Using the context-mechanism-outcome configurational tool, we provided an explanatory focus of how the adherence club intervention is roll-out and works guided by the realist perspective.We classified the assumptions of the adherence club designers and managers into the rollout, implementation, and utilisation of the adherence club programme, constructed around the providers, management/operational staff, and patients, respectively. Two rival theories were identified at the patient-perspective level. We used these perspectives to develop an initial programme theory of the adherence club intervention, which will be tested in a later phase.The perspectives of the programme designers and managers provided an important step towards developing an initial programme

  4. Organizing irresponsibility? The (inter)national management of a nuclear accident damages as discursive regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topcu, Sezin

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the historical process related to the international organization of responsibilities and the management of the damages in case of a nuclear disaster. The author shows that the political and legal settings on which the discourse of an 'international regime of civil responsibility' (that emerged in the 1960's) relies, have globally aimed at maintaining a 'historical and spectacular gap' between the damages the nuclear operators are taking responsibility for, and the real and extensive damages engendered by a major accident. She argues that the existence of such a 'gap' is inherent to the nuclear sector, that it is a form of government (both of economic affairs and of the public space) which was historically constructed, and that the existence of such a gap is crucial for the survival of the nuclear industry itself. Thus the notion of 'responsibility' in the nuclear sector appears to serve mainly as a discursive regime, as a means to organize not only responsibilities but also irresponsibilities, whatever the geographic scale (national or international) at which they should be managed

  5. Stakeholder involvement in the management of rural areas following a nuclear accident: the farming network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer, J.; Nisbet, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    The importance of the participation of stakeholders in the formulation of strategies for maintaining agricultural production and food safety following a nuclear accident, has been successfully demonstrated by the Agriculture and Food Countermeasures Working Group (AFCWG). This group was set up in the UK by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) and the then Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in 1997 (Nisbet and Mondon, 2001). Before this time stakeholder organisations had not collectively considered the implications of contamination of the foodchain in the event of an accidental release of radioactivity. With funding from the European Commission (EC) the UK approach to stakeholder engagement is being taken forward on a European basis during the period 2000-2004 through a project given the acronym FARMING (Food and Agriculture Restoration Management Involving Networked Groups). The overall objective of this project is to create a network of stakeholder working groups in 5 member states (UK, Belgium, Finland, France and Greece) to assist in the development of robust and practicable strategies for restoring and managing contaminated agricultural land and food products in a sustainable way. The initial intention was to involve at least 50 individual stakeholders

  6. The Fukushima Dai Ichi accident. The narrative of the plant manager. Volume 2 - Alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarnieri, Franck; Travadel, Sebastien; Martin, Christophe; Portelli, Aurelien; Afrouss, Aissame; Przyswa, Eric

    2016-05-01

    This book is the second volume of a commented translation of the narrative made by the manager of the Fukushima nuclear plant to the inquiry commission after the accident. It addresses the struggle against a nuclear installation free of any control and safety devices, and also the roles, attitudes and behaviours of Tepco executives and experts, of Japanese self-defence forces, and of the Japanese Prime minister. It notably appears that the team which stayed there to face the crisis had diverging and evolving ideas of the reactors due to their lack of electricity and of data, and thus remained in a constant uncertainty about the actual condition of the four reactors, and about possible actions and their possible success. Away from the plant, Tepco executives, experts and managers could not understand and admit this total loss of control, and cannot cope with system failures. Political authorities had no contact with this reality and do not trust information. Finally, control authorities were totally absent

  7. Perspectives on Severe Accident Management by Depressurization and External Water Injection under Extended SBO Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seol, Wookcheol; Park, Jongwoon

    2014-01-01

    Three major issues of severe accident management guideline (SAMG) after this sort of extended SBO would be depressurization of the primary system, external water injection and hydrogen management inside a containment. Under this situation, typical SAM actions would be depressurization and external water delivery into the core. However, limited amount of external water would necessitate optimization between core cooling, containment integrity and fission product removal. In this paper, effects of SAM actions such as depressurization and external water injection on the reactor and containment conditions after extended SBO are analyzed using MAAP4 code. Positive and negative aspects are discussed with respect to core cooling and fission product retention inside a primary system. Conclusions are made as following: Firstly, early depressurization action itself has two-faces: positive with respect to delay of the reactor vessel failure but negative with respect to the containment failure and fission product retention inside the primary system. Secondly, in order to prevent containment overpressure failure after external water injection, re-closing of PORV later should be considered in SAM, which has never been considered in the previous SAMG. Finally, in case of external water injection, the flow rate should be optimized considering not only the cooling effect but also the long term fission product retention inside the primary system

  8. Implications for accident management of adding water to a degrading reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuan, P.; Hanson, D.J.; Pafford, D.J.; Quick, K.S.; Witt, R.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report evaluates both the positive and negative consequences of adding water to a degraded reactor core during a severe accident. The evaluation discusses the earliest possible stage at which an accident can be terminated and how plant personnel can best respond to undesired results. Specifically discussed are (a) the potential for plant personnel to add water for a range of severe accidents, (b) the time available for plant personnel to act, (c) possible plant responses to water added during the various stages of core degradation, (d) plant instrumentation available to understand the core condition and (e) the expected response of the instrumentation during the various stages of severe accidents

  9. Implications for accident management of adding water to a degrading reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuan, P.; Hanson, D.J.; Pafford, D.J.; Quick, K.S.; Witt, R.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-02-01

    This report evaluates both the positive and negative consequences of adding water to a degraded reactor core during a severe accident. The evaluation discusses the earliest possible stage at which an accident can be terminated and how plant personnel can best respond to undesired results. Specifically discussed are (a) the potential for plant personnel to add water for a range of severe accidents, (b) the time available for plant personnel to act, (c) possible plant responses to water added during the various stages of core degradation, (d) plant instrumentation available to understand the core condition and (e) the expected response of the instrumentation during the various stages of severe accidents.

  10. Decommissioning Programme Management: reducing risk and cost while accelerating schedules through improved planning, Earned Value Management and safe work execution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    CH2M HILL experience includes more than two decades of managing nuclear facilities and providing clean-up and operations support for commercial and government facilities worldwide. Our expertise ranges from decommissioning and defence sector businesses to nuclear technology development and innovation. Our approach places top priority on the safe execution of work while reducing both risk and cost. Our nuclear services include: programme management, nuclear safety analysis, radiological protection, radioactive waste management, nuclear remediation, nuclear materials and waste transportation management, nuclear safeguards and security services, and nuclear decontamination and decommissioning. This paper will discuss our approach which has resulted in a strong track record of accelerating schedules and reducing costs of major nuclear programmes, including Rocky Flats, Idaho, and our work at UKAEA sites. (author)

  11. Coping with Accident Reactions (CARE) early intervention programme for preventing traumatic stress reactions in young injured children: study protocol for two randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, Alexandra C; Haag, Ann-Christin; Kenardy, Justin A; Kimble, Roy M; Landolt, Markus A

    2016-07-28

    Accidental injury represents the most common type of traumatic event experienced by children under the age of 6 years. Around 10-30 % of young injured children will go on to develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other co-morbid conditions. Parents of injured children are also at risk of PTSD, and this is associated with short- and long-term consequences for their children's physical and psychological recovery. Despite the significance of this problem, to date, the mental health needs of injured young children have been neglected. One reason for this is due to the uncertainty and considerable debate around how to best provide early psychological intervention to traumatised children and adults. To address these gaps, researchers and psychologists in Australia and Switzerland have developed the Coping with Accident Reactions (CARE) programme, which is a two-session early intervention designed to prevent persistent PTSD reactions in young injured children screened as 'at risk'. Two separate international studies are being conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of this programme. The study design for the two proposed studies will employ a randomised controlled trial design and children (aged 1-6 years) who are screened as at risk for PTSD 1 week after an unintentional injury, and their parents will be randomised to either (1) CARE intervention or (2) treatment as usual. Assessment will be completed at baseline (2 weeks) and 3 and 6 months post-injury. This international collaboration provides an excellent opportunity to test the benefit of screening and providing early intervention to young children in two different countries and settings. It is expected that outcomes from this research will lead to significant original contributions to the scientific evidence base and clinical treatment and recovery of very young injured children. The Australian study was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ( ACTRN

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF ORGANISATIONAL CULTURE ON THE TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roldán, José L.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to examine the relationships between different types of cultures and effectiveness in Total Quality Management (TQM implementation. Using Cameron’s framework, we have tested the connection between a quality culture taxonomy and TQM programme performance using data from a survey carried out with 113 Spanish companies that have implemented TQM systems. A structural equation modelling is proposed to assess the links between both types of constructs using the Partial Least Squares (PLS technique. The most substantial results confirm, in the sample analysed, the relationship between quality culture types and the TQM programme performance, and there being different influence levels of the quality cultures.

  13. Effect of Occupational Health and Safety Management System on Work-Related Accident Rate and Differences of Occupational Health and Safety Management System Awareness between Managers in South Korea's Construction Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Seok J. Yoon; Hsing K. Lin; Gang Chen; Shinjea Yi; Jeawook Choi; Zhenhua Rui

    2013-01-01

    Background: The study was conducted to investigate the current status of the occupational health and safety management system (OHSMS) in the construction industry and the effect of OHSMS on accident rates. Differences of awareness levels on safety issues among site general managers and occupational health and safety (OHS) managers are identified through surveys. Methods: The accident rates for the OHSMS-certified construction companies from 2006 to 2011, when the construction OHSMS became ...

  14. Skidding accidents : considerations on road surface and vehicle characteristics : summary of the present situation. Provisional recommendation concerning skidding resistance of road surfaces investigation programme. Interim report of the SWOV Working Group "Tyres, road surfaces and skidding accidents"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SWOV Working Group "Tyres, road surfaces and skidding accidents"

    1970-01-01

    This is the first report of SWOV Working Group "Tyres, road surfaces and skidding accidents". Skidding is considered to be an important contributory factor in traffic accidents. Skidding can in principle be prevented in two ways, viz: (1) reduction of the minimum necessary friction, and (2)

  15. Knowledge management systems in support of an induction programme: An action research approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Raman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Higher education institutions are in the knowledge business since they are involved in knowledge creation, dissemination and learning. However, not many higher education institutions get the most benefit out of managing their knowledge. Most of these institutions are so busy delivering knowledge that they fail to capture the best practices in their knowledge delivery. The induction programme for new lecturers is therefore very important to improve the quality of teaching. In teaching, lecturers might be the subject matter experts but could lack knowledge related to teaching, such as theories of teaching and learning, classroom organization and management, development of curriculum and course content, and professionalism. This paper examines if knowledge management systems (KMS can support the induction programmes for new lecturers in an academic setting at the Bina Nusantara University in Indonesia. Action research is used as the underlying methodology. Specifically, a 5-step canonical action research was used to conduct the study. Our findings post intervention suggests that most lecturers understand the importance of the induction programme and the lecturers have positive attitudes towards the implementation of KMS to support the induction programme.

  16. Development of a decision support system for off-site emergency management in the early phase of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, D.; Sharma, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Experience gained after the Chernobyl accident clearly demonstrated the importance of improving administrative, organizational and technical emergency management arrangements in India. The more important areas where technical improvements were needed were early warning monitoring, communication networks for the rapid and reliable exchange of radiological and other information and decision support systems for off-site emergency management. A PC based artificial intelligent software has been developed to have a decision support system that can easily implement to manage off-site nuclear emergency and subsequently analyze the off-site consequences of the nuclear accident. A decision support tool, STEPS (source term estimate based on plant status), that provides desired input to the present software was developed. The tool STEPS facilitates meta knowledge of the system. The paper describes the details of the design of the software, functions of various modules, tuning of respective knowledge base and overall its scope in real sense in nuclear emergency preparedness and response

  17. The Finnish research programme on reactor safety (RETU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanttola, T.

    1995-01-01

    In Finland the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM) has launched two national research programmes on the safety of nuclear reactors for the period 1995-1998. The research programme on Reactor Safety (RETU) concentrates on the search of safe limits of nuclear fuel and the reactor core, accident management methods and risk management of the operation of nuclear power plants. In the research programme the behaviour of high burnup nuclear fuel is studied both in normal operation and during power transients. In particular, the VVER fuel data base is supplemented by performing well-characterized experiments in international cooperation. The reactor dynamics codes are developed further to cope with complicated three-dimensional reactivity transients and accidents, and the operational range of the models is extended by implementing advanced flow models and numerical solution methods. In the research programme separate effects experiments are performed and severe accident calculation methods are developed. The Finnish thermal-hydraulic test facility PACTEL (Parallel Channel Test Loop) is used extensively for the evaluation of the VVER-440 plant accident behaviour, for the validation of the accident analysis computer codes and for the testing of proposed passive safety system concepts. Risk analysis is currently being introduced to safety-related risk decision-making among the power plant staff and the authorities. Methods of risk analysis are developed particularly for complicated accident sequences, where a general disturbance is combined with common-cause failures of equipment and human intervention. (4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.)

  18. A community-based exercise programme in COPD self-management : Two years follow-up of the COPE-II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerink, Marlies; van der Palen, Job; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; van der Valk, Paul; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; Zielhuis, Gerhard; Effing, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: It is still unknown how best to maintain effects of exercise programmes in COPD in the long-term. We present the long-term effects of a community-based exercise programme incorporated in a self-management programme, compared to a self-management programme only in patients with COPD.

  19. A community-based exercise programme in COPD self-management: Two years follow-up of the COPE-II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerink, Marlies; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Kerstjens, Huib A.M.; van der Valk, Paul; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; Zielhuis, Gerhard; Effing, T.W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction It is still unknown how best to maintain effects of exercise programmes in COPD in the long-term. We present the long-term effects of a community-based exercise programme incorporated in a self-management programme, compared to a self-management programme only in patients with COPD.

  20. A community-based exercise programme in COPD self-management: Two years follow-up of the COPE-II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerink, M.; Palen, J. van der; Kerstjens, H.A.; Valk, P. van der; Brusse-Keizer, M.; Zielhuis, G.A.; Effing, T.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It is still unknown how best to maintain effects of exercise programmes in COPD in the long-term. We present the long-term effects of a community-based exercise programme incorporated in a self-management programme, compared to a self-management programme only in patients with COPD.

  1. Development of a national doctrine for the management of the post-accident phase of a radiological emergency situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niel, J.Ch.; Godet, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    For several years, public Authorities have defined an organization for the management of emergency situations arising from an accident occurring at a nuclear installation. So far, the management of the risk arising from the post accident phase was, in itself, not explored with the same care. What so ever, no format policy on which the action of public Authority could be based is today available. The nuclear safety Authority (ASN), in relation with the other concerned departments, is now in charge, according to the above mentioned directive, to prepare and implement the necessary provisions to respond to a post accident situation. In dune 2005, ASN established the steering committee for the management of post nuclear or radiological emergency situations (CODIRPA). The definition of a national policy related to the management of the radiological risk during a post event situation having to integrate various organization aspects as: lifting of protection emergency provisions and rehabilitation of buildings, life in contaminated rural territories, agriculture and water, dose and radiological consequences, sanitary surveillance of victims and populations, indemnification, waste management of contaminated crops and soils, organization of public Authorities. During the 2. phase of CODIRPA work (2008-2009), the first elements of policy will be consolidated and new scenarios will be studied (one worsened scenario and one scenario with alpha emitting radionuclide). in parallel, a procedure for local actor's consultation should be elaborated. (authors)

  2. Establishing an independent mobile health programme for chronic disease self-management support in Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Piette

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobile health (m-health work in low and middle-income countries (LMICs mainly consists of pilot programmes with an unclear path to scaling and dissemination. We describe the deployment and testing of an m-health platform for non-communicable disease (NCD self-management support in Bolivia. Methods: 364 primary care patients in La Paz with diabetes or hypertension completed surveys about their use of mobile phones, health and access to care. 165 of those patients then participated in a 12-week demonstration of automated telephone monitoring and self-management support. Weekly Interactive Voice Response (IVR calls were made from a platform established at a university in La Paz, under the direction of the regional health ministry. Results: 37% of survey respondents spoke indigenous languages at home, and 38% had six or fewer years of education. 82% had a mobile phone; half (45% used text messaging with a standard phone, and 9% had a smartphone. Smartphones were least common among patients who were older, spoke indigenous languages, or had less education. IVR programme participants completed 1007 self-management support calls, with an overall response rate of 51%. IVR call completion was lower among older adults, but was not related to patients’ ethnicity, health status or healthcare access. IVR health and self-care reports were consistent with information reported during baseline interviews. Patients’ likelihood of reporting excellent, very good, or good health (versus fair or poor health via IVR increased during programme participation, and was associated with better medication adherence. Patients completing follow-up interviews were satisfied with the programme, with 19/20 (95% reporting that they would recommend it to a friend. Conclusions: By collaborating with LMICs, m-health programmes can be transferred from higher-resource centres to LMICs and implemented in ways that improve access to self-management support among people

  3. Work Incapacity and Treatment Costs After Severe Accidents: Standard Versus Intensive Case Management in a 6-Year Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Stefan M; Andermatt, Peter; Tobler, Benno L; Spinnler, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    Purpose Case management is widely accepted as an effective method to support medical rehabilitation and vocational reintegration of accident victims with musculoskeletal injuries. This study investigates whether more intensive case management improves outcomes such as work incapacity and treatment costs for severely injured patients. Methods 8,050 patients were randomly allocated either to standard case management (SCM, administered by claims specialists) or intensive case management (ICM, administered by case managers). These study groups differ mainly by caseload, which was approximately 100 cases in SCM and 35 in ICM. The setting is equivalent to a prospective randomized controlled trial. A 6-year follow-up period was chosen in order to encompass both short-term insurance benefits and permanent disability costs. All data were extracted from administrative insurance databases. Results Average work incapacity over the 6-year follow-up, including contributions from daily allowances and permanent losses from disability, was slightly but insignificantly higher under ICM than under SCM (21.6 vs. 21.3 % of pre-accident work capacity). Remaining work incapacity after 6 years of follow-up showed no difference between ICM and SCM (8.9 vs. 8.8 % of pre-accident work incapacity). Treatment costs were 43,500 Swiss Francs (CHF) in ICM compared to 39,800 in SCM (+9.4 %, p = 0.01). The number of care providers involved in ICM was 10.5 compared to 10.0 in ICM (+5.0 %, p work incapacity as compared to SCM, but did increase healthcare consumption and treatment costs. It is concluded that the intensity of case management alone is not sufficient to improve rehabilitation and vocational reintegration of accident victims.

  4. Training Programmes in Sustainable Forest Management in Austria, Croatia and Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvija Krajter Ostoić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: During the Erasmus+ project “Cooperation for Innovative Approach in Sustainable Forest Management Training (CIA2SFM” a study of the existing vocational education and training (VET and lifelong learning (LLL programmes in the field of sustainable forest management (SFM was conducted in Austria, Croatia and Slovenia. The aim of this paper is to get an overview of and analyse SFM-related VET and LLL programmes in the study area, with an emphasis on the identification of good practice examples and providing recommendations for improvement. Materials and Methods: A combined approach of literature review, Internet search and consultations with training providers was applied in order to collect data on training programmes conducted in the period 2006-2015 in Austria, Croatia and Slovenia. The programmes were analysed based on topics, types of methods used, existence of specified learning outcomes, programme evaluation by participants and how the programme was advertised. The analysis employed basic descriptive statistics. Topics were grouped into broader themes. Only training programmes targeting private forest owners, forestry professionals, and forestry entrepreneurs were analysed. Three examples of good practice in each country were selected based on collaboratively developed criteria. Results: In Austria, Croatia and Slovenia numerous training courses related to SFM were conducted in the analysed period, predominantly addressing target groups in forestry sector and covering a variety of topics. The relative importance of themes varied among countries. In order to facilitate the knowledge uptake by participants various methods were applied. Although indoor ex-cathedra approaches prevailed, it could be recognized that there is a growth in interest for foster demonstrations in the field, organizing field trips, emphasize on practical work and combining methods and approaches in most countries. Conclusions: Even if national

  5. Joint research project WASA-BOSS: Further development and application of severe accident codes. Assessment and optimization of accident management measures. Project B: Accident analyses for pressurized water reactors with the application of the ATHLET-CD code; Verbundprojekt WASA-BOSS: Weiterentwicklung und Anwendung von Severe Accident Codes. Bewertung und Optimierung von Stoerfallmassnahmen. Teilprojekt B: Druckwasserreaktor-Stoerfallanalysen unter Verwendung des Severe-Accident-Codes ATHLET-CD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobst, Matthias; Kliem, Soeren; Kozmenkov, Yaroslav; Wilhelm, Polina

    2017-02-15

    Within the framework of the project an ATHLET-CD input deck for a generic German PWR of type KONVOI has been created. This input deck was applied to the simulation of severe accidents from the accident categories station blackout (SBO) and small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCA). The complete accident transient from initial event at full power until the damage of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is covered and all relevant severe accident phenomena are modelled: start of core heat up, fission product release, melting of fuel and absorber material, oxidation and release of hydrogen, relocation of molten material inside the core, relocation to the lower plenum, damage and failure of the RPV. The model has been applied to the analysis of preventive and mitigative accident management measures for SBO and SBLOCA transients. Therefore, the measures primary side depressurization (PSD), injection to the primary circuit by mobile pumps and for SBLOCA the delayed injection by the cold leg hydro-accumulators have been investigated and the assumptions and start criteria of these measures have been varied. The time evolutions of the transients and time margins for the initiation of additional measures have been assessed. An uncertainty and sensitivity study has been performed for the early phase of one SBO scenario with PSD (until the start of core melt). In addition to that, a code -to-code comparison between ATHLET-CD and the severe accident code MELCOR has been carried out.

  6. Designing financial-incentive programmes for return of medical service in underserved areas: seven management functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärnighausen Till

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In many countries worldwide, health worker shortages are one of the main constraints in achieving population health goals. Financial-incentive programmes for return of service, whereby participants receive payments in return for a commitment to practise for a period of time in a medically underserved area, can alleviate local and regional health worker shortages through a number of mechanisms. First, they can redirect the flow of those health workers who would have been educated without financial incentives from well-served to underserved areas. Second, they can add health workers to the pool of workers who would have been educated without financial incentives and place them in underserved areas. Third, financial-incentive programmes may improve the retention in underserved areas of those health workers who participate in a programme, but who would have worked in an underserved area without any financial incentives. Fourth, the programmes may increase the retention of all health workers in underserved areas by reducing the strength of some of the reasons why health workers leave such areas, including social isolation, lack of contact with colleagues, lack of support from medical specialists and heavy workload. We draw on studies of financial-incentive programmes and other initiatives with similar objectives to discuss seven management functions that are essential for the long-term success of financial-incentive programmes: financing (programmes may benefit from innovative donor financing schemes, such as endowment funds, international financing facilities or compensation payments; promotion (programmes should use tested communication channels in order to reach secondary school graduates and health workers; selection (programmes may use selection criteria to ensure programme success and to achieve supplementary policy goals; placement (programmes should match participants to areas in order to maximize participant satisfaction and

  7. Designing financial-incentive programmes for return of medical service in underserved areas: seven management functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E

    2009-06-26

    In many countries worldwide, health worker shortages are one of the main constraints in achieving population health goals. Financial-incentive programmes for return of service, whereby participants receive payments in return for a commitment to practise for a period of time in a medically underserved area, can alleviate local and regional health worker shortages through a number of mechanisms. First, they can redirect the flow of those health workers who would have been educated without financial incentives from well-served to underserved areas. Second, they can add health workers to the pool of workers who would have been educated without financial incentives and place them in underserved areas. Third, financial-incentive programmes may improve the retention in underserved areas of those health workers who participate in a programme, but who would have worked in an underserved area without any financial incentives. Fourth, the programmes may increase the retention of all health workers in underserved areas by reducing the strength of some of the reasons why health workers leave such areas, including social isolation, lack of contact with colleagues, lack of support from medical specialists and heavy workload. We draw on studies of financial-incentive programmes and other initiatives with similar objectives to discuss seven management functions that are essential for the long-term success of financial-incentive programmes: financing (programmes may benefit from innovative donor financing schemes, such as endowment funds, international financing facilities or compensation payments); promotion (programmes should use tested communication channels in order to reach secondary school graduates and health workers); selection (programmes may use selection criteria to ensure programme success and to achieve supplementary policy goals); placement (programmes should match participants to areas in order to maximize participant satisfaction and retention); support (programmes

  8. Views of commissioners, managers and healthcare professionals on the NHS Health Check programme: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Katie; Harte, Emma; Martin, Adam; MacLure, Calum; Griffin, Simon J; Mant, Jonathan; Meads, Catherine; Saunders, Catherine L; Walter, Fiona M; Usher-Smith, Juliet A

    2017-11-15

    To synthesise data concerning the views of commissioners, managers and healthcare professionals towards the National Health Service (NHS) Health Check programme in general and the challenges faced when implementing it in practice. A systematic review of surveys and interview studies with a descriptive analysis of quantitative data and thematic synthesis of qualitative data. An electronic literature search of MEDLINE, Embase, Health Management Information Consortium, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Global Health, PsycInfo, Web of Science, OpenGrey, the Cochrane Library, NHS Evidence, Google Scholar, Google, ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry from 1 January 1996 to 9 November 2016 with no language restriction and manual screening of reference lists of all included papers. Primary research reporting views of commissioners, managers or healthcare professionals on the NHS Health Check programme and its implementation in practice. Of 18 524 citations, 15 articles met the inclusion criteria. There was evidence from both quantitative and qualitative studies that some commissioners and general practice (GP) healthcare professionals were enthusiastic about the programme, whereas others raised concerns around inequality of uptake, the evidence base and cost-effectiveness. In contrast, those working in pharmacies were all positive about programme benefits, citing opportunities for their business and staff. The main challenges to implementation were: difficulties with information technology and computer software, resistance to the programme from some GPs, the impact on workload and staffing, funding and training needs. Inadequate privacy was also a challenge in pharmacy and community settings, along with difficulty recruiting people eligible for Health Checks and poor public access to some venues. The success of the NHS Health Check Programme relies on engagement by those responsible for its

  9. DECISION-MAKING AND MANAGEMENT OF PRE-INVESTMENT IN A PROGRAMME OF PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P. Botha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Owing to ever-increasing business pressures and the resulting requirements of organisations, individual projects rarely fulfil all expectations; so it is quite often necessary to implement a programme of interdependent projects. In such programmes the matter of pre-investment (investing effort or money before the project results are required is a recurring theme amongst programme managers. However, very few decision-making techniques or management guidelines on the topic of pre-investment are available. In this paper a framework is proposed to assist a programme or project manager in the decision-making and management of pre-investment in a programme. The framework is based on pre-investment propositions with high levels of support from a Delphi panel, in the context of a multi-billion Rand petrochemical programme. The results of the research are three matrices that provide guidance on the timing of pre-investment, tools and information required, and benefits of pre-investment. These guidelines all relate to four aspects of pre-investment: context, systems and procedures, timing, and scope. Even though the work was done in the context of a specific case, the preinvestment guidelines should be applicable in various industries.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die steeds toenemende druk op besighede en die gevolglike vereistes wat ondernemings aan hulself stel, lei daartoe dat individuele projekte selde aan al die verwagtings voldoen. Dit is dus dikwels nodig om ’n program van interafhanklike projekte te implementeer. In sulke programme is voorafinvestering (investering van fondse of werk voordat projekresultate vereis word ’n saak wat by herhaling deur programbestuurders opgehaal word. Daar bestaan egter tans geen besluitnemingstegnieke of riglyne vir die bestuur van voorafinvestering nie. Hierdie artikel behandel ’n raamwerk om programbestuurders en projekbestuurders behulpsaam te wees met besluitneming oor en die bestuur

  10. [Evaluation of disease management programmes--assessing methods and initial outcomes from a health economic perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Dana Sophie; Braun, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation represents a substantial component of the concept of Disease Management Programmes. This and the fact that the implementation of Disease Management Programmes constitutes a major change in the German healthcare system require that the criteria established by the German Federal Social Insurance Authority (Bundesversicherungsamt) be carefully reviewed. The present paper focuses on the evaluation method and the economic data. The pre-/-post study design used in the evaluation is known to be vulnerable to threats to internal validity. The objective of this paper is to analyze whether these threats to internal validity which have been known theoretically are confirmed by the results of the final reports. A review of the final reports of health insurance companies like the AOK, Barmer and a group of the BKK in Westfalen-Lippe shows that this question can be answered in the affirmative. The pre-/-post design without control groups is unable to recognize the failure or success of the Disease Management concept. The reasons include a high drop-out rate as well as the lack of consideration of the characteristics of chronic disease. Hence the evaluation method has failed to prove the quality of Disease Management Programmes in Germany. This is why consistent further development is needed.

  11. Implementation and evaluation of a clinical data management programme in a primary care centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, J

    2014-11-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) support clinical management, administration, quality assurance, research, and service planning. The aim of this study was to evaluate a clinical data management programme to improve consistency, completeness and accuracy of EHR information in a large primary care centre with 10 General Practitioners (GPs). A Clinical Data Manager was appointed to implement a Data Management Strategy which involved coding consultations using ICPC-2 coding, tailored support and ongoing individualised feedback to clinicians. Over an eighteen month period there were improvements in engagement with and level of coding. Prior to implementation (August 2011) 4 of the 10 GPs engaged in regular coding and 69% of their consultation notes were coded. After 12 months, all 10 GPs and 6 nurses were ICPC-2 coding their consultations and monthly coding levels had increased to 98%. This structured Data Management Strategy provides a feasible sustainable way to improve information management in primary care.

  12. Analysis of Surface Water Pollution Accidents in China: Characteristics and Lessons for Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hong; Zhang, Tongzhu; Liu, Bo; Lu, Feng; Fang, Shurong; You, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Understanding historical accidents is important for accident prevention and risk mitigation; however, there are no public databases of pollution accidents in China, and no detailed information regarding such incidents is readily available. Thus, 653 representative cases of surface water pollution accidents in China were identified and described as a function of time, location, materials involved, origin, and causes. The severity and other features of the accidents, frequency and quantities of chemicals involved, frequency and number of people poisoned, frequency and number of people affected, frequency and time for which pollution lasted, and frequency and length of pollution zone were effectively used to value and estimate the accumulated probabilities. The probabilities of occurrences of various types based on origin and causes were also summarized based on these observations. The following conclusions can be drawn from these analyses: (1) There was a high proportion of accidents involving multi-district boundary regions and drinking water crises, indicating that more attention should be paid to environmental risk prevention and the mitigation of such incidents. (2) A high proportion of accidents originated from small-sized chemical plants, indicating that these types of enterprises should be considered during policy making. (3) The most common cause (49.8 % of the total) was intentional acts (illegal discharge); accordingly, efforts to increase environmental consciousness in China should be enhanced.

  13. Hazardous waste storage facility accident scenarios for the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Policastro, A.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Marmer, D.; Lazaro, M.; Mueller, C.; Freeman, W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the methods for developing accident categories and accident frequencies for internally initiated accidents at hazardous waste storage facilities (HWSFs) at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. This categorization is a necessary first step in evaluating the risk of accidents to workers and the general population at each of the sites. This risk evaluation is part of the process of comparing alternative management strategies in DOE's Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Such strategies involve regionalization, decentralization, and centralization of waste treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Potential accidents at the HWSFs at the DOE sites are divided into categories of spill alone, spill plus fire, and other event combinations including spill plus fire plus explosion, fire only, spill and explosion, and fire and explosion. One or more accidents are chosen to represent the types of accidents for FY 1992 for 12 DOE sites were studied to determine the most representative set of possible accidents at all DOE sites. Each accident scenario is given a probability of occurrence that is adjusted, depending on the throughput and waste composition that passes through the HWSF at the particular site. The justification for the probabilities chosen is presented

  14. Tenth Warren K. Sinclair keynote address-the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident and comprehensive health risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shunichi

    2014-02-01

    Just two years have passed since the Tokyo Electric Power Company-Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident, a multidimensional disaster that combined to destroy the local infrastructure on which the safety system depended and gave a serious impact to the world. Countermeasures including evacuation, sheltering, and control of the food chain were implemented in a timely manner by the Japanese government. However, there is a clear need for improvement, especially in the areas of nuclear safety and protection and also in the management of the radiation health risk during and even after the accident. To date there have been no acute radiation injuries. The radiation-related physical health consequences to the general public, including evacuees, are likely to be much lower than t