WorldWideScience

Sample records for accident management programmes

  1. The IAEA Accident Management Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabanov, L.; Jankowski, M.; Mauersberger, H.

    1993-01-01

    Accident prevention and mitigation programmes and the Emergency Response System (ERS) are important elements of the Agency's activities in the area of nuclear power plant (NPP) safety. Safety Codes and Guides on siting, design, quality assurance and the operation of NPPs have been produced and are used by NPP operating organizations. Nuclear safety evaluation services are provided by the IAEA. The Emergency Response System and the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) have been developed. The framework for the development of an accident management programme has been set up. The main goal is to develop an Accident Management Manual to provide a systematic, structured approach to the development and implementation of an accident management programme at NPPs. An outline of the Manual has been distributed and the first draft is available. The component parts are: Co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) on severe accident management and containment behaviour; the use of vulnerability analysis; mitigation of the effects of hydrogen, and generic symptom oriented emergency operating procedures. The IAEA provides guidance by the dissemination of information on methods for accident management; collates information on approaches in this field in different organizations and countries; and arranges exchange of experience and the promulgation of knowledge through the training of NPP managers and senior technical staff. (orig.)

  2. The IAEA Accident Management Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabanov, L.; Jankowski, M.; Mauersberger, H. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

    1993-02-01

    Accident prevention and mitigation programmes and the Emergency Response System (ERS) are important elements of the Agency's activities in the area of nuclear power plant (NPP) safety. Safety Codes and Guides on siting, design, quality assurance and the operation of NPPs have been produced and are used by NPP operating organizations. Nuclear safety evaluation services are provided by the IAEA. The Emergency Response System and the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) have been developed. The framework for the development of an accident management programme has been set up. The main goal is to develop an Accident Management Manual to provide a systematic, structured approach to the development and implementation of an accident management programme at NPPs. An outline of the Manual has been distributed and the first draft is available. The component parts are: Co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) on severe accident management and containment behaviour; the use of vulnerability analysis; mitigation of the effects of hydrogen, and generic symptom oriented emergency operating procedures. The IAEA provides guidance by the dissemination of information on methods for accident management; collates information on approaches in this field in different organizations and countries; and arranges exchange of experience and the promulgation of knowledge through the training of NPP managers and senior technical staff. (orig.).

  3. The screening approach for review of accident management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misak, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture the screening approach for review of accident management programmes are presented. It contains objective trees for accident management: logic structure of the approach; objectives and safety functions for accident management; safety principles

  4. The DOE technology development programme on severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhold, R.J.; Moore, R.A.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a programme in technology development aimed at resolving the technical issues in severe accident management strategies for advanced and evolutionary light water reactors (LWRs). The key objective of this effort is to achieve a robust defense-in-depth at the interface between prevention and mitigation of severe accidents. The approach taken towards this goal is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM). Applications of ROAAM to the severe accident management strategy for the US AP600 advanced LWR have been effective both in enhancing the design and in achieving acceptance of the conclusions and base technology developed in the course of the work. This paper presents an overview of that effort and its key technical elements

  5. Implementation of accident management programmes in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    good practices and developments in Member States and is intended as reference material for NPPs, as well as an information source for other organizations such as regulatory bodies. It is a follow-up to the IAEA report on Accident Management Programmes in Nuclear Power Plants, published in 1994, and reflects the considerable progress made since that time. The objective of this report is to provide a description of the elements to be addressed by the team responsible for developing and implementing a plant specific AMP at an NPP. Although it is intended primarily for use by NPP operators, utilities and their technical support organizations, it can also facilitate preparation of the relevant national regulatory requirements. Important event sequences that may lead to severe accidents shall be identified using a combination of probabilistic methods, deterministic methods and sound engineering judgement. These event sequences shall then be reviewed against a set of criteria aimed at determining which severe accidents should be addressed in the design. Potential design or procedural changes that could either reduce the likelihood of these selected events, or mitigate their consequences, should these selected events occur, shall be evaluated, and shall be implemented if reasonably practicable. Consideration shall be given to the plant full design capabilities, including the possible use of some systems (i.e. safety and non-safety systems) beyond their originally intended function and anticipated operating conditions, and the use of additional temporary systems to return the plant to a controlled state and/or to mitigate the consequences of a severe accident, provided that it can be shown that the systems are able to function in the environmental conditions to be expected. For multiunit plants, consideration shall be given to the use of available means and/or support from other units, provided that the safe operation of the other units is not compromised. Accident management

  6. Proceedings of the Specialist Meeting on Severe Accident Management Programme Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-04-15

    Effective Accident Management planning can produce both a reduction in the frequency of severe accidents at nuclear power plants as well as the ability to mitigate a severe accident. The purpose of an accident management programme is to provide to the responsible plant staff the capability to cope with the complete range of credible severe accidents. This requires that appropriate instrumentation and equipment are available within the plant to enable plant staff to diagnose the faults and to implement appropriate strategies. The programme must also provide the necessary guidance, procedures, and training to assure that appropriate corrective actions will be implemented. One of the key issues to be discussed is the transition from control room operations and the associated emergency operating procedures to a technical support team approach (and the associated severe accident management strategies). Following a proposal made by the Senior Group of Experts on Severe Accident Management (SESAM), the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations decided to sponsor a Specialist Meeting on Severe Accident Management Programme Development. The general objectives of the Specialist Meeting were to exchange experience, views, and information among the participants and to discuss the status of severe accident management programmes. The meeting brought together utilities, accident management programme developers, personnel training programme developers, regulators, and researchers. In general, the tone of the Specialist Meeting - designed to promote progress, as contrasted with conferences or symposia where the state-of-the-art is presented - was to be rather practical, and focus on accident management programme development, applications, results, difficulties and improvements. As shown by the conclusions of the meeting, there is no doubt that this objective was widely attained.

  7. Proceedings of the Specialist Meeting on Severe Accident Management Programme Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    Effective Accident Management planning can produce both a reduction in the frequency of severe accidents at nuclear power plants as well as the ability to mitigate a severe accident. The purpose of an accident management programme is to provide to the responsible plant staff the capability to cope with the complete range of credible severe accidents. This requires that appropriate instrumentation and equipment are available within the plant to enable plant staff to diagnose the faults and to implement appropriate strategies. The programme must also provide the necessary guidance, procedures, and training to assure that appropriate corrective actions will be implemented. One of the key issues to be discussed is the transition from control room operations and the associated emergency operating procedures to a technical support team approach (and the associated severe accident management strategies). Following a proposal made by the Senior Group of Experts on Severe Accident Management (SESAM), the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations decided to sponsor a Specialist Meeting on Severe Accident Management Programme Development. The general objectives of the Specialist Meeting were to exchange experience, views, and information among the participants and to discuss the status of severe accident management programmes. The meeting brought together utilities, accident management programme developers, personnel training programme developers, regulators, and researchers. In general, the tone of the Specialist Meeting - designed to promote progress, as contrasted with conferences or symposia where the state-of-the-art is presented - was to be rather practical, and focus on accident management programme development, applications, results, difficulties and improvements. As shown by the conclusions of the meeting, there is no doubt that this objective was widely attained

  8. Summary and conclusions of the specialist meeting on severe accident management programme development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The CSNI Specialist meeting on severe accident management programme development was held in Rome and about seventy experts from thirteen countries attended the meeting. A total of 27 papers were presented in four sessions, covering specific aspects of accident management programme development. It purposely focused on the programmatic aspects of accident management rather than on some of the more complex technical issues associated with accident management strategies. Some of the major observations and conclusions from the meeting are that severe accident management is the ultimate part of the defense in depth concept within the plant. It is function and success oriented, not event oriented, as the aim is to prevent or minimize consequences of severe accidents. There is no guarantee it will always be successful but experts agree that it can reduce the risks significantly. It has to be exercised and the importance of emergency drills has been underlined. The basic structure and major elements of accident management programmes appear to be similar among OECD member countries. Dealing with significant phenomenological uncertainties in establishing accident management programmes continues to be an important issue, especially in confirming the appropriateness of specific accident management strategies

  9. Recent Perspective on the Severe Accident Management Programme for Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Manwoong; Lee, Sukho; Lee, Jungjae; Chung, Kuyoung

    2017-01-01

    Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs), has been developed to help operators to prevent or mitigate the impacts of accidents at nuclear power plants. Severe accident management was first introduced in the 1990s with the creation of SAMGs following recognition that post-Three Mile Island Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) did not adequately address severe core damage conditions. Establishing and maintaining multiple layers of defence against any internal/external hazards is an important measure to reduce radiological risks to the public and environment. This study is intended to suggest future regulatory perspectives to strengthen the prevention and mitigation strategies for severe accidents by review of the current status of revision of IAEA Safety Standard on Severe Accident Management Programmes for Nuclear Power Plants and the combined PWR SAMG. This new IAEA Safety Guide will address guidelines for preparation, development, implementation and review of severe accident management programs during all operating conditions for both reactor and spent fuel pool. This Guide is used by operating organizations of nuclear power plants and their support organizations. It may also be used by national regulatory bodies and technical support organizations as a reference for developing their relevant safety requirements and for conducting reviews and safety assessments for SAMP including SAMG. The Pressurized Water Reactor Owner’s Group (PWROG) is upgrading the original generic Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs) into single Severe Accident Guidelines (SAGs) for the PWR SAMG aims to consolidate the advantages of each of the separate vendor severe accident (SA) mitigation methods. This new PWROG SAGs changes the SAMG process to be made that can improve SA response. Changes have been made that guidance is available for control room operators when the TSC is not activated thus allowing for timely accident response. Other changes were made to the guidance

  10. Accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, R.J.; Monty, B.S.; Liparulo, N.J.; Desaedeleer, G.

    1989-01-01

    The foundation of the framework for a Severe Accident Management Program is the contained in the Probabilistic Safety Study (PSS) or the Individual Plant Evaluations (IPE) for a specific plant. The development of a Severe Accident Management Program at a plant is based on the use of the information, in conjunction with other applicable information. A Severe Accident Management Program must address both accident prevention and accident mitigation. The overall Severe Accident Management framework must address these two facets, as a living program in terms of gathering the evaluating information, the readiness to respond to an event. Significant international experience in the development of severe accident management programs exist which should provide some direction for the development of Severe Accident Management in the U.S. This paper reports that the two most important elements of a Severe Accident Management Program are the Emergency Consultation process and the standards for measuring the effectiveness of individual Severe Accident Management Programs at utilities

  11. Accident prevention programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This study by the Steel Industry Safety and Health Commission was made within the context of the application by undertakings of the principles of accident and disease prevention previously adopted by the said Commission. It puts forward recommendations for the effective and gradual implementation of a programme of action on occupational health and safety in the various departments of an undertaking and in the undertaking as a whole. The methods proposed in this study are likely to be of interest to all undertakings in the metallurgical industry and other industrial sectors

  12. Accident management for severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, R.A.; Pratt, W.T.; Lehner, J.; Leonard, M.; Disalvo, R.; Sheron, B.

    1988-01-01

    The management of severe accidents in light water reactors is receiving much attention in several countries. The reduction of risk by measures and/or actions that would affect the behavior of a severe accident is discussed. The research program that is being conducted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission focuses on both in-vessel accident management and containment and release accident management. The key issues and approaches taken in this program are summarized. 6 refs

  13. Management of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    The definition and the multidimensionality aspects of accident management have been reviewed. The suggested elements in the development of a programme for severe accident management have been identified and discussed. The strategies concentrate on the two tiered approaches. Operative management utilizes the plant's equipment and operators capabilities. The recovery managment concevtrates on preserving the containment, or delaying its failure, inhibiting the release, and on strategies once there has been a release. The inspiration for this paper was an excellent overview report on perspectives on managing severe accidents in commercial nuclear power plants and extending plant operating procedures into the severe accident regime; and by the most recent publication of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) considering the question of risk reduction and source term reduction through accident prevention, management and mitigation. The latter document concludes that 'active development of accident management measures by plant personnel can lead to very large reductions in source terms and risk', and goes further in considering and formulating the key issue: 'The most fruitful path to follow in reducing risk even further is through the planning of accident management.' (author)

  14. Management of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The definition and the multidimensionality aspects of accident management have been reviewed. The suggested elements in the development of a programme for severe accident management have been identified and discussed. The strategies concentrate on the two tiered approaches. Operative management utilizes the plant's equipment and operators capabilities. The recovery management concentrates on preserving the containment, or delaying its failure, inhibiting the release, and on strategies once there has been a release. The inspiration for this paper was an excellent overview report on perspectives on managing severe accidents in commercial nuclear power plants and extending plant operating procedures into the severe accident regime; and by the most recent publication of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) considering the question of risk reduction and source term reduction through accident prevention, management and mitigation. The latter document concludes that active development of accident management measures by plant personnel can lead to very large reductions in source terms and risk, and goes further in considering and formulating the key issue: The most fruitful path to follow in reducing risk even further is through the planning of accident management

  15. International programme on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident (IPHECA). Report of the management committee meeting Geneva 16-17 March 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA) have been initiated in mid-1991 following its endorsement by the Forty-fourth World Health Assembly in resolution WHA44.36. The report of the Management Committee Meeting outlines the progress made in the implementation of the Programme, and summarises the scientific information obtained to date on the health effects and planned future activities. Status reports were provided by the representatives of Belarus, Russia, Ukraine and the WHO Secretariat. The major projects under the programme include Thyroid project, Hematology project, Dosimetry and Communication Support Services, Brain Damage in utero project and Epidemiological Registry project. 4 tabs

  16. Guidelines for the review of accident management programmes in nuclear power plants. Reference document for the IAEA safety service missions on review of accident management programmes in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Similarly as for other IAEA safety services, the objectives of accident management safety service are to assist the Member States in ensuring and enhancing the safety of NPPs. In particular, the objective is to assist at the utility and NPP (i.e. licensee) level in effective plant specific AMP preparation, development and implementation. However, assistance can also be provided to the regulatory body in its reviewing of AMPs. Objectives of the safety service can be summarized as follows: To explain to licensee personnel principles and possible approaches in effective implementation of AMP based on experience world-wide; To give opportunities to experts from the host plant to broaden their experience and knowledge in the field; To perform an objective assessment of the status in various phases of AMP implementation, compared with international experience and practices; To provide the licensee with suggestions and assistance for improvements in various stages of AMP implementation. The objective of the IAEA safety services is to offer two options to respond to individual requirements. These options include missions to review accident analysis needed for accident management and missions to review the whole AMP. Review of accident analysis for accident management (RAAAM): this review is intended to check completeness and quality of accident analysis covering BDBA and severe accidents. The review should be typically performed prior to use of accident analysis for development of AMP. It is considered that 2 experts and 1 IAEA team leader in one-week mission can perform the review. Detailed guidelines for review of analysis are provided in Section 2. Reference is also made to another IAEA Safety Report (Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-1) which is devoted to guidance for accident analysis of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Review of AMP (RAMP): this review of AMP, which is in particular appropriate prior to its implementation, is intended to check its quality, consistency

  17. International programme on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A memorandum of understanding between the WHO and the Ministry of Health of the USSR was signed in April 1990, calling for the development of a long-term international programme to monitor and mitigate the health effects of the Chernobyl accident. This document reports on progress made to date in terms of technical management and coordination and financial aspects of the programme. It also provides information on future activities and discusses related issues

  18. Accident and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, V.; Moellenbach, K.; Heinonen, R.; Jakobsson, S.; Kukko, T.; Berg, Oe.; Larsen, J.S.; Westgaard, T.; Magnusson, B.; Andersson, H.; Holmstroem, C.; Brehmer, B.; Allard, R.

    1988-06-01

    There is an increasing potential for severe accidents as the industrial development tends towards large, centralised production units. In several industries this has led to the formation of large organisations which are prepared for accidents fighting and for emergency management. The functioning of these organisations critically depends upon efficient decision making and exchange of information. This project is aimed at securing and possibly improving the functionality and efficiency of the accident and emergency management by verifying, demonstrating, and validating the possible use of advanced information technology in the organisations mentioned above. With the nuclear industry in focus the project consists of five main activities: 1) The study and detailed analysis of accident and emergency scenarios based on records from incidents and rills in nuclear installations. 2) Development of a conceptual understanding of accident and emergency management with emphasis on distributed decision making, information flow, and control structure sthat are involved. 3) Development of a general experimental methodology for evaluating the effects of different kinds of decision aids and forms of organisation for emergency management systems with distributed decision making. 4) Development and test of a prototype system for a limited part of an accident and emergency organisation to demonstrate the potential use of computer and communication systems, data-base and knowledge base technology, and applications of expert systems and methods used in artificial intelligence. 5) Production of guidelines for the introduction of advanced information technology in the organisations based on evaluation and validation of the prototype system. (author)

  19. Accident management information needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.J.; Ward, L.W.; Nelson, W.R.; Meyer, O.R.

    1990-04-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Accident Management Research Program, a methodology has been developed for identifying the plant information needs necessary for personnel involved in the management of an accident to diagnose that an accident is in progress, select and implement strategies to prevent or mitigate the accident, and monitor the effectiveness of these strategies. This report describes the methodology and presents an application of this methodology to a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with a large dry containment. A risk-important severe accident sequence for a PWR is used to examine the capability of the existing measurements to supply the necessary information. The method includes an assessment of the effects of the sequence on the measurement availability including the effects of environmental conditions. The information needs and capabilities identified using this approach are also intended to form the basis for more comprehensive information needs assessment performed during the analyses and development of specific strategies for use in accident management prevention and mitigation. 3 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  20. Accident management information needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, D.J.; Ward, L.W.; Nelson, W.R.; Meyer, O.R. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-04-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Accident Management Research Program, a methodology has been developed for identifying the plant information needs necessary for personnel involved in the management of an accident to diagnose that an accident is in progress, select and implement strategies to prevent or mitigate the accident, and monitor the effectiveness of these strategies. This report describes the methodology and presents an application of this methodology to a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with a large dry containment. A risk-important severe accident sequence for a PWR is used to examine the capability of the existing measurements to supply the necessary information. The method includes an assessment of the effects of the sequence on the measurement availability including the effects of environmental conditions. The information needs and capabilities identified using this approach are also intended to form the basis for more comprehensive information needs assessment performed during the analyses and development of specific strategies for use in accident management prevention and mitigation. 3 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Strategy generation in accident management support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirola, M.

    1995-01-01

    An increased interest for research in the field of Accident Management can be noted. Several international programmes have been started in order to be able to understand the basic physical and chemical phenomena in accident conditions. A feasibility study has shown that it would be possible to design and develop a computerized support system for plant staff in accident situations. To achieve this goal the Halden Project has initiated a research programme on Computerized Accident Management Support (CAMS project). The aim is to utilize the capabilities of computerized tools to support the plant staff during the various accident stages. The system will include identification of the accident state, assessment of the future development of the accident and planning of accident mitigation strategies. A prototype is developed to support operators and the Technical Support Centre in decision making during serious accident in nuclear power plants. A rule based system has been built to take care of the strategy generation. This system assists plant personnel in planning control proposals and mitigation strategies from normal operation to severe accident conditions. The ideal of a safety objective tree and knowledge from the emergency procedures have been used. Future prediction requires good state identification of the plant status and some knowledge about the history of some critical variables. The information needs to be validated as well. Accurate calculations in simulators and a large database including all important information form the plant will help the strategy planning. (author). 12 refs, 2 figs

  2. Cosyma a new programme package for accident consequence assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, G.N.

    1991-01-01

    This report gives details of a new programme package for accident consequence assessment, prepared under the CEC's Maria programme (Methods for assessing the radiological impact of accidents) initiated in 1982 to review and build on the nuclear accident consequence assessment methods in use within the European Community

  3. NPP Krsko Severe Accident Management Guidelines Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic, I.; Krajnc, B.; Bilic-Zabric, T.; Spiler, J.

    2002-01-01

    Severe Accident Management is a framework to identify and implement the Emergency Response Capabilities that can be used to prevent or mitigate severe accidents and their consequences. The USA NRC has indicated that the development of a licensee plant specific accident management program will be required in order to close out the severe accident regulatory issue (Ref. SECY-88-147). Generic Letter 88-20 ties the Accident management Program to IPE for each plant. The SECY-89-012 defines those actions taken during the course of an accident by the plant operating and technical staff to: 1) prevent core damage, 2) terminate the progress of core damage if it begins and retain the core within the reactor vessel, 3) maintain containment integrity as long as possible, and 4) minimize offsite releases. The subject of this paper is to document the severe accident management activities, which resulted in a plant specific Severe Accident Management Guidelines implementation. They have been developed based on the Krsko IPE (Individual Plant Examination) insights, Generic WOG SAMGs (Westinghouse Owners Group Severe Accident Management Guidances) and plant specific documents developed within this effort. Among the required plant specific actions the following are the most important ones: Identification and documentation of those Krsko plant specific severe accident management features (which also resulted from the IPE investigations). The development of the Krsko plant specific background documents (Severe Accident Plant Specific Strategies and SAMG Setpoint Calculation). Also, paper discusses effort done in the areas of NPP Krsko SAMG review (internal and external ), validation on Krsko Full Scope Simulator (Severe Accident sequences are simulated by MAAP4 in real time) and world 1st IAEA Review of Accident Management Programmes (RAMP). (author)

  4. EPRI research on accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehlberg, R.N.; Chao, J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper discusses Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts regarding severe reactor accident management and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMAEX), activities. (EPRI) Electric Power Research Institute accident management program consists of the two products just mentioned plus one related to severe accident plant status information and the MAAP 4.0 computer code. These are briefly discussed

  5. Severe accident management guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhle, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The events at Fukushima Daiichi have highlighted the importance of Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs). As the world has learned from the catastrophe and countries are considering changes to their nuclear regulatory programs, the content of SAMGs and their regulatory control are being evaluated. This presentation highlights several factors that are being addressed in the United States as rulemaking is underway pertaining to SAMGs. The question of how to be prepared for the unexpected is discussed with specific insights gleaned from Fukushima. (author)

  6. Accident management on french PWRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queniart, D.

    1990-06-01

    After a brief recall of French safety rationale, the reactor operation and severe accident management is given. The research and development aimed at developing accident management procedures and emergency organization in France for the case of a NPP accident are also given

  7. NNP Life Management Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hervia Ruperez, F.

    1996-01-01

    Around the world, power station owners are increasingly concerned to optimise Plant Life Management. In response, they are setting up Life Management programmes, of more or less ambitious scope and depth. Strategic, economic and security concerns and the close link between life extension work and the improved maintenance practices that are so important today, will increase and global these programmes for monitoring and conservation or mitigation of ageing. These programmes are all based on knowledge of the precise condition of all components and population with the greatest effect on the economics and safety of the plant, and trends in changes in their condition. (Author)

  8. Accident management approach in Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazaryan, K.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture the accident management approach in Armenian NPP (ANPP) Unit 2 is described. List of BDBAs had been developed by OKB Gydropress in 1994. 13 accident sequences were included in this list. The relevant analyses had been performed in VNIIAES and the 'Guidelines on operator actions for beyond design basis accident (BDBA) management at ANPP Unit 2' had been prepared. These instructions are discussed

  9. The European Programme Manager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larson, Anne; Bergman, E.; Ehlers, S.

    The publication is a result of a cooperation between organisations in six European countries with the aim to develop a common European education for programme managers. It contains of a description of the different elements of the education together with a number of case-studies from the counties...

  10. International programme on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Two years ago the World Health Assembly approved the establishment of the International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA). The Programme, set up under the auspices of WHO, provides support to the health authorities in Belarus, the Russian Federation and the Ukraine in dealing with the aftermath of the accident, and is intended to serve as a unifying framework for all international health-related activities arising from the accident carried out in the three countries. This document outlines the Programme's objectives, structure, accomplishments and future plans. As a background, it also provides a brief overview of the accident and of its current and potential impact on health in the three countries. 5 figs, 1 tab

  11. Severe accident management. Prevention and Mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Effective planning for the management of severe accidents at nuclear power plants can produce both a reduction in the frequency of such accidents as well as the ability to mitigate their consequences if and when they should occur. This report provides an overview of accident management activities in OECD countries. It also presents the conclusions of a group of international experts regarding the development of accident management methods, the integration of accident management planning into reactor operations, and the benefits of accident management

  12. Management of accident risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compes, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    The example of the Chernobyl accident and the statistics of the occurrence of accidents make clear the threat to humanity, if one cannot guarantee successful accident prevention in the use and distribution of the projects aimed at. The science of safety, as it is known in the Wuppertal model, makes its contribution to this vital task for the human community. It makes it necessary to create the essential dates and concepts, the methods, principles and techniques based on them and the associated instrumentation. (DG) [de

  13. [Early management of cerebrovascular accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libot, Jérômie; Guillon, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    A cerebrovascular accident requires urgent diagnosis and treatment.The management of a stroke must be early and adapted in order to improve the overall clinical outcome and lower the risk of mortality.

  14. International programme on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A memorandum of understanding between the WHO and the Ministry of Health of the USSR was signed in April 1990, calling for the development of a long-term international programme to monitor and mitigate the health effects of the Chernobyl accident. This report examines the scientific, organizational and financial aspects of the programme and describes the action taken by the WHO for its development

  15. Strategy generator in computerized accident management support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirola, M.

    1994-02-01

    An increased interest for research in the field of accident management of nuclear power plants can be noted. Several international programmes have been started in order to be able to understand the basic physical and chemical phenomena in accident conditions. A feasibility study has shown that it would be possible to design and develop a computerized support system for plant staff in accident situations. To achieve this goal the Halden Project has initiated a research programme on Computerized Accident Management Support (CAMS project). The aim is to utilize the capabilities of computerized tools to support the plant staff during the various accident stages. The system will include identification of the accident state, assessment of the future development of the accident and planning of accident mitigation strategies. A prototype is developed to support operators and the Technical Support Centre in decision making during serious accidents in nuclear power plants. A rule based system has been built to take care of the strategy generation. This system assists plant personnel in planning control proposals and mitigation strategies from normal operation to severe accident conditions. The idea of a safety objective tree and knowledge from the emergency procedures have been used. Future prediction requires good state identification of the plant status and some knowledge about the history of some critical variables. The information needs to be validated as well. Accurate calculations in simulators and a large database including all important information from the plant will help the strategy planning. (orig.). (40 refs., 20 figs.)

  16. Management and Communication programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2005-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the launch of three new courses in the Management and Communication programme: 1.     Managing Time (Open to all Staff Members) The objectives are: To enhance your personal effectiveness through better organisation skills To acquire ways of making the most of your time through improved work habits To reduce stress For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/S8E_e.asp 2.     Service Orientation (Open to all Staff Members working in a service-related function) The objectives are: To understand the key elements in an effective client/service provider relationship To develop a client focused approach to providing services For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/serv_e.asp 3.   Introduction to Leadership (Open to Staff in Career Paths E & above, including newly appointed supervisors and Secti...

  17. Management and Communication programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2005-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the launch of three new courses in the Management and Communication programme: 1.     Managing Time (Open to all Staff Members) The objectives are: To enhance your personal effectiveness through better organisation skills To acquire ways of making the most of your time through improved work habits To reduce stress For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/S8E_e.asp 2.     Service Orientation (Open to all Staff Members working in a service-related function) The objectives are: To understand the key elements in an effective client/service provider relationship To develop a client focused approach to providing services For the description of this course, please see:  http://humanresources.web.cern.ch/humanresources/external/training/MANCO/P9798/serv_e.asp 3.   Introduction to Leadership (Open to Staff in Career Paths E & above, including newly appointed supervisors and Sect...

  18. Computerized accident management support system: development for severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, V.; Saiz, J.; Gomez, C.

    1998-01-01

    The activities involved in the international Halden Reactor Project (HRP), sponsored by the OECD, include the development of a Computerized Accident Management Support System (CAMS). The system was initially designed for its operation under normal conditions, operational transients and non severe accidents. Its purpose is to detect the plant status, analyzing the future evolution of the sequence (initially using the APROS simulation code) and the possible recovery and mitigation actions in case of an accident occurs. In order to widen the scope of CAMS to severe accident management issues, the integration of the MAAP code in the system has been proposed, as the contribution of the Spanish Electrical Sector to the project (with the coordination of DTN). To include this new capacity in CAMS is necessary to modify the system structure, including two new modules (Diagnosis and Adjustment). These modules are being developed currently for Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water REactors, by the engineering of UNION FENOSA and IBERDROLA companies (respectively). This motion presents the characteristics of the new structure of the CAMS, as well as the general characteristics of the modules, developed by these companies in the framework of the Halden Reactor Project. (Author)

  19. Severe accident management guidelines tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Varela, Javier; Tanarro Onrubia, Augustin; Martinez Fanegas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Severe Accident is addressed by means of a great number of documents such as guidelines, calculation aids and diagnostic trees. The response methodology often requires the use of several documents at the same time while Technical Support Centre members need to assess the appropriate set of equipment within the adequate mitigation strategies. In order to facilitate the response, TECNATOM has developed SAMG TOOL, initially named GGAS TOOL, which is an easy to use computer program that clearly improves and accelerates the severe accident management. The software is designed with powerful features that allow the users to focus on the decision-making process. Consequently, SAMG TOOL significantly improves the severe accident training, ensuring a better response under a real situation. The software is already installed in several Spanish Nuclear Power Plants and trainees claim that the methodology can be followed easier with it, especially because guidelines, calculation aids, equipment information and strategies availability can be accessed immediately (authors)

  20. Phebus FP. An international severe accident research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardt, P.; Tattegrain, A.

    1995-01-01

    The main hazard during a hypothetical severe nuclear reactor accident resides in its fission product (FP) inventory. For this reason, the behaviour of FPs has been extensively studied, with the aim of determining the potential source to the environment. The Phebus FP programme proposes a novel, integral approach to this research. After 5 years of construction and of analytical preparation the Phebus FP programme has been supplying a large volume of new experimental data. Their processing by code calculations is presently a major challenge to all partners. The intense collaboration of 25 organizations from 15 countries has proven to be a major asset of Phebus FP. (author). 6 refs., 2 figs

  1. Severe accident analysis methodology in support of accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesmans, B.; Auglaire, M.; Snoeck, J.

    1997-01-01

    The author addresses the implementation at BELGATOM of a generic severe accident analysis methodology, which is intended to support strategic decisions and to provide quantitative information in support of severe accident management. The analysis methodology is based on a combination of severe accident code calculations, generic phenomenological information (experimental evidence from various test facilities regarding issues beyond present code capabilities) and detailed plant-specific technical information

  2. Accident management insights after the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, Didier; Viktorov, Alexandre; Tuomainen, Minna; Ducamp, Francois; Chevalier, Sophie; Guigueno, Yves; Tasset, Daniel; Heinrich, Marcus; Schneider, Matthias; Funahashi, Toshihiro; Hotta, Akitoshi; Kajimoto, Mitsuhiro; Chung, Dae-Wook; Kuriene, Laima; Kozlova, Nadezhda; Zivko, Tomi; Aleza, Santiago; Jones, John; McHale, Jack; Nieh, Ho; Pascal, Ghislain; ); Nakoski, John; Neretin, Victor; Nezuka, Takayoshi; )

    2014-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident, that took place on 11 March 2011, initiated a significant number of activities at the national and international levels to reassess the safety of existing NPPs, evaluate the sufficiency of technical means and administrative measures available for emergency response, and develop recommendations for increasing the robustness of NPPs to withstand extreme external events and beyond design basis accidents. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is working closely with its member and partner countries to examine the causes of the accident and to identify lessons learnt with a view to the appropriate follow-up actions to be taken by the nuclear safety community. Accident management is a priority area of work for the NEA to address lessons being learnt from the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP following the recommendations of Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA), Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), and Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH). Considering the importance of these issues, the CNRA authorised the formation of a task group on accident management (TGAM) in June 2012 to review the regulatory framework for accident management following the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. The task group was requested to assess the NEA member countries needs and challenges in light of the accident from a regulatory point of view. The general objectives of the TGAM review were to consider: - enhancements of on-site accident management procedures and guidelines based on lessons learnt from the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident; - decision-making and guiding principles in emergency situations; - guidance for instrumentation, equipment and supplies for addressing long-term aspects of accident management; - guidance and implementation when taking extreme measures for accident management. The report is built on the existing bases for capabilities to respond to design basis

  3. Regulatory approach to accident management in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, L.

    1989-01-01

    The Swedish accident management program includes the following components: definition of overall safety and radiation protection objectives for the program; definition of appropriate accident management strategies to reach these objectives, based on plant-specific severe accident analysis; development and installation of appropriate accident management systems and associated management procedure; definition of roles and resposibilities for plant staff involved in accident management and implementation of appropriate training programs. The discussion of these components tries to highlight the basic technical concepts and approaches and the underlying safety philosophy rather than going into design details. 5 figs., 7 refs

  4. The management of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelce, J.; Brignon, P.

    1987-01-01

    In considering severe accidents in water power reactors, a major problem that arises is how to manage them in such a way that the situation can be controlled as well as possible, from the aspects both of preventing serious damage to the core of limiting the discharge of radioactivity. A number of countries have announced provisions in the field of accident management, some already set up, others planned, but these mainly apply to preventing damage to the core. Part of this report deals with this aspect, to show that there is a fairly wide consensus on how problems should be approached. Attitudes vary, on the other hand, in the approach to mitigate radioactive release. In fact, few countries have proposed concrete steps to manage severe accidents in the final stages when the core is seriously damaged. Since it is difficult to compare different approaches, only the French approach is described. This description is however very brief, because in the five or six years since it was defined, the approach has been presented many times. The stress is placed more on the comments which this type of approach suggests, to make the subsequent general discussion easier

  5. Applicability of Phebus FP results to severe accident safety evaluations and management measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, M.; Clement, B.; Jones, A.V.

    2001-01-01

    The international Phebus FP (Fission Product) programme is the largest research programme in the world investigating core degradation and radioactive product release should a core meltdown accident occur in a light water reactor plant. Three integral experiments have already been performed. The experimental database obtained so far contains a wealth of information to validate the computer codes used for safety and accident management assessment

  6. Stress in accident and post-accident management at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, P.; Dubreuil, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of the Chernobyl nuclear accident on the psychology of the affected population have been much discussed. The psychological dimension has been advanced as a factor explaining the emergence, from 1990 onwards, of a post-accident crisis in the main CIS countries affected. This article presents the conclusions of a series of European studies, which focused on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. These studies show that the psychological and social effects associated with the post-accident situation arise from the interdependency of a number of complex factors exerting a deleterious effect on the population. We shall first attempt to characterise the stress phenomena observed among the population affected by the accident. Secondly, we will be presenting an anlysis of the various factors that have contributed to the emerging psychological and social features of population reaction to the accident and in post-accident phases, while not neglecting the effects of the pre-accident situation on the target population. Thirdly, we shall devote some initial consideration to the conditions that might be conducive to better management of post-accident stress. In conclusion, we shall emphasise the need to restore confidence among the population generally. (Author)

  7. HTR-10 severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yuanhui; Sun Yuliang

    1997-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTR-10) is under construction at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology site northwest of Beijing. This 10 MW thermal plant utilizes a pebble bed high temperature gas cooled reactor for a large range of applications such as electricity generation, steam and district heat generation, gas turbine and steam turbine combined cycle and process heat for methane reforming. The HTR-10 is the first high temperature gas cooled reactor to be licensed in China. This paper describes the safety characteristics and design criteria for the HTR-10 as well as the accident management and analysis required for the licensing process. (author)

  8. SAMEX: A severe accident management support expert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soo-Yong; Ahn, Kwang-Il

    2010-01-01

    A decision support system for use in a severe accident management following an incident at a nuclear power plant is being developed which is aided by a severe accident risk database module and a severe accident management simulation module. The severe accident management support expert (SAMEX) system can provide the various types of diagnostic and predictive assistance based on the real-time plant specific safety parameters. It consists of four major modules as sub-systems: (a) severe accident risk data base module (SARDB), (b) risk-informed severe accident risk data base management module (RI-SARD), (c) severe accident management simulation module (SAMS), and (d) on-line severe accident management guidance module (on-line SAMG). The modules are integrated into a code package that executes within a WINDOWS XP operating environment, using extensive user friendly graphics control. In Korea, the integrated approach of the decision support system is being carried out under the nuclear R and D program planned by the Korean Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST). An objective of the project is to develop the support system which can show a theoretical possibility. If the system is feasible, the project team will recommend the radiation protection technical support center of a national regulatory body to implement a plant specific system, which is applicable to a real accident, for the purpose of immediate and various diagnosis based on the given plant status information and of prediction of an expected accident progression under a severe accident situation.

  9. Energy Management Programmes for Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-05

    The IEA Policy Pathway publications provide details on how to implement specific recommendations drawn from the IEA 25 Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations. This Policy Pathway, jointly produced by the International Energy Agency and the Institute for Industrial Productivity, develops the critical steps for policy makers implementing energy management programmes for industry. Optimising energy use in industry is essential to improve industrial competitiveness and achieve wider societal goals such as energy security, economic recovery and development, climate change mitigation and environmental protection. While there is significant potential to decrease energy consumption in this sector, opportunities to improve energy efficiency are still under-exploited. Energy management programmes have shown to be instrumental in addressing many of the barriers that inhibit wide-scale uptake of energy management in industry. The Policy Pathway builds on lessons learned from country experiences and provides actionable guidance on how to plan and design, implement, evaluate and monitor energy management programmes for industry.

  10. Spinoffs from radiological emergency preparedness programmes to generic emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    In the USA, the radiological emergency preparedness (REP) programme for nuclear power plants is being used to enhance emergency management programmes for other types of emergencies. The REP programme is particularly useful in developing plans and preparedness measures for chemical accidents. The Integrated Emergency Management System (IEMS) approach provides a means for maximizing relationships between the REP programme and other programmes. IEMS essentially involves applying common elements of planning and preparedness to all types of emergencies, while recognizing that unique characteristics of specific natural and man-made emergencies require special planning and preparedness considerations. Features of the REP programme that make it compatible with the IEMS approach and useful in coping with other types of emergencies are: (1) the close co-operation between the national nuclear regulatory and emergency management organizations; (2) the programme integration among all levels of government, the nuclear power industry, public interest groups and the general public and (3) the comprehensiveness and sophistication of the programme. The REP programme in the USA represents a state-of-the-art emergency management capability. Some of its elements are readily transferrable to most other types of emergency preparedness programmes, while other elements can be adapted more readily to other hazard-specific programmes. The Bhopal accident has been a catalyst for this adaptation to chemical accidents, in such areas as furnishing hazard-specific information to the public, alert and notification systems, definition of the hazards and risks involved, establishing planning zones and developing close working relationships among the industry, the public and government

  11. Use of PSA to support accident management at NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Cobo, A.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation discusses the following: Overview of PSA level 2; Introduction: Framework; Accident Progression Phenomena in the Confinement/containment; Severe Accident Sequences; Examples; Results and Insights. Accident Management: Concepts; Process; Use of PSA to support Accident; Management

  12. Approach to accident management in RBMK-1500

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaliatka, A.; Urbonavicius, E.; Uspuras, E.

    2008-01-01

    In order to ensure the safe operation of the nuclear power plants accident management programs are being developed around the world. These accident management programs cover the whole spectrum of accidents, including severe accidents. A lot of work is done to investigate the severe accident phenomena and implement severe accident management in NPPs with vessel-type reactors, while less attention is paid to channel-type reactors CANDU and RBMK. Ignalina NPP with RBMK-1500 reactor has implemented symptom based emergency operation procedures, which cover management of accidents until the core damage and do not extend to core damage region. In order to ensure coverage of the whole spectrum of accidents and meet the requirements of IAEA the severe accident management guidelines have to be developed. This paper presents the basic principles and approach to management of beyond design basis accidents at Ignalina NPP. In general, this approach could be applied to NPPs with RBMK-1000 reactors that are available in Russia, but the design differences should be taken into account

  13. Management & communication programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2006-01-01

    Calendar of courses for September to December 2006 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum 2nd semester 2006 Titres Dates Langue Quality Management 18, 19 September Bilingual Managing Teams 19, 20, 21 September English Communiquer efficacement - résidentiel 20, 21, 22 septembre Bilingue Personal Awareness & Impact 26, 27, 28 September Bilingual Introduction to Leadership 4, 5, 6 October Bilingue IProject Scheduling & Costing 12, 13 October English CDP-SL part 1 17, 18, 19 October English Personal Awareness & Impact 23, 24 October Bilingual Communicating to Convince 23, 24, 25 October Bilingual CDP-GL part 2 25, 26, 27 October English CDP-GL part 1 22, 23, 24 November Bilingual Risk Management 20, 21 December Bilingual Communication curriculum 2nd semester 2006 Titres Dates Langue Techniques d'exposé et de présentation 18, 19 septembre + 16 octobre Français Communi...

  14. Competences and life management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunatti, S.; Bergara, A.; Ranalli, J.; Versaci, R.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The nuclear industry is, at present, at a crucial juncture, where it has to decide about the future of the first generation of nuclear plants, which are approaching the end of their licensed service life. At the same time, long term experience and new advances have established that it is possible to extend the life of nuclear plants beyond their initially licensed life by another 20-30 years. Extending the operating life of existing nuclear plants will help to reduce the short term need for new generating capacity - without new capital costs. However, these extensions must take place in the context of careful safety analysis and monitoring of equipment ageing concerns. A nuclear power plant must be managed in a safe and efficient manner throughout all the life cycle stages from design through decommissioning. The consequences of management decisions about nuclear power plants can have profound economic impacts for the nuclear power plant owner, and possibly for the national economy. In addition, the consequence of a major failure or accident can have catastrophic national socio-economic effects that may be felt internationally. The safe and effective management of a nuclear power plant therefore requires dramatically different perspectives in time from the majority of other industries. The impact of some decisions extends beyond the normal strategic perspective of both owners and governments. The integration of activities for ageing management, safety management and business management of a nuclear power plant are an essential element of 'life cycle management'. The loss of information at any stage of a nuclear power plants life deprives people, at later stages, of knowledge that could be important to safe, economic completion of work or which could aid the analysis of problems and options. It is costly to go through the learning process again, with a risk of potential events or incidents, programme delays, physical injury and increased regulatory

  15. Managing Employee Assistance Programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidenberg, Olive C.; Cordery, John L.

    1990-01-01

    Interviews with 20 branch managers and 20 accountants in an Australian bank determined factors influencing the success of an employee assistance program (EAP). It was found that policies requiring supervisors to act against normal managerial practice doom EAPs to failure. Organizational analysis to integrate the EAP within existing organizational…

  16. Severe accident management programmes for nuclear power plants. Safety Guide (Russian Edition); ПРОГРАММЫ ПО УПРАВЛЕНИЮ ТЯЖЕЛЫМИ АВАРИЯМИ НА АТОМНЫХ ЭЛЕКТРОСТАНЦИЯХ. РУКОВОДСТВО ПО БЕЗОПАСНОСТИ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-02-15

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations for the development of accident management programmes to prevent, and to mitigate the consequences of, beyond design basis accidents, including severe accidents. Although primarily developed for use for light water reactors, the recommendations are valid for a wide range of nuclear reactors, both existing and new.

  17. Containment severe accident management - selected strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duco, J.; Royen, J.; Rohde, J.; Frid, W.; De Boeck, B.

    1994-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) organized in June 1994, in collaboration with the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI), a Specialist Meeting on Selected Containment Severe Accident Management Strategies, to discuss their feasibility, effectiveness, benefits and drawbacks, and long-term impact. The meeting focused on water reactors, mainly on existing systems. The technical content covered topics such as general aspects of accident management strategies in OECD Member countries, hydrogen management techniques and other containment accident management strategies, surveillance and protection of the containment function. The main conclusions of the meeting are summarized in the paper. (author)

  18. The work programme of NERIS in post-accident recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, T; Andronopoulos, S; Camps, J; Duranova, T; Gallego, E; Gering, F; Isnard, O; Maître, M; Murith, C; Oughton, D; Raskob, W

    2018-01-01

    NERIS is the European platform on preparedness for nuclear and radiological emergency response and recovery. Created in 2010 with 57 organisations from 28 different countries, the objectives of the platform are to: improve the effectiveness and coherency of current approaches to preparedness; identify further development needs; improve 'know how' and technical expertise; and establish a forum for dialogue and methodological development. The NERIS Strategic Research Agenda is now structured with three main challenges: (i) radiological impact assessments during all phases of nuclear and radiological events; (ii) countermeasures and countermeasure strategies in emergency and recovery, decision support, and disaster informatics; and (iii) setting up a multi-faceted framework for preparedness for emergency response and recovery. The Fukushima accident has highlighted some key issues for further consideration in NERIS research activities, including: the importance of transparency of decision-making processes at local, regional, and national levels; the key role of access to environmental monitoring; the importance of dealing with uncertainties in assessment and management of the different phases of the accident; the use of modern social media in the exchange of information; the role of stakeholder involvement processes in both emergency and recovery situations; considerations of societal, ethical, and economic aspects; and the reinforcement of education and training for various actors. This paper emphasises the main issues at stake for NERIS for post-accident management.

  19. Auditing emergency management programmes: Measuring leading indicators of programme performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsic, Heather

    Emergency Management Programmes benefit from review and measurement against established criteria. By measuring current vs required programme elements for their actual currency, completeness and effectiveness, the resulting timely reports of achievements and documentation of identified gaps can effectively be used to rationally support prioritised improvement. Audits, with their detailed, triangulated and objectively weighted processes, are the ultimate approach in terms of programme content measurement. Although Emergency Management is often presented as a wholly separate operational mechanism, distinct and functionally different from the organisation's usual management structure, this characterisation is only completely accurate while managing an emergency itself. Otherwise, an organisation's Emergency Management Programme is embedded within that organisation and dependent upon it. Therefore, the organisation's culture and structure of management, accountability and measurement must be engaged for the programme to exist, much less improve. A wise and successful Emergency Management Coordinator does not let the separate and distinct nature of managing an emergency obscure their realisation of the need for an organisation to understand and manage all of the other programme components as part of its regular business practices. This includes its measurement. Not all organisations are sufficiently large or capable of supporting the use of an audit. This paper proposes that alternate, less formal, yet effective mechanisms can be explored, as long as they reflect and support organisational management norms, including a process of relatively informal measurement focused on the organisation's own perception of key Emergency Management Programme performance indicators.

  20. Relationship between accidents and road user behaviour : an integral research programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, P.C. & Horst, A.R.A. van der

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of accident statistics and the study of road user behaviour are the traditional methods of road safety research. Neither of these involve direct observation of accidents. A research programme has been designed to gain insight in the generation process of traffic accidents as well as to

  1. Risk evaluation of accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.; Camp, A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) methods to evaluate accident management strategies in nuclear power plants discussed in this paper. The PRA framework allows an integrated evaluation to be performed to give the full implications of a particular strategy. The methodology is demonstrated for a particular accident management strategy, intentional depressurization of the reactor coolant system to avoid containment pressurization during the ejection of molten debris at vessel breach

  2. Development of integrated accident management assessment technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Won Dea; Ha, Jae Joo; Jin, Young Ho

    2002-04-01

    This project aims to develop critical technologies for accident management through securing evaluation frameworks and supporting tools, in order to enhance capabilities coping with severe accidents. For the research goal, firstly under the viewpoint of accident prevention, on-line risk monitoring system and the analysis framework for human error have been developed. Secondly, the training/supporting systems including the training simulator and the off-site risk evaluation system have been developed to enhance capabilities coping with severe accidents. Four kinds of research results have been obtained from this project. Firstly, the framework and taxonomy for human error analysis has been developed for accident management. As the second, the supporting system for accident managements has been developed. Using data that are obtained through the evaluation of off-site risk for Younggwang site, the risk database as well as the methodology for optimizing emergency responses has been constructed. As the third, a training support system, SAMAT, has been developed, which can be used as a training simulator for severe accident management. Finally, on-line risk monitoring system, DynaRM, has been developed for Ulchin 3 and 4 unit

  3. Accident knowledge and emergency management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, B; Groenberg, C D

    1997-03-01

    The report contains an overall frame for transformation of knowledge and experience from risk analysis to emergency education. An accident model has been developed to describe the emergency situation. A key concept of this model is uncontrolled flow of energy (UFOE), essential elements are the state, location and movement of the energy (and mass). A UFOE can be considered as the driving force of an accident, e.g., an explosion, a fire, a release of heavy gases. As long as the energy is confined, i.e. the location and movement of the energy are under control, the situation is safe, but loss of confinement will create a hazardous situation that may develop into an accident. A domain model has been developed for representing accident and emergency scenarios occurring in society. The domain model uses three main categories: status, context and objectives. A domain is a group of activities with allied goals and elements and ten specific domains have been investigated: process plant, storage, nuclear power plant, energy distribution, marine transport of goods, marine transport of people, aviation, transport by road, transport by rail and natural disasters. Totally 25 accident cases were consulted and information was extracted for filling into the schematic representations with two to four cases pr. specific domain. (au) 41 tabs., 8 ills.; 79 refs.

  4. Accident knowledge and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, B.; Groenberg, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    The report contains an overall frame for transformation of knowledge and experience from risk analysis to emergency education. An accident model has been developed to describe the emergency situation. A key concept of this model is uncontrolled flow of energy (UFOE), essential elements are the state, location and movement of the energy (and mass). A UFOE can be considered as the driving force of an accident, e.g., an explosion, a fire, a release of heavy gases. As long as the energy is confined, i.e. the location and movement of the energy are under control, the situation is safe, but loss of confinement will create a hazardous situation that may develop into an accident. A domain model has been developed for representing accident and emergency scenarios occurring in society. The domain model uses three main categories: status, context and objectives. A domain is a group of activities with allied goals and elements and ten specific domains have been investigated: process plant, storage, nuclear power plant, energy distribution, marine transport of goods, marine transport of people, aviation, transport by road, transport by rail and natural disasters. Totally 25 accident cases were consulted and information was extracted for filling into the schematic representations with two to four cases pr. specific domain. (au) 41 tabs., 8 ills.; 79 refs

  5. Use of simulators in severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. nuclear utility industry is moving in a deliberate fashion through a coordinated industry severe accident working group to study and augment, where appropriate, the existing utility organizational and emergency planning structure to address accident and severe accident management. Full-scope simulators are used extensively to train licensed operators for their initial license examinations and continually thereafter in licensed operator requalification training and yearly examinations. The goal of the training (both initial and requalification) is to ensure that operators possess adequate knowledge, skills and abilities to prevent an event from progressing to core damage. The use of full-scope simulators in severe accident management training is in large part viewed by the industry as being premature. The working group study has not progressed to the point where the decision to employ full-scope simulators can be logically considered. It is not however premature to consider part-task or work station simulators as invaluable research tools to support the industry's study. These simulators could be employed, subject to limitations in the current state of knowledge regarding severe accident progression and phenomenological responses, in the validation and verification (V and V) of severe accident models or codes as they are developed. The U.S. nuclear utility industry has made substantial strides in the past 12 years in the accident prevention, mitigation and management arena. These strides are a product of the industry's preference for a logical and systematic approach to change. (orig.)

  6. Jose Cabrera NPP severe accident management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, J.; Almeida, P.; Saiz, J.; Sastre, J.L.; Delgado, R.

    1998-01-01

    To prepare a common acting plan with respect to Severe Accident Management, in 1994 was founded the severe accident management ''ad-hoc'' working group from the Spanish Westinghouse PWR Nuclear Power Plant Owners Group. In this group actively collaborated the Jose Cabrera NPP Training Centre and the Department of Nuclear Engineering of UNION FENOSA. From this moment, Jose Cabrera NPP began the planning of its specific Severe Accident Management Program, which main point are Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG). To elaborate this guidelines, the Spanish translation of Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) Severe Accident Management Guidelines were considered the reference documents. The implementation of this Guidelines to Jose Cabrera NPP started on January 1997. Once the specific guidelines have been implemented to the plant, training activities for the personnel involved in severe accident issues will be developed. To prepare the training exercises MAAP4 code will be used, and with this intention, a specific Jose Cabrera NPP MAAP-GRAAPH screen has been developed. Furthermore, a wide selection of MAAP input files for the simulation of different scenarios and accidental events is available. (Author)

  7. Uncertainties and severe-accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Severe-accident management can be defined as the use of existing and or alternative resources, systems, and actions to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. Together with risk management (e.g., changes in plant operation and/or addition of equipment) and emergency planning (off-site actions), accident management provides an extension of the defense-indepth safety philosophy for severe accidents. A significant number of probabilistic safety assessments have been completed, which yield the principal plant vulnerabilities, and can be categorized as (a) dominant sequences with respect to core-melt frequency, (b) dominant sequences with respect to various risk measures, (c) dominant threats that challenge safety functions, and (d) dominant threats with respect to failure of safety systems. Severe-accident management strategies can be generically classified as (a) use of alternative resources, (b) use of alternative equipment, and (c) use of alternative actions. For each sequence/threat and each combination of strategy, there may be several options available to the operator. Each strategy/option involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. These include (a) uncertainty in key phenomena, (b) uncertainty in operator behavior, (c) uncertainty in system availability and behavior, and (d) uncertainty in information availability (i.e., instrumentation). This paper focuses on phenomenological uncertainties associated with severe-accident management strategies

  8. NPP Krsko Severe Accident Management Guidelines Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalina, Mario; Spalj, Srdjan; Glaser, Bruno; Jalovec, Robi; Jankovic, Gordan

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant Krsko (NEK) has decided to take steps for upgrade of safety measures to prevent severe accidents, and to improve the means to successfully mitigate their consequences. The content of the program for the NEK Safety Upgrade is consistent with the nuclear industry response to Fukushima accident, which revealed many new insights into severe accidents. Therefore, new strategies and usage of new systems and components should be integrated into current NEK Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG's). SAMG's are developed to arrest the progression of a core damage accident and to limit the extent of resulting releases of fission products. NEK new SAMG's revision major changes are made due to: replacement of Electrical Recombiners by Passive Autocatalytic Recombiners (PARs) and the installation of Passive Containment Filtered Vent System (PCFV); to handle a fuel damage situation in Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) and to assess risk of core damage situation during shutdown operation. (authors)

  9. SEVERE ACCIDENT MANAGEMENT STATUS AT Loviisa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kymalainen, O.; Tuomisto, H.

    1997-01-01

    Some of the specific design features of IVO's Loviisa Plant, most notably the ice-condenser containment, strongly affect the plant response in a hypothetical core melt accident. They have together with the relatively stringent Finnish regulatory requirements forced IVO to develop a tailor made severe accident management strategy for Loviisa. The low design pressure of the ice-condenser containment complicates the design of the hydrogen management system. On the other hand, the ice-condensers and the water available from them are facilitating factors regarding in-vessel retention of corium by external cooling of reactor pressure vessel. This paper summarizes the Finnish severe accident requirements, IVO's approach to severe accidents, and its application to the Loviisa Plant

  10. Dosimetric management during a criticality accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Fottorino, R.; Racine, Y.; Miele, A.; Barbry, F.; Briot, F.; Distinguin, S.; Le Goff, J.P.; Berard, P.; Boisson, P.; Cavadore, D.; Lecoix, G.; Persico, M.H.; Rongier, E.; Challeton-De Vathaire, C.; Medioni, R.; Voisin, P.; Exmelin, L.; Flury-Herard, A.; Gaillard-Lecanu, E.; Lemaire, G.; Gonin, M.; Riasse, C.

    2008-01-01

    A working group from health occupational and clinical biochemistry services on French sites has issued essential data sheets on the guidelines to follow in managing the victims of a criticality accident. Since the priority of the medical management after a criticality accident is to assess the dose and the distribution of dose, some dosimetric investigations have been selected in order to provide a prompt response and to anticipate the final dose reconstruction. Comparison exercises between clinical biochemistry laboratories on French sites were carried out to confirm that each laboratory maintained the required operational methods for hair treatment and the appropriate equipment for 32 P activity in hair and 24 Na activity in blood measurements, and to demonstrate its ability to rapidly provide neutron dose estimates after a criticality accident. As a result, a relation has been assessed to estimate the dose and the distribution of dose according to the neutron spectrum following a criticality accident. (authors)

  11. Use of PSA and severe accident assessment results for the accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S. H.; Kim, H. G.; Jang, H. S.; Moon, S. K.; Park, J. U.

    1993-12-01

    The objectives for this study are to investigate the basic principle or methodology which is applicable to accident management, by using the results of PSA and severe accident research, and also facilitate the preparation of accidents management program in the future. This study was performed as follows: derivation of measures for core damage prevention, derivation of measures for accident mitigation, application of computerized tool to assess severe accident management

  12. Use of PSA and severe accident assessment results for the accident management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, S H; Kim, H G; Jang, H S; Moon, S K; Park, J U [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-15

    The objectives for this study are to investigate the basic principle or methodology which is applicable to accident management, by using the results of PSA and severe accident research, and also facilitate the preparation of accidents management program in the future. This study was performed as follows: derivation of measures for core damage prevention, derivation of measures for accident mitigation, application of computerized tool to assess severe accident management.

  13. Level 2 PSA methodology and severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the work was to review current Level 2-PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) methodologies and practices and to investigate how Level 2-PSA can support severe accident management programmes, i.e. the development, implementation, training and optimisation of accident management strategies and measures. For the most part, the presented material reflects the state in 1996. Current Level 2 PSA results and methodologies are reviewed and evaluated with respect to plant type specific and generic insights. Approaches and practices for using PSA results in the regulatory context and for supporting severe accident management programmes by input from level 2 PSAs are examined. The work is based on information contained in: PSA procedure guides, PSA review guides and regulatory guides for the use of PSA results in risk informed decision making; plant specific PSAs and PSA related literature exemplifying specific procedures, methods, analytical models, relevant input data and important results, use of computer codes and results of code calculations. The PSAs are evaluated with respect to results and insights. In the conclusion section, the present state of risk informed decision making, in particular in the level 2 domain, is described and substantiated by relevant examples

  14. Aspects of accident management in Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dascalu, N.

    1999-01-01

    As a general conclusion, the accident management system as implemented at Cerna voda NPP is expected to be appropriate for handling a severe accident, should it occur, in such a way that the environmental radiological consequences would be insignificant and radiation exposure of the personnel be within recommendations. It is recognized, however, that continued development and verification of the system as well as effective personnel training programs are essential to maintain the safety level achieved. (author)

  15. Medical management of radiation accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1982-12-31

    The film gives advice on actions to be taken in case of a radiation accident. It addresses involving external irradiation of the whole and partial body, very localized exposure, uptake of radioiodine, inhalation of transuranium elements and a wound of a finger. The film is intended to illustrate the Agency`s Safety Series No. 47 entitled ``Manual on Early Medical Treatment of Possible Radiation Injury`` published in 1978

  16. Use of analytical aids for accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of analytical aids by utility technical support teams can enhance the staff's ability to manage accidents. Since instrumentation is exposed to environments beyond design-basis conditions, instruments may provide ambiguous information or may even fail. While it is most likely that many instruments will remain operable, their ability to provide unambiguous information needed for the management of beyond-design-basis events and severe accidents is questionable. Furthermore, given these limitation in instrumentation, the need to ascertain and confirm current plant status and forecast future behavior to effectively manage accidents at nuclear facilities requires a computational capability to simulate the thermal and hydraulic behavior in the primary, secondary, and containment systems. With the need to extend the current preventive approach in accident management to include mitigative actions, analytical aids could be used to further enhance the current capabilities at nuclear facilities. This need for computational or analytical aids is supported based on a review of the candidate accident management strategies discussed in NUREG/CR-5474. Based on the review of the NUREG/CR-5474 strategies, two major analytical aids are considered necessary to support the implementation and monitoring of many of the strategies in this document. These analytical aids include (1) An analytical aid to provide reactor coolant and secondary system behavior under LOCA conditions. (2) An analytical aid to predict containment pressure and temperature response with a steam, air, and noncondensable gas mixture present

  17. Development of Krsko Severe Accident Management Database (SAMD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic, I.; Kocnar, R.

    1996-01-01

    Severe Accident Management is a framework to identify and implement the Emergency Response Capabilities that can be used to prevent or mitigate severe accidents and their consequences. Krsko Severe Accident Management Database documents the severe accident management activities which are developed in the NPP Krsko, based on the Krsko IPE (Individual Plant Examination) insights and Generic WOG SAMGs (Westinghouse Owners Group Severe Accident Management Guidance). (author)

  18. Relationship between accidents and road user behaviour : an integral research programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, P. & Horst, A.R.A. van der

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of accident statistics and the study of road user behaviour are the traditional methods of road safety research. Neither of these involve direct observation of accidents. A research programme has been designed in order to: (1) gain insight into the generation process of traffic

  19. Spreading of Excellence in SARNET Network on Severe Accidents: The Education and Training Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Paci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The SARNET2 (severe accidents Research NETwork of Excellence project started in April 2009 for 4 years in the 7th Framework Programme (FP7 of the European Commission (EC, following a similar first project in FP6. Forty-seven organisations from 24 countries network their capacities of research in the severe accident (SA field inside SARNET to resolve the most important remaining uncertainties and safety issues on SA in water-cooled nuclear power plants (NPPs. The network includes a large majority of the European actors involved in SA research plus a few non-European relevant ones. The “Education and Training” programme in SARNET is a series of actions foreseen in this network for the “spreading of excellence.” It is focused on raising the competence level of Master and Ph.D. students and young researchers engaged in SA research and on organizing information/training courses for NPP staff or regulatory authorities (but also for researchers interested in SA management procedures.

  20. Assessment of uncertainties in severe accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Apostolakis, G.; Catton, I.; Dhir, V.K.; Okrent, D.

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress on the development of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) as a tool for qualifying nuclear reactor safety and on research devoted to severe accident phenomena has made severe accident management an achievable goal. Severe accident management strategies may involve operational changes, modification and/or addition of hardware, and institutional changes. In order to achieve the goal of managing severe accidents, a method for assessment of strategies must be developed which integrates PRA methodology and our current knowledge concerning severe accident phenomena, including uncertainty. The research project presented in this paper is aimed at delineating uncertainties in severe accident progression and their impact on severe accident management strategies

  1. Criticality accidents in solution (CRAC and SILENE programmes) and complementary studies of accidents; radiation dosimetry in human organism during the CRAC programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbry, M.; Dousset, M.

    C.R.A.C. (CRiticality occurring ACcidentally) programme is intended to study experimentally the development of a criticality accident as it could occur when handling solutions of fissile material as well as the radiological consequences of such an accident. The fissile matter solutions have been chosen (a) for practical considerations of use and (b) because the probability of an accident occurring seems greater with this type of environment, as the known accidents have shown. The programme is twofold: study of accident physics: form of the evolution (peak, plateau, oscillations, boil up of solutions) the most probable maximum power, minimal power, flux and radiation spectra emitted, freed energy, associated effects, radiolysis, constraints, etc., study of radiological consequences: area dosimetry, individual dosimetry, radiobiological studies, etc. Additional criticality Accident experiments have been and continue to be made on the SILENE reactor in the following principal domains: determination of the emission rate of gaseous fission products and aerosols, area dosimetry and health dosimetry in the presence of shields around the core to vary the neutron and gamma components of the radiation field. Improvement in the knowledge of certain particular aspects of the power excursion, radiolysis gas and pressure wave, experiments of the ''boiling'' type [fr

  2. Severe accident management. Optimized guidelines and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, Matthias; Löffler, Micha; Plank, Hermann; Asse, Dietmar; Dimmelmeier, Harald

    2014-01-01

    The highest priority for mitigating the consequences of a severe accident with core melt lies in securing containment integrity, as this represents the last barrier against fission product release to the environment. Containment integrity is endangered by several physical phenomena, especially highly transient phenomena following high-pressure reactor pressure vessel failure (like direct containment heating or steam explosions which can lead to early containment failure), hydrogen combustion, quasi-static over-pressure, temperature failure of penetrations, and basemat penetration by core melt. Each of these challenges can be counteracted by dedicated severe accident mitigation hardware, like dedicated primary circuit depressurization valves, hydrogen recombiners or igniters, filtered containment venting, containment cooling systems, and core melt stabilization systems (if available). However, besides their main safety function these systems often have also secondary effects that need to be considered. Filtered containment venting causes (though limited) fission product release into the environment, primary circuit depressurization leads to loss of coolant, and an ex-vessel core melt stabilization system as well as hydrogen igniters can generate high pressure and temperature loads on the containment. To ensure that during a severe accident any available systems are used to their full beneficial extent while minimizing their potential negative impact, AREVA has implemented a severe accident management for German nuclear power plants. This concept makes use of extensive numerical simulations of the entire plant, quantifying the impact of system activations (operational systems, safety systems, as well as dedicated severe accident systems) on the accident progression for various scenarios. Based on the knowledge gained, a handbook has been developed, allowing the plant operators to understand the current state of the plant (supported by computational aids), to predict

  3. Use of NUREG-1150 and IPEs in accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauersberger

    1992-01-01

    The fundamental objective of the accident management program is to assure, in the event of a severe accident at a nuclear plant, that the effectiveness of personnel and equipment is maximized in preventing or mitigating the consequences of the accident. This document studies the use of NUREG-1150 and IPEs in accident management. Figs

  4. Chernobyl reactor accident: medical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, G.K.

    1996-01-01

    Chernobyl reactor accident on 26th April, 1986 is by far the worst radiation accident in the history of the nuclear industry. Nearly 500 plant personnel and rescue workers received doses varying from 1-16 Gy. Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) was seen only in the plant personnel. 499 individuals were screened for ARS symptoms like nausea, vomitting, diarrhoea and fever. Complete blood examination was done which showed initial granulocytosis followed by granulocytopenia and lymphocytopenia. Cytogenetic examinations were confirmatory in classifying the patients on the basis of the doses received. Two hundred and thirty seven cases of ARS were hospitalised in the first 24-36 hrs. No member of general public suffered from ARS. There were two immediate deaths and subsequently 28 died in hospital and one of the cases died due to myocardial infarction, making a total of 31 deaths. The majority of fatal cases had whole body doses of about 6 Gy, besides extensive skin burns. Two cases of radiation burns had thermal burns also. Treatment of ARS consisted of isolation, barrier nursing, replacement therapy with fluid electrolytes, platelets and RBC transfusions and antibiotic therapy for bacterial, fungal and viral infections. Bone marrow transplantations were given to 13 cases out of which 11 died due to various causes. Radiation burns due to beta, gamma radiations were seen in 56 cases and treated with dressings, surgical excision, skin grafting and amputation. Oropharangeal syndrome, producing extensive mucous in the oropharynx, was first seen in Chernobyl. The patients were treated with saline wash of the mouth. The patients who had radioactive contamination due to radioactive iodine were given stable iodine, following wash with soap, water and monitored. Fourteen survivors died subsequently due to other causes. Late health effects seen so far include excess of thyroid cancer in the children and psychological disorders due to stress. No excess leukemia has been reported so

  5. Lessons from Chernobyl post-accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, T.

    2012-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident has shown that the long-term management of its consequences is not straightforward. The management of the consequences has revealed the complexity of the situation to deal with. The long-term contamination of the environment has affected all the dimensions of the daily life of the inhabitants living in affected territories: health, environment, social life, education, work, distribution of foodstuffs and commodities... The experience from the Chernobyl accident shows 4 key issues that may be beneficial for the populations living in territories affected by the Fukushima accident: 1) the direct involvement of the inhabitants in their own protection, 2) the radiation monitoring system and health surveillance at the local level, 3) to develop a practical radiation protection culture among the population, and 4) the setting up of economic measures to favour the local development. (A.C.)

  6. Management of foodstuffs after nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A model for the management of foodstuffs after nuclear accidents is presented. The model is a synthesis of traditions and principles taken from both radioactive protection and management of food. It is based on cooperation between the Nordic countries and on practical experience gained from the Chernobyl accident. The aim of the model is to produce a basis for common plans for critical situations based on criteria for decision making. In the case of radioactive accidents it is important that the protection of the public and of the society is handled in a positive way. The model concerns production, marketing and consumption of food and beverage. The overall aim is that the radiation doses should be as low and harmless to health for individual members of the public. (CLS) 35 refs

  7. Manual for the classification and prioritization of risks due to major accidents in process and related industries. Inter-Agency programme on the assessment and management of health and environmental risks from energy and other complex industrial systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The IAEA, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) decided in 1986 to join forces in order to promote the use of integrated areas wide approaches to risk management. The Inter-Agency Programme brings together expertise in health, the environment, industry and energy, all vital for effective risk management. The purpose of the Inter-Agency Programme is to develop a broad approach to the identification, prioritization and minimization of industrial hazards in a given geographical area. This is one of a series of publications intended to be issued on behalf of the four participating UN organizations. This is the first revision of the original report, distributed in December 1993. The revision was undertaken in the light of experience with the original edition and was prompted by the wish to add the results of a practical case study and some new developments. 13 figs, 23 tabs

  8. Development of severe accident management advisory and training simulator (SAMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, K.-S.; Kim, K.-R.; Jung, W.-D.; Ha, J.-J.

    2002-01-01

    The most operator support systems including the training simulator have been developed to assist the operator and they cover from normal operation to emergency operation. For the severe accident, the overall architecture for severe accident management is being developed in some developed countries according to the development of severe accident management guidelines which are the skeleton of severe accident management architecture. In Korea, the severe accident management guideline for KSNP was recently developed and it is expected to be a central axis of logical flow for severe accident management. There are a lot of uncertainties in the severe accident phenomena and scenarios and one of the major issues for developing a operator support system for a severe accident is the reduction of these uncertainties. In this paper, the severe accident management advisory system with training simulator, SAMAT, is developed as all available information for a severe accident are re-organized and provided to the management staff in order to reduce the uncertainties. The developed system includes the graphical display for plant and equipment status, the previous research results by knowledge-base technique, and the expected plant behavior using the severe accident training simulator. The plant model used in this paper is oriented to severe accident phenomena and thus can simulate the plant behavior for a severe accident. Therefore, the developed system may make a central role of the information source for decision-making for a severe accident management, and will be used as the training simulator for severe accident management

  9. Evaluation of severe accident environmental conditions taking accident management strategy into account for equipment survivability assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Chul; Jeong, Ji Hwan; Na, Man Gyun; Kim, Soong Pyung

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology utilizing accident management strategy in order to determine accident environmental conditions in equipment survivability assessments. In case that there is well-established accident management strategy for specific nuclear power plant, an application of this tool can provide a technical rationale on equipment survivability assessment so that plant-specific and time-dependent accident environmental conditions could be practically and realistically defined in accordance with the equipment and instrumentation required for accident management strategy or action appropriately taken. For this work, three different tools are introduced; Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) outcomes, major accident management strategy actions, and Accident Environmental Stages (AESs). In order to quantitatively investigate an applicability of accident management strategy to equipment survivability, the accident simulation for a most likely scenario in Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants (KSNPs) is performed with MAAP4 code. The Accident Management Guidance (AMG) actions such as the Reactor Control System (RCS) depressurization, water injection into the RCS, the containment pressure and temperature control, and hydrogen concentration control in containment are applied. The effects of these AMG actions on the accident environmental conditions are investigated by comparing with those from previous normal accident simulation, especially focused on equipment survivability assessment. As a result, the AMG-involved case shows the higher accident consequences along the accident environmental stages

  10. Implementation of severe accident management measures - Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the meeting were: 1) to exchange information on activities in the area of SAM implementation and on the rationale for such actions, 2) to monitor progress made, 3) to identify cases of agreement or disagreement, 4) to discuss future orientations of work, 5) to make recommendations to the CSNI. Session summaries prepared by the Chairpersons and discussed by the whole writing group are given in Annex. During the first session, 'SAM Programmes Implementation', papers from one regulator and several utilities and national research institutes were presented to outline the status of implementation of SAM programmes in countries like Switzerland, Russia, Spain, Finland, Belgium and Korea. Also, the contribution of SAM to the safety of Japanese plants (in terms of core damage frequency) was quantified in a paper. One paper gave an overview on the situation regarding SAM implementation in Europe. The second session, 'SAM Approach', provided background and bases for Severe Accident Management in countries like Sweden, Japan, Germany and Switzerland, as well as for hardware features in advanced light water reactor designs, such as the European Pressurised Reactor (EPR), regarding Severe Accident Management. The third session, 'SAM Mitigation Measures', was about hardware measures, in particular those oriented towards hydrogen mitigation where fundamentally different approaches have been taken in Scandinavian countries, France, Germany and Korea. Three papers addressed specific contributions from research to provide a broader basis for the assumptions made in certain computer codes used for the assessment of plant risk arising from beyond-design accident sequences. The fourth session, 'Implementation of SAM Measures on VVER-1000 Reactors', was about the status of work on Severe Accident Management implementation in VVER reactors of existing design and in a new plant currently under construction. The overall picture is that Severe Accident Management has been

  11. Summary and conclusions: Specialist Meeting on Severe Accident Management Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    During the first session of this meeting, regulators, research groups, designers/owners' groups and some utilities discussed the critical decisions in SAM (Severe Accident Management), how these decisions were addressed and implemented in generic SAM guidelines, what equipment and instrumentation was used, what are the differences in national approaches, etc. During the second session, papers were presented by utility specialists that described approaches chosen for specific implementation of the generic guidelines, the difficulties encountered in the implementation process and the perceived likelihood of success of their SAM programme in dealing with severe accidents. The third and final sessions was dedicated to discussing what are the remaining uncertainties and open questions in SAM. Experts from several OECD countries presented significant perspectives on remaining open issues

  12. Road accident rates: strategies and programmes for improving road traffic safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniewicz, K; Goniewicz, M; Pawłowski, W; Fiedor, P

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, the problem of road accident rates is one of the most important health and social policy issues concerning the countries in all continents. Each year, nearly 1.3 million people worldwide lose their life on roads, and 20-50 million sustain severe injuries, the majority of which require long-term treatment. The objective of the study was to identify the most frequent, constantly occurring causes of road accidents, as well as outline actions constituting a basis for the strategies and programmes aiming at improving traffic safety on local and global levels. Comparative analysis of literature concerning road safety was performed, confirming that although road accidents had a varied and frequently complex background, their causes have changed only to a small degree over the years. The causes include: lack of control and enforcement concerning implementation of traffic regulation (primarily driving at excessive speed, driving under the influence of alcohol, and not respecting the rights of other road users (mainly pedestrians and cyclists), lack of appropriate infrastructure and unroadworthy vehicles. The number of fatal accidents and severe injuries, resulting from road accidents, may be reduced through applying an integrated approach to safety on roads. The strategies and programmes for improving road traffic should include the following measures: reducing the risk of exposure to an accident, prevention of accidents, reduction in bodily injuries sustained in accidents, and reduction of the effects of injuries by improvement of post-accident medical care.

  13. Managing severe reactor accidents. A review and evaluation of our knowledge on reactor accidents and accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Veine

    2002-11-01

    The report gives a review of the results from the last years research on severe reactor accidents, and an opinion on the possibilities to refine the present strategies for accident management in Swedish and Finnish BWRs. The following aspect of reactor accidents are the major themes of the study: 1. Early pressure relief from hydrogen production; 2. Recriticality in re-flooded, degraded core; 3. Melt-through; 4. Steam explosion after melt-through; 5. Coolability of the melt after after melt-through; 6. Hydrogen fire in the reactor containment; 7. Leaking containment; 8. Hydrogen fire in the reactor building; 9. Long-time developments after a severe accident; 10. Accidents during shutdown for overhaul; 11. Information need for remedial actions. Possibilities for improving the strategies in each of these areas are discussed. The review shows that our knowledge is sufficient in the areas 1, 2, 4, 6, 8. For the other areas, more research is needed

  14. Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    As an early response to the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident, the Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) Bureau decided to focus on the following issues as an initial response of the joint program after having direct communications with the Japanese official participants in April 2011: - Management of high radiation area worker doses: It has been decided to make available the experience and information from the Chernobyl accident in terms of how emergency worker / responder doses were legally and practically managed, - Personal protective equipment for highly-contaminated areas: It was agreed to collect information about the types of personnel protective equipment and other equipment (e.g. air bottles, respirators, air-hoods or plastic suits, etc.), as well as high-radiation area worker dosimetry use (e.g. type, number and placement of dosimetry) for different types of emergency and high-radiation work situations. Detailed information was collected on dose criteria which are used for emergency workers /responders and their basis, dose management criteria for high dose/dose rate areas, protective equipment which is recommended for emergency workers / responders, recommended individual monitoring procedures, and any special requirement for assessment from the ISOE participating nuclear utilities and regulatory authorities and made available for Japanese utilities. With this positive response of the ISOE official participants and interest in the situation in Fukushima, the Expert Group on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management (EG-SAM) was established by the ISOE Management Board in May 2011. The overall objective of the EG-SAM is to contribute to occupational exposure management (providing a view on management of high radiation area worker doses) within the Fukushima plant boundary with the ISOE participants and to develop a state-of-the-art ISOE report on best radiation protection management practices for proper radiation

  15. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    A recently completed Oak Ridge effort proposes two management strategies for mitigation of the events that might occur in-vessel after the onset of significant core damage in a BWR severe accident. While the probability of such an accident is low, there may be effective yet inexpensive mitigation measures that could be implemented employing the existing plant equipment and requiring only additions to the plant emergency procedures. In this spirit, accident management strategies have been proposed for use of a borated solution for reactor vessel refill should control blade damage occur during a period of temporary core dryout and for containment flooding to maintain the core debris within the reactor vessel if injection systems cannot be restored. The proposed strategy for poisoning of the water used for vessel reflood should injection systems be restored after control blade damage has occurred has great promise, using only the existing plant equipment but employing a different chemical form for the boron poison. The dominant BWR severe accident sequence is Station Blackout and without means for mechanical stirring or heating of the storage tank, the question of being able to form the poisoned solution under accident conditions becomes of supreme importance. On the other hand, the proposed strategy for drywell flooding to cool the reactor vessel bottom head and prevent the core and structure debris from escaping to the drywell holds less promise. This strategy does, however, have potential for future plant designs in which passive methods might be employed to completely submerge the reactor vessel under severe accident conditions without the need for containment venting

  16. Severe accidents at nuclear power plants. Their risk assessment and accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Kiyoharu.

    1995-05-01

    This document is to explain the severe accident issues. Severe Accidents are defined as accidents which are far beyond the design basis and result in severe damage of the core. Accidents at Three Mild Island in USA and at Chernobyl in former Soviet Union are examples of severe accidents. The causes and progressions of the accidents as well as the actions taken are described. Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is a method to estimate the risk of severe accidents at nuclear reactors. The methodology for PSA is briefly described and current status on its application to safety related issues is introduced. The acceptability of the risks which inherently accompany every technology is then discussed. Finally, provision of accident management in Japan is introduced, including the description of accident management measures proposed for BWRs and PWRs. (author)

  17. Artificial intelligence applications in accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    For nuclear power plant accident management, there are some addition concerns: linking AI systems to live data streams must be mastered; techniques for processing sensor inputs with varying data quality need to be provided; systems responsiveness to changing plant conditions and multiple user requests should, in general, be improved; there is a need for porting applications from specialized AI machines onto conventional computer hardware without incurring unacceptable performance penalties; human factors guidelines are required for new user interfaces in AI applications; methods for verification and validation of AI-based systems must be developed; and, finally, there is a need for proven methods to evaluate use effectiveness and firmly establish the benefits of AI-based accident management systems. (orig./GL)

  18. Application of NUREG-1150 methods and results to accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.; Sype, T.; Camp, A.; Maloney, K.

    1991-01-01

    The use of NUREG-1150 and similar probabilistic risk assessments in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and industry risk management programs is discussed. Risk management is more comprehensive than the commonly used term accident management. Accident management includes strategies to prevent vessel breach, mitigate radionuclide releases from the reactor coolant system, and mitigate radionuclide releases to the environment. Risk management also addresses prevention of accident initiators, prevention of core damage, and implementation of effective emergency response procedures. The methods and results produced in NUREG-1150 provide a framework within which current risk management strategies can be evaluated, and future risk management programs can be developed and assessed. Examples of the use of the NUREG-1150 framework for identifying and evaluating risk management options are presented. All phases of risk management are discussed, with particular attention given to the early phases of accidents. Plans and methods for evaluating accident management strategies that have been identified in the NRC accident management program are discussed

  19. Application of NUREG-1150 methods and results to accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.; Sype, T.; Camp, A.; Maloney, K.

    1990-01-01

    The use of NUREG-1150 and similar Probabilistic Risk Assessments in NRC and industry risk management programs is discussed. ''Risk management'' is more comprehensive than the commonly used term ''accident management.'' Accident management includes strategies to prevent vessel breach, mitigate radionuclide releases from the reactor coolant system, and mitigate radionuclide releases to the environment. Risk management also addresses prevention of accident initiators, prevention of core damage, and implementation of effective emergency response procedures. The methods and results produced in NUREG-1150 provide a framework within which current risk management strategies can be evaluated, and future risk management programs can be developed and assessed. Examples of the use of the NUREG-1150 framework for identifying and evaluating risk management options are presented. All phases of risk management are discussed, with particular attention given to the early phases of accidents. Plans and methods for evaluating accident management strategies that have been identified in the NRC accident management program are discussed. 2 refs., 3 figs

  20. Developing a knowledge base for the management of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.; Jenkins, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Prior to the accident at Three Mile Island, little attention was given to the development of procedures for the management of severe accidents, that is, accidents in which the reactor core is damaged. Since TMI, however, significant effort has been devoted to developing strategies for severe accident management. At the same time, the potential application of artificial intelligence techniques, particularly expert systems, to complex decision-making tasks such as accident diagnosis and response has received considerable attention. The need to develop strategies for accident management suggests that a computerized knowledge base such as used by an expert system could be developed to collect and organize knowledge for severe accident management. This paper suggests a general method which could be used to develop such a knowledge base, and how it could be used to enhance accident management capabilities

  1. International programme to mitigate the health effects of the Chernobyl accident: Establishment of an international centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    In April 1990, an agreement was signed between the WHO and the USSR Ministry of Health to set up a long-term international programme to assist the populations affected by the Chernobyl accident, as well as to increase the body of scientific knowledge about radiation effects. This report outlines the contents of the agreement and describes the action taken by the WHO to implement the programme

  2. The expert assistant in accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goddard, A.J.H.; Cannell, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    In the event of a nuclear accident in proximity to an urban area, the consequences resulting from the complex processes of environmental transport of radioactivity would require complex countermeasures. Emphasis has been placed on either modelling the potential effects of such an event on the population, or on attempting to predict the geographical evolution of the release. Less emphasis has been placed on the development of accident management aids with a in-built data acquisition capability. Given the problems of predicting the evolution of an accidental release of activity, more emphasis should be placed on the development of small regional systems specifically engineered to acquire and display environmental data in the most efficaceous form possible. A wealth of information can be obtained from appropriately-sited outstations which can aid those responsible for countermeasures in their decision making processes. The substantial volume of data which would arrive within the duration and during the aftermath of an accident requires skilled interpretation under conditions of considerable stress. It is necessary that a management aid notonly presents these data in a rapidly assimilable form, but is capable of making intelligent decisions of its own, on such matters as information display priority and the polling frequency of outstations. The requirement is for an expert assistant. The XERSES accident management aid has been designed with the foregoing features in mind. Intended for covering regions up to approximately 100 kms square, it links with between 1 and 64 outstations supplying a variety of environmental data. Under quiescent conditions the system will operate unattended, raising alarms remotely only when detecting abnormal conditions. Under emergency conditions, the system automatically adjusts such operating parameters as data acquisition rate

  3. ADAM: An Accident Diagnostic,Analysis and Management System - Applications to Severe Accident Simulation and Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavisca, M.J.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Esmaili, H.; Schulz, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Accident Diagnostic, Analysis and Management (ADAM) computer code has been developed as a tool for on-line applications to accident diagnostics, simulation, management and training. ADAM's severe accident simulation capabilities incorporate a balance of mechanistic, phenomenologically based models with simple parametric approaches for elements including (but not limited to) thermal hydraulics; heat transfer; fuel heatup, meltdown, and relocation; fission product release and transport; combustible gas generation and combustion; and core-concrete interaction. The overall model is defined by a relatively coarse spatial nodalization of the reactor coolant and containment systems and is advanced explicitly in time. The result is to enable much faster than real time (i.e., 100 to 1000 times faster than real time on a personal computer) applications to on-line investigations and/or accident management training. Other features of the simulation module include provision for activation of water injection, including the Engineered Safety Features, as well as other mechanisms for the assessment of accident management and recovery strategies and the evaluation of PSA success criteria. The accident diagnostics module of ADAM uses on-line access to selected plant parameters (as measured by plant sensors) to compute the thermodynamic state of the plant, and to predict various margins to safety (e.g., times to pressure vessel saturation and steam generator dryout). Rule-based logic is employed to classify the measured data as belonging to one of a number of likely scenarios based on symptoms, and a number of 'alarms' are generated to signal the state of the reactor and containment. This paper will address the features and limitations of ADAM with particular focus on accident simulation and management. (authors)

  4. Method of assessing severe accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K.; Okrent, D.; Jae, M.; Lim, H.; Milici, T.; Park, H.; Swider, J.; Xing, L.; Yu, D.

    1991-01-01

    Accident management can be defined as the innovative use of existing and or alternative resources, systems, and actions to prevent or mitigate a severe accident. A significant number of probabilistic safety assessments (PSAs) have been completed that yield the principal plant vulnerabilities. These vulnerabilities can be categorized as (1) dominant sequences with respect to core-melt frequency. (2) dominant sequences with respect to various risk measures. (3) dominant threats that challenge safety functions. (4) dominant threats with respect to failure of safety systems. For each sequence/threat and each combination of strategy, there may be several options available to the operator. Each strategy/option involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. These considerations include uncertainties in key phenomena, operator behavior, system availability and behavior, and available information. This paper presents a methodology for assessing severe accident management strategies given the key uncertainties delineated at two workshops held at the University of California, Los Angeles. Based on decision trees and influence diagrams, the methodology is currently being applied to two case studies: cavity flooding in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) to prevent vessel penetration or failure, and drywell flooding in a boiling water reactor to prevent vessel and/or containment failure

  5. Application of the accident management information needs methodology to a severe accident sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, L.W.; Hanson, D.J.; Nelson, W.R.; Solberg, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting an accident management research program that emphasizes the use of severe accident research to enhance the ability of plant operating personnel to effectively manage severe accidents. Hence, it is necessary to ensure that the plant instrumentation and information systems adequately provide this information to the operating staff during accident conditions. A methodology to identify and assess the information needs of the operating staff of a nuclear power plant during a severe accident has been developed. The methodology identifies (a) the information needs of the plant personnel during a wide range of accident conditions, (b) the existing plant measurements capable of supplying these information needs and minor additions to instrument and display systems that would enhance management capabilities, (c) measurement capabilities and limitations during severe accident conditions, and (d) areas in which the information systems could mislead plant personnel

  6. Application of the accident management information needs methodology to a severe accident sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, L.W.; Hanson, D.J.; Nelson, W.R. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls (USA)); Solberg, D.E. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting an accident management research program that emphasizes the use of severe accident research to enhance the ability of plant operating personnel to effectively manage severe accidents. Hence, it is necessary to ensure that the plant instrumentation and information systems adequately provide this information to the operating staff during accident conditions. A methodology to identify and assess the information needs of the operating staff of a nuclear power plant during a severe accident has been developed. The methodology identifies (a) the information needs of the plant personnel during a wide range of accident conditions, (b) the existing plant measurements capable of supplying these information needs and minor additions to instrument and display systems that would enhance management capabilities, (c) measurement capabilities and limitations during severe accident conditions, and (d) areas in which the information systems could mislead plant personnel.

  7. Severe accident management program at Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borondo, L.; Serrano, C.; Fiol, M.J.; Sanchez, A.

    2000-01-01

    Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant (GE BWR/6) has implemented its specific Severe Accident Management Program within this year 2000. New organization and guides have been developed to successfully undertake the management of a severe accident. In particular, the Technical Support Center will count on a new ''Severe Accident Management Team'' (SAMT) which will be in charge of the Severe Accident Guides (SAG) when Control Room Crew reaches the Emergency Operation Procedures (EOP) step that requires containment flooding. Specific tools and training have also been developed to help the SAMT to mitigate the accident. (author)

  8. Policy Pathways: Energy Management Programmes for Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-06

    The IEA Policy Pathway publications provide details on how to implement specific recommendations drawn from the IEA 25 Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations. This Policy Pathway, jointly produced by the International Energy Agency and the Institute for Industrial Productivity, develops the critical steps for policy makers implementing energy management programmes for industry. Optimising energy use in industry is essential to improve industrial competitiveness and achieve wider societal goals such as energy security, economic recovery and development, climate change mitigation and environmental protection.While there is significant potential to decrease energy consumption in this sector, opportunities to improve energy efficiency are still under-exploited. Energy management programmes have shown to be instrumental in addressing many of the barriers that inhibit wide-scale uptake of energy management in industry. The Policy Pathway builds on lessons learned from country experiences and provides actionable guidance on how to plan and design, implement, evaluate and monitor energy management programmes for industry.

  9. CANDU severe accident management guidance update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.; Popov, N.; Gilbert, L.; Weed, J.

    2014-01-01

    The CANDU Owners Group (COG) developed a set of generic and initial station-specific Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG) documents to mitigate the consequences to the public in the event of a severe accident. The generic portion of the COG SAMG was completed in 2006; the overall project including the station-specific phase was completed in April 2007. Over the years, the CANDU industry and utilities have continuously increased the knowledge base for SAMG and have incorporated various engineered features based on the knowledge obtained. As a result of the event that occurred at the Fukushima Daiiachi nuclear power plant (NPP) in Japan, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) established the CNSC Fukushima Task Force. The results of the task force were documented in INFO-0828, CNSC Staff Action Plan on the CNSC Fukushima Task Force Recommendations. Among the recommendation documented in INFO-828 were Fukushima Action Items (FAIs) directed towards the CANDU utilities in Canada; a portion of which are related to SAMG documentation updates and directed at enhancing SAM response. A COG joint project was established to support the closure of the CNSC FAIs and to revise the current CANDU documentation accordingly. This paper provides a high level summary of the COG project scope and results. It also demonstrates that the CANDU SAMG programs in Canada provide robust protection and mitigation of severe accidents. (author)

  10. CANDU severe accident management guidance update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, L., E-mail: lisa.m.jones@opg.com [Ontario Power Generation, Pickering, ON (Canada); Popov, N., E-mail: nik.popov@rogers.com [Candu Owners Group, Toronto, ON (Canada); Gilbert, L., E-mail: lovell.gilbert@brucepower.com [Bruce Power, Tiverton, ON (Canada); Weed, J., E-mail: jeff.weed@candu.gov [Candu Owners Group, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The CANDU Owners Group (COG) developed a set of generic and initial station-specific Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG) documents to mitigate the consequences to the public in the event of a severe accident. The generic portion of the COG SAMG was completed in 2006; the overall project including the station-specific phase was completed in April 2007. Over the years, the CANDU industry and utilities have continuously increased the knowledge base for SAMG and have incorporated various engineered features based on the knowledge obtained. As a result of the event that occurred at the Fukushima Daiiachi nuclear power plant (NPP) in Japan, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) established the CNSC Fukushima Task Force. The results of the task force were documented in INFO-0828, CNSC Staff Action Plan on the CNSC Fukushima Task Force Recommendations. Among the recommendation documented in INFO-828 were Fukushima Action Items (FAIs) directed towards the CANDU utilities in Canada; a portion of which are related to SAMG documentation updates and directed at enhancing SAM response. A COG joint project was established to support the closure of the CNSC FAIs and to revise the current CANDU documentation accordingly. This paper provides a high level summary of the COG project scope and results. It also demonstrates that the CANDU SAMG programs in Canada provide robust protection and mitigation of severe accidents. (author)

  11. Main post-accident management stakes: IRSN's point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre Oudiz

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Off site management of a radiological crisis covers two phases which need to be clearly distinguished even if there are links between them: emergency phase and recovery phase (also called late or post-accident phase). The presentation will deal with the latter, rather neglected up until recently, but conveying special attention from now on in France and at the international level. It is clear now that the long term management of a radiological or nuclear crisis cannot be reduced to merely site decontamination. Actually, environmental decontamination considerations would be only one amongst other essential economical, social, health, psychological, cultural, and symbolical concerns. This is why off site management of a radiological crisis requires innovative governance, in order to challenge such a complexity. This need for challenge led IRSN to have on the go technical developments and new governance modes reflection. 1) Technical developments: they deal with implementing an organisation, a set of methods, a platform of technical tools which would allow the stakeholders to carry out efficiently their mission during the recovery phase. For example, countermeasures for agricultural and urban rehabilitation are developed within the framework of the 6. PCRDT EURANOS programme. Teams from several countries are involved in common elaboration of rehabilitation strategies based on the best available knowledge. Besides this, simple operational decision aiding tools for the stakeholders (local administration, elected representatives, professional agricultural groups, etc.) are currently developed by IRSN within the framework of the nuclear post-accident exercises. IRSN is also involved in doctrinal reflections about the respective roles of radioactive measurements in the environment and radiological consequences calculation during emergency and recovery phases. Criteria for emergency countermeasures withdrawal are also currently under

  12. Indian programme on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattal, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of radioactive waste management is protection of human health, environment and future generation. This article describes, briefly, the Indian programme on management of different radioactive wastes arising in the entire nuclear fuel cycle adhering to this objective. (author)

  13. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007
Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Management Curriculum / curriculum Management Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 10, 11, 12 September, (full) Managing by Project (English) 9, 10 October (2 places disponibles) Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 15, 16, 17 October, (full) Introduction to Leadership (English) 17, 18, 19 October, (full) Quality Management (Bilingual) 18, 19 October (10 places available) Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (full) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (full) Risk Management (English) 13, 14 December (6 places available) Communication Curriculum / curriculum communication Stress Management (English) 25, 26 September (6 places...

  14. Spent fuel management in France: Programme status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudat, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    France's programme is best characterized as a closed fuel cycle including reprocessing, Plutonium recycling in PWR and use of breeder reactors. The current installed nuclear capacity is 52.5 GWe from 55 units. The spent fuel management scheme chosen is reprocessing. This paper describes the national programme, spent nuclear fuel storage, reprocessing and contracts for reprocessing of spent fuel from various countries. (author). 5 figs, 2 tabs

  15. A Methodology for Probabilistic Accident Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munteanu, Ion; Aldemir, Tunc

    2003-01-01

    While techniques have been developed to tackle different tasks in accident management, there have been very few attempts to develop an on-line operator assistance tool for accident management and none that can be found in the literature that uses probabilistic arguments, which are important in today's licensing climate. The state/parameter estimation capability of the dynamic system doctor (DSD) approach is combined with the dynamic event-tree generation capability of the integrated safety assessment (ISA) methodology to address this issue. The DSD uses the cell-to-cell mapping technique for system representation that models the system evolution in terms of probability of transitions in time between sets of user-defined parameter/state variable magnitude intervals (cells) within a user-specified time interval (e.g., data sampling interval). The cell-to-cell transition probabilities are obtained from the given system model. The ISA follows the system dynamics in tree form and braches every time a setpoint for system/operator intervention is exceeded. The combined approach (a) can automatically account for uncertainties in the monitored system state, inputs, and modeling uncertainties through the appropriate choice of the cells, as well as providing a probabilistic measure to rank the likelihood of possible system states in view of these uncertainties; (b) allows flexibility in system representation; (c) yields the lower and upper bounds on the estimated values of state variables/parameters as well as their expected values; and (d) leads to fewer branchings in the dynamic event-tree generation. Using a simple but realistic pressurizer model, the potential use of the DSD-ISA methodology for on-line probabilistic accident management is illustrated

  16. Risk impact of two accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.; Camp, A.

    1992-01-01

    This report probabilistic Risk Assessment is used to evaluate two accident management strategies: intentionally depressurizing the reactor coolant system of a pressurized water reactor to prevent containment-pressurization during high pressure melt ejection, and flooding the containment of a boiling water reactor to prevent or delay vessel breach. Sensitivity studies indicated that intentional depressurization would not provide a significant risk reduction at Surry. A preliminary evaluation of the containment flooding strategy indicated that it might prove beneficial for some plants, but that further strategy development would be needed to fully evaluate the strategy-

  17. Developing and assessing accident management plans for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.J.; Johnson, S.P.; Blackman, H.S.; Stewart, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    This document is the second of a two-volume NUREG/CR that discusses development of accident management plans for nuclear power plants. The first volume (a) describes a four-phase approach for developing criteria that could be used for assessing the adequacy of accident management plans, (b) identifies the general attributes of accident management plans (Phase 1), (c) presents a prototype process for developing and implementing severe accident management plans (Phase 2), and (d) presents criteria that can be used to assess the adequacy of accident management plans. This volume (a) describes results from an evaluation of the capabilities of the prototype process to produce an accident management plan (Phase 3) and (b), based on these results and preliminary criteria included in NUREG/CR-5543, presents modifications to the criteria where appropriate

  18. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007 Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier.   Management Curriculum / curriculum Management NEW COURSE - Dealing with Conflict, 5 & 12 October (6 places available) Managing by Project (English) 9, 10 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 15, 16, 17 October\t(Full) Introduction to Leadership (English) 17, 18, 19 October\t(Full) Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (1 place available) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Risk Management (English) 13, 14 December (6 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercice) - 
Session to be scheduled from November 2007 to January 2008 &...

  19. International Nuclear Management Programmes -- INMP-- (VNMU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    • INMP is an IAEA-facilitated collaboration for universities to provide master’s degree programs in nuclear management, targeting managers or future managers working in the nuclear sector. • There are currently no full master’s degree programmes specializing in management for the nuclear sector. • Managers at NPP are typically engineers with few chances of formal management education. • In newcomer countries to nuclear energy, working towards the introduction of nuclear power, often lack technical or managerial experience in nuclear energy

  20. Use of probabilistic safety analyses in severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neogy, P.; Lehner, J.

    1991-01-01

    An important consideration in the development and assessment of severe accident management strategies is that while the strategies are often built on the knowledge base of Probabilistic Safety Analyses (PSA), they must be interpretable and meaningful in terms of the control room indicators. In the following, the relationships between PSA and severe accident management are explored using ex-vessel accident management at a PWR ice-condenser plant as an example. 2 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  1. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007 Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Management Curriculum / curriculum Management Managing by Project (English)\t9, 10 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact (English)\t15, 16, 17 October, (Full) Introduction to Leadership (English)\t17, 18, 19 October, (Full) Managing Teams (English)\t13, 14, 15 November\t(1 place available)) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual)\t20, 21, 22 November (Full) Risk Management (English)\t13, 14 December (6 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercice) Session to be scheduled from November 2007 to January 2008 Communication Curriculum / curriculum communication Stress Management (English)\t25, 26 September (4 p...

  2. Emergency room management of radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Emergency room management of radioactively contaminated patients who have an associated medical injury requiring immediate attention must be handled with care. Radioactive contamination of the skin of a worker is not a medical emergency and is usually dealt with at the plant. Effective preplanning and on-the-scene triage will allow the seriously injured and contaminated patients to get the medical care they need with a minimum of confusion and interference. Immediate medical and surgical priorities always take precedence over radiation injuries and radioactive contamination. Probably the most difficult aspect of emergency management is the rarity of such accidents and hence the unfamiliarity of the medical staff with the appropriate procedures. The authors discuss how the answer to these problems is preplanning, having a simple and workable procedure and finally having 24-h access to experts

  3. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from October to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Leadership - 2 October, 29 October + 1 December - (full) CDP-SL for new supervisors, part 1 - 5, 6, 7 October - (2 places available) Introduction to Leadership - 7, 8, 9 October - (4 places available) Voice your Leadership - 13, 14 October - (full) Managing Teams - 10, 11, 12 November - (7 places available) Risk Management - 17, 18 November - (6 places available) Dealing with Conflict - 20, 27 November - (5 places available) CDP pour nouveaux superviseurs, part 1 - 30 novembre, 1, 2 décembre - (4 places disponibles) Communication Curriculum Making presentations - 14, 15 October + 9 November - (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe - 19, 20 octobre - (7 places disponibles) Gestion du stress - 20, 21 octobre - (8 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement - 21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novemb...

  4. Application of the accident management information needs methodology to a severe accident sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, L.W.; Hanson, D.J.; Nelson, W.R.; Solberg, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an Accident Management Research Program that emphasizes the application of severe accident research results to enhance the capability of plant operating personnel to effectively manage severe accidents. A methodology to identify and assess the information needs of the operating staff of a nuclear power plant during a severe accident has been developed as part of the research program designed to resolve this issue. The methodology identifies the information needs of the plant personnel during a wide range of accident conditions, the existing plant measurements capable of supplying these information needs and what, if any minor additions to instrument and display systems would enhance the capability to manage accidents, known limitations on the capability of these measurements to function properly under the conditions that will be present during a wide range of severe accidents, and areas in which the information systems could mislead plant personnel. This paper presents an application of this methodology to a severe accident sequence to demonstrate its use in identifying the information which is available for management of the event. The methodology has been applied to a severe accident sequence in a Pressurized Water Reactor with a large dry containment. An examination of the capability of the existing measurements was then performed to determine whether the information needs can be supplied

  5. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Calendar of courses for February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Management Curriculum Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 3, 4, 5 February (part 1) + 13, 14 May 2009 (part 2) (full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2) 24, 25, 26 February (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (2 places available) Quality Management 25, 26 March (10 places available) Introduction to Leadership 1, 2, 3 April (3 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact 5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (8 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (4 places available) Communication Curriculum Managing stress\t23, 24 February (6 places available) Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (2 places available) Négociation efficace\t17, 18 mar...

  6. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 3, 4, 5 February (part 1) + 13, 14 May 2009 (part 2)\t(full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2) 24, 25, 26 February (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (2 places available) Quality Management\t25, 26 March (10 places available) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (3 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (8 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (4 places available) Communication Curriculum Managing stress\t23, 24 February (6 places available) Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (2 places available) Négociation efficace\t17, 18 mars (6 places d...

  7. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (5 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (2 places available) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (8 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (2 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (1 place disponible) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1...

  8. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (2 places available) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (6 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (full) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (3 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (complet) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (complet) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1 place disponible) Serv...

  9. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (2 places available) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (6 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (full) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (3 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (complet) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (complet) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1 place disponible) Service Orientation/Orienta...

  10. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from November to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (4 places available) CDP pour nouveaux superviseurs, part 1\t30 novembre, 1, 2 décembre (2 places disponibles) Managing by Project\t1, 2 December (full) Communication Curriculum Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (complet) Managing Stress\t10, 11 November (6 places available) Communicating Effectively\t11, 12 November + 8, 9 December (4 places available) Orientation service\t12, 13 novembre (5 places disponibles) Gestion du stress\t17, 18 novembre (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à une réunion de travail\t9, 10, 11 décembre (3 places disponibles) If you are interested in attending any of the above course sessions, please talk to your supervisor and/or your DTO, and apply electronically via EDH from the course description p...

  11. ATHLET validation using accident management experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teschendorff, V.; Glaeser, H.; Steinhoff, F. [Gasellschaft fuer Anlagen - und Reaktorsicherheit (GSR) mbH, Garching (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    The computer code ATHLET is being developed as an advanced best-estimate code for the simulation of leaks and transients in PWRs and BWRs including beyond design basis accidents. The code has features that are of special interest for applications to small leaks and transients with accident management, e.g. initialisation by a steady-state calculation, full-range drift-flux model, and dynamic mixture level tracking. The General Control Simulation Module of ATHLET is a flexible tool for the simulation of the balance-of-plant and control systems including the various operator actions in the course of accident sequences with AM measures. The systematic validation of ATHLET is based on a well balanced set of integral and separate effect tests derived from the CSNI proposal emphasising, however, the German combined ECC injection system which was investigated in the UPTF, PKL and LOBI test facilities. PKL-III test B 2.1 simulates a cool-down procedure during an emergency power case with three steam generators isolated. Natural circulation under these conditions was investigated in detail in a pressure range of 4 to 2 MPa. The transient was calculated over 22000 s with complicated boundary conditions including manual control actions. The calculations demonstrations the capability to model the following processes successfully: (1) variation of the natural circulation caused by steam generator isolation, (2) vapour formation in the U-tubes of the isolated steam generators, (3) break-down of circulation in the loop containing the isolated steam generator following controlled cool-down of the secondary side, (4) accumulation of vapour in the pressure vessel dome. One conclusion with respect to the suitability of experiments simulating AM procedures for code validation purposes is that complete documentation of control actions during the experiment must be available. Special attention should be given to the documentation of operator actions in the course of the experiment.

  12. Management of Radioactive Waste after a Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, Per; Laurent, Gerard; Rindo, Hiroshi; Georges, Christine; Ito, Eiichiro; Yamada, Norikazu; Iablokov, Iuri; Kilochytska, Tatiana; Jefferies, Nick; Byrne, Jim; Siemann, Michael; Koganeya, Toshiyuki; Aoki, Hiroomi

    2016-01-01

    The NEA Expert Group on Fukushima Waste Management and Decommissioning R and D (EGFWMD) was established in 2014 to offer advice to the authorities in Japan on the management of large quantities of on-site waste with complex properties and to share experiences with the international community and NEA member countries on ongoing work at the Fukushima Daiichi site. The group was formed with specialists from around the world who had gained experience in waste management, radiological contamination or decommissioning and waste management R and D after the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents. This report provides technical opinions and ideas from these experts on post-accident waste management and R and D at the Fukushima Daiichi site, as well as information on decommissioning challenges. Chapter 1 provides general descriptions and a short introduction to nuclear accidents or radiological contaminations; for instance the Chernobyl NPP accident, the Three Mile Island Unit 2 accident and the Windscale fire accident. Chapter 2 provides experiences on regulator-implementer interaction in both normal and abnormal situations, including after a nuclear accident. Chapter 3 provides experiences on stakeholder involvement after accidents. These two chapters focus on human aspects after an accident and provide recommendations on how to improve communication between stakeholders so as to resolve issues arising after unexpected nuclear accidents. Chapters 4, 5 and 6 provide information on technical issues related to waste management after accidents. Chapter 4 focuses on the physical and chemical nature of the waste, Chapter 5 on radiological characterisation, and Chapter 6 on waste classification and categorisation. The persons involved in waste management after an accident should address these issues as soon as possible after the accident. Chapters 7 and 8 also focus on technical issues but with a long-term perspective of the waste direction in the future. Chapter 7 relates

  13. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Quality Management\t25, 26 March\t(6 places available) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (2 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (1 place available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (3 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars (4 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (9 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (4 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (6 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Nég...

  14. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Calendar of courses for October to December 2008 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Management Curriculum Introduction to Leadership\t15, 16, 17 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 October (full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2)\t11, 12, 13 November (full) Risk Management\t13, 14 November (5 places available) Managing Teams\t18, 19, 20 November (2 places available) Communicating to Convince\t19, 20 November (5 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 25, 26, 27 November (part 1) + 3, 4 March 2009 (part 2) (full) Core Development Package pour nouveaux superviseurs et chefs de section (3 + 2 jours) 9, 10, 11 décembre (partie 1) + 21, 22 avril 2009 (partie 2) (full) Communication Curriculum Communicating Effectively\t21, 22 October + 27, 28 November (4 places available)\tCommuniquer efficacement\t23, 24 octobre + 2...

  15. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (2 places available) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Quality Management\t12, 13 May (6 places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (2 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t30 June + 1 July (6 places available) Communicating to Convince\t22, 23 June (7 places available) Communication Curriculum Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (3 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 mai + 23 juin + 7 juillet (3 places disponibles) Making presentations\t13, 14 May + 11 June (Full) Writing of Successful FP7 Proposals\t26 May (20 places available) Communicating Effectively\t8, 29 May + 22, 23 June (2 places available) If you are interested in attending any of the above course sessio...

  16. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1994-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for the management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after-core degradation has occurred) of postulated boiling water reactor (BWR) severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities, and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for further assessment. The first was a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertained to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose was to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies were performed during 1991 and this paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies, and the potential for their success. ((orig.))

  17. Assessment of two BWR accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Petek, M.

    1991-01-01

    Candidate mitigative strategies for management of in-vessel events during the late phase (after core degradation has occurred) of postulated BWR severe accidents were considered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during 1990. The identification of new strategies was subject to the constraint that they should, to the maximum extent possible, make use of the existing equipment and water resources of the BWR facilities and not require major equipment modifications or additions. As a result of this effort, two of these candidate strategies were recommended for additional assessment. The first is a strategy for containment flooding to maintain the core and structural debris within the reactor vessel in the event that vessel injection cannot be restored to terminate a severe accident sequence. The second strategy pertains to the opposite case, for which vessel injection would be restored after control blade melting had begun; its purpose is to provide an injection source of borated water at the concentration necessary to preclude criticality upon recovering a damaged BWR core. Assessments of these two strategies have been performed during 1991 under the auspices of the Detailed Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Strategies Program. This paper provides a discussion of the motivation for and purpose of these strategies and the potential for their success. 33 refs., 9 figs

  18. Accident management strategy in Sweden - implementation and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenhielm, Gustaf; Engqvist, Alf; Espefaelt, Ralf

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive program for severe accident mitigation was completed in Sweden by the end of 1988. As described in this paper, this program included plant modifications such as the introduction of filtered containment venting, and an accident management system comprising emergency operating strategies and procedures, training and emergency drills. The accident management system at Vattenfall has been further developed since 1988 and some results and experience from this development are reported in this paper. The main aspects covered concern the emergency organization and the supporting tools developed for use by the emergency response teams, the radiological implications such as accessibility to various locations and the long-term aspects of accident management. ((orig.))

  19. Large Break LOCA Accident Management Strategies for Accidents With Large Containment Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sdouz, Gert

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this work is the investigation of the influence of different accident management strategies on the thermal-hydraulics in the containment during a Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident with a large containment leak from the beginning of the accident. The increasing relevance of terrorism suggests a closer look at this kind of severe accidents. Normally the course of severe accidents and their associated phenomena are investigated with the assumption of an intact containment from the beginning of the accident. This intact containment has the ability to retain a large part of the radioactive inventory. In these cases there is only a release via a very small leakage due to the un-tightness of the containment up to cavity bottom melt through. This paper represents the last part of a comprehensive study on the influence of accident management strategies on the source term of VVER-1000 reactors. Basically two different accident sequences were investigated: the 'Station Blackout'- sequence and the 'Large Break LOCA'. In a first step the source term calculations were performed assuming an intact containment from the beginning of the accident and no accident management action. In a further step the influence of different accident management strategies was studied. The last part of the project was a repetition of the calculations with the assumption of a damaged containment from the beginning of the accident. This paper concentrates on the last step in the case of a Large Break LOCA. To be able to compare the results with calculations performed years ago the calculations were performed using the Source Term Code Package (STCP), hydrogen explosions are not considered. In this study four different scenarios have been investigated. The main parameter was the switch on time of the spray systems. One of the results is the influence of different accident management strategies on the source term. In the comparison with the sequence with intact containment it was

  20. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (1 place available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (3 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(4 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (8 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (6 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou par...

  1. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(5 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (7 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (5 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à une réunion de travail/Chairing ...

  2. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(5 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (7 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (5 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à un...

  3. A structured approach to individual plant evaluation and accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klopp, G.T.

    1991-01-01

    The current requirements for the performance of individual plant evaluations (IPE's) include the derivation of accident management insights as and if they occur in the course of finalizing an IPE. The development of formal, structured accident management programs is, however, explicitly excluded from current IPE requirements. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is following the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC) efforts to establish the framework(s) for accident management program development and plants to issue requirements on such development at a later date. The Commonwealth Edison program consists of comprehensive level 2 PRA's which address the requirements for IPE's and which go beyond those requirements. From the start of the IPE efforts, it was firmly held, within Edison, that the best way to fully and economically extract a viable accident management program from an IPE was to integrate the two efforts from the start and include the accident management program development as a required IPE product

  4. Big Rock Point severe accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brogan, B.A.; Gabor, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    December 1994, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) issued guidance relative to the formal industry position on Severe Accident Management (SAM) approved by the NEI Strategic Issues Advisory Committee on November 4, 1994. This paper summarizes how Big Rock Point (BRP) has and continues to address SAM strategies. The historical accounting portion of this presentation includes a description of how the following projects identified and defined the current Big Rock Point SAM strategies: the 1981 Level 3 Probabilistic Risk Assessment performance; the development of the Plant Specific Technical Guidelines from which the symptom oriented Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) were developed; the Control Room Design Review; and, the recent completion of the Individual Plant Evaluation (IPE). In addition to the historical presentation deliberation, this paper the present activities that continue to stress SAM strategies

  5. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (12 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (4 places disponibles) Core Development Pa...

  6. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (7 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (2 places disponibles) Core Development Pac...

  7. Using MARS to assist in managing a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raines, J.C.; Hammersley, R.J.; Henry, R.E.

    2004-01-01

    During an accident, information about the current and possible future states of the plant provides guidance for accident managers in evaluating which actions should be taken. However, depending upon the nature of the accident and the stress levels imposed on the plant staff responding to the accident the current and future plant assessments may be very difficult or nearly impossible to perform without supplemental training and/or appropriate tools. The MAAP Accident Response System (MARS) has been developed as a calculational aid to assist the responsible accident management individuals. Specifically MARS provides additional insights on the current and possible future states of the plant during an accident including the influence of operator actions. In addition to serving as a calculational aid, the MARS software can be an effective means for providing supplemental training. The MARS software uses engineering calculations to perform an integral assessment of the plant status including a consistency assessment of the available instrumentation. In addition, it uses the Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) to provide near term predictions of the plant response if corrective actions are taken. This paper will discuss the types of information that are beneficial to the accident manager and how MARS addresses each. The MARS calculational functions include: instrumentation, validation and simulation, projected operator response based on the EOPs, as well as estimated timing and magnitude of in-plant and off-site radiation dose releases. Each of these items is influential in the management of a severe accident. (author)

  8. The Spanish radioactive waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beceiro, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    All radioactive waste management activities in Spain are controlled by the Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, installed by royal decree in 1984. The programme for low- and intermediate-level wastes is well advanced. A near-surface repository for these type of wastes has been in operation since October 1992. The programme for high-level wastes including spent fuel from the operating nuclear power plants is progressing stepwise. As the first step, effforts are made to secure the temporary storage of spent fuel. Final disposal is envisaged in an deep repository in one of the main geological media available in Spain, namely, granite, salt and clay. (orig.) [de

  9. A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K.

    1993-09-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed

  10. Swedish REGULATORY APPROACH TO SAFETY Assessment AND SEVERE ACCIDENT MANAGEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, W.; Sandervaag, O.

    1997-01-01

    The Swedish regulatory approach to safety assessment and severe accident management is briefly described. The safety assessment program, which focuses on prevention of incidents and accidents, has three main components: periodic safety reviews, probabilistic safety analysis, and analysis of postulated disturbances and accident progression sequences. Management and man-technology-organisation issues, as well as inspections, play a key role in safety assessment. Basis for severe accident management were established by the Government decisions in 1981 and 1986. By the end of 1988, the severe accident mitigation systems and emergency operating procedures were implemented at all Swedish reactors. The severe accident research has continued after 1988 for further verification of the protection provided by the systems and reduction of remaining uncertainties in risk dominant phenomena

  11. A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastenberg, W.E. [ed.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering] [and others

    1993-09-01

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed.

  12. European Union research in safety of LWRs with emphasis on accident management measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermejo, J.M.; Van Goethem, G.

    1998-01-01

    On April 26th 1994 the European Union (EU) adopted via a Council Decision a multiannual programme for community activities in the field of nuclear research and training for the period 1994 to 1998. This programme continued the EU research activities of the 1992-1995 Reactor Safety Programme which was carried out as a Reinforced Concerted Action (RCA), and which covered mainly research activities in the area of severe accident phenomena, both for the existing and next-generation light water reactors. The 1994-1998 Framework programme includes activities regarding Research and Technological Development (R and TD), such as demonstration projects, international cooperation, dissemination and optimization of results, as well as training, in a wide range of scientific fields, including nuclear fission safety and controlled thermonuclear fusion. The 1994-1998 specific programme for nuclear fission safety has five main activity areas: (i) Exploring Innovative Approaches, (ii) Reactor Safety, (iii) Radioactive Waste Management, Disposal, and Decommissioning, (iv) Radiological Impact on Man and Environment, and (v) Mastering Events of the past. The specific topics included in this work programme were chosen in consultation with the EU Joint Research Centres (JRC), and with experts in the different fields taking into account the needs of the end users of the Community research, i.e. vendors, utilities and licensing and regulators authorities. This paper briefly discusses the objectives and achievements of the 1992-1995 RCA and also describes the projects being (or to be) implemented as part of the 1994-1995 programme in the areas of R eactor Safety/Severe Accidents , particularly those related to Accident Management (AM) Measures. In addition to this, some relevant projects related to AM which have been funded via independent PHARE/TACIS assistance programmes will also be mentioned

  13. Creating meaningful business continuity management programme metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Brian

    2010-11-01

    The popular axiom, 'what gets measured gets done', is often applied in the quality management and continuous improvement disciplines. This truism is also useful to business continuity practitioners as they continually strive to prove the value of their organisation's investment in a business continuity management (BCM) programme. BCM practitioners must also remain relevant to their organisations as executives focus on the bottom line and maintaining stakeholder confidence. It seems that executives always find a way, whether in a hallway or elevator, to ask BCM professionals about the company's level of readiness. When asked, they must be ready with an informed response. The establishment of a process to measure business continuity programme performance and organisational readiness has emerged as a key component of US Department of Homeland Security 'Voluntary Private Sector Preparedness (PS-Prep) Program' standards where the overarching goal is to improve private sector preparedness for disasters and emergencies. The purpose of this paper is two-fold: to introduce continuity professionals to best practices that should be considered when developing a BCM metrics programme as well as providing a case study of how a large health insurance company researched, developed and implemented a process to measure BCM programme performance and company readiness.

  14. Quality Management in Slovenian Education Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Alič

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Product and service quality, effective process management, continuous improvement and innovation are some essential conditions for making a successful business. They are often emphasised by managers of successful organizations, by authors of professional and scientific papers and even by politicians and journalists. Quality management standards and models, such as ISO 9001 and EFQM model appeared in assistance to the needs of organisations to assure stable product and service quality, to improve it and to make the production process and its supporting processes effective. It has been 28 years since the standard ISO 9001 appeared. Now it is the most widely spread global standard implemented in more than 1.100.000 organizations worldwide. If quality management was proved to be an important approach to make organizations operate better and thus to contribute to well-being of the society, it would be expected that it is somehow included in our regular school programmes on all the levels. We expect that learning and living quality approaches in childhood and youth would be the least costly way to improve the culture of quality in the society and to implement it in our organizations as well. The paper gives some insight in the situation by searching for quality management related programmes and approaches in our primary, secondary and tertiary school programmes. The purpose of this paper is only to highlight the issue of teaching for quality in our regular education programmes – just to become aware of it and to find some improvement opportunities. There should be still some more detailed research on this topic to give strong suggestions.

  15. Application of simulation techniques for accident management training in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    Many IAEA Member States operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) are at present developing accident management programmes (AMPs) for the prevention and mitigation of severe accidents. However, the level of implementation varies significantly between NPPs. The exchange of experience and best practices can considerably contribute to the quality, and facilitate the implementation of AMPs at the plants. Various IAEA activities assist countries in the area of accident management. Several publications have been developed which provide guidance and support in establishing accident management at NPPs. The defence in depth concept in nuclear safety requires that, although highly unlikely, beyond design basis and severe accident conditions should also be considered, in spite of the fact that they were not explicitly addressed in the original design of currently operating nuclear power plants (NPPs). Defence in depth is physically achieved by means of four successive barriers (fuel matrix, cladding, primary coolant boundary, and containment) that prevent the release of radioactive material. These barriers are protected by a set of design measures at three levels, including prevention of abnormal operation and failures (level 1), control of abnormal operation and detection of failures (level 2) and control of accidents within the design basis (level 3). Should these first three levels fail to ensure the structural integrity of the core, additional efforts are made at the fourth level of defence in depth in order to further reduce the risks. The objective at level 4 is to ensure that both the likelihood of an accident entailing significant core damage (severe accident) and the magnitude of radioactive releases following a severe accident are kept as low as reasonably achievable. The term 'accident management' refers to the overall range of capabilities of a NPP and its personnel to both prevent and mitigate accident situations that could lead to severe fuel damage in the reactor

  16. Sustainable integration of EU research in severe accident phenomenology and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dorsselaere, Jean-Pierre; Albiol, Thierry; Chaumont, Bernard; Haste, Tim; Journeau, Christophe; Meyer, Leonhard; Sehgal, Bal Raj; Schwinges, Bernd; Beraha, David; Annunziato, Alessandro; Zeyen, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The SARNET network gathers most worldwide actors involved in severe accident research. → It defines common research programmes for resolving the most important pending safety issues. → It optimises the use of the available European resources and constitutes sustainable research groups. → It disseminates the knowledge on severe accidents through education courses. → Knowledge produced is capitalized through physical models in the ASTEC simulation code. - Abstract: In order to optimise the use of the available means and to constitute sustainable research groups in the European Union, the Severe Accident Research NETwork of Excellence (SARNET) has gathered, between 2004 and 2008, 51 organizations representing most of the actors involved in severe accident (SA) research in Europe plus Canada. This project was co-funded by the European Commission (EC) under the 6th Euratom Framework Programme. Its objective was to resolve the most important pending issues for enhancing, in regard of SA, the safety of existing and future nuclear power plants (NPPs). SARNET tackled the fragmentation that existed between the national R and D programmes, in defining common research programmes and developing common computer codes and methodologies for safety assessment. The Joint Programme of Activities consisted in: -Implementing an advanced communication tool for accessing all project information, fostering exchange of information, and managing documents; - Harmonizing and re-orienting the research programmes, and defining new ones; -Analyzing the experimental results provided by research programmes in order to elaborate a common understanding of relevant phenomena; -Developing the ASTEC code (integral computer code used to predict the NPP behaviour during a postulated SA) by capitalizing in terms of physical models the knowledge produced within SARNET; - Developing scientific databases, in which the results of research experimental programmes are stored in a common

  17. The management of individuals involved in radiation accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindon, T N [Australian Radiation Lab., Melbourne (Australia)

    1991-09-01

    The author defines the objectives and the coverage of two radiation accident courses presented in 1990 by the US Radiation Emergency Assistance Centre and Training Site of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities together with some Australian Medical institutions. It is estimated that the courses, directed towards physicians, radiotherapists and nurses gave plenty practical advices and details on how to go about radiation accident managements. A manual on handling radiation accidents is also to be prepared after the courses.

  18. Sustainable integration of EU research in severe accident phenomenology and management (SARNET2 project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dorsselaere, Jean-Pierre; Albiol, Thierry; Chaumont, Bernard; Haste, Tim; Journeau, Christophe; Meyer, Leonhard; Sehgal, Bal Raj; Schwinges, Bernd; Beraha, David; Annunziato, Alessandro; Zeyen, Roland

    2010-01-01

    In order to optimise the use of the available means and to constitute sustainable research groups in the European Union, the Severe Accident Research NETwork of Excellence (SARNET) has gathered 51 organisations representing most of the actors involved in Severe Accident (SA) research in Europe plus Canada. This project was co-funded by the European Commission (EC) under the 6th Euratom Framework Programme. Its objective was to resolve the most important pending issues for enhancing, in regard of SA, the safety of existing and future Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). SARNET tackled the fragmentation that existed between the national R and D programmes, in defining common research programmes and developing common computer codes for safety assessment. The Joint Programme of Activities consisted in: (i) Implementing an advanced communication tool for accessing all project information, fostering exchange of information, and managing documents; (ii) Harmonizing and re-orienting the research programmes, and defining new ones; (iii) Analyzing the experimental results provided by research programmes in order to elaborate a common understanding of relevant phenomena; (iv) Developing the ASTEC code (integral computer code used to predict the NPP behaviour during a postulated SA) by integrating the knowledge produced within SARNET; (v) Developing Scientific Databases, in which the results of research experimental programmes are stored in a common format; (vi) Developing a common methodology for Probabilistic Safety Assessment of NPPs; (vii) Developing short courses and writing a text book on Severe Accidents for students and researchers; (viii) Promoting personnel mobility amongst various European organizations. This paper presents the major achievements after four and a half years of operation of the network, in terms of knowledge gained, of improvements of the ASTEC reference code, of dissemination of results and of integration of the research programmes conducted by the various

  19. Update on Waste Management Policies and Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    In addition to the regular items on national, international and NEA programme activities, this edition of the Bulletin contains two special contributions. First, a special editorial by Dr. Rudolf Rometsch, President of the Swiss National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) and current Chairman of the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC), provides his personal reflections on the significance and relevance of the recent ''TRANSNUKLEAR AFFAIR'' to the waste management community. Secondly, the recently released Goguel Report from France is featured in the ''Topical Report'' section. This report provides a useful examination of site selection criteria for geological waste repositories [fr

  20. Development of an accident management expert system for containment assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.; Sebo, D.E.; Haney, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRSC) is sponsoring a program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop an accident management expert system. The intended users of the system are the personnel of the NRC Operations Center in Washington, D.C. The expert system will be used to help NRC personnel monitor and evaluate the status and management of the containment during a severe reactor accident. The knowledge base will include severe accident knowledge regarding the maintenance of the critical safety functions, especially containment integrity, during an accident. This paper summarizes the concepts that have been developed for the accident management expert system, and the plans that have been developed for its implementation

  1. On preparation for accident management in LWR power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear Safety Commission received the report from Reactor Safety General Examination Committee which investigated the policy of executing the preparation for accident management. The basic policy on the preparation for accident management was decided by Nuclear Safety Commission in May, 1992. This Examination Committee investigated the policy of executing the preparation for accident management, which had been reported from the administrative office, and as the result, it judged the policy as adequate, therefore, the report is made. The course to the foundation of subcommittee is reported. The basic policy of the examination on accident management by the subcommittee conforming to the decision by Nuclear Safety Commission, the measures of accident management which were extracted for BWR and PWR facilities, the examination of the technical adequacy of selecting accident sequences in BWR and PWR facilities and the countermeasures to them, the adequacy of the evaluation of the possibility of executing accident management measures and their effectiveness and the adequacy of the evaluation of effect to existing safety functions, the preparation of operation procedure manual, and education and training plan are reported. (K.I.)

  2. Accident management-defence in depth in Indian PHWRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagannad, V.B.L.; Reddy, V.V.; Hajela, Sameer; Bhatia, C.M.; Nair, Suma

    2015-01-01

    Defence in Depth (DiD) is the established safety principle for the design of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi had highlighted the importance of provisions at Level-4 and 5 of DiD. Post Fukushima accident, on-site measures have been strengthened for Indian Nuclear Power Plants. On procedural front, Accident Management Guidelines have been introduced to handle events more severe than design basis accidents. This paper elaborates enhancement of Defence in Depth provisions for Indian Nuclear Power Plants. (author)

  3. Accident management for PWRs in France and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heili, F.; Lecomte, C.; L'Homme, A.

    1991-11-01

    The results of risk analyses, research and particularly the two severe accidents in the nuclear power plants TMI-2 and Chernobyl let to a worldwide re-examination of all aspects dealing with the capability to cope with severe accidents. Strategies have been developed or are under development providing actions that can be taken to prevent severe accidents or to mitigate their consequences. Those strategies are investigated and discussed using the term 'accident management'. The purpose of this report is to present the respective views in France and Germany and to point out differences and commonalties of the approaches. This report also includes proposals for further work

  4. Effect of Structured Teaching Programme on Knowledge of School Teachers regarding First Aid Management in Selected Schools of Bangalore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Piyali

    2014-01-01

    Safe childhood is the foundation of a good future. Children face different kinds of accidents at school premises while playing. Prevention of these accidents and their management is essential. A study was therefore conducted among school teachers at Anekal Taluk, Bangalore to make them aware about different accidents of children at school premises and their first aid management. The sample consisted of 30 primary and higher primary school teachers selected by convenience sampling technique. The analysis showed that improvement of knowledge occurred after administering structured teaching programme (STP) on first aid management. Nursing professionals can benefit from the study result at the area of community, administration, research and education.

  5. The management of severe accidents in modern pressure tube reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.K.; Santamaura, P.; Blahnik, C.; Snell, V.G.; Duffey, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced new reactor designs resist severe accidents through a balance between prevention and mitigation. This balance is achieved by designing to ensure that such accidents are very rare; and by limiting core damage progression and releases from the plant in the event of such rare accidents. These design objectives are supported by a suitable combination of probabilistic safety analysis, engineering judgment and experimental and analytical study. This paper describes the approach used for the Advanced CANDU Reactor TM -1000 (ACR-1000) design, which includes provisions to both prevent and mitigate severe accidents. The paper describes the use of PSA as a 'design assist' tool; the analysis of core damage progression pathways; the definition of the core damage states; the capability of the mitigating systems to stop and control severe accident events; and the severe accident management opportunities for consequence reduction. (author)

  6. Decision-making guide for management of agriculture in the case of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourrie, Laetitia; Grosjean, Francois; Adam, Didier; Pretet, Caroline; Michel, Aurelie; Fostier, Bernard; Bertrand, Sophie; Cessac, Bruno; Reales, Nicolas IRSN; Aubert, Claude

    2007-05-01

    For several years, agricultural and nuclear professionals in France have been working on how to manage the agricultural situation in the event of a nuclear accident. This work resulted in measures at both the national (Aube nuclear safety exercises in 2003, INEX3 in 2005) and international levels (EURATOM Programmes). Following on from the European FARMING (FP5) and EURANOS (FP6) works, ACTA', IRSN and six agricultural technical institutes which are specialized in agricultural production and processing network (arable crop [especially cereals, maize, pulses, potatoes and forage crops], fruits and vegetables, vine and wine, livestock farming [cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry]), created a resource adapted to the French context: the Decision-aiding Tool for the Management of Agriculture in case of a Nuclear Accident. Devised for the Ministry of Agriculture services supporting state officials in a radiation emergency, this manual focuses on the early phase following the accident when the state of emergency would make discussion on countermeasures with a large stakeholder panel impossible. Supported by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries and the French Nuclear Safety Authority, this project increased knowledge of post-accident management strategies and made an important contribution to the national think tank set up within the framework of the French Steering Committee for managing the post-event phase of a nuclear accident (CODIRPA). This article describes how the manual evolved throughout the project and the development of new resources

  7. Decision-making guide for management of agriculture in the case of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reales, N.; Fourrie, L.; Quinio, C.; Grastilleur, Ch.

    2008-01-01

    For several years, agricultural and nuclear professionals in France have been working on how to manage the agricultural situation in the event of a nuclear accident. This work resulted in measures at both the national (Aube nuclear safety exercises in 2003, INEX3 in 2005) and international levels (EURATOM Programmes). Following on from the European FARMING (FP5) and EURANOS (FP6) works, ACTA', IRSN and six agricultural technical institutes which are specialized in agricultural production and processing network (arable crop [especially cereals, maize, pulses, potatoes and forage crops], fruits and vegetables, vine and wine, livestock farming [cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry]), created a resource adapted to the French context: the Decision-aiding Tool for the Management of Agriculture in case of a Nuclear Accident. Devised for the Ministry of Agriculture services supporting state officials in a radiation emergency, this manual focuses on the early phase following the accident when the state of emergency would make discussion on countermeasures with a large stakeholder panel impossible. Supported by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries and the French Nuclear Safety Authority, this project increased knowledge of post-accident management strategies and made an important contribution to the national think tank set up within the framework of the French Steering Committee for managing the post-event phase of a nuclear accident (CODIRPA). This article describes how the manual evolved throughout the project and the development of new resources. (authors)

  8. ACCIDENT PHENOMENA OF RISK IMPORTANCE PROJECT - Continued RESEARCH CONCERNING SEVERE ACCIDENT PHENOMENA AND MANAGEMENT IN Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolandson, S.; Mueller, F.; Loevenhielm, G.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1988 all reactors in Sweden have mitigating measures, such as filtered vents, implemented. In parallel with the work of implementing these measures, a cooperation effort (RAMA projects) between the Swedish utilities and the Nuclear Power Inspectorate was performed to acquire sufficient knowledge about severe accident research work. The on-going project has the name Accident Phenomena of Risk Importance 3. In this paper, we will give background information about severe accident management in Sweden. In the Accident Phenomena of Risk Importance 3 project we will focus on the work concerning coolability of melted core in lower plenum which is the main focus of the In-vessel Coolability Task Group within the Accident Phenomena of Risk Importance 3 project. The Accident Phenomena of Risk Importance 3 project has joined on international consortium and the in-vessel cooling experiments are performed by Fauske and Associates, Inc. in Burr Ridge, Illinois, United States America, Sweden also intends to do one separate experiment with one instrument penetration we have in Swedish/Finnish BWR's. Other parts of the Accident Phenomena of Risk Importance 3 project, such as support to level 2 studies, the research at Royal Institute of Technology and participation in international programs, such as Cooperative Severe Accident Research Program, Advanced Containment Experiments and PHEBUS will be briefly described in the paper

  9. Update on waste management policies and programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The NEA Nuclear Waste Bulletin has been prepared by the Radiation Protection and Waste Management Division of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency to provide a means of communication amongst the various technical and policy groups within the waste management community. In particular, it is intended to provide concise information on current radioactive waste management activities, policies and programmes in Member countries and at the NEA. It is also intended that the Bulletin assists in the communication of recent developments in a variety of areas contributing to the development of acceptable technology for the management and disposal of nuclear waste (e.g., performance assessment, in-situ investigations, repository engineering, scientific data bases, regulatory developments, etc.). For practical purposes, the Bulletin does not include an exhaustive description of national programmes. The reader is therefore invited to go back to the information given in previous bulletins and, if necessary, to contact national correspondents in order to obtain a more complete picture of on-going activities. (authors)

  10. French policy for managing the post-accident phase of a nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallay, F; Godet, J L; Niel, J C

    2015-06-01

    In 2005, at the request of the French Government, the Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) established a Steering Committee for the Management of the Post-Accident Phase of a Nuclear Accident or a Radiological Emergency, with the objective of establishing a policy framework. Under the supervision of ASN, this Committee, involving several tens of experts from different backgrounds (e.g. relevant ministerial offices, expert agencies, local information commissions around nuclear installations, non-governmental organisations, elected officials, licensees, and international experts), developed a number of recommendations over a 7-year period. First published in November 2012, these recommendations cover the immediate post-emergency situation, and the transition and longer-term periods of the post-accident phase in the case of medium-scale nuclear accidents causing short-term radioactive release (less than 24 h) that might occur at French nuclear facilities. They also apply to actions to be undertaken in the event of accidents during the transportation of radioactive materials. These recommendations are an important first step in preparation for the management of a post-accident situation in France in the case of a nuclear accident. © The Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers 2014.

  11. Severe accident management: radiation dose control, Fukushima Daiichi and TMI-2 nuclear plant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This presentation presents valuable dose information related to the Fukushima Daiichi and Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Nuclear Plant accidents. Dose information is provided for what is well known for TMI-2, and what is available for Fukushima Daiichi. Particular emphasis is placed on the difference between the type of reactors involved, overarching plant damage issues, and radiation worker dose outcomes. For TMI-2, more in depth dose data is available for the accident and the subsequent recovery efforts. The comparisons demonstrate the need to understand the wide variation in potential dose management measures and outcomes for severe reactor accidents. (author)

  12. Some aspects of the research and development programmes on the behaviour of containments during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, J.

    1989-01-01

    The R and D programmes relating to the behaviour of containments during severe accidents cover several domains: .leaktightness of the containment: this programme concerns the mechanical resistance of the concretes and the cracking criteria, on the one hand, and the leak rate through the porosities or cracks, on the other; . gaseous releases inside the containment. In addition to the releases of steam and fission products from the primary circuit, the gaseous H 2 0 and C0 2 releases from the concrete must also be studied: firstly during the corium-concrete interaction, and secondly during the heating of the internal surface of the containment which can be raised to a high temperature on contact with the atmosphere, for example during hydrogen combustion; . the release of fission products during the corium-concrete interactions; . the behaviour of the fission products inside the containment, particularly as regards iodine

  13. Methodological aspects to elaborate the management and procedure guides of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Gonzalez, F.; Jimenez Fernandez, A.

    1995-01-01

    The management guides in severe accidents are very important to know the procedures in these accidents. The present articles summarizes the methodological aspects to elaborate the management guides, in order to prevent the severe accidents

  14. Severe accident management guidance for third Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Changsong

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the background, document structure and the summaries of Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG) for Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant (TQNPP), and also introduces briefly some design features and their impacts on SAMG. (authors)

  15. Indian radioactive waste management programme: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Kanwar; Ozarde, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    The salient features of the closed fuel cycle are recovery and recycle of uranium and plutonium for reconversion as fuel. Emphasis is also being given to separation of useful isotopes of cesium and strontium for use in healthcare and in heat source applications and partitioning of minor actinides for transmutation. This finally leaves a very small percentage of material present in the spent fuel as radioactive waste, which needs to be managed. Radioactive waste management practices in India have roots in indigenous research and development in view of the importance accorded to it from the very inception of the country's nuclear energy programme. India's experience in the management of radioactive waste from research and power reactors, fuel reprocessing, and allied facilities is rich and comparable with international practices. (author)

  16. Strategy-oriented display concept to assist severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwangsub; Ha, Jaejoo

    2000-01-01

    The Critical Function Monitoring System (CFMS) is a typical Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS) to assist the operation of Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants during normal and emergency operation, and SPDS for severe accident is being developed in Korea. When the existing CFMS is used under a severe accident situation, some problems are expected from: (1) different design basis, i.e. prevention of core melt vs. protection of radiation release to environment, (2) different parameters for decision-making, and (3) different domain and depth of information to restore the plant. To resolve the above problems, a concept, 'Strategy-Oriented Information Display' concept, for displaying information for severe accident management is developed in this paper. Whereas the existing SPDS structure is based on the critical safety function, the developed concept is based on the severe accident management strategy. The display for each strategy includes the plant parameters to check the status of plant and component with the logical or graphical views necessary for executing the strategy. As the application of the proposed concept, KAERI is developing a display system, the prototype severe accident SPDS, Severe Accident Management Display System (SAMDIS), to assist plant personnel for executing Korean Severe Accident Management Guidelines. CFMS is developed for a general display suitable to all situations with various displays. On the contrary, SAMDIS provides all the relevant information on one screen based on the proposed concept. The SAMDIS screen shows more extensive area than CFMS and thus plant personnel can recognize the overall plant status at a glance. This concept is quite effective when used with severe accident management guidelines because of the relatively macroscopic characteristics of a severe accident management strategy. (author)

  17. Discussion on several issues of the accidents management of nuclear power plants in operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Xuewu; Wang Zhe; Zhang Yingzhen

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses several issues of the accident management of nuclear power plants in operation, for example: the necessity, implementation principle of accident management and accident management program etc. For conducting accident management for beyond design basis accidents, this article thinks that the accident management program should be developed and implemented to ensure that the plant and its personnel with responsibilities for accident management are adequately prepared to take effective on-site actions to prevent or mitigate the consequences of severe accident. (authors)

  18. Six Decades of Nuclear Accidents, Nuclear Compensation, and Issues of Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonsuwan, P.; Songjakkeaw, A.

    2011-11-01

    Thailand has made a serious aim to employ nuclear power by adopting five 1,000 MWt in the 2010 national Power Development Plan (PDP 2010) with the first NPP coming online in 2020. However, after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in March 2011, the National Energy Policy Committee had made the resolution to postpone the plan by 3 years. The post-Fukushima atmosphere does not bode well for the public sentiment towards the proposed programme, especially with regards to safety of an NPP. Nonetheless, during the six decades that NPPs have been in operation in 32 countries worldwide, there are only 19 serious accidents involving fatalities and/or damage to properties in excess of 100 million USD. Out of the three significant accidents - Fukushima nuclear accident (2011), Chernobyl nuclear accident (1986), and Three Miles Island nuclear accident (1979) - only the accident at Three Miles Island occurs during normal operation. Such can be implied that the operation of NPPs does maintain a high level of safety. The current technology on nuclear safety has been advancing greatly to the point that the new NPP design claims to render the possibility of a severe accident resulting in core melting insignificant. Along with the technical improvements, laws and regulations have also be progressing in parallel to adequately compensate and limit the liability of operators in case of a nuclear accident. The international agreements such as the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage and the Convention of the Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy had also been established and also the national laws of countries such as the United States and Japan have been implemented to address such issues to the point that victims of a nuclear accidents are adequately and justly compensated. In addition to the issues of nuclear accident, the dilemma in nuclear waste management, especially with regards to the High Level Waste which is highly radioactive while having very

  19. Development of Krsko Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizel, F.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture development of severe accident management guidances for Krsko NPP are described. Author deals with the history of severe accident management and implementation of issues (validation, review of E-plan and other aspects SAMG implementation guidance). Methods of Westinghouse owners group, of Combustion Engineering owners group, of Babcock and Wilcox owners group, of the BWR owners group, as well as application of US SAMG methodology in Europe and elsewhere are reviewed

  20. Neural network-based expert system for severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klopp, G.T.; Silverman, E.B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the second phase of a three-phase Severe Accident Management expert system program underway at Commonwealth Edison Company (CECo). Phase I successfully demonstrated the feasibility of Artificial Neural Networks to support several of the objectives of severe accident management. Simulated accident scenarios were generated by the Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) code currently in use by CECo as part of their Individual Plant Evaluations (IPE)/Accident Management Program. The primary objectives of the second phase were to develop and demonstrate four capabilities of neural networks with respect to nuclear power plant severe accident monitoring and prediction. The results of this work would form the foundation of a demonstration system which included expert system performance features. These capabilities included the ability to: (1) Predict the time available prior to support plate (and reactor vessel) failure; (2) Calculate the time remaining until recovery actions were too late to prevent core damage; (3) Predict future parameter values of each of the MAAP parameter variables; and (4) Detect simulated sensor failure and provide best-value estimates for further processing in the presence of a sensor failure. A variety of accident scenarios for the Zion and Dresden plants were used to train and test the neural network expert system. These included large and small break LOCAs as well as a range of transient events. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  1. Identification of the operating crew's information needs for accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.; Hanson, D.J.; Ward, L.W.; Solberg, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    While it would be very difficult to predetermine all of the actions required to mitigate the consequences of every potential severe accident for a nuclear power plant, development of additional guidance and training could improve the likelihood that the operating crew would implement effective sever-accident management measures. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an Accident Management Research Program that emphasizes the application of severe-accident research results to enhance the capability of the plant operating crew to effectively manage severe accidents. One element of this program includes identification of the information needed by the operating crew in severe-accident situations. This paper discusses a method developed for identifying these information needs and its application. The methodology has been applied to a generic reactor design representing a PWR with a large dry containment. The information needs were identified by systematically determining what information is needed to assess the health of the critical functions, identify the presence of challenges, select strategies, and assess the effectiveness of these strategies. This method allows the systematic identification of information needs for a broad range of severe-accident scenarios and can be validated by exercising the functional models for any specific event sequence

  2. Regulatory perspective on accident management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Effective response to reactor accidents requires a combination of emergency operations, technical support and emergency response. The NRC and industry have actively pursued programs to assure the adequacy of emergency operations and emergency response. These programs will continue to receive high priority. By contrast, the technical support function has received relatively little attention from NRC and the industry. The results from numerous PRA studies and the severe accident programs of NRC and the industry have yielded a wealth of insights on prevention and mitigation of severe accidents. The NRC intends to work with the industry to make these insights available to the technical support staffs through a combination of guidance, training and periodic drills

  3. An international co-ordinated research programme on nuclear accident dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flakus, F.N.

    1977-01-01

    Where fissile materials are being processed in quantities exceeding the minimum critical amounts, a radiation risk to workers arises from the possibility of criticality excursions. Despite the fact that techniques for preventing the occurende of such accidental excursions have reached very high standards it is generally agreed that the availability of suitable nuclear accident dosimetry (NAD) systems is very important. Following the recommendations of an Advisory Group meeting on NAD, the IAEA had established in 1969 an international coordinated research programme on NAD systems and elaborating standarized systems. A large number of research groups from 14 Member States throughout the world participated in this co-ordinated work. Since 1970 four international multilaboratory intercomparison experiments on NAD have been organized and the response of a variety of dosimeters examined in different neutron spectra under simulated accident conditions at Valduc (France), Oak Ridge (USA), Vinca (Yugoslavia) and Harwell (UK). The results achieved in these intercomparison studies show that NAD systems have been substantially improved and that several systems are available now in a number of laboratories throughout the world that perform within the criteria laid down by the initiating advisory group in 1969. A compendium of neutron leakage spectra has also been elaborated for facilitating the determination of dose from readings of detectors exposed to various neutron fields in criticality accidents

  4. Severe accident management: a summary of the VAHTI and ROIMA projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sairanen, R.

    1998-01-01

    Two severe accident research projects: 'Severe Accident Management' (VAHTI), 1994-96 and 'Reactor Accidents' Phenomena and Simulation (ROIMA) 1997-98. have been conducted at VTT Energy within the RETU research programme. The main objective was to assist the severe accident management programmes of the Finnish nuclear power plants. The projects had several subtopics. These included thermal hydraulic validation of the APROS code, studies of failure mode of the BWR pressure vessel, investigation of core melt progression within a BWR pressure vessel, containment phenomena, development of a computerised severe accident training tool, and aerosol behaviour experiments. The last topic is summarised by another paper in the seminar. The projects have met the objectives set at the project commencement. Calculation tools have been developed and validated suitable for analyses of questions specific for the Finnish plants. Experimental fission product data have been produced that can be used to validate containment aerosol codes. The tools and results have been utilised in plant assessments. One of the main achievements has been the computer code PASULA for analysis of interactions between core melt and pressure vessel. The code has been applied to pressure vessel penetration analysis. The results have shown the importance of the nozzle construction. Modelling possibilities have recently improved by addition of a creep and porous debris models. Cooling of a degraded BWR core has been systematically studied as joint Nordic projects with a set of severe accident codes. Estimates for coolable conditions have been provided. Recriticality due to reflooding of a damaged core has been evaluated. (orig.)

  5. Severe accident analysis and management in nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golshan, Mina

    2013-01-01

    Within the UK regulatory regime, assessment of risks arising from licensee's activities are expected to cover both normal operations and fault conditions. In order to establish the safety case for fault conditions, fault analysis is expected to cover three forms of analysis: design basis analysis (DBA), probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) and severe accident analysis (SAA). DBA should provide a robust demonstration of the fault tolerance of the engineering design and the effectiveness of the safety measures on a conservative basis. PSA looks at a wider range of fault sequences (on a best estimate basis) including those excluded from the DBA. SAA considers significant but unlikely accidents and provides information on their progression and consequences, within the facility, on the site and off site. The assessment of severe accidents is not limited to nuclear power plants and is expected to be carried out for all plant states where the identified dose targets could be exceeded. This paper sets out the UK nuclear regulatory expectation on what constitutes a severe accident, irrespective of the type of facility, and describes characteristics of severe accidents focusing on nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Key rules in assessment of severe accidents as well as the relationship to other fault analysis techniques are discussed. The role of SAA in informing accident management strategies and offsite emergency plans is covered. The paper also presents generic examples of scenarios that could lead to severe accidents in a range of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (authors)

  6. The computer aided education and training system for accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Masuda, Takahiro; Kubota, Ryuji; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Sakuma, Hitoshi

    2000-01-01

    Under severe accident conditions of a nuclear power plant, plant operators and technical support center (TSC) staffs will be under a amount of stress. Therefore, those individuals responsible for managing the plant should promote their understanding about the accident management and operations. Moreover, it is also important to train in ordinary times, so that they can carry out accident management operations effectively on severe accidents. Therefore, the education and training system which works on personal computers was developed by Japanese BWR group (Tokyo Electric Power Co.,Inc., Tohoku Electric Power Co. ,Inc., Chubu Electric Power Co. ,Inc., Hokuriku Electric Power Co.,Inc., Chugoku Electric Power Co.,Inc., Japan Atomic Power Co.,Inc.), and Hitachi, Ltd. The education and training system is composed of two systems. One is computer aided instruction (CAI) education system and the other is education and training system with a computer simulation. Both systems are designed to execute on MS-Windows(R) platform of personal computers. These systems provide plant operators and technical support center staffs with an effective education and training tool for accident management. TEPCO used the simulation system for the emergency exercise assuming the occurrence of hypothetical severe accident, and have performed an effective exercise in March, 2000. (author)

  7. Passive depressurization accident management strategy for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Maolong; Erkan, Nejdet; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Okamoto, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We proposed two passive depressurization systems for BWR severe accident management. • Sensitivity analysis of the passive depressurization systems with different leakage area. • Passive depressurization strategies can prevent direct containment heating. - Abstract: According to the current severe accident management guidance, operators are required to depressurize the reactor coolant system to prevent or mitigate the effects of direct containment heating using the safety/relief valves. During the course of a severe accident, the pressure boundary might fail prematurely, resulting in a rapid depressurization of the reactor cooling system before the startup of SRV operation. In this study, we demonstrated that a passive depressurization system could be used as a severe accident management tool under the severe accident conditions to depressurize the reactor coolant system and to prevent an additional devastating sequence of events and direct containment heating. The sensitivity analysis performed with SAMPSON code also demonstrated that the passive depressurization system with an optimized leakage area and failure condition is more efficient in managing a severe accident

  8. Passive depressurization accident management strategy for boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Maolong, E-mail: liuml@vis.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Erkan, Nejdet [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Ishiwatari, Yuki [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan); Okamoto, Koji [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • We proposed two passive depressurization systems for BWR severe accident management. • Sensitivity analysis of the passive depressurization systems with different leakage area. • Passive depressurization strategies can prevent direct containment heating. - Abstract: According to the current severe accident management guidance, operators are required to depressurize the reactor coolant system to prevent or mitigate the effects of direct containment heating using the safety/relief valves. During the course of a severe accident, the pressure boundary might fail prematurely, resulting in a rapid depressurization of the reactor cooling system before the startup of SRV operation. In this study, we demonstrated that a passive depressurization system could be used as a severe accident management tool under the severe accident conditions to depressurize the reactor coolant system and to prevent an additional devastating sequence of events and direct containment heating. The sensitivity analysis performed with SAMPSON code also demonstrated that the passive depressurization system with an optimized leakage area and failure condition is more efficient in managing a severe accident.

  9. Usage of geotechnologies for risk management in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.A.A.; Marques, F.A.P.; Murta, Y.L.

    2017-01-01

    Through the use of geotechnologies an important tool can be created for risk management in radiation accidents. With the use of the QGIS software (Las Palmas version), it is shown its applicability in situations of radiological emergency, as in the case of the accident with cesium-137 in Goiânia. The work analyses the risk of a possible accident with the deposit of cesium wastes that still remains in the region, aiming to protect the population with the best exit routes and forms of allocation of the residents

  10. Olympic Dam operations - environmental management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This is the 3rd Annual Report pertaining to the Olympic Dam Operations Environmental Management Programme and covers the period 1st March, 1989 to 28th February, 1990. The monitoring programe has provided detailed assessment of meteorological data, vegetation, fauna, soil stability, soil salinity, hydrogeology and well-fields both inside and outside the operations area. Mine site rehabilitation is considered to be progressing satisfactorily. Out of the 851 drill pad sites 72% have been rehabilitated to the stage where natural soil stability and plant cover has been achieved. Drill pad sites that have received good rainfall within one year of being ripped have rehabilitated very succesfully. Sites that receive no significant rainfall for more than two years, particularly on dune slopes may require re-ripping before successful regeneration can occur. To improve the drill pad site rehabilitation monitoring programme it is recommended that 200 drill sites be analysed each year. Air emission and solid waste data are also presented. This program is considered to be particularly successful in relation to SO 2 assessment. 90 tabs., 63 figs., ills

  11. Reconstruction of the Chernobyl emergency and accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schinner, F.; Andreev, I.; Andreeva, I.; Fritsche, F.; Hofer, P.; Lettner, E.; Seidelberger, E.; Kromp-Kolb, H.; Kromp, W.

    1998-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: on April 26, 1986 the most serious civil technological accident in the history of mankind occurred of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) in the former Soviet Union. As a direct result of the accident, the reactor was severely destroyed and large quantities of radionuclides were released. Some 800000 persons, also called 'liquidators' - including plant operators, fire-fighters, scientists, technicians, construction workers, emergency managers, volunteers, as well as medical and military personnel - were part of emergency measurements and accident management efforts. Activities included measures to prevent the escalation of the accident, mitigation actions, help for victims as well as activities in order to provide a basic infrastructure for this unprecedented and overwhelming task. The overall goal of the 'Project Chernobyl' of the Institute of Risk Research of the University of Vienna was to preserve for mankind the experience and knowledge of the experts among the 'liquidators' before it is lost forever. One method used to reconstruct the emergency measures of Chernobyl was the direct cooperation with liquidators. Simple questionnaires were distributed among liquidators and a database of leading accident managers, engineers, medical experts etc. was established. During an initial struggle with a number of difficulties, the response was sparse. However, after an official permit had been issued, the questionnaires delivered a wealth of data. Furthermore a documentary archive was established, which provided additional information. The multidimensional problem in connection with the severe accident of Chernobyl, the clarification of the causes of the accident, as well as failures and successes and lessons to be learned from the Chernobyl emergency measures and accident management are discussed. (authors)

  12. Managing Nuclear Reactor Accidents: Issues Raised by Three Mile Island

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper provides a descriptive account of significant events in the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in March, 1979. It is based upon documents collected as background materials for the IIASA workshop: Procedural and Organizational Measures for Accident Management: Nuclear Reactors. In addition to the references listed, information was supplied by John Lathrop, who conducted interviews with government and industry officials involved in the crisis. There have been ...

  13. Extension of emergency operating procedures for severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    To enhance the capability of reactor operators to cope with the hypothetical severe accident its the key issue for utilities. Taiwan Power Company has started the enhancement programs on extension of emergency operating procedures (EOPs). It includes the review of existing LOPs based on the conclusions and recommendations of probabilistic risk assessment studies to confirm the operator actions. Then the plant specific analysis for accident management strategy will be performed and the existing EOPs will be updated accordingly

  14. Validation of severe accident management guidance for the wolsong plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. Y.; Jin, Y. H.; Kim, S. D.; Song, Y. M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: The severe accident management(SAM) guidance has been developed for the Wolsong nuclear power plants in Korea. The Wolsong plants are 700MWe CANDU-type reactors with heavy water as the primary coolant, natural uranium-fueled pressurized, horizontal tubes, surrounded by heavy water moderator inside a horizontal calandria vessel. The guidance includes six individual accident management strategies: (1) injection into primary heat transport system (2) injection into calandria vessel (3) injection into calandria vault (4) reduction of fission product release (5) control of reactor building condition (6) reduction of reactor building hydrogen. The paper provides the approaches to validate the SAM guidance. The validation includes the evaluation of:(l) effectiveness of accident management strategies, (2) performance of mitigation systems or components, (3) calculation aids, (4) strategy control diagram, and (5) interface with emergency operation procedure and with radiation emergency plan. Several severe accident sequences with high probability is selected from the plant specific level 2 probabilistic safety analysis results for the validation of SAM guidance. Afterward, thermal hydraulic and severe accident phenomenological analyses is performed using ISAAC(Integrated Severe Accident Analysis Code for CANDU Plant) computer program. Furthermore, the experiences obtained from a table-top-drill is also discussed

  15. Management of older patients presenting after a fall - an accident ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. It is common for older patients to present to accident and emergency (AE) departments after a fall. Management should include assessment and treatment of the injuries and assessment and correction of underlying risk factors in order to prevent recurrent falls. Objectives. To determine management of older ...

  16. Recent Developments in Level 2 PSA and Severe Accident Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Ming Leang; Shepherd, Charles; Gauntt, Randall; Landgren, Vickie; Van Dorsselaere, Jean Pierre; Chaumont, Bernard; Raimond, Emmanuel; Magallon, Daniel; Prior, Robert; Mlady, Ondrej; Khatib-Rahbar, Mohsen; Lajtha, Gabor; Tinkler, Charles; Siu, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    In 1997, CSNI WGRISK produced a report on the state of the art in Level 2 PSA and severe accident management - NEA/CSNI/R(1997)11. Since then, there have been significant developments in that more Level 2 PSAs have been carried out worldwide for a variety of nuclear power plant designs including some that were not addressed in the original report. In addition, there is now a better understanding of the severe accident phenomena that can occur following core damage and the way that they should be modelled in the PSA. As requested by CSNI in December 2005, the objective of this study was to produce a report that updates the original report and gives an account of the developments that have taken place since 1997. The aim has been to capture the most significant new developments that have occurred rather than to provide a full update of the original report, most of which is still valid. This report is organised using the same structure as the original report as follows: Chapter 2: Summary on state of application, results and insights from recent Level 2 PSAs. Chapter 3: Discussion on key severe accident phenomena and modelling issues, identification of severe accident issues that should be treated in Level 2 PSAs for accident management applications, review of severe accident computer codes and the use of these codes in Level 2 PSAs. Chapter 4: Review of approaches and practices for accident management and SAM, evaluation of actions in Level 2 PSAs. Chapter 5: Review of available Level 2 PSA methodologies, including accident progression event tree / containment event tree development. Chapter 6: Aspects important to quantification, including the use of expert judgement and treatment of uncertainties. Chapter 7: Examples of the use of the results and insights from the Level 2 PSA in the context of an integrated (risk informed) decision making process

  17. Severe Accident Management System On-line Network SAMSON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, Eugene B.

    2004-01-01

    SAMSON is a computational tool used by accident managers in the Technical Support Centers (TSC) and Emergency Operations Facilities (EOF) in the event of a nuclear power plant accident. SAMSON examines over 150 status points monitored by nuclear power plant process computers during a severe accident and makes predictions about when core damage, support plate failure, and reactor vessel failure will occur. These predictions are based on the current state of the plant assuming that all safety equipment not already operating will fail. SAMSON uses expert systems, as well as neural networks trained with the back propagation learning algorithms to make predictions. Training on data from an accident analysis code (MAAP - Modular Accident Analysis Program) allows SAMSON to associate different states in the plant with different times to critical failures. The accidents currently recognized by SAMSON include steam generator tube ruptures (SGTRs), with breaks ranging from one tube to eight tubes, and loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs), with breaks ranging from 0.0014 square feet (1.30 cm 2 ) in size to breaks 3.0 square feet in size (2800 cm 2 ). (author)

  18. Benchmarking MARS (accident management software) with the Browns Ferry fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, S.M.; Liu, L.Y.; Raines, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The MAAP Accident Response System (MARS) is a userfriendly computer software developed to provide management and engineering staff with the most needed insights, during actual or simulated accidents, of the current and future conditions of the plant based on current plant data and its trends. To demonstrate the reliability of the MARS code in simulatng a plant transient, MARS is being benchmarked with the available reactor pressure vessel (RPV) pressure and level data from the Browns Ferry fire. The MRS software uses the Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) code as its basis to calculate plant response under accident conditions. MARS uses a limited set of plant data to initialize and track the accidnt progression. To perform this benchmark, a simulated set of plant data was constructed based on actual report data containing the information necessary to initialize MARS and keep track of plant system status throughout the accident progression. The initial Browns Ferry fire data were produced by performing a MAAP run to simulate the accident. The remaining accident simulation used actual plant data

  19. Development of Parameter Network for Accident Management Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, Sukyoung; Ahemd, Rizwan; Heo, Gyunyoung [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Taek; Park, Soo Yong; Ahn, Kwang Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    When a severe accident happens, it is hard to obtain the necessary information to understand of internal status because of the failure or damage of instrumentation and control systems. We learned the lessons from Fukushima accident that internal instrumentation system should be secured and must have ability to react in serious conditions. While there might be a number of methods to reinforce the integrity of instrumentation systems, we focused on the use of redundant behavior of plant parameters without additional hardware installation. Specifically, the objective of this study is to estimate the replaced value which is able to identify internal status by using set of available signals when it is impossible to use instrumentation information in a severe accident, which is the continuation of the paper which was submitted at the last KNS meeting. The concept of the VPN was suggested to improve the quality of parameters particularly to be logged during severe accidents in NPPs using a software based approach, and quantize the importance of each parameter for further maintenance. In the future, we will continue to perform the same analysis to other accident scenarios and extend the spectrum of initial conditions so that we are able to get more sets of VPNs and ANN models to predict the behavior of accident scenarios. The suggested method has the uncertainty underlain in the analysis code for severe accidents. However, In case of failure to the safety critical instrumentation, the information from the VPN would be available to carry out safety management operation.

  20. Application of NUREG-1150 methods and results to accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.E.; Sype, T.T.; Camp, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    The risk from five nuclear power plants was examined during the NUREG-1150 program. When the analyses of the plants were complete, an effort was undertaken to examine the implications of NUREG-1150 for accident management initiatives. The framework provided by the NUREG-1150 analysis presented a means within which current accident management strategies could be evaluated and future accident management strategies could be developed and assessed. Five separate but interrelated phases of risk management were considered: (1) prevention of accident initiators, (2) prevention of core damage, (3) implementation of an effective emergency response, (4) prevention of vessel breach and mitigation of radionuclide releases from the reactor coolant system, and (5) retention of fission products in the containment and other surrounding buildings. A risk-based methodology was developed to identify and evaluate risk management options for each of these five phases. The methodology was demonstrated through quantitative examples for the first two phases of risk management listed above. In addition, the reduction in risk for several currently implemented risk management strategies at operating plants was quantified

  1. Seabrook Station Level 2 PRA Update to Include Accident Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, Robert; Lucci, Melissa; Kiper, Kenneth; Henry, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A ground-breaking study was recently completed as part of the Seabrook Level 2 PRA update. This study updates the post-core damage phenomena to be consistent with the most recent information and includes accident management activities that should be modeled in the Level 2 PRA. Overall, the result is a Level 2 PRA that fully meets the requirements of the ASME PRA Standard with respect to modeling accident management in the LERF assessment and NRC requirements in Regulatory Guide 1.174 for considering late containment failures. This technical paper deals only with the incorporation of operator actions into the Level 2 PRA based on a comprehensive study of the Seabrook Station accident response procedures and guidance. The paper describes the process used to identify the key operator actions that can influence the Level 2 PRA results and the development of success criteria for these key operator actions. This addresses a key requirement of the ASME PRA Standard for considering SAMG. An important benefit of this assessment was the identification of Seabrook specific accident management insights that can be fed back into the Seabrook Station accident management procedures and guidance or the training provided to plant personnel for these procedures and guidance. (authors)

  2. Severe accident management at South Africa's Koeberg plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, R.P.; Wolvaardt, F.P.; Holderbaum, D.F.; Lutz, R.J.; Taylor, J.J.; Hodgson, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    Between the middle of 1993 and the end of 1995, Westinghouse and Eskom implemented plant specific Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs) at the Koeberg Nuclear Power Plant in South Africa. Prior to this project, Koeberg, like many plants, had emergency operating procedures which contain guidance for plant personnel to perform preventive accident management measures in event of an accident. There was, however, no structured guidance on recovery from an event which progresses past core damage -mitigative accident management. The SAMGs meet this need. In this paper, the Westinghouse approach to severe accident management is outlined, and the Koeberg implementation project described. A few key issues which arose during implementation are discussed, including plant instrumentation, flooding of the reactor pit, organisation and training of the Technical Support Centre staff, and impact of SAMG on risk. The means by which both generic and plant-specific SAMG have been validated is also summarised. In the next few years, many LWR owners will be implementing SAMG. In the U.S. all plants are in the process of developing SAMG. The Koeberg project is believed to be the first plant specific implementation of the WOG SAMG worldwide, and this paper has hopefully provided insights into some of the implementation issues for those about to undertake similar projects. (author)

  3. A framework for assessing severe accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K.; Okrent, D.; Jae, M.; Lim, H.; Milici, T.; Park, H.; Swider, J.; Xing, L.; Yu, D.

    1991-01-01

    Accident management can be defined as the innovative use of existing and or alternative resources, systems and actions to prevent or mitigate a severe accident. Together with risk management (changes in plant operation and/or addition of equipment) and emergency planning (off-site actions), accident management provides an extension of the defense-in-depth safety philosophy for severe accidents. A significant number of probabilistic safety assessments (PSA) have been completed which yield the principal plant vulnerabilities. For each sequence/threat and each combination of strategy there may be several options available to the operator. Each strategy/option involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. These considerations include uncertainty in key phenomena, uncertainty in operator behavior, uncertainty in system availability and behavior, and uncertainty in available information (i.e., instrumentation). The objective of this project is to develop a methodology for assessing severe accident management strategies given the key uncertainties mentioned above. Based on Decision Trees and Influence Diagrams, the methodology is currently being applied to two case studies: cavity flooding in a PWR to prevent vessel penetration or failure, and drywell flooding in a BWR to prevent containment failure

  4. A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K.; Okrent, D.; Jae, M.; Lim, H.; Milici, T.; Park, H.; Swider, J.; Xing, L.; Yu, D.

    1992-01-01

    Accident management can be defined as the innovative use of existing and or alternative resources, systems and actions to prevent or mitigate a severe accident. Together with risk management (changes in plant operation and/or addition of equipment) and emergency planning (off-site actions), accident management provides an extension of the defense-in-depth safety philosophy for severe accidents. A significant number of probabilistic safety assessments (PSA) have been completed which yield the principal plant vulnerabilities. For each sequence/threat and each combination of strategy there may be several options available to the operator. Each strategy/option involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. These considerations include uncertainty in key phenomena, uncertainty in operator behavior, uncertainty in system availability and behavior, and uncertainty in available information (i.e., instrumentation). The objective of this project is to develop a methodology for assessing severe accident management strategies given the key uncertainties mentioned above. Based on decision trees and influence diagrams, the methodology is currently being applied to two case studies: cavity flooding in a pressurized water reactor to prevent vessel penetration or failure, and drywell flooding in a boiling water reactor to prevent containment failure

  5. Simulation of operator's actions during severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktorov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Implementing accident management counter measures or actions to mitigate consequences of a severe accident is essential to reduce radiological risks to the public and environment. Station-specific severe accident management guidelines (SAMGs) have been developed and implemented at all Canadian nuclear power plants. Following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident certain enhancements were introduced to the SAMG, namely consideration of multi-units accidents, events involving spent fuel pools, incorporation of capability offered by the portable emergency mitigating equipment, and so on. To evaluate the adequacy and usability of the SAMGs, CNSC staff initiated a number of activities including a desktop review of SAMG documentation, evaluation of SAMG implementation through exercises and interviews with station staff, and independent verification of SAMG action effectiveness. This paper focuses on the verification of SAMG actions through analytical simulations. The objectives of the work are two-folds: (a) to understand the effectiveness of SAMG-specified mitigation actions in addressing the safety challenges and (b) to check for potential negative effects of the action. Some sensitivity calculations were performed to help understanding of the impact from actions that rely on the partially effective equipment or limited material resources. The severe accident computer code MAAP4-CANDU is used as a tool in this verification. This paper will describe the methodology used in the verification of SAMG actions and some results obtained from simulations. (author)

  6. Managing major chemical accidents in China: Towards effective risk information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Guizhen; Zhang Lei; Lu Yonglong; Mol, Arthur P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical industries, from their very inception, have been controversial due to the high risks they impose on safety of human beings and the environment. Recent decades have witnessed increasing impacts of the accelerating expansion of chemical industries and chemical accidents have become a major contributor to environmental and health risks in China. This calls for the establishment of an effective chemical risk management system, which requires reliable, accurate and comprehensive data in the first place. However, the current chemical accident-related data system is highly fragmented and incomplete, as different responsible authorities adopt different data collection standards and procedures for different purposes. In building a more comprehensive, integrated and effective information system, this article: (i) reviews and assesses the existing data sources and data management, (ii) analyzes data on 976 recorded major hazardous chemical accidents in China over the last 40 years, and (iii) identifies the improvements required for developing integrated risk management in China.

  7. Concept and objectives of accident management in LWR type plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herttrich, P.M.; Hicken, E.F.

    1990-01-01

    For the sake of putting the previous protection and prevention concept in its proper place, it is shown, first of all, on which basis the prevention against damages required according to the state of the art in science and technology was proved under the licensing practice applied so far. Secondly, the previous practice of dynamic upgrading of safety engineering and risk prevention is explained. The introduction of accident management measures is a consequent continuation of this practice. Concrete approaches and objectives of accident management are outlined; an overview of scientific and technical foundations for the development, assessment and introduction of accident management measures is given, and finally the most important organizational and procedural aspects are dealt with. (orig./DG) [de

  8. Applying Functional Modeling for Accident Management of Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Morten; Zhang Xinxin [Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2014-08-15

    The paper investigate applications of functional modeling for accident management in complex industrial plant with special reference to nuclear power production. Main applications for information sharing among decision makers and decision support are identified. An overview of Multilevel Flow Modeling is given and a detailed presentation of the foundational means-end concepts is presented and the conditions for proper use in modelling accidents are identified. It is shown that Multilevel Flow Modeling can be used for modelling and reasoning about design basis accidents. Its possible role for information sharing and decision support in accidents beyond design basis is also indicated. A modelling example demonstrating the application of Multilevel Flow Modelling and reasoning for a PWR LOCA is presented.

  9. Challenges to a successful waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bars, Y.

    2005-01-01

    I have chosen to testify about my personal experience as a practitioner in the development and implementation of sensitive public policies and about some of the lessons I have learnt in various related fields. Those fields do not only include Andra, but also the exchanges from which I benefit within EDRAM, the club (that I currently chair) of agency directors responsible for those programmes, as well as within the Forum for Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) of the DECD/NEA. Last but not least, I would also introduce some lessons from my previous activities in the city planning, and in the management of water projects. In order to succeed, a sound policy relating to a sustainable radioactive-waste management must be able to take up a certain number of challenges. Three of those challenges seem essential to me: combining the technical and social aspects of the issue; organizing a suitable context in which the definition and the implementation of the policy will take place; and achieving a solid implementation locally. (author)

  10. OSSA. A second generation of severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvage, E.C.; Musoyan, G.; Ducros, V.D.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays the severe accident and their management are an integrated part of the new generation of power plants. The EPR, as the third generation of nuclear plants, includes both systems and instrumentation to mitigate a severe accident, but also a new generation of severe accident management guidelines: the OSSA. Severe accident management guidelines are highly dependent on human means available: emergency organization actors, training and knowledge shall be taken in consideration in an innovative way. Their impacts on ergonomy and content of the document lead to a new generation of guidelines with several innovative features. This second generation of severe accident management guidelines was developed in parallel with the PSA level 2, the human reliability analyses, the validation and verification process, the severe accident simulator progresses. By taking in consideration this variety of input the OSSA were developed in a user aspect orientation. For example in the OSSA a larger responsibility is given to the operational crew to better support the technical support group evaluation. Their existing knowledge of the plant and of the systems and instrumentation is used. This collaboration work implies a strong communication tool that has been developed to enhance the permanent communication within the emergency organization, but although to ensure the main up-to-date information for evaluation will be available where required. The entry condition is based on a strong and stand alone diagnostic for all plant states, that uses in particular a curve of core exit temperature as a function of primary pressure for a fixed core cladding temperature, or its equivalent in term of containment conditions. It ensures relatively consistent core conditions on entry. A first criterion for ultimate final primary depressurization is provided, ensuring all attempts to reflood the core with the available means have been ensured before the OSSA entry condition is reached. This

  11. Enhancing AP1000 reactor accident management capabilities for long term accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Pingting; Liu Mengying; Duan Chengjie; Liao Yehong

    2015-01-01

    Passive safety actions are considered as main measures under severe accident in AP1000 power plant. However, risk is still existed. According to PSA, several probable scenarios for AP1000 nuclear power plant are analyzed in this paper with MAAP the severe accident analysis code. According to the analysis results, several deficiencies of AP1000 severe accident management are found. The long term cooling and containment depressurization capability for AP1000 power plant appear to be most important factors under such accidents. Then, several temporary strategies for AP1000 power plant are suggested, including PCCWST temporary water supply strategy after 72h, temporary injection strategy for IRWST, hydrogen relief action in fuel building, which would improve the safety of AP1000 power plant. At last, assessments of effectiveness for these strategies are performed, and the results are compared with analysis without these strategies. The comparisons showed that correct actions of these strategies would effectively prevent the accident process of AP1000 power plant. (author)

  12. The computer aided education and training system for accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Kubota, Ryuji; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Sakuma, Hitoshi

    1999-01-01

    The education and training system for Accident Management was developed by the Japanese BWR group and Hitachi Ltd. The education and training system is composed of two systems. One is computer aided instruction (CAI) education system and the education and training system with computer simulations. Both systems are designed to be executed on personal computers. The outlines of the CAI education system and the education and training system with simulator are reported below. These systems provides plant operators and technical support center staff with the effective education and training for accident management. (author)

  13. A systematic process for developing and assessing accident management plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S.; Meyer, O.R.; Ward, L.W.

    1991-04-01

    This document describes a four-phase approach for developing criteria recommended for use in assessing the adequacy of nuclear power plant accident management plans. Two phases of the approach have been completed and provide a prototype process that could be used to develop an accident management plan. Based on this process, a preliminary set of assessment criteria are derived. These preliminary criteria will be refined and improved when the remaining steps of the approach are completed, that is, after the prototype process is validated through application. 9 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs

  14. The evolution of computerized displays in accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBor, J.

    1988-01-01

    Key regulations implemented by the NRC in 1982, which included requirements such as upgraded emergency operating procedures, detailed control room design reviews, the addition of a safety parameter display system, and the inclusion of a degreed shift technical advisor as part of the operating staff, have enabled the use of computerized displays to evolve as an integral part of accident management within each of the four main vendor groups. Problems, however, remain to be resolved in the area of technical content, information reliability, and rules for use in order to achieve the goal of more reliable accident management in nuclear power plants

  15. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl: programme 3: Health consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirmarche, M.; Kellerer, A.M.; Bazyka, D.

    2006-01-01

    - Goals: The main objectives of the health programme are collection and validation of existing data on cancer and non cancer diseases in the most highly contaminated regions of Ukraine, Russia and Belarus, common scientific expertise on main health indicators and reliable dosimetry, and finally communication of the results to the scientific community and to the public. - General Tasks: 1- Comparison between high and low exposed regions, 2- Description of trends over time, 3- Consideration of specific age groups. This methodological approach is applied on Solid cancer incidence and leukaemia incidence in different regions in Ukraine, Belarus and Russia, With a special focus on thyroid cancer in young exposed ages. - Thyroid cancer: Those exposed in very young ages continue to express a relatively high excess of thyroid cancer even though they have now reached the age group 15-29. Those exposed as young adults show a small increase, at least partly due to better screening conditions - Leukemia: Description of leukemia trends for various age groups show no clear difference between exposed and unexposed regions when focusing on those exposed at very young ages. The rates of childhood leukemia before and after the accident show no evidence of any increase (oblasts in Belarus over 1982-1998). - Specific studies: Incidence of congenital malformations in Belarus; Infant mortality and morbidity in the most highly contaminated regions; Potential effects of prenatal irradiation on the brain as a result of the Chernobyl accident; Nutritional status of population living in regions with different levels of contamination; Dosimetry of Chernobyl clean-up workers; Radiological passports in contaminated settlements. - Congenital malformations: As a national register was existing since the 1980's and gives the possibility to compare trends before and after the accident, results of congenital malformations describe large results collected over Belarus, There is no evidence of a

  16. Camelias: a tool for the management of a complex set of γ spectrometry stations for the on-line monitoring of a reactor severe accident simulation in the framework of the Phebus FP programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantera, L.; Cornu, B.

    2003-01-01

    During a PHEBUS PF experiment, the on-line fission product release measurement is carried out by a set of seven γ stations supervised by a computer network. These stations generate about 20000 spectra for each experiment. These spectra are obtained under complex experimental conditions (high count rate, constrained nuclear environment and large diversity of configuration). The objective is to perform a quantitative γ-spectrometry analysis. The possibly complex use of self-attenuation models as well as the large volume of data to be treated led its to consider a flexible and generic method to manage the whole set of stations. The γ station calibration is carried out on-site. For each case, the developed methodology strictly uses the same approach for collecting data during the calibration phase, for calculations and for the software environment: that is the CAMELIAS application. The on-site calibration methodology is based on the use of a linear reference source allowing to reduce the 3D calculations to 2D calculations to obtain the reference efficiency function and the collimation function. Additional calculations then allow computing the efficiency function associated with the actual source. To centralize and to guarantee the coherence of the large volume of data collected during the calibration phase, we use a relational database management system. The computation of the self-attenuation coefficients associated with the actual source is performed by considering a simple model of self-attenuation along a straight line. The method, which can be generalized, is further applied to the delayed analysis of samplings and experimental devices of all the programs managed by the laboratory. (authors)

  17. PSA use in accident management studies in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Mitsumasa

    1994-01-01

    The safety of NPPs in Japan is secured by stringent safety regulations based on the deterministic method, minimizing the possibility a severe accident to a technologically negligible level. PSA is not required in the current regulatory procedures. Accident management based on PSA is a 'knowledge-based' action dependent on utilities' technical knowledge aimed at further reduction of the risk which is kept small enough by existing measures. The paper discusses the following three kinds of PSAs that have been conducted practically and efficiently on NPPs to provide supplemental information about their safety characteristics in addition to the deterministic evaluation used in the regulatory safety review: PSAs on typical NPPs, PSAs on all NPPs to examine candidates for accident management, and PSAs as part of periodic safety review (PSR). 1 fig., 5 tabs

  18. Plant specific severe accident management - the implementation phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, R.

    1999-01-01

    Many plants are in the process of developing on-site guidance for technical staff to respond to a severe accident situation severe accident management guidance (SAMG). Once the guidance is developed, the SAMG must be implemented at the plant site, and this involves addressing a number of additional aspects. In this paper, approaches to this implementation phase are reviewed, including review and verification of plant specific SAMG, organizational aspects and integration with the emergency plan, training of SAMG users, validation and self-assessment and SAMG maintenance. Examples draw on experience from assisting numerous plants to implement symptom based severe accident management guidelines based on the Westinghouse Owners Group approach, in Westinghouse, non-Westinghouse and VVER plant types. It is hoped that it will be of use to those plant operators about to perform these activities.(author)

  19. A systems approach to the management of radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, L.L.; Berk, H.W.; Teates, C.D.; Larkham, N.E.; Friesen, E.J.; Edlich, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    Management of radiation accident patients should have a multidisciplinary approach that includes all health professionals as well as members of public safety agencies. Emergency plans for radiation accidents include detection of the ionizing radiation, patient evacuation, resuscitation, and decontamination. The resuscitated patient should be transported to a radiation control area located outside but adjacent to the emergency department. Ideally this area is accessed through an entrance separate from that used for the main flow of daily emergency department patients. The hospital staff, provided with protective clothing, dosimeters, and preprinted guidelines, continues the resuscitation and definitive care of the patient. This system approach to the management of radiation accidents may be tailored to meet the specific needs of other emergency medical systems

  20. Severe accident management (SAM), operator training and instrumentation capabilities - Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Workshop on Operator Training for Severe Accident Management (SAM) and Instrumentation Capabilities During Severe Accidents was organised in collaboration with Electricite de France (Service Etudes et Projets Thermiques et Nucleaires). There were 34 participants, representing thirteen OECD Member countries, the Russian Federation and the OECD/NEA. Almost half the participants represented utilities. The second largest group was regulatory authorities and their technical support organisations. Basically, the Workshop was a follow-up to the 1997 Second Specialist Meeting on Operator Aids for Severe Accident Management (SAMOA-2) [Reports NEA/CSNI/R(97)10 and 27] and to the 1992 Specialist Meeting on Instrumentation to Manage Severe Accidents [Reports NEA/CSNI/R(92)11 and (93)3]. It was aimed at sharing and comparing progress made and experience gained from these two meetings, emphasizing practical lessons learnt during training or incidents as well as feedback from instrumentation capability assessment. The objectives of the Workshop were therefore: - to exchange information on recent and current activities in the area of operator training for SAM, and lessons learnt during the management of real incidents ('operator' is defined hear as all personnel involved in SAM); - to compare capabilities and use of instrumentation available during severe accidents; - to monitor progress made; - to identify and discuss differences between approaches relevant to reactor safety; - and to make recommendations to the Working Group on the Analysis and Management of Accidents and the CSNI (GAMA). The Workshop was organised into five sessions: - 1: Introduction; - 2: Tools and Methods; - 3: Training Programmes and Experience; - 4: SAM Organisation Efficiency; - 5: Instrumentation Capabilities. It was concluded by a Panel and General Discussion. This report presents the summary and conclusions: the meeting confirmed that only limited information is needed for making required decisions

  1. The Swedish programme for radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjurstroem, S.; Forsstroem, H.

    1986-10-01

    The following systems and facilities are currently in operation and under implementation: a sea transportation system for all kinds of nuclear waste, a central facility for interim storage of spent fuel (CLAB) and a central underground repository for final disposal of low and medium level reactor waste (SFR). For the remaining steps - final disposal of highly active and longlived radioactive residues - a concept, based on encapsulation of the fuel elements in copper canisters and final storage of the canisters in a repository situated 500 m down in crystalline rock (KBS-3), has been developed and approved by the government in accordance with the Swedish nuclear legislation. Although a feasible method for final disposal of the highly active residues has been shown, the Swedish legislation requires that research be carried out to reach the best possible base for the final decision around the year 2000. In parallel with this a geological investigation programme is carried out to find a suitable site for a final repository. The final site selection is foreseen at the end of the 1990's. All costs for the management of radioactive waste from the nuclear power plants are carried by a fee determined annually. The fee is 0.019 SEK/kWh for 1986

  2. Remote management and programmable automata; Telegestion et automate programmable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This document is the proceedings of the meeting organized by the French association of refrigeration (AFF) during the ELEC 2000 exhibition about the measurement, recording, data transmission, automation, diagnosis and management of refrigeration systems. An example of the energy saving made in a supermarket context thanks to the operation control of a refrigerating machinery is presented. (J.S.)

  3. Logistics management in Universal Immunisation Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachani, D; Bansal, R D

    1990-01-01

    The review of the National Immunization Programme of India in 1989 focused attention to the issue of storage and distribution of vaccines. Cold-chain equipment such as walk-in-coolers (WICs), deep freezers, ice-lined refrigerators (ILRs), and vaccine carriers proliferated after the introduction of the universal immunization program (UIP) but the available units fell short of the official targets in 1988, especially ILRs (7500 proposed and 2876 available) and vaccine carriers (250,000 proposed and 35,500 available). Some states had over 6 months of supplies of vaccines whose management posed problems of losing potency: oral polio virus (OPV) potency was acceptable in 63% of stock in 1988. Syringes, needles, stoves, pressure-cooker sterilizers, dial thermometers, and refrigerator repair kits were in short supply especially at the primary health care (PHC) level. Only 1/3 of subcenters had sterilizers and 58% had vaccines carriers. Logistics management on the state level required provision of vaccines based on previous use and eligible population with even distribution throughout the year. On the district level WICs were needed for every district with 1.5 million inhabitants. Recording of vaccine requirement, utilization, and storage would aid target allocations and avoid wastage. On the institutional and PHC level an ILR and a transporting vehicle was needed. The number of women and children eligible for immunization had to be calculated based on real population figures. Cold-chain capacity of 30,000-40,000 vials was required for a district as well as about 500 reusable syringes and needles a year along with vaccination cards exceeding the number of women and children by 10% for recordkeeping at the PHC center.

  4. Investigation on accident management measures for VVER-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tusheva, P.; Schaefer, F.; Rohde, U.; Reinke, N.

    2009-01-01

    A consequence of a total loss of AC power supply (station blackout) leading to unavailability of major active safety systems which could not perform their safety functions is that the safety criteria ensuring a secure operation of the nuclear power plant would be violated and a consequent core heat-up with possible core degradation would occur. Currently, a study which examines the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of the plant during the early phase of the scenario is being performed. This paper focuses on the possibilities for delay or mitigation of the accident sequence to progress into a severe one by applying Accident Management Measures (AMM). The strategy 'Primary circuit depressurization' as a basic strategy, which is realized in the management of severe accidents is being investigated. By reducing the load over the vessel under severe accident conditions, prerequisites for maintaining the integrity of the primary circuit are being created. The time-margins for operators' intervention as key issues are being also assessed. The task is accomplished by applying the GRS thermal-hydraulic system code ATHLET. In addition, a comparative analysis of the accident progression for a station blackout event for both a reference German PWR and a reference VVER-1000, taking into account the plant specifics, is being performed. (authors)

  5. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1993-06-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  6. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1992-07-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  7. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1991-07-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  8. Proceedings of the specialist meeting on selected containment severe accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    Twenty papers were presented at the first specialist meeting on Selected Containment Severe Accident management Strategies, held in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1994, half of them dealing with accident management strategies implementation status, half of them with research aspects. The four sessions were: general aspects of containment accident management strategies, hydrogen management techniques, other containment accident management strategies (spray cooling, core catcher...), surveillance and protection of containment function

  9. Proceedings of the specialist meeting on selected containment severe accident management strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-15

    Twenty papers were presented at the first specialist meeting on Selected Containment Severe Accident management Strategies, held in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1994, half of them dealing with accident management strategies implementation status, half of them with research aspects. The four sessions were: general aspects of containment accident management strategies, hydrogen management techniques, other containment accident management strategies (spray cooling, core catcher...), surveillance and protection of containment function

  10. Development of Integrated Evaluation System for Severe Accident Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, K. R.; Park, S. H.; Park, S. Y.; Park, J. H.; Song, Y. M.; Ahn, K. I.; Choi, Y

    2007-06-15

    The objective of the project is twofold. One is to develop a severe accident database (DB) for the Korean Standard Nuclear Power plant (OPR-1000) and a DB management system, and the other to develop a localized computer code, MIDAS (Multi-purpose IntegrateD Assessment code for Severe accidents). The MELCOR DB has been constructed for the typical representative sequences to support the previous MAAP DB in the previous phase. The MAAP DB has been updated using the recent version of MAAP 4.0.6. The DB management system, SARD, has been upgraded to manage the MELCOR DB in addition to the MAAP DB and the network environment has been constructed for many users to access the SARD simultaneously. The integrated MIDAS 1.0 has been validated after completion of package-wise validation. As the current version of MIDAS cannot simulate the anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) sequence, point-kinetics model has been implemented. Also the gap cooling phenomena after corium relocation into the RPV can be modeled by the user as an input parameter. In addition, the subsystems of the severe accident graphic simulator are complemented for the efficient severe accident management and the engine of the graphic simulator was replaced by the MIDAS instead of the MELCOR code. For the user's convenience, MIDAS input and output processors are upgraded by enhancing the interfacial programs.

  11. Development of Integrated Evaluation System for Severe Accident Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, K. R.; Park, S. H.; Park, S. Y.; Park, J. H.; Song, Y. M.; Ahn, K. I.; Choi, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The objective of the project is twofold. One is to develop a severe accident database (DB) for the Korean Standard Nuclear Power plant (OPR-1000) and a DB management system, and the other to develop a localized computer code, MIDAS (Multi-purpose IntegrateD Assessment code for Severe accidents). The MELCOR DB has been constructed for the typical representative sequences to support the previous MAAP DB in the previous phase. The MAAP DB has been updated using the recent version of MAAP 4.0.6. The DB management system, SARD, has been upgraded to manage the MELCOR DB in addition to the MAAP DB and the network environment has been constructed for many users to access the SARD simultaneously. The integrated MIDAS 1.0 has been validated after completion of package-wise validation. As the current version of MIDAS cannot simulate the anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) sequence, point-kinetics model has been implemented. Also the gap cooling phenomena after corium relocation into the RPV can be modeled by the user as an input parameter. In addition, the subsystems of the severe accident graphic simulator are complemented for the efficient severe accident management and the engine of the graphic simulator was replaced by the MIDAS instead of the MELCOR code. For the user's convenience, MIDAS input and output processors are upgraded by enhancing the interfacial programs

  12. OSSA - An optimized approach to severe accident management: EPR application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvage, E. C.; Prior, R.; Coffey, K.; Mazurkiewicz, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    There is a recognized need to provide nuclear power plant technical staff with structured guidance for response to a potential severe accident condition involving core damage and potential release of fission products to the environment. Over the past ten years, many plants worldwide have implemented such guidance for their emergency technical support center teams either by following one of the generic approaches, or by developing fully independent approaches. There are many lessons to be learned from the experience of the past decade, in developing, implementing, and validating severe accident management guidance. Also, though numerous basic approaches exist which share common principles, there are differences in the methodology and application of the guidelines. AREVA/Framatome-ANP is developing an optimized approach to severe accident management guidance in a project called OSSA ('Operating Strategies for Severe Accidents'). There are still numerous operating power plants which have yet to implement severe accident management programs. For these, the option to use an updated approach which makes full use of lessons learned and experience, is seen as a major advantage. Very few of the current approaches covers all operating plant states, including shutdown states with the primary system closed and open. Although it is not necessary to develop an entirely new approach in order to add this capability, the opportunity has been taken to develop revised full scope guidance covering all plant states in addition to the fuel in the fuel building. The EPR includes at the design phase systems and measures to minimize the risk of severe accident and to mitigate such potential scenarios. This presents a difference in comparison with existing plant, for which severe accidents where not considered in the design. Thought developed for all type of plants, OSSA will also be applied on the EPR, with adaptations designed to take into account its favourable situation in that field

  13. Peace programme for evaluating the impact of accidents contaminating the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brechignac, F.; Vallejo, R.; Sauras, T.; Casadesus, J.; Thiry, Y.; Waegeneers, N.; Forsberg, S.; Shaw, G.; Madoz-Escande, C.; Gonze, M.A. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, IPSN, 92 (France)

    2000-07-01

    The Chernobyl accident, which led to substantial release of radioactive materials in the atmosphere, demonstrated that large environmental areas may be contaminated by fall-out deposition of radioactivity. In particular, contamination by Cs and Sr of agro-ecosystems where food production is taking place is most susceptible to contribute to population radiation dose. Nuclear safety analysis shows that, although very small, the probability of an accident occurring on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) cannot be completely set aside. In such a situation, decision making and management of the contaminated agricultural surfaces largely depend on our ability to predict how, and to which extent, the initial contamination may lead to polluted foodstuffs. Furthermore, the efficiency of the prediction models relies on our level of understanding of the mechanisms governing the transfer of radionuclides in the soil-plant system. Unraveling these mechanisms from in situ observations of environmental areas contaminated by past events is difficult due to the lack of control on both, the contamination itself, which happened in a critical situation, and the natural environment, which is highly variable, temporally and spatially. Such conditions prevent a clear identification of the most relevant parameters influencing the radionuclides transfer and thereby the prediction goal. In particular, current transfer factors introduced in prediction models suffer from unresolved and poorly documented variabilities. This is why IPSN developed a unique research facility capable of generating, in closed and controlled environmental conditions, a mini-accident with release of radioactive aerosols on small-scale, but realistic, samples of crops. These crops are conducted on undisturbed soil monoliths, featuring several soil types from various European countries, managed in lysimeters with advanced water movement control, and placed in greenhouses where three typical climates can be reproduced

  14. Peace programme for evaluating the impact of accidents contaminating the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechignac, F.; Vallejo, R.; Sauras, T.; Casadesus, J.; Thiry, Y.; Waegeneers, N.; Forsberg, S.; Shaw, G.; Madoz-Escande, C.; Gonze, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident, which led to substantial release of radioactive materials in the atmosphere, demonstrated that large environmental areas may be contaminated by fall-out deposition of radioactivity. In particular, contamination by Cs and Sr of agro-ecosystems where food production is taking place is most susceptible to contribute to population radiation dose. Nuclear safety analysis shows that, although very small, the probability of an accident occurring on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) cannot be completely set aside. In such a situation, decision making and management of the contaminated agricultural surfaces largely depend on our ability to predict how, and to which extent, the initial contamination may lead to polluted foodstuffs. Furthermore, the efficiency of the prediction models relies on our level of understanding of the mechanisms governing the transfer of radionuclides in the soil-plant system. Unraveling these mechanisms from in situ observations of environmental areas contaminated by past events is difficult due to the lack of control on both, the contamination itself, which happened in a critical situation, and the natural environment, which is highly variable, temporally and spatially. Such conditions prevent a clear identification of the most relevant parameters influencing the radionuclides transfer and thereby the prediction goal. In particular, current transfer factors introduced in prediction models suffer from unresolved and poorly documented variabilities. This is why IPSN developed a unique research facility capable of generating, in closed and controlled environmental conditions, a mini-accident with release of radioactive aerosols on small-scale, but realistic, samples of crops. These crops are conducted on undisturbed soil monoliths, featuring several soil types from various European countries, managed in lysimeters with advanced water movement control, and placed in greenhouses where three typical climates can be reproduced

  15. Precept from the management for the accident of Fukushima daiichi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaushiro, Norihiro

    2013-01-01

    At 17 hours after the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, National Institute of Radiological Sciences sent the first REMAT (Radiation Emergency Medical Assistance Team) in the 20 km range from the Plant. The team members were confronted by two issues: (1) Medical activities under the infrastructures destructed by a multiple disaster caused by earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident, which was not presumed. (2) Radiation protection management for dispatched staff. Measures for this situation worked out by activities on the site are presented. (K.Y.)

  16. Finnish Research Programme on Nuclear Waste Management (KYT). Framework Programme for 2002-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasilainen, K.

    2002-12-01

    The new Finnish research programme on nuclear waste management (KYT) will be conducted in 2002 - 2005. This framework programme describes the starting point, the basic aims and the organisation of the research programme. The starting point of the KYT programme is derived from the present state and future challenges of Finnish nuclear waste management. The research programme is funded mainly by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Posiva Oy, Fortum Oyj, Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO), and the National Technology Agency (Tekes). As both regulators and implementors are involved, the research programme concentrates on neutral research topics that must be studied in any case. Methods and tools for experimental and theoretical studies fall in this category. State of the art -reviews on relevant topics also create national know-how. Topics that directly belong to licensing activities of nuclear waste management are excluded from the research programme. KYT carries out technical studies that increase national know-how in the area of nuclear waste management. The aim is to maintain and develop basic expertise needed in the operations derived from the national nuclear waste management plan. The studies have been divided into strategic studies and studies enhancing the long-term safety of spent nuclear fuel disposal. Strategic studies support the overall feasibility of Finnish nuclear waste management. These studies include basic options and overall safety principles related to nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear waste management. In addition, general cost estimates as well as general safety considerations related to transportations, low- and medium level wastes, and decommissioning are included in strategic studies. Studies supporting the long-term safety of spent fuel disposal include issues related to performance assessment methodology, release of radionuclides from the repository, behaviour of bedrock and groundwater

  17. Dose management programmes at Kaiga Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, P.; Prabhakaran, V.; Managavi, Sadashiv B.; Danannavar, Veerendra; Biju, P.; Manoj Kumar, M.; Shrikrishna, U.V.

    2001-01-01

    Kaiga Generating Station (KGS) has two units of pressurized heavy water reactors of 220 MWe each capacity. KGS-2 started power generation since 1999 and KGS-1 since 2000. Several programmes such as assessment of radioactive condition, training on radiological safety aspects, job planning in radioactive areas, etc. are conducted periodically to implement an effective dose control programmes in KGS. These efforts are briefly discussed in this report. Facilities and techniques to implement ALARA programs are also highlighted in this report. (author)

  18. Management of area-wide integrated pest management programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, V.A.; Vreysen, M.J.B.; Reyes Flores, J.; Regidor Fernandez, E.E.; Teruya, T.; Barnes, B.; Gomez Riera, P.; Lindquist, D.; Loosjes, M.

    2005-01-01

    Effective management of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes that integrate the sterile insect technique (SIT) is key to success. Programme planning includes collection of baseline data and a feasibility assessment. The optimal management structure is where the programme can be implemented effectively and flexibly, independent of government politics, bureaucracy, and even corruption that impede timely goal achievement. Ideally, programmes include both public and private management, and require strong and steady financial support. Governments and donors are the most common sources of funds, but a mixture of public, community, and private funds is now the trend. Interrupted cash flow severely restrains programme performance. Physical support of programme operations must be reliable, and led by a maintenance professional. It is essential to have full-time, well-paid, and motivated staff led by a programme manger with technical and management experience. Programme failure is usually due to poor management and inadequate public support, and not to poor technology. (author)

  19. Use of decision trees for evaluating severe accident management strategies in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclerar Engineering; Lee, Yongjin; Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). School of Energy Systems Engineering

    2016-07-15

    Accident management strategies are defined to innovative actions taken by plant operators to prevent core damage or to maintain the sound containment integrity. Such actions minimize the chance of offsite radioactive substance leaks that lead to and intensify core damage under power plant accident conditions. Accident management extends the concept of Defense in Depth against core meltdown accidents. In pressurized water reactors, emergency operating procedures are performed to extend the core cooling time. The effectiveness of Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG) became an important issue. Severe accident management strategies are evaluated with a methodology utilizing the decision tree technique.

  20. An operational centre for managing major chemical industrial accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiranoudis, C T; Kourniotis, S P; Christolis, M; Markatos, N C; Zografos, K G; Giannouli, I M; Androutsopoulos, K N; Ziomas, I; Kosmidis, E; Simeonidis, P; Poupkou, N

    2002-01-28

    The most important characteristic of major chemical accidents, from a societal perspective, is their tendency to produce off-site effects. The extent and severity of the accident may significantly affect the population and the environment of the adjacent areas. Following an accident event, effort should be made to limit such effects. Management decisions should be based on rational and quantitative information based on the site specific circumstances and the possible consequences. To produce such information we have developed an operational centre for managing large-scale industrial accidents. Its architecture involves an integrated framework of geographical information system (GIS) and RDBMS technology systems equipped with interactive communication capabilities. The operational centre was developed for Windows 98 platforms, for the region of Thriasion Pedion of West Attica, where the concentration of industrial activity and storage of toxic chemical is immense within areas of high population density. An appropriate case study is given in order to illuminate the use and necessity of the operational centre.

  1. Final report on the Risoe monitoring programme after the Chernobyl accident for the period Oct 1, 1986 - Sept 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarkrog, A.; Nielsen, S.P.; Dahlgaard, H.; Lauridsen, B.; Soegaard-Hansen, J.

    1988-01-01

    In cooperation with the National Agency of Environmental Protection in Denmark, Risoe National Laboratory has examined the radioactive contamination from the Chernobyl accident. The programme for these investigations was an expansion of the countrywide monitoring programme operated since 1962 by Risoe National Laboratory. The present report cover the period Oct 1, 1986 to Sept. 30, 1987. All types of environmental samples relevant for radioactive contamination has been analysed. Most samples were collected countrywide and all samples were analysed for radiocaesium ( 134 Cs and 137 Cs). Many samples were furthermore anlaysed for 90 Sr and in a few samples transuranic elements ( 29,240 Pu, 241 Am and 242 Cm) were determined. On the basis of the diet and wholebody measurements of radiocaesium the individual mean dose equivalent commitment from Danish diet consumed in the first two years after the Chernobyl accident was calculated to 27 μ Sv. (author)

  2. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl: programme 3: Health consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tirmarche, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Radiological Protection and Human Health Div. (DRPH), Radiobiology and Epidemiology Dept., 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Kellerer, A.M. [Munchen Univ., Strahlenbiologisches Institut (Germany); Bazyka, D. [Chornobyl Center (CC), Kiev regoin (Ukraine)

    2006-07-01

    - Goals: The main objectives of the health programme are collection and validation of existing data on cancer and non cancer diseases in the most highly contaminated regions of Ukraine, Russia and Belarus, common scientific expertise on main health indicators and reliable dosimetry, and finally communication of the results to the scientific community and to the public. - General Tasks: 1- Comparison between high and low exposed regions, 2- Description of trends over time, 3- Consideration of specific age groups. This methodological approach is applied on Solid cancer incidence and leukaemia incidence in different regions in Ukraine, Belarus and Russia, With a special focus on thyroid cancer in young exposed ages. - Thyroid cancer: Those exposed in very young ages continue to express a relatively high excess of thyroid cancer even though they have now reached the age group 15-29. Those exposed as young adults show a small increase, at least partly due to better screening conditions - Leukemia: Description of leukemia trends for various age groups show no clear difference between exposed and unexposed regions when focusing on those exposed at very young ages. The rates of childhood leukemia before and after the accident show no evidence of any increase (oblasts in Belarus over 1982-1998). - Specific studies: Incidence of congenital malformations in Belarus; Infant mortality and morbidity in the most highly contaminated regions; Potential effects of prenatal irradiation on the brain as a result of the Chernobyl accident; Nutritional status of population living in regions with different levels of contamination; Dosimetry of Chernobyl clean-up workers; Radiological passports in contaminated settlements. - Congenital malformations: As a national register was existing since the 1980's and gives the possibility to compare trends before and after the accident, results of congenital malformations describe large results collected over Belarus, There is no evidence of a

  3. Ineffective programme management on the delivery of health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    outsourced to the Department of Public Works and the Independent. Development .... achieve a common strategic or business goal. ... Since programme management ... civil and structural engineering together with quantity surveying. The.

  4. Management of a radiological emergency. Experience feedback and post-accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubiau, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    In France, the organization of crisis situations and the management of radiological emergency situations are regularly tested through simulation exercises for a continuous improvement. Past severe accidents represent experience feedback resources of prime importance which have led to deep changes in crisis organizations. However, the management of the post-accident phase is still the object of considerations and reflections between the public authorities and the intervening parties. This document presents, first, the nuclear crisis exercises organized in France, then, the experience feedback of past accidents and exercises, and finally, the main aspects to consider for the post-accident management of such events: 1 - Crisis exercises: objectives, types (local, national and international exercises), principles and progress, limits; 2 - Experience feedback: real crises (major accidents, other recent accidental situations or incidents), crisis exercises (experience feedback organization, improvements); 3 - post-accident management: environmental contamination and people exposure, management of contaminated territories, management of populations (additional protection, living conditions, medical-psychological follow up), indemnification, organization during the post-accident phase; 4 - conclusion and perspectives. (J.S.)

  5. Guide on medical management of persons exposed in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The present guide has been prepared in order to provide guidance to medical and para-medical personnel regarding medical management of the different types of radiation accidents. It discusses briefly the physical aspects and biological effect of radiation, for the benefit of those who have not specialised in radiation medicine. The diagnosis, medical management and follow-up of persons involved in different types of radiation accidents are also dealt with. The implementation of the procedures described calls for organisation of appropriate facilities and provision of requisite equipment as well as education and training of the staff. It is emphasised that major radiation accidents are rare events and the multi-disciplinary nature of the response required to deal with them calls for proper planning and continuous liaison among plant management, radiation protection personnel, first-aid assistants and medical and paramedical staff. The organisation and conduct of emergency drills may help in maintaining preparedness of the medical facilities for efficient management of radiation casualities. (original). 64 refs., tabs., figs

  6. Decision making process and emergency management in different phases of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duranova, T.

    2005-01-01

    EVATECH, Information Requirements and Countermeasure Evaluation Techniques in Nuclear Emergency Management, was a research project in the key action 'Nuclear Fission' of the fifth EURATOM Framework Programme (FP5). The overall objective of the project was to enhance the quality and coherence of response to nuclear emergencies in Europe by improving the decision support methods, models and processes in ways that take into account the expectations and concern of the many different parties involved - stake holders both in managing the emergency response and those who are affected by the consequences of nuclear emergencies. The project had ten partners from seven European countries. The development of the real-time online decision support system RODOS has been one of the major items in the area of radiation protection within the European Commission's Framework Programmes. The main objectives of the RODOS project have been to develop a comprehensive and integrated decision support system that is generally applicable across Europe and to provide a common framework for incorporating the best features of existing decision support systems and future developments. Furthermore the objective has been to provide greater transparency in the decision process to: improve public understanding and acceptance of off-site emergency measures, to facilitate improved communication between countries of monitoring data, predictions of consequences, etc., in the event of any future accident, and to promote, through the development and use of the system, a more coherent, consistent and harmonised response to any future accident that may affect Europe. (authors)

  7. Accident Precursor Analysis and Management: Reducing Technological Risk Through Diligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phimister, James R. (Editor); Bier, Vicki M. (Editor); Kunreuther, Howard C. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    Almost every year there is at least one technological disaster that highlights the challenge of managing technological risk. On February 1, 2003, the space shuttle Columbia and her crew were lost during reentry into the atmosphere. In the summer of 2003, there was a blackout that left millions of people in the northeast United States without electricity. Forensic analyses, congressional hearings, investigations by scientific boards and panels, and journalistic and academic research have yielded a wealth of information about the events that led up to each disaster, and questions have arisen. Why were the events that led to the accident not recognized as harbingers? Why were risk-reducing steps not taken? This line of questioning is based on the assumption that signals before an accident can and should be recognized. To examine the validity of this assumption, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) undertook the Accident Precursors Project in February 2003. The project was overseen by a committee of experts from the safety and risk-sciences communities. Rather than examining a single accident or incident, the committee decided to investigate how different organizations anticipate and assess the likelihood of accidents from accident precursors. The project culminated in a workshop held in Washington, D.C., in July 2003. This report includes the papers presented at the workshop, as well as findings and recommendations based on the workshop results and committee discussions. The papers describe precursor strategies in aviation, the chemical industry, health care, nuclear power and security operations. In addition to current practices, they also address some areas for future research.

  8. The Assesment Of Radioactive Accident Management On The RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soejoedi, Agoes; Karmana, Endang

    2000-01-01

    In the operational reactor facilities include RSG-GAS, safety factor for radioactive accident very important to be prioritized. Till now the anticipate happening radioactive accident on the RSG-GAS threat only by the RSG-GAS Operation Manual. For increasing the working function need to create radioactive accident management by facility level. From studying result which source IAEA guidebook, can be composed the assessment accident management of radioactive the RSG-GAS.The sketching this accident management of radioactive to be hoped can helping P2TRR organization by handling radioactive accident if this moment happen on the RSG-GAS

  9. Development of the severe accident management guidance module for the SATS training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. R.; Park, S. H.; Kim, D. H.

    2004-01-01

    Recently KAERI has developed severe accident management guidance to establish Korea standard severe accident management system. On the other hand PC-based severe accident training simulator SATS has been developed, which uses MELCOR computing code as the simulation engine. SATS graphically displays and simulates the severe accident progression with interactive user inputs. The control capability of SATS makes a severe accident training course more interesting and effective. In this paper the development and functions of HyperKAMG module are explained. Furthermore easiness and effectiveness of the HyperKAMG-SATS system in severe accident management are described

  10. The IAEA's high level radioactive waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saire, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the different activities that are performed under the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) high level radioactive waste management programme. The Agency's programme is composed of five main activities (information exchange, international safety standards, R ampersand D activities, advisory services and special projects) which are described in the paper. Special emphasis is placed on the RADioactive WAste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme which was implemented in 1991 to document international consensus that exists on the safe management of radioactive waste. The paper also raises the question about the need for regional repositories to serve certain countries that do not have the resources or infrastructure to construct a national repository

  11. Major accident prevention through applying safety knowledge management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalatpour, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Many scattered resources of knowledge are available to use for chemical accident prevention purposes. The common approach to management process safety, including using databases and referring to the available knowledge has some drawbacks. The main goal of this article was to devise a new emerged knowledge base (KB) for the chemical accident prevention domain. The scattered sources of safety knowledge were identified and scanned. Then, the collected knowledge was formalized through a computerized program. The Protégé software was used to formalize and represent the stored safety knowledge. The domain knowledge retrieved as well as data and information. This optimized approach improved safety and health knowledge management (KM) process and resolved some typical problems in the KM process. Upgrading the traditional resources of safety databases into the KBs can improve the interaction between the users and knowledge repository.

  12. Accident management strategies for VVER-1000 reactors. Part 1: text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sdouz, G.; Sonneck, G.; Pachole, M.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the effect of different accident management strategies on the onset, development and end of the core-concrete-interaction as well as on the containment integrity for a TMLB'-type sequence in a Pressurized Water Reactor of the type VVER- 1000. Using the computer code MARCH3 the following strategies were investigated: (1) One or more Spray and LP ECC Systems available with and without coolers after 10 hours (2) Inclusion of the reactor pressure vessel testing facility room to the cavity (3) Containment venting (4) External water supply and (5) Different electric power restoration times. The results show that some of these accident management measures will maintain the containment integrity and reduce the source term drastically, others will reduce the source term rate. For some measures final conclusions can only be given after complete source term calculations have been performed. (authors)

  13. Application of the severe accident code ATHLET-CD. Modelling and evaluation of accident management measures (Project WASA-BOSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, Polina; Jobst, Matthias; Kliem, Soeren; Kozmenkov, Yaroslav; Schaefer, Frank [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Reactor Safety

    2016-07-01

    The improvement of the safety of nuclear power plants is a continuously on-going process. The analysis of transients and accidents is an important research topic, which significantly contributes to safety enhancements of existing power plants. In case of an accident with multiple failures of safety systems core uncovery and heat-up can occur. In order to prevent the accident to turn into a severe one or to mitigate the consequences of severe accidents, different accident management measures can be applied. Numerical analyses are used to investigate the accident progression and the complex physical phenomena during the core degradation phase, as well as to evaluate the effectiveness of possible countermeasures in the preventive and mitigative domain [1, 2]. The presented analyses have been performed with the computer code ATHLET-CD developed by GRS [3, 4].

  14. A structured approach to individual plant evaluation and accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klopp, G.T.

    1992-01-01

    The need for long term development of accident management programs is acknowledged and the key tool for that development is identified as the IPE Program. The Edison commitment to build an integrated program is cited and the effect on the IPE effort is considered. Edison's integrated program is discussed in detail. The key benefits, realism and long term savings, are discussed. Some of the highly visible products such as neural network artificial intelligence systems are cited

  15. Application of high-order uncertainty for severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Donghan; Ha, Jaejoo

    1998-01-01

    The use of probability distribution to represent uncertainty about point-valued probabilities has been a controversial subject. Probability theorists have argued that it is inherently meaningless to be uncertain about a probability since this appears to violate the subjectivists' assumption that individual can develop unique and precise probability judgments. However, many others have found the concept of uncertainty about the probability to be both intuitively appealing and potentially useful. Especially, high-order uncertainty, i.e., the uncertainty about the probability, can be potentially relevant to decision-making when expert's judgment is needed under very uncertain data and imprecise knowledge and where the phenomena and events are frequently complicated and ill-defined. This paper presents two approaches for evaluating the uncertainties inherent in accident management strategies: 'a fuzzy probability' and 'an interval-valued subjective probability'. At first, this analysis considers accident management as a decision problem (i.e., 'applying a strategy' vs. 'do nothing') and uses an influence diagram. Then, the analysis applies two approaches above to evaluate imprecise node probabilities in the influence diagram. For the propagation of subjective probabilities, the analysis uses the Monte-Carlo simulation. In case of fuzzy probabilities, the fuzzy logic is applied to propagate them. We believe that these approaches can allow us to understand uncertainties associated with severe accident management strategy since they offer not only information similar to the classical approach using point-estimate values but also additional information regarding the impact from imprecise input data

  16. Modeling and measuring the effects of imprecision in accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Donghan

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents two approaches for evaluating the uncertainties inherent in accident management strategies. Current PRA methodology uses expert opinion in the assessment of rare event probabilities. The problem is that these probabilities may be difficult to estimate even though reasonable engineering judgement is applied. This occurs because expert opinion under incomplete knowledge and limited data is inherently imprecise. In this case, the concept of uncertainty about a probability value is both intuitively appealing and potentially useful. This analysis considers accident management as a decision problem (i.e. 'applying a strategy' vs. 'do nothing') and uses an influence diagram. Then, the analysis applies two approaches to evaluating imprecise node probabilities in the influence diagram: 'a fuzzy probability' and 'an interval-valued subjective probability'. For the propagation of subjective probabilities, the analysis uses a Monte-Carlo simulation approach. In case of fuzzy probabilities, fuzzy logic is applied to propagate them. We believe that these approaches can allow us to better understand uncertainties associated with severe accident management strategies, because they provide additional information regarding the implications of using imprecise input data

  17. Pending issues for severe accident management in Wolsong plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.M.; Kim, D.H.; Park, S.Y.

    2015-01-01

    While the fraction of electric power supplied from a PHWR is more than 10% in Korea, the establishment of PHWR safety enhancement based on the SAM (Severe Accident Management) technology is still weak. The final approval on the extended operation and a stress test of Wolsong-1 were made under the condition that SAM is to be enhanced. Under this situation, the current research at KAERI of Korea has a vision to strengthen the unique value of a PHWR by resolving the pending SAM issues devaluating the PHWRs’ original value. Research activities in this area will be presented. This presentation will include: The operating strategy of CFVS (Containment Filtered Vent System) for Wolsong in which vent size and closure pressure are treated because some peak spikes (at failure times of calandria and calandria vault) are difficult to be controlled; Reactor Building failure pressure at which failure probability is treated for different modes such as global and leak failures; the adequacy of DCRV (Degasser Condenser tank Relief Valve) steam relief capacity with severe SGTR source term, and Hydrogen generation and control issue which is specific to CANDU. Furthermore, current SAM guidance has a lack of information on accident diagnostic and prognostic analyses, which is difficult for the TSC (Technical Service Center) emergency staff members to deal with under real accident conditions. Thus, prototypic technologies (such as an accident inferring engine and simulator) together with SAM updates are being developed as key elements to SAM supporting tools called SAMEX-CANDU

  18. Public sector's research programme on nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    2000-06-01

    According to the Finnish nuclear energy legislation, each producer of nuclear waste is responsible for the safe handling, management and disposal of the waste as well as for the arising costs. Authorities supervise and control the implementation of the national waste management programme and set the necessary safety and other requirements. In these tasks the authorities are supported by a research programme on nuclear waste management that is independent of the implementing organisations and power companies. The main objective of the research programme has been to provide the authorities with information and research results relevant for the safety of nuclear waste management. The main emphasis in this research programme has been devoted to the final disposal of spent fuel. The whole area of the research programme has been subdivided into the following main topic areas: (1) Behaviour of bedrock (2) Geohydrology and geochemistry, (3) Release of radionuclides from repository and subsequent transport in bedrock, (4) Engineered safety barriers of the repository, system, (5) Performance and safety assessment of spent fuel disposal facilities, (6) Waste management technology and costs (7) Evaluation of the contents and scope of and observation of the realisation of the environmental impact assessment procedure for the siting of spent nuclear fuel disposal facility, and research on other societal and sociopolitical issues, and (8) Public information, attitude, and image issues for waste management facilities. The research programme has generated considerably increased information on the behaviour of the natural and technical release barriers of the disposal system and thereby contributed to building of confidence on the long-term safety of geological disposal of spent fuel. Furthermore, increased confidence among the public in the affected candidate municipalities has probably been achieved by the complementary studies conducted within the research programme on topics

  19. Aspects of nuclear waste management after a 4-year Nordic programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moberg, L.

    1990-01-01

    Six areas of concern in nuclear waste management have been dealt with in a four-year Nordic research programme. They include work in two international projects, Hydrocoin dealing with modelling of groundwater flow in crystalline rock, and Biomovs, concerned with biosphere models. Geologic questions of importance to the prediction of future behaviour are examined. Waste quantities from the decommissioning of nuclear power stations are estimated, and total amounts of waste to be transported in the Nordic countries are evaluated. Waste amounts from a hypothetical reactor accident are also calculated. (author)

  20. Molten Corium-Concrete Interaction Behavior Analyses for Severe Accident Management in CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.; Kim, D. H.; Song, Y. M.

    2014-01-01

    After the last few severe accidents, the importance of accident management in nuclear power plants has increased. Many countries, including the United States (US) and Canada, have focused on understanding severe accidents in order to identify ways to further improve the safety of nuclear plants. It has been recognized that severe accident analyses of nuclear power plants will be beneficial in understanding plant-specific vulnerabilities during severe accidents. The objectives of this paper are to describe the molten corium behavior to identify a plant response with various concrete specific components. Accident analyses techniques using ISSAC can be useful tools for MCCI behavior in severe accident mitigation

  1. Analysis of the reasons of recently some radioactive source accidents and suggestions for management countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Yongjie; Feng Youcai; Song Chenxiu; Gao Huibin; Xing Jinsong; Pang Xinxin; Wang Xiaoqing; Wei Hong

    2007-01-01

    The article introduces recently some radioactive source accidents in China, and analyses the reasons of the accidents. Some important issues existed in the process of implementing new regulation were summarized, and some suggestions for managing radioactive sources are made. (authors)

  2. A Study on the Requisite Information for Severe Accident Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sunhee; Ahn, Kwang-Il; Kim, Jae-Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Related this research on arranging the requisite information for severe accident management, the documents of various forms in each country as well as the domestic literature are secured and analyzed. The analyzed information is arranged up to a detailed level. For the secured documents, the issued organizations and the issued purpose are diverse. Thus, the contents of the secured documents are also diverse according to the reactor type, and the purpose and standards of the classification are also diverse. Moreover, terminologies with same meaning are not unified. These various documents are analyzed to arrange the requisite information for severe accident management. Based on the documents of a related severe accident, the major information was analyzed. The information is different according to the reactor type, classification standard, and classification standard of the safety function. Thus the information is classified variously. In this study, based on the analysis results of the documents described these information, the major information and parameters are examined as safety function. And the results of parameters and information including the safety function and the detail information are induced.

  3. Influence of boron reduction strategies on PWR accident management flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papukchiev, Angel Aleksandrov; Liu, Yubo; Schaefer, Anselm

    2007-01-01

    In conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs, soluble boron is used for reactivity control over core fuel cycle. Design changes to reduce boron concentration in the reactor coolant are of general interest regarding three aspects - improved reactivity feedback properties, lower impact of boron dilution scenarios on PWR safety and eventually more flexible accident management procedures. In order to assess the potential advantages through the introduction of boron reduction strategies in current PWRs, two low boron core configurations based on fuel with increased utilization of gadolinium and erbium burnable absorbers have been developed. The new PWR designs permit to reduce the natural boron concentration in reactor coolant at begin of cycle to 518 ppm and 805 ppm. For the assessment of the potential safety advantages of these cores a hypothetical beyond design basis accident has been simulated with the system code ATHLET. The analyses showed improved inherent safety and increased accident management flexibility of the low boron cores in comparison with the standard PWR. (author)

  4. Proceedings of the specialist meeting on severe accident management implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Niantic Specialist meeting was structured around three main themes, one for each session. During the first session, papers from regulators, research groups, designers/owners groups and some utilities discussed the critical decisions in Severe Accident Management (SAM), how these decisions were addressed and implemented in generic SAM guidelines, what equipment and instrumentation was used, what are the differences in national approaches, etc. During the second session, papers were presented by utility specialists that described approaches chosen to specific implementation of the generic guidelines, the difficulties encountered in the implementation process and the perceived likelihood of success of their SAM program in dealing with severe accidents. The third session was dedicated to discussing what are the remaining uncertainties and open questions in SAM. Experts from several OECD countries presented significant perspectives on remaining open issues

  5. PWR accident management realated tests: some Bethsy results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, P.; Chataing, T.; Deruaz, R.

    1993-01-01

    The BETHSY integral test facility which is a scaled down model of a 3 loop FRAMATOME PWR and is currently operated at the Nuclear Center of Grenoble, forms an important part of the French strategy for PWR Accident Management. In this paper the features of both the facility and the experimental program are presented. Two accident transients: a total loss of feedwater and a 2'' cold leg break in case of High Pressure Safety Injection System failure, involving either Event Oriented - or State Oriented-Emergency Operating Procedures (EO-EOP or SO-EOP) are described and the system response analyzed. CATHARE calculation results are also presented which illustrate the ability of this code to adequately predict the key phenomena of these transients. (authors). 13 figs., 11 refs., 2 tabs

  6. Proceedings of the specialist meeting on severe accident management implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Niantic Specialist meeting was structured around three main themes, one for each session. During the first session, papers from regulators, research groups, designers/owners groups and some utilities discussed the critical decisions in Severe Accident Management (SAM), how these decisions were addressed and implemented in generic SAM guidelines, what equipment and instrumentation was used, what are the differences in national approaches, etc. During the second session, papers were presented by utility specialists that described approaches chosen to specific implementation of the generic guidelines, the difficulties encountered in the implementation process and the perceived likelihood of success of their SAM program in dealing with severe accidents. The third session was dedicated to discussing what are the remaining uncertainties and open questions in SAM. Experts from several OECD countries presented significant perspectives on remaining open issues

  7. Guide to Effective Purchasing. Operational Management Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frediani, Pam

    This manual is intended to help create and sustain good relations between purchasers and suppliers of foods and related products. It is designed to guide anyone involved in the purchasing function: purchasing officers and managers in medium and large establishments, food and beverage managers, catering managers, chefs, caterers, restaurateurs,…

  8. Nuclear knowledge management in radioactive waste management programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetere, Claudia L.; Gomiz, Pablo R.; Lavalle, Myriam; Masset, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    In late 2007, the Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) group of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), understanding the need to preserve knowledge related with radioactive waste, formulated the CONRRaD Project with the aim of developing and implementing a sustainable knowledge management system. The CONRRaD Project was highly focused on minimising the loss of radioactive waste management knowledge related to processes and facilities as a consequence of staff ageing and retiring, promoting transfer and preservation so as to ensure that future generations interpret and improve the management of waste, protecting the environment and people's health. The National Programme for Radioactive Waste Management (NPRWM) has the responsibility of maintaining a documented record system to preserve the knowledge that is available and relates to the facilities for radioactive wastes treatment, conditioning, packaging, storing and disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. The STOReR system has been designed with the aim of ensuring traceability through all the steps of radioactive waste management from generation to storage or disposal. Apart from upgrading an application in use since 2001, the new software includes improvements in the inventory calculations according to the current regulations. Basically, the system consists of two applications. One application called PAGE is on the Net and it is available for the producers. These producers are the facilities that generate radioactive waste as a consequence of their normal operation. PAGE enables the producers to access all the services provided by AGE more easily. Not only are producers the users of PAGE, but there are also authorised owners of radioactive sources and devices because AGE provides transitory or permanent storage of these elements. The other application called STOReR is the main one which provides the capabilities needed to support the whole system, such as the databases storage and management. STORe

  9. Designing a portfolio management programme to optimize cash-flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassom, D.

    1996-01-01

    The design and implementation of any portfolio management programme must, by definition, be tailored to the drivers and particular objectives of the company owning the assets. This paper will concentrate on one of the most important driving forces, namely managing cash-flow. Five key steps are required to achieve an effective portfolio management programme: 1. establish targets/goals; 2. describe and value the assets in your company's portfolio; 3. identify and catalogue potential 'customers'; 4. construct appropriate deal structures and other strategies to achieve your targets; 5. work hard and do deals. (author)

  10. Overview of training methodology for accident management at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    Many IAEA Member States operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) are at present developing accident management programmes (AMPs) for the prevention and mitigation of severe accidents. However, the level of implementation varies significantly between NPPs. The exchange of experience and best practices can considerably contribute to the quality and facilitate the implementation of AMPs at the plants. The main objective of this publication is to describe available material and technical support tools that can be used to support training of the personnel involved in the accident management (AM), and to highlight the current status of their application. The focus is on those operator aids that can help the plant personnel to take correct actions during an emergency to prevent and mitigate consequences of a severe accident. The second objective is to describe the available material for the training courses of those people who are responsible of the AMP development and implementation of an individual plant. The third objective is to collect a compact set of information on various aspects of AM training into a single publication. In this context, the AM personnel includes both the plant staff responsible for taking the decision and actions concerning preventive and mitigative AM and the persons involved in the management of off-site releases. Thus, the scope of this publication is on the training of personnel directly involved in the decisions and execution of the SAM actions during progression of an accident. The integration of training into the AMP development and implementation is summarized. The technical AM support tools and material are defined as operator aids involving severe accident guidelines, various computational aids and computerized tools. The operator aids make also an essential part of the training tools. The simulators to be applied for the AM training have been developed or are under development by various organizations in order to support the training on

  11. Financial aspects of veterinary herd health management programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifende, V I; Derks, M; Hooijer, G A; Hogeveen, H

    2014-09-06

    Veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programmes have been shown to be economically effective in the past. However, no current information is available on costs and benefits of these programmes. This study compared economics and farm performance between participants and non-participants in VHHM programmes in 1013 dairy farms with over 40 cows. Milk Production Registration (MPR) data and a questionnaire concerning VHHM were used. Based on the level of participation in VHHM (as indicated in the questionnaire), costs of the programmes were calculated using a normative model. The economic value of the production effects was similarly calculated using normative modelling based on MPR data. Participants in VHHM had a better performance with regard to production, but not with regard to reproduction. Over 90 per cent of the VHHM participants were visited at least once every six weeks and most participants discussed at least three topics. In most farms, the veterinarian did the pregnancy checks as part of the VHHM programmes. There was a benefit to cost ratio of about five per cow per year for VHHM participants, and a mean difference in net returns of €30 per cow per year after adjusting for the cost of the programme. This portrays that participation in a VHHM programme is cost-efficient. There is, however, much unexplained variation in the net returns, possibly due to diverse approaches by veterinarians towards VHHM or by other factors not included in this analysis, like nutritional quality or management abilities of the farmer. British Veterinary Association.

  12. A proposal for accident management optimization based on the study of accident sequence analysis for a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobajima, M.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes a proposal for accident management optimization based on the study of accident sequence and source term analyses for a BWR. In Japan, accident management measures are to be implemented in all LWRs by the year 2000 in accordance with the recommendation of the regulatory organization and based on the PSAs carried out by the utilities. Source terms were evaluated by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) with the THALES code for all BWR sequences in which loss of decay heat removal resulted in the largest release. Identification of the priority and importance of accident management measures was carried out for the sequences with larger risk contributions. Considerations for optimizing emergency operation guides are believed to be essential for risk reduction. (author)

  13. Evaluation of constrained mobility for programmability in network management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohoris, C.; Liotta, A.; Pavlou, G.; Ambler, A.P.; Calo, S.B.; Kar, G.

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, a significant amount of research work has addressed the use of code mobility in network management. In this paper, we introduce first three aspects of code mobility and argue that constrained mobility offers a natural and easy approach to network management programmability. While

  14. TEACHING METHODS IN MBA AND LIFELONG LEARNING PROGRAMMES FOR MANAGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarošová, Eva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Teaching methods in MBA and Lifelong Learning Programmes (LLP for managers should be topically relevant in terms of content as well as the teaching methods used. In terms of the content, the integral part of MBA and Lifelong Learning Programmes for managers should be the development of participants’ leadership competencies and their understanding of current leadership concepts. The teaching methods in educational programmes for managers as adult learners should correspond to the strategy of learner-centred teaching that focuses on the participants’ learning process and their active involvement in class. The focus on the participants’ learning process also raises questions about whether the programme’s participants perceive the teaching methods used as useful and relevant for their development as leaders. The paper presents the results of the analysis of the responses to these questions in a sample of 54 Czech participants in the MBA programme and of lifelong learning programmes at the University of Economics, Prague. The data was acquired based on written or electronically submitted questionnaires. The data was analysed in relation to the usefulness of the teaching methods for understanding the concepts of leadership, leadership skills development as well as respondents’ personal growth. The results show that the respondents most valued the methods that enabled them to get feedback, activated them throughout the programme and got them involved in discussions with others in class. Implications for managerial education practices are discussed.

  15. Health effects of the Chernobyl accident and special health care programmes. Report of the UN Chernobyl Forum Expert Group 'Health'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.; Repacholi, M.; Carr, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Twenty years have passed since the worst nuclear reactor accident in the world occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine. The radioactive contamination which resulted from the explosion and fire in the first few days spread over large areas of neighbouring Belarus and the Russian Federation, with most of the fallout in Belarus. While national and local authorities did not immediately disclose the scale of the accident, the mitigation measures, such as distribution of potassium iodine pills, food restriction, and mass evacuation from areas where the radioactive contamination was greatest, undoubtedly reduced the health impact of the radiation exposure and saved many lives. The accident caused severe social and economic disruption and had significant environmental and health impact. This was aggravated by the political and economical changes in the three affected states related to the break-down of the Soviet Union. In the aftermath of the accident the international scientific and medical community collaborated closely with national experts dealing with health effects of the accident in the affected countries. There is a substantial body of international collaborative projects on the situation, which should lead to advancement in radiation sciences. However, considerable speculation and disinformation remains about the possible health impact of the accident for the millions of affected people. To address the health, environmental and socioeconomic consequences of the Chernobyl accident, the United Nations in 2003 launched an Inter-Agency initiative, the Chernobyl Forum. The Forum's Secretariat, led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and several other international organizations collaborated with the governments of the affected countries. The purpose of the Chernobyl Forum was to review the consequences of the accident, issue technical reports and, based

  16. Specific features of RBMK severe accidents progression and approach to the accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskij, V.P.; Nikitin, Yu.M.; Petrov, A.A.; Potapov, A.A.; Cherkashov, Yu.M.

    2001-01-01

    Fundamental construction features of the LWGR facilities (absence of common external containment shell, disintegrated circulation circuit and multichannel reactor core, positive vapor reactivity coefficient, high mass of thermally capacious graphite moderator) predetermining development of assumed heavy non-projected accidents and handling them are treated. Rating the categories of the reactor core damages for non-projected accidents and accident types producing specific grope of damages is given. Passing standard non-projected accidents, possible methods of attack accident consequences, as well as methods of calculated analysis of non-projected accidents are demonstrated [ru

  17. French regulatory requirements concerning severe accidents in PWRs and associated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Homme, A.; Pelce, J.

    1983-12-01

    The French approach to safety doctrine is first presented: safety objectives as regards populations, and, plant safety objectives. Then, a description of ultimate or ''U'' procedures, involving the proceeding of physical phenomena induced by severe accidents, is given. Finally, R and D programs in relation to the various stages or severe accidents are presented

  18. French regulatory requirements concerning severe accidents in PWRs and associated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Homme, A.; Pelce, J.

    1986-07-01

    This report gives a global view of the French reactor safety approach; aspects in relation with severe accidents are pointed out: safety goals regarding population, and safety goals regarding plant design. Ultimate or U procedures involving physical phenomena of severe accidents are then described. R. and D. programs have been defined with regard to the priorities resulting from this approach [fr

  19. Health consequences of the Chernobyl accident. Results of the IPHECA pilot projects and related national programmes. Scientific report. International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Since the Chernobyl accident, massive efforts have been made by the governmental authorities to mitigate the effects, to provide diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation to those affected and to investigate the effects on health which had occurred. Vast amounts of resources have and continue to be expended in supporting these efforts. In 1991, WHO officially joined this effort through the establishment by the World Health Assembly of the International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA). The objectives of this Programme were: to contribute to the efforts to alleviate the health consequences of the accident by assisting health authorities in Belarus, Russian Federation and Ukraine; to consolidate the experience gained from treatment of over-exposure and from various practical interventions and thereby improve medical preparedness for the future; and to acquire data in the fields of radiation epidemiology and medical response to disasters. IPHECA initially concentrated on five priority areas, and pilot projects were developed for implementation in Belarus, Russian Federation and Ukraine for each: thyroid, haematology, brain damage in-utero, epidemiological registry and oral health (only in Belarus). This publication is intended to fulfil a number of purposes. It provides an account of what was accomplished during the pilot phase of IPHECA. It discusses the protocols which were developed and used, summarizes the investigations which were carried out and reports on the instrumentation, supplies and training programmes which were provided. The publication also describes and discusses the results which have been obtained to date and identifies the still existing gaps in knowledge

  20. Health consequences of the Chernobyl accident. Results of the IPHECA pilot projects and related national programmes. Scientific report. International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Since the Chernobyl accident, massive efforts have been made by the governmental authorities to mitigate the effects, to provide diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation to those affected and to investigate the effects on health which had occurred. Vast amounts of resources have and continue to be expended in supporting these efforts. In 1991, WHO officially joined this effort through the establishment by the World Health Assembly of the International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA). The objectives of this Programme were: to contribute to the efforts to alleviate the health consequences of the accident by assisting health authorities in Belarus, Russian Federation and Ukraine; to consolidate the experience gained from treatment of over-exposure and from various practical interventions and thereby improve medical preparedness for the future; and to acquire data in the fields of radiation epidemiology and medical response to disasters. IPHECA initially concentrated on five priority areas, and pilot projects were developed for implementation in Belarus, Russian Federation and Ukraine for each: thyroid, haematology, brain damage in-utero, epidemiological registry and oral health (only in Belarus). This publication is intended to fulfil a number of purposes. It provides an account of what was accomplished during the pilot phase of IPHECA. It discusses the protocols which were developed and used, summarizes the investigations which were carried out and reports on the instrumentation, supplies and training programmes which were provided. The publication also describes and discusses the results which have been obtained to date and identifies the still existing gaps in knowledge Refs, figs, tabs

  1. Severe accident management at nuclear power plants - emergency preparedness and response actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawar, S.K.; Krishnamurthy, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the current level of emergency planning and preparedness and also improvement in the emergency management programme over the years including lessons learned from Fukushima accident, hazard analysis and categorization of nuclear facilities into hazard category for establishing the emergency preparedness class, classification of emergencies based on the Emergency Action Levels (EAL), development of EAL’s for PHWR, Generic Criteria in terms of projected dose for initiating protective actions (precautionary urgent protective actions, urgent protective actions, early protective actions), operational intervention levels (OIL), Emergency planning zones and distances, protection strategy and reference levels, use of residual dose for establishing reference levels for optimization of protection strategy, criteria for termination of emergency, transition of emergency exposure situation to existing exposure situation or planned exposure situation, criteria for medical managements of exposed persons and guidance for controlling the dose of emergency workers. This paper also highlights the EALs for typical PHWR type reactors for all types of emergencies (plant, site and offsite), transition from emergency operating procedures (EOP) to accident management guidelines (AMG) to emergency response actions and proposed implementation of guidelines

  2. Severe accident research and management in Nordic Countries - A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, W.

    2002-01-01

    The report describes the status of severe accident research and accident management development in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark. The emphasis is on severe accident phenomena and issues of special importance for the severe accident management strategies implemented in Sweden and in Finland. The main objective of the research has been to verify the protection provided by the accident mitigation measures and to reduce the uncertainties in risk dominant accident phenomena. Another objective has been to support validation and improvements of accident management strategies and procedures as well as to contribute to the development of level 2 PSA, computerised operator aids for accident management and certain aspects of emergency preparedness. Severe accident research addresses both the in-vessel and the ex-vessel accident progression phenomena and issues. Even though there are differences between Sweden and Finland as to the scope and content of the research programs, the focus of the research in both countries is on in-vessel coolability, integrity of the reactor vessel lower head and core melt behaviour in the containment, in particular the issues of core debris coolability and steam explosions. Notwithstanding that our understanding of these issues has significantly improved, and that experimental data base has been largely expanded, there are still important uncertainties which motivate continued research. Other important areas are thermal-hydraulic phenomena during reflooding of an overheated partially degraded core, fission product chemistry, in particular formation of organic iodine, and hydrogen transport and combustion phenomena. The development of severe accident management has embraced, among other things, improvements of accident mitigating procedures and strategies, further work at IFE Halden on Computerised Accident Management Support (CAMS) system, as well as plant modifications, including new instrumentation. Recent efforts in Sweden in this area

  3. Consideration of Command and Control Performance during Accident Management Process at the Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Nisrene M. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sok Chul [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants shifted the nuclear safety paradigm from risk management to on-site management capability during a severe accident. The kernel of on-site management capability during an accident at a nuclear power plant is situation awareness and agility of command and control. However, little consideration has been given to accident management. After the events of September 11, 2001 and the catastrophic Fukushima nuclear disaster, agility of command and control has emerged as a significant element for effective and efficient accident management, with many studies emphasizing accident management strategies, particularly man-machine interface, which is considered a key role in ensuring nuclear power plant safety during severe accident conditions. This paper proposes a conceptual model for evaluating command and control performance during the accident management process at a nuclear power plant. Communication and information processing while responding to an accident is one of the key issues needed to mitigate the accident. This model will give guidelines for accurate and fast communication response during accident conditions.

  4. Main post-accident management stakes: IRSN's point of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre Oudiz [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (France)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Off site management of a radiological crisis covers two phases which need to be clearly distinguished even if there are links between them: emergency phase and recovery phase (also called late or post-accident phase). The presentation will deal with the latter, rather neglected up until recently, but conveying special attention from now on in France and at the international level. It is clear now that the long term management of a radiological or nuclear crisis cannot be reduced to merely site decontamination. Actually, environmental decontamination considerations would be only one amongst other essential economical, social, health, psychological, cultural, and symbolical concerns. This is why off site management of a radiological crisis requires innovative governance, in order to challenge such a complexity. This need for challenge led IRSN to have on the go technical developments and new governance modes reflection. 1) Technical developments: they deal with implementing an organisation, a set of methods, a platform of technical tools which would allow the stakeholders to carry out efficiently their mission during the recovery phase. For example, countermeasures for agricultural and urban rehabilitation are developed within the framework of the 6. PCRDT EURANOS programme. Teams from several countries are involved in common elaboration of rehabilitation strategies based on the best available knowledge. Besides this, simple operational decision aiding tools for the stakeholders (local administration, elected representatives, professional agricultural groups, etc.) are currently developed by IRSN within the framework of the nuclear post-accident exercises. IRSN is also involved in doctrinal reflections about the respective roles of radioactive measurements in the environment and radiological consequences calculation during emergency and recovery phases. Criteria for emergency countermeasures withdrawal are also currently under

  5. Evaluation of the Finnish nuclear waste management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    In response to a request from Finland in November 1992, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) set up a Team of four experts (representatives from Belgium, Canada, Germany and Switzerland) to review the Finnish nuclear waste management programme within the auspices of IAEA's Waste Management programme (WATRP). During the early summer of 1993, the Team reviewed a large amount of documentation supplied by the Finnish industry, government and research organizations. The radioactive waste management programme areas within the Team's terms of reference included: (1) work being done in siting and building a conditional facility for spent nuclear fuel and siting and constructing a co-located repository, (2) the plans and activities for conditioning and disposing of the low and intermediate level waste from Finland's NPPs and (3) the plans for decommissioning Finland's reactors when that becomes necessary. The evaluation work and the recommendations of the Team are detailed in the report

  6. Improvement of Severe Accident Analysis Computer Code and Development of Accident Management Guidance for Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Ko Ryu; Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, See Darl; Song, Yong Mann; Choi, Young; Jin, Young Ho

    2005-03-01

    The objective of the project is to develop a generic severe accident management guidance(SAMG) applicable to Korean PHWR and the objective of this 3 year continued phase is to construct a base of the generic SAMG. Another objective is to improve a domestic computer code, ISAAC (Integrated Severe Accident Analysis code for CANDU), which still has many deficiencies to be improved in order to apply for the SAMG development. The scope and contents performed in this Phase-2 are as follows: The characteristics of major design and operation for the domestic Wolsong NPP are analyzed from the severe accident aspects. On the basis, preliminary strategies for SAM of PHWR are selected. The information needed for SAM and the methods to get that information are analyzed. Both the individual strategies applicable for accident mitigation under PHWR severe accident conditions and the technical background for those strategies are developed. A new version of ISAAC 2.0 has been developed after analyzing and modifying the existing models of ISAAC 1.0. The general SAMG applicable for PHWRs confirms severe accident management techniques for emergencies, provides the base technique to develop the plant specific SAMG by utility company and finally contributes to the public safety enhancement as a NPP safety assuring step. The ISAAC code will be used inevitably for the PSA, living PSA, severe accident analysis, SAM program development and operator training in PHWR

  7. Improvement of Severe Accident Analysis Computer Code and Development of Accident Management Guidance for Heavy Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Ko Ryu; Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, See Darl; Song, Yong Mann; Choi, Young; Jin, Young Ho

    2005-03-15

    The objective of the project is to develop a generic severe accident management guidance(SAMG) applicable to Korean PHWR and the objective of this 3 year continued phase is to construct a base of the generic SAMG. Another objective is to improve a domestic computer code, ISAAC (Integrated Severe Accident Analysis code for CANDU), which still has many deficiencies to be improved in order to apply for the SAMG development. The scope and contents performed in this Phase-2 are as follows: The characteristics of major design and operation for the domestic Wolsong NPP are analyzed from the severe accident aspects. On the basis, preliminary strategies for SAM of PHWR are selected. The information needed for SAM and the methods to get that information are analyzed. Both the individual strategies applicable for accident mitigation under PHWR severe accident conditions and the technical background for those strategies are developed. A new version of ISAAC 2.0 has been developed after analyzing and modifying the existing models of ISAAC 1.0. The general SAMG applicable for PHWRs confirms severe accident management techniques for emergencies, provides the base technique to develop the plant specific SAMG by utility company and finally contributes to the public safety enhancement as a NPP safety assuring step. The ISAAC code will be used inevitably for the PSA, living PSA, severe accident analysis, SAM program development and operator training in PHWR.

  8. Specialist meeting on selected containment severe accident management strategies. Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The CSNI Specialist Meeting on Selected Containment Severe Accident Management Strategies held in Stockholm, Sweden in June 1994 was organised by the Task Group on Containment Aspects of Severe Accident Management (CAM) of CSNI's Principal Working Group on the Confinement of Accidental Radioactive Releases (PWG4) in collaboration with the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI). Conclusions and recommendations are given for each of the sessions of the workshops: Containment accident management strategies (general aspects); hydrogen management techniques and other containment accident management techniques; surveillance and protection of containment function

  9. Final report. The Watercourse Management Programme; Sluttrapport. Vassdragsdriftprogrammet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skarboevik, Eva; Berg, Gry; Faugli, Per Einar

    1997-10-01

    In Norway, there was a need to provide quick answers to questions related to the management and use of river systems. To this end, the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Administration (NVE) in 1988-1994 conducted the research and development programme described in this report. In the mid-eighties, river management came into focus. The importance of coordination, multi-use planning and multi-use assessments was constantly being stressed and the natural environment, recreation and health were incorporated into the decision-making processes. The programme has contributed to the Norwegian section of the UNESCO project Flow Regimes from International Experimental and Network Data (FRIEND). 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. New nuclear programmes must not neglect waste management - 59077

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCombie, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Many established nuclear power programmes have learned to their dismay that waste management and disposal are not tasks that can be postponed at will if public and political acceptance is a prerequisite for progress. In fact, some programmes that recognised this back in the 1970's and 1980's moved into leading positions in repository development. This happened, for example, in Sweden and Switzerland where already in the 1970's Laws were passed specifying that safe disposal must be demonstrated before new nuclear plants could operate. In recent years, it has become recognised that, in order to ensure that the radioactive wastes in any country are managed safely, it is necessary to have an established legislative and regulatory framework and also to create the necessary organizations for implementation and for oversight of waste management operations and facility development. Guidance on these issues is given in the Joint Convention and a number of other IAEA documents. The IAEA, and also the EC, have in addition published key overarching advisory documents for new nuclear programmes. These are useful for strategic planning but, when it comes to actual implementation projects, the advice tends to imply that all nuclear programmes, however large or small, should be pressing ahead urgently towards early operation of geological repositories. In practice, however, in small programmes there are neither economic nor technical drivers for early implementation of deep geological repositories. Constructing simpler facilities for the disposal of the larger volume of low-level wastes has higher priority. Nevertheless, in all countries political decisions have to be taken and policies set in place to ensure that geological disposal will implemented without unjustified delay. This paper distils out a set of key messages for new programmes. Amongst the most critical are the following. Even if disposal is far off, planning and organization should begin at the initiation of the

  11. International programme on the health effects of the Chernobyl accidents (IPHECA). Protocol for the pilot project ''Thyroid''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The protocol document for the Thyroid Project of International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accidents (IPHECA) describes the main aims of the project, namely 1) to detect and describe selected diseases of the thyroid among children and adolescents in population centres assigned earlier as ''strictly controlled zones'' and, 2) to determine, if possible, the link between the prevalence of the diseases and radiation doses received by the thyroid. Population to be investigated, medical and laboratory examinations and advanced diagnostics for thyroid diseases to be undertaken are enlisted in the protocol

  12. International Nuclear Management Academy Requirements for University Master’s Programmes in Nuclear Technology Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosbois, J. de; Hirose, H.; Adachi, F.; Liu, L.; Hanamitsu, K.; Kosilov, A.; Roberts, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The development of any national nuclear energy programme is dependent on the successful development of qualified human resources, through a sustainable nuclear education and training programmes supported by government and industry. Among the broad range of specialists needed for the continued safe and economic utilization of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, are a most vital component—managers. The International Nuclear Management Academy (INMA) is an IAEA facilitated collaboration framework in which universities provide master’s degree programmes focusing on the management aspect for the nuclear sector. INMA master’s programmes in Nuclear Technology Management (NTM) specify a common set of competency requirements that graduates should acquire to prepare them to become competent managers. This paper presents an overview of the INMA collaboration framework and the requirements for partner universities to implement master’s programmes in Nuclear Technology Management. (author

  13. The response of the radionuclide monitoring programme for agricultural products in Great Britain to the accident at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of the radiation monitoring and control programme of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in Great Britain is to ensure the safety of foodstuffs. The particular responsibility of my department within the Ministry is the analysis of agricultural products for the presence of radionuclides entering the human food chain from atmospheric releases. The Ministry also has a laboratory which monitors the marine environment. This presentation describes the surveillance programme for agricultural foodstuffs and show how it was used to monitor the deposition from the Chernobyl accident, and shows some of the monitoring data obtained and indicate how the information was used in formulating protective measures. It also mentions future plans

  14. The response of the radionuclide monitoring programme for agricultural products in Great Britain to the accident at Chernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J A [Central Veterinary Laboratory, Weybridge, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1986-07-01

    The overall objective of the radiation monitoring and control programme of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in Great Britain is to ensure the safety of foodstuffs. The particular responsibility of my department within the Ministry is the analysis of agricultural products for the presence of radionuclides entering the human food chain from atmospheric releases. The Ministry also has a laboratory which monitors the marine environment. This presentation describes the surveillance programme for agricultural foodstuffs and show how it was used to monitor the deposition from the Chernobyl accident, and shows some of the monitoring data obtained and indicate how the information was used in formulating protective measures. It also mentions future plans.

  15. Indian programme on radioactive waste management

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These can be disposed of to the environment and are not likely to cause any ... The overall philosophy for the safe management of radioactive ... power plants and other fuel cycle facilities in order to keep the air in the working area and the.

  16. Generalities on nuclear accidents and their short-dated and middle-dated management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    All the nuclear activities present a radiation risk. The radiation exposure of the employees or the public, may occur during normal activity or during an accident. The IRSN realized a document on this radiation risk and the actions of protection. The sanitary and medical aspects of a radiation accident are detailed. The actions of the population protection during an accident and the post accident management are also discussed. (A.L.B.)

  17. Identification and evaluation of PWR in-vessel severe accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukelow, J.S.; Harrison, D.G.; Morgenstern, M.

    1992-03-01

    This reports documents work performed the NRC/RES Accident Management Guidance Program to evaluate possible strategies for mitigating the consequences of PWR severe accidents. The selection and evaluation of strategies was limited to the in-vessel phase of the severe accident, i.e., after the initiation of core degradation and prior to RPV failure. A parallel project at BNL has been considering strategies applicable to the ex-vessel phase of PWR severe accidents

  18. Accident management: What is it and how do you do it?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, Robert E.; Hammersley, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Accident management is the composite of those actions that would prevent, stop and/or mitigate a severe accident in a nuclear power plant. Since they act to prevent core damage, the Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) are an integral part of accident management. Each of the Owners Groups have developed EOPs that are well thought out for instructing the operator to respond to accident conditions which could threaten the core. However, for those very low probability events in which the core could be uncovered and damaged, accident management actions arise from a logical evaluation of possible actions (strategies) for recovering from the accident state and protecting the public health and safety. To understand the character of accident management it is first necessary to define: 1. What is threatened as a result of the accident? 2. Fundamentally, what needs to be protected? 3. What is known during an accident? 4. What have we learned from the TMI-2 accident? 5. What have we learned from the plant specific IPEs? Once these subjects are reviewed on a utility specific and plant specific basis, accident management actions become relatively straightforward and likely can be effectively addressed using the total capability available in a given design. This paper discusses these five questions in a global manner with the aim being to aid plant specific implementation. (author)

  19. Developement of integrated evaluation system for severe accident management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, H. D.; Park, S. Y.; Kim, K. R.; Park, S. H.; Choi, Y.; Song, Y. M.; Ahn, K. I.; Park, J. H

    2005-04-01

    The scope of the project includes four activities such as construction of DB, development of data base management tool, development of severe accident analysis code system and FP studies. In the construction of DB, level-1,2 PSA results and plant damage states event trees were mainly used to select the following target initiators based on frequencies: LLOCA, MLOCA, SLOCA, station black out, LOOP, LOFW and SGTR. These scenarios occupy more than 95% of the total frequencies of the core damage sequences at KSNP. In the development of data base management tool, SARD 2.0 was developed under the PC microsoft windows environment using the visual basic 6.0 language. In the development of severe accident analysis code system, MIDAS 1.0 was developed with new features of FORTRAN-90 which makes it possible to allocate the storage dynamically and to use the user-defined data type, leading to an efficient memory treatment and an easy understanding. Also for user's convenience, the input (IEDIT) and output (IPLOT) processors were developed and implemented into the MIDAS code. For the model development of MIDAS concerning the FP behavior, the one dimensional thermophoresis model was developed and it gave much improvement to predict the amount of FP deposited on the SG U-tube. Also the source term analysis methodology was set up and applied to the KSNP and APR1400.

  20. The Radioactive Waste Management Programme in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beceiro, A. R.; Vico, E.

    2000-01-01

    In 1984 the Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos (ENRESA) was set up in order to be responsible for all radioactive waste management activities in the country. ENRESA is a state-owned company, the shareholders of which are CIEMAT (Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, formerly (JEN) and SEPI (Sociedad Estatal de Participaciones Industriales), both institutions dependent on the Ministry of Industry and Energy. ENRESA has a broad scope of responsibilities, including not only the management of L/ILW, HLW and spent fuel but also the decommissioning of nuclear installations, as well as the rehabilitation of uranium mining and milling facilities when required. The policy on radioactive waste management is defined by the Government, and the strategies are developed by ENRESA in accordance with the General Radioactive Waste Management Plan. This Plan is a strategic document which must be submitted yearly by ENRESA to the Government, for its approval when the Ministry of Industry and Energy decided so. The plan, in general terms, contains the main aspects related to waste generation and forecasts, as well as the strategies and technical solutions to be prepared, along with the associated economic and financial aspects. ENRESA's activities are financed by the waste producers. On the one hand the nucleoelectric sector pays a percentage fee on all the electricity sales, while small producers pay tariffs according to the services provided, both are approved by the Government. The fifth General Radioactive Waste Plan, approved by the Government in July 1999, is currently in force and contains the strategies for the management of radioactive wastes and decommissioning of nuclear installations in Spain. (author)

  1. The radioactive waste management programme in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beceiro, Alvaro R.; Vico, Elena

    2002-01-01

    In 1984 the Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos (ENRESA) was set up in order to be responsible for all radioactive waste management activities in the country. ENRESA is a state-owned company, the shareholders of which are CIEMAT (Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, formerly (JEN) and SEPI (Sociedad Estatal de Participaciones Industriales), both institutions dependent on the Spanish Government. ENRESA has a broad scope of responsibilities, including not only the management of L/ILW, HLW and spent fuel but also the decommissioning of nuclear installations, as well as the rehabilitation of uranium mining and milling facilities when required. The policy on radioactive waste management is defined by the Government, and the strategies are developed by ENRESA in accordance with the General Radioactive Waste Management Plan. This Plan is a strategic document which must be submitted yearly by ENRESA to the Government, for its approval when the Ministry of Economy decided so. The plan, in general terms, contains the main aspects related to waste generation and forecasts, as well as the strategies and technical solutions to be prepared, along with the associated economic and financial aspects. ENRESA's activities are financed by the waste producers. On the one hand the nucleoelectric sector pays a percentage fee on all the electricity sales, while small producers pay tariffs according to the services provided, both are approved by the Government. The Fifth General Radioactive Waste Plan, approved by the Government in July 1999, is currently in force and contains the strategies for the management of radioactive wastes and decommissioning of nuclear installations in Spain. (author)

  2. Network-Embedded Management and Applications Understanding Programmable Networking Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Wolter, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Despite the explosion of networking services and applications in the past decades, the basic technological underpinnings of the Internet have remained largely unchanged. At its heart are special-purpose appliances that connect us to the digital world, commonly known as switches and routers. Now, however, the traditional framework is being increasingly challenged by new methods that are jostling for a position in the next-generation Internet. The concept of a network that is becoming more programmable is one of the aspects that are taking center stage. This opens new possibilities to embed software applications inside the network itself and to manage networks and communications services with unprecedented ease and efficiency. In this edited volume, distinguished experts take the reader on a tour of different facets of programmable network infrastructure and application exploit it. Presenting the state of the art in network embedded management and applications and programmable network infrastructure, the book c...

  3. Development of Human Factor Management Requirements and Human Error Classification for the Prevention of Railway Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Sang Log; Park, Chan Woo; Shin, Seung Ryoung

    2008-08-01

    Railway accident analysis results show that accidents cased by human factors are not decreasing, whereas H/W related accidents are steadily decreasing. For the efficient management of human factors, many expertise on design, conditions, safety culture and staffing are required. But current safety management activities on safety critical works are focused on training, due to the limited resource and information. In order to improve railway safety, human factors management requirements for safety critical worker and human error classification is proposed in this report. For this accident analysis, status of safety measure on human factor, safety management system on safety critical worker, current safety planning is analysis

  4. The costs assessment of the RENEL's programme for radwaste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barariu, Gh.; Andreescu, N.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents first economical assessment of the Radwaste Management Programme of the Romanian Electricity Authority - Nuclear Power Group (RENEL-GEN) until closing all foreseeable activities in the field of nuclear waste processing and disposal. (Author) 1 Tab., 7 Refs

  5. Financial aspects of veterinary herd health management programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ifende, V.I.; Derks, M.; Hooijer, G.A.; Hogeveen, H.

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programmes are meant to support herd health and farmers’ income (Brand and Guard 1996). They were introduced in the Netherlands in the 1970s (Sol and Renkema 1984) and at present many veterinarians provide them to farmers. VHHM comprises a basic structure of

  6. Management of Adult Education Programme in Abia State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adult Education is the instruction or controlled experiences for the mature person so that he/she may attain social, economic, cultural, political or technical competence or individual development. The importance of management in adult education programme cannot be over emphasized because of the vital role it plays in ...

  7. Development of the severe accident risk information database management system SARD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Kwang Il; Kim, Dong Ha

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this report is to introduce essential features and functions of a severe accident risk information management system, SARD (Severe Accident Risk Database Management System) version 1.0, which has been developed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, and database management and data retrieval procedures through the system. The present database management system has powerful capabilities that can store automatically and manage systematically the plant-specific severe accident analysis results for core damage sequences leading to severe accidents, and search intelligently the related severe accident risk information. For that purpose, the present database system mainly takes into account the plant-specific severe accident sequences obtained from the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs), base case analysis results for various severe accident sequences (such as code responses and summary for key-event timings), and related sensitivity analysis results for key input parameters/models employed in the severe accident codes. Accordingly, the present database system can be effectively applied in supporting the Level 2 PSA of similar plants, for fast prediction and intelligent retrieval of the required severe accident risk information for the specific plant whose information was previously stored in the database system, and development of plant-specific severe accident management strategies

  8. Development of the severe accident risk information database management system SARD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Kwang Il; Kim, Dong Ha

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this report is to introduce essential features and functions of a severe accident risk information management system, SARD (Severe Accident Risk Database Management System) version 1.0, which has been developed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, and database management and data retrieval procedures through the system. The present database management system has powerful capabilities that can store automatically and manage systematically the plant-specific severe accident analysis results for core damage sequences leading to severe accidents, and search intelligently the related severe accident risk information. For that purpose, the present database system mainly takes into account the plant-specific severe accident sequences obtained from the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs), base case analysis results for various severe accident sequences (such as code responses and summary for key-event timings), and related sensitivity analysis results for key input parameters/models employed in the severe accident codes. Accordingly, the present database system can be effectively applied in supporting the Level 2 PSA of similar plants, for fast prediction and intelligent retrieval of the required severe accident risk information for the specific plant whose information was previously stored in the database system, and development of plant-specific severe accident management strategies.

  9. Experience of the Spanish radioactive management programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beceiro, A.R.; Zuloaga, P.; Espejo, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The important results achieved in the last 12 years , since the ENRESA inception, are reported. The establishment and start-up of the low and intermediate level waste management system (waste acceptance criteria and verification laboratories, waste collection and transport systems and conditioning facilities, temporary storage and disposal) is capable of managing wastes of these categories forecast to be produced in Spain up to the year 2013. The capacity to store temporarily the spent fuel on site at the operating NPPs is being increased to met practically the needs up to end of these plants' operating lifetime. This is being achieved through the re-racking of spent fuel pools and the use of metallic casks, depending on the technical possibilities of each plant. These increase in the capacity for spent fuel temporary storage will allow work on geological prospecting and technology development to progress over the next two decades, prior to construction of a geological disposal facility. All these tasks are being carried out in accordance with the established program initiated in 1987 which is requiring important technological financial and communication-related efforts. The financial, technological and waste management means required for dismantling of nuclear installations at the end of their operating lifetime have been established; thus, for instance, the works involved in dismantling and tailing dyke remodeling at the disused uranium mill in Andujar were completed. The engineering project for the dismantling of the Vandellos I NPP is going ahead according to schedule and was submitted to the Authorities during the first half of 1994, the starting of work being expected for the end of 1997. This overall set of results represents an appreciable improvement in Spain's capacity to solve environmental problems and a substantial reduction in the potential risk associated with the radioactive wastes accumulation. (authors)

  10. The Chernobyl accident as a source of new radiological knowledge: implications for Fukushima rehabilitation and research programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balonov, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine in 1986 caused a huge release of radionuclides over large areas of Europe. During large scale activities focused on overcoming of its negative consequences for public health, various research programmes in radioecology, dosimetry and radiation medicine were conducted. New knowledge was applied internationally in substantial updating of radiation protection systems for emergency and existing situations of human exposure, for improvement of emergency preparedness and response. Radioecological and dosimetry models were significantly improved and validated with numerous measurement data, guidance on environmental countermeasures and monitoring elaborated and tested. New radiological knowledge can be of use in the planning and implementation of rehabilitation programmes in Japan following the Fukushima nuclear accident. In particular, the following activity areas would benefit from application of the Chernobyl experience: strategy of rehabilitation, and technology of settlement decontamination and of countermeasures applied in agriculture and forestry. The Chernobyl experience could be very helpful in planning research activities initiated by the Fukushima radionuclide fallout, i.e. environmental transfer of radionuclides, effectiveness of site-specific countermeasures, nationwide dose assessment, health effect studies, etc. (paper)

  11. Development of PSA module for computerized accident management support (CAMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Yukihiro

    1996-10-01

    CAMS (Computerised Accident Management Support) is a system that will provide assistance in case of the accidents in a nuclear power plant. The PSA module was developed in order to give useful information in this situation applying the PSA method, which is a comprehensive source of safety knowledge. This module contains plant-specific PSA data, comprising event trees, failure probabilities etc. It has several event trees categorised according to the initiating events. Each event tree has an initiating event frequency and branching probabilities. The various support systems for branches are considered and their dependencies are calculated logically. This module can be activated by data from the state identification (SI) module of CAMS. If an initiating event occurs, the event tree is re-calculated and the PSA module shows which systems of the plant should be activated to bring the plant to a safe state. If the plant responds to the event in the normal way, the plant will be shut down and come to a safe state. However, if some functions do not work, the PSA module generates another path and gives information about the critical systems. If the state of the plant is changed, either by the operators or automatically by the control system, the PSA module follows the new path. Because the estimation of the core damage frequency should be very quick in the accident situation, a simplified model of the event tree and fault trees was adopted. It enabled the PSA module to calculates the CDF within 5 seconds on a standard type work station. The development of the module has been successful. However, further development of the functionality of the module is suggested like real connection to a plant and to the strategy generator module of CAMS, applications for operational support, low power operation optimisation, etc. (author)

  12. A regional programme to improve skin cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeoch, Graham R; Sycamore, Mark J; Shand, Brett I; Simcock, Jeremy W

    2015-12-01

    In 2008, public specialist and general practice services in Canterbury were unable to manage demand for skin cancer treatment. Local clinicians decided the solution was to develop a see-and-treat skin excision clinic staffed by plastic surgeons and general practitioners (GPs), and the introduction of subsidised excisions in general practice. This paper describes the collaboration between clinicians, managers and funders and the results and quality management measures of these initiatives. There is an increasing incidence of skin cancer. GPs in Canterbury were unable to meet increasing demand for skin cancer treatment because some lacked confidence and competence in skin cancer management. There was no public funding for primary care management of skin cancer, driving patients to fully funded secondary care services. Secondary care services were at capacity, with no coordinated programme across primary and secondary care. The programme has resulted in a greater number of skin cancers being treated by the public health system, a reduction in waiting times for treatment, and fewer minor skin lesions being referred to secondary care. Quality measures have been achieved and are improving steadily. Development of the programme has improved working relationships between primary and secondary care clinicians. The strategy was to facilitate the working relationship between primary and secondary care and increase the capacity for skin lesion excisions in both sectors. Skin cancer management can be improved by a coordinated approach between primary and secondary care.

  13. Developing a national programme of flood risk management measures: Moldova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsbottom David

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A Technical Assistance project funded by the European Investment Bank has been undertaken to develop a programme of flood risk management measures for Moldova that will address the main shortcomings in the present flood management system, and provide the basis for long-term improvement. Areas of significant flood risk were identified using national hydraulic and flood risk modelling, and flood hazard and flood risk maps were then prepared for these high risk areas. The flood risk was calculated using 12 indicators representing social, economic and environmental impacts of flooding. Indicator values were combined to provide overall estimates of flood risk. Strategic approaches to flood risk management were identified for each river basin using a multi-criteria analysis. Measures were then identified to achieve the strategic approaches. A programme of measures covering a 20-year period was developed together with a more detailed Short-Term Investment Plan covering the first seven years of the programme. Arrangements are now being made to implement the programme. The technical achievements of the project included national hydrological and hydraulic modelling covering 12,000 km of river, the development of 2-dimensional channel and floodplain hydraulic models from a range of topographic and bathymetric data, and an integrated flood risk assessment that takes account of both economic and non-monetary impacts.

  14. Program for accident and incident management support, AIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putra, M.A.

    1993-12-01

    A prototype of an advisory computer program is presented which could be used in monitoring and analyzing an ongoing incident in a nuclear power plant. The advisory computer program, called the Accident and Incident Management Support (AIMS), focuses on processing a set of data that is to be transmitted from a nuclear power plant to a national or regional emergency center during an incident. The AIMS program will assess the reactor conditions by processing the measured plant parameters. The applied model of the power plant contains a level of complexity that is comparable with the simplified plant model that the power plant operator uses. A standardized decay heat function and a steam water property library is used in the integral balance equations for mass and energy. A simulation of the station blackout accident of the Borssele plant is used to test the program. The program predicts successively: (1) the time of dryout of the steam generators, (2) the time of saturation of the primary system, and (3) the onset of core uncovery. The coolant system with the actual water levels will be displayed on the screen. (orig./HP)

  15. Role of the man-machine interface in accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oewre, Fridtjov

    2001-01-01

    First, this paper gives a short general review on important safety issues in the field of man-machine interaction as expressed by important nuclear safety organisations. Then follows a summary discussion on what constitutes a modern Man-Machine Interface (MMI) and what is normally meant with accident management and accident management strategies. Furthermore, the paper focuses on three major issues in the context of accident management. First, the need for reliable information in accidents and how this can be obtained by additional computer technology. Second, the use of procedures is discussed, and basic MMI aspects of computer support for procedure presentation are identified followed by a presentation of a new approach on how to computerise procedures. Third, typical information needs for characteristic end-users in accidents, such as the control room operators, technical support staff and plant emergency teams, is discussed. Some ideas on how to apply virtual reality technology in accident management is also presented

  16. Accident beyond the design basis management with the coolant loss at the NPP with WWER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalozubov, V.I.; Klyuchnikov, A.A.; Kolykhanov, V.N.

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of status and experience of development on modelling and accident beyond the design basis management, including the severe accidents, at the nuclear power plants is carried out. The methodical providing of manuals on the accident beyond the design basis management with the coolant loss on the basis of simulated critical system configurations providing the necessary safety function performance on reactor unit is proposed. The project of symptom-oriented manuals on accident beyond the design basis management with the coolant loss on the serial power unit with WWER-1000 on the basis of developed methodical providing and well known results of deepened safety analysis is presented.

  17. Development of severe accident management guidance for Younggwang units 5 and 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Beon, C. S.; Kim, M. K.; Hong, S. Y.; Park, K. S.

    2001-01-01

    Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG) has been developed for Younggwang Units 5 and 6. It is consisted of Severe Accident Control Room Guideline, Diagnostic Flow Chart, Severe Accident Guideline, Severe Challenge Guideline, TSC Long Term Monitoring, SAMG Termination. Severe Accident Control Room Guideline, which deals with severe accident after finishing Emergency Operation Procedure, consists of acitions before and after TSC actuation. Seven servere accident management strategies are developed. Diagnostic Flow Chart, Severe Accident Guideline, and Severe Challenge Guideline are developed for each strategy, which enables the users to the implementation of strategy easily and systematically. TSC Long Term Monitoring is also developed to monitor long term activities after a particular strategy. Total of 45 set points are developed for decision making during the implementation of the SAMG

  18. The management of risk to society from potential accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, F.R.; Garlick, A.R.; Hayns, M.R.; Taig, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    The main report of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) Working Group on Risks to Society from Potential Major Accidents is presented. It is the outcome of a study by AEA Technology, the trading name of the UKAEA, in support of its own decision-making on risk management of the nuclear plants and laboratories it controls. The principles underlying decisions on social risk are of much broader applicability, however. The report is prefaced by an Executive Summary which is intended to be a stand-alone summary of the results of the study. The topics covered include: an examination of the nature of risk; the distinction to be drawn between individual and societal risk; existing risks; risk estimation; goals and targets as defined in terms of acceptance, tolerability and comparison between risks; regulations relating to risk targets; risk management decisions in theory and practice; societal risk management. A final chapter brings together the conclusions and recommendations from the preceding nine with respect to risk estimation, evaluation, management and overall approach. Two appendices deal with cost benefit analysis and provide a glossary and acronyms. (UK)

  19. Workshop proceedings of ISAMM 2009: Implementation of severe accident management measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guentay, S.

    2010-10-01

    achieved at the end of the workshop was that significant progress has been made in many countries since the 2001 OECD workshop on Severe Accident Management. It is also noted that the workshop objective of prompting more interaction between probabilistic and deterministic analysts has been achieved, based on the breadth of papers submitted and the discussions that took place regarding the interface of these two approaches. A guide published by the International Atomic Energy Authority IAEA contains detailed recommendations for all steps in developing accident management guidelines. In addition, two safety guides on PSA have been approved by the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS) and are expected to be published by the end of 2009. The Safety Guides on PSA provide recommendations for performing or managing a Level 1 and Level 2 PSA and for using the PSA to support the safe design and operation of nuclear power plant. Numerous initiatives at different levels (national, European, international) are quoted as being currently in progress in order to define standards and/or best practices for the development of Level 2 PSA. Progress made in SAM programmes concerning low power and shutdown states is commented on and it is noted that several utilities have already developed Level 2 PSAs for shutdown and low power severe accident situations. The importance of validation and training of SAM measures was stressed. Recommendations resulting from the conference are presented and discussed

  20. Workshop proceedings of ISAMM 2009: Implementation of severe accident management measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guentay, S. (ed.) [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Thermal Hydraulics, ViIligen (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    achieved at the end of the workshop was that significant progress has been made in many countries since the 2001 OECD workshop on Severe Accident Management. It is also noted that the workshop objective of prompting more interaction between probabilistic and deterministic analysts has been achieved, based on the breadth of papers submitted and the discussions that took place regarding the interface of these two approaches. A guide published by the International Atomic Energy Authority IAEA contains detailed recommendations for all steps in developing accident management guidelines. In addition, two safety guides on PSA have been approved by the Commission on Safety Standards (CSS) and are expected to be published by the end of 2009. The Safety Guides on PSA provide recommendations for performing or managing a Level 1 and Level 2 PSA and for using the PSA to support the safe design and operation of nuclear power plant. Numerous initiatives at different levels (national, European, international) are quoted as being currently in progress in order to define standards and/or best practices for the development of Level 2 PSA. Progress made in SAM programmes concerning low power and shutdown states is commented on and it is noted that several utilities have already developed Level 2 PSAs for shutdown and low power severe accident situations. The importance of validation and training of SAM measures was stressed. Recommendations resulting from the conference are presented and discussed

  1. Medical deficiencies and traffic accidents : a review of the literature and a programme for research (summary).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, D.J.

    1965-01-01

    In 1964 a working part was established by the Dutch Government (Public Health Department) to study "Medical Deficiencies in the Prevention of Traffic Accidents. Study of the literature was directed at temporary and permanent medico-psychological disorders, and medical disorders in road users that

  2. Influence diagrams and decision trees for severe accident management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, W.W.J.

    1996-09-01

    A review of relevant methodologies based on Influence Diagrams (IDs), Decision Trees (DTs), and Containment Event Trees (CETs) was conducted to assess the practicality of these methods for the selection of effective strategies for Severe Accident Management (SAM). The review included an evaluation of some software packages for these methods. The emphasis was on possible pitfalls of using IDs and on practical aspects, the latter by performance of a case study that was based on an existing Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). The study showed that the use of a combined ID/DT model has advantages over CET models, in particular when conservatisms in the Level 2 PSA have been identified and replaced by fair assessments of the uncertainties involved. It is recommended to use ID/DT models complementary to CET models. (orig.).

  3. Influence diagrams and decision trees for severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, W.W.J.; Seebregts, A.J.; Bedford, T.J.

    1996-08-01

    A review of relevent methodologies based on Influence Diagrams (IDs), Decision Trees (DTs), and Containment Event Trees (CETs) was conducted to assess the practicality of these methods for the selection of effective strategies for Severe Accident Management (SAM). The review included an evaluation of some software packages for these methods. The emphasis was on possible pitfalls of using IDs and on practical aspects, the latter by performance of a case study that was based on an existing Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). The study showed that the use of a combined ID/DT model has advantages over CET models, in particular when conservatisms in the Level 2 PSA have been identified and replaced by fair assessments of the uncertainties involved. It is recommended to use ID/DT models as complementary to CET models. (orig.)

  4. CATHARE Assessment of PACTEL LOCA Experiments with Accident Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luben Sabotinov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the analysis results of three PACTEL experiments, carried out with the advanced thermal-hydraulic system computer CATHARE 2 code as a part of the second work package WP2 (analytical work of the EC project “Improved Accident Management of VVER nuclear power plants” (IMPAM-VVER. The three LOCA experiments, conducted on the Finnish test facility PACTEL (VVER-440 model, represent 7.4% cold leg breaks with combination of secondary bleed and primary bleed and feed and different actuation modes of the passive safety injection. The code was used for both defining and analyzing the experiments, and to assess its capabilities in predicting the associated complex VVER-related phenomena. The code results are in reasonable agreement with the measurements, and the important physical phenomena are well predicted, although still further improvement and validation might be necessary.

  5. Influence diagrams and decision trees for severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, W.W.J.

    1996-09-01

    A review of relevant methodologies based on Influence Diagrams (IDs), Decision Trees (DTs), and Containment Event Trees (CETs) was conducted to assess the practicality of these methods for the selection of effective strategies for Severe Accident Management (SAM). The review included an evaluation of some software packages for these methods. The emphasis was on possible pitfalls of using IDs and on practical aspects, the latter by performance of a case study that was based on an existing Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). The study showed that the use of a combined ID/DT model has advantages over CET models, in particular when conservatisms in the Level 2 PSA have been identified and replaced by fair assessments of the uncertainties involved. It is recommended to use ID/DT models complementary to CET models. (orig.)

  6. A database system for the management of severe accident risk information, SARD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, K. I.; Kim, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce main features and functions of a PC Windows-based database management system, SARD, which has been developed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute for automatic management and search of the severe accident risk information. Main functions of the present database system are implemented by three closely related, but distinctive modules: (1) fixing of an initial environment for data storage and retrieval, (2) automatic loading and management of accident information, and (3) automatic search and retrieval of accident information. For this, the present database system manipulates various form of the plant-specific severe accident risk information, such as dominant severe accident sequences identified from the plant-specific Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) and accident sequence-specific information obtained from the representative severe accident codes (e.g., base case and sensitivity analysis results, and summary for key plant responses). The present database system makes it possible to implement fast prediction and intelligent retrieval of the required severe accident risk information for various accident sequences, and in turn it can be used for the support of the Level 2 PSA of similar plants and for the development of plant-specific severe accident management strategies

  7. A database system for the management of severe accident risk information, SARD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, K. I.; Kim, D. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce main features and functions of a PC Windows-based database management system, SARD, which has been developed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute for automatic management and search of the severe accident risk information. Main functions of the present database system are implemented by three closely related, but distinctive modules: (1) fixing of an initial environment for data storage and retrieval, (2) automatic loading and management of accident information, and (3) automatic search and retrieval of accident information. For this, the present database system manipulates various form of the plant-specific severe accident risk information, such as dominant severe accident sequences identified from the plant-specific Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) and accident sequence-specific information obtained from the representative severe accident codes (e.g., base case and sensitivity analysis results, and summary for key plant responses). The present database system makes it possible to implement fast prediction and intelligent retrieval of the required severe accident risk information for various accident sequences, and in turn it can be used for the support of the Level 2 PSA of similar plants and for the development of plant-specific severe accident management strategies.

  8. A study on the development of framework and supporting tools for severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hyun Sop

    1996-02-01

    Through the extensive research on severe accidents, knowledge on severe accident phenomenology has constantly increased. Based upon such advance, probabilistic risk studies have been performed for some domestic plants to identify plant-specific vulnerabilities to severe accidents. Severe accident management is a program devised to cover such vulnerabilities, and leads to possible resolution of severe accident issues. This study aims at establishing severe accident management framework for domestic nuclear power plants where severe accident management program is not yet established. Emphasis is given to in-vessel and ex-vessel accident management strategies and instrumentation availability for severe accident management. Among the various strategies investigated, primary system depressurization is found to be the most effective means to prevent high pressure core melt scenarios. During low pressure core melt sequences, cooling of in-vessel molten corium through reactor cavity flooding is found to be effective. To prevent containment failure, containment filtered venting is found to be an effective measure to cope with long-term and gradual overpressurization, together with appropriate hydrogen control measure. Investigation of the availability of Yonggwang 3 and 4 instruments shows that most of instruments essential to severe accident management lose their desired functions during the early phase of severe accident progression, primarily due to the environmental condition exceeded ranges of instruments. To prevent instrument failure, a wider range of instruments are recommended to be used for some severe accident management strategies such as reactor cavity flooding. Severe accidents are generally known to accompany a number of complex phenomena and, therefore, it is very beneficial when severe accident management personnel is aided by appropriately designed supporting systems. In this study, a support system for severe accident management personnel is developed

  9. Analytical support for SAMG development as a part of accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honcarenko, R.

    1999-01-01

    The decision to built up and implement a comprehensive Accident Management Program applying best world-wide knowledge made during last year at Temelin. A small group of engineers dedicated to Accident Management was formed at Temelin NPP as a part of the plant organisation scheme. A short summary of these activities performed by this group is presented. (author)

  10. The link between off-site-emergency planning and plant-internal accident management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, H.; Goertz, R.

    1995-02-01

    A variety of accident management measures has been developed and implemented in the German nuclear power plants. They constitute a fourth level of safety in the defence-in-depth concept. The containment venting system is an important example. A functioning link with well defined lines of communication between plant-internal accident management and off-site disaster emergency planning has been established.

  11. A preliminary study for the implementation of general accident management strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Soo Hyung; Kim, Soo Hyung; Jeong, Young Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    To enhance the safety of nuclear power plants, implementation of accident management has been suggested as one of most important programs. Specially, accident management strategies are suggested as one of key elements considered in development of the accident management program. In this study, generally applicable accident management strategies to domestic nuclear power plants are identified through reviewing several accident management programs for the other countries and considering domestic conditions. Identified strategies are as follows; 1) Injection into the Reactor Coolant System, 2) Depressurize the Reactor Coolant System, 3) Depressurize the Steam Generator, 4) Injection into the Steam Generator, 5) Injection into the Containment, 6) Spray into the Containment, 7) Control Hydrogen in the Containment. In addition, the systems and instrumentation necessary for the implementation of each strategy are also investigated. 11 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  12. A preliminary study for the implementation of general accident management strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Soo Hyung; Kim, Soo Hyung; Jeong, Young Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    To enhance the safety of nuclear power plants, implementation of accident management has been suggested as one of most important programs. Specially, accident management strategies are suggested as one of key elements considered in development of the accident management program. In this study, generally applicable accident management strategies to domestic nuclear power plants are identified through reviewing several accident management programs for the other countries and considering domestic conditions. Identified strategies are as follows; 1) Injection into the Reactor Coolant System, 2) Depressurize the Reactor Coolant System, 3) Depressurize the Steam Generator, 4) Injection into the Steam Generator, 5) Injection into the Containment, 6) Spray into the Containment, 7) Control Hydrogen in the Containment. In addition, the systems and instrumentation necessary for the implementation of each strategy are also investigated. 11 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  13. A preliminary study for the implementation of general accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Soo Hyung; Kim, Soo Hyung; Jeong, Young Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung

    1997-01-01

    To enhance the safety of nuclear power plants, implementation of accident management has been suggested as one of most important programs. Specially, accident management strategies are suggested as one of key elements considered in development of the accident management program. In this study, generally applicable accident management strategies to domestic nuclear power plants are identified through reviewing several accident management programs for the other countries and considering domestic conditions. Identified strategies are as follows; 1) Injection into the Reactor Coolant System, 2) Depressurize the Reactor Coolant System, 3) Depressurize the Steam Generator, 4) Injection into the Steam Generator, 5) Injection into the Containment, 6) Spray into the Containment, 7) Control Hydrogen in the Containment. In addition, the systems and instrumentation necessary for the implementation of each strategy are also investigated

  14. Chernobyl post-accident management: the ETHOS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, G H; Lochard, J; Girard, P; Guyonnet, J F; Le Cardinal, G; Lepicard, S; Livolsi, P; Monroy, M; Ollagnon, H; Pena-Vega, A; Pupin, V; Rigby, J; Rolevitch, I; Schneider, T

    1999-10-01

    ETHOS is a pilot research project supported by the radiation protection research program of the European Commission (DG XII). The project provides an alternative approach to the rehabilitation of living conditions in the contaminated territories of the CIS in the post-accident context of Chernobyl. Initiated at the beginning of 1996, this 3-y project is currently being implemented in the Republic of Belarus. The ETHOS project involves an interdisciplinary team of European researchers from the following institutions: the Centre d'etude sur l'Evaluation de la Protection dans le domaine Nucleaire CEPN (radiological protection, economics), the Institute National d'Agronomie de Paris-Grignon INAPG (agronomy, nature & life management), the Compiegne University of Technology (technological and industrial safety, social trust), and the Mutadis Research Group (sociology, social risk management), which is in charge of the scientific co-ordination of the project. The Belarussian partners in the ETHOS project include the Ministry of Emergencies of Belarus as well as the various local authorities involved with the implementation site. The ETHOS project relies on a strong involvement of the local population in the rehabilitation process. Its main goal is to create conditions for the inhabitants of the contaminated territories to reconstruct their overall quality of life. This reconstruction deals with all the day-to-day aspects that have been affected or threatened by the contamination. The project aims at creating a dynamic process whereby acceptable living conditions can be rebuilt. Radiological security is developed in the ETHOS project as part of a general improvement in the quality of life. The approach does not dissociate the social and the technical dimensions of post-accident management. This is so as to avoid radiological risk assessment and management being reduced purely to a problem for scientific experts, from which local people are excluded, and to take into

  15. Aspects of Knowledge Management Programme Implementation into Management System of NPP Operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudakov, V.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper deals with the implementation of KM tools and approaches in NPPs of Slovenské elektrárne. The case study emphasizes the importance of KM programme introduction into the existing management system of the company taking into account sustainability and successful of the programme and demonstrates some practical examples. (author

  16. Appendix: Data management and data archive for the HYREX Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Roberts

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the mid 1980s, changes in political imperatives plus technological changes in computer hardware and software have heightened the awareness of the economic value and importance of quality datasets to scientific research. The Natural Environment Research Council’s (NERC interdisciplinary Thematic and Special Topic Programmes have highlighted the need for a coherent data management policy to provide and preserve these quality datasets for posterity. The Hydrological Radar EXperiment (HYREX Special Topic Programme brought together multi-disciplinary researchers from UK public sector laboratories and universities. In this paper, the HYREX data management strategy, its problems and its solutions are discussed. The HYREX data archive, situated at NERC’s British Atmospheric Data Centre, is described. Keywords: radar, data, archive, web, storm, flood

  17. Policy elements for post-accident management in the event of nuclear accident. Document drawn up by the Steering Committee for the Management of the Post-Accident Phase of a Nuclear Accident (CODIRPA). Final version - 5 October 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Pursuant to the Inter-ministerial Directive on the Action of the Public Authorities, dated 7 April 2005, in the face of an event triggering a radiological emergency, the National directorate on nuclear safety and radiation protection (DGSNR), which became the Nuclear safety authority (ASN) in 2006, was tasked with working the relevant Ministerial offices in order to set out the framework and outline, prepare and implement the provisions needed to address post-accident situations arising from a nuclear accident. In June 2005, the ASN set up a Steering committee for the management of the post-accident phase in the event of nuclear accident or a radiological emergency situation (CODIRPA), put in charge of drafting the related policy elements. To carry out its work, CODIRPA set up a number of thematic working groups from 2005 on, involving in total several hundred experts from different backgrounds (local information commissions, associations, elected officials, health agencies, expertise agencies, authorities, etc.). The working groups reports have been published by the ASN. Experiments on the policy elements under construction were carried out at the local level in 2010 across three nuclear sites and several of the neighbouring municipalities, as well as during national crisis drills conducted since 2008. These works gave rise to two international conferences organised by ASN in 2007 and 2011. The policy elements prepared by CODIRPA were drafted in regard to nuclear accidents of medium scale causing short-term radioactive release (less than 24 hours) that might occur at French nuclear facilities equipped with a special intervention plan (PPI). They also apply to actions to be carried out in the event of accidents during the transport of radioactive materials. Following definitions of each stage of a nuclear accident, this document lists the principles selected by CODIRPA to support management efforts subsequent to a nuclear accident. Then, it presents the main

  18. The Harwell fallout monitoring programme and its response to the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambray, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Harwell laboratory operates a worldwide network of air and rain sampling stations for radioactivity in the atmosphere. In the months after the Chernobyl accident of 29 April 1986 the network was used to study the distribution and behaviour of radioactive debris from that source. An estimate of 5 x 10 16 Bq of caesium-137 has been deduced for the global distribution from Chernobyl

  19. Development of the methodology and approaches to validate safety and accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmolov, V.G.

    1997-01-01

    The article compares the development of the methodology and approaches to validate the nuclear power plant safety and accident management in Russia and advanced industrial countries. It demonstrates that the development of methods of safety validation is dialectically related to the accumulation of the knowledge base on processes and events during NPP normal operation, transients and emergencies, including severe accidents. The article describes the Russian severe accident research program (1987-1996), the implementation of which allowed Russia to reach the world level of the safety validation efforts, presents future high-priority study areas. Problems related to possible approaches to the methodological accident management development are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Hobday, E, fl. 1905, artist

    2003-01-01

    A photograph of an illustrated programme listing dances. The illustration shows a snake charmer playing to a snake while another man watches. Buildings and trees can be seen behind a wall in the distance. In the lower right-hand corner of the programme is the signature 'E. Hobday'. The programme is almost certainly related to the Punjab Ball, Lahore. It is placed next to the Punjab Ball Menu in the album and the Menu is also illustrated by 'E. Hobday'.

  1. Accidents - Chernobyl accident; Accidents - accident de Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  2. Knowledge data base for severe accident management of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Masao; Kawabe, Ryuhei; Nagasaka, Hideo; Sumida, Susumu; Fukasawa, Masanori; Muta, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    For the reinforcement of the safety of NPPs, the continuous efforts are very important to take in the up-to-date scientific and technical knowledge positively and to reflect them into the safety regulation. The purpose of this present study is to gather effectively the scientific and technical knowledge about the severe accident (SA) phenomena and the accident management (AM) for prevention and mitigation of severe accident, and to take in the experimental data by participating in the international cooperative experiments regarding the important SA phenomena and the effectiveness of accident management. Based on those data and knowledge, JNES is developing and improving severe accident analysis models to maintain the severe accident analysis codes and the accident management knowledge base for assessment of the NPPs in Japan. The activities in fiscal year 2010 are as follows; Experimental study on OECD/NEA projects such as MCCI, SERENA, SFP and international cooperative PSI-ARTIST project, and analytical study on accident management review of new plant and making regulation for severe accident. (author)

  3. Research and technology programmes supporting waste management in BNFL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairhall, G.A.; Horner, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Waste Management is a major activity of BNFL in the UK and at various locations internationally. To support these activities extensive programmes of Research and Technology have been undertaken for many years. This involves practical studies involving active and non-active work at laboratory and pilot plant scale. Extensive use is also made of theoretical and modelling techniques. Current work is aimed at underpinning and improving current operations supporting the design and safety cases of new plant and addressing waste management activities of the future including decommissioning. (authors)

  4. Applying Functional Modeling for Accident Management of Nuclear Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten; Zhang, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    Modeling is given and a detailed presentation of the foundational means-end concepts is presented and the conditions for proper use in modelling accidents are identified. It is shown that Multilevel Flow Modeling can be used for modelling and reasoning about design basis accidents. Its possible role...... for information sharing and decision support in accidents beyond design basis is also indicated. A modelling example demonstrating the application of Multilevel Flow Modelling and reasoning for a PWR LOCA is presented...

  5. Applying Functional Modeling for Accident Management of Nucler Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten; Zhang, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    Modeling is given and a detailed presentation of the foundational means-end concepts is presented and the conditions for proper use in modelling accidents are identified. It is shown that Multilevel Flow Modeling can be used for modelling and reasoning about design basis accidents. Its possible role...... for information sharing and decision support in accidents beyond design basis is also indicated. A modelling example demonstrating the application of Multilevel Flow Modelling and reasoning for a PWR LOCA is presented....

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on operator training for severe accident management and instrumentation capabilities during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This Workshop was organised in collaboration with Electricite de France (Service Etudes et Projets Thermiques et Nucleaires). There were 34 participants, representing thirteen OECD Member countries, the Russian Federation and the OECD/NEA. Almost half the participants represented utilities. The second largest group was regulatory authorities and their technical support organisations. Basically, the Workshop was a follow-up to the 1997 Second Specialist Meeting on Operator Aids for Severe Accident Management (SAMOA-2) [Reports NEA/CSNI/R(97)10 and 27] and to the 1992 Specialist Meeting on Instrumentation to Manage Severe Accidents [Reports NEA/CSNI/R(92)11 and (93)3]. It was aimed at sharing and comparing progress made and experience gained from these two meetings, emphasizing practical lessons learnt during training or incidents as well as feedback from instrumentation capability assessment. The objectives of the Workshop were therefore: - to exchange information on recent and current activities in the area of operator training for SAM, and lessons learnt during the management of real incidents ('operator' is defined hear as all personnel involved in SAM); - to compare capabilities and use of instrumentation available during severe accidents; - to monitor progress made; - to identify and discuss differences between approaches relevant to reactor safety; - and to make recommendations to the Working Group on the Analysis and Management of Accidents and the CSNI (GAMA). The meeting confirmed that only limited information is needed for making required decisions for SAM. In most cases existing instrumentation should be able to provide usable information. Additional instrumentation requirements may arise from particular accident management measures implemented in some plants. In any case, depending on the time frame where the instrumentation should be relied upon, it should be assessed whether it is likely to survive the harsh environmental conditions it will be exposed

  7. Aspects of risk analysis application to estimation of nuclear accidents and tests consequences and intervention management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demin, V.F.; Hedemann-Jensen, P.; Rolevich, I.V.; Schneider, T.S.; Sobolev, B.G.

    1996-01-01

    For assessment of accident consequences and a post-accident management a risk analysis methodology and data bank (BARD) with allowance for radiation and non-radiation risk causes should be developed and used. Aspects of these needs and developments are considered. Some illustrative results of health risk estimation made with BARD for the Bryansk region territory with relatively high radioactive contamination from the Chernobyl accident are presented

  8. Main results of assessing integrity of RNPP-3 steam generator heat exchange tubes in accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shugajlo, Al-j P.; Mustafin, M.A.; Shugajlo, Al-r P.; Ryzhov, D.I.; Zhabin, O.I.

    2017-01-01

    Tubes integrity evaluation under accident conditions considering drain of SG and current technical state of steam exchange tubes is an important question regarding SG long-term operation and improvement of accident management strategy.The main investigation results prepared for heat exchange surface of RNPP-3 steam generator are presented in this research aimed at assessing integrity of heat exchange tubes under accident conditions, which lead to full or partial drain of heat exchange surface, in particular during station blackout.

  9. Recent results from CEC cost sharing research programme on LWR fuel behaviour under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairbairn, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    The present structure and intentions of the CEC sponsored cost sharing programme for LWR safety research are outlined. Detailed results are reported for two projects from this programme. The first project concerns experimental data on the thermohydraulic effects of flow diversion around ballooned fuel rods. Data are presented on single and two phase heat transfer in an electrically heated rod bundle. Detailed photographic data on droplet behaviour are also given. The second project is an investigation of the effects of zircaloy oxidation on rewetting during reflood. It is shown that as oxide thickness increases from 1μm to 76μm that rewet rates can increase by up to 40%. A systematic effect of oxidation on rewet temperatures is also noted. (author)

  10. International programme on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident. Report by the Director-General. Executive Board 95. session, provisional agenda item 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA) have been initiated in mid-1991 following its endorsement by the Forty-fourth World Health Assembly in resolution WHA44.36. This report by the Director General outlines the progress made in the implementation of the Programme, and summarises the scientific information obtained to date on the health effects and planned future activities. The major projects under the programme include Thyroid project, Hematology project, Dosimetry and Communication Support Services, Brain Damage in utero project and Epidemiological Registry project

  11. Regulatory requirements on accident management and emergency preparedness - concept of nuclear and radiation safety during beyond-design-basis accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanke, R.

    2002-01-01

    Actual practice the and proposals for further activities in the field of Accident Management (AM) in the member countries of the Co-operation Forum of WWER regulators and in Western countries have been assessed. Further the results of the last working group on AM , the overview of interactions of severe accident research and the regulatory positions in various countries, IAEA reports, practice in Switzerland and Finland, were taken into consideration. From this information, the working group derived recommendations on Accident Management. The general proposals correspond to the present state of the art on AM. They do not describe the whole spectra of recommendations on AM for NPPs with WWER reactors. A basis for the implementation of an AM program is given, which could be extended in a follow-up working group. The developments and research concerning AM have to be continued. The positions of various countries with regard to the 'Interactions of severe accident research and the regulatory positions' are given. On the basis of the working group proposals, the WWER regulators could set regulatory requirements and support further developments of AM strategies, making use of the benefits of common features of NPPs with WWER reactors. Concerted actions in the field of AM between the WWER regulators would bundle the development of a unified concept of recommendations and speed up the implementation of AM measures in order to minimise the risks involved in nuclear power generation

  12. Disease management programmes in Germany: a fundamental fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Stefan

    2006-12-01

    In 2001 Germany introduced disease management programmes (DMPs) in order to give sick funds an incentive to improve the treatment of the chronically ill. By 1 March 2005, a total of 3275 programmes had been approved, 2760 for diabetes, 390 for breast cancer and 125 for coronary heart disease, covering roughly 1 million patients. German DMPs show a major fault regarding financial incentives. Sick funds increase their transfers from the risk adjustment scheme when their clients enroll in DMPs. Since this money is a lump sum, sick funds do not necessarily foster treatment of the chronically ill. Similarly, reimbursement of physicians is also not well targeted to the needs of DMPs. Preliminary evidence points to poor performance of German DMPs.

  13. Management, administrative and operational causes of the accident: Chernobyl nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastas, G.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The Chernobyl accident, which occurred in April 1986, was the result of management, administrative, operational, technical and design flaws. The accident released millions of curies of mixed fission products (including 70-100 P Bq of 137 Cs). The results of this study strongly suggest that the cultural, political, managerial and operational attributes of the Soviet 'system' performed in a synergistic manner to significantly contribute to the initiation of the accident. At the time of the accident, science, engineering and safety in the former Soviet Union were dominated by an atmosphere of politics, group think and 'dingoes tending the sheep'

  14. Management, administrative and operational causes of the accident: Chernobyl nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastas, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident, which occurred in April 1986, was the result of management, administrative, operational, technical and design flaws. The accident released millions of curies of mixed fission products including 70-100 PBq of 137 Cs. At the time of the accident, science, engineering and safety in the former Soviet Union were dominated by an atmosphere of politics, group think and 'dingoes tending the sheep'. This corrupted safety culture exacerbated the poor design of the reactor. The results of this study strongly suggest that the cultural, political, managerial and operational attributes of the Soviet 'system' performed in a synergistic manner to significantly contribute to the initiation of the accident. (authors)

  15. Opportunities for international cooperation in nuclear accident preparedness and management: Procedural and organizational measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lathrop, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we address a difficult problem: How can we create and maintain preparedness for nuclear accidents? Our research has shown that this can be broken down into two questions: (1) How can we maintain the resources and expertise necessary to manage an accident once it occurs? and (2) How can we develop plans that will help in actually managing an accident once it occurs? It is apparently beyond the means of ordinary human organizations to maintain the capability to respond to a rare event. (A rare event is defined as something like an accident that only happens once every five years or so, somewhere in the world.) Other more immediate pressures tend to capture the resources that should, in a cost/benefit sense, be devoted to maintaining the capability. This paper demonstrates that some of the important factors behind that phenomenon can be mitigated by an international body that promotes and enforces preparedness. Therefore this problem provides a unique opportunity for international cooperation: an international organization promoting and enforcing preparedness could help save us from our own organizational failings. Developing useful accident management plans can be viewed as a human performance problem. It can be restated: how can we support and off-load the accident managers so that their tasks are more feasible? This question reveals the decision analytic perspective of this paper. That is, we look at the problem managing a nuclear accident by focusing on the decision makers, the accident managers: how do we create a decision frame for the accident managers to best help them manage? The decision frame is outlined and discussed. 9 refs

  16. US nuclear industry approach to severe accident management guidance development and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modeen, D.; Walsh, L.; Oehlberg, R.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the US nuclear industry activities, occurring under the auspices of Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), to define, develop and implement enhancements to utility accident management capabilities. This effort consists of three major parts: (1) Development of a practical framework for evaluation of plant-specific accident management capabilities and the subsequent implementation of selected enhancements. (2) Development of specific technical guidance that address arresting core damage if it begins, either in-vessel or ex-vessel, and maintaining containment integrity. Preventing inadequate core cooling or minimizing the consequences of offsite releases, while considered to be candidate areas for accident management enhancements, have been the subject of intense previous study and development. (3) Plant-specific implementation of accident management enhancements in three areas: (a) personnel resources (organization, training, communications); (b) systems and equipment (restoration and repair, instrumentation, use of alternatives); and (c) information resources (procedures and guidance, technical information, process information)

  17. U.S. nuclear industry approach to severe accident management guidance, development and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modeen, D.; Walsh, L.; Oehlberg, R.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the US nuclear industry activities, occurring under the auspices of Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), to define, develop and implement enhancements to utility accident management capabilities. This effort consists of three major parts: (1) Development of a practical framework for evaluation of plant-specific accident management capabilities and the subsequent implementation of selected enhancements. (2) Development of specific technical guidance that address arresting core damage if it begins, either in-vessel or ex-vessel, and maintaining containment integrity. Preventing inadequate core cooling or minimizing the consequences of offsite releases, while considered to be candidate areas for accident management enhancements, have been the subject of intense previous study and development. (3) Plant-specific implementation of accident management enhancements in three areas: (a) personnel resources (organization, training, communications); (b) systems and equipment (restoration and repair, instrumentation, use of alternatives); and (c) information resources (procedures and guidance, technical information, process information)

  18. Development of A Methodology for Assessing Various Accident Management Strategies Using Decision Tree Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam Yeong; Kim, Jin Tae; Jae, Moo Sung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, Dong Wook [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of ASP (Accident Sequence Precursor) analysis is to evaluate operational accidents in full power and low power operation by using PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment) technologies. The awareness of the importance of ASP analysis has been on rise. The methodology for ASP analysis has been developed in Korea, KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) has managed KINS-ASP program since it was developed. In this study, we applied ASP analysis into operational accidents in full power and low power operation to quantify CCDP (Conditional Core Damage Probability). To reflect these 2 cases into PRA model, we modified fault trees and event trees of the existing PRA model. Also, we suggest the ASP regulatory system in the conclusion. In this study, we reviewed previous studies for ASP analysis. Based on it, we applied it into operational accidents in full power and low power operation. CCDP of these 2 cases are 1.195E-06 and 2.261E-03. Unlike other countries, there is no regulatory basis of ASP analysis in Korea. ASP analysis could detect the risk by assessing the existing operational accidents. ASP analysis can improve the safety of nuclear power plant by detecting, reviewing the operational accidents, and finally removing potential risk. Operator have to notify regulatory institute of operational accident before operator takes recovery work for the accident. After follow-up accident, they have to check precursors in data base to find similar accident.

  19. An evaluation of the Davis-Besse loss of feedwater event (June 1985) from an accident management perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Salvo, R.; Leonard, M.T.; Wreathall, J.

    1986-01-01

    An accident management perspective is used to analyze events associated with a total loss-of-feedwater at the Davis-Besse nuclear power plant in June 1985. The relationships of accident management to the closely associated concepts of risk management and emergency management are delineated. The analysis shows that the principal contributors to the event's occurrence were shortcomings in risk management. Successful performance by the operators in accident management was principally responsible for terminating the event without consequence to public health

  20. Comparison of Management Oversight and Risk Tree and Tripod-Beta in Excavation Accident Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadfam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Accident investigation programs are a necessary part in identification of risks and management of the business process. Objectives One of the most important features of such programs is the analysis technique for identifying the root causes of accidents in order to prevent their recurrences. Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP was used to compare management oversight and risk tree (MORT with Tripod-Beta in order to determine the superior technique for analysis of fatal excavation accidents in construction industries. Materials and Methods MORT and Tripod-Beta techniques were used for analyzing two major accidents with three main steps. First, these techniques were applied to find out the causal factors of the accidents. Second, a number of criteria were developed for the comparison of the techniques and third, using AHP, the techniques were prioritized in terms of the criteria for choosing the superior one. Results The Tripod-Beta investigation showed 41 preconditions and 81 latent causes involved in the accidents. Additionally, 27 root causes of accidents were identified by the MORT analysis. Analytical hierarchy process (AHP investigation revealed that MORT had higher priorities only in two criteria than Tripod-Beta. Conclusions Our findings indicate that Tripod-Beta with a total priority of 0.664 is superior to MORT with the total priority of 0.33. It is recommended for future research to compare the available accident analysis techniques based on proper criteria to select the best for accident analysis.

  1. THAI experimental programme for containment safety assessment under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, S.; Freitag, M. [Becker Technologies GmbH, Eschborn (Germany); Poss, G.

    2016-05-15

    The THAI (THAI = Thermal hydraulics, Hydrogen, Aerosols, Iodine) experimental programme aims to address open questions concerning the behavior of hydrogen, iodine and aerosols in the containment of water cooled reactors. Since its construction in 2000, THAI programme is being performed in the frame of various national projects (sponsored by German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, BMWi) and two international joint projects (under auspices of OECD/NEA). THAI experimental data have been widely used for the validation and further development of Lumped Parameter (LP) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes with 3D capabilities. Selected examples of code benchmark exercises performed based on the THAI data include; hydrogen distribution experiment (ISP-47 and OECD/NEA THAI code benchmark), hydrogen combustion behaviour (ISP-49), hydrogen mitigation by PARs (OECD/NEA THAI-2 code benchmark), iodine/surface interactions, iodine mass transfer, and iodine transport and multi-compartment behaviour (EU-SARNET and EU-SARNET2), thermal-hydraulic tests (German CFD-network). In the present paper, a brief overview on the THAI experiments and their role in the containment safety assessment is discussed.

  2. The philosophy of severe accident management in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baratta, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The US NRC has put forth the initial steps in what is viewed as the resolution of the severe accident issue. Underlying this process is a fundamental philosophy that if followed will likely lead to an order of magnitude reduction in the risk of severe accidents. Thus far, this philosophy has proven cost effective through improved performance. This paper briefly examines this philosophy and the next step in closure of the severe accident issue, the IPE. An example of the authors experience with determinist. (author)

  3. Solid waste accident analysis in support of the Savannah River Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, W.J.; Crumm, A.T.; Kearnaghan, D.P.; Rabin, M.S.; Rossi, D.E.

    1994-07-01

    The potential for facility accidents and the magnitude of their impacts are important factors in the evaluation of the solid waste management addressed in the Environmental Impact Statement. The purpose of this document is to address the potential solid waste management facility accidents for comparative use in support of the Environmental Impact Statement. This document must not be construed as an Authorization Basis document for any of the SRS waste management facilities. Because of the time constraints placed on preparing this accident impact analysis, all accident information was derived from existing safety documentation that has been prepared for SRS waste management facilities. A list of facilities to include in the accident impact analysis was provided as input by the Savannah River Technology Section. The accident impact analyses include existing SRS waste management facilities as well as proposed facilities. Safety documentation exists for all existing and many of the proposed facilities. Information was extracted from this existing documentation for this impact analysis. There are a few proposed facilities for which safety analyses have not been prepared. However, these facilities have similar processes to existing facilities and will treat, store, or dispose of the same type of material that is in existing facilities; therefore, the accidents can be expected to be similar

  4. Accident management information needs for a BWR with a MARK I containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, D.N.; Hanson, D.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1991-05-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Management Research Program, information needs during severe accidents have been evaluated for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) with MARK 1 containments. This evaluation was performed using a methodology that identifies plant information needs necessary for personnel to: (a) diagnose that an accident is in progress, (b) select and implement strategies to prevent or mitigate the accident, and (c) monitor the effectiveness of these strategies. The information needs and capabilities identified are intended to form a basis for more comprehensive information needs assessments. The assessments will be performed during the analysis and development of specific strategies, which will be used in accident management prevention and mitigation. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Accident management information needs for a BWR with a MARK I containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, D.N.; Hanson, D.J.

    1991-05-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Management Research Program, information needs during severe accidents have been evaluated for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) with MARK 1 containments. This evaluation was performed using a methodology that identifies plant information needs necessary for personnel to: (a) diagnose that an accident is in progress, (b) select and implement strategies to prevent or mitigate the accident, and (c) monitor the effectiveness of these strategies. The information needs and capabilities identified are intended to form a basis for more comprehensive information needs assessments. The assessments will be performed during the analysis and development of specific strategies, which will be used in accident management prevention and mitigation. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Medical management of radiological accidents in non-specialized clinics: mistakes and lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jikia, D.

    2009-01-01

    In 1996-2002 three radiological accidents were developed in Georgia. There were some people injured in those accidents. During medical management of the injured some mistakes and errors were revealed both in diagnostics and scheme of the treatment. The goal of this article is to summarize medical management of the mentioned radiological accidents, to estimate reasons of mistakes and errors, to present the lessons drawn in result of Georgia radiological accidents. There was no clinic with specialized profile and experience. Accordingly due to having no relevant experience late diagnosis can be considered as the main error. It had direct influence on the patients' health and results of treatment. Lessons to be drawn after analyzing Georgian radiological accidents: 1. informing medical staff about radiological injuries (pathogenesis, types, symptoms, clinical course, principles of treatment and etc.); 2. organization of training and meetings in non-specialized clinics or medical institutions for medical staff; 3. preparation of informational booklets and guidelines.(author)

  7. Training programmes and experiences of medical emergency preparedness for radiation accident in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki-Yasumoto, M

    1982-01-01

    Our policy of training programmes for medical radiation emergency preparedness is described. We found it is necessary to have two approaches to the training of relevant personnel. The first approach was to conduct adequate basic training of nurses and health physics personnel in large nuclear installations for medical radiation emergency preparedness. We found it was necessary to have courses for basic knowledge of nuclear radiation and industrial activities, radiation monitoring procedures, radiation injuries, human counters and wound monitors, first aid practices, and radiation medical emergency procedures including practices. The second approach was to make a simple and introductory training program on the subject using lectures and visual presentations in the vicinity of big nuclear installations for personnel relating to the nuclear industrial activities and for concerned local personnel, including medical doctors and nurses. These two training courses and approaches were planned and have been conducted. 2 refs. (DT)

  8. Simulator drills for the management of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, E.

    1989-01-01

    The present state of deliberations on the simulation of severe accidents is presented and applied to a training philosophy. The special characteristics of 'severe' accidents are addressed and, falling under this category, the 'psychological structure of the man-machine-situation' is examined. The valid rules for drilling 'post-RESA-conduct' (RESA = fast reactor shut down) and the monitoring of safety goals are introduced. 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. Impact of an occupation-based self-management programme on chronic disease management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, Lynn

    2013-02-01

    There is a need for the development and evaluation of occupational therapy interventions enabling participation and contributing to self-management for individuals with multiple chronic conditions. This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility and potential impact of an occupation-based self-management programme for community living individuals with multiple chronic conditions.

  10. German Phase B [risk study] highlights the role of [reactor] accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Phase B of the German probabilistic risk assessment study, now scheduled for publication this month, suggests that reactor accident management measures can prevent or mitigate about 90 per cent of event sequences. (author)

  11. Four African Nations Agree to Water Management Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Seeking to improve their management of water resources, four northeast African nations today agreed at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to establish a long-term framework for utlizing a key underground water system. Chad, Egypt, Libya and Sudan signed a Strategic Action Programme (SAP) that aims to optimize the equitable use of the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System, a huge water resource that lies beneath the four nations. The SAP also commits the countries to strengthen and build upon a previously existing regional coordination mechanism, in part by establishing a new Joint Authority for the Nubian Aquifer System. The Programme lays the groundwork for improving cooperation among the four arid nations and for strengthening their capacity to monitor and manage the aquifer effectively. With growing populations and decreasing water availability from other sources in the region, the aquifer is under mounting pressure. Removing water without a clear understanding of transboundary and other implications threatens water quality and has the potential to harm biodiversity and accelerate land degradation. The agreement resulted from a joint Technical Cooperation project of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the IAEA. ''I congratulate all involved on this significant achievement,'' said IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano. ''Water is a key resource, and effective management and use of such water resources is essential for the future. The agreement of the Strategic Action Programme is the result of real cooperation between the four States, the Agency and UNDP-GEF. I am confident that this Programme will be a success and will benefit the people of the region. This positive project experience benefits strengthened and expanded cooperation between the IAEA and the UNDP-GEF.'' ''UNDP would like to congratulate the

  12. Post-Accident Waste Management in Ukraine : Challenges and Steps Needed to Resolve the Accident Waste Problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilochytska, T.; Zinkevich, L.; Shybetskyi, I.; Krone, J.

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: • Solving the problem of management of “Chernobyl waste” requires: - a systematic review of the existing norms and regulations with respect to best international practice of radioactive waste management; - improvement of the existing classification / characterization of radioactive waste with a focus on disposal; - improvement of the safety assessment approaches for licensing the disposal of accident waste, taking into account relevant safety features and site specific conditions; - involving of international experience and support to plan and perform safety related activity on the Shelter Object transformation

  13. Management of Industrial Processes with Programmable Logic Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Tufoi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In a modern economy, automation (the control is primarily to raise the competitiveness of a product, either directly through price or quality, or indirectly through the improvement of working conditions of staff productive. The control of industrial processes involves the management of dynamic systems that have continuous states. These systems are described by differential equations and, in general, analog inputs and outputs. Management of these systems is achieved, in general, with classical automation, by automation or with analog computers which contains modules with input / output analog performance. If states, inputs and outputs of a system can be modeled using binary variables, then these systems can be driven with Programmable Logic Controller.

  14. Initial medical management of criticality accident victim; Conduite a tenir aux victimes d'un accident de criticite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miele, A; Bebaron-Jacobs, L

    2005-07-01

    The extremely severe criticality accidents known to this day, and the subsequent deaths recorded (Sarov 1997 and Tokai Mura 1999), demonstrate the need for sustained surveillance and constant adapted training for the teams in charge of irradiated and/or contaminated victims. The aim of this work group, composed of occupational health services and associated medical biology laboratories, is to present, in leaflet format, the essential data on the documentation and the conduct to be held when facing the victims of a criticality accident. The studies of this work group confirm the difficulties involved in managing this type of accident, both from the dosimetric evaluation point of view and from the therapeutic management point of view. That is why several research themes and perspectives are developed. During the different phases of victim triage, the recommendations given on these leaflets describe the operational conducts to be held. This work will have to be updated according to the evolution in knowledge and means: short and long term effects of exposure to neutrons, multi-competence hospital cooperation, expertise networks related to dosimetric reconstitution. (authors)

  15. Initial medical management of criticality accident victim; Conduite a tenir aux victimes d'un accident de criticite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miele, A.; Bebaron-Jacobs, L

    2005-07-01

    The extremely severe criticality accidents known to this day, and the subsequent deaths recorded (Sarov 1997 and Tokai Mura 1999), demonstrate the need for sustained surveillance and constant adapted training for the teams in charge of irradiated and/or contaminated victims. The aim of this work group, composed of occupational health services and associated medical biology laboratories, is to present, in leaflet format, the essential data on the documentation and the conduct to be held when facing the victims of a criticality accident. The studies of this work group confirm the difficulties involved in managing this type of accident, both from the dosimetric evaluation point of view and from the therapeutic management point of view. That is why several research themes and perspectives are developed. During the different phases of victim triage, the recommendations given on these leaflets describe the operational conducts to be held. This work will have to be updated according to the evolution in knowledge and means: short and long term effects of exposure to neutrons, multi-competence hospital cooperation, expertise networks related to dosimetric reconstitution. (authors)

  16. Waste management assessment and technical review programme. WATRP. An international peer review service for radioactive waste management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency provides international peer review services in radioactive waste management to those Member States that have established radioactive waste management programmes. Such services are provided within Waste Management Assessment and Technical Review Programme (WATRP). The main objective of WATRP is to provide international expertise and information on a requested subject in the field of radioactive waste management and to validate that programmes and activities are sound and performing well. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Management of radioactive wastes - an overview of the Indian programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K.T.; Sunder Rajan, N.S.; Balu, K.; Khan, A.A.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the management of radioactive wastes with particular reference to the Indian Nuclear Programme is presented. The initial design philosophy of the radwaste management system is discussed in relation to accepting a calculated, minimum discharge of radioactivity to the environment. A brief report of the operational experience with the low and intermediate level radwaste systems is given. Factors that influence the review of the present philosophy for future adoption are presented. Some methods being developed for decreasing release of the radioactivity to the environment are discussed. Among techniques considered are solar evaporation, delay and decay of fission rare gases from power reactors and concentration and storage of Kr 85 from fuel reprocessing plants. Problems in the management of high level and alph-bearing wastes are discussed with particular reference to the nature of the waste generated and the policy under implementation for their management. The matrices, solidification processes, modes of interim storage and criteria for selection of site for ultimate dispensation of the solidified high level wastes in geological formations are described. An approach towards the solution of the probelm of management of alpha-bearing waste is also presented

  18. Accident analysis for transuranic waste management alternatives in the U.S. Department of Energy waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabelssi, B.; Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Tompkins, M.; Jackson, R.

    1995-01-01

    Preliminary accident analyses and radiological source term evaluations have been conducted for transuranic waste (TRUW) as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) effort to manage storage, treatment, and disposal of radioactive wastes at its various sites. The approach to assessing radiological releases from facility accidents was developed in support of the Office of Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). The methodology developed in this work is in accordance with the latest DOE guidelines, which consider the spectrum of possible accident scenarios in the implementation of various actions evaluated in an EIS. The radiological releases from potential risk-dominant accidents in storage and treatment facilities considered in the EM PEIS TRUW alternatives are described in this paper. The results show that significant releases can be predicted for only the most severe and extremely improbable accidents sequences

  19. Second Specialist Meeting on operator aids for severe accident management: summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The second OECD Specialist Meeting on operator aids for severe accident management (SAMOA-2) was held in Lyon, France (1997), and was attended by 33 specialists representing ten OECD member countries. As for SAMOA-1, the scope of SAMOA-2 was limited to operator aids for accident management which were in operation or could be soon. The meeting concentrated on the management of accidents beyond the design basis, including tools which might be extended from the design basis range into the severe accident area. Relevant simulation tools for operator training were also part of the scope of the meeting. 20 papers were presented; there were two demonstrations of computerized systems (the ATLAS analysis simulator developed by GRS, and EDF's 'Simulateur Post Accidentels' (SIPA). The three sessions dealt with operator aids for control rooms, operator aids for technical support centres, and simulation tools for operator training. The various papers for each session are summarized

  20. Written instructions for the transport of hazardous materials: Accident management instruction sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridder, K.

    1988-01-01

    In spite of the regulations and the safety provisions taken, accidents are not entirely avoidable in the transport of hazardous materials. For managing an accident and preventing further hazards after release of dangerous substances, the vehicle drivers must carry with them the accident management instruction sheets, which give instructions on immediate counter measures to be taken by the driver, and on information to be given to the police and the fire brigades. The article in hand discusses the purpose, the contents, and practice-based improvement of this collection of instruction sheets. Particular reference is given to the newly revised version of June 15, 1988 (Verkehrsblatt 1/88) of the 'Directives for setting up accident management instruction sheets - written instructions - for road transport of hazardous materials', as issued by the Federal Ministry of Transport. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Sisifo-gas a computerised system to support severe accident training and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.; Buedo, J.L.; Borondo, L.; Lopez, N.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) will have to be prepared to face the management of severe accidents, through the development of Severe Accident Guides and sophisticated systems of calculation, as a supporting to the decision-making. SISIFO-GAS is a flexible computerized tool, both for the supporting to accident management and for education and training in severe accident. It is an interactive system, a visual and an easily handle one, and needs no specific knowledge in MAAP code to make complicate simulations in conditions of severe accident. The system is configured and adjusted to work in a BWR/6 technology plant with Mark III Containment, as it is Cofrentes NPP. But it is easily portable to every other kind of reactor, having the level 2 PSA (probabilistic safety analysis) of the plant to be able to establish the categories of the source term and the most important sequences in the progression of the accident. The graphic interface allows following in a very intuitive and formative way the evolution and the most relevant events in the accident, in the both system's way of work, training and management. (authors)

  2. Identification of the operating crew's information needs for accident management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W.R.; Hanson, D.J.; Ward, L.W.; Solberg, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    While it would be very difficult to predetermine all of the actions required to mitigate the consequences of every potential severe accident for a nuclear power plant, development of additional guidance and training could improve the likelihood that the operating crew would implement effective sever-accident management measures. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting an Accident Management Research Program that emphasizes the application of severe-accident research results to enhance the capability of the plant operating crew to effectively manage severe accidents. One element of this program includes identification of the information needed by the operating crew in severe-accident situations. This paper discusses a method developed for identifying these information needs and its application. The methodology has been applied to a generic reactor design representing a PWR with a large dry containment. The information needs were identified by systematically determining what information is needed to assess the health of the critical functions, identify the presence of challenges, select strategies, and assess the effectiveness of these strategies. This method allows the systematic identification of information needs for a broad range of severe-accident scenarios and can be validated by exercising the functional models for any specific event sequence.

  3. Research on the management of the wastes from plant accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    The accident in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant released large amount of radio-nuclides and contaminated wide areas within and out of the site. The decontamination, storage, treatment and disposal of generated wastes are now under planning. Though the regulations for radioactive wastes discharged from normal operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities have been prepared, it is necessary to make amendments of those regulations to deal with wastes from the severe accidents which may have much different features on nuclides contents, or possibility to accompany hazardous chemical materials. Characteristics, treatment and disposal of wastes from accidents were surveyed by literature and the radionuclide migration from the assumed temporally storage yards of the disaster debris was analyzed for consideration of future regulation. (author)

  4. Investigation of the management of the wastes from plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-08-15

    The accident in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant discharged large amount of radio-nuclides and contaminated wide areas in and out of the site. The decontamination, storage, treatment and disposal of generated wastes are now under planning. Though regulations for the radioactive wastes arisen from normal operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities have been prepared, it is necessary to make amendment of those regulations to deal with wastes from the severe accident which may have much different features on nuclides contents, or possible accompanying hazardous chemical materials. Characteristics of wastes from accidents in foreign nuclear installations, and the treatment and the disposal of those wastes were surveyed by literature and radionuclide migration from the assumed temporally storage yards of the disaster debris was analyzed for consideration of future regulation. (author)

  5. Radioactive waste management after NPP accident: Post-Chernobyl experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhalevich, A.; Grebenkov, A.

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the Chernobyl NPP accident a very large amount of so-called 'Chernobyl waste' were generated in the territory of Belarus, which was contaminated much more than all other countries. These wastes relate mainly to two following categories: low-level waste (LLW) and new one 'Conventionally Radioactive Waste' (CRW). Neither regulations nor technology and equipment were sufficiently developed for such an amount and kind of waste before the accident. It required proper decisions in respect of regulations, treatment, transportation, disposal of waste, etc. (author)

  6. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Water management. A core task of the Wismut remediation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Michael; Meyer, Juergen; Jenk, Ulf; Kassahun, Andrea; Schramm, Andrea; Baacke, Delf; Forbrig, Norbert; Metschies, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Water management and conventional technical water treatment are by far the most cost-intensive long-term tasks of the Wismut remediation programme. Over the medium term, there is no viable alternative to the operation of active systems to catch and treat contaminated mine waters at the Ronneburg, Schlema, Koenigstein, Poehla, Seelingstaedt and Heimsdorf sites. Based on the status quo this paper outlines the key issues of the Wismut GmbH water management strategy over the medium and long term. lt is focused primarily on achieving protection goals for potentially impacted water bodies in the surroundings of Wismut sites and on optimising associated remediation expenditure as well as on creating the prerequisites for achieving low post-remedial care and maintenance or walk-away system status over the long term. The topic of this paper is the presentation of priority tasks related to future water management at Wismut sites in Saxony and Thuringia. The reflections are based on experiences and lessons learned and take into account current statutory management requirements referring to ground and surface water bodies affected by Wismut. The paper is based on a presentation made at the International Mining Symposium WISSYM 2015 on 2nd September 2015 in Bad Schlema, Germany.

  8. Example of severe accident management guidelines validation and verification using full scope simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajnc, B.; Basic, I.; Spiler, J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG) is to provide guidelines to mitigate and control beyond design bases accidents. These guidelines are to be used by the technical support center that is established at the plant within one hour after the beginning of the accident as a technical support for the main control room operators. Since some of the accidents can progress very fast there are also two guidelines provided for the main control room operators. The first one is to be used if the core damage occurs and the TSC is not established yet and the second one after technical support center become operational. After SG replacement and power uprate in year 2000, NPP Krsko developed Rev.1 of these procedures, which have been validated and verified during one-week effort. Plant specific simulator capable of simulating severe accidents was extensively used.(author)

  9. Operational programs for national radioactive waste and spent fuel management programme in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, Nadja; Kralj, Metka; Mele, Irena

    2007-01-01

    The first separate National Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Programme (National Programme) was prepared in Slovenia in 2005 as a supplementary part of the National Environmental Action Programme and was adopted in February 2006 by the Slovenian Parliament. The new National Programme includes all topics being relevant for the management of the radioactive waste and spent fuel which are produced in Slovenia, from the legislation and identification of different waste streams, to the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and management of (TE)NORM in the near future from 2006 up to the 2015. The National Programme identified the existing and possible future problems and proposed the technical solutions and action plans for two distinctive periods: 2006-2009 and 2010- 2015. According to the requirement of Act on Protection against Ionising Radiation and Nuclear Safety the national Agency for Radwaste Management (ARAO) prepared the operational programmes for the four year period with technical details on implementation of the National programme. ARAO gained the detailed plans of different involved holders and proposed 9 operational programmes with aims, measures, individual organizations in charge, expenses and resources for each of the programmes. The Operational programmes were already reviewed by the Ministry of Environment and Physical Planning and are under acceptance. The orientation of the radioactive waste management according to the National Programme and operational activities within additional limitations based on the strategical decisions of Slovenian Government is presented in the paper. (authors)

  10. Accidents - Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  11. A Masters Programme in Telecommunications Management--Demand-Based Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, Khaled M.; Kaylani, Hazem; Murphy, Noel; Brennan, Conor; Itradat, Awni; Al-Bataineh, Mohammed; Aloqlah, Mohammed; Salhieh, Loay; Altarazi, Safwan; Rawashdeh, Nathir; del Carmen Bas Cerdá, María; Conchado Peiró, Andrea; Al-Zoubi, Asem; Harb, Bassam; Bany Salameh, Haythem

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a curriculum design approach for a Masters Programme in Telecommunications Management based on demand data obtained from surveying the needs of potential students of the proposed programme. Through online surveys disseminated at telecom companies in Jordan, it was possible to measure the demand for such a programme and to…

  12. Improving Educational Objectives of the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Programme at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldowaisan, Tariq; Allahverdi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process of developing programme educational objectives (PEOs) for the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering programme at Kuwait University, and the process of deployment of these PEOs. Input of the four constituents of the programme, faculty, students, alumni, and employers, is incorporated in the development and…

  13. Managing major chemical accidents in China: Towards effective risk information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, G.; Zhang, L.; Lu, Y.; Mol, A.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical industries, from their very inception, have been controversial due to the high risks they impose on safety of human beings and the environment. Recent decades have witnessed increasing impacts of the accelerating expansion of chemical industries and chemical accidents have become a major

  14. An exercise on clean-up actions in an urban environment after a nuclear accident. Report of the NKS EKO 4 programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, S.; Haemaelaeinen, R.; Naadland, E.; Roed, J.; Salo, A.; Sinkko, K.

    1996-03-01

    The EKO 4/c working group of the environmental effects and emergency preparedness programme (EKO) of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research (NKS) organised a decision conference on August 30th and 31st, 1995 in Stockholm, Sweden. The meeting was designed to be attended by those responsible for planning and deciding on protective actions in the Nordic countries after a nuclear accident. Issues concerning clean-up strategies in an urban environment after a hypothetical and very severe reactor accident were discussed at the meeting. The objectives of the meeting were to provide a shared understanding between the decision makers and the radiation protection community on concerns and issues related to decision on protective actions after a nuclear accident. (6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.)

  15. An exercise on clean-up actions in an urban environment after a nuclear accident. Report of the NKS EKO 4 programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, S. [ed.] [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Computer Studies; Finck, R. [ed.] [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Haemaelaeinen, R. [ed.] [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Naadland, E. [ed.] [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway); Roed, J. [ed.] [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Salo, A. [ed.] [Helsinki (Finland); Sinkko, K. [ed.] [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-03-01

    The EKO 4/c working group of the environmental effects and emergency preparedness programme (EKO) of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research (NKS) organised a decision conference on August 30th and 31st, 1995 in Stockholm, Sweden. The meeting was designed to be attended by those responsible for planning and deciding on protective actions in the Nordic countries after a nuclear accident. Issues concerning clean-up strategies in an urban environment after a hypothetical and very severe reactor accident were discussed at the meeting. The objectives of the meeting were to provide a shared understanding between the decision makers and the radiation protection community on concerns and issues related to decision on protective actions after a nuclear accident. (6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.).

  16. Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-09-01

    The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies

  17. Populations protection and territories management in nuclear emergency and post-accident situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourrel, M.; Calmon, Ph.; Calvez, M.; Chambrette, V.; Champion, D.; Devin, P.; Godino, O.; Lombard, J.; Rzepka, J.P.; Schneider, Th.; Verhaeghe, B.; Cogez, E.; Kayser, O.; Guenon, C.; Jourdain, J.R.; Bouchot, E.; Murith, Ch.; Lochard, J.; Cluchier, A.; Vandecasteele, Ch.; Pectorin, X.; Dubiau, Ph.; Gerphagnon, O.; Roche, H.; Cessac, B.; Cochard, A.; Machenaud, G.; Jourdain, J.R.; Pirard, Ph.; Leger, M.; Bouchot, E.; Demet, M.; Charre, J.P.; Poumadere, M.; Cogez, E.

    2010-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during these conference days. Twenty seven presentations out of 29 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - radiological and dosimetric consequences in nuclear accident situation: impact on the safety approach and protection stakes (E. Cogez); 2 - organisation of public authorities in case of emergency and in post-event situation (in case of nuclear accident or radiological terror attack in France and abroad), (O. Kayser); 3 - ORSEC plan and 'nuclear' particular intervention plan (PPI), (C. Guenon); 4 - thyroid protection by stable iodine ingestion: European perspective (J.R. Jourdain); 5 - preventive distribution of stable iodine: presentation of the 2009/2010 public information campaign (E. Bouchot); 6 - 2009/2010 iodine campaign: presentation and status (O. Godino); 7 - populations protection in emergency and post-accident situation in Switzerland (C. Murith); 8 - CIPR's recommendations on the management of emergency and post-accident situations (J. Lochard); 9 - nuclear exercises in France - status and perspectives (B. Verhaeghe); 10 - the accidental rejection of uranium at the Socatri plant: lessons learnt from crisis management (D. Champion); 11 - IRE's radiological accident of August 22, 2008 (C. Vandecasteele); 12 - presentation of the CEA's crisis national organisation: coordination centre in case of crisis, technical teams, intervention means (X. Pectorin); 13 - coordination and realisation of environmental radioactivity measurement programs, exploitation and presentation of results: status of IRSN's actions and perspectives (P. Dubiau); 14 - M2IRAGE - measurements management in the framework of geographically-assisted radiological interventions in the environment (O. Gerphagnon and H. Roche); 15 - post-accident management of a nuclear accident - the CODIRPA works (I. Mehl-Auget); 16 - nuclear post-accident: new challenges of crisis expertise (D. Champion); 17 - aid guidebooks

  18. Evaluating disease management programme effectiveness: an introduction to instrumental variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ariel; Adams, John L

    2006-04-01

    This paper introduces the concept of instrumental variables (IVs) as a means of providing an unbiased estimate of treatment effects in evaluating disease management (DM) programme effectiveness. Model development is described using zip codes as the IV. Three diabetes DM outcomes were evaluated: annual diabetes costs, emergency department (ED) visits and hospital days. Both ordinary least squares (OLS) and IV estimates showed a significant treatment effect for diabetes costs (P = 0.011) but neither model produced a significant treatment effect for ED visits. However, the IV estimate showed a significant treatment effect for hospital days (P = 0.006) whereas the OLS model did not. These results illustrate the utility of IV estimation when the OLS model is sensitive to the confounding effect of hidden bias.

  19. Application of probabilistic methods to accident analysis at waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banz, I.

    1986-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment is a technique used to systematically analyze complex technical systems, such as nuclear waste management facilities, in order to identify and measure their public health, environmental, and economic risks. Probabilistic techniques have been utilized at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, to evaluate the probability of a catastrophic waste hoist accident. A probability model was developed to represent the hoisting system, and fault trees were constructed to identify potential sequences of events that could result in a hoist accident. Quantification of the fault trees using statistics compiled by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) indicated that the annual probability of a catastrophic hoist accident at WIPP is less than one in 60 million. This result allowed classification of a catastrophic hoist accident as ''not credible'' at WIPP per DOE definition. Potential uses of probabilistic techniques at other waste management facilities are discussed

  20. Chronic Disease Management Programmes: an adequate response to patients’ needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijken, Mieke; Bekkema, Nienke; Boeckxstaens, Pauline; Schellevis, François G.; De Maeseneer, Jan M.; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  Inspired by American examples, several European countries are now developing disease management programmes (DMPs) to improve the quality of care for patients with chronic diseases. Recently, questions have been raised whether the disease management approach is appropriate to respond to patient‐defined needs. Objective  In this article we consider the responsiveness of current European DMPs to patients’ needs defined in terms of multimorbidity, functional and participation problems, and self‐management. Method  Information about existing DMPs was derived from a survey among country‐experts. In addition, we made use of international scientific literature. Results  Most European DMPs do not have a solid answer yet to the problem of multimorbidity. Methods of linking DMPs, building extra modules to deal with the most prevalent comorbidities and integration of case management principles are introduced. Rehabilitation, psychosocial and reintegration support are not included in all DMPs, and the involvement of the social environment of the patient is uncommon. Interventions tailored to the needs of specific social or cultural patient groups are mostly not available. Few DMPs provide access to individualized patient information to strengthen self‐management, including active engagement in decision making. Conclusion  To further improve the responsiveness of DMPs to patients’ needs, we suggest to monitor ‘patient relevant outcomes’ that might be based on the ICF‐model. To address the needs of patients with multimorbidity, we propose a generic comprehensive model, embedded in primary care. A goal‐oriented approach provides the opportunity to prioritize goals that really matter to patients. PMID:22712877

  1. A programme management approach for supporting a transition to integrated flood management in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijke, J.S.; Van Herk, S.; Zevenbergen, C.; Ashley, R.

    2012-01-01

    In the Netherlands and many other developed countries, flood management is transitioning from sectoral engineering approaches to more integrated approaches. The 2.3 billion Euro Room for the River programme plays an important role in this transition, because it is the first large scale

  2. Facility accident considerations in the US Department of Energy Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.

    1994-01-01

    A principal consideration in developing waste management strategies is the relative importance of Potential radiological and hazardous releases to the environment during postulated facility accidents with respect to protection of human health and the environment. The Office of Environmental Management (EM) within the US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently formulating an integrated national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of existing and future wastes at DOE sites. As part of this process, a Programmatic Environmental impact Statement (PEIS) is being prepared to evaluate different waste management alternatives. This paper reviews analyses that have been Performed to characterize, screen, and develop source terms for accidents that may occur in facilities used to store and treat the waste streams considered in these alternatives. Preliminary results of these analyses are discussed with respect to the comparative potential for significant releases due to accidents affecting various treatment processes and facility configurations. Key assumptions and sensitivities are described

  3. Causal Factors and Adverse Events of Aviation Accidents and Incidents Related to Integrated Vehicle Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Jones, Sharon M.; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Leone, Karen M.; Sandifer, Carl E.

    2011-01-01

    Causal factors in aviation accidents and incidents related to system/component failure/malfunction (SCFM) were examined for Federal Aviation Regulation Parts 121 and 135 operations to establish future requirements for the NASA Aviation Safety Program s Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project. Data analyzed includes National Transportation Safety Board (NSTB) accident data (1988 to 2003), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) incident data (1988 to 2003), and Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) incident data (1993 to 2008). Failure modes and effects analyses were examined to identify possible modes of SCFM. A table of potential adverse conditions was developed to help evaluate IVHM research technologies. Tables present details of specific SCFM for the incidents and accidents. Of the 370 NTSB accidents affected by SCFM, 48 percent involved the engine or fuel system, and 31 percent involved landing gear or hydraulic failure and malfunctions. A total of 35 percent of all SCFM accidents were caused by improper maintenance. Of the 7732 FAA database incidents affected by SCFM, 33 percent involved landing gear or hydraulics, and 33 percent involved the engine and fuel system. The most frequent SCFM found in ASRS were turbine engine, pressurization system, hydraulic main system, flight management system/flight management computer, and engine. Because the IVHM Project does not address maintenance issues, and landing gear and hydraulic systems accidents are usually not fatal, the focus of research should be those SCFMs that occur in the engine/fuel and flight control/structures systems as well as power systems.

  4. Disease management programmes for patients with coronary heart disease--an empirical study of German programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapp, Oliver; Schweikert, Bernd; Meisinger, Christa; Holle, Rolf

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate healthcare and outcomes of disease management programmes (DMPs) for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) in primary care, and to assess selection of enrollment for these programmes. A cross-sectional survey of 2330 statutorily insured patients with a history of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was performed in 2006 by the population-based KORA Myocardial Infarction Register from the region of Augsburg, Germany. Patients enrolled in DMP-CHDs receive evidence-based care, with patients not enrolled receiving standard care. To control for selection bias, a propensity score approach was used. Main factors influencing DMP participation were age (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96-0.99), diabetes (OR 1.56, CI 1.25-1.95) and time since last heart attack (OR 0.98, CI 0.95-0.99). Significantly more patients enrolled in DMP-CHDs stated that they received medical counselling for smoking (OR 3.77, CI 1.07-13.34), nutrition (OR 2.15, 1.69-2.74) and for physical activity (OR 2.58, 1.99-3.35). Furthermore, prescription of statins (OR 1.58, CI 1.24-2.00), antiplatelets (OR 1.96, CI 1.43-2.69) and beta-blockers (not significant) were higher in the DMP group. With respect to outcomes, we did not see relevant differences in quality of life and body mass index, and only a minor reduction in smoking. Enrollment into DMPs for CHD exhibits systematic selection effects. Participants tend to experience--at least on a short to medium term and for AMI patients--better quality of healthcare services. However, since DMP-CHDs were initiated only 2 years ago, we were unable to identify significant improvements in health outcomes. Only the reduction in smoking provides a first indication of better quality outcomes following DMP-CHD. Thus, policy-makers must provide appropriate incentives to sickness funds and physicians in order to ensure initiation and continuation of high quality DMPs.

  5. Support calculations for management of PRISE leakage accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matejovic, P.; Vranka, L. [Nuclear Power Plants Research Inst. Vuje, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1997-12-31

    Accidents involving primary-to-secondary leakage (PRISE) caused by rupture of one or a few tubes are well known design basis events in both, western and VVER NPPs. Operating experience and in-service inspections of VVER-440 units have demonstrated also the potential for large PRISE leaks in the case of the steam generator (SG) primary collector cover lift-up (Rovno NPP). Without performing any countermeasure for limitation of SG collector cover lift-up, a full opening results in PRISE leak with an equivalent diameter 107 mm. Although this accident was not considered in the original design, this event is usually analysed as DBA too. Different means are available for detection and mitigation of PRISE leakage in NPPs currently in operation (J.Bohunice V-1 and V-2) or under construction (Mochovce) in Slovakia. 8 refs.

  6. Support calculations for management of PRISE leakage accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matejovic, P; Vranka, L [Nuclear Power Plants Research Inst. Vuje, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1998-12-31

    Accidents involving primary-to-secondary leakage (PRISE) caused by rupture of one or a few tubes are well known design basis events in both, western and VVER NPPs. Operating experience and in-service inspections of VVER-440 units have demonstrated also the potential for large PRISE leaks in the case of the steam generator (SG) primary collector cover lift-up (Rovno NPP). Without performing any countermeasure for limitation of SG collector cover lift-up, a full opening results in PRISE leak with an equivalent diameter 107 mm. Although this accident was not considered in the original design, this event is usually analysed as DBA too. Different means are available for detection and mitigation of PRISE leakage in NPPs currently in operation (J.Bohunice V-1 and V-2) or under construction (Mochovce) in Slovakia. 8 refs.

  7. Developing an education programme for schools on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curd, P.J.; Hutchins, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    United Kingdom Nirex Ltd. is responsible for the development of a deep disposal facility for Britain's solid low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. In line with their technical programme Nirex has a substantial public information programme costing in excess of Brit-pounds 1M per year. An important part of this programme is the need to develop an effective education programme for schools. This paper details the development and content of this education programme and the rationale behind the development in its current form

  8. Development of a site-wide accident management center for the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heal, D.W.; Britt, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    In 1990, the Safety Analysis Group at the Savannah River Site (SRS) began development of an Accident Management program. The program was designed to provide a total system which would meet the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Performance Criteria, in regard to severe accident management, in the most effective manner. This paper will present two significant changes in the current SRS Accident Management program which will be used to meet these expanded needs. The first and most significant change will be to expand the diversity of the groups involved in the Accident Management process. In the future, organizations such as Environmental Safety, Health ampersand Quality Assurance, Emergency Planning, Site Management, Human Factors, Risk Assessment, and many others will work as an integrated team to solve facility problems. Organizations such as Materials Technology, Equipment Engineering and many of the laboratories on site will be utilized as support groups to increase the technical capability for specific accident analyses. This phase of the program is currently being structured, and should be operational by January of 1993

  9. WASTE-ACC: A computer model for analysis of waste management accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabelssi, B.K.; Folga, S.; Kohout, E.J.; Mueller, C.J.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1996-12-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory has developed WASTE-ACC, a computational framework and integrated PC-based database system, to assess atmospheric releases from facility accidents. WASTE-ACC facilitates the many calculations for the accident analyses necessitated by the numerous combinations of waste types, waste management process technologies, facility locations, and site consolidation strategies in the waste management alternatives across the DOE complex. WASTE-ACC is a comprehensive tool that can effectively test future DOE waste management alternatives and assumptions. The computational framework can access several relational databases to calculate atmospheric releases. The databases contain throughput volumes, waste profiles, treatment process parameters, and accident data such as frequencies of initiators, conditional probabilities of subsequent events, and source term release parameters of the various waste forms under accident stresses. This report describes the computational framework and supporting databases used to conduct accident analyses and to develop source terms to assess potential health impacts that may affect on-site workers and off-site members of the public under various DOE waste management alternatives

  10. IAEA Perspectives and Programme on Nuclear Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosbois, J. de

    2016-01-01

    Full text: There are many challenging issues facing Member States with respect to knowledge management. Each country’s situation and history with nuclear technology is different and strategic issues and immediate priorities are not the same. Member States recognize nuclear technology is inherently complex and requires advanced specialization and expertise. Maintaining a competent workforce is always of concern, especially in organizations with an aging workforce. Countries making major transitions such as gearing up for new build construction or decommissioning projects face particular challenges. Licensed nuclear facilities operate under a range of different organizational business models. For example, some rely heavily on outsourced and external services, and different approaches are needed to ensure critical knowledge is available and maintained. For countries phasing out nuclear power, critical knowledge must be maintained to ensure decommissioning and environmental remediation of sites is done in a responsible manner. Newcomer countries have the difficult challenge of building up their needed workforce competencies to be ready in time to support construction and commissioning schedules. The capture, preservation, transfer and overall management of design knowledge over the technology lifecycle is another important issue that is needed to ensure both the economics and safety of nuclear facilities over their lifetimes, and is especially important to ensure life extension and refurbishment projects can be implemented cost effectively. This presentation will present an overall perspective of the major knowledge management challenges and issues facing the nuclear sector and provide an overview of the IAEA’s nuclear knowledge management programme and initiatives that support Member States in addressing them. (author

  11. Communication and Monitoring- Necessary Processes for Managing and Measuring Conflicts, Absenteeism, Fluctuation and Work Accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tănăsescu Dorina Antoneta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In any organizations, between employees, between employees and management are inevitabily appearing conflicts, absenteeism, personnel fluctuation and work accidents (CAFA factors. To diminish the impact of these social dysfunctions, organizations must pay attention to the effective managing and monitoring using performance indicators and an effective communication process and implementing a good plan of evaluation.

  12. Beyond-design-basis accident management in the RF regulation documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukrinskij, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The article observes the issues of the management of beyond-design-basis accidents (BDBA) in the existing regulations in Russia. The ideology of the approach to the definition of the BDBA list to formulate the management guidelines has been proposed [ru

  13. Impact of social responsibility programmes in stakeholder satisfaction: an empirical study of Portuguese managers' perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, L.; Ramos, A.; Rosa, A.; Sampaio, P.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between social responsibility programmes of organizations and stakeholder satisfaction. Based on stakeholder theory, an online survey was administered to managers of Portuguese organizations with certified management systems. The findings suggest that stakeholder satisfaction is indeed increased with a social responsibility programme, as suggested by Freeman’s stakeholder theory. The components of social responsibility programmes that we discussed in t...

  14. The role of systems availability and operator actions in accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, R.J. Jr.; Scobel, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Traditional analyses of severe accidents, such as those presented in Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) studies of nuclear power stations, have generally been performed on the assumption that all means of cooling the reactor core are lost and that no operator actions to mitigate the consequences or progression of the severe accident are performed. The assumption to neglect the availability of safety systems and operator actions which do not prevent core melting can lead to erroneous conclusions regarding the plant severe accident profile. Recent work in severe accident management has identified the need to perform analyses which consider all systems availabilities and operator actions, irrespective of their contribution to the prevention of core melting. These new analyses have far reaching conclusions. The analysis results indicate an unacceptably high degree of simplicity in the present severe accident analyses for Probabilistic Risk Assessment studies; the simplicity is in the assumption that systems availabilities and operator actions which do not impact core melt frequency can be neglected in the severe accident analyses. This results in overly pessimistic predictions of the time of core melting and the subsequent potential for recovery of core cooling prior to core melting. This simplicity can have a considerable impact on severe accident decision making, particularly in the evaluation of alternate plant design features and the priorities for research studies

  15. Tourism and Management Study Programme through Blended Learning: Development and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonova, Ivana

    2018-01-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a tourism and management study programme at the Faculty of Informatics and Management (FIM), University of Hradec Králové. It begins with description of the programme, along with a summary of its history and is considered in the light of changes in accreditation requirements. Students' interest in the programme…

  16. Evaluation of a communication and stress management training programme for infertile couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lone; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Boivin, Jackey

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates a patient education programme focussed on improving communication and stress management skills among couples in fertility treatment.......This study evaluates a patient education programme focussed on improving communication and stress management skills among couples in fertility treatment....

  17. Cost Analysis of Chronic Disease Self-Management Programmes Being Delivered in South Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Timothy F.; Palmer, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic disease accounts for the majority of healthcare costs. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) has been shown to be effective in reducing the burden of chronic disease. Objectives: The objective of this study was to measure the cost of delivering the Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) in order to…

  18. Reducing Wildlife Damage with Cost-Effective Management Programmes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl R Krull

    Full Text Available Limiting the impact of wildlife damage in a cost effective manner requires an understanding of how control inputs change the occurrence of damage through their effect on animal density. Despite this, there are few studies linking wildlife management (control, with changes in animal abundance and prevailing levels of wildlife damage. We use the impact and management of wild pigs as a case study to demonstrate this linkage. Ground disturbance by wild pigs has become a conservation issue of global concern because of its potential effects on successional changes in vegetation structure and composition, habitat for other species, and functional soil properties. In this study, we used a 3-year pig control programme (ground hunting undertaken in a temperate rainforest area of northern New Zealand to evaluate effects on pig abundance, and patterns and rates of ground disturbance and ground disturbance recovery and the cost effectiveness of differing control strategies. Control reduced pig densities by over a third of the estimated carrying capacity, but more than halved average prevailing ground disturbance. Rates of new ground disturbance accelerated with increasing pig density, while rates of ground disturbance recovery were not related to prevailing pig density. Stochastic simulation models based on the measured relationships between control, pig density and rate of ground disturbance and recovery indicated that control could reduce ground disturbance substantially. However, the rate at which prevailing ground disturbance was reduced diminished rapidly as more intense, and hence expensive, pig control regimes were simulated. The model produced in this study provides a framework that links conservation of indigenous ecological communities to control inputs through the reduction of wildlife damage and suggests that managers should consider carefully the marginal cost of higher investment in wildlife damage control, relative to its marginal conservation

  19. Considerations on monitoring needs of advanced, passive safety light water reactors for severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bava, G.; Zambardi, F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with problems concerning information and related instrumentation needs for Accident Management (AM), with special emphasis on Severe Accidents (SA) in the new advanced, passive safety Light Water Reactors (PLWR), presently in a development stage. The passive safety conception adopted in the plants concerned goes parallel with a deeper consideration of SA, that reflects the need of increasing the plant resistance against conditions going beyond traditional ''design basis accidents''. Further, the role of Accident Management (AM) is still emphasized as last step of the defence in depth concept, in spite of the design efforts aimed to reduce human factor importance; as a consequence, the availability of pertinent information on actual plant conditions remains a necessary premise for performing preplanned actions. This information is essential to assess the evolution of the accident scenarios, to monitor the performances of the safety systems, to evaluate the ultimate challenge to the plant safety, and to implement the emergency operating procedures and the emergency plans. Based on these general purposes, the impact of the new conception on the monitoring structure is discussed, furthermore reference is made to the accident monitoring criteria applied in current plants to evaluate the requirements for possible solutions. (orig.)

  20. The Community's R and D programme on the management and storage of radioactive waste. Shared-cost action programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMenamin, T.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1975 the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) has been operating a series of shared-cost action programmes in the field of radioactive waste management with the primary objective of developing methods to protect the public and the environment against the potential hazards of radioactive waste. Member States with small, as well as sizeable, nuclear programmes have been taking part. The choice and type of topics for the programme have depended largely on the work being carried out nationally by these countries with the programmes acting as a support and extension to national projects. To this end they have acted as a catalyst in encouraging and promoting cross-border cooperation and have provided a unique opportunity to compare results and ideas leading to improved quality and efficiency. The list of publications covers reports, proceedings, communications and information leaflets produced and published in the framework of the cost-sharing research programmes of the Commission of the European Communities on radioactive waste management and disposal. The list, which is regularly updated, includes: reports of contractors on research supported by the Commission; reports on research in coordinated actions, assembled and edited by the Commission staff or on behalf of the Commission; proceedings of meetings, conferences and workshops organized and edited by the Commission staff; scientific reports, communications, annual progress reports and information leaflets produced and edited by the Commission staff. Not included are contributions of contractors and staff to national or international meetings, workshops, conferences and expert groups

  1. The use of influence diagrams for evaluating severe accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jae, M.; Apostolakis, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the influence diagram, a new analytical tool for developing and evaluating severe accident management strategies, is presented. Influence diagrams are much simpler than decision trees because they do not lead to the large number of branches that are generated when decision trees are used in realistic problems; furthermore, they show explicitly the dependencies between the variables of the problem. One of the accident management strategies proposed for light water reactors, flooding the reactor cavity as a means of preventing vessel breach during a short-term station blackout sequence, is presented. The influence diagram associated with this strategy is constructed. Finally, the advantages of using influence diagrams in accident management are explored

  2. Proceedings of the International conference on nuclear accidents and crisis management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefenson, B.; Landahl, P.A.; Ritchey, T.

    1993-06-01

    This booklet presents the proceedings of the international conference on nuclear accidents and crisis management, held in Stockholm 16-18 March, 1993. It consists of a collection of lectures and discussion notes. The overall purpose of the conference was to promote a greater awareness of crisis management problems during a nuclear accident of potential international scope. Emphasis was placed on information and cooperation, and on experience of different forms of emergency planning and crisis management. The foreign participants in the conference were scientists and representatives from different levels of authority in Denmark, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Russia, and USA. The second half of the conference was reserved for Swedish national issues. Several additional themes were discussed here, inter alia: *problems of local, regional and central government cooperation. *the need for special laws and directives concerning nuclear accidents. *the need for more research. The lectures and discussion notes from the second part of the conference are in Swedish

  3. Applying of Reliability Techniques and Expert Systems in Management of Radioactive Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldaihan, S.; Alhbaib, A.; Alrushudi, S.; Karazaitri, C.

    1998-01-01

    Accidents including radioactive exposure have variety of nature and size. This makes such accidents complex situations to be handled by radiation protection agencies or any responsible authority. The situations becomes worse with introducing advanced technology with high complexity that provide operator huge information about system working on. This paper discusses the application of reliability techniques in radioactive risk management. Event tree technique from nuclear field is described as well as two other techniques from nonnuclear fields, Hazard and Operability and Quality Function Deployment. The objective is to show the importance and the applicability of these techniques in radiation risk management. Finally, Expert Systems in the field of accidents management are explored and classified upon their applications

  4. Medical management of two accidents by ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda C, G.

    1991-01-01

    Two cases of accidents of occupationally exposed personnel are presented, the first one was an accidental sharp exhibition to whole body that a 27 year-old worker suffered when being exposed to a source of Iridium 192 of 94 Curies. For this case it was diagnosed an hematopoiesis syndrome that it was responded to the handling prescribe until him recovery. The second case, a radiologist technical 22 year-old that was irradiated with a source of Iridium 192 of 79 Curies. The treatment consisted on cleaning, antibiotics, analgesic and inert ointment, being achieved recovery after several weeks

  5. Triage and medical management of criticality accident victims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Flury-Herard, A.; Cavadore, D.

    2002-01-01

    The criticality accident is the result of an uncontrolled chain fission reaction initiated when the quantities of nuclear materials (uranium or plutonium)present accidentally exceed a given limit called the c ritical mass . As soon as the critical state is exceeded, the chain reaction increases exponentially. The result is a fast increase in the number of fission events which occur within the fissile medium. This phenomenon results in a release of energy mainly in the form of heat, accompanied by the intense emission of neutron and gamma radiation and the release of fission gases (Barby, 1983)

  6. Risk management: Role of societal factors in major industrial accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovden, J.; Rausand, M.; Sergeev, G.

    1995-01-01

    The paper discusses factors influencing the occurrence of major accidents in complex technological systems. Societal factors are identified as most significant in this context. Important types of societal factors are pin-pointed and discussed. The safety situation in the former Soviet Union and in today's Russian is described. The calamities at Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, and partly also Bhopal are discussed, and the role of societal factors identified. A main point of view is that it is not surprising that these catastrophes happened in the then existing conditions. What is surprising is that they did not happen earlier exclamation point

  7. Review of current status for designing severe accident management support system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kwang Sub

    2000-05-01

    The development of operator support system (OSS) is ongoing in many other countries due to the complexity both in design and in operation for nuclear power plant. The computerized operator support system includes monitoring of some critical parameters, early detection of plant transient, monitoring of component status, plant maintenance, and safety parameter display, and the operator support system for these areas are developed and are being used in some plants. Up to now, the most operator support system covers the normal operation, abnormal operation, and emergency operation. Recently, however, the operator support system for severe accident is to be developed in some countries. The study for the phenomena of severe accident is not performed sufficiently, but, based on the result up to now, the operator support system even for severe accident will be developed in this study. To do this, at first, the current status of the operator support system for normal/abnormal/emergency operation is reviewed, and the positive aspects and negative aspects of systems are analyzed by their characteristics. And also, the major items that should be considered in designing the severe accident operator support system are derived from the review. With the survey of domestic and foreign operator support systems, they are reviewed in terms of the safety parameter display system, decision-making support system, and procedure-tracking system. For the severe accident, the severe accident management guideline (SAMG) which is developed by Westinghouse is reviewed; the characteristics, structure, and logical flow of SAMG are studied. In addition, the critical parameters for severe accident, which are the basis for operators decision-making in severe accident management and are supplied to the operators and the technical support center, are reviewed, too.

  8. Review of current status for designing severe accident management support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwang Sub

    2000-05-01

    The development of operator support system (OSS) is ongoing in many other countries due to the complexity both in design and in operation for nuclear power plant. The computerized operator support system includes monitoring of some critical parameters, early detection of plant transient, monitoring of component status, plant maintenance, and safety parameter display, and the operator support system for these areas are developed and are being used in some plants. Up to now, the most operator support system covers the normal operation, abnormal operation, and emergency operation. Recently, however, the operator support system for severe accident is to be developed in some countries. The study for the phenomena of severe accident is not performed sufficiently, but, based on the result up to now, the operator support system even for severe accident will be developed in this study. To do this, at first, the current status of the operator support system for normal/abnormal/emergency operation is reviewed, and the positive aspects and negative aspects of systems are analyzed by their characteristics. And also, the major items that should be considered in designing the severe accident operator support system are derived from the review. With the survey of domestic and foreign operator support systems, they are reviewed in terms of the safety parameter display system, decision-making support system, and procedure-tracking system. For the severe accident, the severe accident management guideline (SAMG) which is developed by Westinghouse is reviewed; the characteristics, structure, and logical flow of SAMG are studied. In addition, the critical parameters for severe accident, which are the basis for operators decision-making in severe accident management and are supplied to the operators and the technical support center, are reviewed, too

  9. The Management of innovation: Lessons from a Danish Development Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lennie

    1997-01-01

    The paper reports from an ongoing Danish development programme entitled "Process and Product Development in the Building Industry". The programme is a joint initiatvie, initiated by the Ministry of Housing and Building and the Ministry of Busines and Industry. In a competition in 1994 four...... consortia representing actors of the whole value chain were chosen to carry out innovation projects during a 4-year period, including experimental building projects. The paper describes the programme with respect to its background and organisation, the basic development ideas of the four consortia...... in the consortia.Keywords: R&D programme, innovation, experimental building projects, consortia....

  10. Mental health effects from radiological accidents and their social management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenot, J.; Charron, S.; Verger, P.

    2000-01-01

    Mental health effects resulting from exposure to radiation have been identified principally in the context of large radiological accidents. They cover an extended scope of manifestations in relation with the notion of stress: increase of some hormones, modifications in mental concentration, symptoms of anxiety and depression, psycho-somatic diseases, deviation behaviours, and, on the long term, a possible post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The main results come from the Three Mile Island, Goiania, and Chernobyl accidents and several modifying factors have been identified. Considering those facts, diverse social responses can be brought to reduce the detriment to affected individuals and communities. Medical treatments are necessary for persons who suffer from pathological diseases. In most cases, a structured public health follow-up is required to establish the seriousness of the health problems, to forecast the extent of medical and psychological assistance, and to inform people who express fears and worries. Social assistance is always valuable under various forms: financial compensations, preferential medical care, and particular advantages concerning working and living conditions. If this social assistance is necessary and helpful, it also induces a loss in personal adjustment capability and initiative capacity. To overcome those negative impacts, some guidelines to authorities' action can be set up. But the best approach, not excluding the previous ones, remains problem solving at the local level through community responsibilization; some instructive examples come from the Chernobyl experience. (author)

  11. Mental health effects from radiological accidents and their social management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenot, J.; Charron, S.; Verger, P. [Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

    2000-05-01

    Mental health effects resulting from exposure to radiation have been identified principally in the context of large radiological accidents. They cover an extended scope of manifestations in relation with the notion of stress: increase of some hormones, modifications in mental concentration, symptoms of anxiety and depression, psycho-somatic diseases, deviation behaviours, and, on the long term, a possible post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The main results come from the Three Mile Island, Goiania, and Chernobyl accidents and several modifying factors have been identified. Considering those facts, diverse social responses can be brought to reduce the detriment to affected individuals and communities. Medical treatments are necessary for persons who suffer from pathological diseases. In most cases, a structured public health follow-up is required to establish the seriousness of the health problems, to forecast the extent of medical and psychological assistance, and to inform people who express fears and worries. Social assistance is always valuable under various forms: financial compensations, preferential medical care, and particular advantages concerning working and living conditions. If this social assistance is necessary and helpful, it also induces a loss in personal adjustment capability and initiative capacity. To overcome those negative impacts, some guidelines to authorities' action can be set up. But the best approach, not excluding the previous ones, remains problem solving at the local level through community responsibilization; some instructive examples come from the Chernobyl experience. (author)

  12. The Fukushima Dai Ichi accident. The narrative of the station manager. Volume 1. The destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarnieri, Franck; Travadel, Sebastien; Martin, Christophe; Portelli, Aurelien; Afrouss, Aissame; Takesada, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    While outlining that the Fukushima accident could have been more severe without the courage and action of men who stayed at the controls of the plant under the management of Masao Yoshida, this book proposes a translation of the manager's narrative made for the official inquiry commission. He tells the story of a team of workers facing a disaster foretold. Besides this narrative, the authors propose a discussion on emergency engineering, present the Kan inquiry commission, present the power station and recall the circumstances of the accident and its consequences. Several hearings are reported

  13. Information needs and instrument availability for accident management : Application to YGN 3 and 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Whan; Park, Rae Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kune Yull [Seoul Nationsl University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    This paper introduces the five-step methodology for identifying information needs and assessing instrument availability during the course of severe in nuclear power plants. The methodology is applied to the Yonggwang (YGN) 3 and 4 to shed light on accident management. It constructs three safety objective trees to prevent the reactor vessel failure, to prevent the containment failure, and to mitigate the fission product release from the containment. The study assesses information needs and instrument availability under severe conditions for preventing the reactor vessel failure of YGN 3 and 4, and recommends additional instruments that may prove to be vital importance in managing the accident. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs. (author).

  14. Five Years Progress on Waste Management of Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Shigeo; Katoh, Kazuyuki; Okano, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: • A huge amount of off-site specified waste is planned to be managed by constructing and operating interim storage facilities. However, there still needs a lot of initiatives to recover the 1F nuclear accident. • On-site management of solid waste generated by the accident should be sustained as long-term key activities, such as safe storage, characterization, processing and disposal of various wastes. • Effective collaborations among NDF, TEPCO, IRID, JAEA, other domestic and international organizations and companies are strongly requested to tackle challenging projects on 1F decommissioning.

  15. Radiological protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations resulting from a nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2013-01-01

    In environmental remediation after nuclear accidents, radioactive wastes have to be appropriately managed in existing exposure situations with contamination resulting from the emission of radionuclides by such accidents. In this paper, a framework of radiation protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations for application to the practical and reasonable waste management in contaminated areas, referring to related ICRP recommendations was proposed. In the proposed concept, intermediate reference levels for waste management are adopted gradually according to the progress of the reduction in the existing ambient dose in the environment on the basis of the principles of justification and optimisation by taking into account the practicability of the management of radioactive waste and environmental remediation. It is essential to include the participation of relevant stakeholders living in existing exposure situations in the selection of reference levels for the existing ambient dose and waste management.

  16. How to manage forest environments after a nuclear accident? Lessons learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-03-01

    Based on several published studies, this report proposes a synthetic overview of observations made on the fate of radionuclides in contaminated forests, like in forest environments which represent a great part of highly contaminated areas about Chernobyl and Fukushima. It appears that the main characteristics of forest ecosystems impacted by radioactive fallouts are different (there is no 'red' (dead) forest around Fukushima), that processes governing the fate of radionuclides in forest ecosystems imply a high remanence of radioactive contamination in these environments. It also appears that the interception of radioactive fallouts by the canopy and radionuclide transfers towards the litter and the soil are the most important processes during the early phase and during the first months after the accident. Thus, the soil becomes the main reservoir in which radio-caesium can be found. Some studies outline that the management of contaminated forest ecosystems after the Fukushima accident differs from that applied in the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Others notice that the fire risk is higher in the Chernobyl exclusion zone

  17. The program of international intercomparison of accident dosimetry; Le programme d'intercomparaison internationale de dosimetrie d'accident 10-12 juin 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    The French institute of radioprotection and nuclear safety (IRSN) has carried out in June 2002 an international intercomparison program for the testing of the physical and biological accident dosimetry techniques. The intercomparison is jointly organized by the IRSN and the OECD-NEA with the sustain of the European commission and the collaboration of the CEA centre of Valduc (France). About 30 countries have participated to this program. Each country has supplied its own dosimeters and biological samples which have been irradiated using the Silene reactor of CEA-Valduc or a {sup 60}Co source. These experiments allow to test the new dosimetric techniques that have been developed since the previous intercomparison program (1993) and to confirm or improve the performances of older techniques. Aside from the intercomparison exercise, this report makes a status of the known radiological accidents and of the effects of high doses of ionizing radiations on human health (symptoms, therapeutics). It explains the phenomenology of criticality accidents, the prevention means, and the history of such accidents up to the Tokai-Mura one in 1999. Finally, the dosimetry of criticality is presented with its physical and biological techniques. (J.S.)

  18. iROCS: Integrated accident management framework for coping with beyond-design-basis external events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jaewhan; Park, Soo-Yong; Ahn, Kwang-Il; Yang, Joon-Eon

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An integrated mitigating strategy to cope with extreme external events, iROCS, is proposed. • The strategy aims to preserve the integrity of the reactor vessel as well as core cooling. • A case study for an extreme damage state is performed to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of candidate mitigation strategies under an extreme event. - Abstract: The Fukushima Daiichi accident induced by the Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, poses a new challenge to the nuclear society, especially from an accident management viewpoint. This paper presents a new accident management framework called an integrated, RObust Coping Strategy (iROCS) to cope with beyond-design-basis external events (BDBEEs). The iROCS approach is characterized by classification of various plant damage conditions (PDCs) that might be impacted by BDBEEs and corresponding integrated coping strategies for each of PDCs, aiming to maintain and restore core cooling (i.e., to prevent core damage) and to maintain the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel if it is judged that core damage may not be preventable in view of plant conditions. From a case study for an extreme damage condition, it showed that candidate accident management strategies should be evaluated from the viewpoint of effectiveness and feasibility against accident scenarios and extreme damage conditions of the site, especially when employing mobile or portable equipment under BDBEEs within the limited time available to achieve desired goals such as prevention of core damage as well as a reactor vessel failure.

  19. Development of Severe Accident Management Strategies for Shin-Kori 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youngseung; Kim, Hyeongtaek; Shin, Jungmin

    2013-01-01

    Shin-Kori units 3 and 4 are new reactors under construction as an APR 1400 type reactor. The plants which considered coping with severe accident from design phase are different from other operating plants in view of severe accident management strategies. The purpose of this paper is to establish optimal strategies for Shin-Kori 3 and 4. A scheme for optimized severe accident management was drawn up with the object of achieving core cooling, containment integrity, and decreased release of fission product. Shin-Kori units 3 and 4 are a new reactor and designed to add mitigating systems for coping with severe accident such as ECSBS, PAR, and CFS. Also the plants are reflected as a part of Fukushima followup measures The strategies of SAMG for Shin-Kori 3 and 4 were developed. The strategic approach was based on the concept of defense in depth. Firstly, strategies for core cooling were chosen such as RCS depressurization, injection to SG, injection to RCS, and injection to reactor cavity. Secondly, the plans for containment integrity were developed for controlling pressure and hydrogen in containment. Lastly, reduced release of fission product was considered for protection of the public after containment failure. The achieved strategies meet the needs of effective methods for severe accident management and enhancement of safety

  20. Proceedings of the first OECD (NEA) CSNI-Specialist Meeting on Instrumentation to Manage Severe Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnenkalb, Martin

    1992-07-01

    OECD member countries have adopted various accident management measures and procedures. To initiate these measures and control their effectiveness, information on the status of the plant and on accident symptoms is necessary. This information includes physical data (pressure, temperatures, hydrogen concentrations, etc.) but also data on the condition of components such as pumps, valves, power supplies, etc. In response to proposals made by the CSNI - PWG 4 Task Group on Containment Aspects of Severe Accident Management (CAM) and endorsed by PWG 4, CSNI has decided to sponsor a Specialist Meeting on Instrumentation to Manage Severe Accidents. The knowledge-basis for the Specialist Meeting was the paper on 'Instrumentation for Accident Management in Containment'. This technical document (NEA/CSNI/R(92)4) was prepared by the CSNI - Principle Working Group Number 4 of experts on January 1992. The Specialist Meeting was structured in the following sessions: I. Information Needs for Managing Severe Accidents, II. Capabilities and Limitations of Existing Instrumentation, III. Unconventional Use and Further Development of Instrumentation, IV. Operational Aids and Artificial Intelligence. The Specialist Meeting concentrated on existing instrumentation and its possible use under severe accident conditions; it also examined developments underway and planed. Desirable new instrumentation was discussed briefly. The interactions and discussions during the sessions were helpful to bring different perspectives to bear, thus sharpening the thinking of all. Questions were raised concerning the long-term viability of current (or added) instrumentation. It must be realized that the subject of instrumentation to manage severe accidents is very new, and that no international meeting on this topic was held previously. One of the objectives was to bring this important issue to the attention of both safety authorities and experts. It could be seen from several of the presentations and from

  1. Beyond Design Basis Severe Accident Management as an Element of DiD Concept Strengthening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, M., E-mail: kuznetsov_mv@vosafety.ru [FSUE VO “Safety”, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-15

    The 4{sup th} Level of DiD is ensured by management of beyond design basis accidents which is achieved by implementation of the Beyond Design Basis Accidents Management Guidance (BDBAMG) and, if necessary, by additional technical devices and organizational measures at NPP Unit. BDBAMG is located between Levels 3 and 5 in DiD and is related to them. It is connected with Level 3 by means of conditions generated at this Level and according to which BDBAM should be initiated (Level 4). It is associated with Level 5 by conditions which necessitate implementation of Emergency planning. Both types of conditions should be identified in BDBAMG. BDBAs including the phase of severe damage of fuel and protective barriers (severe accidents) in accordance with Russian regulatory framework are a subset of all BDBAs set. In this connection, such accident scenarios meet the representativeness criterion for further analysis and development of Guidance for their management. BDBAMG availability, as it provides robustness of DiD as a whole, is an obligatory condition for obtaining a NPP operational license. In the process of BDBAMG development and implementation a feedback with technical and organizational measures, comprising Level 1 and, to a less extent, Level 2, comes up. BDBAMG verification is an important final stage of its development. Addressing severe accidents, it is a challenging issue for a full scope simulator and may require its software modernization to make it responsive to severe accident phenomena. The existing BDBAMGs should be updated due to NPP Unit modernizations and in conjunction with the latest knowledge on severe accident phenomenology and lessons learnt from known events (e.g. NPP Fukushima). Thus, improvements incorporated in BDBAMG, enhance the strength of DiD. (author)

  2. Utilization technique of 'radiation management manual in medical field (2012).' What should be learnt from the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Toru

    2014-01-01

    From the abstract of contents of the 'Radiation management manual in medical field (2012),' the utilization technique of the manual is introduced. Introduced items are as follows: (1) Exposure management; exposure management for radiation medical workers, patients, and citizens in the medical field, and exposure management for radiation workers and citizens involved in the emergency work related to the Fukushima nuclear accident, (2) Health management; health management for radiation medical workers, (3) Radiation education: Education/training for radiation medical workers, and radiation education for health care workers, (4) Accident and emergency measures; emergency actions involved in the radiation accidents and radiation medicine at medical facilities

  3. An Am-Be neutron source Accident and its management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Guang; Wang Xinyong; Wu Zhenghan

    1988-01-01

    An 241 Am-Be neutron source for inaustrial use was lost in a county of Guangdong Province in April, 1982. A school boy picked up and brought it to his home. The source was broken and 10 people were contaminated with radioactive substance. The boy (X) received the highest external irradiation, with chest dose of 0.12 Sv and hand dose of 0.32 Sv. His brother (Y) incurred the heaviest internal contamination by 241 Am, about 3.3 x 10 3 Bq. Decorporation was carried out in four persons including Y, and the excretion of 241 Am in stools and urine was increased significantly. With the medical examination performed upon these persons one and half years after the accident, no positive findings induced by radiation were found except the increase of chromosomal aberration rate in lymphocytes

  4. Medical management of the victims of Goiana 137 Cs accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao-Mello, C.E.; Farina, R.; Oliveira, A.R.; Valverde, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    In September 1987, a radiation accident happened in Gioania due to the theft of a shielded source of 137 Cs. Fifty persons were involved showing whole-body and local acute irradiation and also external and/or internal contamination mainly due to ingestion or absorption of 137 Cs. Fourteen of fifty developed severe bone marrow depression characterized by neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. None were submitted to bone marrow transplantation. Eight of fourteen received intravenously GM-CSF. Four of the fourteen died due to hemorrhage and infection. For those with significant internal contamination, Prussian blue was administered (1.5 to 10.0 gm/per day). Besides blue, other measures were taken to increase decorporation of 137 Cs including diuretics, water overload and ergometric exercises. Radiation induced skin injuries were observed in 28 patients and were treated conservatively. 6 patients required surgical intervention. (author)

  5. Impact of the effect of economic crisis and the targeted motorcycle safety programme on motorcycle-related accidents, injuries and fatalities in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, T H; Umar, R S Radin; Zulkaurnain, S; Kulanthayan, S

    2005-03-01

    In 1997, a Motorcycle Safety Programme (MSP) was introduced to address the motorcycle-related accident problem. The MSP was specifically targeted at motorcyclists. In addition to the MSP, the recent economic recession has significantly contributed to a reduction of traffic-related incidents. This paper examines the effects of the recent economic crisis and the MSP on motorcycle-related accidents, casualties and fatalities in Malaysia. The autocorrelation integrated moving average model with transfer function was used to evaluate the overall effects of the interventions. The variables used in developing the model were gross domestic product and MSPs. The analysis found a 25% reduction in the number of motorcycle-related accidents, a 27% reduction in motorcycle casualties and a 38% reduction in motorcycle fatalities after the implementation of MSP. Findings indicate that the MSP has been one of the effective measures in reducing motorcycle safety problems in Malaysia. Apart from that, the performance of the country's economy was also found to be significant in explaining the number of motorcycle-related accidents, casualties and fatalities in Malaysia.

  6. Severe Accident Management Guidance: Lessons Still to be Learned after Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vayssier, G.

    2016-01-01

    After the accidents in Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, many countries decided to develop and implement guidelines specifically directed to mitigate accidents with core damage, so-called severe accidents. The guidelines are usually named Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMG). In the USA, all operating plants had these guidelines in place at the end of 1998. Most other countries followed later, but today, it can be said that many nuclear power plants in the world have such guidelines in place. Typically, however, the guidelines were constructed under the assumption that many plant systems still will be available, i.e. there will be DC to feed the instruments, AC to feed equipment and water to restore cooling to the core. Typically, this was basically the situation at TMI: most equipment was functional, only the insight of what had happened had been lost and operators did not know how to respond. At Fukushima-Daiichi, a Site Disruptive Accident (SDA) occurred and it appeared that the situation was much more complex: much of the needed supportive equipment needed was unavailable, which greatly complicated the handling of the event. In this paper, the major shortcomings of the present existing SAMG are discussed, both from a technical, and an organisational viewpoint. It is concluded that, where proper regulation still is missing, the development of an industrial standard is recommended to define adequate tools and guidelines to mitigate severe accidents, including SDAs. (author).

  7. Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management. EG-SAM Interim Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    As an early response to the Fukushima NPP accident, the ISOE Bureau decided to focus on the following issues as an initial response of the joint program after having direct communications with the Japanese official participants in April 2011; - Management of high radiation area worker doses: It has been decided to make available the experience and information from the Chernobyl accident in terms of how emergency worker / responder doses were legally and practically managed, - Personal protective equipment for highly-contaminated areas: It was agreed to collect information about the types of personnel protective equipment and other equipment (e.g. air bottles, respirators, air-hoods or plastic suits, etc.), as well as high-radiation area worker dosimetry use (e.g. type, number and placement of dosimetry) for different types of emergency and high-radiation work situations. Detailed information was collected on dose criteria which are used for emergency workers/responders and their basis, dose management criteria for high dose/dose rate areas, protective equipment which is recommended for emergency workers / responders, recommended individual monitoring procedures, and any special requirement for assessment from the ISOE participating nuclear utilities and regulatory authorities and made available for Japanese utilities. With this positive response of the ISOE actors and interest in the situation in Fukushima, the Expert Group on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management (EG-SAM) was established by the ISOE Management Board in May 2011. The overall objective of the EG-SAM is to contribute to occupational exposure management (providing a view on management of high radiation area worker doses) within the Fukushima plant boundary with the ISOE participants and to develop a state-of-the- art ISOE report on best radiation protection management practices for proper radiation protection job coverage during severe accident initial response and recovery

  8. The management of cardiovascular disease in the Netherlands: analysis of different programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane M. Cramm

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disease management programmes are increasingly used to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of chronic care delivery.But, disease management programme development and implementation is a complex undertaking that requires effective decision-making.Choices made in the earliest phases of programme development are crucial, as they ultimately impact costs, outcomes and sustainability. Methods: To increase our understanding of the choices that primary healthcare practices face when implementing such programmes and to stimulate successful implementation and sustainability, we compared the early implementation of eight cardiovascular disease management programmes initiated and managed by healthcare practices in various regions of the Netherlands. Using a mixed-methods design, we identified differences in and challenges to programme implementation in terms of context, patient characteristics, disease management level, healthcare utilisation costs, development costs and health-related quality of life. Results: Shifting to a multidisciplinary, patient-centred care pathway approach to disease management is demanding for organisations, professionals and patients, and is especially vulnerable when sustainable change is the goal. Funding is an important barrier to sustainable implementation of cardiovascular disease management programmes, although development costs of the individual programmes varied considerably in relation to the length of the development period. The large number of professionals involved in combination with duration of programme development was the largest cost drivers. While Information and Communication Technology systems to support the new care pathways did not directly contribute to higher costs, delays in implementation indirectly did. Conclusions: Developing and implementing cardiovascular disease management programmes is time-consuming and challenging. Multidisciplinary, patient-centred care demands multifaceted changes

  9. The management of cardiovascular disease in the Netherlands: analysis of different programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane M. Cramm

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disease management programmes are increasingly used to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of chronic care delivery.But, disease management programme development and implementation is a complex undertaking that requires effective decision-making.Choices made in the earliest phases of programme development are crucial, as they ultimately impact costs, outcomes and sustainability.Methods: To increase our understanding of the choices that primary healthcare practices face when implementing such programmes and to stimulate successful implementation and sustainability, we compared the early implementation of eight cardiovascular disease management programmes initiated and managed by healthcare practices in various regions of the Netherlands. Using a mixed-methods design, we identified differences in and challenges to programme implementation in terms of context, patient characteristics, disease management level, healthcare utilisation costs, development costs and health-related quality of life.Results: Shifting to a multidisciplinary, patient-centred care pathway approach to disease management is demanding for organisations, professionals and patients, and is especially vulnerable when sustainable change is the goal. Funding is an important barrier to sustainable implementation of cardiovascular disease management programmes, although development costs of the individual programmes varied considerably in relation to the length of the development period. The large number of professionals involved in combination with duration of programme development was the largest cost drivers. While Information and Communication Technology systems to support the new care pathways did not directly contribute to higher costs, delays in implementation indirectly did.Conclusions: Developing and implementing cardiovascular disease management programmes is time-consuming and challenging. Multidisciplinary, patient-centred care demands multifaceted changes in

  10. The management of cardiovascular disease in the Netherlands: analysis of different programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane M; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Walters, Bethany H; Adams, Samantha A; Bal, Roland; Huijsman, Robbert; Rutten-Van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Nieboer, Anna P

    2013-01-01

    Disease management programmes are increasingly used to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of chronic care delivery. But, disease management programme development and implementation is a complex undertaking that requires effective decision-making. Choices made in the earliest phases of programme development are crucial, as they ultimately impact costs, outcomes and sustainability. To increase our understanding of the choices that primary healthcare practices face when implementing such programmes and to stimulate successful implementation and sustainability, we compared the early implementation of eight cardiovascular disease management programmes initiated and managed by healthcare practices in various regions of the Netherlands. Using a mixed-methods design, we identified differences in and challenges to programme implementation in terms of context, patient characteristics, disease management level, healthcare utilisation costs, development costs and health-related quality of life. Shifting to a multidisciplinary, patient-centred care pathway approach to disease management is demanding for organisations, professionals and patients, and is especially vulnerable when sustainable change is the goal. Funding is an important barrier to sustainable implementation of cardiovascular disease management programmes, although development costs of the individual programmes varied considerably in relation to the length of the development period. The large number of professionals involved in combination with duration of programme development was the largest cost drivers. While Information and Communication Technology systems to support the new care pathways did not directly contribute to higher costs, delays in implementation indirectly did. Developing and implementing cardiovascular disease management programmes is time-consuming and challenging. Multidisciplinary, patient-centred care demands multifaceted changes in routine care. As care pathways become more complex, they

  11. The management of cardiovascular disease in the Netherlands: analysis of different programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane M.; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Walters, Bethany H.; Adams, Samantha A.; Bal, Roland; Huijsman, Robbert; Rutten-Van Mölken, Maureen P.M.H.; Nieboer, Anna P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Disease management programmes are increasingly used to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of chronic care delivery. But, disease management programme development and implementation is a complex undertaking that requires effective decision-making. Choices made in the earliest phases of programme development are crucial, as they ultimately impact costs, outcomes and sustainability. Methods To increase our understanding of the choices that primary healthcare practices face when implementing such programmes and to stimulate successful implementation and sustainability, we compared the early implementation of eight cardiovascular disease management programmes initiated and managed by healthcare practices in various regions of the Netherlands. Using a mixed-methods design, we identified differences in and challenges to programme implementation in terms of context, patient characteristics, disease management level, healthcare utilisation costs, development costs and health-related quality of life. Results Shifting to a multidisciplinary, patient-centred care pathway approach to disease management is demanding for organisations, professionals and patients, and is especially vulnerable when sustainable change is the goal. Funding is an important barrier to sustainable implementation of cardiovascular disease management programmes, although development costs of the individual programmes varied considerably in relation to the length of the development period. The large number of professionals involved in combination with duration of programme development was the largest cost drivers. While Information and Communication Technology systems to support the new care pathways did not directly contribute to higher costs, delays in implementation indirectly did. Conclusions Developing and implementing cardiovascular disease management programmes is time-consuming and challenging. Multidisciplinary, patient-centred care demands multifaceted changes in routine care. As

  12. A defense in depth approach for nuclear power plant accident management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chih-Yao Hsieh; Hwai-Pwu Chou [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, TW (China)

    2015-07-01

    An initiating event may lead to a severe accident if the plant safety functions have been challenged or operators do not follow the appropriate accident management procedures. Beyond design basis accidents are those corresponding to events of very low occurrence probability but such an accident may lead to significant consequences. The defense in depth approach is important to assure nuclear safety even in a severe accident. Plant Damage States (PDS) can be defined by the combination of the possible values for each of the PDS parameters which are showed on the nuclear power plant simulator. PDS is used to identify what the initiating event is, and can also give the information of safety system's status whether they are bypassed, inoperable or not. Initiating event and safety system's status are used in the construction of Containment Event Tree (CET) to determine containment failure modes by using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) technique. Different initiating events will correspond to different CETs. With these CETs, the core melt frequency of an initiating event can be found. The use of Plant Damage States (PDS) is a symptom-oriented approach. On the other hand, the use of Containment Event Tree (CET) is an event-oriented approach. In this study, the Taiwan's fourth nuclear power plants, the Lungmen nuclear power station (LNPS), which is an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) with fully digitized instrumentation and control (I and C) system is chosen as the target plant. The LNPS full scope engineering simulator is used to generate the testing data for method development. The following common initiating events are considered in this study: loss of coolant accidents (LOCA), total loss of feedwater (TLOFW), loss of offsite power (LOOP), station blackout (SBO). Studies have indicated that the combination of the symptom-oriented approach and the event-oriented approach can be helpful to find mitigation strategies and is useful for the accident

  13. The technical requirements concerning severe accident management in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Kamata, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake with a magnitude of 9.0 (The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake) occurred on March 11, 2011, and the beyond design-basis tsunami descended on the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant by the earthquake. Eventually, the core cooling systems of the units 1, 2 and 3 could not operate stably, they all suffered severe accident, and hydrogen explosions were triggered in the reactor buildings of units 1, 3 and 4. In the light of these circumstances, Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) decided to establish a standard that consolidates the concept of maintaining and improving severe accident management. In the SAM standard, the combination of hardware and software measures based on the risk assessment enables a scientific and rational approach to apply to scenarios of various severe accidents including low-frequency, high-impact events, and assures safety with functionality and flexibility. The SAM standard is already established in March, 2014. After publication of the SAM standard, with regard to effectiveness assessment for accident management and treatment of the uncertainty of severe accident analysis code, for example, the detailed guideline will be prepared as appendices of the standard. (author)

  14. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl: programme 2: REDAC, the radioecological database after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville-Cavelin, G.; Biesold, H.; Chabanyuk, V.

    2006-01-01

    Goals: to built a database for integrating the results of programme 'Radioecology' of the French-German Initiative: Ecological portrait, initial contamination, wastes management, soil-plants and animals transfer, transfer by runoff and in the aquatic environment, countermeasures in urban and natural and agricultural environments. Specific methodology: original 'Project Solutions Framework': Information system developed as a soft integrated portal, Geo-information system: all spatial data geo-coded. DB structure: Publications: all classical informations, original data; Products: storage of open publications of the Project; Processes: management of the Project and Sub-projects; Services: information and software objects, help; Basics: information on system and organizational development. - Soft integration: cartography system: Map from 'Ecological portrait' integrated with thematic databases, Loaded in a special category (by IS Geo Internet Map Server); Cartographical functions: navigation, scaling, extracting, layer management, Databases arrangement independent of map system architecture. - Soft integration: portlets and DDB: Portlets = mini-applications for business functions and processes, made of web parts; Digital Dashboards (DDB) Portlets + web parts DDB sites = collections of DDB, adjustable by users. - General conclusions: REDAC, powerful and useful radioecological tool: All elements easily accessible through the original tool, ProSF, developed by IS Geo; Relations constructed between the documents (files, databases, documentation, reports,...); All elements structured by a meta-information; Mechanisms of search; Global radioecological glossary; Spatial data geo-coded; Processes, tools and methodology suitable for similar projects; Data useful for scientific studies, modelling, operational purposes, communication with mass media. - Outlook: Addition of functionality, support and maintenance Strong integration: Thematic integration = merging of all DB in an

  15. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl: programme 2: REDAC, the radioecological database after the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville-Cavelin, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Environment and Emergency Operations Div. - Dept. for the Study of Radionuclide Behaviour in Ecosystems, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Biesold, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Braunschweig (Germany); Chabanyuk, V. [Chornobyl Center (CC), Kiev regoin (Ukraine)

    2006-07-01

    Goals: to built a database for integrating the results of programme 'Radioecology' of the French-German Initiative: Ecological portrait, initial contamination, wastes management, soil-plants and animals transfer, transfer by runoff and in the aquatic environment, countermeasures in urban and natural and agricultural environments. Specific methodology: original 'Project Solutions Framework': Information system developed as a soft integrated portal, Geo-information system: all spatial data geo-coded. DB structure: Publications: all classical informations, original data; Products: storage of open publications of the Project; Processes: management of the Project and Sub-projects; Services: information and software objects, help; Basics: information on system and organizational development. - Soft integration: cartography system: Map from 'Ecological portrait' integrated with thematic databases, Loaded in a special category (by IS Geo Internet Map Server); Cartographical functions: navigation, scaling, extracting, layer management, Databases arrangement independent of map system architecture. - Soft integration: portlets and DDB: Portlets = mini-applications for business functions and processes, made of web parts; Digital Dashboards (DDB) Portlets + web parts DDB sites = collections of DDB, adjustable by users. - General conclusions: REDAC, powerful and useful radioecological tool: All elements easily accessible through the original tool, ProSF, developed by IS Geo; Relations constructed between the documents (files, databases, documentation, reports,...); All elements structured by a meta-information; Mechanisms of search; Global radioecological glossary; Spatial data geo-coded; Processes, tools and methodology suitable for similar projects; Data useful for scientific studies, modelling, operational purposes, communication with mass media. - Outlook: Addition of functionality, support and maintenance Strong integration: Thematic

  16. Workshop on iodine aspects of severe accident management. Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    Following a recommendation of the OECD Workshop on the Chemistry of Iodine in Reactor Safety held in Wuerenlingen (Switzerland) in June 1996 [Summary and Conclusions of the Workshop, Report NEA/CSNI/R(96)7], the CSNI decided to sponsor a Workshop on Iodine Aspects of Severe Accident Management, and their planned or effective implementation. The starting point for this conclusion was the realization that the consolidation of the accumulated iodine chemistry knowledge into accident management guidelines and procedures remained, to a large extent, to be done. The purpose of the meeting was therefore to help build a bridge between iodine research and the application of its results in nuclear power plants, with particular emphasis on severe accident management. Specifically, the Workshop was expected to answer the following questions: - what is the role of iodine in severe accident management? - what are the needs of the utilities? - how can research fulfill these needs? The Workshop was organized in Vantaa (Helsinki), Finland, from 18 to 20 May 1999, in collaboration with Fortum Engineering Ltd. It was attended by forty-six specialists representing fifteen Member countries and the European Commission. Twenty-eight papers were presented. These included four utility papers, representing the views of Electricite de France (EDF), Teollisuuden Voima Oy and Fortum Engineering Ltd (Finland), the Nuclear Energy Institute (USA), and Japanese utilities. The papers were presented in five sessions: - iodine speciation; - organic compound control; - iodine control; - modeling; - iodine management; A sixth session was devoted to a general discussion on iodine management under severe accident conditions. This report summarizes the content of the papers and the conclusions of the workshop

  17. Geographic Information System (GIS) capabilities in traffic accident information management: a qualitative approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Valinejadi, Ali; Goodarzi, Afshin; Safari, Ameneh; Hemmat, Morteza; Majdabadi, Hesamedin Askari; Mohammadi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background Traffic accidents are one of the more important national and international issues, and their consequences are important for the political, economical, and social level in a country. Management of traffic accident information requires information systems with analytical and accessibility capabilities to spatial and descriptive data. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the capabilities of a Geographic Information System (GIS) in management of traffic accident information. Methods This qualitative cross-sectional study was performed in 2016. In the first step, GIS capabilities were identified via literature retrieved from the Internet and based on the included criteria. Review of the literature was performed until data saturation was reached; a form was used to extract the capabilities. In the second step, study population were hospital managers, police, emergency, statisticians, and IT experts in trauma, emergency and police centers. Sampling was purposive. Data was collected using a questionnaire based on the first step data; validity and reliability were determined by content validity and Cronbach’s alpha of 75%. Data was analyzed using the decision Delphi technique. Results GIS capabilities were identified in ten categories and 64 sub-categories. Import and process of spatial and descriptive data and so, analysis of this data were the most important capabilities of GIS in traffic accident information management. Conclusion Storing and retrieving of descriptive and spatial data, providing statistical analysis in table, chart and zoning format, management of bad structure issues, determining the cost effectiveness of the decisions and prioritizing their implementation were the most important capabilities of GIS which can be efficient in the management of traffic accident information. PMID:28848627

  18. Geographic Information System (GIS) capabilities in traffic accident information management: a qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Valinejadi, Ali; Goodarzi, Afshin; Safari, Ameneh; Hemmat, Morteza; Majdabadi, Hesamedin Askari; Mohammadi, Ali

    2017-06-01

    Traffic accidents are one of the more important national and international issues, and their consequences are important for the political, economical, and social level in a country. Management of traffic accident information requires information systems with analytical and accessibility capabilities to spatial and descriptive data. The aim of this study was to determine the capabilities of a Geographic Information System (GIS) in management of traffic accident information. This qualitative cross-sectional study was performed in 2016. In the first step, GIS capabilities were identified via literature retrieved from the Internet and based on the included criteria. Review of the literature was performed until data saturation was reached; a form was used to extract the capabilities. In the second step, study population were hospital managers, police, emergency, statisticians, and IT experts in trauma, emergency and police centers. Sampling was purposive. Data was collected using a questionnaire based on the first step data; validity and reliability were determined by content validity and Cronbach's alpha of 75%. Data was analyzed using the decision Delphi technique. GIS capabilities were identified in ten categories and 64 sub-categories. Import and process of spatial and descriptive data and so, analysis of this data were the most important capabilities of GIS in traffic accident information management. Storing and retrieving of descriptive and spatial data, providing statistical analysis in table, chart and zoning format, management of bad structure issues, determining the cost effectiveness of the decisions and prioritizing their implementation were the most important capabilities of GIS which can be efficient in the management of traffic accident information.

  19. Military Curricula for Vocational and Technical Education. Traffic Management and Accident Investigation, 17-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Force, Washington, DC.

    This teaching guide and student workbook for a postsecondary level course in traffic management and accident investigation is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Purpose stated for the 132-hour course is to expose students to…

  20. A study on the implementation effect of accident management strategies on safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jae, Moo Sung; Kim, Dong Ha; Jin, Young Ho

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for assessing accident management strategies using containment event trees(CETs) developed during an individual plant examination (IPE) for a reference plant (CE type, 950 MWe PWR). Various accident management strategies to reduce risk have been proposed through IPE. Three strategies for the station blackout sequence are used as an example: 1) reactor cavity flooding only, 2) primary system depressurization only, and 3) doing both. These strategies are assumed to be initiated at about the time of core uncovery. The station blackout (SBO) sequence is selected in this paper since it is identified as one of the most threatening sequences to safety of the reference plant. The effectiveness and adverse effects of each accident management strategy are considered synthetically in the CETs. A best estimate assessment for the developed CETs using data obtained from NUREG-1150, other PRA results, and the MAAP code calculations is performed. The strategies are ranked with respect to minimizing the frequencies of various containment failure modes. The proposed approach is demonstrated to be very flexible in that it can be applied to any kind of accident management strategy for any sequence. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs. (author)

  1. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis L Kodner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each. It started during the first phase at Massachusetts General Hospital, a major academic medical centre in Boston, Massachusetts in collaboration with Massachusetts General Physicians Organisation. During the second phase, the programme expanded to two more affiliated sites in and around the Boston area, including a community hospital, as well as incorporated several modifications primarily focused on the management of transitions to post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities. At the close of the demonstration in July 2012, Mass General Massachusetts General Care Management Program became a component of a new Pioneer accountable care organisation (ACO. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program is focused on individuals meeting defined eligibility criteria who are offered care that is integrated by a case manager embedded in a primary care practice. The demonstration project showed substantial cost savings compared to fee-for-service patients served in the traditional Medicare system but no impact on hospital readmissions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program does not rest upon a “whole systems” approach to integrated care. It is an excellent example of how an innovative care co-ordination programme can be implemented in an existing health-care organisation without making fundamental changes in its underlying structure or the way in which direct patient care services are paid for. The accountable care organisation version of the Massachusetts General Care Management Program

  2. Nuclear power plant ageing management programmes in foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simola, K.; Laakso, K.; Pekkonen, A.

    1992-09-01

    The report describes ageing studies of nuclear power plants and research programmes on plant life extension in foreign countries. Ageing studies are aimed to ascertain that the availability and safety of components and structures can be maintained throughout the plant lifetime. In life extension programmes the purpose is to evaluate the technical and economical possibilities to extend the plant lifetime beyond the originally planned operation period, without reducing the plant safety. The main emphasis of the report is put on the ageing and life extension programmes in the United States. Besides the U.S. studies, research on plant life extension possibilities conducted in France and Japan are also described. Examples of studies performed in other nuclear energy producing countries are given. These examples are mainly related to the development of maintenance programmes and techniques

  3. Programmable Relations for Managing Change During Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-15

    POSTGRES [37], in which attributes of relations can include abstract data types, although not other relations. POSTGRES [39] also includes other...that programmability of this type is missing from both POSTGRES and ALGRES. Nevertheless, programmable implementations are not mutually incompatible...December 1975. [37] L. A. Rowe and Michael R. Stonebraker. "The POSTGRES Data Model". In Proc. of the 13th VLDB Conference, pages 83-96, 1987. [38

  4. Conclusions of the specialist meeting on operator AIDS for severe accident management and training (SAMOA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The scope of the Specialist Meeting was limited to operator aids for accident management which were in operation or could be soon. Moreover, the meeting concentrated on the management of accidents beyond the design basis, including tools which might be extended from the design basis range into the severe accident area. Relevant simulation tools for operator training were also part of the scope of the meeting. The presentations showed that the design and implementation of operator aids were closely related to the organisation adopted by the user, whether it was a utility or a governmental agency. The most common organisation is to share the management of severe accidents among two groups of people: the operating team in the Control Room (CR) and a team of specialists in a Technical Support Centre (TSC). The CR is in charge of the operation of the plant in all conditions using a set of procedures and guidelines, while the experts in the TSC are able to produce in-depth analyses of the plant state and its evolution. The responsibility is shared between the CR and the TSC during accident progression. The TSC acts as a support for the CR for reactor operation and takes charge of the predictions of radioactive releases (source term, accident progression, release and dispersion of radioactive substances, as well as the interaction with public authorities). But this type of organisation is not general and the differences can induce different approaches in the design of operator aids. The first session was dedicated to operator aids for control rooms, the second session to operator aids for technical support centres

  5. Uncertainty quantification for accident management using ACE surrogates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varuttamaseni, A.; Lee, J. C.; Youngblood, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    The alternating conditional expectation (ACE) regression method is used to generate RELAP5 surrogates which are then used to determine the distribution of the peak clad temperature (PCT) during the loss of feedwater accident coupled with a subsequent initiation of the feed and bleed (F and B) operation in the Zion-1 nuclear power plant. The construction of the surrogates assumes conditional independence relations among key reactor parameters. The choice of parameters to model is based on the macroscopic balance statements governing the behavior of the reactor. The peak clad temperature is calculated based on the independent variables that are known to be important in determining the success of the F and B operation. The relationship between these independent variables and the plant parameters such as coolant pressure and temperature is represented by surrogates that are constructed based on 45 RELAP5 cases. The time-dependent PCT for different values of F and B parameters is calculated by sampling the independent variables from their probability distributions and propagating the information through two layers of surrogates. The results of our analysis show that the ACE surrogates are able to satisfactorily reproduce the behavior of the plant parameters even though a quasi-static assumption is primarily used in their construction. The PCT is found to be lower in cases where the F and B operation is initiated, compared to the case without F and B, regardless of the F and B parameters used. (authors)

  6. Motor vehicle accidents: How should cirrhotic patients be managed?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takumi Kawaguchi; Eitaro Taniguchi; Michio Sata

    2012-01-01

    Motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) are serious social issues worldwide and driver illness is an important cause of MVAs.Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is a complex cognitive dysfunction with attention deficit,which frequently occurs in cirrhotic patients independent of severity of liver disease.Although MHE is known as a risk factor for MVAs,the impact of diagnosis and treatment of MHE on MVA-related societal costs is largely unknown.Recently,Bajaj et al demonstrated valuable findings that the diagnosis of MHE by rapid screening using the inhibitory control test (ICT),and subsequent treatment with lactulose could substantially reduce the societal costs by preventing MVAs,Besides the ICT and lactulose,there are various diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies for MHE.In this commentary,we discussed a current issue of diagnostic tools for MHE,including neuropsychological tests.We also discussed the advantages of the other therapeutic strategies for MHE,such as intake of a regular breakfast and coffee,and supplementation with zinc and branched chain amino acids,on the MVA-related societal costs.

  7. The integration of studio cycling into a worksite stress management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Matthew M; Soyring, Jason E; Jenkins, Sarah M; Daniels, Denise C; Berkland, Bridget E; Werneburg, Brooke L; Hagen, Philip T; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Warren, Beth A; Olsen, Kerry D

    2014-04-01

    High stress is a prevalent problem in the worksite. To reduce stress, improve productivity, reduce absenteeism, and lower healthcare costs, many companies offer exercise classes or stress management programmes. Although physical activity is an important component of stress management, few worksites have integrated physical activity into their comprehensive stress reduction programmes. The purpose of this single-arm pilot project was to examine the potential effectiveness of an integrated exercise (studio cycling) and cognitive-behavioural stress management programme. Eighty-four adults, 75% female, mostly aged 40+ years, participated in an integrated 12-week cycling studio and cognitive-behavioural stress management programme. Participants experienced a significant and clinically meaningful reduction on the Perceived Stress Scale (p manage stress at the programme's end and at a 1-month follow-up. Participants also reported having significantly improved overall health, improved nutritional habits, higher physical activity level, greater confidence in their ability to follow a healthy diet, higher spiritual well-being, improved sleep, receiving more support for maintaining healthy living and improved quality of life at the completion of the 12-week programme and 1-month follow-up. These findings provide further support for an integrated exercise and stress management programme. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. POST GRADUATE PROGRAMME IN DIETETICS &FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT (MSCDFSM PROGRAMME of IGNOU: Access through the Lucknow Regional Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. DOROTHY

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU which was established initially as a Single mode Distance Teaching Institution (DTI in the year 1985 opened its campus to face-to-face education in the year 2008 and thus now is a Dual mode Distance Teaching Institution (DTI. The Post Graduate Programme (Master of Science in Dietetics and Food Service Management (MScDFSM Programme of IGNOU offered through the Distance Learning Mode from the year 2005 has been the boon in developing human resources involved in Nutrition and Dietetics services and also serves as a mode for continuing education among the professionals on-the-job. Accessibility to the programme is independent of the qualification earned at the Bachelor’s level as at IGNOU flexibility of the qualification is ensured for fulfilling the eligibility criteria into the MScDFSM Programme so that the diverse needs of the aspirants are accommodated at entry level itself. The Programme is unique in that it has compulsory Dissertation and Internship besides the Theory and Practical Courses. The Self-Study is enriched by the Teacher inbuilt Self-instructional Study Materials coupled with compulsory submission of the Tutor Marked Assignments (TMA which phase learning and initiate the didactic communication between the Academic Counsellor (who facilitate the Academic Transactions at the field level functionary - the Learner Support Centre and the Learner. The MSc DFSM Programme of IGNOU, as the distance learning programme offered by the School of Continuing Education (SOCE of IGNOU in the Indian Sub-Continent only. This paper discusses how the MScDFSM Programme of IGNOU is contributing to the staff development of in-service Nutritionists and Dietitians through the distance education/learning mode in Lucknow (Uttar Pradesh, North India Regional Centre. This paper also highlights the Institutions, which served as the Learner Support Centres from the year 2005 (when the programme was launched till 2011

  9. Continuous Improvement in the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering Programme at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldowaisan, Tariq; Allahverdi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process employed by the Industrial and Management Systems Engineering programme at Kuwait University to continuously improve the programme. Using a continuous improvement framework, the paper demonstrates how various qualitative and quantitative analyses methods, such as hypothesis testing and control charts, have been…

  10. Strategy implemented for a safe management of the waste arising from the Goiania accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miaw, Sophia T.W. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Safety Co-ordination Section; Mezhari, Arnaldo; Shu, Jane; Xavier, Ana Maria [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Superintendencia de Licenciamento e Controle

    1997-12-31

    The management of radioactive waste after the accident is discussed. Several aspects such as properties of the waste, the available infrastructure for its collection, the decontamination logistics, the motivation and commitment of works and the politically sensitive definition of handling different waste as well as the administrative procedure to set up reliable records on the collected waste are studied. Four years after the accident, corrosion was detected in some packages. Waste reconditioning, development and implementation of waste data base and development of a national safety evaluation procedure for the final disposal facility are presented 11 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. Advanced evacuation model managed through fuzzy logic during an accident in LNG terminal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovicj, Goran; Petelin, Stojan [Faculty for Maritime Studies and Transport, University of Ljubljana, Portorozh (Sierra Leone); others, and

    2014-07-01

    Evacuation of people located inside the enclosed area of an LNG terminal is a complex problem, especially considering that accidents involving LNG are potentially very hazardous. In order to create an evacuation model managed through fuzzy logic, extensive influence must be generated from safety analyses. A very important moment in the optimal functioning of an evacuation model is the creation of a database which incorporates all input indicators. The output result is the creation of a safety evacuation route which is active at the moment of the accident. (Author)

  12. Strategy implemented for a safe management of the waste arising from the Goiania accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miaw, Sophia T.W.; Mezhari, Arnaldo; Shu, Jane; Xavier, Ana Maria

    1997-01-01

    The management of radioactive waste after the accident is discussed. Several aspects such as properties of the waste, the available infrastructure for its collection, the decontamination logistics, the motivation and commitment of works and the politically sensitive definition of handling different waste as well as the administrative procedure to set up reliable records on the collected waste are studied. Four years after the accident, corrosion was detected in some packages. Waste reconditioning, development and implementation of waste data base and development of a national safety evaluation procedure for the final disposal facility are presented

  13. Development and application of a radioactivity evaluation technique the to obtain radiation exposure dose of radioactivity evaluation technique when a severe accident occurs in the a power station of a severe accident. Accident management guidelines of knowledge-based maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Ikuo; Yoshida, Yoshitaka

    2013-01-01

    As a One of the lessons learned from the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company, the was the need for improvement of accident management guidelines is required. In this report study, we developed and applied a dose evaluation technique to evaluated the radiation dose in a nuclear power plant assuming three conditions: employees were evacuation evacuated at the time of a severe accident occurrence; operators carried out the accident management operation; of the operators, and the repair work was carried out for of the trouble damaged apparatuses in a the nuclear power plant using a dose evaluation system. The following knowledge findings were obtained and should to be reflected to in the knowledge base of the guidelines was obtained. (1) By making clearly identifying an areas beforehand becoming the that would receive high radiation doses at the time of a severe accident definitely beforehand, we can employees can be moved to the evacuation places through an areas having of low dose rate and it is also known it how much we long employees can safely stay in the evacuation places. (2) When they circulate CV containment vessel recirculation sump water is recirculated by for the accident management operation and the restoration of safety in the facilities, because the plumbing piping and the apparatuses become radioactive radioactivity sources, the dose evaluation of the shortest access route and detour access routes with should be made for effective the accident management operation is effective. Because the area where a dose rate rises changes which as safety apparatuses are restored, in consideration of a plant state, it is necessary to judge the rightness or wrongness of the work continuation from the spot radioactive dose of the actual apparatus area, with based on precedence of the need to restore with precedence, and to choose a system to be used for accident management. (author)

  14. Programme evaluation: Can it improve human resource management practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Louw

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This is the final article in the special edition on human resource (HR programmes and evaluation. Its starting point is that programme evaluation is the application of a wide range of social science research methods that provide credible information about the need, use, planning, effectiveness and cost of a programme. Research purpose: The purpose of this article is to review the other articles in this volume, and to draw out general conclusions about their contributions to knowledge in the field. Motivation for the study: If evaluations are undertaken in the HR domain in South Africa, they remain mostly unpublished, and thus cannot contribute to a knowledge base for the field. Research design, approach and method: This article provides a theory-based approach to programme evaluation. The seven articles were analysed in terms of two major functions of programme evaluation, namely to ask ‘How does a programme work?’, and ‘Does it work?‘ Main findings: Eight overarching themes are identified in the articles included in this volume. Practical/managerial implications: The evidence discussed here can be used to make better decisions, promote organisational learning, improve practice, and enhance employee wellbeing. Contribution/value-add: The main contribution of this concluding article is its argument that research and theory in this field can enhance the work of HR professionals, by providing evidence about how ‘good’ a programme is, and why it is good. This adds substantial value in a world characterised by accountability and evidence-based practice.

  15. Regulatory Research of the PWR Severe Accident. Information Needs and Instrumentation for Hydrogen Control and Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Gun Chul; Suh, Kune Y.; Lee, Jin Yong; Lee, Seung Dong

    2001-03-01

    The current research is concerned with generation of basic engineering data needed in the process of developing hydrogen control guidelines as part of accident management strategies for domestic nuclear power plants and formulating pertinent regulatory requirements. Major focus is placed on identification of information needs and instrumentation methods for hydrogen control and management in the primary system and in the containment, development of decision-making trees for hydrogen management and their quantification, the instrument availability under severe accident conditions, critical review of relevant hydrogen generation model and phenomena In relation to hydrogen behavior, we analyzed the severe accident related hydrogen generation in the UCN 3·4 PWR with modified hydrogen generation model. On the basis of the hydrogen mixing experiment and related GASFLOW calculation, the necessity of 3-dimensional analysis of the hydrogen mixing was investigated. We examined the hydrogen control models related to the PAR(Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner) and performed MAAP4 calculation in relation to the decision tree to estimate the capability and the role of the PAR during a severe accident

  16. Regulatory Research of the PWR Severe Accident. Information Needs and Instrumentation for Hydrogen Control and Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gun Chul; Suh, Kune Y.; Lee, Jin Yong; Lee, Seung Dong [Seoul Nat' l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    The current research is concerned with generation of basic engineering data needed in the process of developing hydrogen control guidelines as part of accident management strategies for domestic nuclear power plants and formulating pertinent regulatory requirements. Major focus is placed on identification of information needs and instrumentation methods for hydrogen control and management in the primary system and in the containment, development of decision-making trees for hydrogen management and their quantification, the instrument availability under severe accident conditions, critical review of relevant hydrogen generation model and phenomena In relation to hydrogen behavior, we analyzed the severe accident related hydrogen generation in the UCN 3{center_dot}4 PWR with modified hydrogen generation model. On the basis of the hydrogen mixing experiment and related GASFLOW calculation, the necessity of 3-dimensional analysis of the hydrogen mixing was investigated. We examined the hydrogen control models related to the PAR(Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner) and performed MAAP4 calculation in relation to the decision tree to estimate the capability and the role of the PAR during a severe accident.

  17. Use of a fuzzy decision-making method in evaluating severe accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jae, M.; Moon, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    In developing severe accident management strategies, an engineering decision would be made based on the available data and information that are vague, imprecise and uncertain by nature. These sorts of vagueness and uncertainty are due to lack of knowledge for the severe accident sequences of interest. The fuzzy set theory offers a possibility of handling these sorts of data and information. In this paper, the possibility to apply the decision-making method based on fuzzy set theory to the evaluation of the accident management strategies at a nuclear power plant is scrutinized. The fuzzy decision-making method uses linguistic variables and fuzzy numbers to represent the decision-maker's subjective assessments for the decision alternatives according to the decision criteria. The fuzzy mean operator is used to aggregate the decision-maker's subjective assessments, while the total integral value method is used to rank the decision alternatives. As a case study, the proposed method is applied to evaluating the accident management strategies at a nuclear power plant

  18. Learning Lessons from TMI to Fukushima and Other Industrial Accidents: Keys for Assessing Safety Management Practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dechy, N.; Rousseau, J.-M.; Dien, Y.; Montmayeul, R.; Llory, M.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the paper is to discuss and to argue about transfer, from an industrial sector to another industrial sector, of lessons learnt from accidents. It will be achieved through the discussion of some theoretical foundations and through the illustration of examples of application cases in assessment of safety management practices in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The nuclear energy production industry has faced three big ones in 30 years (TMI, Chernobyl, Fukushima) involving three different reactor technologies operated in three quite different cultural, organizational and regulatory contexts. Each of those accident has been the origin of questions, but also generator of lessons, some changing the worldview (see Wilpert and Fahlbruch, 1998) of what does cause an accident in addition to the engineering view about the importance of technical failures (human error, safety culture, sociotechnical interactions). Some of their main lessons were implemented such as improvements of human-machine interfaces ergonomics, recast of some emergency operating procedures, severe accident mitigation strategies and crisis management. Some lessons did not really provide deep changes. It is the case for organizational lessons such as, organizational complexity, management of production pressures, regulatory capture, and failure to learn, etc.

  19. Status of the Real-time On-line Decision Support (RODOS) system for off-site emergency management after nuclear and radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskov, W.; Ehrhardt, J.; Landman, C.; Pasler-Sauer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Under the auspices of its EURATOM Research Framework Programmes, the European Commission (EC) has supported the development of the comprehensive decision support system RODOS (Real-time On-line Decision Support) for off-site emergency management after nuclear accidents for more than a decade. Many national research programmes, research institutes and industrial collaborators contributed to the project, in particular the German Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Reactor Safety (B MU). The RODOS system can be applied to accidental releases into the atmosphere and various aquatic environments within and across Europe. It provides coherent support before, during and after such a release to assist analysis of the situation and decision making about short and long-term countermeasures for mitigating the consequences with respect to health, the environment, and the economy. Appropriate interfaces exist with local and national radiological monitoring data systems, meteorological measurements and forecasts, and for the adaptation to local, regional and national conditions in Europe. Within the European Integrated Project EURANOS of the sixth Framework Programme, the RODOS system is being enhanced, among others, for radiological emergencies such as dirty bombs attacks, transport accidents and satellite crashes by extensions of the nuclide list, the source term characteristics and the atmospheric dispersion model

  20. Construction Project Administration and Management for Mitigating Work Zone Accidents and Fatalities: An Integrated Risk Management Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this research is to mitigate the risk of highway accidents (crashes) and fatalities in work zones. The approach of this research has been to address the mitigation of work zone crashes through the creation of a formal risk management mode...

  1. Knowledge data base for severe accident management of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    For the safety enhancement of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), continuous efforts are very important to take in the up-to-date scientific and technical knowledge positively and to reflect them into the safety regulation. The purpose of the present study is to gather effectively the scientific and technical knowledge about the severe accident (SA) phenomena and the accident management (AM) for prevention and mitigation of SA, and to take in the experimental data by participating in the international cooperative experiments regarding the important SA phenomena and the effectiveness of AM. Based on those data and knowledge, JNES is developing and improving severe accident analysis models to maintain the SA analysis codes and the AM knowledge base for assessment of the NPPs in Japan. The activities in fiscal year 2012 are as follows; Analytical study on OECD/NEA projects such as MCCI, SERENA and SFP projects, and support in making regulation for SA. (author)

  2. PCTRAN-3: The third generation of personal computer-based plant analyzer for severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li-Chi Cliff Po; Link, John M.

    2004-01-01

    PCTRAN is a plant analyzer that uses a personal computer to simulate plant response. The plant model is recently expanded to accommodate beyond design-basis severe accidents. In the event of multiple failures of the plant safety systems, the core may experience heatup and extensive failure. Using a high-powered personal computer (PC), PCTRAN-3 is designed to operate at a speed significantly faster than real-time. A convenient, interactive and user-friendly graphics interface allows full control by the operator. The plant analyzer is intended for use in severe accident management. In this paper the code's component models and sample runs ranging from normal operational transients to severe accidents are reviewed. (author)

  3. Knowledge data base for severe accident management of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    For the safety enhancement of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), continuous efforts are very important to take in the up-to-date scientific and technical knowledge positively and to reflect them into the safety regulation. The purpose of the present study is to gather effectively the scientific and technical knowledge about the severe accident (SA) phenomena and the accident management (AM) for prevention and mitigation of SA, and to take in the experimental data by participating in the international cooperative experiments regarding the important SA phenomena and the effectiveness of AM. Based on those data and knowledge, JNES is developing and improving severe accident analysis models to maintain the SA analysis codes and the AM knowledge base for assessment of the NPPs in Japan. The activities in fiscal year 2012 are as follows; Analytical study on OECD/NEA projects such as MCCI, SERENA and SFP projects, and support in making regulation for SA. (author)

  4. Accident management to prevent containment failure and reduce fission product release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, J.R.; Lin, C.C.; Luckas, W.J.; Pratt, W.T.

    1991-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory, under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is investigating accident management strategies which could help preserve containment integrity or minimize releases during a severe accident. The strategies considered make use of existing plant systems and equipment in innovative ways to reduce the likelihood of containment failure or to mitigate the release of fission products to the environment if failure cannot be prevented. Many of these strategies would be implemented during the later stages of a severe accident, i.e. after vessel breach, and sizable uncertainties exist regarding some of the phenomena involved. The identification and assessment process for containment and release strategies is described, and some insights derived from its application to specific containment types are presented. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  5. The PSI Artist Project: Aerosol Retention and Accident Management Issues Following a Steam Generator Tube Rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guntay, Salih; Dehbi, Abdel; Suckow, Detlef; Birchley, Jon

    2002-01-01

    Steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) incidents, such as those, which occurred in various operating pressurized, water reactors in the past, are serious operational concerns and remain among the most risk-dominant events. Although considerable efforts have been spent to understand tube degradation processes, develop improved modes of operation, and take preventative and corrective measures, SGTR incidents cannot be completely ruled out. Under certain conditions, high releases of radionuclides to the environment are possible during design basis accidents (DBA) and severe accidents. The severe accident codes' models for aerosol retention in the secondary side of a steam generator (SG) have not been assessed against any experimental data, which means that the uncertainties in the source term following an un-isolated SGTR concurrent with a severe accident are not currently quantified. The accident management (AM) procedures aim at avoiding or minimizing the release of fission products from the SG. The enhanced retention of activity within the SG defines the effectiveness of the accident management actions for the specific hardware characteristics and accident conditions of concern. A sound database on aerosol retention due to natural processes in the SG is not available, nor is an assessment of the effect of management actions on these processes. Hence, the effectiveness of the AM in SGTR events is not presently known. To help reduce uncertainties relating to SGTR issues, an experimental project, ARTIST (Aerosol Trapping In a Steam generator), has been initiated at the Paul Scherrer Institut to address aerosol and droplet retention in the various parts of the SG. The test section is comprised of a scaled-down tube bundle, a full-size separator and a full-size dryer unit. The project will study phenomena at the separate effect and integral levels and address AM issues in seven distinct phases: Aerosol retention in 1) the broken tube under dry secondary side conditions, 2

  6. Developing a Minimum Data Set for an Information Management System to Study Traffic Accidents in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ali; Ahmadi, Maryam; Gharagozlu, Alireza

    2016-03-01

    Each year, around 1.2 million people die in the road traffic incidents. Reducing traffic accidents requires an exact understanding of the risk factors associated with traffic patterns and behaviors. Properly analyzing these factors calls for a comprehensive system for collecting and processing accident data. The aim of this study was to develop a minimum data set (MDS) for an information management system to study traffic accidents in Iran. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed in 2014. Data were collected from the traffic police, trauma centers, medical emergency centers, and via the internet. The investigated resources for this study were forms, databases, and documents retrieved from the internet. Forms and databases were identical, and one sample of each was evaluated. The related internet-sourced data were evaluated in their entirety. Data were collected using three checklists. In order to arrive at a consensus about the data elements, the decision Delphi technique was applied using questionnaires. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaires were assessed by experts' opinions and the test-retest method, respectively. An (MDS) of a traffic accident information management system was assigned to three sections: a minimum data set for traffic police with six classes, including 118 data elements; a trauma center with five data classes, including 57 data elements; and a medical emergency center, with 11 classes, including 64 data elements. Planning for the prevention of traffic accidents requires standardized data. As the foundation for crash prevention efforts, existing standard data infrastructures present policymakers and government officials with a great opportunity to strengthen and integrate existing accident information systems to better track road traffic injuries and fatalities.

  7. RBMK-1500 accident management for loss of long-term core cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uspuras, E.; Kaliatka, A.

    2001-01-01

    Results of the Level 1 probabilistic safety assessment of the Ignalina NPP has shown that in topography of the risk, transients dominate above the accidents with LOCAs and failure of the core long-term cooling are the main factors to frequency of the core damage. Previous analyses have shown, that after initial event, as a rule, the reactivity control, as well as short-term and intermediate cooling are provided. However, the acceptance criteria of the long-term cooling are not always carried out. It means that from this point of view the most dangerous accident scenarios are the scenarios related to loss of the core long-term cooling. On the other hand, the transition to the core condition due to loss of the long-term cooling specifies potential opportunities for the management of the accident consequences. Hence, accident management for the mitigation of the accident consequences should be considered and developed. The most likely initiating event, which probably leads to the loss of long term cooling accident, is station blackout. The station blackout is the loss of normal electrical power supply for local needs with an additional failure on start-up of all diesel generators. In the case of loss of electrical power supply MCPs, the circulating pumps of the service water system and MFWPs are switched-off. At the same time, TCV of both turbines are closed. Failure of diesel generators leads to the non-operability of the ECCS long-term cooling subsystem. It means the impossibility to feed MCC by water. The analysis of the station blackout for Ignalina NPP was performed using RELAP5 code. (author)

  8. Nuclear waste management programme 2003 for the Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    A joint company Posiva Oy founded by nuclear energy producing Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) and Fortum Power and Heat Oy coordinates the research work of the companies on nuclear waste management in Finland. In Posiva's Nuclear Waste Management Programme 2003, an account of the nuclear waste management measures of TVO and Fortum is given as required by the sections 74 and 75 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. At first, nuclear waste management situation and the programme of activities are reported. The nuclear waste management research for the year 2003 and more generally for the years 2003-2007 is presented

  9. ''RESURS'' - The Russian scientific-technical programme for NPP equipment lifetime monitoring, estimation, prediction and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emelyanov, V.

    1994-01-01

    RESURS programme is described implementation of which will allow to work out regulatory-methodological basis providing legal and technical solution of NPP equipment lifetime management, prediction, monitoring and estimation problems

  10. Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziakova, M.

    1998-01-01

    Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes is described for the following job positions: reactor operator; turbine operator; reactor maintenance worker; pump maintenance worker; chemistry foreman; health physics foreman; electric maintenance worker

  11. Thyroid cancer in Belarus after Chernobyl: International thyroid project. International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident has demonstrated what was always known but perhaps has not been as fully acknowledged as it might, namely that national or other geographical boundaries are no defence against radioactive fallout. Much (some 2.2 millions) of the approximately 10 million population of Belarus have been, and are still being, exposed to the radiation resulting from the accident. The most obvious adverse effect of the radiation is on the condition of the thyroid system in children. Now, only just over eight years after the accident, we are experiencing an increase in childhood thyroid cancer which is particularly marked in those closest to the site of the accident. In young children thyroid cancer is an extremely rare condition and thus although at present the numbers of cases (more than 250 since the accident) is not large in absolute terms it is a sufficiently important development to capture the interest of the international medical and scientific community and to give rise to considerable apprehension as to the future development of the outbreak. Although this increase in thyroid cancer has not been definitively attributed to the Chernobyl accident, and indeed a major aim of this project is to elucidate the cause of the cancer, the fact of the exposure of the population of Belarus to the isotopes of iodine at the time of accident, and what we have learned from the experience in the Marshall Islands following the testing of the first hydrogen bomb on Bikini Atoll lead us to consider the accident as the most likely cause of the increase. Belarus is a relatively small and newly independent country. By any standards the Chernobyl accident was a technological disaster of enormous proportions causing damage to the environment over vast land areas. Necessarily it must be a major concern for us and an issue to be considered in the planning of our future. Its impact on the future health of our nation must be assessed as objectively and dispassionately as possible and

  12. Effects of a group-based reproductive management extension programme on key management outcomes affecting reproductive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlie, Tom S; Morton, John M; Heuer, Cord; McDougall, Scott

    2015-02-01

    A group-based reproductive management extension programme has been designed to help managers of dairy herds improve herd reproductive performance. The aims of this study were, firstly, to assess effects of participation by key decision makers (KDMs) in a farmer action group programme in 2009 and 2010 on six key management outcomes (KMOs) that affect reproductive performance over 2 years (2009-2010 and 2010-2011), and secondly, to describe KDM intentions to change management behaviour(s) affecting each management outcome after participation in the programme. Seasonal calving dairy herds from four regions of New Zealand were enrolled in the study. Intentions to modify management behaviour were recorded using the formal written action plans developed during the extension programme. KMOs assessed were calving pattern of the herd, pre-calving heifer liveweight, pre-calving and premating body condition score (BCS), oestrus detection, anoestrus cow management and bull management. Participation was associated with improvements in heifer liveweight, more heifers calving in the first 6 weeks of the seasonal calving period, premating BCS and oestrus detection. No significant effects were observed on anoestrus cow management or bull management. KDMs with greater numbers of proposed actions had lower 6 week in-calf rates in the second study year than KDMs who proposed fewer actions. A more effective strategy to ensure more appropriate objectives is proposed. Strategies to help KDMs to implement proposed actions more successfully should be investigated to improve the programme further. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Talent Management Programmes at British, American and Canadian Universities: Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boichenko, Maryna

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with the peculiarities of talent management programmes implementation at the top British, American and Canadian universities. The essence of the main concepts of research--talent and talent management--has been revealed. Talent management is referred to as the systematic attraction, identification, development, engagement,…

  14. Preparation of the National Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Programme in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralj, M.; Zeleznik, N.; Mele, I.; Veselic, M.

    2006-01-01

    The first separate National Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Programme (National Programme) was prepared in Slovenia in 2005, as a separate part of the National Environmental Action Programme that was adopted in June 2005. In the previous National Environmental Action Programme from the year 1999, the radioactive waste and spent fuel management was mentioned only briefly in the paragraph on radiation and nuclear safety with two main objectives: to provide an effective management of radioactive waste, and to keep the environmental ionising radiation under control. The new National Programme from 2005 includes all topics being relevant for the management of the radioactive waste and spent fuel, from the legislation and identification of different waste streams in Slovenia, to the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and management of (TE)NORM. It deals also with the relevant actors in the radioactive waste management, communication and information activities, and the financial aspects of the radioactive waste and spent fuel management. The National Programme was already adopted by the Slovenian Government in October 2005 and will go to Parliament proceedings. The Technical bases for the National Programme was prepared by ARAO and presented to the government in the beginning of 2005. The frames for this document were taken from relevant strategic documents: the Programme of decommissioning the nuclear power plant Krsko and the radioactive waste and spent fuel management, prepared in 2004 by Slovenian and Croatian experts (ARAO and APO), the Proposal of LILW Management Strategy (1999), the Strategy of Spent Fuel Management (1996), and the Resolution on the National Energy Programme (2004). ARAO made a detailed study on the amount and types of radioactive waste produced in Slovenia and future arising with emphasis on the minimization on radioactive waste production. It considered all producers of LILW and

  15. Construction safety: Can management prevent all accidents or are workers responsible for their own actions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotten, G.B.; Jenkins, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    The construction industry has struggled for many years with the answer to the question posed in the title: Can Management Prevent All Accidents or Are Workers Responsible for Their Own Actions? In the litigious society that we live, it has become more important to find someone open-quotes at faultclose quotes for an accident than it is to find out how we can prevent it from ever happening again. Most successful companies subscribe to the theme that open-quotes all accidents can be prevented.close quotes They institute training and qualification programs, safe performance incentives, and culture-change-driven directorates such as the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP); yet we still see construction accidents that result in lost time, and occasionally death, which is extremely costly in the shortsighted measure of money and, in real terms, impact to the worker''s family. Workers need to be properly trained in safety and health protection before they are assigned to a job that may expose them to safety and health hazards. A management committed to improving worker safety and health will bring about significant results in terms of financial savings, improved employee morale, enhanced communities, and increased production. But how can this happen, you say? Reduction in injury and lost workdays are the rewards. A decline in reduction of injuries and lost workdays results in lower workers'' compensation premiums and insurance rates. In 1991, United States workplace injuries and illnesses cost public and private sector employers an estimated $62 billion in workers'' compensation expenditures

  16. Effectiveness of an NGO primary health care programme in rural Bangladesh: evidence from the management information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Alec; Khan, Mobarak Hossain; Daulatuzzaman, Muhammad; Reid, Joanna

    2004-07-01

    This paper considers evidence of the effectiveness of a non-governmental organization (NGO) primary health care programme in rural Bangladesh. It is based on data from the programme's management information system reported by 27 partner NGOs from 1996-2002. The data indicate relatively high coverage has been achieved for reproductive and child health services, as well as lower infant and child mortality. On the basis of a crude indicator of socio-economic status, the programme is poverty-focused. There is good service coverage among the poorest one-third and others, and the infant and child mortality differential has been eliminated over recent years. A rapid decline in infant mortality among the poorest from 1999-2002 reflects a reduction in neonatal mortality of about 50%. Allowing for some under-reporting and possible misclassification of deaths to the stillbirths category, neonatal mortality is relatively low in the NGO areas. The lower child and maternal mortality for the NGO areas combined, compared with estimates for Bangladesh in recent years, may at least in part be due to high coverage of reproductive and child health services. Other development programmes implemented by many of the NGOs could also have contributed. Despite the limited resources available, and the lower infant and child mortality already achieved, there appears to be scope for further prevention of deaths, particularly those due to birth asphyxia, acute respiratory infection, diarrhoeal disease and accidents. Maternal mortality in the NGO areas was lower in 2000-02 than the most recent estimate for Bangladesh. Further reduction is likely to depend on improved access to qualified community midwives and essential obstetric care at government referral facilities.

  17. Managing "Spoiled Identities": Parents' Experiences of Compulsory Parenting Support Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    While recent years have seen a rapid growth of research exploring the usefulness of parenting support programmes, no empirical research to date has specifically explored experiences of compulsory parenting support. The present study examines the narrative accounts of 17 parents who, through a Parenting Order, were made to participate in such…

  18. Joint research project WASA-BOSS: Further development and application of severe accident codes. Assessment and optimization of accident management measures. Project B: Accident analyses for press