WorldWideScience

Sample records for access site bleeding

  1. Provocative Endoscopy to Identify Bleeding Site in Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Novel Approach in Transarterial Embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Minobu; Fuwa, Sokun; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yoshiyuki; Kurihara, Yasuyuki

    2016-07-01

    This report describes a novel approach to endoscopically induce bleeding by removing a clot from the bleeding site during angiography for upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage. This procedure enabled accurate identification of the bleeding site, allowing for successful targeted embolization despite a negative initial angiogram. Provocative endoscopy may be a feasible and useful option for angiography of obscure bleeding sites in patients with UGI arterial hemorrhage. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An Unusual Appearance of Meckel's Diverticulum as a Site of Bleed on Gastrointestinal Bleeding Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Madhuri Shimpi

    2013-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a frequently encountered and challenging clinical problem. GI bleeding scans are extremely useful for localizing the source of GI bleeding before interventional radiology procedures. It is essential that physicians understand the numerous possible pitfalls when interpreting these scans. Understanding the potential causes of false-positive scan interpretation eliminates unnecessary procedures for the patient and minimizes costs. We report a rare case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with GI bleeding. Upper and lower GI endoscopy did not reveal a source of bleeding. We emphasize case of Meckel's diverticulum appearing as a proximal jejunum false-positive site of bleed on bleeding scan. In addition, we reinforce the criteria needed for diagnosis of GI bleeding site on the nuclear bleeding scan. A high index of suspicion is the most important diagnostic aid that can prevent the nuclear medicine physicians from misdiagnosing the site of lower GI hemorrhage. PMID:25165421

  3. Overlooked problem of laparoscopic surgery: trocar site bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Oguzhan Dincel; Fatih Basak; Erdem Kinaci

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Trocar site bleeding is a complication which can be overlooked and prevented if pay attention. It can lead to unwanted problems during surgery if not noticed. In our study, we aimed to investigate the problem that can be seen in every laparoscopic surgery. Material and Methods: We reviewed the cases who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy in our clinic between September 2012 - September 2015. Patients with trocar site bleeding after surgery were enrolled into the study. Demogra...

  4. Overlooked problem of laparoscopic surgery: trocar site bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Dincel, Oğuzhan; Başak, Fatih; Kınacı, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Trocar site bleeding is a complication which can be overlooked and prevented if pay attention. It can lead to unwanted problems during surgery if not noticed. In our study, we aimed to investigate the problem that can be seen in every laparoscopic surgery.Material and Methods: We reviewed the cases who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy in our clinic between September 2012 - September 2015. Patients with trocar site bleeding after surgery were enrolled into the study. Demographic...

  5. Overlooked problem of laparoscopic surgery: trocar site bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguzhan Dincel

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Trocar site bleeding can be prevented by application of appropriate methods. In particular, special care should be taken when inserting and removing the trocars during the operation. During the entry of secondary trocars it should be accompanied by trans-illumination and at the end of the operation trocars should be removed from their places under direct vision. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 767-770

  6. Ultrasonographic visualization of bleeding sites can help control postpartum hemorrhage using intrauterine balloon tamponade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoh, Eiji; Konishi, Mitsunaga; Kariya, Yoshitaka; Konishi, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Identification of precise bleeding sites is generally important to control hemorrhage. Nevertheless, the optimal technique to detect the bleeding sites has not yet been fully defined for patients with life-threatening post partum hemorrhage. We describe that ultrasonographic visualization of bleeding sites can help control post partum hemorrhage using intrauterine balloon tamponade. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Impact of Arterial Access Site on Outcomes After Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamon, Martial; Coste, Pierre; Van't Hof, Arnoud

    2015-01-01

    ratio, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.27-0.74; P=0.002). CONCLUSIONS: In this prespecified analysis from EUROMAX, radial access was preferred in lower risk patients and did not improve clinical outcomes. Bivalirudin was associated with less bleeding irrespective of access site. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http...

  8. Access site complications and puncture site pain following transradial coronary procedures: a correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ka Yan; Chair, Sek Ying; Choi, Kai Chow

    2013-10-01

    Transradial coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are gaining worldwide popularity due to the low incidence of major vascular complications and early mobilization of patients post procedures. Although post transradial access site complications are generally considered as minor in nature, they are not being routinely recorded in clinical settings. To evaluate the incidence of access site complications and level of puncture site pain experienced by patients undergoing transradial coronary procedures and to examine factors associated with access site complications occurrence and puncture site pain severity. A cross-sectional correlational study of 85 Chinese speaking adult patients scheduled for elective transradial CA and or PCI. Ecchymosis, bleeding, hematoma and radial artery occlusion (RAO) were assessed through observation, palpation and plethysmographic signal of pulse oximetry after coronary procedures. Puncture site pain was assessed with a 100mm Visual Analogue Scale. Factors that were related to access site complications and puncture site pain were obtained from medical records. Ecchymosis was the most commonly reported transradial access site complication in this study. Paired t-test showed that the level of puncture site pain at 24 h was significantly (pstudy findings suggest that common access site complications post transradial coronary procedures among Chinese population are relatively minor in nature. Individual puncture site pain assessment during the period of hemostasis is important. Nurses should pay more attention to factors such as female gender, sheath time and volume of compression that are more likely to be associated with transradial access site complications and puncture site pain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Water Access Sites in Minnesota

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data shows the approximate locations of boat accesses in the state. This is not a comprehensive list but one that was generated through a cooperative effort....

  10. Bleeding Time, Volume of Shed Blood Collected at the Bleeding Time Site, and the Peripheral Venous Hematocrit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    The bleeding time. Prog in Hemostasis and Thrombosis, NY, Grune-Stratton 2:249-271,1974. 2. The bleeding time. The Lancet 1991;337:1447-1448. 3...aggregation. The Lancet 1984;1409-1410. 29. The bleeding-time and the haematocrit. The Lancet May 4; 1984;997-998. 30. Turrito VT,Weiss HJ: Red blood

  11. A Web Site to Improve Management of Patients with Inherited Bleeding Disorders in the Emergency Department: Results at 2 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliaferri, Annarita; Di Perna, Caterina; Biasoli, Chiara; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Quintavalle, Gabriele; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Barozzi, Marco; Benedettini, Laura; Pattacini, Corrado

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of patients with inherited bleeding disorders (PWIBD) in the emergency department (ED) is challenging. In 2010, a project was started involving all eight hemophilia centers (HC) and all 44 EDs of the Region of Emilia-Romagna (Italy) to improve emergency care for PWIBD. The project incorporates guidelines for emergency treatment, education for ED staff, and a dedicated Web site providing extensive information, proposing treatments, and sharing data with patients' electronic clinical records. A Web algorithm, accessible to PWIBD as well as ED and HC staff, suggests the first dose of concentrate for each type and severity of bleed or trauma. Following training courses in each ED, the network was activated. During 2012 and 2013, the site was visited 14,000 times, the EDs accessed the Web site 1,739 times, and used the algorithms 206 times. In two reference EDs, triage-assessment and triage-treatment times were reduced in 2013 and 2012 (27/20 and 110/71.5 minutes, respectively) and medical advice from the HC increased (54 vs. 24% cases). The main advantages of this system are better management of patients in ED (shorter triage-to-treatment times) and improved collaboration between HCs and EDs. The most critical point remaining is staff turnover in EDs, necessitating continual training.

  12. Minnesota Walk-In Access Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Minnesota Walk-In Access site (WIA) GIS data represents areas of private land that have been made open to the public for the purpose of walk-in (foot travel)...

  13. Access to Space Interactive Design Web Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, John; Cutlip, William; Hametz, Mark

    2000-01-01

    The Access To Space (ATS) Group at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) supports the science and technology community at GSFC by facilitating frequent and affordable opportunities for access to space. Through partnerships established with access mode suppliers, the ATS Group has developed an interactive Mission Design web site. The ATS web site provides both the information and the tools necessary to assist mission planners in selecting and planning their ride to space. This includes the evaluation of single payloads vs. ride-sharing opportunities to reduce the cost of access to space. Features of this site include the following: (1) Mission Database. Our mission database contains a listing of missions ranging from proposed missions to manifested. Missions can be entered by our user community through data input tools. Data is then accessed by users through various search engines: orbit parameters, ride-share opportunities, spacecraft parameters, other mission notes, launch vehicle, and contact information. (2) Launch Vehicle Toolboxes. The launch vehicle toolboxes provide the user a full range of information on vehicle classes and individual configurations. Topics include: general information, environments, performance, payload interface, available volume, and launch sites.

  14. Vascular Complications and Bleeding After Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Performed Through Open Surgical Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Florence; Akodad, Mariama; Macia, Jean-Christophe; Gandet, Thomas; Lattuca, Benoit; Schmutz, Laurent; Gervasoni, Richard; Nogue, Erika; Nagot, Nicolas; Levy, Gilles; Maupas, Eric; Robert, Gabriel; Targosz, Frederic; Vernhet, Hélène; Cayla, Guillaume; Albat, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Major vascular complications (VC) remain frequent after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and may be associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the rate of VC after transfemoral TAVI performed using an exclusive open surgical access strategy. From 2010 to 2014, we included in a monocentric registry all consecutive patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI. The procedures were performed with 16Fr to 20Fr sheath systems. VC were evaluated within 30 days and classified as major or minor according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definition. The study included 396 patients, 218 were women (55%), median age was 85 years (81 to 88), and the median logistic Euroscore was 15.2% (11 to 23). The balloon-expandable SAPIEN XT and the self-expandable Medtronic Core Valve prosthesis were used in 288 (72.7%) and 108 patients (27.3%), respectively. The total length of the procedure was 68 ± 15 minutes including 13 ± 5 minutes for the open surgical access. Major and minor VC were observed in 9 (2.3%) and 16 patients (4%), respectively, whereas life-threatening and major bleeding concerned 18 patients (4.6%). The median duration of hospitalization was 5 days (interquartile range 2 to 7), significantly higher in patients with VC (7 days [5 to 15], p strategy, with a particular advantage observed in high-risk bleeding patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Entrance C - Meyrin site: new access conditions

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Entrance C on the Meyrin site, which drivers of motorised vehicles can use Mondays to Fridays from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. and from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., has been altered to include a turnstile to allow cyclists and pedestrians to use their access card to get in and out of the site from 6 a.m. until 10 p.m.   The following video illustrates how to use the new turnstile: A new type of entrance gate fitted with a number plate reader similar to that installed at the entrance to the Prévessin site should, once fully tested, allow drivers of motorised vehicles to access the site. For the time being, the conditions of use of Entrance C remain unchanged. Further information on the entry into force of new arrangements will be issued in due course. For further information about CERN entrances: CERN opening hours CERN control access GS Department

  16. Torrential upper gastrointestinal bleeding from ‘downhill’ oesophageal varices complicating long term central venous access for total parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eu Jin; Stella, Damien L; Russell, David M

    2010-01-01

    Oesophageal varices usually develop in the setting of portal hypertension secondary to chronic liver disease. However, superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction can result in ‘downhill’ varices forming in the upper oesophagus. A case of torrential upper gastrointestinal bleeding from SVC obstruction due to chronic central venous access for home total parenteral nutrition is described. It is suggested that in patients presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding in the setting of SVC obstruction, ‘downhill’ varices should be suspected. The current literature is discussed regarding management of such varices. It is recommended that endoscopic variceal surveillance be carried out in patients with known SVC obstruction. PMID:28839559

  17. Novel Use of a Pneumatic Compression Device for Haemostasis of Haemodialysis Fistula Access Catheterisation Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Michael K; Ryan, David; Sugrue, Gavin; Geoghegan, Tony; Lawler, Leo P; Farrelly, Cormac T

    2016-12-01

    Transradial pneumatic compression devices can be used to achieve haemostasis following radial artery puncture. This article describes a novel technique for acquiring haemostasis of arterio-venous haemodialysis fistula access sites without the need for suture placement using one such compression device. A retrospective review of fistulograms with or without angioplasty/thrombectomy in a single institution was performed. 20 procedures performed on 12 patients who underwent percutaneous intervention of failing or thrombosed arterio-venous fistulas (AVF) had 27 puncture sites. Haemostasis was achieved using a pneumatic compression device at all access sites. Procedure details including size of access sheath, heparin administration and complications were recorded. Two diagnostic fistulograms, 14 fistulograms and angioplasties and four thrombectomies were performed via access sheaths with an average size (±SD) of 6 Fr (±1.12). IV unfractionated heparin was administered in 11 of 20 procedures. Haemostasis was achieved in 26 of 27 access sites following 15-20 min of compression using the pneumatic compression device. One case experienced limited bleeding from an inflow access site that was successfully treated with reinflation of the device for a further 5 min. No other complication was recorded. Haemostasis of arterio-venous haemodialysis fistula access sites can be safely and effectively achieved using a pneumatic compression device. This is a technically simple, safe and sutureless technique for acquiring haemostasis after AVF intervention.

  18. "Fine Tuning" image accessibility for museum Web sites

    OpenAIRE

    Leporini, Barbara; Norscia, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Accessibility and usability guidelines are available to design web sites accessible to blind users. However, the actual usability of accessible web pages varies depending on the type of information the user is dealing with. Museum web sites, including specimens and hall descriptions, need specific requirements to allow vision-impaired users, who navigate using a screen-reader, to access pieces of information that are mainly based on visual perception. Here we address a methodology to be appli...

  19. Evaluation of /sup 99m/Tc labeled red blood cell scintigraphy for the detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markisz, J.A.; Front, D.; Royal, H.D.; Sacks, B.; Parker, J.A.; Kolodny, G.M.

    1982-08-01

    /sup 99m/Tc labeled red blood cell scintigraphy was performed upon 39 patients with clinical evidence for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding from an unknown source. Seventeen of 39 patients (44%) had a scan became positive 6 or more h after injection, consistent with intermittent bleeding, in 8 of 17 patients (47%). In the 11 patients in whom the bleeding site was definitely identified by arteriography, surgery, or colonoscopy, scintigraphy correctly localized the bleeding site in 10 of 11 patients (91%). Four of 11 patients (36%) had an active bleeding site identified by arteriography. Ten of 17 patients (58%) with a positive scan required either gelfoam embolization (4 patients) or surgery (6 patients) to control the bleeding, whereas only 1 of 22 patients (5%) required surgery when the scan was negative. Six deaths occurred in the scan-positive patients compared with no deaths in the scan-negative patients. None of the 8 patients who had arteriography and no active bleeding site by scintigraphy had arteriographically demonstrable active bleeding. Scintigraphy provides a reliable noninvasive test to screen patients in whom arteriography is being considered to localize active bleeding sites. If the arteriogram is negative, the scintigraphic findings alone may guide the surgical or arteriographic intervention. In addition, scintigraphy identifies two patient populations which have considerably different morbidity and mortality.

  20. Risk factors for major bleeding in the SEATTLE II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Immad; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Liu, Ping-Yu; Piazza, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis minimizes the risk of intracranial bleeding compared with systemic full-dose fibrinolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism (PE). However, major bleeding is nevertheless a potential complication. We analyzed the 150-patient SEATTLE II trial of submassive and massive PE patients to describe those who suffered major bleeding events following ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis and to identify risk factors for bleeding. Major bleeding was defined as GUSTO severe/life-threatening or moderate bleeds within 72 hours of initiation of the procedure. Of the 15 patients with major bleeding, four (26.6%) developed access site-related bleeding. Multiple venous access attempts were more frequent in the major bleeding group (27.6% vs 3.6%; p<0.001). All patients with major bleeding had femoral vein access for device delivery. Patients who developed major bleeding had a longer intensive care stay (6.8 days vs 4.7 days; p=0.004) and longer hospital stay (12.9 days vs 8.4 days; p=0.004). The frequency of inferior vena cava filter placement was 40% in patients with major bleeding compared with 13% in those without major bleeding ( p=0.02). Massive PE (adjusted odds ratio 3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.01-12.9; p=0.049) and multiple venous access attempts (adjusted odds ratio 10.09; 95% confidence interval 1.98-51.46; p=0.005) were independently associated with an increased risk of major bleeding. In conclusion, strategies for improving venous access should be implemented to reduce the risk of major bleeding associated with ultrasound-facilitated, catheter-directed, low-dose fibrinolysis. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01513759; EKOS Corporation 10.13039/100006522.

  1. Web Accessibility in Romania: The Conformance of Municipal Web Sites to Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costin PRIBEANU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The accessibility of public administration web sites is a key quality attribute for the successful implementation of the Information Society. The purpose of this paper is to present a second review of municipal web sites in Romania that is based on automated accessibility checking. A number of 60 web sites were evaluated against WCAG 2.0 recommendations. The analysis of results reveals a relatively low web accessibility of municipal web sites and highlights several aspects. Firstly, a slight progress in web accessibility was noticed as regarded the sample evaluated in 2010. Secondly, the number of specific accessibility errors is varying across the web sites and the accessibility is not preserved in time. Thirdly, these variations suggest that an accessibility check before launching a new release for a web page is not a common practice.

  2. Volcano-like intermittent bleeding activity for seven years from an arterio-enteric fistula on a kidney graft site after pancreas-kidney transplantation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schölmerich Jürgen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report the first case of a patient who underwent simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplantation and who then suffered from repeated episodes of severe gastrointestinal bleeding over a period of seven years. Locating the site of gastrointestinal bleeding is a challenging task. This case illustrates that detection of an arterio-enteric fistula can be very difficult, especially in technically-challenging situations such as cases of severe intra-abdominal adhesions. It is important to consider the possibility of arterio-enteric fistulas in cases of intermittent bleeding episodes, especially in transplant patients. Case presentation A 40-year-old Caucasian man received a combined pancreas-kidney transplantation as a result of complications from diabetes mellitus type I. Thereafter, he suffered from intermittent clinically-relevant episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding. Repeat endoscopic, surgical, scintigraphic, and angiographic investigations during his episodes of acute bleeding could not locate the bleeding site. He finally died in hemorrhagic shock due to arterio-enteric bleeding at the kidney graft site, which was diagnosed post-mortem. Conclusions In accordance with the literature, we suggest considering the removal of any rejected transplant organs in situations where arterio-enteric fistulas seem likely but cannot be excluded by repeat conventional or computed tomography-angiographic methods. Arterio-enteric fistulas may intermittently bleed over many years.

  3. 66 Accessibility Constraints of Patronage of Tourist Sites in Ondo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Choice-Academy

    of its negative impact on the economic potential derivable from these facilities. Of particularly interest is the accessibility constraint to tourist sites in Nigeria which has been identified to limit the .... common sense of identity within a community.

  4. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sigmoidoscopy Alternative Names Lower GI bleeding; GI bleeding; Upper GI bleeding; Hematochezia Images GI bleeding - series Fecal occult blood test References Kovacs TO, Jensen DM. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  5. Influence of Access, Anticoagulant, and Bleeding Definition on Outcomes of Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Early Experience of an US Academic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bheemarasetti, M K; Shawar, S; Chithri, S; Khalife, W I; Rangasetty, U M; Fujise, K; Gilani, S A

    2015-03-01

    Background We aimed to carry out comparison of different bleeding avoidance strategies in doing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) using either radial or femoral as access of choice and either bivalirudin or unfractionated heparin as anticoagulant of choice. In this analysis, we analyzed the influence of major bleeding definition on bleeding outcomes as well. Methods We did a retrospective analysis of 139 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who had PPCI in our academic center from January 2010 till October 2013. The primary outcome at 30 days was a composite of death from any cause or stent thrombosis or non-coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) related major bleeding (CathPCI Registry definition) and secondary outcomes were individual components of primary outcome and the hospital length of stay. Results There was no significant difference among different access/anticoagulant combinations with regards to primary outcome (22% in radial/bivalirudin vs. 5% in radial/heparin vs. 17% in femoral/bivalirudin vs. 28% in femoral/heparin group; p = 0.2) as well as its individual components except the hospital length of stay (2.56 vs. 3 vs. 3.97 vs. 4.4 days each; p definition, it went up to 25 % due to one particular component (p definition on bleeding outcomes.

  6. Checklists Application Accessibility and Usability for Redesign of Site Accessible for the Elderly users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Lesinhovski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the evaluation of the accessibility and usability of four sites with information and services for the elderly user. With the results, the site with the lowest score was selected and underwent a process of Redesign in order to improve their accessibility. In this study the methodology used the ergonomic approach and the use of Design in phases. For this, adopted action research, which stands out for its characteristic of knowing and acting, and then study the results. Participated in this study 21 elderly users voluntarily reviewed the four selected sites, helped in some stages of prototype development and its assessment of accessibility. Among the results, after the Redesign process of prototype and evaluation, it became clear that there was a gain in accessibility and usability over the original version of the site. Fact verified through the application of two Checklists, specific to review sites and for its assessment of accessibility and usability held with the participants of the study elderly. Keywords: Elderly; Redesign; Accessibility; Usability.

  7. Vaginal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menstruation, or period, is a woman's monthly bleeding.Abnormal vaginal bleeding is different from normal menstrual periods. It could be bleeding that is between periods, is very heavy, or lasts much ...

  8. Efficacy of plain radiography and computer tomography in localizing the site of pelvic arterial bleeding in trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormagen, Johann B. (Dept. of Radiology, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway)), e-mail: johannd@medisin.uio.no; Toetterman, Anna (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Uppsala Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)); Roeise, Olav (Div. of Neuroscience and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway)); Sandvik, Leiv (Center for Clinical Research, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway)); Kloew, Nils-E. (Dept. of Cardiovascular Radiology, Oslo Univ. Hospital - Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway))

    2010-01-15

    Background: Immediate angiography is warranted in pelvic trauma patients with suspected arterial injury (AI) in order to stop ongoing bleeding. Prior to angiography, plain pelvic radiography (PPR) and abdominopelvic computer tomography (CT) are performed to identify fracture and hematoma sites. Purpose: To investigate if PPR and CT can identify the location of AI in trauma patients undergoing angiography. Material and Methods: 95 patients with pelvic fractures on PPR (29 women, 66 men), at a mean age of 44 (9-92) years, underwent pelvic angiography for suspected AI. Fifty-six of them underwent CT additionally. Right and left anterior and posterior fractures on PPR were registered, and fracture displacement was recorded for each quadrant. Arterial blush on CT was registered, and the size of the hematoma in each region was measured in cm2. AIs were registered for anterior and posterior segments of both internal iliac arteries. Presence of fractures, arterial blush, and hematomas were correlated with AI. Results: Presence of fracture in the corresponding skeletal segment on PPR showed sensitivity and specificity of 0.86 and 0.58 posteriorly, and 0.87 and 0.44 anteriorly. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.77 and 0.69, respectively. Fracture displacement on PPR >0.9 cm posteriorly and >1.9 cm anteriorly revealed specificity of 0.84. Sensitivities of arterial blush and hematoma on CT were 0.38 and 0.82 posteriorly, and 0.24 and 0.82 anteriorly. The specificities were 0.96 and 0.58 posteriorly, and 0.79 and 0.53 anteriorly, respectively. For hematomas, the AUC was 0.79 posteriorly and 0.75 anteriorly. Size of hematoma >22 cm2 posteriorly and >29 cm2 anteriorly revealed specificity of 0.85 and 0.86, respectively. Conclusion: CT findings of arterial blush and hematoma predicted site of arterial bleeding on pelvic angiography. Also, PPR predicted the site of bleeding using location of fracture and size of displacement. In the hemodynamically unstable patient, PPR may

  9. Prognostic Significance of Bleeding Location and Severity Among Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavalle, John P.; Clare, Robert; Chiswell, Karen; Rao, Sunil V.; Petersen, John L.; Kleiman, Neal S.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Wang, Tracy Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine if there is an association between bleed location and clinical outcomes in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) patients. Background The prognostic significance of bleeding location among ACS patients undergoing cardiac catheterization is not well known. Methods We analyzed in-hospital bleeding events among 9,978 patients randomized in the SYNERGY (Superior Yield of the New Strategy of Enoxaparin, Revascularization, and Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa Inhibitors) study. Bleeding events were categorized by location as access site, systemic, surgical, or superficial, and severity was graded using the GUSTO (Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries) definition. We assessed the association of each bleeding location and severity with 6-month risk of death or myocardial infarction using a multicovariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazard model. Results A total of 4,900 bleeding events were identified among 3,694 ACS patients with in-hospital bleeding. Among 4,679 GUSTO mild/moderate bleeding events, only surgical and systemic bleeds were associated with an increased risk of 6-month death or myocardial infarction (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 2.52 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.16 to 2.94, and 1.40 [95% CI: 1.16 to 1.69], respectively). Mild/moderate superficial and access-site bleeds were not associated with downstream risk (adjusted HR: 1.17 [95% CI: 0.97 to 1.40], and 0.96 [95% CI: 0.82 to 1.12], respectively). Among 221 GUSTO severe bleeds, surgical bleeds were associated with the highest risk (HR: 5.27 [95% CI: 3.80 to 7.29]), followed by systemic (HR: 4.48 [95% CI: 2.98 to 6.72]), and finally access-site bleeds (HR: 3.57 [95% CI: 2.35 to 5.40]). Conclusions Among ACS patients who develop in-hospital bleeding, systemic and surgical bleeding are associated with the highest risks of adverse outcomes regardless of bleeding severity. Although the most frequent among bleeds, GUSTO mild/moderate access-site bleeding is not

  10. Bleeding management of special sites for hemophilia patients%血友病特定出血部位的治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴润晖

    2013-01-01

    As one of congenital bleeding diseases,the bleeding is the most important manifestation in hemophilia patients.The most common bleeding sites are joints and muscles,the most life-threatening bleedings are intracranial hemorrhage and gastrointestinal hemorrhage,and some special sites (like eye,throat) are also very important.The correct identification and appropriate management for the bleeding episode are the most important issues for the reduction of modality and morbidity and the improvement of their life quality improvement.In this review,we will discuss the management of several special sites in hemophilia patients.%血友病作为先天遗传性出血性疾病,出血为其主要表现.最常见的出血部位为关节、肌肉.颅内出血、消化道出血将危及生命,而特殊部位(如眼部、咽喉部等)出血也十分重要.对血友病患儿出血的正确识别和恰当治疗至关重要,将减少致死致残,提高患儿生活质量.本文介绍血友病患儿的几个特定部位的出血治疗.

  11. Feasibility of iodine-125 labeled anti-human hemoglobin antibody in the detection of bleeding sites from the large bowel-A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, G.L.M.; Abe, Yoshinao; Saito, Hiroshi [Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine; Nakamura, Kayoko

    2001-07-01

    A monoclonal anti-human hemoglobin antibody that cross-reacts with mouse hemoglobin was labeled with Iodine-125 through the Chloramine-T method. The labeled antibody was used in an attempt to recognize bleeding sites from the large bowel in a mouse model, through a non-invasive enema-like study. In vitro experiments after double column chromatography of the labeled antibody and 10% trichloroacetic acid conjugation revealed that about 80% of the radioactivity was incorporated into protein. Inhibition assay containing could (non-radiolabeled) antibody showed that Iodine-125 radiolabeled antibody preserved its immunoreactivity. Autoradiographs exquisitely demonstrated accumulation of isotope in the corresponding intestinal bleeding areas. These findings suggest that this method can be useful for scintigraphic localization of bleeding sites in the large bowel. (author)

  12. Short- and midterm results of the fascia suture technique for closure of femoral artery access sites after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montán, Carl; Lehti, Leena; Holst, Jan; Björses, Katarina; Resch, Timothy A

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the midterm outcomes and potential risk factors associated with the fascia suture technique (FST) for closure of femoral artery access sites after percutaneous endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Between April 2007 and April 2008, 100 consecutive EVAR cases were evaluated retrospectively. A third of the procedures were emergent (16 ruptured aneurysms). Of the 187 femoral access sites, 160 (85.5%) were closed by the FST as a first choice. Pre- and postoperative chart and imaging data were collected from computerized medical records for analysis of demographics and the rate of complications (bleeding, infection, thrombosis, pseudoaneurysms, and stenosis). Preoperative risk factors for FST failure were analyzed with regard to obesity (based on the subcutaneous fat layer), plaque at the femoral access site, and stenosis based on the pre- and 1-year postoperative computed tomography scans. Of the 160 FST closures, 146 (91.3%) were technically successful. The 14 (8.8%) technical failures were converted to open cutdown intraoperatively because of bleeding (11, 6.8%), inadequate limb perfusion (2, 1.2%), and a broken guidewire (1, 0.6%). Two (1.2%) pseudoaneurysms required surgical repair after 2 weeks. Data from the 1-year follow-up showed no signs of increased stenosis, thrombosis, or formation of plaque. Nine small (<1 cm(3)) pseudoaneurysms were detected and managed conservatively. No preoperative risk factors were associated with FST failure. The fascia suture technique seems to be safe, effective, and simple to use for closing percutaneous access sites after EVAR. Complications are rare, and the outcome is not affected by obesity, femoral calcification, or femoral artery stenosis.

  13. Development and Validation of a Preprocedural Risk Score to Predict Access Site Complications After Peripheral Vascular Interventions Based on the Vascular Quality Initiative Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Access site complications following peripheral vascular intervention (PVI are associated with prolonged hospitalization and increased mortality. Prediction of access site complication risk may optimize PVI care; however, there is no tool designed for this. We aimed to create a clinical scoring tool to stratify patients according to their risk of developing access site complications after PVI. Methods: The Society for Vascular Surgery’s Vascular Quality Initiative database yielded 27,997 patients who had undergone PVI at 131 North American centers. Clinically and statistically significant preprocedural risk factors associated with in-hospital, post-PVI access site complications were included in a multivariate logistic regression model, with access site complications as the outcome variable. A predictive model was developed with a random sample of 19,683 (70% PVI procedures and validated in 8,314 (30%. Results: Access site complications occurred in 939 (3.4% patients. The risk tool predictors are female gender, age > 70 years, white race, bedridden ambulatory status, insulin-treated diabetes mellitus, prior minor amputation, procedural indication of claudication, and nonfemoral arterial access site (model c-statistic = 0.638. Of these predictors, insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and prior minor amputation were protective of access site complications. The discriminatory power of the risk model was confirmed by the validation dataset (c-statistic = 0.6139. Higher risk scores correlated with increased frequency of access site complications: 1.9% for low risk, 3.4% for moderate risk and 5.1% for high risk. Conclusions: The proposed clinical risk score based on eight preprocedural characteristics is a tool to stratify patients at risk for post-PVI access site complications. The risk score may assist physicians in identifying patients at risk for access site complications and selection of patients who may benefit from bleeding avoidance

  14. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  15. Bleeding disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can occur when certain factors are low or missing. Bleeding problems can range from mild to severe. Some bleeding disorders are present at birth and are passed through families (inherited). Others develop from: Illnesses such as vitamin ...

  16. Bleeding gums

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... periodontal exam. DO NOT use tobacco, since it makes bleeding gums worse. Control gum bleeding by applying pressure directly on the gums with a gauze pad soaked in ice water. If you have been diagnosed with a ...

  17. Internal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Paralyzed Monkeys Additional Content Medical News Internal Bleeding By Amy H. Kaji, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, ... Emergency First Aid Priorities Cardiac Arrest Choking Internal Bleeding Wounds Soft-Tissue Injuries Severed or Constricted Limbs ...

  18. Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients About ACOG Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Home For Patients Search FAQs Perimenopausal Bleeding and ... 2011 PDF Format Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Gynecologic Problems What are menopause and perimenopause? What ...

  19. Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients About ACOG Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Home For Patients Search FAQs Perimenopausal Bleeding and ... 2011 PDF Format Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Gynecologic Problems What are menopause and perimenopause? What ...

  20. Single-port access laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection through the colostomy site: a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Morten; Bulut, O

    2012-01-01

    of the operation was performed with a SILS port inserted through the marked colostomy site, and the specimen was removed through the perineum after intersphincteric dissection. Operating time was 317 min. Bleeding was negligible. The specimen measured 26 cm in length. Thirteen lymph nodes were found, 2...

  1. Gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, T A

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains one of the most important emergencies in gastroenterology. Despite this, only about 100 abstracts concerning gastrointestinal bleeding (excluding bleeding complicating endoscopic procedures) were presented at this year's Digestive Disease Week (DDW; 7-10 May 2011; Chicago, Illinois, USA), accounting for less than 2% of all presented lectures and posters. It seems that the number of such abstracts has been decreasing over recent years. This may be due in part to the high level of medical care already achieved, especially in the areas of pharmacotherapy and endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review of gastrointestinal bleeding, priority has been given to large epidemiological studies reflecting "real life," and abstracts dealing more or less directly with endoscopic management. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. 40 CFR 1400.5 - Internet access to certain off-site consequence analysis data elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Internet access to certain off-site... DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Public Access § 1400.5 Internet access to certain off... elements in the risk management plan database available on the Internet: (a) The concentration of...

  3. Precision medicine to improve use of bleeding avoidance strategies and reduce bleeding in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: prospective cohort study before and after implementation of personalized bleeding risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spertus, John A; Decker, Carole; Gialde, Elizabeth; Jones, Philip G; McNulty, Edward J; Bach, Richard; Chhatriwalla, Adnan K

    2015-03-24

    To examine whether prospective bleeding risk estimates for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention could improve the use of bleeding avoidance strategies and reduce bleeding. Prospective cohort study comparing the use of bleeding avoidance strategies and bleeding rates before and after implementation of prospective risk stratification for peri-procedural bleeding. Nine hospitals in the United States. All patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for indications other than primary reperfusion for ST elevation myocardial infarction. Use of bleeding avoidance strategies, including bivalirudin, radial approach, and vascular closure devices, and peri-procedural bleeding rates, stratified by bleeding risk. Observed changes were adjusted for changes observed in a pool of 1135 hospitals without access to pre-procedural risk stratification. Hospital level and physician level variability in use of bleeding avoidance strategies was examined. In a comparison of 7408 pre-intervention procedures with 3529 post-intervention procedures, use of bleeding avoidance strategies within intervention sites increased with pre-procedural risk stratification (odds ratio 1.81, 95% confidence interval 1.44 to 2.27), particularly among higher risk patients (2.03, 1.58 to 2.61; 1.41, 1.09 to 1.83 in low risk patients, after adjustment for control sites; P for interaction = 0.05). Bleeding rates within intervention sites were significantly lower after implementation of risk stratification (1.0% v 1.7%; odds ratio 0.56, 0.40 to 0.78; 0.62, 0.44 to 0.87, after adjustment); the reduction in bleeding was greatest in high risk patients. Marked variability in use of bleeding avoidance strategies was observed across sites and physicians, both before and after implementation. Prospective provision of individualized bleeding risk estimates was associated with increased use of bleeding avoidance strategies and lower bleeding rates. Marked variability between providers highlights

  4. Management of postoperative arterial hemorrhage after pancreato-biliary surgery according to the site of bleeding: re-laparotomy or interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Fumihiko; Asano, Takehide; Amano, Hodaka; Yoshida, Masahiro; Toyota, Naoyuki; Wada, Keita; Kato, Kenichiro; Yamazaki, Eriko; Kadowaki, Susumu; Shibuya, Makoto; Maeno, Sawako; Furui, Shigeru; Takeshita, Koji; Kotake, Yutaka; Takada, Tadahiro

    2009-01-01

    Intra-abdominal arterial hemorrhage is still one of the most serious complications after pancreato-biliary surgery. We retrospectively analyzed our experiences with 15 patients in order to establish a therapeutic strategy for postoperative arterial hemorrhage following pancreato-biliary surgery. Between August 1981 and November 2007, 15 patients developed massive intra-abdominal arterial bleeding after pancreato-biliary surgery. The initial surgery of these 15 patients were pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD) (7 patients), hemihepatectomy and caudate lobectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection or PPPD (4 patients), Whipple's pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) (3 patients), and total pancreatectomy (1 patient). Twelve patients were managed by transcatheter arterial embolization and three patients underwent re-laparotomy. Patients were divided into two groups according to the site of bleeding: SMA group, superior mesenteric artery (4 patients); HA group, stump of gastroduodenal artery, right hepatic artery, common hepatic artery, or proper hepatic artery (11 patients). In the SMA group, re-laparotomy and coil embolization for pseudoaneurysm were performed in three and one patients, respectively, but none of the patients survived. In the HA group, all 11 patients were managed by transcatheter arterial embolization. None of four patients who had major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection survived. Six of seven patients (85.7%) who had pancreatectomy survived, although hepatic infarction occurred in four. Management of postoperative arterial hemorrhage after pancreato-biliary surgery should be done according to the site of bleeding and the initial operative procedure. Careful consideration is required for indication of interventional radiology for bleeding from SMA after pancreatectomy and hepatic artery after major hepatectomy with bilioenteric anastomosis.

  5. Ultrasound-guided Femoral Artery Access for Minimally Invasive Neuro-intervention and Risk Factors for Access Site Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    KURISU, Kota; OSANAI, Toshiya; KAZUMATA, Ken; NAKAYAMA, Naoki; ABUMIYA, Takeo; SHICHINOHE, Hideo; SHIMODA, Yusuke; HOUKIN, Kiyohiro

    2016-01-01

    Although ultrasound (US) guidance for venous access is becoming the “standard of care” for preventing access site complications, its feasibility for arterial access has not been fully investigated, especially in the neuro-interventional population. We conducted the first prospective cohort study on US-guided femoral artery access during neuro-interventional procedure. This study included 64 consecutive patients who underwent US-guided femoral artery access through 66 arterial access sites for diagnostic and/or neuro-interventional purposes. The number of attempts required for both the sheath insertion and the success of anterior wall puncture were recorded. In addition, the occurrence of major complications and hematoma formation on the arterial access site examined by US were statistically analyzed. The median number of attempts was 1 (1–2) and first-pass success rate was 63.6%. Anterior wall puncture was achieved in 98.5%. In one case (1.5%), a pseudoaneurysm was observed. In all cases, US clearly depicted a common femoral artery (CFA) and its bifurcation. Post-procedural hematoma was detected in 13 cases (19.7%), most of which were “tiny” or “moderate” in size. Low body mass index and antiplatelet therapy were the independent risk factors for access site hematoma. The US-guided CFA access was feasible even in neuro-interventional procedure. The method was particularly helpful in the patients with un-palpable pulsation of femoral arteries. To prevent arterial access site hematoma, special care should be taken in patients with low body mass index and who are on antiplatelet therapy. PMID:27194178

  6. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: preoperative CT-guided percutaneous needle localization of the bleeding small bowel segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Peter; Feuerbach, Stefan; Iesalnieks, Igors; Rockmann, Felix; Wrede, Christian E; Zorger, Niels; Schlitt, Hans J; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Hamer, Okka W

    2009-04-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Double balloon enteroscopy, angiography, and surgery including intraoperative enteroscopy failed to identify the bleeding site. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) depicted active bleeding of a small bowel segment. The bleeding segment was localized by CT-guided percutaneous needle insertion and subsequently removed surgically.

  7. The contribution of atom accessibility to site of metabolism models for cytochromes P450

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydberg, Patrik; Rostkowski, M.; Gloriam, D.E.

    2013-01-01

    Three different types of atom accessibility descriptors are investigated in relation to site of metabolism predictions. To enable the integration of local accessibility we have constructed 2DSASA, a method for the calculation of the atomic solvent accessible surface area that is independent of 3D...

  8. 18 CFR 16.5 - Site access for a competing applicant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Site access for a competing applicant. 16.5 Section 16.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... RELICENSING OF LICENSED PROJECTS General Provisions § 16.5 Site access for a competing applicant. (a)...

  9. Global Web Accessibility Analysis of National Government Portals and Ministry Web Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goodwin, Morten; Susar, Deniz; Nietzio, Annika

    2011-01-01

    Equal access to public information and services for all is an essential part of the United Nations (UN) Declaration of Human Rights. Today, the Web plays an important role in providing information and services to citizens. Unfortunately, many government Web sites are poorly designed and have...... accessibility of 192 United Nation Member States made publically available. The article also identifies common properties of Member States that have accessible and inaccessible Web sites and shows that implementing antidisability discrimination laws is highly beneficial for the accessibility of Web sites, while...... signing the UN Rights and Dignity of Persons with Disabilities has had no such effect yet. The article demonstrates that, despite the commonly held assumption to the contrary, mature, high-quality Web sites are more accessible than lower quality ones. Moreover, Web accessibility conformance claims by Web...

  10. Global Web Accessibility Analysis of National Government Portals and Ministry Web Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goodwin, Morten; Susar, Deniz; Nietzio, Annika

    2011-01-01

    Equal access to public information and services for all is an essential part of the United Nations (UN) Declaration of Human Rights. Today, the Web plays an important role in providing information and services to citizens. Unfortunately, many government Web sites are poorly designed and have...... accessibility barriers that prevent people with disabilities from using them. This article combines current Web accessibility benchmarking methodologies with a sound strategy for comparing Web accessibility among countries and continents. Furthermore, the article presents the first global analysis of the Web...... accessibility of 192 United Nation Member States made publically available. The article also identifies common properties of Member States that have accessible and inaccessible Web sites and shows that implementing antidisability discrimination laws is highly beneficial for the accessibility of Web sites, while...

  11. Accessibility of U.S. Federal Government Home Pages: Section 508 Compliance and Site Accessibility Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olalere, Abiodun; Lazar, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    U.S. federal websites are required to be accessible for people with impairments. However, despite the existing regulations and guidelines, many federal websites continue to be inaccessible, and accessibility policy statements available on federal websites often do not provide any useful information. This paper provides three contributions to the…

  12. Bleeding Disorders in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Bleeding Disorders in Women Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... risk for a bleeding disorder. What is excessive bleeding in women? Women with excessive bleeding may experience ...

  13. Hand Society and Matching Program Web Sites Provide Poor Access to Information Regarding Hand Surgery Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Richard M; Klifto, Christopher S; Naik, Amish A; Sapienza, Anthony; Capo, John T

    2016-08-01

    The Internet is a common resource for applicants of hand surgery fellowships, however, the quality and accessibility of fellowship online information is unknown. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the accessibility of hand surgery fellowship Web sites and to assess the quality of information provided via program Web sites. Hand fellowship Web site accessibility was evaluated by reviewing the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) on November 16, 2014 and the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) fellowship directories on February 12, 2015, and performing an independent Google search on November 25, 2014. Accessible Web sites were then assessed for quality of the presented information. A total of 81 programs were identified with the ASSH directory featuring direct links to 32% of program Web sites and the NRMP directory directly linking to 0%. A Google search yielded direct links to 86% of program Web sites. The quality of presented information varied greatly among the 72 accessible Web sites. Program description (100%), fellowship application requirements (97%), program contact email address (85%), and research requirements (75%) were the most commonly presented components of fellowship information. Hand fellowship program Web sites can be accessed from the ASSH directory and, to a lesser extent, the NRMP directory. However, a Google search is the most reliable method to access online fellowship information. Of assessable programs, all featured a program description though the quality of the remaining information was variable. Hand surgery fellowship applicants may face some difficulties when attempting to gather program information online. Future efforts should focus on improving the accessibility and content quality on hand surgery fellowship program Web sites.

  14. Airway injury during emergency transcutaneous airway access: a comparison at cricothyroid and tracheal sites.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Salah, Nazar

    2009-12-01

    Oxygenation via the cricothyroid membrane (CTM) may be required in emergencies, but inadvertent tracheal cannulation may occur. In this study, we compared airway injury between the tracheal and CTM sites using different techniques for airway access.

  15. Challenges in Obtaining Property Access: The FUSRAP Maywood Site Experience - 13433

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollar, William [Shaw Environmental, Inc., 100 West Hunter Avenue, Maywood, NJ 07607 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) is the US government program started in 1974 to identify, investigate and clean up or control sites that became contaminated as a result of the nation's early atomic programs. Many of these sites are not owned by the federal government and therefore require owner permission to enter. The experience in pursuing such access at the FUSRAP Maywood Superfund Site (the Maywood Site or the Site) in Bergen County, New Jersey, is extensive. Since the US Army Corps of Engineers (the Corps) assumed responsibility for the Maywood Site from the US Department of Energy in 1997, at least 186 separate property access agreements (known in FUSRAP as a Real Estate Right-of- Entry or ROE) have been executed between the Corps and approximately 55 different land owners and tenant occupants at the Maywood Site (agreement renewals with the same owners over time account for the difference). Maywood's experience during the Corps' tenure, reflected here in three case studies of representative property access efforts, offers some lessons and best practices that may apply to other remedial programs. While the Site Community Relations Manager (the author of this paper) managed the property access task, multi-disciplinary support from across the project was also critical to success in this endeavor. (authors)

  16. The contribution of atom accessibility to site of metabolism models for cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydberg, Patrik; Rostkowski, Michal; Gloriam, David E; Olsen, Lars

    2013-04-01

    Three different types of atom accessibility descriptors are investigated in relation to site of metabolism predictions. To enable the integration of local accessibility we have constructed 2DSASA, a method for the calculation of the atomic solvent accessible surface area that is independent of 3D coordinates. The method was implemented in the SMARTCyp site of metabolism prediction models and improved the results by up to 4 percentage points for nine cytochrome P450 isoforms. The final models are made available at http://www.farma.ku.dk/smartcyp.

  17. Compliance with Operational Circular No. 2 on conditions of access to the fenced CERN sites

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of Operational Circular No. 2 is to contribute to the protection of people and property by defining the conditions of access to the Organization's fenced sites. However, recently, the services concerned have noted a significant increase in the instances of non-compliance with those conditions that cannot be tolerated, for example: use of CERN access cards by people, other than the cardholders themselves, in order to gain access to facilities without having attended the required safety course; speeding, particularly on Route Gregory and Route Weisskopf; driving in and out of the site on the wrong side of the road; parking on spaces set aside for the disabled; nuisance parking, especially in the proximity of the Restaurants; the dumping of wrecked vehicles. As the aforementioned instances of non-compliance can lead to dangerous situations, the Organization reserves the right to apply the penalties provided for under paragraph 26 of Operational Circular No. 2, namely to refuse access to the site...

  18. REMINDER - Compliance with Operational Circular No. 2 on conditions of access to the fenced CERN sites

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of Operational Circular No. 2 is to contribute to the protection of people and property by defining the conditions of access to the Organization's fenced sites. However, recently, the services concerned have noted a significant increase in the instances of non-compliance with those conditions that cannot be tolerated, for example: use of CERN access cards by people, other than the cardholders themselves, in order to gain access to facilities without having attended the required safety course; speeding, particularly on Route Gregory and Route Weisskopf; driving in and out of the site on the wrong side of the road; parking on spaces set aside for the disabled; nuisance parking, especially in the proximity of the Restaurants; the dumping of wrecked vehicles. As the aforementioned instances of non-compliance can lead to dangerous situations, the Organization reserves the right to apply the penalties provided for under paragraph 26 of Operational Circular No. 2, namely to refuse access to the site ...

  19. Archiving Web Sites for Preservation and Access: MODS, METS and MINERVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Rebecca; Myrick, Leslie

    2006-01-01

    Born-digital material such as archived Web sites provides unique challenges in ensuring access and preservation. This article examines some of the technical challenges involved in harvesting and managing Web archives as well as metadata strategies to provide descriptive, technical, and preservation related information about archived Web sites,…

  20. Vaginal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2011. http://www.ovid.com/site/ ... Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2011. http://www.ovid.com/site/ ...

  1. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Matthew; Lobo, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a frequently encountered medical emergency with an incidence of 84-160/100000 and associated with mortality of approximately 10%. Guidelines from the National Institute for Care and Care Excellence outline key features in the management of AUGIB. Patients require prompt resuscitation and risk assessment using validated tools. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy provides accurate diagnosis, aids in estimating prognosis and allows therapeutic intervention. Endoscopy should be undertaken immediately after resuscitation in unstable patients and within 24 hours in all other patients. Interventional radiology may be required for bleeding unresponsive to endoscopic intervention. Drug therapy depends on the cause of bleeding. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors should be used in patients with high-risk ulcers. Terlipressin and broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used following variceal haemorrhage. Hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB need to provide well organised services and ensure access to relevant services for all patients, and particularly to out of hours endoscopy. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  2. A technique for re-utilizing catheter insertion sites in children with difficult central venous access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S M; Garnett, G M; Woo, R K

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance of central venous access in patients with chronic medical conditions such as short bowel syndrome demands forethought and ingenuity. We describe an innovative technique for re-utilizing central venous access sites in patients who have chronic central venous access needs. Records of patients undergoing this technique were reviewed between August 2012 and December 2015. The technique involves "cutting-down" to the sterile fibrous tunnel that naturally forms around tunneled catheters. The fibrous sheath is then isolated and controlled much as would be done for a venous "cut-down." A separate exit site is then created for the new catheter and it is tunneled to the "cut-down" site per routine. The non-functioning catheter is then removed from the surgical field. The proximal fibrous sheath is finally cannulated either directly with the new catheter or with a wire/dilator system. This technique effectively re-uses the same venous access point while allowing for a complete change of the physical line and external site. Twenty attempts at this technique were made in twelve patients; six patients underwent the site re-utilization procedure multiple times. Re-using the fibrous tunnel to re-cycle the internal catheter site was successful in seventeen of twenty attempts. All patients had chronic conditions leading to difficult long-term central venous access [short bowel syndrome (6), hemophilia (2), cystic fibrosis (1), chronic need for central IV access (3)]. Indications for catheter replacement included catheter occlusion/mechanical failure/breakage (9), dislodgement (6), infection (1), and inadequate catheter length due to patient growth (4). Broviac/Hickman catheter sites were most commonly re-used (13; one failure); re-using a portcath site was successful in 5 of 7 attempts. There were no short term infections or mechanical complications. We describe a novel technique for salvaging tunneled central venous catheter access sites. This technique is well suited

  3. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ095 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is abnormal bleeding more ...

  4. Universal Access in Heritage Sites: A Case Study on Historic Sites in Jaipur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardia, Shweta; Khare, Rachna; Khare, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    A nation is recognized by a range of its significant historical, cultural and natural properties. These properties are generally preserved and maintained either by national administration or by private owners and charitable trusts due to higher value of their cultural inheritance and termed globally as heritage or historic sites. Heritage sites are a significant asset, a unique and irreplaceable resource which reflects a rich and diverse expression of past societies and forms an integral part of local, regional and national cultural identity. Today, heritage sites also play an important role in communication and knowledge exchange. Thus the rapidly increasing heritage tourism industry faces several challenges too. One of the challenges is that there is a segment of society who is not yet able to equally enjoy the visit to historic structures/sites and attractions, facilities and services. This paper aims to study the experience and develop understanding regarding the heritage structures/sites approached and interacted by diverse users. This study is an outcome of a hands on workshop conducted with diverse users at various historic sites in the city of Jaipur viz. at The City Palace Complex, Jaipur, Jaigarh Fort and the Haveli at Kanota near to Jaipur India.

  5. Digital Accessible Knowledge and well-inventoried sites for birds in Mexico: baseline sites for measuring faunistic change

    OpenAIRE

    A. Townsend PETERSON; Adolfo G. Navarro-Sigüenza; Enrique Martínez-Meyer

    2016-01-01

    Background Faunal change is a basic and fundamental element in ecology, biogeography, and conservation biology, yet vanishingly few detailed studies have documented such changes rigorously over decadal time scales. This study responds to that gap in knowledge, providing a detailed analysis of Digital Accessible Knowledge of the birds of Mexico, designed to marshal DAK to identify sites that were sampled and inventoried rigorously prior to the beginning of major global climate change (1980). M...

  6. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / For Patients / Patient Information Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding What are the possible causes of minor rectal bleeding? Hemorrhoids Anal fissures Proctitis (inflammation of the rectum) ...

  7. Menorrhagia (Heavy Menstrual Bleeding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Menorrhagia (heavy menstrual bleeding) By Mayo Clinic Staff Menorrhagia is the medical term for menstrual periods with abnormally heavy or prolonged bleeding. Although heavy ...

  8. 40 CFR 1400.8 - Access to off-site consequence analysis information by Federal government officials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INFORMATION DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Access to Off-Site Consequence Analysis Information by Government Officials. § 1400.8 Access to off-site consequence analysis information by Federal... analysis information by Federal government officials. 1400.8 Section 1400.8 Protection of...

  9. 40 CFR 1400.9 - Access to off-site consequence analysis information by State and local government officials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Access to Off-Site Consequence Analysis Information by Government Officials. § 1400.9 Access to off-site consequence analysis... analysis information by State and local government officials. 1400.9 Section 1400.9 Protection...

  10. 41 CFR 102-79.95 - Who is responsible for the costs associated with providing access to antenna sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the costs associated with providing access to antenna sites? 102-79.95 Section 102-79.95 Public... Space Siting Antennas on Federal Property § 102-79.95 Who is responsible for the costs associated with... costs to Federal agencies associated with providing access to antenna sites, including obtaining...

  11. Development of access-based metrics for site location of ground segment in LEO missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bonyan Khamseh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The classical metrics of ground segment site location do not take account of the pattern of ground segment access to the satellite. In this paper, based on the pattern of access between the ground segment and the satellite, two metrics for site location of ground segments in Low Earth Orbits (LEO missions were developed. The two developed access-based metrics are total accessibility duration and longest accessibility gap in a given period of time. It is shown that repeatability cycle is the minimum necessary time interval to study the steady behavior of the two proposed metrics. System and subsystem characteristics of the satellite represented by each of the metrics are discussed. Incorporation of the two proposed metrics, along with the classical ones, in the ground segment site location process results in financial saving in satellite development phase and reduces the minimum required level of in-orbit autonomy of the satellite. To show the effectiveness of the proposed metrics, simulation results are included for illustration.

  12. Active-site residues of procarboxypeptidase Y are accessible to chemical modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, S O; Winther, Jakob R.

    1994-01-01

    The accessibility of the active-site cleft of procarboxypeptidase Y from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied by chemical modifications of two specific amino-acid residues. Previous studies have shown that these residues, Cys-341 and Met-398 in the mature enzyme, are located in the S1 and S'1...

  13. Digital Accessible Knowledge and well-inventoried sites for birds in Mexico: baseline sites for measuring faunistic change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Townsend Peterson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Faunal change is a basic and fundamental element in ecology, biogeography, and conservation biology, yet vanishingly few detailed studies have documented such changes rigorously over decadal time scales. This study responds to that gap in knowledge, providing a detailed analysis of Digital Accessible Knowledge of the birds of Mexico, designed to marshal DAK to identify sites that were sampled and inventoried rigorously prior to the beginning of major global climate change (1980. Methods We accumulated DAK records for Mexican birds from all relevant online biodiversity data portals. After extensive cleaning steps, we calculated completeness indices for each 0.05° pixel across the country; we also detected ‘hotspots’ of sampling, and calculated completeness indices for these broader areas as well. Sites were designated as well-sampled if they had completeness indices above 80% and >200 associated DAK records. Results We identified 100 individual pixels and 20 broader ‘hotspots’ of sampling that were demonstrably well-inventoried prior to 1980. These sites are catalogued and documented to promote and enable resurvey efforts that can document events of avifaunal change (and non-change across the country on decadal time scales. Conclusions Development of repeated surveys for many sites across Mexico, and particularly for sites for which historical surveys document their avifaunas prior to major climate change processes, would pay rich rewards in information about distributional dynamics of Mexican birds.

  14. Helical CT in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Olivier; Leroy, Christophe; Sergent, Geraldine [Department of Radiology, Hopital Huriez, 1 rue Polonovski, 59037 Lille (France); Bulois, Philippe; Saint-Drenant, Sophie; Paris, Jean-Claude [Department of Gastroenterology, Hopital Huriez, 1 rue Polonovski, 59037 Lille (France)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of helical CT in depicting the location of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. A three-phase helical CT of the abdomen was performed in 24 patients referred for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The diagnosis of the bleeding site was established by CT when there was at least one of the following criteria: spontaneous hyperdensity of the peribowel fat; contrast enhancement of the bowel wall; vascular extravasation of the contrast medium; thickening of the bowel wall; polyp or tumor; or vascular dilation. Diverticula alone were not enough to locate the bleeding site. The results of CT were compared with the diagnosis obtained by colonoscopy, enteroscopy, or surgery. A definite diagnosis was made in 19 patients. The bleeding site was located in the small bowel in 5 patients and the colon in 14 patients. The CT correctly located 4 small bowel hemorrhages and 11 colonic hemorrhages. Diagnosis of the primary lesion responsible for the bleeding was made in 10 patients. Our results suggest that helical CT could be a good diagnostic tool in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding to help the physician to diagnose the bleeding site. (orig.)

  15. The management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Y; Lebreton, G; Le Pennec, V; Hourna, E; Viennot, S; Alves, A

    2014-06-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (LGI) bleeding is generally less severe than upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding with spontaneous cessation of bleeding in 80% of cases and a mortality of 2-4%. However, unlike UGI bleeding, there is no consensual agreement about management. Once the patient has been stabilized, the main objective and greatest difficulty is to identify the location of bleeding in order to provide specific appropriate treatment. While upper endoscopy and colonoscopy remain the essential first-line examinations, the development and availability of angiography have made this an important imaging modality for cases of active bleeding; they allow diagnostic localization of bleeding and guide subsequent therapy, whether therapeutic embolization, interventional colonoscopy or, if other techniques fail or are unavailable, surgery directed at the precise site of bleeding. Furthermore, newly developed endoscopic techniques, particularly video capsule enteroscopy, now allow minimally invasive exploration of the small intestine; if this is positive, it will guide subsequent assisted enteroscopy or surgery. Other small bowel imaging techniques include enteroclysis by CT or magnetic resonance imaging. At the present time, exploratory surgery is no longer a first-line approach. In view of the lesser gravity of LGI bleeding, it is most reasonable to simply stabilize the patient initially for subsequent transfer to a specialized center, if minimally invasive techniques are not available at the local hospital. In all cases, the complexity and diversity of LGI bleeding require a multidisciplinary collaboration involving the gastroenterologist, radiologist, intensivist and surgeon to optimize diagnosis and treatment of the patient.

  16. AN UNUSUAL CAUSE OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Kishwar; Zarin, Muhammad; Latif, Humera

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (GI) is a serious condition that presents both diagnostic as well as therapeutic challenges. Resuscitation of the patient is the first and most important step in its management followed by measures to localize and treat the exact source and site of bleeding. These modalities are upper and lower GI endoscopies, radionuclide imaging and angiography. Surgery is the last resort to handle the situation, if the patient does not respond to resuscitative measures and the various interventional procedures fail to locate and stop the bleeding. We present a case of upper GI bleeding which presented with massive per rectal bleeding and the patient was not responding to resuscitation with multiple blood transfusions. Ultimately an exploratory laparotomy was done which revealed an extra-intestinal source of bleeding into the lumen of duodenum, presenting as upper GI bleeding.

  17. Carboxylator: incorporating solvent-accessible surface area for identifying protein carboxylation sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Tsung; Chen, Shu-An; Bretaña, Neil Arvin; Cheng, Tzu-Hsiu; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2011-10-01

    In proteins, glutamate (Glu) residues are transformed into γ-carboxyglutamate (Gla) residues in a process called carboxylation. The process of protein carboxylation catalyzed by γ-glutamyl carboxylase is deemed to be important due to its involvement in biological processes such as blood clotting cascade and bone growth. There is an increasing interest within the scientific community to identify protein carboxylation sites. However, experimental identification of carboxylation sites via mass spectrometry-based methods is observed to be expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Thus, we were motivated to design a computational method for identifying protein carboxylation sites. This work aims to investigate the protein carboxylation by considering the composition of amino acids that surround modification sites. With the implication of a modified residue prefers to be accessible on the surface of a protein, the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA) around carboxylation sites is also investigated. Radial basis function network is then employed to build a predictive model using various features for identifying carboxylation sites. Based on a five-fold cross-validation evaluation, a predictive model trained using the combined features of amino acid sequence (AA20D), amino acid composition, and ASA, yields the highest accuracy at 0.874. Furthermore, an independent test done involving data not included in the cross-validation process indicates that in silico identification is a feasible means of preliminary analysis. Additionally, the predictive method presented in this work is implemented as Carboxylator (http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/Carboxylator/), a web-based tool for identifying carboxylated proteins with modification sites in order to help users in investigating γ-glutamyl carboxylation.

  18. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first few months of a normal pregnancy. Some birth control pills or the intrauterine device (IUD) can also cause ... this type can significantly reduce abnormal bleeding. Like birth control pills, sometimes IUDs can actually cause abnormal bleeding. Tell ...

  19. Bleeding esophageal varices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000268.htm Bleeding esophageal varices To use the sharing features on ... veins in the esophagus to balloon outward. Heavy bleeding can occur if the veins break open. Any ...

  20. Bleeding into the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003235.htm Bleeding into the skin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bleeding into the skin can occur from broken blood ...

  1. [Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, J; Adámek, S

    2013-08-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding represents 5% of all cases of bleeding into the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The cause of this type of bleeding cannot be found by gastroscopy or colonoscopy - the most common cause being bleeding from the source in the small intestine. In other cases it is bleeding from other parts of the digestive tube which has already stopped or was not noticed during admission endoscopy. Imaging methods (X-ray, CT, MRI, scintigraphy) and endoscopic methods (flexible or capsule enteroscopy) are used in the diagnosis and treatment. If, despite having used these methods, the source of bleeding is not found and the bleeding continues, or if the source is known but the bleeding cannot be stopped by radiologic or endoscopic intervention, surgical intervention is usually indicated. The article provides an overview of current diagnostic and treatment options, including instructions on how to proceed in these diagnostically difficult situations.

  2. Transarterial embolization of acute intercostal artery bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jae Ik; Park, Auh Whan; Lee, Seon Joo [Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Chang Jin [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Tae Beom [Donga University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwan [Kyimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    To report our experiences of transarterial embolization for acute intercostal artery bleeding. A retrospectively analysis of the causes, clinical manifestations, angiographic findings and transarterial embolization technique in 8 patients with acute intercostal artery bleeding, with a review of the anatomical basis. The causes of intercostal artery bleeding were iatrogenic and traumatic in 88 and 12% of cases, respectively. Active bleeding from the collateral intercostal or posterior intercostal arteries was angiographically demonstrated in 75 and 25% of cases, respectively. Transarterial embolization successfully achieved hemostasis in all cases. However, two patient with hypovolemic shock expired due to a massive hemothorax, despite successful transarterial embolization. Intercostal access should be performed through the middle of the intercostal space to avoid injury to the collateral intercostal artery. Transarterial embolization is an effective method for the control of intercostal artery bleeding.

  3. Open sesame: IDC launches Internet site to access well logs, other data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsters, S.

    2001-06-01

    International Datashare Corporation has recently opened a new website - www.EnerGISite.com - to make it possible for geologists and geophysicists to access its vast store of Canadian well logs. The well logs have been reproduced over the years in a variety of forms: microfiche, half-scale prints and film, and full-scale prints and film. More recently, IDC has digitized a large number of logs and captured the images in raster form (i.e. scanned, not digitized). The digital and raster logs will, henceforth, be accessible in the EnerGISite through a GIS map front end. When users log on to the site, a picture of world will appear. Clicking on the Canadian landmass, the database will the tell the user what data is available. By zooming in on a particular area of the map such as for example Alberta, all well locations will be shown. By selecting individual wells, users can find out if raster and digital curves exist. Individual logs can be purchased on a transactional basis. Companies can also subscribe for unlimited usage. Logs will be sent by e-mail, or downloaded directly into a user-created file. U.S. data is expected to be launched in July 2001, with selected areas of the world added at a later date. Production data for a site will be provided by International Petrodata Limited, a business partner of IDC. New datasets and software tools to the site are planned by IDC over time.

  4. Vivax malaria:a rare cause of thalamic bleed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaydeep Sarkar; Biku Naik; Atul Gawande; Atul Goel

    2012-01-01

    Most common cause of thalamic bleed is hypertension; other causes are arteriovenous malformation, aneurysm, bleeding diathesis, drugs, amyloid angiopathy, tumor etc.We present a case ofPlasmodium vivax (P. vivax) malaria with unusual site of bleeding i.e. left thalamus of brain.To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of thalamic bleed caused by vivax malaria in absence of severe thrombocytopenia/disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).

  5. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco; Bustamante-Balén; Gema; Plumé

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding(AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal(GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325(Hemospray), EndoClotTM polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper. Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a secondline treatment, and they seem to be especially indi-cated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area.

  6. Developing an open-access antimicrobial resistance learning site for veterinary medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordoncillo, Mary Joy N; Bender, Jeff; Noffsinger, Jason; Bartlett, Paul C

    2011-01-01

    Recognizing the crucial role of veterinarians in mitigating antimicrobial resistance (AMR), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has funded the development of a suite of educational materials to promote the responsible veterinary medical use of antimicrobials. An open-access, Web-based multimedia curriculum regarding antimicrobial resistance in veterinary practice was thus created. The antimicrobial-resistance learning site (AMRLS) for veterinary medical students was completed and made available for use in January 2011 (http://amrls.cvm.msu.edu/). Designed for integration into existing veterinary medical courses, the AMRLS is also a resource for continuing education for practicing veterinarians, animal scientists, and food-animal industry specialists. This Web site emphasizes the mechanisms by which AMR emerges and spreads, the significant role of veterinarians in mitigating AMR, and the need to preserve the efficacy of antibiotics for future generations.

  7. Selective nitrogen capture by porous hybrid materials containing accessible transition metal ion sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ji Woong; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Seung-Joon; Hwang, Young Kyu; Hong, Do-Young; Lee, Su-Kyung; Lee, Ji Sun; Jang, Seunghun; Yoon, Tae-Ung; Kwac, Kijeong; Jung, Yousung; Pillai, Renjith S.; Faucher, Florian; Vimont, Alexandre; Daturi, Marco; Férey, Gérard; Serre, Christian; Maurin, Guillaume; Bae, Youn-Sang; Chang, Jong-San

    2017-05-01

    Selective dinitrogen binding to transition metal ions mainly covers two strategic domains: biological nitrogen fixation catalysed by metalloenzyme nitrogenases, and adsorptive purification of natural gas and air. Many transition metal-dinitrogen complexes have been envisaged for biomimetic nitrogen fixation to produce ammonia. Inspired by this concept, here we report mesoporous metal-organic framework materials containing accessible Cr(III) sites, able to thermodynamically capture N2 over CH4 and O2. This fundamental study integrating advanced experimental and computational tools confirmed that the separation mechanism for both N2/CH4 and N2/O2 gas mixtures is driven by the presence of these unsaturated Cr(III) sites that allows a much stronger binding of N2 over the two other gases. Besides the potential breakthrough in adsorption-based technologies, this proof of concept could open new horizons to address several challenges in chemistry, including the design of heterogeneous biomimetic catalysts through nitrogen fixation.

  8. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); Golzarian, Jafar [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  9. Choosing the Access Site in Percuaneous Nephrolithotomy: Is Intercostal Approach as Safe as Subcostal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Yonguc

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, we aimed to compare the success and complication rates of intercostal and subcostal aproaches in percutaneous nephrolithotomy which is applied for renal stones in different locations and upper ureteral stones. Material and Method: We record retrospectively of 378 patients operated at Izmir Bozyaka Training and Research Hospital Department of Urology between January 2011-January 2015 for renal stones in different locations and upper ureteral stones. The patients were divided into two different groups according to access site. Group 1 consists of 228 patients with subcostal access and group 2 consists of 150 patients with intercostal access. Results: Mean ages of group 1 and group 2 were 48.65±12.87 and 48.57±12.91 respectively (p=0.949. Mean stone burden was not statistically significiant between the groups. Mean stone burden of group 1 and group 2 were 788.6±475.47 mm2 and 657.5±469.63 mm2 respectively (p=0.081. Mean operative time was statistically significant between the groups (p=0.042. Mean operative time was 113.84±41.34 min. in group 1 and 105.07±40.30 min. in group 2. Scopy times were 92.38±58.06 sec. in group 1 and 95.51±70.06 sec in group 2 (p=0.637. At the post-operative first day heamothocrit loss was 1.81±1.25 g/dl and 1.62±1.34 g/dl for groups 1 and 2 respectively (p=0.175. Residual fragmants were detected in 47 and 29 patients for groups 1 and 2 respectively (p=0.761. Duration of hospitalization was 4.16±2.68 days and 4.0±2.01 days (p=0.514 in groups 1 and 2 respectively. Discussion: Intercostal access is as safe as the subcostal access when the access is performed between 11 and 12th intercostal spaces according to lung complications. In this way, we determined that stone-free rates, blood losses, hospitalization and scopy durations were similar in both groups.

  10. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Marcie; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remains a commonly encountered diagnosis for acute care surgeons. Initial stabilization and resuscitation of patients is imperative. Stable patients can have initiation of medical therapy and localization of the bleeding, whereas persistently unstable patients require emergent endoscopic or operative intervention. Minimally invasive techniques have surpassed surgery as the treatment of choice for most upper GI bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 血管入路对中至极高危出血风险急性冠状动脉综征患者院内出血的影响%Influence of vascular access on in-hospital major bleeding in patients with acute coronary synd rome at moderate to very high bleeding risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋文奇; 段君君; 司志燕; 马丽辉; 温芳华; 聂亚楠; 赵梦华

    2014-01-01

    目的:评估血管入路对Crusade评分为中至极高危出血风险急性冠状动脉综合征患者院内出血( IHMB)的影响。方法对249例经Crusade评分为中至极高危出血风险,行经皮冠状动脉介入( PCI)治疗的非ST段抬高急性冠脉综合征患者资料进行回顾性分析。其中101例患者经桡动脉入路(TRI),148例经股动脉入路(TFI),主要终点为院内主要出血(IHMB)。结果 TRI组IHMB发生率及输血率低于TFI组(P均<0.05),2组患者在院内及1 a时的病死率比较均无显著性差异。发生IHMB患者1 a内病死率明显高于未发生IHMB患者(P<0.05)。 TRI可作为独立的IHMB负性预测因素(P<0.01)。结论与TFI相比,TRI可减少有中至极高危出血风险急性冠脉综合征患者的 IHMB,IHMB与1 a内病死率明显相关。%Objective It is to evaluate the influence of vascular access on in -hospital major bleeding ( IHMB) in patients with acute coronary syndrome ( ACS) at moderate to very high bleeding risk diagnosed by Grusade scores .Me thods The data of 249 patients with non-ST elevation ACS treated with PCI at moderate to very high bleeding risk evaluated by Grusade score were retrospectively analyzed, in which a total of 101 patients received trans -radial intervention ( TRI) and 148 patients re-ceived trans-femoral intervention ( TFI) .The primary end-point was IHMB as defined in the Crusade .Results There was no significant differences in one year mortality rate between two groups .However, TRI had lower incidences of IHMB and blood transfusion rate than TFI (P<0.05).The patients suffered from IHMB had higher incidences of one year mortality than those free from IHMB (P=0.045).TRI was an independent negative predictor of IHMB (P=0.003).Co nclusion IHMB is significantly correlated with one year mortality .Our study suggests that compared to TFI , TRI could reduce IHMB in patients with ACS at moderate to very high

  12. The usefulness of MDCT in acute intestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kum Rae; Park, Won Kyu; Kim, Jae Woon; Chang, Jay Chun; Jang, Han Won [College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-15

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of MDCT for localizing a bleeding site and for helping make a decision on further management for acute intestinal bleeding. We conducted a retrospective review of 17 consecutive patients who presented with acute intestinal bleeding and who also underwent MDCT before angiography or surgery. The sensitivity of MDCT for detecting acute intestinal bleeding was assessed and compared with that of conventional angiography. The sensitivity of MDCT for the detection of acute intestinal bleeding was 77% (13 or 17), whereas that of angiography was 46% (6 or 13). All the bleeding points that were subsequently detected on angiography were visualized on MDCT. In three cases, the bleeding focus was detected on MDCT and not on angiography. In four cases, both MDCT and angiography did not detect the bleeding focus; for one of these cases, CT during SMA angiography was performed and this detected the active bleeding site. In patients with acute intestinal bleeding, MDCT is a useful image modality to detect the bleeding site and to help decide on further management before performing angiography or surgery. When tumorous lesions are detected, invasive angiography can be omitted.

  13. Operational Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) - Conditions of access to the fenced parts of the CERN site

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2015-01-01

    Operational Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) entitled "Conditions of access to the fenced parts of the CERN site", approved by the Director-General following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting on 24 September 2015, is now available via this link.   This revised circular cancels and replaces Operational Circular No. 2 (Rev. 2) also entitled "Conditions of access to the fenced parts of the CERN site", of September 2014. The circular was revised predominantly in order to specify that access to the CERN site is granted to CERN Pension Fund beneficiaries only provided that they are actually in receipt of payments from the Fund; and to allow the Director-General to permit special types of vehicles on site, such as trailers. It also includes a certain number of text improvements and an updated version of the implementation measures, in particular with regard to vehicle identification, road traffic and parking.  

  14. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  15. Bleed caused by varicose veins rupture in a rare site in portal hypertension. Differential diagnosis with causes of acute hypovolemic shock in emergency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosarino Procopio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Portal hypertension is the increase in the pressure of the venous portal system, which receives around 1,500 mL/m of blood from the intestinum tenue, colon, spleen, and pancreas. A blocking of the flux or an increase in the resistance at any level of the portal tree results in an increase in the pressure in the system and the appearance of lateral circles between the portal vein and the inferior and superior, thus allowing for varicose veins to spread in the whole system. The present paper reports the case of a woman with liver cirrhosis, great ascites and bleeding out of varicose veins’ rupture at the spleen axis level, which presented the problem of differential diagnosis with other causes of hypovolemic shock. This cases resulted in the patient’s exitus.

  16. Acute, nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Amir; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-04-01

    Acute, nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common medical emergency encountered worldwide. Despite medical and technological advances, it remains associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Rapid patient assessment and management are paramount. When indicated, upper endoscopy in patients presenting with acute UGIB is effective for both diagnosis of the bleeding site and provision of endoscopic hemostasis. Endoscopic hemostasis significantly reduces rebleeding rates, blood transfusion requirements, length of hospital stay, surgery, and mortality. Furthermore, early upper endoscopy, defined as being performed within 24 h of patient presentation, improves patient outcomes. A structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes early hemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization, preendoscopic risk stratification using validated instruments, pharmacologic and endoscopic intervention, and postendoscopy therapy is important to optimize patient outcome and assure efficient use of medical resources.

  17. An accessibility graph-based model to optimize tsunami evacuation sites and routes in Martinique, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péroche, M.; Leone, F.; Gutton, R.

    2014-01-01

    The risk of tsunami threatens the whole Caribbean coastline especially the Lesser Antilles. The first available models of tsunami propagation estimate that the travel time from the closest seismic sources would only take few minutes to impact the Martinique Island. Considering this threat, the most effective measure is a planned and organized evacuation of the coastal population. This requires an efficient regional warning system, estimation of the maximum expected tsunami flood height, preparation of the population to evacuate, and drawing up of local and regional emergency plans. In order to produce an efficient evacuation plan, we have to assess the number of people at risk, the potential evacuation routes, the safe areas and the available time to evacuate. However, this essential information is still lacking in the French West Indies emergency plans. This paper proposes a model of tsunami evacuation sites accessibility for Martinique directly addressed to decision makers. It is based on a population database at a local scale, the development of connected graphs of roads, the identification of potential safe areas and the velocity setting for pedestrians. Evacuation routes are calculated using the Dijkstra's algorithm which gives the shortest path between areas at risk and designated evacuation sites. The first results allow us to map the theoretical times and routes to keep the exposed population safe and to compare these results with a tsunami travel time scenario.

  18. Web 2.0 Sites for Collaborative Self-Access: The Learning Advisor vs. Google®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig D. Howard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available While Web 2.0 technologies provide motivated, self-access learners with unprecedented opportunities for language learning, Web 2.0 designs are not of universally equal value for learning. This article reports on research carried out at Indiana University Bloomington using an empirical method to select websites for self-access language learning. Two questions related to Web 2.0 recommendations were asked: (1 How do recommended Web 2.0 sites rank in terms of interactivity features? (2 How likely is a learner to find highly interactive sites on their own? A list of 20 sites used for supplemental and self-access activities in language programs at five universities was compiled and provided the initial data set. Purposive sampling criteria revealed 10 sites truly represented Web 2.0 design. To address the first question, a feature analysis was applied (Herring, The international handbook of internet research. Berlin: Springer, 2008. An interactivity framework was developed from previous research to identify Web 2.0 design features, and sites were ranked according to feature quantity. The method used to address the second question was an interconnectivity analysis that measured direct and indirect interconnectivity within Google results. Highly interactive Web 2.0 sites were not prominent in Google search results, nor were they often linked via third party sites. It was determined that, using typical keywords or searching via blogs and recommendation sites, self-access learners were highly unlikely to find the most promising Web 2.0 sites for language learning. A discussion of the role of the learning advisor in guiding Web 2.0 collaborative self-access, as well as some strategic short cuts to quick analysis, conclude the article.

  19. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are many causes of abnormal vaginal bleeding. HORMONES Most often, abnormal uterine bleeding is caused by a hormone imbalance. When hormones are the cause, doctors call the problem dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB) . DUB is more ...

  20. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  1. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit blood ...

  2. Angiographic diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Sung, Kyu Bo; Koo, Kyung Hoi; Bae, Tae Young; Chung, Eun Chul; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    Diagnostic angiographic evaluations were done in 33 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding for recent 5 years at Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. On 11 patients of them, therapeutic interventional procedures were made and the results were analysed. 1. In a total of 33 cases, there were 18 cases of upper GI bleeding and 15 cases of lower GI bleeding. The most frequent causes were peptic ulcer in the former and intestinal typhoid fever in the latter. 2. Bleeding sites were localized angiographically in 28 cases, so the detection rate was 85%. Four of the five angiographically negative cases were lower GI bleeding cases. 3. The most frequent bleeding site was left gastric artery (7/33). The next was ileocecal branch of superior mesenteric artery (6/33). 4. Among the 11 interventional procedures, Gelfoam embolization was done in 7 cases and Vasopressin infusion was tried in 4 cases. They were successful in 4 and 3 cases, suggesting 57% and 47% success rates respectively.

  3. Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Enns

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lower gastrointestinal (LGI bleeding is typically caused by vascular malformations, diverticuli and neoplasia. Although endoscopic evaluation of the colon is relatively standard in stable patients with LGI bleeding, those with significant ongoing hemorrhage are often more difficult to evaluate endoscopically. Other investigative techniques such as nuclear scintigraphy, angiography and surgical exploration have been commonly used in unstable patients with LGI bleeding when the exact site is unknown. These investigative techniques have had variable measures of success. This two-part review evaluates the literature in an attempt to review the optimal investigative approach in patients with LGI hemorrhage, in particular patients who have had significant and ongoing bleeding. Part 1 of this article concentrates on the etiology of LGI hemorrhage, followed in a subsequent article by diagnostic and management strategies. Following the review, a consensus update will be included with guidelines for clinical use.

  4. Investigation of prototypal MOFs consisting of polyhedral cages with accessible Lewis-acid sites for quinoline synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wen-Yang; Leng, Kunyue; Cash, Lindsay; Chrzanowski, Matthew; Stackhouse, Chavis A; Sun, Yinyong; Ma, Shengqian

    2015-03-21

    A series of prototypal metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) consisting of polyhedral cages with accessible Lewis-acid sites, have been systematically investigated for Friedländer annulation reaction, a straightforward approach to synthesizing quinoline and its derivatives. Amongst them MMCF-2 demonstrates significantly enhanced catalytic activity compared with the benchmark MOFs, HKUST-1 and MOF-505, as a result of a high-density of accessible Cu(II) Lewis acid sites and large window size in the cuboctahedral cage-based nanoreactor of MMCF-2.

  5. Avoiding Winter Nose Bleeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    WINTER is the best season for peopleto do cold-endurance exercises. But thedry, windy weather makes the moisturein the nasal mucosa evaporate quickly,reducing the elasticity of capillaries andmaking for frequent nose-bleeds.

  6. GI bleeding - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100162.htm GI bleeding - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... colon, and finally, the rectum and anus. The GI tract is a long, hollow, muscular tube through ...

  7. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Marcie; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-02-01

    This article examines causes of occult, moderate and severe lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The difference in the workup of stable vs unstable patients is stressed. Treatment options ranging from minimally invasive techniques to open surgery are explored.

  8. Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Menorrhagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related to pregnancy, such as a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy, can cause abnormal bleeding. A miscarriage is when ... called a fetus) dies in the uterus. An ectopic pregnancy is when a baby starts to grow outside ...

  9. Severe Bleeding: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... remove the gauze or bandage. If the bleeding seeps through the gauze or other cloth on the ... up blood Bruising A tender or swollen stomach Cold, clammy skin Thirst Fractures Shock, indicated by a ...

  10. National accessibility portal and social networking sites: how to make facebook and twitter work for you

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The National Accessibility Portal (NAP) is a website specifically designed to give South Africans living with disabilities access to important information which may enhance their lives. This information includes lists of schools for children...

  11. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB) is defined as abnormal uterine bleeding that results from an ovarian endocrinopathy. It may be associated with ovulatory and anovulatory cycles. The diagnosis of DUB depends on a thorough history and physical examination to exclude organic disorders. In older women, endometrial biopsy should be done before starting therapy. The treatment depends on an understanding of the menstrual cycle. In less urgent cases, anovulatory cycles are managed using progester...

  12. The decision to access patient information from a social media site: what would you do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jent, Jason F; Eaton, Cyd K; Merrick, Melissa T; Englebert, Nicole E; Dandes, Susan K; Chapman, Ana V; Hershorin, Eugene R

    2011-10-01

    The current study examined the prevalence with which healthcare providers use a social media site (SMS) account (e.g., Facebook), the extent to which they use SMSs in clinical practice, and their decision-making process after accessing patient information from an SMS. Pediatric faculty and trainees from a medical school campus were provided a SMS history form and seven fictional SMS adolescent profile vignettes that depicted concerning information. Participants were instructed to rate their personal use and beliefs about SMSs and to report how they would respond if they obtained concerning information about an adolescent patient from their public SMS profile. Healthcare providers generally believed it not to be an invasion of privacy to conduct an Internet/SMS search of someone they know. A small percentage of trainees reported a personal history of conducting an Internet search (18%) or an SMS search (14%) for a patient. However, no faculty endorsed a history of conducting searches for patients. Faculty and trainees also differed in how they would respond to concerning SMS adolescent profile information. The findings that trainees are conducting Internet/SMS searches of patients and that faculty and trainees differ in how they would respond to concerning profile information suggest the need for specific guidelines regarding the role of SMSs in clinical practice. Practice, policy, and training implications are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gastrointestinal bleeding 30 years after a complicated cholecystectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thorsten; Brechmann; Wolff; Schmiegel; Volkmar; Nicolas; Markus; Reiser

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding from small-bowel varices is a rare and difficult to treat complication of portal hypertension. We describe the case of a 79-year-old female patient with recurrent severe hemorrhage from smallbowel varices 30 years after a complicated cholecystectomy. When double balloon enteroscopy was unsuccessful to reach the site of bleeding, a rendezvous approach was favored with intraoperative endoscopy. Active bleeding from varices within a biliodigestive anastomosis was found and controlled ...

  14. The International Bleeding Risk Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Laine, L.; Dalton, H.

    2017-01-01

    The International Bleeding Risk Score: A New Risk Score that can Accurately Predict Mortality in Patients with Upper GI-Bleeding.......The International Bleeding Risk Score: A New Risk Score that can Accurately Predict Mortality in Patients with Upper GI-Bleeding....

  15. The complexities of measuring access to parks and physical activity sites in New York City: a quantitative and qualitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohler Nancy L

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proximity to parks and physical activity sites has been linked to an increase in active behaviors, and positive impacts on health outcomes such as lower rates of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. Since populations with a low socio-economic status as well as racial and ethnic minorities tend to experience worse health outcomes in the USA, access to parks and physical activity sites may be an environmental justice issue. Geographic Information systems were used to conduct quantitative and qualitative analyses of park accessibility in New York City, which included kernel density estimation, ordinary least squares (global regression, geographically weighted (local regression, and longitudinal case studies, consisting of field work and archival research. Accessibility was measured by both density of park acreage and density of physical activity sites. Independent variables included percent non-Hispanic black, percent Hispanic, percent below poverty, percent of adults without high school diploma, percent with limited English-speaking ability, and population density. Results The ordinary least squares linear regression found weak relationships in both the park acreage density and the physical activity site density models (Ra2 = .11 and .23, respectively; AIC = 7162 and 3529, respectively. Geographically weighted regression, however, suggested spatial non-stationarity in both models, indicating disparities in accessibility that vary over space with respect to magnitude and directionality of the relationships (AIC = 2014 and -1241, respectively. The qualitative analysis supported the findings of the local regression, confirming that although there is a geographically inequitable distribution of park space and physical activity sites, it is not globally predicted by race, ethnicity, or socio-economic status. Conclusion The combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses demonstrated the complexity of the issues around

  16. Rapid hemostasis at the femoral venous access site using a novel hemostatic pad containing kaolin after atrial fibrillation ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairaku, Akinori; Nakano, Yukiko; Oda, Noboru; Makita, Yuko; Kajihara, Kenta; Tokuyama, Takehito; Kihara, Yasuki

    2011-08-01

    Hemostasis at the femoral venous access site after atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation is often prolonged because of aggressive anticoagulation and the use of several large-sized sheaths. A newly developed hemostatic pad containing a natural mineral called kaolin causes blood to clot quickly. We evaluated the efficacy of this pad for hemostasis at the venous access site after AF ablation. Patients who were scheduled to undergo AF ablation were randomized to be treated with manual compression with (n = 59) or without kaolin-impregnated pads (n = 59) as hemostatic approaches at the femoral venous access site following sheath removal. Hemostasis time, rebleeding frequency, massive hematoma, device-related complications, and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) were compared between the two groups. Hemostasis time in the patients treated with kaolin-impregnated pads was significantly shorter than in those treated without (6.1 ± 2.3 vs. 14.5 ± 4.0 min; p kaolin-impregnated pads was the only independent variable reducing hemostasis time (β = -0.78; p kaolin-impregnated pads; p = 0.35). Only one patient had a massive groin hematoma, and no patient had device-related complications or DVT. Kaolin-impregnated hemostatic pads safely and effectively decreased hemostasis time for the femoral venous access site in patients undergoing AF ablation. However, whether its use allows earlier postprocedural ambulation is difficult to predict.

  17. Alternate hemodialysis access in patients with occluded peripheral venous access sites; Alternative Zugangswege fuer Haemodialysekatheter bei Patienten mit verschlossenen peripheren venoesen Zugangswegen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, F.K. [Klinik und Hochschulambulanz fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospitals of Cleveland, Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); LiPuma, J.; Blum, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospitals of Cleveland, Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: the goal of this study was to evaluate translumbar and transhepatic placement of hemodialysis (HD) catheters for patients with occlusion of the veins that are commonly used for hemodialysis access. Method: over a 12-month period three translumbar and one transhepatic hemodialysis catheters were placed in 4 patients suffering from end-stage renal disease, who had thrombosis of the upper and lower extremity veins as well as the jugular veins. The percutaneous access was performed under fluoroscopic guidance. After successful passage of a guidewire into the right atrium and creation of a subcutaneous tunnel at the skin entry site, all patients received a 14 F double-lumen catheter that was placed with its tip in the right atrium. Results: percutaneous translumbar and transhepatic placement of the HD catheters was successful in all patients. No intervention-associated complications were observed. Hemodialysis could be started 1 to 20 hours after initial catheter placement in all patients. During an observation period of 3 to 7 months, 3 patients underwent hemodialysis without any complications. In one patient, an occlusion of an translumbar HD catheter was observed after 5 months. This catheter could be temporarily recanalized using rTPA injection and was then exchanged after 6 months. Conclusion: transhepatic and translumbar placement of HD catheters is a safe and viable alternative for patients who have exhausted conventional venous access sites. (orig.)

  18. Selection of optimal antisense accessible sites of survivin and its application in treatment of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang-Song Tong; Li-Duan Zheng; Fang-Min Chen; Fu-Qing Zeng; Liang Wang; Ji-Hua Dong; Gong-Cheng Lu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To select the optimal antisense accessible sites of survivin, a highly expressed gene in tumor tissues, in order to explore a novel approach to improve biological therapy of gastric cancer.METHODS: The 20 mer random oligonucleotide library was synthesized, hybridized with in vitro transcribed total survivin cRNA, then digested by RNase H. After primer extension and autoradiography, the antisense accessible sites (AAS) of survivin were selected. Then RNADraw software was used to analyze and choose the AAS with obvious stem-loop structures, according to which the complementary antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ODNs) were synthesized and transferred into survivin highly- expressing gastric cancer cell line MKN-45. Survivin expression was detected by RT-PCR and Western Blotting. Cellular growth activities were assayed by tetrazolium bromide (MTT)colorimetry. Cellular ultrastructure was observed by electronic microscopy, while apoptosis was detected by annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining flow cytometry.RESULTS: Thirteen AAS of survivin were selected in vitro.Four AAS with stem-loop structures were chosen, locating at 207-226 bp, 187-206 bp, 126-145 bp and 44-63 bp of survivin cDNA respectively. When compared with nontranfection controls, their corresponding AS-ODNs (AS-ODN1,AS-ODN2, AS-ODN3 and AS-ODN4) could reduce Survivin mRNA levels in MKN-45 cells by 54.3±1.1% (t= 6.12, P<0.01),86.1±1.0% (t= 5.27, P<0.01), 32.2±1.3% (t= 7.34, P<0.01)and 56.2±0.9% (t= 6.45, P<0.01) respectively, while survivin protein levels were decreased by 42.2±2.5% (t = 6.26,P<0.01), 75.4±3.1% (t= 7.11, P<0.01), 28.3±2.0% (t= 6.04,P<0.01) and 45.8±1.2% (t = 6.38, P<0.01) respectively.After transfection with 600 nmol/L AS-ODN1~AS-ODN4 for24 h, cell growth was inhibited by 28.12±1.54% (t= 7.62,P<0.01), 38.42±3.12% (t = 7.75, P<0.01), 21.46±2.63%(t= 5.94, P<0.01) and 32.12±1.77% (t= 6.17, P<0.01)respectively. Partial cancer cells presented the

  19. 微波凝固止血治疗肝脏活动性出血的可行性%Feasibility study on coagulation of hepatic active bleeding site with microwave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴鸿莉; 宋宏萍; 周晓东; 于铭; 韩增辉; 曹军英; 蒋苏齐; 王占江

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the feasibility of using microwave to produce rapid hemostasis of liver active bleeding. Methods Twelve new Zealand white rabbits were anesthetized, and their livers were exposed. After heparinized, the animals were randomly divided into 80 W group, 60 W group and control group. Guided by color Doppler ultrasonography, an 18 G semi-automatic biopsy needle was inserted into the hepatic parenchyma, injuring the hepatic parenchyma and small blood vessel to create active bleeding. There were about 3-5 hepatic active bleeding sites created in one animal. Paired comparisons were performed among three groups. The microwave antenna was posed to the bleeding site worked with 80 W or 60 W. A corresponding site of active bleeding in another animal without application of microwave served as a control. Significant differences of blood loss, hemostasis time and carbonization rate were tested. Results 80 W and 60 W groups showed significantly less mean blood loss than control group [ ( 0. 09 ±0. 12 )g vs ( 1. 83 ±0. 52 )g, χ2 =25. 00,P 0. 05 ). 80 W group had less hemostasis time than 60 W group [ ( 13. 1 ±4. 2 )s vs ( 18. 3 ± 7. 9 )s, T + = 4. 5000, T - = 115. 5000, P = 0. 000 ], but had higher carbonization rate than 60 W group ( 13/16 vs 5/16, χ2 = 8. 127, P= 0.004). Conclusions Coagulation with microwave is a rapid and effective method to arrest hepatic active bleeding. Sixty W can effectively induce hemostasis without significant carbonization, and the time of duration is 10 s to 40 s.%目的 探讨微波凝固止血治疗肝脏活动性出血的可行性.方法 12只新西兰大白兔暴露肝脏.实验动物经肝素化后,彩色多普勒超声引导下18G半自动活检针击发穿刺损伤肝组织及小血管结构,建立肝脏活动性出血模型.实验动物随机均分为对照组、60 W组和80 W组3组,每组各4只动物,每只动物做3 ~ 5个活动性出血点,各组间作点对点对照.60 W组和80 W组分别用相应功率微波凝

  20. Role of endoscopy in the management of acute diverticular bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charalampos Pilichos; Emmanouil Bobotis

    2008-01-01

    Colonic diverticulosis is one of the most common causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopy is not only a useful diagnostic tool for localizing the bleeding site, but also a therapeutic modality for its management. To date, haemostatic methods have included adrenaline injection, mechanical clipping, thermal and electrical coagulation or combinations of them. The results of all published data are herein reviewed.

  1. Assessment of an Electronic Intervention in Young Women with Heavy Menstrual Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Jennifer E; Yee, Donald L; Santos, Xiomara M; Bercaw-Pratt, Jennifer L; Kurkowski, Jennifer; Soni, Heather; Lee-Kim, Youngna J; Shah, Mona D; Mahoney, Donald; Srivaths, Lakshmi V

    2016-10-15

    STUDY OBJECTIVE, DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, INTERVENTIONS, AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Bleeding disorders (BD) occur in up to 50% of adolescents with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). This presents unique challenges to health care providers because of the complexity of treating the condition and such complexity can result in difficulty with patients understanding basic information about their condition, limit communication with medical providers, and patient compliance. The aim of the study was to use an electronic approach to enhance patient compliance with medications used to treat their HMB, and to provide educational access to adolescents with BD. This was a prospective cohort study involving patients in a Young Women's Bleeding Disorder Clinic at a single children's hospital. Subjects were given an iPod Touch (Apple Inc, Cupertino, CA) device (ITD), preloaded with the iPeriod (Winkpass Creations) application. Participants recorded information about their BD that they learned about on BD Web sites, and menses, and medications. Electronic and charted data were collected to monitor compliance with prescribed treatment regimens. All ITD allowed Wi-Fi access to allow teens to explore BD Web sites and knowledge was assessed.

  2. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Syed Irfan-Ur; Saeian, Kia

    2016-04-01

    In the intensive care unit, vigilance is needed to manage nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A focused history and physical examination must be completed to identify inciting factors and the need for hemodynamic stabilization. Although not universally used, risk stratification tools such as the Blatchford and Rockall scores can facilitate triage and management. Urgent evaluation for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeds requires prompt respiratory assessment, and identification of hemodynamic instability with fluid resuscitation and blood transfusions if necessary. Future studies are needed to evaluate the indication, safety, and efficacy of emerging endoscopic techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Incidence and Management of Bleeding Complications Following Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Nieun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu Bo [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a serious complication that sometimes occurs after percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG). We evaluated the incidence of bleeding complications after a PRG and its management including transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). We retrospectively reviewed 574 patients who underwent PRG in our institution between 2000 and 2010. Eight patients (1.4%) had symptoms or signs of upper GI bleeding after PRG. The initial presentation was hematemesis (n = 3), melena (n = 2), hematochezia (n = 2) and bloody drainage through the gastrostomy tube (n = 1). The time interval between PRG placement and detection of bleeding ranged from immediately after to 3 days later (mean: 28 hours). The mean decrease in hemoglobin concentration was 3.69 g/dL (range, 0.9 to 6.8 g/dL). In three patients, bleeding was controlled by transfusion (n = 2) or compression of the gastrostomy site (n = 1). The remaining five patients underwent an angiography because bleeding could not be controlled by transfusion only. In one patient, the bleeding focus was not evident on angiography or endoscopy, and wedge resection including the tube insertion site was performed for hemostasis. The other four patients underwent prophylactic (n = 1) or therapeutic (n = 3) TAEs. In three patients, successful hemostasis was achieved by TAE, whereas the remaining one patient underwent exploration due to persistent bleeding despite TAE. We observed an incidence of upper GI bleeding complicating the PRG of 1.4%. TAE following conservative management appears to be safe and effective for hemostasis.

  4. Environmental assessment for the Area 5 radioactive waste management site access improvement at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment which analyzes the potential environmental effects of improving access to its AREA 5 RWMS at the NTS. The EA evaluates the potential impacts of constructing an extension of the Cane Springs Road between Mercury Highway and the 5-01 Road. Three alternative actions are also evaluated: (1) construction of a new road along the existing alignment of the Powerline Road between Mercury Highway and the 5-01 Road, (2) upgrading the existing 5-01 Road, and (3) taking no action. The purpose and need for improving access to the RWMS are addressed in Section 1.0 of the EA. A detailed description of the proposed action and alternatives is in Section 2.0. Section 3.0 describes the affected environment and Section 4.0 the environmental effects of the proposed action and alternatives. Health and transportation effects, accident scenarios, cumulative effects, and other relevant information are found in Sections 5.0 through 12.0 of the EA. DOE determined that the alternative action of upgrading the existing 5-01 Road would best meet the needs of the agency.

  5. 成人烟雾病颅内出血部位及原N的MSCTA分析%MSCTA analysis of intracranial bleeding site and causes in adults moyamoya disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立莎; 朱磊; 张悦; 李光; 王勇

    2013-01-01

    Objective; To investigate the locations and causes of intracranial hemorrhage in adult moyamoya dis ease by the use of MSCTA technology. Methods:Clinical data and MSCTA materials of 30 moyamoya patients at the age of 30 or above were retrospectively analyzed. Results:ln this group,there were 6 cases of cerebral lobar hemorrhage,15 cases of thalamus and basal ganglia region hemorrhage,5 cases of intraventricular hemorrhage,and 4 cases of subarachnoid hemor rhage. MSCTA manifestations:① All cases of this group showed different degree of stenosis and occlusion above the internal carotid bifurcation;20 cases showed stenosis and occlusion in bilateral middle cerebral artery and 10 cases unilateral;25 caebral artery and 3 cases unilateral cases showed stenosis in superficial temporal artery and 3 cases unilateral. ②Abnormal vascular network developed around circle of Willis and basal ganglia region in 28 cases. ③Development of collateral circula tion: dilatation of posterior cerebral artery with formation of collateral with leptomeningeal branches in 22 cases; dilatation of anterior communicating artery supplied from the contralateral anterior cerebral artery in 10 case;dilatation of ophthalmic ar teries in 5 caseidilalation of external carotid artery branches forming anastomosis with cerebral pial arteris in 8 cases. ④ de velopment of cerebral aneurysm in 11 cases. ⑤Relationship between cerebral hemorrhage and collateral circulation: we can see the abnormal vascular network developed in all cases (15 cases of thalamus and basal ganglia area hemorrhage and 5 ca ses of ventricular hemorrhage). In 6 cases of cerebral lobar hemorrhage we can see rich piamater anastomosis branches,one of which showed that the bleeding in occipital lobe was due to the rupture of posterior cerebral artery aneurysm. Conclusion: Intracranial hemorrhage in adult moyamoya disease is mainly located in thalamus, basal ganglia region and ventricle. Abnormal vascular network,dilatation of

  6. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons. PMID:26962402

  7. Bleeding during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQ090 “Early Pregnancy Loss”). What is an ectopic pregnancy? An ectopic pregnancy occurs when the fertilized egg does not implant ... vaginal bleeding is the only sign of an ectopic pregnancy. Other symptoms may include abdominal, pelvic, or shoulder ...

  8. Trocar-related abdominal wall bleeding in 200 patients after laparoscopic cholecistectomy: Personal experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Girolamo Geraci; Carmelo Sciumè; Franco Pisello; Francesco Li Volsi; Tiziana Facella; Giuseppe Modica

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the complications and incidence of the first and second access-related vascular injuries induced by videolaparoscopic cholecistectomy.METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed vascular injuries in 200 consecutive patients who underwent videolaparoscopic cholecistectomy from 2003 to 2005.One hundred and one patients with placement of radial expanding trocars were assigned into group A and 99patients with placement of pyramidal tipped trocars into group B. All the patients were submitted to open access according to Hasson for the first trocar.RESULTS: Bleeding did not occur at the intraoperative cannula-site in group A. However, it occurred at the intraoperative cannula-site of 7 patients (7.1%) in group B, with a statistically significant difference (P < 0.01).No mortality was registered. More vascular lesions were found in group B.CONCLLSION: The advantage of Hasson technique is that peritoneal cavity access is gained under direct vision, preventing most severe injuries. The open technique with radial expanding trocars is recommended for secure access to the abdominal cavity in videolaparoscopy. Great care should be taken to avoid major complications and understanding the abdominal wall anatomy is important for reducing bleeding during or after s placement of trocars.

  9. Endovascular revascularization of chronically thrombosed arteriovenous fistulas and grafts for hemodialysis: a retrospective study in 15 patients with 18 access sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Mei-Jui; Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu; Chi, Wen-Che; Liu, Yi-Chun; Liang, Huei-Lung; Pan, Huay-Ben

    2011-04-01

    The current study retrospectively evaluated whether endovascular revascularization of chronically thrombosed and long-discarded vascular access sites for hemodialysis was feasible. Technical and clinical success rates, postintervention primary and secondary patency rates, and complications were reported. During a 1-year period, we reviewed a total of 924 interventions performed for dysfunction and/or failed hemodialysis vascular access sites and permanent catheters in 881 patients. In patients whose vascular access-site problems were considered untreatable or were considered treatable with a high risk of failure and access-site abandonment, we attempted to revascularize (resurrect) the chronically occluded and long-discarded (mummy) vascular access sites. We attempted to resurrect a total of 18 mummy access sites (mean age 46.6 ± 38.7 months; range 5-144) in 15 patients (8 women and 7 men; mean age 66.2 ± 11.5 years; age range 50-85) and had an overall technical success rate of 77.8%. Resurrection failure occurred in 3 fistulas and in 1 straight graft. The clinical success rate was 100% at 2 months after resurrection. In the 14 resurrected vascular access sites, 6 balloon-assisted maturation procedures were required in 5 fistulas; after access-site maturation, a total of 22 interventions were performed to maintain access-site patency. The mean go-through time for successful resurrection procedures was 146.6 ± 34.3 min (range 74-193). Postmaturation primary patency rates were 71.4 ± 12.1% at 30 days, 57.1 ± 13.2% at 60 days, 28.6 ± 13.4% at 90 days, and 19 ± 11.8% at 180 days. Postmaturation secondary patency rates were 100% at 30, 60, and 90 days and 81.8 ± 11.6% at 180 days. There were 2 major complications consisting of massive venous ruptures in 2 mummy access sites during balloon dilation; in both cases, prolonged balloon inflation failed to achieve hemostasis, but percutaneous N-butyl cyanoacrylate glue seal-off was performed successfully. Percutaneous

  10. The role of nuclear medicine in acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, P. (Saint James' s Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-10-01

    In most patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, endoscopy will locate the site and cause of bleeding, and also provide an opportunity for local therapy. The cause of lower GI bleeding is often difficult to attribute, even when pathology is found by colonoscopy or barium enema. Nuclear medicine techniques can be used to identify the site of bleeding in those patients in whom the initial diagnostic procedures are negative or inconclusive. Methods using transient labelling of blood (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-sulphur colloid) produce a high target-to-background ratio in positive cases, give quick results and localize bleeding sites accurately, but depend upon bleeding being active at the time of injection. Techniques using stable blood labelling (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-labelled red blood cells) may be positive even with intermittent bleeding but may take several hours to produce a result and are less precise in localization. The most useful application is in patients with recurrent or prolonged bleeding, those with inconclusive endoscopy or barium studies, and those who are high-risk surgical candidates. (author).

  11. Operational Circular No.2 (Rev. 2) - Conditions of access to the fenced parts of the CERN site

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Operational Circular No. 2 (Rev. 2) entitled “Conditions of access to the fenced parts of the CERN site” and its “implementation measures”, approved by the Director-General following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee meeting on 20 May 2014 and entering into force on 1 September 2014, are available on the intranet site of the Human Resources Department (see here).   This circular is applicable to members of the personnel and other persons concerned. It cancels and replaces Operational Circular No. 2 (Rev. 1) entitled “Conditions of access to the fenced parts of the CERN site”, of April 1998. In particular, the revised circular provides for the possibility of mandating a person responsible for the proper implementation of the circular, specifies the rules relating to vehicles allowed on the site and the respective responsibilities of their owners, and relaxes certain administrative formalities in case of loss, theft or di...

  12. Electrochemistry suggests proton access from the exit site to the binuclear center in Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase pathway variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas; Melin, Frédéric; Richter, Oliver-M H; Ludwig, Bernd; Kannt, Aimo; Müller, Hanne; Michel, Hartmut; Hellwig, Petra

    2015-02-27

    Two different pathways through which protons access cytochrome c oxidase operate during oxygen reduction from the mitochondrial matrix, or the bacterial cytoplasm. Here, we use electrocatalytic current measurements to follow oxygen reduction coupled to proton uptake in cytochrome c oxidase isolated from Paracoccus denitrificans. Wild type enzyme and site-specific variants with defects in both proton uptake pathways (K354M, D124N and K354M/D124N) were immobilized on gold nanoparticles, and oxygen reduction was probed electrochemically in the presence of varying concentrations of Zn(2+) ions, which are known to inhibit both the entry and the exit proton pathways in the enzyme. Our data suggest that under these conditions substrate protons gain access to the oxygen reduction site via the exit pathway. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Modular Robotics for Delivering On-Site contamination Sensors and Mapping Systems to Difficult-to-Access Locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisinger, Joseph

    2001-05-21

    Presently, characterization operations are scheduled for thousands of facilities and pieces of equipment throughout DOE sites, each of which requires manual surveying with handheld instruments and manual record keeping. Such work, particularly in difficult-to-access-areas, results in significant amounts of worker exposure, long timelines and additional secondary waste generation. Therefore, a distinct need exists for remote tools that can quickly deploy sensors and automated contamination mapping systems into these areas.

  14. Internet sites of public utilities. Customers wish for interactive access; Die Internetauftritte der Versorger. Kunden wuenschen interaktive Anbindung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knechtel, Karsten [Process Management Consulting GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Electric and gas utilities all have internet sites for private customers. Many of them provide interactive access to all relevant services for both regular and interested new customers. To the end users, innovative aspects of energy supply in the deregulated market are currently of increasing interest. A recent industry barometer shows the extent to which utilities have installed interactive integration of both their current and prospective private customers in their business processes. Especially multimedia criteria are gaining increasing importance. (orig.)

  15. Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000627.htm Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy To use the sharing features ... the blood from soaking your clothes. What Causes Bleeding Later in Pregnancy? When labor begins, the cervix ...

  16. Platelet function in bleeding disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bladel, E.R.

    2013-01-01

    The first bleeding diathesis we studied was hemophilia A. Since FVIII activity level does not always correlate with the bleeding tendency in individual patients, bleeding tendency must also be influenced by other factors. Earlier studies excluded the remaining clotting factors and FVIII genotype as

  17. Approach to the bleeding newborn

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Bleeding in the newborn can lead to serious cardiovascular and neurological effects. Routine administration of vitamin K has reduced the incidence of hemorrhagic disease of the newborn, but abnormal bleeding can occur in babies from many causes. A practical approach to the diagnosis and treatment of bleeding in the newborn is described in this article.

  18. Spatial accessibility to vaccination sites in a campaign against rabies in São Paulo city, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Gina; Acosta, Carlos Mera; Dias, Ricardo Augusto

    2013-08-01

    It is estimated that the city of São Paulo has over 2.5 million dogs and 560 thousand cats. These populations are irregularly distributed throughout the territory, making it difficult to appropriately allocate health services focused on these species. To reasonably allocate vaccination sites, it is necessary to identify social groups and their access to the referred service. Rabies in dogs and cats has been an important zoonotic health issue in São Paulo and the key component of rabies control is vaccination. The present study aims to introduce an approach to quantify the potential spatial accessibility to the vaccination sites of the 2009 campaign against rabies in the city of São Paulo and solve the overestimation associated with the classic methodology that applies buffer zones around vaccination sites based on Euclidean (straight-line) distance. To achieve this, a Gaussian-based two-step floating catchment area method with a travel-friction coefficient was adapted in a geographic information system environment, using distances along a street network based on Dijkstra's algorithm (short path method). The choice of the distance calculation method affected the results in terms of the population covered. In general, areas with low accessibility for both dogs and cats were observed, especially in densely populated areas. The eastern zone of the city had higher accessibility values compared with peripheral and central zones. The Gaussian-based two-step floating catchment method with a travel-friction coefficient was used to assess the overestimation of the straight-line distance method, which is the most widely used method for coverage analysis. We conclude that this approach has the potential to improve the efficiency of resource use when planning rabies control programs in large urban environments such as São Paulo. The findings emphasize the need for surveillance and intervention in isolated areas.

  19. Transumbilical laparoendoscopic single-site donor nephrectomy: Without the use of a single port access device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Dubey

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions : Transumbilical LESS-DN can be cost-effectively performed using conventional laparoscopy instruments and without the need for a single port access device. Warm ischemia times with this technique are comparable with that during conventional multiport laparoscopic donor nephrectomy.

  20. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Right Sport for You Shyness Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) KidsHealth > For Teens > Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) ... español Hemorragia uterina disfuncional What Is Abnormal Uterine Bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is the name doctors ...

  1. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF PREGNANCY WITH BLEEDING PER VAGINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit C

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study of 150 patients presenting with bleeding per vagina in first, second & third trimester was conducted to evaluate the cause of bleeding, access the severity of condition, to predict the later coarse of pregnancy & to evaluate the role of ultrasonography in management. This study was conducted in department of Radiology at Basaweshwar Teaching & General hospital, Government general hospital & Sangameshwer teaching & General hospital. This study concludes that, Ultrasonography should be the first line of investigation in all the cases of bleeding per vagina in pregnancy

  2. Replacement tunnelled dialysis catheters for haemodialysis access: Same site, new site, or exchange - a multivariate analysis and risk score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapping, C R; Scott, P M; Lakshminarayan, R; Ettles, D F; Robinson, G J

    2012-10-01

    To identify variables related to complications following tunnelled dialysis catheter (TDC) replacement and stratifying the risk to reduce morbidity in patients with end-stage renal disease. One hundred and forty TDCs (Split Cath, medCOMP) were replaced in 140 patients over a 5 year period. Multiple variables were retrospectively collected and analysed to stratify the risk and to predict patients who were more likely to suffer from complications. Multivariate regression analysis was used to identify variables predictive of complications. There were six immediate complications, 42 early complications, and 37 late complications. Multivariate analysis revealed that variables significantly associated to complications were: female sex (p = 0.003; OR 2.9); previous TDC in the same anatomical position in the past (p = 0.014; OR 4.1); catheter exchange (p = 0.038; OR 3.8); haemoglobin 15 s (p = 0.002; OR 4.1); and C-reactive protein >50 mg/l (p = 0.007; OR 4.6). A high-risk score, which used the values from the multivariate analysis, predicted 100% of the immediate complications, 95% of the early complications, and 68% of the late complications. Patients can now be scored prior to TDC replacement. A patient with a high-risk score can be optimized to reduce the chance of complications. Further prospective studies to confirm that rotating the site of TDC reduces complications are warranted as this has implications for current guidelines. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Balloon occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration for bleeding gastric varices: Eyes see what the mind knows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpinder S Khera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one in six patients with portal hypertension who develop varices at sites of portosystemic venous collaterals has gastric varices due to hepatofugal flow into the gastric veins. Bleeding from gastric varices, though less common, has a higher mortality and morbidity compared to bleeding esophageal varices, which are easier to manage endoscopically. The efferent channel for gastric varices is mostly the gastrorenal shunt (GRS which opens into the left renal vein. Balloon-occluded transvenous obliteration (BRTO involves accessing the GRS with an aim to temporarily occlude its outflow using a balloon catheter and at the same time injecting sclerosant mixture within the varix so as to cause its thrombosis and thereby obliteration. BRTO is one of the mainstays of minimally invasive treatment for bleeding gastric varices. In the minority of cases where the GRS is absent, conventional BRTO is technically not possible. However, accessing the small alternate shunt from the inferior phrenic vein may be possible if one is aware of its existence.

  4. Coral Reef Surveys at 21 Sites in American Samoa during 2002 (NODC Accession 0000622)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Transects of the coral colonies at 21 sites in American Samoa were surveyed by Dr. Charles Birkeland during an underwater swim in March 2002. Data for each coral...

  5. Coral Reef Surveys at 21 Sites in American Samoa during 2002 (NODC Accession 0000735)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Transects of the coral colonies at 21 sites in American Samoa were surveyed by Dr. Charles Birkeland during an underwater swim in March 2002. Data for each coral...

  6. Risk of bleeding with dabigatran in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Inmaculada; Baik, Seo Hyon; Piñera, Antonio; Zhang, Yuting

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear whether dabigatran etexilate mesylate is associated with higher risk of bleeding than warfarin sodium in real-world clinical practice. To compare the risk of bleeding associated with dabigatran and warfarin using Medicare data. In this retrospective cohort study, we used pharmacy and medical claims in 2010 to 2011 from a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries. We identified participants as those newly diagnosed as having atrial fibrillation from October 1, 2010, through October 31, 2011, and who initiated dabigatran or warfarin treatment within 60 days of initial diagnosis. We followed up patients until discontinued use or switch of anticoagulants, death, or December 31, 2011. Dabigatran users (n = 1302) and warfarin users (n = 8102). We identified any bleeding events and categorized them as major and minor bleeding by anatomical site. Major bleeding events included intracranial hemorrhage, hemoperitoneum, and inpatient or emergency department stays for hematuria, gastrointestinal, or other hemorrhage. We used a propensity score weighting mechanism to balance patient characteristics between 2 groups and Cox proportional hazards regression models to evaluate the risk of bleeding. We further examined the risk of bleeding for 4 subgroups of high-risk patients: those 75 years or older, African Americans, those with chronic kidney disease, and those with more than 7 concomitant comorbidities. Dabigatran was associated with a higher risk of bleeding relative to warfarin, with hazard ratios of 1.30 (95% CI, 1.20-1.41) for any bleeding event, 1.58 (95% CI, 1.36-1.83) for major bleeding, and 1.85 (95% CI, 1.64-2.07) for gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk of intracranial hemorrhage was higher among warfarin users, with a hazard ratio of 0.32 (95% CI, 0.20-0.50) for dabigatran compared with warfarin. Dabigatran was consistently associated with an increased risk of major bleeding and gastrointestinal hemorrhage for all subgroups analyzed. The risk of

  7. Small intestine bleeding due to multifocal angiosarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luisa Zacarias F(o)ohrding; Arne Macher; Stefan Braunstein; Wolfram Trudo Knoefel; Stefan Andreas Topp

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of an 84-year-old male patient with primary small intestinal angiosarcoma.The patient initially presented with anemia and melena.Consecutive endoscopy revealed no signs of upper or lower active gastrointestinal bleeding.The patient had been diagnosed 3 years previously with an aortic dilation,which was treated with a stent.Computed tomography suggested an aorto-intestinal fistula as the cause of the in-testinal bleeding,leading to operative stent explantation and aortic replacement.However,an aorto-intestinal fistula was not found,and the intestinal bleeding did not arrest postoperatively.The constant need for blood transfusions made an exploratory laparotomy imperative,which showed multiple bleeding sites,predominately in the jejunal wall.A distal loop jejunostomy was conducted to contain the small intestinal bleeding and a segmental resection for histological evaluation was performed.The histological analysis revealed a lessdifferentiated tumor with characteristic CD31,cytokeratin,and vimentin expression,which led to the diagnosis of small intestinal angiosarcoma.Consequently,the infiltrated part of the jejunum was successfully resected in a subsequent operation,and adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel was planned.Angiosarcoma of the small intestine is an extremely rare malignant neoplasm that presents with bleeding and high mortality.Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to improve outcome.A small intestinal angiosarcoma is a challenging diagnosis to make because of its rarity,nonspecific symptoms of altered intestinal function,nonspecific abdominal pain,severe melena,and acute abdominal signs.Therefore,a quick clinical and histological diagnosis and decisive measures including surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy should be the aim.

  8. Predicting Social Networking Site Use and Online Communication Practices among Adolescents: The Role of Access and Device Ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew P. Cingel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Given adolescents' heavy social media use, this study examined a number of predictors of adolescent social media use, as well as predictors of online communication practices. Using data collected from a national sample of 467 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17, results indicate that demographics, technology access, and technology ownership are related to social media use and communication practices. Specifically, females log onto and use more constructive com-munication practices on Facebook compared to males. Additionally, adolescents who own smartphones engage in more constructive online communication practices than those who share regular cell phones or those who do not have access to a cell phone. Overall, results imply that ownership of mobile technologies, such as smartphones and iPads, may be more predictive of social networking site use and online communication practices than general ownership of technology.

  9. Predicting Social Networking Site Use and Online Communication Practices among Adolescents: The Role of Access and Device Ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew P. Cingel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Given adolescents' heavy social media use, this study examined a number of predictors of adolescent social media use, as well as predictors of online communication practices. Using data collected from a national sample of 467 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17, results indicate that demographics, technology access, and technology ownership are related to social media use and communication practices. Specifically, females log onto and use more constructive communication practices on Facebook compared to males. Additionally, adolescents who own smartphones engage in more constructive online communication practices than those who share regular cell phones or those who do not have access to a cell phone. Overall, results imply that ownership of mobile technologies, such as smartphones and iPads, may be more predictive of social networking site use and online communication practices than general ownership of technology.

  10. UTSA-74: A MOF-74 Isomer with Two Accessible Binding Sites per Metal Center for Highly Selective Gas Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feng; Yan, Changsheng; Dang, Lilong; Krishna, Rajamani; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Hui; Dong, Xinglong; Han, Yu; Hu, Tong-Liang; O'Keeffe, Michael; Wang, Lingling; Luo, Mingbiao; Lin, Rui-Biao; Chen, Banglin

    2016-05-04

    A new metal-organic framework Zn2(H2O)(dobdc)·0.5(H2O) (UTSA-74, H4dobdc = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid), Zn-MOF-74/CPO-27-Zn isomer, has been synthesized and structurally characterized. It has a novel four coordinated fgl topology with one-dimensional channels of about 8.0 Å. Unlike metal sites in the well-established MOF-74 with a rod-packing structure in which each of them is in a five coordinate square pyramidal coordination geometry, there are two different Zn(2+) sites within the binuclear secondary building units in UTSA-74 in which one of them (Zn1) is in a tetrahedral while another (Zn2) in an octahedral coordination geometry. After activation, the two axial water molecules on Zn2 sites can be removed, generating UTSA-74a with two accessible gas binding sites per Zn2 ion. Accordingly, UTSA-74a takes up a moderately high and comparable amount of acetylene (145 cm(3)/cm(3)) to Zn-MOF-74. Interestingly, the accessible Zn(2+) sites in UTSA-74a are bridged by carbon dioxide molecules instead of being terminally bound in Zn-MOF-74, so UTSA-74a adsorbs a much smaller amount of carbon dioxide (90 cm(3)/cm(3)) than Zn-MOF-74 (146 cm(3)/cm(3)) at room temperature and 1 bar, leading to a superior MOF material for highly selective C2H2/CO2 separation. X-ray crystal structures, gas sorption isotherms, molecular modeling, and simulated and experimental breakthroughs comprehensively support this result.

  11. UTSA-74: A MOF-74 Isomer with Two Accessible Binding Sites per Metal Center for Highly Selective Gas Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Feng

    2016-04-26

    A new metal-organic framework Zn2(H2O)-(dobdc)·0.5(H2O) (UTSA-74, H4dobdc = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid), Zn-MOF-74/CPO-27-Zn isomer, has been synthesized and structurally characterized. It has a novel four coordinated fgl topology with one-dimensional channels of about 8.0 Å. Unlike metal sites in the wellestablished MOF-74 with a rod-packing structure in which each of them is in a five coordinate square pyramidal coordination geometry, there are two different Zn2+ sites within the binuclear secondary building units in UTSA-74 in which one of them (Zn1) is in a tetrahedral while another (Zn2) in an octahedral coordination geometry. After activation, the two axial water molecules on Zn2 sites can be removed, generating UTSA-74a with two accessible gas binding sites per Zn2 ion. Accordingly, UTSA-74a takes up a moderately high and comparable amount of acetylene (145 cm3/cm3) to Zn-MOF-74. Interestingly, the accessible Zn2+ sites in UTSA-74a are bridged by carbon dioxide molecules instead of being terminally bound in Zn-MOF-74, so UTSA-74a adsorbs a much smaller amount of carbon dioxide (90 cm3/cm3) than Zn-MOF-74 (146 cm3/cm3) at room temperature and 1 bar, leading to a superior MOF material for highly selective C2H2/CO2 separation. X-ray crystal structures, gas sorption isotherms, molecular modeling, and simulated and experimental breakthroughs comprehensively support this result. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  12. Impact of language anxiety and self-efficacy on accessing Internet sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Jen; Lay, Yun-Long; Tsao, Wen-Yu; Liou, Yi-Chin; Lin, Cheng-Kun

    2007-04-01

    Language interface plays a critical role as the foundation of communication. Possessing greater fluency in the host language can lead to increased opportunities for interaction with host members. This research is to examine the impact of language and Internet usage anxiety and self-efficacy on the intended uses of Internet sites, respectively. By the same token, whether Internet/language self-efficacy would mediate the effects of Internet/language anxiety on the intention of the Internet site use is also examined. A valid sample of 368 undergraduates was tested in this study. The path analysis results mostly supported the model tested. The results display that the anxiety of language and Internet use have significantly influenced self-efficacy of Internet use and language, respectively. Anxiety about language and Internet use have also significantly influenced the intention to use Internet sites individually. Furthermore, language self-efficacy has significantly influenced the intention to use Internet sites, but Internet self-efficacy has not. The implications are discussed at the end of the paper.

  13. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which…

  14. Ganges Chasma Landing Site: Access to Sand Sheets, Wall Rock and Layered Mesa Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, James W., Jr.

    1999-06-01

    The floor of Ganges Chasma offers an ideal landing site for the MSP 2001 lander. This site is exquisite both in terms of engineering constraints and science objectives. The floor of Ganges Chasma is mantled with an extensive sand sheet. Sand sheets develop in conditions which are unfavorable for dune formation. These may include a high water table, periodic flooding, surface cementation, and coarse grained sands. The most extensive sand sheets on Earth are located in the eastern Sahara. These sheets have a relief of less than 1 m over wide areas and total thickness ranges from a few cm to 10 m. The surfaces of sand sheets are composed of granule to pebbly lag deposits. Sand sheets provide an extremely safe landing site and have very low relief. The safety concerns regarding slopes, rocks, and dust would be alleviated by the sand sheet. Furthermore, this vast sand sheet would allow the Marie Curie Rover to cover great distances. Rover navigability would be very easily compared to the tedious rock avoidance maneuvers that Sojourner had to accomplish. This exercise would be an important precursor test for the more capable Athena Rover which will execute longer traverses. Moreover, the Rover has already been "field tested" on sand at the JPL Mars sandbox. Dust should not be a problem: Thermal inertia is 7.7 to 8.9 cgs units. This site satisfies all engineering constraints.

  15. Site selection for vascular access creation in hemodialysis in end stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekhar C. Mahakalkar

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The site for fistula creation depends on the quality of the artery and vein. To achieve good success rates preoperative color Doppler is essential to evaluate the vessels. The complication rates can be minimised by following standard operating protocols. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 681-685

  16. Story: A Bleeding Watermelon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor bzang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A Bleeding Watermelon was written by Norsang (Nor bzang;b. 1988, a native of Dpa ris (Rab rgyas (Huazangsi 华藏寺 Township, Tianzhu 天祝 Tibetan Autonomous County,Gansu 甘肃 Province. Norsang writes: I heard that a university student opened an elevator door in a campus building still under construction. The elevator shaft was empty and he fell to his death. Many people had questions about his death. This inspired me to write this story.

  17. Constrained water access to the active site of cytochrome P450 from the piezophilic bacterium Photobacterium profundum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sineva, Elena V.; Davydov, Dmitri R.

    2010-12-01

    Living species inhabiting ocean deeps must adapt to high hydrostatic pressure. This adaptation, which must enable functioning under conditions of promoted protein hydration, is especially important for proteins such as cytochromes P450 that exhibit functionally important hydration-dehydration dynamics. Here we study the interactions of substrates with cytochrome P450-SS9, a putative fatty acid hydroxylase from the piezophilic bacterium Photobacterium profundum SS9, and characterize the protein's barotropic properties. Comparison of P450-SS9 with cytochrome P450BM-3, a mesophilic fatty acid hydroxylase, suggests that P450-SS9 is characterized by severely confined accessibility and low water occupancy of the active site. This feature may reveal a mechanism for the structural adaptation of the piezophilic enzyme. We also demonstrate that saturated and unsaturated fatty acids exert opposite effects on solvent accessibility and hydration of the active site. Modulation of the protein conformation by fatty acids is hypothesized to have an important physiological function in the piezophile.

  18. Safety and Efficacy of the Prostar XL Vascular Closing Device for Percutaneous Closure of Large Arterial Access Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Prostar XL device for percutaneous large access site closure in an unselected patient and operator collective. Materials and Methods. All patients ( who had received percutaneous vascular closing with the Prostar XL device in our institution with follow-up data of at least 6 months were retrospectively included. Primary (freedom from surgical conversion and continued (freedom from groin surgery in further course technical success and major (deviations from expected outcome requiring surgery and minor (other deviations from expected outcome complications were assessed. Success and complications rates were correlated with delivery system size (Mann-Whitney Rank Sum Tests and operator experience (paired samples t-test. Results. Rates of primary and continued technical success as well as major and minor complications were 93.6%, 89.7%, 10.3%, and 10.3% (groin based and 90.0%, 84.0%, 16.0%, and 16.0% (patient based, respectively. No correlation of success and complications rate was found with delivery system sizes and operator experience. Conclusions. Application of the Prostar XL device for percutaneous closure of large arterial access sites is safe with a relatively high rate of technical success and low rate of major complications. Sizes of the delivery systems and the experience of the operator did not influence the results.

  19. Conformation analysis of a surface loop that controls active site access in the GH11 xylanase A from Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Davi Serradella; Ward, Richard John

    2012-04-01

    Xylanases (EC 3.2.1.8 endo-1,4-glycosyl hydrolase) catalyze the hydrolysis of xylan, an abundant hemicellulose of plant cell walls. Access to the catalytic site of GH11 xylanases is regulated by movement of a short β-hairpin, the so-called thumb region, which can adopt open or closed conformations. A crystallographic study has shown that the D11F/R122D mutant of the GH11 xylanase A from Bacillus subtilis (BsXA) displays a stable "open" conformation, and here we report a molecular dynamics simulation study comparing this mutant with the native enzyme over a range of temperatures. The mutant open conformation was stable at 300 and 328 K, however it showed a transition to the closed state at 338 K. Analysis of dihedral angles identified thumb region residues Y113 and T123 as key hinge points which determine the open-closed transition at 338 K. Although the D11F/R122D mutations result in a reduction in local inter-intramolecular hydrogen bonding, the global energies of the open and closed conformations in the native enzyme are equivalent, suggesting that the two conformations are equally accessible. These results indicate that the thumb region shows a broader degree of energetically permissible conformations which regulate the access to the active site region. The R122D mutation contributes to the stability of the open conformation, but is not essential for thumb dynamics, i.e., the wild type enzyme can also adapt to the open conformation.

  20. Bleeding Meckel's diverticulum diagnosis: an unusual indication for computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzer, D; Gervaz, P; Platon, A; Poletti, P A

    2003-01-01

    Despite the wide use of modern investigation techniques, the diagnosis of complications related to Meckel's diverticulum (MD) remains difficult. Arteriography is commonly indicated for acute bleeding, and radionuclide scans may help in identifying the site of intestinal hemorrhage. In contrast, computed tomography (CT) is usually considered little use in the diagnosis of bleeding MD. We present the case of a young patient with massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage, in whom the diagnosis of MD bleeding was preoperatively made with contrast-enhanced CT after two negatives arteriographies.

  1. Fallot′s tetralogy presenting with variceal bleed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejariwal D

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The erythrocytosis of Fallot′s tetralogy may lead to spontaneous thrombosis at any site, but splenic vein thrombosis and variceal bleed is rarely a presentation of Fallot′s tetralogy. A case of a 48 years old female with undiagnosed Fallot′s tetralogy, presenting with variceal bleed due to splenic vein thrombosis, is reported. It is also interesting to note that the patient survived till this age without any medical or surgical treatment.

  2. Access to site-specific Fc-cRGD peptide conjugates through streamlined expressed protein ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frutos, S; Jordan, J B; Bio, M M; Muir, T W; Thiel, O R; Vila-Perelló, M

    2016-10-12

    An ideal drug should be highly effective, non-toxic and be delivered by a convenient and painless single dose. We are still far from such optimal treatment but peptides, with their high target selectivity and low toxicity profiles, provide a very attractive platform from which to strive towards it. One of the major limitations of peptide drugs is their high clearance rates, which limit dosage regimen options. Conjugation to antibody Fc domains is a viable strategy to improve peptide stability by increasing their hydrodynamic radius and hijacking the Fc recycling pathway. We report the use of a split-intein based semi-synthetic approach to site-specifically conjugate a synthetic integrin binding peptide to an Fc domain. The strategy described here allows conjugating synthetic peptides to Fc domains, which is not possible via genetic methods, fully maintaining the ability of both the Fc domain and the bioactive peptide to interact with their binding partners.

  3. Bleeding complications in immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Donald M

    2015-01-01

    Bleeding manifestations in patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) range from mild skin bruises to life-threatening intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). Severe bleeding is distinctly uncommon when the platelet count is >30 × 10(9)/L and usually only occurs when the platelet count falls administrative databases, the frequency of ICH in patients with ITP is ~0.5% in children and 1.5% in adults. Estimates of severe (non-ICH) bleeding are difficult to obtain because of the lack of standardized case definitions; the lack of a universally accepted, ITP-specific bleeding assessment tool; and the omission of reporting bleeding outcomes in many clinical studies. In practice, the presence of bleeding should dictate whether or not treatment is needed because many patients, especially children, can be safely managed with observation alone. Guiding principles for the management of ITP, based on the bleeding risk are: (1) Decide when treatment is needed and when it can safely be withheld; (2) for patients with chronic ITP, use the least toxic treatment at the lowest dose; (3) emergency treatment of severe thrombocytopenia-associated bleeding requires combination therapy; and (4) early aggressive therapy may result in durable platelet count responses.

  4. Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngu, Jing H.; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Chin, YK

    2017-01-01

    Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study.......Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study....

  5. Duodenal Bleeding from Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rangasamy, Priya; Versland, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested. PMID:21577373

  6. Duodenal Bleeding from Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Rustagi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested.

  7. Duodenal bleeding from metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rangasamy, Priya; Versland, Mark

    2011-04-20

    Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested.

  8. Safety and feasibility of emergent percutaneous coronary intervention with the transradial access in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei-min; ZHOU Li-jun; LIU Pei-dong; ZHANG Li; CHU Shan; LI Yue; ZHAO Ji-yi; DUAN Ya-nan; SHENG Li; YANG Bao-feng; WANG Feng-long; GONG Yong-tai; YANG Shu-sen

    2007-01-01

    @@ The use of intense anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in acute myocardial infarction (AMI)potentially increases the risk of bleeding complications during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) via the transfemoral approach. Recently, the transradial access has been increasingly employed as an alternative means for diagnostic and interventional procedures. Low incidence of vascular access site bleeding complications suggests the transradial approach as a safe alternative to the femoral technique in AMI, particularly under an aggressive anticoagulation/antiplatelet regimen. 1,2Nevertheless, the safety and feasibility of employing the transradial approach for primary PCI in AMI has not been thoroughly investigated so far.

  9. New binding site conformations of the dengue virus NS3 protease accessed by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo de Almeida

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is caused by four distinct serotypes of the dengue virus (DENV1-4, and is estimated to affect over 500 million people every year. Presently, there are no vaccines or antiviral treatments for this disease. Among the possible targets to fight dengue fever is the viral NS3 protease (NS3PRO, which is in part responsible for viral processing and replication. It is now widely recognized that virtual screening campaigns should consider the flexibility of target protein by using multiple active conformational states. The flexibility of the DENV NS3PRO could explain the relatively low success of previous virtual screening studies. In this first work, we explore the DENV NS3PRO conformational states obtained from molecular dynamics (MD simulations to take into account protease flexibility during the virtual screening/docking process. To do so, we built a full NS3PRO model by multiple template homology modeling. The model comprised the NS2B cofactor (essential to the NS3PRO activation, a glycine flexible link and the proteolytic domain. MD simulations had the purpose to sample, as closely as possible, the ligand binding site conformational landscape prior to inhibitor binding. The obtained conformational MD sample was clustered into four families that, together with principal component analysis of the trajectory, demonstrated protein flexibility. These results allowed the description of multiple binding modes for the Bz-Nle-Lys-Arg-Arg-H inhibitor, as verified by binding plots and pair interaction analysis. This study allowed us to tackle protein flexibility in our virtual screening campaign against the dengue virus NS3 protease.

  10. Multidetector CT angiography for acute gastrointestinal bleeding: technique and findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas, José M; Martí, Milagros; Soto, Jorge A; Esteban, Helena; Pinilla, Inmaculada; Guillén, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common reason for emergency department admissions and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Factors that complicate its clinical management include patient debility due to comorbidities; intermittence of hemorrhage; and multiple sites of simultaneous bleeding. Its management, therefore, must be multidisciplinary and include emergency physicians, gastroenterologists, and surgeons, as well as radiologists for diagnostic imaging and interventional therapy. Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding is usually managed endoscopically, with radiologic intervention reserved as an alternative to be used if endoscopic therapy fails. Endoscopy is often less successful in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, where colonoscopy may be more effective. The merits of performing bowel cleansing before colonoscopy in such cases might be offset by the resultant increase in response time and should be weighed carefully against the deficits in visualization and diagnostic accuracy that would result from performing colonoscopy without bowel preparation. In recent years, multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography has gained acceptance as a first-line option for the diagnosis and management of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding. In selected cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding, CT angiography also provides accurate information about the presence or absence of active bleeding, its source, and its cause. This information helps shorten the total diagnostic time and minimizes or eliminates the need for more expensive and more invasive procedures.

  11. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often ...

  12. Risk of bleeding and repeated bleeding events in prasugrel-treated patients: a review of data from the Japanese PRASFIT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Masakatsu; Isshiki, Takaaki; Kimura, Takeshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Yokoi, Hiroyoshi; Miyazaki, Shunichi; Ikeda, Yasuo; Nakamura, Masato; Tanaka, Yuko; Saito, Shigeru

    2017-04-01

    Prasugrel is a third-generation thienopyridine that achieves potent platelet inhibition with less pharmacological variability than other thienopyridines. However, clinical experience suggests that prasugrel may be associated with a higher risk of de novo and recurrent bleeding events compared with clopidogrel in Japanese patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In this review, we evaluate the risk of bleeding in Japanese patients treated with prasugrel at the doses (loading/maintenance doses: 20/3.75 mg) adjusted for Japanese patients, evaluate the risk factors for bleeding in Japanese patients, and examine whether patients with a bleeding event are at increased risk of recurrent bleeding. This review covers published data and new analyses of the PRASFIT (PRASugrel compared with clopidogrel For Japanese patIenTs) trials of patients undergoing PCI for acute coronary syndrome or elective reasons. The bleeding risk with prasugrel was similar to that observed with the standard dose of clopidogrel (300/75 mg), including when bleeding events were re-classified using the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium criteria. The pharmacodynamics of prasugrel was not associated with the risk of bleeding events. The main risk factors for bleeding events were female sex, low body weight, advanced age, and presence of diabetes mellitus. Use of a radial puncture site was associated with a lower risk of bleeding during PCI than a femoral puncture site. Finally, the frequency and severity of recurrent bleeding events during continued treatment were similar between prasugrel and clopidogrel. In summary, this review provides important insights into the risk and types of bleeding events in prasugrel-treated patients.Trial registration numbers: JapicCTI-101339 and JapicCTI-111550.

  13. Recurrent bleeding after perimesencephalic hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauw, Frans; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Kizilates, Ufuk; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2017-08-31

    Perimesencephalic hemorrhage (PMH) is a type of subarachnoid hemorrhage with excellent long-term outcomes. Only one well-documented case of in-hospital rebleeding after PMH is described in the literature, which occurred after initiating antithrombotic treatment because of myocardial ischemia. In this case report we describe a patient with PMH without antithrombotic treatment who had two episodes of recurrent bleeding on the day of ictus. In order to validate the radiological findings we conducted a case-control study. Six neuroradiologists and two neuroradiology fellows performed a blinded assessment of serial unenhanced head CT scans of eight patients with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern (1 index patient, 6 patients with PMH, 1 patient with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern and basilar artery aneurysm) to investigate a potential increase in amount of subarachnoid blood. A 56-year-old woman with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern and negative CT angiography had after the onset headache two episodes with a sudden increase of the headache. Blinded assessment of serial head CTs of eight patients with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern identified the patient who was clinically suspected to have two episodes of recurrent bleeding to have an increased amount of subarachnoid blood on two subsequent CT scans. Recurrent bleeding after PMH may also occur in patients not treated with antithrombotics. Even after early rebleeding, prognosis of PMH is excellent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficacy of intra-arterial treatment for massive gastrointestinal bleeding in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banshodani, Masataka; Kawanishi, Hideki; Moriishi, Misaki; Shintaku, Sadanori; Sato, Tomoyasu; Tsuchiya, Shinichiro

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of acute nonvariceal massive gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is higher in hemodialysis (HD) patients than in healthy individuals, and this is often a life-threatening event. We evaluated the efficacy of intra-arterial treatment for GIB in HD patients. Between January 2006 and June 2012, eight HD patients with GIB were treated with superselective transarterial embolization. Of the eight cases, one was duodenal bleeding, two were jejunal bleeding, one was ileocecum bleeding, two were ascending colonic bleeding, and two were sigmoid colonic bleeding. After examining the site of bleeding by endoscopy or contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), embolizations with microcoils, gelatin sponges, or N-butyl cyanoacrylate were performed through interventional radiology (IVR). In all cases, blood transfusions were frequently administered. Six of the eight patients with GIB were successfully salvaged by transarterial embolization. In one case, duodenal bleeding was refractory to endoscopic treatment. Embolization was performed twice in this case; however, the patient died of an aneurysm rupture at the embolization site 24 days after the embolizations. In another case, massive jejunal bleeding and disseminated intravascular coagulation were identified at the time of the first examination, and the patient died of multiorgan failure 26 days after the embolization. On the basis of our experience, we established an effective treatment strategy for HD patients with acute nonvariceal massive GIB, by immediately identifying the exact site and degree of bleeding using contrast-enhanced computed tomography and performing early treatment with transarterial embolization.

  15. Prognosis following upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E Roberts

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is one of the most common, high risk emergency disorders in the western world. Almost nothing has been reported on longer term prognosis following upper GI bleeding. The aim of this study was to establish mortality up to three years following hospital admission with upper GI bleeding and its relationship with aetiology, co-morbidities and socio-demographic factors. METHODS: Systematic record linkage of hospital inpatient and mortality data for 14 212 people in Wales, UK, hospitalised with upper GI bleeding between 1999 and 2004 with three year follow-up to 2007. The main outcome measures were mortality rates, standardised mortality ratios (SMRs and relative survival. RESULTS: Mortality at three years was 36.7% overall, based on 5215 fatalities. It was highest for upper GI malignancy (95% died within three years and varices (52%. Compared with the general population, mortality was increased 27-fold during the first month after admission. It fell to 4.3 by month four, but remained significantly elevated during every month throughout the three years following admission. The most important independent prognostic predictors of mortality at three years were older age (mortality increased 53 fold for people aged 85 years and over compared with those under 40 years; oesophageal and gastric/duodenal malignancy (48 and 32 respectively and gastric varices aetiologies (2.8 when compared with other bleeds; non-upper GI malignancy, liver disease and renal failure co-morbidities (15, 7.9 and 3.9; social deprivation (29% increase for quintile V vs I; incident bleeds as an inpatient (31% vs admitted with bleeding and male patients (25% vs female. CONCLUSION: Our study shows a high late as well as early mortality for upper GI bleeding, with very poor longer term prognosis following bleeding due to malignancies and varices. Aetiologies with the worst prognosis were often associated with high levels of social

  16. Ultrasound contrast agents for bleeding detection and acoustic hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zderic, Vesna; Luo, Wenbo; Brayman, Andrew; Crum, Lawrence; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-04-01

    Objective: To investigate the application of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) in improving both therapeutic and diagnostic aspects of ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. Methods: Incisions (3 cm long, 0.5 cm deep) were made in rabbit livers (in anterior surface for HIFU treatment, or posterior surface for bleeding detection). UCA Optison (~0.1 ml/kg) was injected into mesenteric vein or ear vein. A HIFU applicator (5.5 MHz, 6400 W/cm2) was scanned manually over the incision until hemostasis was achieved. Occult bleeding was monitored with Doppler ultrasound. Results: The presence of Optison produced 37% reduction in hemostasis times normalized to initial bleeding rates. Gross and histological observations showed similar appearance of HIFU lesions produced in the presence of Optison and control HIFU lesions. The temperature reached 100°C in both HIFU only and HIFU+UCA treatments. Tension strength of hemostatic liver incisions was 0.9+/-0.5 N. Almost no bleeding could be detected before Optison injection. First appearance of contrast enhancement localized at the bleeding site was 15 s after Optison injection, and lasted for ~50 s. Conclusion: The presence of UCA during HIFU treatment of liver incisions resulted in shortening of HIFU application times and better visualization of bleeding sites.

  17. Multidetector computed tomography in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Palma

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available John Palma, Marius Mihaila, Frank PilleulDépartement de Radiologie Digestive et des Urgences, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, CHU, Lyon, FranceBackground: The aim of this study is to evaluate multidetector computed tomography (MDCT in acute massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding, with endoscopy and surgery as reference examinations.Methods: A single-center retrospective study involving 34 patients with acute massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding was carried out. All patients were evaluated by MDCT scan then endoscopic or surgical examinations. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of MDCT scan were calculated using the extravasation of the contrast agent as the main criterion.Results: Extravasation of the contrast agent was found in 30 of 34 patients (88%. The bleeding site seen on CT was always the same as on endoscopic or surgical examinations (100%. Sensitivity of MDCT scan was 94%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 50% (P < 0.001. Twelve diverticulum bleedings were seen on MDCT scan compared with 13 (92% on endoscopic or surgical examinations. Angiodysplasia was overestimated by MDCT scan.Conclusion: MDCT scan appears to be an excellent tool to find and localize the bleeding site in cases of acute massive lower gastrointestinal disease.Keywords: MDCT, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding, extravasation, contrast agent

  18. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation.

  19. Menstrual bleeding after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth; Larsen, Signe Holm; Wilkens, Helena; Jakobsen, Anja; Pedersen, Thais Almeida Lins

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether open-heart surgery with the use of extracorporeal circulation has an impact on menstrual bleeding. The menstrual bleeding pattern was registered in fertile women undergoing open-heart surgery in 2010-12. Haematocrit and 24-h postoperative bleeding were compared with those of men undergoing cardiac surgery. Women (n = 22), with mean age of 36 (range 17-60) years, were operated on and hospitalized for 4-5 postoperative days. The mean preoperative haematocrit was 40% (range 32-60%), and mean haematocrit at discharge was 32% (range 26-37%). Mean postoperative bleeding in the first 24 h was 312 (range 50-1442) ml. They underwent surgery for atrial septal defect (n = 5), composite graft/David procedure (n = 4), pulmonary or aortic valve replacement (n = 6), myxoma (n = 2), mitral valvuloplasty (n = 2), ascending aortic aneurysm (n = 1), aortic coarctation (n = 1) and total cavopulmonary connection (n = 1). Unplanned menstrual bleeding (lasting 2-5 days) was detected in 13 (60%) patients. Of them, 4 were 1-7 days early, 4 were 8-14 days early, 3 were 1-7 days late and 2 had menstruation despite having had menstrual bleeding within the last 2 weeks. None had unusually large or long-lasting menstrual bleeding. Ten women took oral contraceptives, 8 of whom had unexpected menstrual bleeding during admission. Men (n = 22), with a mean age of 35 (range 17-54) years, had mean bleeding of 331 (range 160-796) ml postoperatively, which was not statistically significantly different from the women's. The mean preoperative haematocrit was 40% (range 29-49%) among men, while haematocrit at discharge was 32% (28-41), not significantly different from that seen in the female subgroup. Menstrual bleeding patterns are disturbed by open-heart surgery in the majority of fertile women. Nevertheless, the unexpected menstrual bleeding is neither particularly long-lasting nor of large quantity, and the postoperative surgical bleeding is unaffected. We recommend that

  20. Acute variceal bleeding: general management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Patch; Lucy Dagher

    2001-01-01

    @@ TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR ACUTE VARICEAL BLEEDING Backgound Acute variceal bleeding has a significant mortality which ranges form 5% to 50% in patients with cirrhosis[1].Overall survival is probably improving,because of new therapeutic approaches,and improved medical care.However,mortality is still closely related to failure to control hacmorrhage or carly rebleeding,which is a distinct characteristic of portal hypertensive bleeding and occures in as many as 50% of patients in the first days to 6 weeks after admission et al[2].

  1. Side Effects: Bleeding and Bruising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and targeted therapy, can increase patients’ risk of bleeding and bruising, also called thrombocytopenia. Learn about steps to take if you are at increased risk of a low platelet count.

  2. Fibrinogen concentrate in bleeding patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Anne; Lunde, Jens; Johansen, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Hypofibrinogenaemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but the optimal treatment level, the use of preemptive treatment and the preferred source of fibrinogen remain disputed. Fibrinogen concentrate is increasingly used and recommended for bleeding with acquired haemostatic...

  3. Bleeding in children with cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    His tory and clinical picture ... Bleeding at presentation is most commonly caused by bone marrow infiltration, whether by ... 7 - 10 days after chemotherapy, except in the case of carboplatinum/ ... adult autologous stem cell transplant patients.

  4. Physical activity and risk of bleeding in elderly patients taking anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, P M; Méan, M; Limacher, A; Jaeger, K; Beer, H-J; Frauchiger, B; Aschwanden, M; Rodondi, N; Righini, M; Egloff, M; Osterwalder, J; Kucher, N; Angelillo-Scherrer, A; Husmann, M; Banyai, M; Matter, C M; Aujesky, D

    2015-02-01

    Although the possibility of bleeding during anticoagulant treatment may limit patients from taking part in physical activity, the association between physical activity and anticoagulation-related bleeding is uncertain. To determine whether physical activity is associated with bleeding in elderly patients taking anticoagulants. In a prospective multicenter cohort study of 988 patients aged ≥ 65 years receiving anticoagulants for venous thromboembolism, we assessed patients' self-reported physical activity level. The primary outcome was the time to a first major bleeding, defined as fatal bleeding, symptomatic bleeding in a critical site, or bleeding causing a fall in hemoglobin or leading to transfusions. The secondary outcome was the time to a first clinically relevant non-major bleeding. We examined the association between physical activity level and time to a first bleeding by using competing risk regression, accounting for death as a competing event. We adjusted for known bleeding risk factors and anticoagulation as a time-varying covariate. During a mean follow-up of 22 months, patients with a low, moderate, and high physical activity level had an incidence of major bleeding of 11.6, 6.3, and 3.1 events per 100 patient-years and an incidence of clinically relevant non-major bleeding of 14.0, 10.3, and 7.7 events per 100 patient-years, respectively. A high physical activity level was significantly associated with a lower risk of major bleeding (adjusted sub-hazard ratio 0.40, 95% confidence interval 0.22-0.72). There was no association between physical activity and non-major bleeding. A high level of physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of major bleeding in elderly patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  5. Chitosan pads vs. manual compression to control bleeding sites after transbrachial arterial catheterization in a randomized trial; Randomisierte Untersuchung zur Anwendung eines Chitosan-Gerinnungspads zur Blutstillung bei transbrachialen Angiographien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poretti, F.; Rosen, T.; Koerner, B.; Vorwerk, D. [Inst. fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Klinikum Ingolstadt (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: until now, no mechanical closure devices were available to achieve fast and secure hemostasis for vessel closure after catheterization of small arterial vessels. Material and methods: eighty patients were randomized to evaluate the effect on hemostasis by use of a chitosan pad (Chito-Seal, Abbott Vascular Devices, Galway/Ireland) in comparison to manual compression after diagnostic transbrachial arterial catheterization. Hemostasis after three minutes and one hour as well as local development of a hematoma after one and twenty-four hours were assessed. Results: the use of chitosan pads significantly decreased the bleeding time in the first three minutes after manual compression time (p < 0.01). Significant decrease in bleeding risk at three minutes by use of the chitosan closure pads was also found in subgroups of patients with hypertension (p < 0.001) or diabetes (p < 0.01) and also in patients under anticoagulation therapy (p < 0.01). In addition, long-term protection from bleeding complications such as the risk of hematoma was decreased by the use of chitosan closure pads one hour (p < 0.01) or twenty-four hours (p < 0.001) after catheter removal. Conclusion: the use of an intravascular anchor or suture system is not safely applicable in these vessels due to the small diameter of the brachial artery. Our results document a significant improvement in hemostasis by using chitosan pads in these cases. (orig.)

  6. Accurate microRNA target prediction using detailed binding site accessibility and machine learning on proteomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eReczko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small regulatory genes regulating gene expression by targetingmessenger RNA. Though computational methods for miRNA target prediction are the prevailingmeans to analyze their function, they still miss a large fraction of the targeted genes and additionallypredict a large number of false positives. Here we introduce a novel algorithm called DIANAmicroT-ANN which combines multiple novel target site features through an artificial neural network(ANN and is trained using recently published high-throughput data measuring the change of proteinlevels after miRNA overexpression, providing positive and negative targeting examples. The featurescharacterizing each miRNA recognition element include binding structure, conservation level and aspecific profile of structural accessibility. The ANN is trained to integrate the features of eachrecognition element along the 3’ untranslated region into a targeting score, reproducing the relativerepression fold change of the protein. Tested on two different sets the algorithm outperforms otherwidely used algorithms and also predicts a significant number of unique and reliable targets notpredicted by the other methods. For 542 human miRNAs DIANA-microT-ANN predicts 120,000targets not provided by TargetScan 5.0. The algorithm is freely available athttp://microrna.gr/microT-ANN.

  7. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  8. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erwin; Biecker

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding(UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions,erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor(PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application(oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased.

  9. Translating access into utilization: lessons from the design and evaluation of a health insurance Web site to promote reproductive health care for young women in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiak, Elizabeth; Rhodes, Elizabeth; Foster, Angel M

    2013-12-01

    Following state-level health care reform in Massachusetts, young women reported confusion over coverage of contraception and other sexual and reproductive health services under newly available health insurance products. To address this gap, a plain-language Web site titled "My Little Black Book for Sexual Health" was developed by a statewide network of reproductive health stakeholders. The purpose of this evaluation was to assess the health literacy demands and usability of the site among its target audience, women ages 18-26 years. We performed an evaluation of the literacy demands of the Web site's written content and tested the Web site's usability in a health communications laboratory. Participants found the Web site visually appealing and its overall design concept accessible. However, the Web site's literacy demands were high, and all participants encountered problems navigating through the Web site. Following this evaluation, the Web site was modified to be more usable and more comprehensible to women of all health literacy levels. To avail themselves of sexual and reproductive health services newly available under expanded health insurance coverage, young women require customized educational resources that are rigorously evaluated to ensure accessibility. To maximize utilization of reproductive health services under expanded health insurance coverage, US women require customized educational resources commensurate with their literacy skills. The application of established research methods from the field of health communications will enable advocates to evaluate and adapt these resources to best serve their targeted audiences. © 2013.

  10. Bleed Hole Flow Phenomena Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Boundary-layer bleed is an invaluable tool for controlling the airflow in supersonic aircraft engine inlets. Incoming air is decelerated to subsonic speeds prior to entering the compressor via a series of oblique shocks. The low momentum flow in the boundary layer interacts with these shocks, growing in thickness and, under some conditions, leading to flow separation. To remedy this, bleed holes are strategically located to remove mass from the boundary layer, reducing its thickness and helping to maintain uniform flow to the compressor. The bleed requirements for any inlet design are unique and must be validated by extensive wind tunnel testing to optimize performance and efficiency. To accelerate this process and reduce cost, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center initiated an experimental program to study the flow phenomena associated with bleed holes. Knowledge of these flow properties will be incorporated into computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that will aid engine inlet designers in optimizing bleed configurations before any hardware is fabricated. This ongoing investigation is currently examining two hole geometries, 90 and 20 (both with 5-mm diameters), and various flow features.

  11. Management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadafilopoulos, George

    2012-09-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding, acute overt, occult or obscure in nature, causes significant morbidity and mortality in older adults. As the elderly population is expected to increase in the future, healthcare costs and the clinical burden of lower gastrointestinal bleeding will rise. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding, by definition, originates from a site distal to the ligament of Treitz and is usually suspected when patients present with haematochezia, or maroon stools per rectum. A thorough history is paramount in guiding the diagnostic steps and management but is frequently inadequate in elderly, poorly communicating, nursing home patients. The causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in older adults may be anatomic, vascular, inflammatory, neoplastic or iatrogenic. Comorbidity from cardiopulmonary disease, renal disease, diabetes or underlying cancer, all prevalent in older adults, may affect the incidence, severity, morbidity and mortality of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly. The use of multiple medications, particularly non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents, needs to be always considered in elderly patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding and anaemia. CT imaging and early colonoscopy are useful in determining the site of bleeding and allowing haemostasis. If unsuccessful, angiographic intervention and surgery need to be considered. Videocapsule endoscopy is useful in cases where the small bowel is suspected as the source, and its results guide the performance of double- or single-balloon enteroscopy. Optimal care should involve a coordinated effort among the primary physician, endoscopist, interventional radiologist and surgeon in order to improve prognosis and subsequent management and reduce morbidity, mortality, length of stay and overall healthcare costs.

  12. Endoscopic band ligation for bleeding lesions in the small bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Takashi; Ishii, Naoki; Shimamura, Yuto; Nakano, Kaoru; Ego, Mai; Nakamura, Kenji; Takagi, Koichi; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2014-10-16

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of endoscopic band ligation (EBL) for bleeding lesions in the small bowel. This is a retrospective study evaluating EBL in six consecutive patients (three males, three females, 46-86 years of age) treated between May 2009 and February 2014: duodenal vascular ectasia; 1, jejunal bleeding diverticulum; 1, ileal Dieulafoy's lesion; 1 and ileal bleeding diverticula; 3. The success of the initial hemostasis was evaluated, and patients were observed for early rebleeding (within 30 d after EBL), and complications such as perforation and abscess formation. Follow-up endoscopies were performed in four patients. Initial hemostasis was successfully achieved with EBL in all six patients. Eversion was not sufficient in four diverticular lesions. Early rebleeding occurred three days after EBL in one ileal diverticulum, and a repeat endoscopy revealed dislodgement of the O-band and ulcer formation at the banded site. This rebleeding was managed conservatively. Late rebleeding occurred in this case (13 and 21 mo after initial EBL), and re-EBL was performed. Follow-up endoscopies revealed scar formation and the disappearance of vascular lesions at the banded site in the case with a duodenal bleeding lesion, and unresolved ileal diverticula in three cases. Surgery or transarterial embolization was not required without any complications during the median follow-up period of 45 (range, 2-83) mo. EBL is a safe and effective endoscopic treatment for hemostasis of bleeding lesions in the small bowel.

  13. Endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarun; McCarty, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    Diverticular hemorrhage is the most common reason for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) with substantial cost of hospitalization and a median length of hospital stay of 3 days. Bleeding usually is self-limited in 70-80% of cases but early rebleeding is not an uncommon problem that can be reduced with proper endoscopic therapies. Colonoscopy is recommended as first-line diagnostic and therapeutic approach. In the vast majority of patients diverticular hemorrhage can be readily managed by interventional endotherapy including injection, heat cautery, clip placement, and ligation to achieve endoscopic hemostasis. This review will serve to highlight the various interventions available to endoscopists with specific emphasis on superior modalities in the endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

  14. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2012-01-01

    serious ulcer bleeding is suspected and blood found in gastric aspirate, endoscopy within 12 hours will result in faster discharge and reduced need for transfusions. Endoscopic hemostasis remains indicated for high-risk lesions. Clips, thermocoagulation, and epinephrine injection are effective......Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved......-risk stigmata. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least 3 days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA...

  15. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2012-01-01

    serious ulcer bleeding is suspected and blood found in gastric aspirate, endoscopy within 12 hours will result in faster discharge and reduced need for transfusions. Endoscopic hemostasis remains indicated for high-risk lesions. Clips, thermocoagulation, and epinephrine injection are effective......Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved......-risk stigmata. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least 3 days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA...

  16. Endoscopic Management of Diverticular Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Rustagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverticular hemorrhage is the most common reason for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB with substantial cost of hospitalization and a median length of hospital stay of 3 days. Bleeding usually is self-limited in 70–80% of cases but early rebleeding is not an uncommon problem that can be reduced with proper endoscopic therapies. Colonoscopy is recommended as first-line diagnostic and therapeutic approach. In the vast majority of patients diverticular hemorrhage can be readily managed by interventional endotherapy including injection, heat cautery, clip placement, and ligation to achieve endoscopic hemostasis. This review will serve to highlight the various interventions available to endoscopists with specific emphasis on superior modalities in the endoscopic management of diverticular bleeding.

  17. Differences in Glycoprotein Complex Receptor Binding Site Accessibility Prompt Poor Cross-Reactivity of Neutralizing Antibodies between Closely Related Arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, Rachel B; Phillips, Elisabeth K; Ayithan, Natarajan; Maury, Wendy

    2017-04-01

    Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease-assigned category A priority pathogens. In this study, we sought to better understand how closely related arenaviruses elude cross-species neutralization by investigating the structural bases of antibody binding and avoidance. In our studies, we found that neutralizing antibodies against two New World arenaviruses, Machupo virus (MACV) and Junín virus (JUNV), bound to the envelope glycoprotein 1 (GP1) with JUNV monoclonal antibodies targeting the receptor binding site (RBS). We further show that altered structures surrounding the RBS pocket in MACV GP1 impede access of JUNV-elicited antibodies.

  18. MEXICANA DE CANANEA TO START UP BREAKTHROUGH PROCESS TO ELIMINATE ELECTROLYTE BLEEDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FaniaLisa

    1997-01-01

    Copper processors using solvent extraction/electrowinning(SX/EW) have known for years that eliminating the electrolyte bleed could benefit process economics dramatically Until now.there was no practical solution to eliminate the bleed.Available processes either could nor reduce iron contaminants sufficiently,or pulled out too much valuable copper and cobalt along with the iron.Based on pilot tests of a new breed of ion exchange separatioin system at three different mine sites on representative electrolytes,an alternmative to bleeding electrolytes now exists.On this basis,processors can shelve the wasteful electrolyte bleeding practice.Already,one major copper producer is installing a fullscale system.

  19. Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn: an unusual etiology of neonatal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, L

    1986-08-01

    Emergency physicians may encounter presentations of bleeding in the neonate that have multifactorial etiologies. A case of a 15-day-old male infant with umbilical bleeding that exhibited many of the characteristic features of hemorrhagic disease of the newborn (nonmedically attended birth, breastfeeding, no definite history of Vitamin K administration, bleeding from iatrogenic puncture sites, and isolated prolongation of the prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time) is presented. A differential diagnosis and laboratory evaluation of bleeding in the newborn are summarized, and treatment recommendations for hemorrhagic disease of the newborn are discussed.

  20. [Gastrointestinal bleeding: the role of radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga Gómez, S; Pérez Lafuente, M; Abu-Suboh Abadia, M; Castell Conesa, J

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a diagnostic challenge both in its acute presentation, which requires the point of bleeding to be located quickly, and in its chronic presentation, which requires repeated examinations to determine its etiology. Although the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding is based on endoscopic examinations, radiological studies like computed tomography (CT) angiography for acute bleeding or CT enterography for chronic bleeding are becoming more and more common in clinical practice, even though they have not yet been included in the clinical guidelines for gastrointestinal bleeding. CT can replace angiography as the diagnostic test of choice in acute massive gastrointestinal bleeding, and CT can complement the endoscopic capsule and scintigraphy in chronic or recurrent bleeding suspected to originate in the small bowel. Angiography is currently used to complement endoscopy for the treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  1. Management of severe perioperative bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A; Afshari, Arash; Albaladejo, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The aims of severe perioperative bleeding management are three-fold. First, preoperative identification by anamesis and laboratory testing of those patients for whom the perioperative bleeding risk may be increased. Second, implementation of strategies for correcting preoperative anaemia......-sectional surveys were selected. At the suggestion of the ESA Guideline Committee, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) grading system was initially used to assess the level of evidence and to grade recommendations. During the process of guideline development, the official position of the ESA...

  2. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding: CT angiography with multi-planar reformatting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Kate; Gollub, Frank; Stuart, Sam; Papadopoulou, Anthie; Woodward, Nick

    2011-04-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency, which carries a significant mortality. CT Angiography is an important non-invasive diagnostic tool, which can be used to plan subsequent endovascular or surgical management. The cases presented demonstrate that a meticulous and systematic approach to image interpretation is necessary, in particular, to detect focal sites of contrast extravasation and small pseudoaneurysms.

  3. Preventive Strategies against Bleeding due to Nonvitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lessire Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dabigatran etexilate (DE, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs that have been compared in clinical trials with existing anticoagulants (warfarin and enoxaparin in several indications for the prevention and treatment of thrombotic events. All NOACs presented bleeding events despite a careful selection and control of patients. Compared with warfarin, NOACs had a decreased risk of intracranial hemorrhage, and apixaban and DE (110 mg BID had a decreased risk of major bleeding from any site. Rivaroxaban and DE showed an increased risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding compared with warfarin. Developing strategies to minimize the risk of bleeding is essential, as major bleedings are reported in clinical practice and specific antidotes are currently not available. In this paper, the following preventive approaches are reviewed: improvement of appropriate prescription, identification of modifiable bleeding risk factors, tailoring NOAC’s dose, dealing with a missed dose as well as adhesion to switching, bridging and anesthetic procedures.

  4. Fishing Access Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department maintains developed fishing access areas. These sites provide public access to waters in Vermont for shore fishing...

  5. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jae, Hwan Jun; Chung, Jin Wook; Jung, Ah Young; Lee, Whal; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Between March 1999 and December 2002, TAE for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding was performed in 93 patients. The endoscopic approach had failed or was discarded as an approach for control of bleeding in all study patients. Among the 93 patients NBCA was used as the primary embolic material for TAE in 32 patients (28 men, four women; mean age, 59.1 years). The indications for choosing NBCA as the embolic material were: inability to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and effective wedging of the microcatheter into the bleeding artery. TAE was performed using 1:1 1:3 mixtures of NBCA and iodized oil. The angiographic and clinical success rate, recurrent bleeding rate, procedure related complications and clinical outcomes were evaluated. The angiographic and clinical success rates were 100% and 91% (29/32), respectively. There were no serious ischemic complications. Recurrent bleeding occurred in three patients (9%) and they were managed with emergency surgery (n = 1) and with a successful second TAE (n = 2). Eighteen patients (56%) had a coagulopathy at the time of TAE and the clinical success rate in this group of patients was 83% (15/18). TAE with NBCA is a highly effective and safe treatment modality for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, especially when it is not possible to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and when the patient has a coagulopathy.

  6. The critical role of CT angiography in the detection and management of lower gastro-intestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Lower gastro-intestinal bleeding (LGIB) is defined as a bleeding site localised in the colon or anorectum. (1) In the past, the diagnosis of LGIB has been a serious challenge for the radiology department because of its possible intermittent character, making it difficult to pinpoint the bleeding site. Patients with a LGIB will typically have undergone a long diagnostic work-up before they end up on the interventional radiology department.The development of multi-detector computed tomography (...

  7. Capsule endoscopy and push enteroscopy in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戈之铮; 胡运彪; 萧树东

    2004-01-01

    Background In obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, it is often difficult to detect the bleeding sites located in the small bowel with conventional radiological, scintigraphic or angiographic techniques. Push enteroscopy and capsule endoscopy are currently considered to be the most effective diagnostic procedures. The aim of this study was to compare the detection rates between capsule endoscopy and push enteroscopy. Methods From May 2002 through January 2003, we prospectively examined by capsule endoscopy 39 patients with suspected small bowel diseases, in particular GI bleeding of unknown origin in Renji Hospital. Among them, 32 complained of obscure recurrent GI bleeding. Between January 1993 and October 1996, we used push enteroscopy on 36 patients who suffered from unexplained GI bleeding. All patients had prior normal results on gastroscopy, colonoscopy, small bowel barium radiography, scintigraphy and/or angiography. Results M2A capsule endoscopy disclosed abnormal small bowel findings in 26 (82%) out of 32 patients. Twenty-one of them had significant pathological findings explaining their clinical disorders. Diagnostic yield was therefore 66% (21 of 32 patients). Definite bleeding sites diagnosed by capsule endoscopy in 21 patients included angiodysplasia (8), inflammatory small-bowel (5), small-bowel polyps (4), gastrointestinal stromal tumour (2), carcinoid tumour and lipoma (1), and hemorrhagic gastritis (1). Push enteroscopy detected the definite sources of bleeding in 9 (25%) of the 36 patients. Patients with definite bleeding sources included angiodysplasias (2), leiomyosarcoma (2), leiomyoma (1), lymphoma (1), Crohn's disease (1), small-bowel polyps (1) and adenocarcinoma of ampulla (1). Suspected bleeding sources were shown by push enteroscopy in two additional patients (6%), and in other five patients (16%) by capsule endoscopy.Conclusions The present study of patients with obscure GI bleeding showed that capsule endoscopy significantly superior

  8. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B.

    2012-01-01

    Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved by the D......Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved...... serious ulcer bleeding is suspected and blood found in gastric aspirate, endoscopy within 12 hours will result in faster discharge and reduced need for transfusions. Endoscopic hemostasis remains indicated for high-risk lesions. Clips, thermocoagulation, and epinephrine injection are effective......-risk stigmata. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least 3 days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA...

  9. Treatment of acute variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Flemming; Krag, Aleksander Ahm; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The management of variceal bleeding remains a clinical challenge with a high mortality. Standardisation in supportive and new therapeutic treatments seems to have improved survival within the last 25 years. Although overall survival has improved in recent years, mortality is still closely related...

  10. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B.

    2012-01-01

    -risk stigmata. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least 3 days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA...

  11. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-11-17

    BACKGROUND Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. CASE REPORT A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding.

  12. A Conserved Target Site in HIV-1 Gag RNA is Accessible to Inhibition by Both an HDV Ribozyme and a Short Hairpin RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Scarborough

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense-based molecules targeting HIV-1 RNA have the potential to be used as part of gene or drug therapy to treat HIV-1 infection. In this study, HIV-1 RNA was screened to identify more conserved and accessible target sites for ribozymes based on the hepatitis delta virus motif. Using a quantitative screen for effects on HIV-1 production, we identified a ribozyme targeting a highly conserved site in the Gag coding sequence with improved inhibitory potential compared to our previously described candidates targeting the overlapping Tat/Rev coding sequence. We also demonstrate that this target site is highly accessible to short hairpin directed RNA interference, suggesting that it may be available for the binding of antisense RNAs with different modes of action. We provide evidence that this target site is structurally conserved in diverse viral strains and that it is sufficiently different from the human transcriptome to limit off-target effects from antisense therapies. We also show that the modified hepatitis delta virus ribozyme is more sensitive to a mismatch in its target site compared to the short hairpin RNA. Overall, our results validate the potential of a new target site in HIV-1 RNA to be used for the development of antisense therapies.

  13. Gastrointestinal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GI Bleeding in Children (North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition) - PDF Patient Handouts Bleeding esophageal varices (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Bloody or tarry stools (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in ...

  14. Facts about Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit Button Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding Recommend on Facebook ... deficiency and VKDB? Protect Your Baby from Bleeds Fact Sheet   Download and print this fact ...

  15. Moderate superficial hypothermia prolongs bleeding time in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romlin, B; Petruson, K; Nilsson, K

    2007-02-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that mild systemic hypothermia influences platelet adhesion and aggregation and coagulation reactions. We wanted to test the hypothesis that mild local hypothermia in healthy volunteers with preserved core temperature increased bleeding time. A secondary aim was to evaluate if local cooling influenced whole blood coagulation measured by thrombelastograph (TEG) in the same setting. Bleeding time was measured at the left volar forearm at a baseline skin temperature of 32 degrees C and after cooling to 30 degrees C and 28 degrees C in a water bath. Skin temperature was continuously measured by contact thermistors. Measurements of coagulation by TEG were performed at baseline skin temperature before cooling and after cooling to 28 degrees C skin temperature. Tympanic membrane temperature was continuously measured. Compared with baseline, bleeding time was significantly prolonged at 30 degrees C skin temperature and further prolonged at 28 degrees C skin temperature. No significant differences were measured in any of the TEG parameters. During the procedure, tympanic membrane temperature did not change. Lowering the skin temperature from 32 degrees C to 30 degrees C and 28 degrees C with a preserved core temperature more than doubled the bleeding time. Whole blood coagulation measured by TEG was not influenced by the local cooling. In addition to core temperature, local temperature may offer information in understanding the surgical site of bleeding.

  16. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: fatima.rsreis@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Cardia, P.P. [Hospital Vera Cruz, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. (author)

  17. The complexities of measuring access to parks and physical activity sites in New York City: a quantitative and qualitative approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maroko, Andrew R; Maantay, Juliana A; Sohler, Nancy L; Grady, Kristen L; Arno, Peter S

    2009-01-01

    ... be an environmental justice issue. Geographic Information systems were used to conduct quantitative and qualitative analyses of park accessibility in New York City, which included kernel density estimation, ordinary least squares (global...

  18. Massive upper gastrointestinal bleed from epiphrenic diverticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Cesar J; Dias, Ajoy; Hejazi, Reza A; Burgos, Jose D; Huerta, Ana; Zuckerman, Marc J

    2011-05-01

    Epiphrenic diverticula are outpouchings of the esophagus that retain some or all layers of the esophageal wall. Symptoms such as intermittent dysphagia and vomiting may occur. The authors present a case of an elderly woman with a history of dysphagia who presented with a massive upper gastrointestinal bleed because of a bleeding epiphrenic diverticulum seen at endoscopy who responded to conservative management. Bleeding epiphrenic diverticula should be considered as a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  19. Abdominal compartment syndrome from bleeding duodenal diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakhtang Tchantchaleishvili

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal diverticuli are acquired false diverticuli of unknown etiology. Although mostly asymptomatic, they can occasionally cause upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, rarely with massive bleeding. In this report, we present (to the best of our knowledge the first reported case of duodenal diverticular bleeding, causing abdominal compartment syndrome. Albeit a rare event, duodenal diverticular bleeding should be included in the differential diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. As with our case, a multidisciplinary approach to managing such patients is crucial.

  20. An unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C K Adarsh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI bleed often brings the patient to the emergency medical service with great anxiety. Known common causes of GI bleed include ulcers, varices, Mallory-Weiss among others. All causes of GI bleed should be considered however unusual during the evaluation. Aortoenteric fistula (AEF is one of the unusual causes of GI bleed, which has to be considered especially in patients with a history of abdominal surgery in general and aortic surgery in particular.

  1. Emergency management of lower gastrointestinal bleed in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Binesh; Singhi, Sunit

    2013-03-01

    Lower gastro intestinal bleed (LGIB) is defined as any bleeding that occurs distal to the ligament of Treitz (situated at the duodeno jejunal junction). It constitutes the chief complaint of about 0.3 % of children presenting to the pediatric emergency department(ED). Among Indian children the most common causes are colitis and polyps. In most of the cases of LGIB the bleeding is small and self limiting, but conditions like Meckel's diverticulum often presents with life threatening bleeds. The approach in ED should include in order of priority-assessment and maintenance of hemodynamic stability, confirmation of LGIB and then to attempt for specific diagnoses and their management. This is achieved with help of rapid cardiopulmonary assessment, focused history and examination. The management of all serious hemodynamically significant bleeds includes, rapid IV access, volume replacement with normal saline 20 ml/kg, blood sampling (for cross matching, hematocrit, platelet, coagulogram and liver function tests), Inj. Vit K 5-10 mg IV, acid suppression with H2 antagonists/PPI and nasogastric lavage to rule out upper gastrointestinal bleed. Continuous ongoing monitoring of vital signs is important after stabilization. In ill looking infant, infectious colitis, Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), Hirschsprung enterocolitis and volvulus and in older infants and children, intussusceptions, typhoid fever, volvulus should be looked for. Proctosigmoidoscopy remains the first investigation to be done and reveals majority of etiology. Multidetector CT scan, Tc 99 m RBC scan, angiography and Push enteroscopy are the further investigation choices according to the clinical condition of the child. Intra operative enteroscopy is reserved for refractory cases with an obscure etiology.

  2. Water Quality and Sedimentation Data of the Coastal Intensive Site Network (CISNet) Long Term Monitoring Sites in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii from 1998 to 2001 (NODC Accession 0001473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A long term project to monitor water quality and sediment processes in Kaneohe Bay was initiated in November 1998 and continued through July 2001. Four primary sites...

  3. Symptomatic radial artery thrombosis successfully treated with endovascular approach via femoral access route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasha, Ahmed Khurshid [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Arizona (United States); Elder, Mahir D. [Heart and Vascular Institute, Detroit, MI (United States); Division of Cardiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Malik, Umer Ejaz [Department of Internal Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Science Center at Permian Basin, TX (United States); Khalid, Abdullah Mian [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburg Medical Center, Mercy Hospital, Pittsburg, PA (United States); Noor, Zeeshan [Department of Internal Medicine, St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Movahed, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: rmova@aol.com [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Arizona (United States); Sarver Heart Center, University of Arizona (United States); CareMore HealthCare, AZ (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Radial access has been increasingly utilized for coronary intervention due to higher safety profile in comparison to femoral access site with lower bleeding rate. Radial artery occlusion is not uncommon with radial access site. This usually does not lead to any harm due to ulnar artery collaterals that are sufficient to prevent hand ischemia and is usually left alone. However, in the case of significant hand ischemia, treatment is often necessary. We are reporting an interesting case of symptomatic radial artery thrombosis leading to arm ischemia that was successfully treated percutaneously using femoral access. Using femoral access for radial artery intervention has not been reported previously. This case is followed by review of the literature.

  4. Characteristics and risk factors of major and clinically relevant non-major bleeding in cancer patients receiving anticoagulant treatment for acute venous thromboembolism-the CATCH study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuisen, P.W.; Lee, A.Y.Y.; Meyer, Guy; Bauersachs, R.; Janas, M.S.; Jarner, M.F.; Khorana, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) receiving anticoagulant treatment have a substantial risk of bleeding complications. Aims: To assess the rate, site and risk factors of clinically relevant bleeding (CRB; major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding) in cancer pa

  5. Differences in bleeding behavior after endoscopic band ligation: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasch, Florian; Grothaus, Johannes; Mössner, Joachim; Schiefke, Ingolf; Hoffmeister, Albrecht

    2010-01-15

    Endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is generally accepted as the treatment of choice for bleeding from esophageal varices. It is also used for secondary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal hemorrhage. However, there is no data or guidelines concerning endoscopic control of ligation ulcers. We conducted a retrospective study of EBL procedures analyzing bleeding complications after EBL. We retrospectively analyzed data from patients who underwent EBL. We analyzed several data points, including indication for the procedure, bleeding events and the time interval between EBL and bleeding. 255 patients and 387 ligation sessions were included in the analysis. We observed an overall bleeding rate after EBL of 7.8%. Bleeding events after elective treatment (3.9%) were significantly lower than those after treatment for acute variceal hemorrhage (12.1%). The number of bleeding events from ligation ulcers and variceal rebleeding was 14 and 15, respectively. The bleeding rate from the ligation site in the group who underwent emergency ligation was 7.1% and 0.5% in the group who underwent elective ligation. Incidence of variceal rebleeding did not vary significantly. Seventy-five percent of all bleeding episodes after elective treatment occurred within four days after EBL. 20/22 of bleeding events after emergency ligation occurred within 11 days after treatment. Elective EBL has a lower risk of bleeding from treatment-induced ulceration than emergency ligation. Patients who underwent EBL for treatment of acute variceal bleeding should be kept under medical surveillance for 11 days. After elective EBL, it may be reasonable to restrict the period of surveillance to four days or even perform the procedure in an out-patient setting.

  6. Comparison of a novel bedside portable endoscopy device with nasogastric aspiration for identifying upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Hwan; Choi, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hyung Ki; Choi, Wang Yong; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok

    2014-07-07

    To compare outcomes using the novel portable endoscopy with that of nasogastric (NG) aspiration in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients who underwent NG aspiration for the evaluation of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding were eligible for the study. After NG aspiration, we performed the portable endoscopy to identify bleeding evidence in the UGI tract. Then, all patients underwent conventional esophagogastroduodenoscopy as the gold-standard test. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the portable endoscopy for confirming UGI bleeding were compared with those of NG aspiration. In total, 129 patients who had GI bleeding signs or symptoms were included in the study (age 64.46 ± 13.79, 91 males). The UGI tract (esophagus, stomach, and duodenum) was the most common site of bleeding (81, 62.8%) and the cause of bleeding was not identified in 12 patients (9.3%). Specificity for identifying UGI bleeding was higher with the portable endoscopy than NG aspiration (85.4% vs 68.8%, P = 0.008) while accuracy was comparable. The accuracy of the portable endoscopy was significantly higher than that of NG in the subgroup analysis of patients with esophageal bleeding (88.2% vs 75%, P = 0.004). Food material could be detected more readily by the portable endoscopy than NG tube aspiration (20.9% vs 9.3%, P = 0.014). No serious adverse effect was observed during the portable endoscopy. The portable endoscopy was not superior to NG aspiration for confirming UGI bleeding site. However, this novel portable endoscopy device might provide a benefit over NG aspiration in patients with esophageal bleeding.

  7. Management of severe perioperative bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A; Ahmed, Aamer B; Afshari, Arash

    2017-01-01

    healthcare professionals with an overview of the most recent evidence to help ensure improved clinical management of patients. For this update, electronic databases were searched without language restrictions from 2011 or 2012 (depending on the search) until 2015. These searches produced 18 334 articles. All......: The management of perioperative bleeding involves multiple assessments and strategies to ensure appropriate patient care. Initially, it is important to identify those patients with an increased risk of perioperative bleeding. Next, strategies should be employed to correct preoperative anaemia...... articles were assessed and the existing 2013 guidelines were revised to take account of new evidence. This update includes revisions to existing recommendations with respect to the wording, or changes in the grade of recommendation, and also the addition of new recommendations. The final draft guideline...

  8. Role of videocapsule endoscopy for gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Carretero; Ignacio Fernandez-Urien; Maite Betes; Miguel Mu(n)oz-Navas

    2008-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is defined as bleeding of an unknown origin that persists or recurs after negative initial upper and lower endoscopies.Several techniques,such as endoscopy,arteriography,scintigraphy and barium radiology are helpful for recognizing the bleeding source;nevertheless,in about 5%-10% of cases the bleeding lesion cannot be determined.The development of videocapsule endoscopy (VCE) has permitted a direct visualization of the small intestine mucosa.We will analyze those techniques in more detail.The diagnostic yield of CE for OGIB varies from 38% to 93%,being in the higher range in those cases with obscure-overt bleeding.

  9. 76 FR 71914 - Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in Air Travel: Accessibility of Web Sites and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... industry. We are aware that there are pros and cons to our proposal to require carriers to work with their... the pros and cons from their perspectives of this approach. 6. Ongoing Costs To Maintain an Accessible... compatible with screen-reader technology and is activated by a single click on the homepage of the...

  10. 78 FR 67881 - Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in Air Travel: Accessibility of Web Sites and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... section 508 standards for Web content, forms and applications.\\12\\ \\10\\ See 75 FR 43460-43467 (July 26... information and communication technology (ICT) procurements that specifically proposes WCAG 2.0 Level AA as... Factors (HF); Accessibility Requirements for Public Procurement of ICT products and services in...

  11. 76 FR 46853 - JLG Industries, Inc., Access Segment, a Subsidiary of Oshkosh Corporation, Including On-Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... for workers of JLG- McConnellsburg. New information supplied by the workers and confirmed by JLG...Connellsburg in the production of access equipment and supplied design engineering, global procurement supply chain, safety, and reliability services used in the production of equipment at JLG-McConnellsburg....

  12. [Antithrombotic therapy and nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanová, Veronika; Gřiva, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is about 85-108/100,000 inhabitants per year, nonvariceal bleeding accounts for 80-90%. Antiplatelet and anticoagulation treatment are the significant risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. To evaluate the occurrence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the general community of patients in a county hospital. And to compare the role played by antiplatelet and anticoagulation drugs and other risk medication. Retrospective analysis of patients over 18 years of age who underwent endoscopy for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding or anaemia (haemoglobinupper gastrointestinal tract during a hospital stay in 2013 (from January to June). We included 111 patients of average age 69±15 years, men 60%. Nonvariceal bleeding accounted for 90% of the cases. None of the patients with variceal bleeding (10% of patients) took antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy. There were 100 patients with nonvariceal bleeding of average age 70±15, 61% men. With the symptoms of acute bleeding (hematemesis, melena) presented in 73% of patients. The most frequent cause of bleeding was gastric and duodenal ulcer (54%). 32% of patients with nonvariceal bleeding had antiplatelets, 19% anticoagulants and 10% used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or corticosteroids. 30-days mortality of patients with nonvariceal bleeding was 11%, annual mortality was 23%. There was no significant difference in mortality, blood transfusion requirements or surgical intervention between the patients with antithrombotic agents and without them. 25% of patients (8 patients) using acetylsalicylic acid did not fulfil the indication for this treatment. Among the patients examined by endoscopy for symptomatic nonvariceal bleeding and/or anaemia (haemoglobingastrointestinal bleeding. With regard to that, it is alarming, that there still exists a nonnegligible percentage of patients taking acetylsalicylic acid even

  13. The timing of neovascularization in fingertip replantation by external bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung-Kyu; Chung, Heung-Soo; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2002-09-15

    To overcome venous congestion in fingertip replantation with no venous anastomosis, the authors have used a salvage procedure that consists of continuous external bleeding through a stab incision on the paraungual area and dripping a heparinized saline solution at the incision site to maintain external bleeding. Because this method requires continuous bleeding for a certain period of time, it may be a great burden on the patient; therefore, it is most important to minimize the duration of bleeding. Many authors have studied the timing of the new venous channel formation of the flap. However, to our knowledge, a study on fingertip replantations has not yet been performed. From June of 1985 to November of 1999, the authors performed fingertip replantations on 144 fingers of 137 patients using our salvage procedure at Korea University Guro Hospital. Among the 144 fingers, 101 fingers of 96 patients were successfully transplanted, including those with partial necrosis. The authors reviewed the medical records of these 101 fingers retrospectively; they compared and analyzed the necessary duration of external bleeding according to sex, age, level of injury, cause of amputation, and the type of injury. The average period of the salvage procedure was 7.6 days. Regarding age, the shortest period (5.5 days) was required for patients younger than 10 years. On the basis of the types of injuries, the duration of bleeding was shortest for the guillotine injury group (5.9 days) compared with crush (8.2 days) or avulsion (8.0 days) injuries. Sex and level of injury did not make much difference in the duration of the procedure.

  14. Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency medical services: overview and ground transport. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. ... Simon BC, Hern HG. Wound management principles. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. ...

  15. The value of RI scintigraphy and angiography in small intestinal bleeding; Report of eight cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosawa, Susumu; Kuwata, Hajime; Kushibiki, Kyoko; Akimoto, Kimihiko; Hashimoto, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Toshiya (Showa General Hospital, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-07-01

    We retrospectively reviewed eight cases of small intestinal bleeding and assessed the value of RI scintigraphy and angiography in diagnosing the bleeding site. The patients' average age was 56.2 years. Chief complaint was melena of variable degree. In most cases neither upper endoscopy nor colonoscopy was diagnostic. RI scientigraphy (Tc-99 labeled human serum albumin) showed 75% of positive rate whereas angiography showed 66.7% (4/6) of positive rate. All four cases of leiomyosarcoma and leiomyoma demonstrated hypervascular stain and/or extra-vasation in angiography whereas RI scintigraphy failed to detect active gastrointestinal bleeding in 2 of the 4 cases. Therefore angiography was considered useful for the detection of bleeding from leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma which are often hypervascular. Scintigraphy is thought of most value in the demonstration of small amount of bleeding with minimum vascular abnormality. (author).

  16. Endoclipping treatment of life-threatening rectal bleeding after prostate biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Panagiotis Katsinelos,; Jannis Kountouras,; Georgios Dimitriadis,; Grigoris Chatzimavroudis,; Christos Zavos,; Ioannis Pilpilidis,; George Paroutoglou,; George Germanidis,; Kostas Mimidis

    2009-01-01

    Rectal bleeding is frequently seen in patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided multiple biopsy of the prostate, but is usually mild and stops spontaneously. We report what is believed to be the first case of life-threatening rectal bleeding following this procedure, which was successfully treated by endoscopic intervention through placement of three clips on the sites of bleeding. This case emphasizes endoscopic intervention associated with endoclipping as a safe and effective method to achieve hemostasis in massive rectal bleeding after prostate biopsy. Additionally, current data on the complications of the TRUS-guided multiple biopsy of the prostate and the options for treating fulminant rectal bleeding, a consequence of this procedure, are described.

  17. Predicting Social Networking Site Use and Online Communication Practices among Adolescents: The Role of Access and Device Ownership

    OpenAIRE

    Drew P. Cingel; Alexis R. Lauricella; Ellen Wartella; Annie Conway

    2014-01-01

    Given adolescents' heavy social media use, this study examined a number of predictors of adolescent social media use, as well as predictors of online communication practices. Using data collected from a national sample of 467 adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17, results indicate that demographics, technology access, and technology ownership are related to social media use and communication practices. Specifically, females log onto and use more constructive com-munication practices on Fa...

  18. Endoscopic band ligation for bleeding lesions in the small bowel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takashi; Ikeya; Naoki; Ishii; Yuto; Shimamura; Kaoru; Nakano; Mai; Ego; Kenji; Nakamura; Koichi; Takagi; Katsuyuki; Fukuda; Yoshiyuki; Fujita

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of endo-scopic band ligation(EBL) for bleeding lesions in the small bowel.METHODS: This is a retrospective study evaluating EBL in six consecutive patients(three males, three fe-males, 46-86 years of age) treated between May 2009 and February 2014: duodenal vascular ectasia; 1, je-junal bleeding diverticulum; 1, ileal Dieulafoy’s lesion; 1 and ileal bleeding diverticula; 3. The success of the initial hemostasis was evaluated, and patients were observed for early rebleeding(within 30 d after EBL), and complications such as perforation and abscess for-mation. Follow-up endoscopies were performed in four patients.RESULTS: Initial hemostasis was successfully achieved with EBL in all six patients. Eversion was not sufficient in four diverticular lesions. Early rebleeding occurred three days after EBL in one ileal diverticulum, and arepeat endoscopy revealed dislodgement of the O-band and ulcer formation at the banded site. This rebleeding was managed conservatively. Late rebleeding occurred in this case(13 and 21 mo after initial EBL), and re-EBL was performed. Follow-up endoscopies revealed scar formation and the disappearance of vascular lesions at the banded site in the case with a duodenal bleeding lesion, and unresolved ileal diverticula in three cases. Surgery or transarterial embolization was not required without any complications during the median follow-up period of 45(range, 2-83) mo.CONCLUSION: EBL is a safe and effective endoscopic treatment for hemostasis of bleeding lesions in the small bowel.

  19. Assessment of multi-modality evaluations of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ryan; Varayil, Jithinraj E; WongKeeSong, Louis M; Fidler, Jeff; Fletcher, Joel G; Barlow, John; Alexander, Jeffrey; Rajan, Elizabeth; Hansel, Stephanie; Becker, Brenda; Larson, Joseph J; Enders, Felicity T; Bruining, David H; Coelho-Prabhu, Nayantara

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the frequency of bleeding source detection in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) after pre-procedure imaging [multiphase computed tomography enterography (MPCTE), video capsule endoscopy (VCE), or both] and assess the impact of imaging on DBE diagnostic yield. METHODS Retrospective cohort study using a prospectively maintained database of all adult patients presenting with OGIB who underwent DBE from September 1st, 2002 to June 30th, 2013 at a single tertiary center. RESULTS Four hundred and ninety five patients (52% females; median age 68 years) underwent DBE for OGIB. AVCE and/or MPCTE performed within 1 year prior to DBE (in 441 patients) increased the diagnostic yield of DBE (67.1% with preceding imaging vs 59.5% without). Using DBE as the gold standard, VCE and MPCTE had a diagnostic yield of 72.7% and 32.5% respectively. There were no increased odds of finding a bleeding site at DBE compared to VCE (OR = 1.3, P = 0.150). There were increased odds of finding a bleeding site at DBE compared to MPCTE (OR = 5.9, P < 0.001). In inpatients with overt OGIB, diagnostic yield of DBE was not affected by preceding imaging. CONCLUSION DBE is a safe and well-tolerated procedure for the diagnosis and treatment of OGIB, with a diagnostic yield that may be increased after obtaining a preceding VCE or MPCTE. However, inpatients with active ongoing bleeding may benefit from proceeding directly to antegrade DBE. PMID:28216967

  20. Comparison of the effects of lidocaine pre-administration and local warming of the intravenous access site on propofol injection pain: Randomized, double-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Meejeong; Yoon, Haesang

    2016-09-01

    Lidocaine reduces pain that occurs upon the intravenous injection of propofol. But, there are few non-pharmacological nursing interventions to reduce propofol injection pain. To compare the effects of lidocaine pre-administration and local warming of the intravenous access site on propofol injection pain. Prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial. The 555 bed, non-teaching National Cancer Center in Kyunggido, South Korea. A total of 96 patients who underwent thyroidectomy under total intravenous general anesthesia with propofol were randomly allocated to the control, lidocaine pre-administration (LA) or local warming (LW) group. All three groups received 2% propofol with an effect-site target at 3μg/mL for induction dose. The control group received 2% propofol with no intervention. The lidocaine pre-administration group received 2% propofol 30s after 1% lidocaine 30mg. The local warming group received 2% propofol after warming of the intravenous access site for 1min using 43°C forced air. Propofol injection pain was assessed by four-point verbal categorial scoring (VCS), numerical rating scale (NRS) and surgical pleth index (SPI). Pain VCS of the LA group (mean±SD, 1.11±0.45) was significantly reduced (U=-3.92, plidocaine pre-administration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Intractable Hematuria After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation: Can Lessons Learned from Gastrointestinal Bleeding Be Applied?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Andre Y; Zhao, Lee; Reyentovich, Alex; Deanda, Abe; Balsam, Leora B

    2016-01-01

    Patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) are at increased risk of bleeding. We reviewed our institutional experience with bleeding in the urinary tract after CF-LVAD implantation and quantified the impact on hospital resource utilization in comparison with bleeding in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the most commonly reported mucosal site of bleeding after LVAD implantation. Records were retrospectively reviewed for patients undergoing CF-LVAD implantation at our institution between October 2011 and April 2015. Major adverse events of gross hematuria and GI bleeding were identified, and patient demographics and hospital course were reviewed. Gross hematuria occurred in 3 of the 35 patients (8.6%) and in 5.1% of all hospitalizations for CF-LVAD patients. Severe hematuria occurred after traumatic urethral catheterization, urinary retention, or urologic surgery. Hospitalization for hematuria was six times less likely than hospitalization for GI bleeding; however, hematuria hospitalizations lasted 3.2 times longer than GI bleeding hospitalizations (17.0 vs. 5.3 days). Late recurrent gross hematuria occurred in all cases, with rehospitalization occurring after 109 ± 53 days. In conclusion, gross hematuria is an infrequent but morbid bleeding complication in CF-LVAD patients. Strategies to avoid this complication include strict avoidance of traumatic urethral catheterization and urinary retention in high-risk patients.

  2. [Digestive bleeding due to jejunal diverticula: A case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake-Siemsen, Jorge Cuauhtémoc; Kortright-Farías, Marisol; Casale-Menier, Dante Rafael; Gámez-Araujo, Jesús

    2017-01-02

    Bleeding from the small bowel is a rare pathology that represents 5-10% of gastrointestinal bleeding; 0.06% to 5% of cases are due to the presence of diverticula of the small intestine. The majority of diverticula are asymptomatic and present symptoms when there is a complication. We present the case of a 53-year-old male with a history of chronic renal failure and hypertension. While he was hospitalized due to cerebrovascular disease he recurrently presented lower gastrointestinal bleeding that required blood transfusion on several occasions. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding and colon bleeding were ruled out by endoscopy. It was not until an arteriography was performed that we identified bleeding at proximal jejunum level, and therefore we performed a laparotomy. We present the studies and management that the patient underwent. Although jejunal diverticula are rare, they must be included in the differential diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding when present in a patient. Arteriography is a study of great use in locating the site, provided the bleeding is more than 0.5ml/minute. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  4. Accessibility for persons with mobility impairments within an informal trading site: A case study on the markets of Warwick, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragashnie Naidoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are a number of informal trading sites across cities in sub-Saharan Africa,of which the markets of Warwick is one example. Since the informal economy is an important contributor to a city’s economy as well as a source of employment, it is important for these sites to be accessible for all persons. Whilst the South African government has put structures in place to identify and remove environmental barriers in order to meet the individual needs of persons with mobility impairments and improve their quality of life, persons with mobility impairments still face barriers and restricting environments that prevent them from participating in society and its social and economic activities.Objectives: This case study aimed at exploring accessibility within the markets of Warwick for persons with mobility impairments by an ergonomic assessment, augmented by voices of participants within the market.Method: A qualitative, instrumental, single case study design was utilised with purposive sampling of the markets of Warwick as the study setting. Multiple sources of data were gathered, such as semi-structured interviews, direct observations of an environmental survey supported by photographs, and the authors’ review of relevant documents. Transcriptions were analysed using NVivo 10 software programme with inductive coding.Results: Whilst policies have been in place since 1996 to adjust infrastructure, the markets of Warwick still remain inaccessible to persons with mobility impairments and do not meet the standardised infrastructural design.Conclusion: The findings of this study may offer a significant understanding of the complexity of accessibility within an informal trading site and create an awareness of the limitations this has for persons with mobility impairments. Additionally, these findings may assist in effecting a positive change in terms of the infrastructure of the Markets and in continuous advocating for the rights of persons

  5. Postmenopausal Vaginal Bleeding after Infesting with Leeches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghaieh Rahmani-Bilandi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and therapeutic measures are immediately taken for abnormal postmenopausal vaginal bleeding, because its causes range from atrophic endometrium to malignancy. In this paper, abnormal bleeding is reported due to leech infection. The patient is a 69-year-old woman who has reached menopause for 12 years and has visited a physician because of vaginal bleeding. The patient had no history of abnormal bleeding or medication. The patient first refused to get hospitalized and continue medical care, but she finally accepted to take diagnostic and therapeutic procedures after a few times of visit and increased bleeding. During general anesthesia and upon opening vagina, a large hemorrhagic and moving mass was observed at the upper posterior vaginal wall which was removed with surgical forceps. Surprisingly, this mass was a leech. Bleeding at the leech’s junction was stopped after half an hour using sterile gas and the patient was discharged on the next day.

  6. Embolotherapy using N-butyl cyanoacrylate for abdominal wall bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Ho; Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Dae Hee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Cha, Joo Hee; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Chi Sung [Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    We describe our experience with the use of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of abdominal wall bleeding and we evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the procedure. Embolization was performed in nine patients with abdominal wall bleeding. The sites of embolization were the left first lumbar (n = 1), left second lumbar (n = 1), right inferior epigastric (n 2), left inferior epigastric (n = 3), right circumflex iliac (n = 1), and left circumflex iliac artery (n = 1). A coil was used with NBCA in one patient due to difficulty in selecting only a bleeding focus and anticipated reflux. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:4. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and after the embolization procedure, and the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Hemostasis was obtained in six out of the nine patients and technical success was achieved in all patients. There were no procedure-related complications. Four out of the nine patients died due to rebleeding of a subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 1), multiorgan failure (n = 1), and hepatic failure (n =2) that occurred two to nine days after the embolization procedure. One patient had rebleeding. The five surviving patients had no rebleeding, and the patients continue to visit the clinical on an outpatient basis. NBCA embolization is a clinically safe procedure and is effective for abdominal wall bleeding.

  7. 76 FR 59307 - Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in Air Travel: Accessibility of Web Sites and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... Room Web site, http://www.regulationroom.org , to learn about the rule and the rulemaking process, to... carriers enter into written agreements spelling out the respective responsibilities of the parties for... W3C adopted WCAG 2.0, incorporating developments in Web technology and lessons learned since WCAG...

  8. Science and Technology Undergraduate Students' Use of the Internet, Cell Phones and Social Networking Sites to Access Library Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Lutishoor; Laincz, Jozef; Smith, Jeremy J.

    2012-01-01

    Many academic libraries and publishers have developed mobile-optimized versions of their web sites and catalogs. Almost all database vendors and major journal publishers have provided a way to connect to their resources via the Internet and the mobile web. In light of this pervasive use of the Internet, mobile devices and social networking, this…

  9. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chih-Chia; Wang, Su-Ming; Kuo, Huey-Liang; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Wang, I-Kuan; Yang, Ya-Fei; Lu, Yueh-Ju; Chou, Che-Yi; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2014-08-07

    Patients with CKD receiving maintenance dialysis are at risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with early CKD who are not receiving dialysis is unknown. The hypothesis was that their risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is negatively linked to renal function. To test this hypothesis, the association between eGFR and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis was analyzed. Patients with stages 3-5 CKD in the CKD program from 2003 to 2009 were enrolled and prospectively followed until December of 2012 to monitor the development of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding was analyzed using competing-risks regression with time-varying covariates. In total, 2968 patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis were followed for a median of 1.9 years. The incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding per 100 patient-years was 3.7 (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 3.9) in patients with stage 3 CKD, 5.0 (95% confidence interval, 4.8 to 5.3) in patients with stage 4 CKD, and 13.9 (95% confidence interval, 13.1 to 14.8) in patients with stage 5 CKD. Higher eGFR was associated with a lower risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (P=0.03), with a subdistribution hazard ratio of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.87 to 0.99) for every 5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) higher eGFR. A history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Pupper gastrointestinal bleeding risk. In patients with CKD who are not receiving dialysis, lower renal function is associated with higher risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk is higher in patients with previous upper gastrointestinal bleeding history and low serum albumin. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  10. Gastric ulcer bleeding: diagnosis by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voloudaki, Argyro; Tsagaraki, Kaliopi; Mouzas, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nickolas

    1999-06-01

    A case of CT demonstration of a bleeding gastric ulcer is presented, in a patient with confusing clinical manifestations. Abdominal CT was performed without oral contrast medium administration, and showed extravasation of intravenous contrast into a gastric lumen distended with material of mixed attenuation. It is postulated that if radiopaque oral contrast had been given, peptic ulcer bleeding would probably have been masked. CT demonstration of gastric ulcer bleeding, may be of value in cases of differential diagnostic dilemmas.

  11. Endoscopy for Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Ki Bae; Yoon, Soon Man; Youn, Sei Jin

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding plays an important role in primary diagnosis and management, particularly with respect to identification of high-risk stigmata lesions...

  12. NetOglyc: prediction of mucin type O-glycosylation sites based on sequence context and surface accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Erik; Lund, Ole; Tolstrup, Niels

    1998-01-01

    -glycosylation signals in these evolutionary-related glycoproteins were found in their first hypervariable loop, V1. However, the strain variation for HIV-1 gp120 was significant. A computer server, available through WWW or E-mail, has been developed for prediction of mucin type O-glycosylation sites in proteins based...... on the amino acid sequence. The server addresses are http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetOGlyc/ and netOglyc@cbs.dtu.dk...

  13. Measurement of spatial proximity and accessibility of chromosomal loci in yeast using Cre/loxP site-specific recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, Doris; Burgess, Sean M.

    2009-01-01

    Several methods have been developed to measure interactions between homologous chromosomes during meiosis in budding yeast. These include cytological analysis of fixed, spread nuclei using fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) (1, 2), visualization of GFP-labeled chromosomal loci in living cells (3), and Chromosome-Conformation Capture (3C) (4). Here we describe a quantitative genetic assay that uses exogenous site-specific recombination to monitor the level of homolog associations betwee...

  14. Femoral versus Radial Access in Primary Angioplasty. Analysis of the ACCEPT Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Beraldo de Andrade

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The radial access provides a lower risk of bleeding and vascular complications related to the puncture site in comparison to the femoral access. Recent studies have suggested a reduction in mortality associated with the radial access in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Objective: To compare the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular ischemic and hemorrhagic events in patients undergoing primary angioplasty according to the type of arterial access route. Methods: From August 2010 to December 2011, 588 patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention during acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were assessed; they were recruited from 47 centers participating in the ACCEPT registry. Patients were grouped and compared according to the arterial access used for the procedure. Results: The mean age was 61.8 years; 75% were males and 24% had diabetes mellitus. There was no difference between groups as regards the procedure success rate, as well as regards the occurrence of death, reinfarction, or stroke at six months of follow-up. Severe bleeding was reported in 1.1% of the sample analyzed, with no statistical difference related to the access used. Conclusions: The femoral and radial accesses are equally safe and effective for the performance of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. The low rate of cardiovascular events and of hemorrhagic complications reflects the quality of the participating centers and the operators expertise with the use of both techniques.

  15. Femoral versus Radial Access in Primary Angioplasty. Analysis of the ACCEPT Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Pedro Beraldo; de Andrade, Mônica Vieira Athanazio; Barbosa, Robson Alves; Labrunie, André; Hernandes, Mauro Esteves; Marino, Roberto Luiz; Precoma, Dalton Bertolim; de Sá, Francisco Carleial Feijó; Berwanger, Otávio; Mattos, Luiz Alberto Piva e

    2014-01-01

    Background The radial access provides a lower risk of bleeding and vascular complications related to the puncture site in comparison to the femoral access. Recent studies have suggested a reduction in mortality associated with the radial access in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Objective To compare the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular ischemic and hemorrhagic events in patients undergoing primary angioplasty according to the type of arterial access route. Methods From August 2010 to December 2011, 588 patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention during acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were assessed; they were recruited from 47 centers participating in the ACCEPT registry. Patients were grouped and compared according to the arterial access used for the procedure. Results The mean age was 61.8 years; 75% were males and 24% had diabetes mellitus. There was no difference between groups as regards the procedure success rate, as well as regards the occurrence of death, reinfarction, or stroke at six months of follow-up. Severe bleeding was reported in 1.1% of the sample analyzed, with no statistical difference related to the access used. Conclusions The femoral and radial accesses are equally safe and effective for the performance of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. The low rate of cardiovascular events and of hemorrhagic complications reflects the quality of the participating centers and the operators expertise with the use of both techniques. PMID:25004418

  16. Femoral versus Radial Access in Primary Angioplasty. Analysis of the ACCEPT Registry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Pedro Beraldo de, E-mail: pedroberaldo@cardiol.br; Andrade, Mônica Vieira Athanazio de; Barbosa, Robson Alves; Labrunie, André [Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Marília, São Paulo -SP (Brazil); Hernandes, Mauro Esteves [Santa Casa de Votuporanga, São Paulo -SP (Brazil); Marino, Roberto Luiz [Hospital Madre Teresa, Belo Horizonte -MG (Brazil); Precoma, Dalton Bertolim [Sociedade Hospital Angelina Caron, Campina Grande do Sul -PR (Brazil); Sá, Francisco Carleial Feijó de [Hospital do Coração do Cariri, Barbalha -CE (Brazil); Berwanger, Otávio [Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa do Hospital do Coração, São Paulo -SP (Brazil); Mattos, Luiz Alberto Piva e [Sociedade Brasileira de Cardiologia, São Paulo -SP (Brazil); Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo -SP (Brazil); Unidades de Hemodinâmica e Intervenção Cardiovascular Rede D' Or / São Luiz, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-15

    The radial access provides a lower risk of bleeding and vascular complications related to the puncture site in comparison to the femoral access. Recent studies have suggested a reduction in mortality associated with the radial access in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. To compare the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular ischemic and hemorrhagic events in patients undergoing primary angioplasty according to the type of arterial access route. From August 2010 to December 2011, 588 patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention during acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were assessed; they were recruited from 47 centers participating in the ACCEPT registry. Patients were grouped and compared according to the arterial access used for the procedure. The mean age was 61.8 years; 75% were males and 24% had diabetes mellitus. There was no difference between groups as regards the procedure success rate, as well as regards the occurrence of death, reinfarction, or stroke at six months of follow-up. Severe bleeding was reported in 1.1% of the sample analyzed, with no statistical difference related to the access used. The femoral and radial accesses are equally safe and effective for the performance of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. The low rate of cardiovascular events and of hemorrhagic complications reflects the quality of the participating centers and the operators expertise with the use of both techniques.

  17. Percutaneous suture-mediated closure of femoral access sites deployed through the procedure sheath: initial clinical experience with a novel vascular closure device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggebrecht, Holger; Naber, Christoph; Woertgen, Uta; Ringe, Sonia; Konorza, Thomas F M; Schmermund, Axel; von Birgelen, Clemens; Haude, Michael; Kroeger, Knut; Erbel, Raimund; Baumgart, Dietrich

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the initial safety and feasibility of a novel suture-mediated device for closure of femoral access sites immediately after diagnostic or interventional cardiac catheterization. In a prospective study, 150 patients (mean age, 61.5 years; 109 male) underwent femoral access closure with a novel suture closure device (Superstitch, Sutura) immediately after diagnostic (n = 106) or interventional (n = 44) catheterization procedures, independently of the coagulation status. All patients were monitored for 24 hr after the procedure. The closure device was successfully deployed in 92% of patients. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in 77% of patients with no differences between patients undergoing diagnostic catheterization or coronary interventions (79% vs. 73%; P = 0.659). After 2 min of additional light manual compression, hemostasis was achieved in 92% of patients. There was one major complication requiring vascular surgery (0.7%). The novel suture closure device is a safe and effective device that allows for immediate closure of femoral puncture sites after both diagnostic and interventional procedures with a low rate of major complications.

  18. Single-residue posttranslational modification sites at the N-terminus, C-terminus or in-between: To be or not to be exposed for enzyme access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, Fernanda L; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Many protein posttranslational modifications (PTMs) are the result of an enzymatic reaction. The modifying enzyme has to recognize the substrate protein's sequence motif containing the residue(s) to be modified; thus, the enzyme's catalytic cleft engulfs these residue(s) and the respective sequence environment. This residue accessibility condition principally limits the range where enzymatic PTMs can occur in the protein sequence. Non-globular, flexible, intrinsically disordered segments or large loops/accessible long side chains should be preferred whereas residues buried in the core of structures should be void of what we call canonical, enzyme-generated PTMs. We investigate whether PTM sites annotated in UniProtKB (with MOD_RES/LIPID keys) are situated within sequence ranges that can be mapped to known 3D structures. We find that N- or C-termini harbor essentially exclusively canonical PTMs. We also find that the overwhelming majority of all other PTMs are also canonical though, later in the protein's life cycle, the PTM sites can become buried due to complex formation. Among the remaining cases, some can be explained (i) with autocatalysis, (ii) with modification before folding or after temporary unfolding, or (iii) as products of interaction with small, diffusible reactants. Others require further research how these PTMs are mechanistically generated in vivo.

  19. Factors Associated With Major Bleeding Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Shaun G.; Wojdyla, Daniel M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; White, Harvey D.; Paolini, John F.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Patel, Manesh R.; Sherwood, Matthew W.; Becker, Richard C.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Hacke, Werner; Singer, Daniel E.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Breithardt, Gunter; Fox, Keith A. A.; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to report additional safety results from the ROCKET AF (Rivaroxaban Once-daily oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation). Background The ROCKET AF trial demonstrated similar risks of stroke/systemic embolism and major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding (principal safety endpoint) with rivaroxaban and warfarin. Methods The risk of the principal safety and component bleeding endpoints with rivaroxaban versus warfarin were compared, and factors associated with major bleeding were examined in a multivariable model. Results The principal safety endpoint was similar in the rivaroxaban and warfarin groups (14.9 vs. 14.5 events/100 patient-years; hazard ratio: 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 0.96 to 1.11). Major bleeding risk increased with age, but there were no differences between treatments in each age category (<65, 65 to 74, ≥75 years; pinteraction = 0.59). Compared with those without (n = 13,455), patients with a major bleed (n = 781) were more likely to be older, current/prior smokers, have prior gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, mild anemia, and a lower calculated creatinine clearance and less likely to be female or have a prior stroke/transient ischemic attack. Increasing age, baseline diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥90 mm Hg, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were independently associated with major bleeding risk; female sex and DBP <90 mm Hg were associated with a decreased risk. Conclusions Rivaroxaban and warfarin had similar risk for major/nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding. Age, sex, DBP, prior GI bleeding, prior acetylsalicylic acid use, and anemia were associated with the risk of major bleeding. (An Efficacy and Safety Study of Rivaroxaban With Warfarin for the Prevention of Stroke and Non-Central Nervous System Systemic Embolism in Patients With Non

  20. Zenker's diverticulum, a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bălălău, C; Stoian, S; Motofei, I; Popescu, B; Popa, F; Scăunaşu, R V

    2013-01-01

    The most common complication of Zenker's diverticulum is aspiration pneumonia, compression of the trachea and esophageal obstruction with large diverticulum, and increased risk of development of carcinoma. Thus bleeding occurs rarely, can be massive and life threatening, with ulceration being the most common cause. We describe a patient with sever upper gastrointestinal bleeding as a result of a Zenker's diverticulum. A 75 year-old woman was referred to the emergency room and hospitalized for hematemesis, melena, asthenia and total dysphagia. In this particular case we preferred open technique because of the diverticulum dimensions and bleeding episode. Left cervicotomy was practiced on the anterior edge of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, being known that Zenker diverticulum extend into the left neck 90% of the time, fact also confirmed by radiology in this case. Postoperatively, the patient showed a complication free recovery. Five days after treatment the patient resumed nourishment. Several days later our patient was able to return home. Follow-up at 12 months after the operation showed complete recovery. Ulcer of the basis of Zenker's diverticulum is a rare entity and, only a few cases were reported in the literature to date. Omitting thecricomyotomy predisposes to fistula or diverticulum recurrence due to the persistence of a high pharyngeal intraluminal pressure that acts on the posterior wall just proximal to the upper esophageal sphincter. Zenker's diverticulum is an unusual site of origin for clinically significant upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and differential diagnosis must include other more frequent causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. In our opinion, classicalsurgical therapy is indicated when distal esophageal imaging cannot be obtained during endoscopic examination, there is a large diverticulum or in an emergency setting when fast control over the bleeding source is required.

  1. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants and abnormal bleeding: a review for clinicians and a reconsideration of mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Sandarsh, Surya; Chethan, Kumar B; Nagesh, Koregala S

    2010-12-01

    It is generally believed that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) drugs increase the risk of abnormal bleeding and decrease the risk of ischemic heart disease events by blocking the uptake of serotonin into platelets, leading to an impairment in the platelet hemostatic response. To perform a detailed qualitative review of existing literature on the association of abnormal bleeding with the use of SSRIs. We conducted a PubMed search during June 2009 using the search terms antidepressants and SSRIs (including the names of individual SSRIs: fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, fluvoxamine, citalopram, and escitalopram) in association with bleeding, platelets, hemostasis, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin, antiplatelet drugs, proton pump inhibitors, peptic ulcer, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, menstruation, pregnancy, postpartum hemorrhage, surgery, tooth extraction, dental bleeding, stroke, ischemic heart disease, and other terms related to the field. We then searched the reference lists of identified studies. We provide a qualitative discussion of all studies that would inform clinicians about the mechanisms of bleeding and bleeding risks associated with these drugs in different clinical contexts. Epidemiologic studies show that SSRI use is associated with roughly doubled odds of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding; bleeding at other sites has been less commonly described, as has a possibly increased risk of bleeding associated with surgical procedures. The risk of SSRI-associated GI bleeding is increased with the concurrent use of NSAIDs, anticoagulants, and antiplatelet agents and is decreased by concurrent proton pump inhibitors. The risk of bleeding is increased in patients with cirrhosis of the liver or liver failure. There is, curiously, little literature on use of SSRIs and menstrual or postpartum blood loss. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors appear protective against ischemic heart disease events. The data are too

  2. Exploring the structure of the voltage-gated Na+ channel by an engineered drug access pathway to the receptor site for local anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S; Cervenka, Rene; Ke, Song; Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Zarrabi, Touran; Hilber, Karlheinz; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna; Todt, Hannes

    2014-08-01

    Despite the availability of several crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na(+) channels, the structure of eukaryotic Na(+) channels is still undefined. We used predictions from available homology models and crystal structures to modulate an external access pathway for the membrane-impermeant local anesthetic derivative QX-222 into the internal vestibule of the mammalian rNaV1.4 channel. Potassium channel-based homology models predict amino acid Ile-1575 in domain IV segment 6 to be in close proximity to Lys-1237 of the domain III pore-loop selectivity filter. The mutation K1237E has been shown previously to increase the diameter of the selectivity filter. We found that an access pathway for external QX-222 created by mutations of Ile-1575 was abolished by the additional mutation K1237E, supporting the notion of a close spatial relationship between sites 1237 and 1575. Crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na(+) channels predict that the side chain of rNaV1.4 Trp-1531 of the domain IV pore-loop projects into the space between domain IV segment 6 and domain III pore-loop and, therefore, should obstruct the putative external access pathway. Indeed, mutations W1531A and W1531G allowed for exceptionally rapid access of QX-222. In addition, W1531G created a second non-selective ion-conducting pore, bypassing the outer vestibule but probably merging into the internal vestibule, allowing for control by the activation gate. These data suggest a strong structural similarity between bacterial and eukaryotic voltage-gated Na(+) channels. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Exploring the Structure of the Voltage-gated Na+ Channel by an Engineered Drug Access Pathway to the Receptor Site for Local Anesthetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Cervenka, Rene; Ke, Song; Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Zarrabi, Touran; Hilber, Karlheinz; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna; Todt, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of several crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na+ channels, the structure of eukaryotic Na+ channels is still undefined. We used predictions from available homology models and crystal structures to modulate an external access pathway for the membrane-impermeant local anesthetic derivative QX-222 into the internal vestibule of the mammalian rNaV1.4 channel. Potassium channel-based homology models predict amino acid Ile-1575 in domain IV segment 6 to be in close proximity to Lys-1237 of the domain III pore-loop selectivity filter. The mutation K1237E has been shown previously to increase the diameter of the selectivity filter. We found that an access pathway for external QX-222 created by mutations of Ile-1575 was abolished by the additional mutation K1237E, supporting the notion of a close spatial relationship between sites 1237 and 1575. Crystal structures of bacterial voltage-gated Na+ channels predict that the side chain of rNaV1.4 Trp-1531 of the domain IV pore-loop projects into the space between domain IV segment 6 and domain III pore-loop and, therefore, should obstruct the putative external access pathway. Indeed, mutations W1531A and W1531G allowed for exceptionally rapid access of QX-222. In addition, W1531G created a second non-selective ion-conducting pore, bypassing the outer vestibule but probably merging into the internal vestibule, allowing for control by the activation gate. These data suggest a strong structural similarity between bacterial and eukaryotic voltage-gated Na+ channels. PMID:24947510

  4. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae, Hwan Jun; Jung, Ah Young; Lee, Whal; Park, Jae Hyung

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods Between March 1999 and December 2002, TAE for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding was performed in 93 patients. The endoscopic approach had failed or was discarded as an approach for control of bleeding in all study patients. Among the 93 patients NBCA was used as the primary embolic material for TAE in 32 patients (28 men, four women; mean age, 59.1 years). The indications for choosing NBCA as the embolic material were: inability to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and effective wedging of the microcatheter into the bleeding artery. TAE was performed using 1:1-1:3 mixtures of NBCA and iodized oil. The angiographic and clinical success rate, recurrent bleeding rate, procedure related complications and clinical outcomes were evaluated. Results The angiographic and clinical success rates were 100% and 91% (29/32), respectively. There were no serious ischemic complications. Recurrent bleeding occurred in three patients (9%) and they were managed with emergency surgery (n = 1) and with a successful second TAE (n = 2). Eighteen patients (56%) had a coagulopathy at the time of TAE and the clinical success rate in this group of patients was 83% (15/18). Conclusion TAE with NBCA is a highly effective and safe treatment modality for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, especially when it is not possible to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and when the patient has a coagulopathy. PMID:17277563

  5. First trimester bleeding and maternal cardiovascular morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jacob A; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2012-01-01

    First trimester bleeding without miscarriage is a risk factor for complications later in the pregnancy, such as preterm delivery. Also, first trimester miscarriage has been linked to subsequent maternal ischemic heart disease. We investigated the link between maternal cardiovascular disease prior...... to and subsequent to first trimester bleeding without miscarriage....

  6. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Gachabayov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma.

  7. Recurrent Midgut Bleeding due to Jejunal Angioleiomyoma

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Angioleiomyoma being a type of true smooth muscle gastrointestinal tumors can lead to serious life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding. We report a case of 21-year-old male patient with recurrent midgut bleeding. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed highly vascular small bowel neoplasm. The patient underwent laparotomy with bowel resection and recovered uneventfully. Histopathology revealed jejunal angioleiomyoma.

  8. A cytoskeletal localizing domain in the cyclase-associated protein, CAP/Srv2p, regulates access to a distant SH3-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J; Wang, C; Palmieri, S J; Haarer, B K; Field, J

    1999-07-09

    In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase consists of a 200-kDa catalytic subunit (CYR1) and a 70-kDa subunit (CAP/SRV2). CAP/Srv2p assists the small G protein Ras to activate adenylyl cyclase. CAP also regulates the cytoskeleton through an actin sequestering activity and is directed to cortical actin patches by a proline-rich SH3-binding site (P2). In this report we analyze the role of the actin cytoskeleton in Ras/cAMP signaling. Two alleles of CAP, L16P(Srv2) and R19T (SupC), first isolated in genetic screens for mutants that attenuate cAMP levels, reduced adenylyl cyclase binding, and cortical actin patch localization. A third mutation, L27F, also failed to localize but showed no loss of either cAMP signaling or adenylyl cyclase binding. However, all three N-terminal mutations reduced CAP-CAP multimer formation and SH3 domain binding, although the SH3-binding site is about 350 amino acids away. Finally, disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin-A did not affect the cAMP phenotypes of the hyperactive Ras2(Val19) allele. These data identify a novel region of CAP that controls access to the SH3-binding site and demonstrate that cytoskeletal localization of CAP or an intact cytoskeleton per se is not necessary for cAMP signaling.

  9. Large lateral movement of transmembrane helix S5 is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid intramembrane protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yi; Ha, Ya

    2013-06-07

    Rhomboids represent an evolutionarily ancient protease family. Unlike most other proteases, they are polytopic membrane proteins and specialize in cleaving transmembrane protein substrates. The polar active site of rhomboid protease is embedded in the membrane and normally closed. For the bacterial rhomboid GlpG, it has been proposed that one of the transmembrane helices (S5) of the protease can rotate to open a lateral gate, enabling substrate to enter the protease from inside the membrane. Here, we studied the conformational change in GlpG by solving the cocrystal structure of the protease with a mechanism-based inhibitor. We also examined the lateral gating model by cross-linking S5 to a neighboring helix (S2). The crystal structure shows that inhibitor binding displaces a capping loop (L5) from the active site but causes only minor shifts in the transmembrane helices. Cross-linking S5 and S2, which not only restricts the lateral movement of S5 but also prevents substrate from passing between the two helices, does not hinder the ability of the protease to cleave a membrane protein substrate in detergent solution and in reconstituted membrane vesicles. Taken together, these data suggest that a large lateral movement of the S5 helix is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid protease.

  10. Ileal polypoid lymphangiectasia bleeding diagnosed and treated by double balloon enteroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Seon; Lee, Beom Jae; Gu, Dae Hoe; Pyo, Jeung-Hui; Kim, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Yun Ho; Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae

    2013-12-07

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease characterized by focal or diffuse dilated enteric lymphatics with impaired lymph drainage. It causes protein-losing enteropathy and may lead to gastrointestinal bleeding. Commonly, lymphangiectasia presents as whitish spots or specks. To our knowledge, small bowel bleeding resulting from polypoid intestinal lymphangiectasia has not been reported. Here, we report a rare case of active bleeding from the small bowel caused by polypoid lymphangiectasia with a review of the relevant literature. An 80-year-old woman was hospitalized for melena. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy could not identify the source of bleeding. Subsequent colonoscopy showed fresh bloody material gushing from the small bowel. An abdominal-pelvic contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan did not reveal any abnormal findings. Video capsule endoscopy showed evidence of active and recent bleeding in the ileum. To localize the bleeding site, we performed double balloon enteroscopy by the anal approach. A small, bleeding, polypoid lesion was found in the distal ileum and was successfully removed using endoscopic snare electrocautery.

  11. Route of children at ulcerative gastroduodenal bleedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергій Олександрович Сокольник

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To elaborate the step-by-step differential algorithm of the motion of children with ulcerative gastroduodenal bleedings. Methods. There were examined 45 patients with gastroduodenal bleeding of ulcerative genesis using clinical, sociometric, genealogic, immune-enzyme, biochemical, endoscopic, functional methods. In the complex treatment for stop bleeding 13 patients underwent argon-plasma coagulation and the other – irrigation with aminocapronic acid. An efficiency of treatment was evaluated using epidemiologic and statistical methods.Results. At presence of an appropriate clinical symptomatology, burdened genealogic anamnesis, laboratory changes it is necessary to carry out an emergency endoscopic examination. In the case of continuing bleeding or instable homeostasis it is recommended to carry out an endoscopic hemostasis using argon-plasma coagulation, in conditions of the high risk of relapse of bleeding – the repeated course of argon-plasma coagulation. After stabilization - an examination for helicobacter infection, conservative therapy and dynamic observation with detection of risk of relapse of bleeding and elaboration of individualized medioprophylactic program.Conclusions. The use of step-by-step differentiated diagnostic and treatment algorithm of the motion in patients with ulcerative disease complicated with gastroduodenal bleeding allows detect the main spectrum of diagnostic researches faster and choose the tactics of treatment and therefore improve an efficiency of medical help for patient and shorten the term of inpatient treatment. 

  12. Double-balloon enteroscopy reliably directs surgical intervention for patients with small intestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mou-Bin Lin; Lu Yin; Jian-Wen Li; Wei-Guo Hu; Qian-Jian Qian

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate preoperative double-balloon enteroscopy for determining bleeding lesions of small intestine, thus directing selective surgical intervention.METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 56 patients who underwent double-balloon enteroscopy to localize intestinal bleeding prior to surgical intervention, and compared enteroscopic findings with those of intraoperation to determine the accuracy of enteroscopy in identifying and localizing the sites of small intestinal bleeding.RESULTS: Double-balloon enteroscopy was performed in all 56 patients in a 30-mo period. A possible site of blood loss was identified in 54 (96%) patients. Enteroscopy provided accurate localization of the bleeding in 53 (95%) of 56 patients, but failed to disclose the cause of bleeding in 4 (7%). There was one case with negative intraoperative finding (2%). Resection of the affected bowel was carried out except one patient who experienced rebleeding after operation. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was most frequently diagnosed (55%).CONCLUSION: Double-balloon enteroscopy is a safe, reliable modality for determining bleeding lesion of small intestine. This technique can be used to direct selective surgical intervention.

  13. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding - state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a condition requiring immediate medical intervention, with high associated mortality exceeding 10%. The most common cause of upper GI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, which largely corresponds to the intake of NSAIDs and Helicobacter pylori infection. Endoscopy is the essential tool for the diagnosis and treatment of active upper GI hemorrhage. Endoscopic therapy together with proton pump inhibitors and eradication of Helicobacter pylori significantly reduces rebleeding rates, mortality and number of emergency surgical interventions. This paper presents contemporary data on the diagnosis and treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  14. Tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Cathy; Klingenberg, Sarah Louise; Langholz, Ebbe

    2014-01-01

    no intervention, placebo or other antiulcer drugs for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.Search methods We updated the review by performing electronic database searches (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL),MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index) and manual searches in July 2014.Selection...... and should include all participants with suspected bleeding or with endoscopically verified bleeding, as well as a tranexamic placebo arm and co-administration of pump inhibitors and endoscopic therapy. Assessment of outcome measures in such studies should be clearly defined. Endoscopic examination...

  15. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  16. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Saeed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is more common in patients with chronic kidney disease and is associated with higher mortality than in the general population. Blood losses in this patient population can be quite severe at times and it is important to differentiate anemia of chronic diseases from anemia due to GI bleeding. We review the literature on common causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGI in chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients. We suggest an approach to diagnosis and management of this problem.

  17. Spontaneous bleeding or thrombosis in cirrhosis: What should be feared the most?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castro, Kryssia Isabel; Antonello, Alessandro; Ferrarese, Alberto

    2015-07-18

    The more modern and accurate concept of a rebalanced hemostatic status in cirrhosis is slowly replacing the traditional belief of patients with cirrhosis being "auto-anticoagulated", prone only to bleeding complications, and protected from thrombotic events. With greater attention to clinical thrombotic events, their impact on the natural history of cirrhosis, and with the emergence and increased use of point-of-care and global assays, it is now understood that cirrhosis results in profound hemostatic alterations that can lead to thrombosis as well as to bleeding complications. Although many clinical decisions are still based on traditional coagulation parameters such as prothrombin (PT), PT, and international normalized ratio, it is increasingly recognized that these tests do not adequately predict the risk of bleeding, nor they should guide pre-emptive interventions. Moreover, altered coagulation tests should not be considered as a contraindication to the use of anticoagulation, although this therapeutic or prophylactic approach is not at present routinely undertaken. Gastroesophageal variceal bleeding continues to be one of the most feared and deadly complications of cirrhosis and portal hypertension, but great progresses have been made in prevention and treatment strategies. Other bleeding sites that are frequently part of end-stage liver disease are similar to clinical manifestations of thrombocytopenia, with gum bleeding and epistaxis being very common but fortunately only rarely a cause of life-threatening bleeding. On the contrary, manifestations of coagulation factor deficiencies like soft tissue bleeding and hemartrosis are rare in patients with cirrhosis. As far as thrombotic complications are concerned, portal vein thrombosis is the most common event in patients with cirrhosis, but venous thromboembolism is not infrequent, and results in important morbidity and mortality in patients with cirrhosis, especially those with decompensated disease. Future

  18. Detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with arterial phase multi-detector row helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckle, T.; Stuber, G.; Hoffmann, M.H.K.; Jeltsch, M.; Schmitz, B.L.; Aschoff, A.J. [University Hospital of Ulm, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ulm (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of multi-detector row helical CT (MDCT) for detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage or intraperitoneal bleeding. Thirty-six consecutive patients with clinical signs of acute bleeding underwent biphasic (16- or 40-channel) MDCT. MDCT findings were correlated with endoscopy, angiography or surgery. Among the 36 patients evaluated, 26 were examined for GI bleeding and 10 for intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Confirmed sites of GI bleeding were the stomach (n = 5), duodenum (n = 5), small bowel (n = 6), large bowel (n = 8) and rectum (n = 2). The correct site of bleeding was identifiable on MDCT in 24/26 patients with GI bleeding. In 20 of these 24 patients, active CM extravasation was apparent during the exam. Among the ten patients with intraperitoneal hemorrhage, MDCT correctly identified the bleeding source in nine patients. Our findings suggest that fast and accurate localization of acute gastrointestinal and intraperitoneal bleeding is achievable on MDCT. (orig.)

  19. Detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with arterial phase multi-detector row helical CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeckle, T; Stuber, G; Hoffmann, M H K; Jeltsch, M; Schmitz, B L; Aschoff, A J

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of multi-detector row helical CT (MDCT) for detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage or intraperitoneal bleeding. Thirty-six consecutive patients with clinical signs of acute bleeding underwent biphasic (16- or 40-channel) MDCT. MDCT findings were correlated with endoscopy, angiography or surgery. Among the 36 patients evaluated, 26 were examined for GI bleeding and 10 for intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Confirmed sites of GI bleeding were the stomach (n = 5), duodenum (n = 5), small bowel (n = 6), large bowel (n = 8) and rectum (n = 2). The correct site of bleeding was identifiable on MDCT in 24/26 patients with GI bleeding. In 20 of these 24 patients, active CM extravasation was apparent during the exam. Among the ten patients with intraperitoneal hemorrhage, MDCT correctly identified the bleeding source in nine patients. Our findings suggest that fast and accurate localization of acute gastrointestinal and intraperitoneal bleeding is achievable on MDCT.

  20. Multidetector computed tomography mesentericography for the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, P.; Hamer, O.W.; Mueller-Wille, R.; Rennert, J.; Feuerbach, S.; Zorger, N. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Wrede, C.E. [Helios-Klinikum Berlin-Buch (Germany). Interdisziplinaeres Notfallzentrum mit Rettungsstelle; Siebig, S.; Schoelmerich, J. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik I

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic yield of 16-row multidetector computed tomography (CT) mesentericography in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods: The radiological information system database was used to retrospectively identify all patients in whom CT mesentericography (CTM) was performed for the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding between July 2002 and September 2006. A subsequent prospective study was conducted between October 2006 and September 2009 to evaluate CTM in patients with major obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The retrospectively identified patients (six patients) as well as the prospectively evaluated patients (seven patients) constitute the study population. Following mesenteric DSA the catheter was left in the superior mesenteric artery, the patient was transferred to the CT suite and CTM was carried out by scanning the abdomen after contrast material injection via the catheter. Active bleeding was suspected if a focal area of high attenuation consistent with contrast material extravasation was found within the bowel lumen. Results: CTM detected the site of active bleeding in three of 13 patients (23 %). In the subpopulation of patients who were prospectively evaluated, CT mesentericography identified the site of active bleeding in one of seven patients (14 %). Depiction of active bleeding by CTM prompted surgical intervention in each case and surgery confirmed the findings of CT mesentericography. Conclusion: Due to the relatively low rate of positive findings and inherent drawbacks, we feel that CTM cannot be recommended in general. However, in selected patients who are continuously bleeding at a low rate and in whom iv-CT was negative, CT mesentericography might be helpful. (orig.)

  1. Therapeutic and prophylactic ethanol lock therapy in patients with bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpurkar, M; McGrath, E; Joyce, J; Boldt-MacDonald, K; Chitlur, M; Lusher, J

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining a reliable venous access is a limiting factor for early initiation of clotting factor prophylaxis and immune tolerance induction. To circumvent this issue, central venous access devices (CVADs) are increasingly being used. Catheter-related infections (CRIs) remain the primary complication of insertion of CVAD. Thus, newer strategies for treatment and prevention of CRI are needed. Ethanol lock therapy (ELT) has been used to treat and prevent CRI in non-bleeding disorder patients. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of ELT in treating and preventing CRI in bleeding disorder patients. The medical charts of patients with bleeding disorders who underwent ELT for antimicrobial resistant CRIs were reviewed and data were analysed. ELT was effective in catheter salvage in 87% of patients with antimicrobial resistant CRI by a wide variety of pathogens. Prophylactic therapy with ethanol lock was associated with catheter dysfunction especially in mediports. ELT should be considered prior to removal of catheters in bleeding disorder patients with resistant CRIs. Further studies are needed for using prophylactic ethanol lock in prevention of CRIs in bleeding disorder patients.

  2. Bleeding and starving: fasting and delayed refeeding after upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jorge; Meira, Tânia; Nunes, Ana; Santos, Carla Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Early refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is safe and reduces hospital stay/costs. The aim of this study was obtaining objective data on refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. From 1 year span records of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients that underwent urgent endoscopy: clinical features; rockall score; endoscopic data, including severity of lesions and therapy; feeding related records of seven days: liquid diet prescription, first liquid intake, soft/solid diet prescription, first soft/solid intake. From 133 patients (84 men) Rockall classification was possible in 126: 76 score ≥5, 50 score bleeding, eight rebled, two underwent surgery, 13 died. Ulcer was the major bleeding cause, 63 patients underwent endoscopic therapy. There was 142/532 possible refeeding records, no record 37% patients. Only 16% were fed during the first day and half were only fed on third day or later. Rockall upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients must be refed earlier, according to guidelines.

  3. Bleeding time in uremia: a useful test to assess clinical bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, R W; Coggins, C; Carvalho, A C

    1979-01-01

    Modified Ivy bleeding time (template) and platelet aggregation to ADP, epinephrine, and collagen were studied in 26 uremic patients who had not recently ingested anti-platelet drugs. Regardless of the aggregating agent used, the abnormalities in platelet aggregation were often mild, even with advanced uremia, and frequently less severe than the effects of common anti-platelet drugs. The inhibition of collagen-induced aggregation was significantly correlated with both increased bleeding time and blood urea nitrogen. Platelet aggregation was not discriminative between clinically bleeding and non-bleeding groups of patients, but the bleeding time was helpful in this regard. In certain cases, the aggregometric patterns differed between drug-induced and uremic thrombocytopathies. Platelet aggregometry appears to be of little help clinically in assessing the severity of the uremic bleeding diathesis.

  4. Gastrointestinal bleeding in the pediatric patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Hillemeier, C.; Gryboski, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hemorrhage in infants and children is a catastrophic event but is not associated with significant mortality except in those with a severe primary illness. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in infants and young children is most often associated with stress ulcers or erosions, but in older children it may also be caused by duodenal ulcer, esophagitis, and esophageal varices. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding may be caused by a variety of lesions among which are infectious colitides...

  5. Management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, E

    2011-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is unique from variceal bleeding in terms of patient characteristics, management, rebleeding rates, and prognosis, and should be managed differently. The majority of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeds will not rebleed once treated successfully. The incidence is 80 to 90% of all upper gastrointestinal bleeds and the mortality is between 5 to 10%. The causes include nonacid-related ulceration from tumors, infections, inflammatory disease, Mallory-Weiss tears, erosions, esophagitis, dieulafoy lesions, angiodysplasias, gastric antral vascular ectasia, and portal hypertensive gastropathy. Rarer causes include hemobilia, hemosuccus pancreaticus, and aortoenteric fistulas. Hematemesis and melena are the key features of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract, but fresh per rectal bleeding may be present in a rapidly bleeding lesion. Resuscitation and stabilization before endoscopy leads to improved outcomes. Fluid resuscitation is essential to avoid hypotension. Though widely practiced, there is currently insufficient evidence to show that routine red cell transfusion is beneficial. Coagulopathy requires correction, but the optimal international normalized ratio has not been determined yet. Risk stratification scores such as the Rockall and Glasgow-Blatchford scores are useful to predict rebleeding, mortality, and to determine the urgency of endoscopy. Evidence suggests that high-dose proton pump inhibitors (PPI) should be given as an infusion before endoscopy. If patients are intolerant of PPIs, histamine-2 receptor antagonists can be given, although their acid suppression is inferior. Endoscopic therapy includes thermal methods such as coaptive coagulation, argon plasma coagulation, and hemostatic clips. Four quadrant epinephrine injections combined with either thermal therapy or clipping reduces mortality. In hypoxic patients, endoscopy masks allow high-flow oxygen during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The

  6. Management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Wee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is unique from variceal bleeding in terms of patient characteristics, management, rebleeding rates, and prognosis, and should be managed differently. The majority of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeds will not rebleed once treated successfully. The incidence is 80 to 90% of all upper gastrointestinal bleeds and the mortality is between 5 to 10%. The causes include nonacid-related ulceration from tumors, infections, inflammatory disease, Mallory-Weiss tears, erosions, esophagitis, dieulafoy lesions, angiodysplasias, gastric antral vascular ectasia, and portal hypertensive gastropathy. Rarer causes include hemobilia, hemosuccus pancreaticus, and aortoenteric fistulas. Hematemesis and melena are the key features of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract, but fresh per rectal bleeding may be present in a rapidly bleeding lesion. Resuscitation and stabilization before endoscopy leads to improved outcomes. Fluid resuscitation is essential to avoid hypotension. Though widely practiced, there is currently insufficient evidence to show that routine red cell transfusion is beneficial. Coagulopathy requires correction, but the optimal international normalized ratio has not been determined yet. Risk stratification scores such as the Rockall and Glasgow-Blatchford scores are useful to predict rebleeding, mortality, and to determine the urgency of endoscopy. Evidence suggests that high-dose proton pump inhibitors (PPI should be given as an infusion before endoscopy. If patients are intolerant of PPIs, histamine-2 receptor antagonists can be given, although their acid suppression is inferior. Endoscopic therapy includes thermal methods such as coaptive coagulation, argon plasma coagulation, and hemostatic clips. Four quadrant epinephrine injections combined with either thermal therapy or clipping reduces mortality. In hypoxic patients, endoscopy masks allow high-flow oxygen during upper

  7. Bleeding from gastrointestinal angioectasias is not related to bleeding disorders - a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lärfars Gerd

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angioectasias in the gastrointestinal tract can be found in up to 3% of the population. They are typically asymptomatic but may sometimes result in severe bleeding. The reasons for why some patients bleed from their angioectasias are not fully understood but it has been reported that it may be explained by an acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS. This condition has similar laboratory findings to congenital von Willebrand disease with selective loss of large von Willebrand multimers. The aim of this study was to find out if AVWS or any other bleeding disorder was more common in patients with bleeding from angioectasias than in a control group. Methods We compared bleeding tests and coagulation parameters, including von Willebrand multimers, from a group of 23 patients with anemia caused by bleeding from angioectasias, with the results from a control group lacking angioectasias. Results No significant differences between the two groups were found in coagulation parameters, bleeding time or von Willebrand multimer levels. Conclusion These results do not support a need for routine bleeding tests in cases of bleeding from angioectasias and do not show an overall increased risk of AVWS among these patients.

  8. Application of laparoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of massive small intestinal bleeding: Report of 22 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Chen Ba; San-Hua Qing; Xiang-Cheng Huang; Ying Wen; Guo-Xin Li; Jiang Yu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic and therapeutic value of laparoscopy in patients with massive small intestinal bleeding.METHODS: Twenty-two patients with massive small intestinal bleeding and hemodynamic alteration underwent laparoscopic laparotomy in our unit from December 2002 to April 2005. Post pathologic sites were found, laparoscopy- or laparoscopy-assisted part small intestinal resection including pathologic intestinal site and enteroanastomosis was performed in all these patients.RESULTS: The bleeding sites were successfully detected by laparoscopy in all these 22 patients. Massive small intestinal bleeding was caused by jejunum benign stromal tumor in 8 cases, by jejunum potential malignant stromal tumor in 5 cases, by jejunum malignant stromal tumor in 1 case, by Mechel's diverticulum in 5 cases,by small intestinal vascular deformity in 2 cases, and by ectopic pancreas in 1 case. A total of 16 patients underwent laparoscopy-assisted enterectomy and enteroanastomosis of small intestine covering the of the diseased segment under laparoscope. No surgical complications occurred and the outcome was satisfactory.CONCLUSION: Laparoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of massive small intestinal bleeding is noninvasive with less pain, short recovery time and definite therapeutic efficacy.

  9. ABNORMAL UTERINE BLEEDING IN PERIMENOPAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaji

    2016-06-01

    endometrial carcinoma. Perimenopausal women with heavy or irregular menstrual bleeding should have an endometrial biopsy taken to exclude endometrial disease and early evaluation and diagnosis of the complications of AUB, and thus arrive at timely and effective therapeutic strategies.

  10. Safety and effectiveness of a synthetic hemostatic patch for intraoperative soft tissue bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhmacher, Christoph; Pratschke, Johann; Weiss, Sascha; Schneeberger, Stefan; Mihaljevic, André L; Schirren, Rebekka; Winkler, Michael; Emmanouilidis, Nikos

    2015-01-01

    Continuous bleeding after using conventional hemostatic methods involving energy, sutures, or clips, is a serious and costly surgical complication. Many topical agents have been developed to promote intraoperative hemostasis, but improvement is needed in both decreasing time to hemostasis and increasing ease of use. Veriset™ hemostatic patch is CE-marked for controlling bleeding on the liver and in soft tissue. In the current study, we aimed to gather further evidence for the safety and effectiveness of Veriset™ hemostatic patch in soft tissue bleeding during a variety of surgical procedures. Thirty patients scheduled for nonemergency surgery, each with an intraoperative soft tissue bleeding site, were treated with Veriset™ hemostatic patch. Time to hemostasis was monitored, and adverse events were assessed during the 90 days after surgery. When Veriset™ hemostatic patch was used, hemostasis occurred within 5 minutes in 29/30 (96.7%) subjects and within 1 minute in 21/30 (70.0%) subjects. No device-related serious adverse events were recorded during the 30 days after surgery, and no reoperations for device-related bleeding complications were performed during the 5 days after surgery. Veriset™ hemostatic patch is a safe and effective hemostat for controlling soft tissue bleeding during a variety of surgical procedures.

  11. Endoscopic Evaluation and Management of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Patients with Ventricular Assist Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marty M. Meyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal diagnostic approach and yield for gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB in patients with ventricular assist devices (VAD are unknown. We explored the etiology of bleeding and yield of upper and lower endoscopy, balloon-assisted enteroscopy, and video capsule endoscopy in the evaluation of GIB in patients with VADs. Methods. All VAD patients with overt gastrointestinal bleeding and drop in hematocrit from April 1, 2000 to July 31, 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. The endoscopic evaluation of each episode was recorded. Overall yield of EGD, colonoscopy, balloon-assisted, and video capsule endoscopy were evaluated. Results. Thirty-six bleeding episodes occurred involving 20 patients. The site of GIB was identified in 32/36 episodes (88.9%, and the etiology of bleeding was determined in 30/36 cases (83.3%. Five VAD patients underwent VCE. The VCE exams demonstrated a high yield with 80% of exams identifying the etiology of GIB. Endoscopic intervention was successful in 8/9 attempts. No adverse events were recorded. Two patients required surgical intervention for GIB. Conclusion. Upper, lower, video capsule, and balloon-assisted enteroscopies are safe and demonstrate a high yield in the investigation of gastrointestinal bleeding in VAD patients. Medical centers caring for VAD patients should employ a standardized protocol to optimize endoscopic evaluation and intervention.

  12. Left ventricular assist devices and gastrointestinal bleeding: a narrative review of case reports and case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sameer; Cevik, Cihan; Madonna, Rosalinda; Frandah, Wesam; Islam, Ebtesam; Islam, Sherazad; Nugent, Kenneth

    2013-04-01

    The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) has become a state-of-the-art therapy for advanced cardiac heart failure; however, multiple reports in the literature describe an increased risk for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in these patients. We characterized this association by reviewing recent studies on this topic. GI bleeding occurs frequently in patients with LVADs, especially with devices with nonpulsatile flow patterns. We performed a comprehensive literature review to identify articles that reported GI bleeding in patients with LVADs. Databases used included PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, and Ovid. Baseline and outcome data were then ed from these reports. We identified 10 case reports and 22 case series with 1543 patients. The mean age was 54.2 years. Most patients had nonpulsatile LVADs (1316, 85.3%). Three hundred and seventeen patients (20.5%) developed GI bleeding; this occurred more frequently in patients with nonpulsatile LVADs. Multiple procedures were performed without complications but often did not identify a definite bleeding site. Suspect lesions occurred throughout the GI tract but were more frequent in the upper GI tract. Many patients had arteriovenous malformations. All patients received medical therapy. None of the patients had their LVAD replaced. The use of anticoagulation did not appear to predispose these patients to more GI bleeding episodes. Patients with LVADs have frequent GI bleeds, especially from arteriovenous malformations, which can occur throughout the GI tract. Most diagnostic and therapeutic interventions can be used safely in these patients. The pathogenesis of the GI bleeding in these patients may involve the use of anticoagulant medications, the formation of arteriovenous malformations, loss of von Willebrand factor activity, and mucosal ischemia. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Comparison of ACUITY and CRUSADE Scores in Predicting Major Bleeding during Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis C. L. Correia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:The ACUITY and CRUSADE scores are validated models for prediction of major bleeding events in acute coronary syndrome (ACS. However, the comparative performances of these scores are not known.Objective:To compare the accuracy of ACUITY and CRUSADE in predicting major bleeding events during ACS.Methods:This study included 519 patients consecutively admitted for unstable angina, non-ST-elevation or ST-elevation myocardial infarction. The scores were calculated based on admission data. We considered major bleeding events during hospitalization and not related to cardiac surgery, according to the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC criteria (type 3 or 5: hemodynamic instability, need for transfusion, drop in hemoglobin ≥ 3 g, and intracranial, intraocular or fatal bleeding.Results:Major bleeding was observed in 31 patients (23 caused by femoral puncture, 5 digestive, 3 in other sites, an incidence of 6%. While both scores were associated with bleeding, ACUITY demonstrated better C-statistics (0.73, 95% CI = 0.63 - 0.82 as compared with CRUSADE (0.62, 95% CI = 0.53 - 0.71; p = 0.04. The best performance of ACUITY was also reflected by a net reclassification improvement of + 0.19 (p = 0.02 over CRUSADE’s definition of low or high risk. Exploratory analysis suggested that the presence of the variables ‘age’ and ‘type of ACS’ in ACUITY was the main reason for its superiority.Conclusion:The ACUITY Score is a better predictor of major bleeding when compared with the CRUSADE Score in patients hospitalized for ACS.

  14. Immediate bleeding complications in dental implants: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Balaguer Martí, José Carlos; Peñarrocha Oltra, David; Balaguer Martínez, José; Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A review is made of the immediate or immediate postoperative bleeding complications in dental implants, with a view to identifying the areas of greatest bleeding risk, the causes of bleeding, the length of the implants associated with bleeding, the most frequently implicated blood vessels, and the treatments used to resolve these complications. Material and Methods: A Medline (PubMed) and Embase search was made of articles on immediate bleeding complications in dental implants publ...

  15. G quadruplex RNA structures in PSD-95 mRNA: potential regulators of miR-125a seed binding site accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanovic, Snezana; Bassell, Gary J; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability caused by the CGG trinucleotide expansion in the 3'-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene on the X chromosome, that silences the expression of the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP has been shown to bind to a G-rich region within the PSD-95 mRNA which encodes for the postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), and together with the microRNA miR-125a, to play an important role in the reversible inhibition of the PSD-95 mRNA translation in neurons. The loss of FMRP in Fmr1 KO mice disables this translation control in the production of the PSD-95 protein. Interestingly, the miR-125a binding site on PSD-95 mRNA is embedded in the G-rich region bound by FMRP and postulated to adopt one or more G quadruplex structures. In this study, we have used different biophysical techniques to validate and characterize the formation of parallel G quadruplex structures and binding of miR-125a to its complementary sequence located within the 3' UTR of PSD-95 mRNA. Our results indicate that the PSD-95 mRNA G-rich region folds into alternate G quadruplex conformations that coexist in equilibrium. miR-125a forms a stable complex with PSD-95 mRNA, as evident by characteristic Watson-Crick base-pairing that coexists with one of the G quadruplex forms, suggesting a novel mechanism for G quadruplex structures to regulate the access of miR-125a to its binding site. © 2014 Stefanovic et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  16. Clinical audit of inherited bleeding disorders in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Raihan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We did a clinical audit to determine the status of coagulation disorders in a hemophilia care center in Pakistan. Setting: Fatimid foundation blood bank and hematological diseases center, Lahore. Study Design: This is a retrospective descriptive study. Materials and Methods: All patients registered at Lahore center were included. Data was collected using a questionnaire including age, gender, diagnosis, hepatitis and human immune deficiency virus (HIV status, number of episodes of bleeding, most common site of bleeding, severity of disorder and number of transfusions required to treat the episode. Results: During the study period, a total of 923 registered patients were reviewed at Lahore center and of these, 408 patients (44.2% were on regular follow-up. Inherited bleeding disorders identified in these patients included hemophilia A, hemophilia B, vWD, factor VII deficiency, factor V deficiency, factor X deficiency, dysfibrinogenemia, afibrinogenemia, factor XIII deficiency; and platelet function defects. Median age was 17 years with a range of three to 57 years. Median age at diagnosis was one year. There were 329 (80.6% males and 79 (19.3% females. The products used in these patients included factor VIII concentrate, fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, cryosupernatant and platelets. Testing for transmission of viral infections was also done in these patients and one patient (0.2% was found hepatitis B positive, six patients (1.4% were hepatitis C positive and two patients (0.49% were HIV positive. Conclusion: Hemophilia A, hemophilia B and vWD are the commonly encountered inherited bleeding disorders in our patients followed by other recessively transmitted disorders with a median age of 17 years and male to female ratio of 4: 1. Most of the patients utilized services available at Fatimid foundation with good clinical results. In Pakistan, non-governmental organizations (NGOs are trying their best for providing optimal treatment

  17. Optical investigation of the intergrowth structure and accessibility of Brønsted acid sites in etched SSZ-13 zeolite crystals by confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Linn; Svelle, Stian; Lillerud, Karl Petter; Stöcker, Michael; Weckhuysen, Bert M; Olsbye, Unni

    2010-11-02

    Template decomposition followed by confocal fluorescence microscopy reveals a tetragonal-pyramidal intergrowth of subunits in micrometer-sized nearly cubic SSZ-13 zeolite crystals. In order to accentuate intergrowth boundaries and defect-rich areas within the individual large zeolite crystals, a treatment with an etching NaOH solution is applied. The defective areas are visualized by monitoring the spatial distribution of fluorescent tracer molecules within the individual SSZ-13 crystals by confocal fluorescence microscopy. These fluorescent tracer molecules are formed at the inner and outer crystal surfaces by utilizing the catalytic activity of the zeolite in the oligomerization reaction of styrene derivatives. This approach reveals various types of etching patterns that are an indication for the defectiveness of the studied crystals. We can show that specially one type of crystals, denoted as core-shell type, is highly accessible to the styrene molecules after etching. Despite the large crystal dimensions, the whole core-shell type SSZ-13 crystal is utilized for catalytic reaction. Furthermore, the confocal fluorescence microscopy measurements indicate a nonuniform distribution of the catalytically important Brønsted acid sites underlining the importance of space-resolved measurements.

  18. Intracranial hemorrhage in congenital bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibian, Shadi; Motlagh, Hoda; Naderi, Majid; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2017-09-09

    : Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), as a life-threatening bleeding among all kinds of congenital bleeding disorders (CBDs), is a rare manifestation except in factor XIII (FXIII) deficiency, which is accompanied by ICH, early in life, in about one-third of patients. Most inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs) are mild to moderate bleeding disorders that can never experience a severe bleeding as in ICH; however, Glanzmann's thrombasthenia, a common and severe inherited platelet function disorder, can lead to ICH and occasional death. This bleeding feature can also be observed in grey platelet syndrome, though less frequently than in Glanzmann's thrombasthenia. In hemophilia, intracerebral hemorrhage is affected by various risk factors one of which is the severity of the disease. The precise prevalence of ICH in these patients is not clear but an estimated incidence of 3.5-4% among newborns with hemophilia is largely ascertained. Although ICH is a rare phenomenon in CBDs, it can be experienced by every patient with severe hemophilia A and B, FXIII deficiency (FXIIID), FVIID, FXD, FVD, FIID, and afibrinogenemia. Upon observing the general signs and symptoms of ICH such as vomiting, seizure, unconsciousness, and headache, appropriate replacement therapies and cranial ultrasound scans must be done to decrease ICH-related morbidity and mortality.

  19. Investigation of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding with 16- and 64-slice multidetector CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S; Welman, C J; Ramsay, D

    2009-02-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of 16- and 64-slice multidetector CT (MDCT) in the detection of a bleeding site in acute lower gastrointestinal tract (GIT) haemorrhage by conducting a retrospective study of cases of presumed acute lower GIT haemorrhage imaged with CT in two teaching hospitals in an 11-month period. The patients underwent contrast enhanced CT using either a 16 or 64 MDCT. No oral contrast was used. One hundred milliliters of non-ionic intravenous contrast agent was injected at 4.5 mL/s, followed by a 60 mL saline flush at 4 mL/s through a dual head injector. Images were acquired in arterial phase with or without non-contrast and portal phase imaging with 16 x 1.5 mm or 64 x 0.625 mm collimation. Active bleeding was diagnosed by the presence of iodinated contrast extravasation into the bowel lumen on arterial phase images with attenuation greater than and distinct from the normal mucosal enhancement or focal pooling of increased attenuation contrast material within a bowel segment on portal-venous images. Further management and final diagnosis was recorded. Fourteen patients and 15 studies were reviewed. CT detected and localized a presumed bleeding site or potential causative pathology in 12 (80%) of the patients. Seven of these were supported by other investigations or surgery, while five were not demonstrated by other modalities. Eight patients had mesenteric angiography, of which only four corroborated the site of bleeding. CT did not detect the bleeding site in three patients, of which two required further investigation and definitive treatment. We propose that MDCT serves a useful role as the initial rapid investigation to triage patients presenting with lower GIT bleeding for further investigation and management.

  20. What nephrologists need to know about vascular access cannulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwiddie, Lesley C; Ball, Lynda; Brouwer, Deborah; Doss-McQuitty, Sheila; Holland, Janet

    2013-01-01

    This article describes cannulation events, especially problems, common and rare, minor and major, to aid the nephrologist (and mid-level providers e.g. nurse practitioner and physician's assistant) in decision-making to prevent or treat cannulation-related adverse outcomes. The usual management, potential outcomes, nephrologist intervention, and prevention are discussed and include: assessment of arteriovenous (AV) access and readiness for cannulation; initial cannulation of both arteriovenous fistulas and grafts; needle size and adequacy; needle direction and potential for recirculation; limited cannulation sites/buttonhole; pain and fear of pain; prevention of bleeding; management of infiltrations/extravasations; prevention and management of "one-site-itis"; prevention and management of infection. It concludes with the importance of the medical director as the leader of the continuous quality improvement (CQI) team in preventing/reducing cannulation-related adverse events.

  1. Bayesian network modelling of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisha, Nazziwa; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Adam, Mohd Bakri

    2013-09-01

    Bayesian networks are graphical probabilistic models that represent causal and other relationships between domain variables. In the context of medical decision making, these models have been explored to help in medical diagnosis and prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the Bayesian network formalism in building medical support systems and we learn a tree augmented naive Bayes Network (TAN) from gastrointestinal bleeding data. The accuracy of the TAN in classifying the source of gastrointestinal bleeding into upper or lower source is obtained. The TAN achieves a high classification accuracy of 86% and an area under curve of 92%. A sensitivity analysis of the model shows relatively high levels of entropy reduction for color of the stool, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, consistency and the ratio of blood urea nitrogen to creatinine. The TAN facilitates the identification of the source of GIB and requires further validation.

  2. Fibrinogen concentrate for bleeding - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, J; Stensballe, J; Wikkelsø, A

    2014-01-01

    Fibrinogen concentrate as part of treatment protocols increasingly draws attention. Fibrinogen substitution in cases of hypofibrinogenaemia has the potential to reduce bleeding, transfusion requirement and subsequently reduce morbidity and mortality. A systematic search for randomised controlled...... trials (RCTs) and non-randomised studies investigating fibrinogen concentrate in bleeding patients was conducted up to November 2013. We included 30 studies of 3480 identified (7 RCTs and 23 non-randomised). Seven RCTs included a total of 268 patients (165 adults and 103 paediatric), and all were...... determined to be of high risk of bias and none reported a significant effect on mortality. Two RCTs found a significant reduction in bleeding and five RCTs found a significant reduction in transfusion requirements. The 23 non-randomised studies included a total of 2825 patients, but only 11 of 23 studies...

  3. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the jejunum presenting as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a history of gliosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso Puentes, Nidia; Jimenez-Alfaro Larrazabal, Carmen; García Higuera, Maria Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Small bowel malignant tumors are rare and sarcomatoid carcinomas have rarely been reported at this site. We report a 56-year-old woman, with history of an excised gliosarcoma, who presented with recurrent obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. She underwent endoscopy and colonoscopy, which failed to identify the cause of the bleeding. The abdominal computed tomography scan located a tumor in the small bowel. Pathology revealed a jejunal sarcomatoid carcinoma. She developed tumor recurrence and multiple liver metastases shortly after surgery. Immunohistochemistry is required for accurate diagnosis. Sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, which is associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:24759341

  4. Arterial embolization for iatrogenic life-threatening bleeding from subcutaneous hypervascular tumor in prone position

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seiji Morita; Tomoatsu Tsuji; Toru Sawamoto; Hiromichi Aoki; Naoya Miura; Hiroyuki Otsuka; Sadaki Inokuchi

    2010-01-01

    Performing angiography in the prone position is a difficult technique; however it is useful in some emergency situation. We experienced a 60 years old male who was performed lipoma excision on his back in his family doctor's clinic. Since massive arterial bleeding could not be controlled with manual astriction, he transferred to our hospital in prone position with hemodynamic instability. Operating field was not kept because of massive bleeding; there-fore surgical treatment was impossible. We planed emer-gency arterial embolization (AE) in prone position. Hence we chose the left radial artery for vascular access. The left subclavicle arteriography showed many major and minor feeding arteries from left subclavicular and axillary arteries and a massive extravasation of the contrast medium. Three major feeding arteries were performed AE with gelatin sponge and steel coils. After AE, massive bleeding was controlled.He could discharge from our hospital on the 5th hospital day without any complication. Arterial embolization for lifethreatening bleeding from subcutaneous hypervascular tumor in the prone position is first report to our knowledge,and it is extremely rare. However we thought that this tech-nique is useful for patients who could not turn in the supine position, e.g. massive bleeding during renal biopsy and penetrating trauma from back.

  5. The Approach to Occult Gastrointestinal Bleed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naut, Edgar R

    2016-09-01

    Occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not visible and may present with a positive fecal occult blood test or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure bleeding can be overt or occult, with no source identified despite an appropriate diagnostic workup. A stepwise approach to this evaluation after negative upper and lower endoscopy has been shown to be cost effective. This includes repeat endoscopies if warranted, followed by video capsule endoscopy (VCE) if no obstruction is present. If the VCE is positive then specific endoscopic intervention may be possible. If negative, patients may undergo either repeat testing or watchful waiting with iron supplements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Epidemiology of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Gabon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudong Mbethe, G L; Mounguengui, D; Ondounda, M; Magne, C; Bignoumbra, R; Ntsoumou, S; Moussavou Kombila, J-B; Nzenze, J R

    2014-01-01

    The department of internal medicine of the military hospital of Gabon managed 92 cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from April 2009 to November 2011. The frequency of these hemorrhages in the department was 8.2%; they occurred most often in adults aged 30-40 years and 50-60 years, and mainly men (74%). Erosive-ulcerative lesions (65.2%) were the leading causes of hemorrhage, followed by esophageal varices (15.2%). These results underline the importance of preventive measures for the control of this bleeding.

  7. Acid inhibition and peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štimac, D; Franjić, N; Krznarić, Ž

    2011-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is one of the most common emergency situations in medicine. Combined pharmacological and endoscopic therapy together with emerging interventional radiological procedures are successfully treating peptic ulcer disease, reserving surgical procedures for only a small portion of patients unresponsive to 'conventional' therapy. Technological advancement has seen a great improvement in the field of endoscopic treatment in the form of various methods of hemostasis. However, pharmacological therapy with proton pump inhibitors still plays the central role in the peptic ulcer bleeding treatment algorithm.

  8. 99mTechnetium-labelled red blood cell scintigraphy as an alternative to angiography in the investigation of gastrointestinal bleeding: clinical experience in a district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearn, P.; Persad, R.; Wilson, N.; Flanagan, J.; Williams, T.

    1992-01-01

    99mTechnetium-labelled red blood cell scintigraphy (99mTc RBC scintigraphy) was used as the second-line investigation to localise bleeding in 23 patients (11 male, 12 female; mean age 67 years) presenting with active bleeding per rectum. Scintigraphy was available on a 24 h basis. A total of 18 patients had positive scans (78%). Surgery was performed urgently in 11 patients and the site of bleeding, as predicted by scintigraphy, was confirmed in 9 (82%). 99mTc RBC scintigraphy was less useful in patients who were not bleeding actively or who were being investigated for chronic anaemia. This study suggests that 99mTc RBC scintigraphy can play a useful role in the preoperative localisation of unexplained gastrointestinal bleeding in hospitals with nuclear medicine facilities, but confirms it has little place in the management of patients unless they are bleeding actively. PMID:1319696

  9. "Downhill" Esophageal Varices due to Dialysis Catheter-Induced Superior Vena Caval Occlusion: A Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayudu, Suresh Kumar; Dev, Anil; Kanneganti, Kalyan

    2013-01-01

    "Downhill" varices are a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Rarely these varices are reported in patients receiving hemodialysis as a complication of chronic dialysis vascular access. We present a case of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an individual with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed "downhill" varices in the upper third of the esophagus without any active bleeding at the time of the procedure. An angiogram was performed disclosing superior vena caval occlusion, which was treated with balloon angioplasty. Gastroenterologists should have a high index of suspicion for these rare "downhill" varices when dealing with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving hemodialysis and manage it appropriately using endoscopic, radiological, and surgical interventions.

  10. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  11. Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Children: Variceal and Nonvariceal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirio, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is generally defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz, which leads to hematemesis. There are several causes of UGI bleeding necessitating a detailed history to rule out comorbid conditions, medications, and possible exposures. In addition, the severity, timing, duration, and volume of the bleeding are important details to note for management purposes. Despite the source of the bleeding, acid suppression with a proton-pump inhibitor has been shown to be effective in minimizing rebleeding. Endoscopy remains the interventional modality of choice for both nonvariceal and variceal bleeds because it can be diagnostic and therapeutic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bong; Sik; Matthew; Kim; Bob; T; Li; Alexander; Engel; Jaswinder; S; Samra; Stephen; Clarke; Ian; D; Norton; Angela; E; Li

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is notapparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians.

  13. Duodenal variceal bleed: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed and a difficult diagnosis to make.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagani, Shradha; Winters, Conchubhair; Moreea, Sulleman

    2017-02-27

    We present a case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in a man aged 57 years with primary biliary cholangitis who was ultimately diagnosed with an isolated duodenal variceal bleed, which was successfully treated with histoacryl glue injection. Duodenal varices are an uncommon presentation of portal hypertension and can result in significant GI bleeding with a high mortality. Diagnosis can be difficult and therapeutic options limited. Endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy with histoacryl glue provides an effective treatment, though endoscopists need to remain aware of and vigilant for the serious complications of this treatment option. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. Management of Acute Bleeding Per Rectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benita K.T. Tan

    2004-01-01

    Conclusion: Perianal conditions contributed to the majority of acute patient admissions. Colonic causes of bleeding were less common and were most stable. There were differences in the frequencies of aetiologies in our population compared to Western populations. Understanding the common pathologies and outcomes guides the management of our patients.

  15. Acute radiologic intervention in gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesak, F.

    1986-01-01

    A case of embolization of the gastroduodenal artery in a 38-year old man with chronic pancreatitis and uncontrollable bleeding is presented. The advantage of this interventional radiologic procedure is discussed and in selective cases it seems to be the choice of treatment.

  16. [OMEPRAZOL VS RANITIDINE IN UPPER DIGESTIVE BLEEDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis R, Regina; Bisso A, Aland; Rebaza, Segundo

    1999-01-01

    Pectic ulcer is the most frequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. The homeostatic mechanism of bleeding, and coagulation, does not happen with values of pH less than 5,0. Therefore neutralization of gastric acidity (pH more than 5,0) is a recourse of control, improve the evolution and healing of peptic ulcer and to avoid a new bleeding. The aim of this study was to compare the results of treatment with omeprazole and ranitidine, in 57 patients admitted at emergency room of the Hospital Central de la Polic a Nacional del Per with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcer, using Forrest classification. Patients received omeprazole 40 mg in bolus IV, followed by continuos infusion of 8 mg/hour for 72 hours (group A) or ranitidine 50 mg IV each 8 hours for 72 hours (group B). A new endoscopy was made 72 hours after admission demostrated a succesful therapy in both group. Bleeding stopped in 26/27 patients in group A (96,2%) and in 23/30 patients in group B (76,6%) (pomeprazole IV is more effective than ranitidine IV in the control of UGB because of peptic ulcer and provides a faster healing.

  17. ENDOSCOPIC THERAPY OF SEVERE ULCER BLEEDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Thomas O.G.; Jensen, Dennis M.

    2013-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding secondary to ulcer disease occurs commonly and results in significant patient morbidity and medical expense. After initial resuscitation, carefully performed endoscopy provides an accurate diagnosis of the source of the UGI hemorrhage and can reliably identify those high-risk subgroups that may benefit most from endoscopic hemostasis. Large channel therapeutic endoscopes are recommended. Endoscopists should be very experienced in management of patients with UGI hemorrhage including the use of various hemostatic devices. For patients with major stigmata of ulcer hemorrhage – active arterial bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel and adherent clot – combination therapy with epinephrine injection and either thermal coaptive coagulation (with multipolar or heater probe), or endoclips is recommended. High dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors are recommended as concomitant therapy with endoscopic hemostasis of major stigmata. Patients with minor stigmata or clean-based ulcers will not benefit from endoscopic therapy and should be triaged to less intensive care and be considered for early discharge. Effective endoscopic hemostasis of ulcer bleeding can significantly improve outcomes by reducing rebleeding, transfusion requirement, and need for surgery, as well as reduce cost of medical care. PMID:21944418

  18. Systemic causes of heavy menstrual bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is a common problem in fertile women. In addition to local factors, such as a polyp or a uterine fibroid, systemic causes may lead to HMB. These systemic causes are discussed in this thesis. For years, women with HMB were tested underlying thyroid disorder, but our res

  19. Italian Registry of Congenital Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampaolo, Adele; Abbonizio, Francesca; Arcieri, Romano; Hassan, Hamisa Jane

    2017-01-01

    In Italy, the surveillance of people with bleeding disorders is based on the National Registry of Congenital Coagulopathies (NRCC) managed by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità). The NRCC collects epidemiological and therapeutic data from the 54 Hemophilia Treatment Centers, members of the Italian Association of Hemophilia Centres (AICE). The number of people identified with bleeding disorders has increased over the years, with the number rising from approx. 7000 in 2000 to over 11,000 in 2015. The NRCC includes 4020 patients with hemophilia A and 859 patients with hemophilia B. The prevalence of the rare type 3 vWD is 0.20/100,000 inhabitants. Less common congenital bleeding disorders include the following deficiencies: Factor I (fibrinogen), Factor II (prothrombin), Factor V, Factor VII, Factor X, Factor XI and Factor XIII, which affect 1953 patients. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection affects 1561 patients, more than 200 of whom have two infections (HCV + HIV). Estimated hemophilia-related drug consumption in 2015 was approx. 550 million IU of FVIII for hemophilia A patients and approx. 70 million IU of FIX for hemophilia B patients. The NRCC, with its bleeding disorder data set, is a tool that can provide answers to fundamental questions in public health, monitoring care provision and drug treatment, as well as facilitating clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:28335488

  20. Making It Work for Everyone: HTML5 and CSS Level 3 for Responsive, Accessible Design on Your Library's Web Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stewart C.

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that accessibility and universality are essential to good Web design. A brief review of library science literature sets the issue of Web accessibility in context. The bulk of the article explains the design philosophies of progressive enhancement and responsive Web design, and summarizes recent updates to WCAG 2.0, HTML5, CSS…

  1. Making It Work for Everyone: HTML5 and CSS Level 3 for Responsive, Accessible Design on Your Library's Web Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stewart C.

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that accessibility and universality are essential to good Web design. A brief review of library science literature sets the issue of Web accessibility in context. The bulk of the article explains the design philosophies of progressive enhancement and responsive Web design, and summarizes recent updates to WCAG 2.0, HTML5, CSS…

  2. Comparison of four technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding in a sheep model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owunwanne, A.; Al-Wafai, I.; Vallgren, S.; Sadek, S.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Yacoub, T.

    1988-01-01

    Four Tc-99 radiopharmaceuticals, Tc-99m sulphur colloid, Tc-99m red blood cells (RBCs), Tc-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3), and Tc-99m DTPA, were studied in an experimental animal model for detection and localization of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding site in both the upper and lower abdomen. With Tc-99m sulphur colloid and Tc-99m RBCs, it was possible to detect and localize the GI bleeding site in the lower abdomen. With Tc-99m MAG3, it was possible to visualize the bleeding site in both the upper and lower abdomen. However, Tc-99m MAG3 is partially excreted by the liver into the bile, hence it will be difficult to use Tc-99m MAG3 to localize the GI bleeding site in the lower abdomen. With Tc-99m DTPA, it was possible to detect and localize the GI bleeding site simultaneously in both upper and lower abdomen. The overall background radioactivity was reduced considerably by diuresis with frusemide and catheterization of the urinary bladder.

  3. Correlation of bleeding pattern with endometrial histopathologic results in perimenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Yilmaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB is referred as bleeding outside of normal menstruation pattern and it is the most common gynecological problem for women of all ages. This study was evaluated the correlation of menstrual bleeding patterns and endometrial histopathological findings in perimenopausal women. Methods: This study was done on perimenopausal aged women presented with AUB for the last 6 months at a gynecology clinic of a tertiary medical center. Only the patients with isolated endometrial causes of AUB were selected for study. A total of 313 cases were included in the study. Abnormal bleeding patterns of the patients were recorded and endometrial sampling was performed to all women. AUB was classified as menorrhagia, metrorrhagia, menometrorrhagia, polymenorrhea, intermenstrual bleeding, and histopathological findings were classified as Proliferative Endometrium (PE, Secretory Endometrium (SE, Disordered Proliferative Pattern (DPP, Endometrial Polyp (EP, Chronic Endometritis (CE, Endometrial Hyperplasia (EH, and Endometrial Adenocarcinoma (CA. Results: The most common bleeding pattern was menorrhagia (45.0% and the most common histopathological finding was PE+SE (52.0% in our study. PE+SE and endometrial hyperplasia without atypia were found more common in menorrhagia group. The most histopathological findings were found PE+SE in menometrorrhagia and polymenorrhea group (P 0.05. Conclusions: We concluded that although menometrorrhagia and polymenorrhea were significantly more associated with PE+SE, intermenstrual bleeding was significantly more associated with EP and CE. It is noteworthy that endometrial hyperplasia without atypia is significantly higher in patients with menorrhagia which is the most common abnormal bleeding pattern in perimenopausal aged women. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(3.000: 547-550

  4. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding: Questions to Discuss with Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delivered to your inbox ! When You Visit Your Doctor - Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding Questions to Discuss with Your Doctor: Do you have regular menstrual cycles? When was ...

  5. Bleeding risk of intracranial vascular malformations; Das Risiko intrazerebraler Gefaessmissbildungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, I.; Panagiotopoulos, V.; Forsting, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Inst. fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    In general, intracranial vascular malformations are divided into pial AVM, dural AV fistula, cavernoma and capillary telangiectasias. Developmental venous anomalies are sometimes thought to be vascular malformations. In fact, they are just a variant of venous drainage. In general, pial AVMs have a high risk of intracerebral bleeding. In dural AV fistulas, the individual bleeding risk can be effectively estimated by analyzing the venous drainage. Cavernomas have a low bleeding risk and the bleeding is rarely life-threatening. DVAs do not have any bleeding risk but 30 % are associated with cavernomas. Capillary telangiectasias also have no bleeding risk. Therefore, a radiological finding of an intracranial vascular malformation should not automatically elicit the reaction ''time bomb in your head with a bleeding risk'' but should be subjected to an analysis of the bleeding risk for the individual patient.

  6. Risk of bleeding related to antithrombotic treatment in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Olesen, Jonas B; Charlot, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is a cornerstone of treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease with bleeding being the most feared complication. This review describes the risk of bleeding related to different combinations of antithrombotic drugs used for cardiovascular disease: acute coronary...

  7. Decreasing trend of upper gastrointestinal bleeding mortality risk over three decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taefi, Amir; Cho, Won Kyoo; Nouraie, Mehdi

    2013-10-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) causes over $1 billion in medical expenses annually. The purpose of this study was to examine changes of UGIB mortality risks and trends over the last three decades. We analyzed the National Hospital Discharge Sample from 1979 to 2009. Patients with primary ICD-9 code representing a diagnosis of UGIB were included. The UGIB mortality risks and trends in each decade by anatomical sites, bleeding causes, comorbidities, and other important variables were analyzed. UGIB mortality risk decreased by 35.4 % from 4.8 % in the first decade to 3.1 % in the third decade (P risk factors in all decades. Most significant decreases were observed in patients over 65 years and during the first day of admission. Gastric (P bleedings showed significant decreasing mortality risk trends. Duodenal bleeding mortality risk was stable in three decades. Mortality risk declined significantly among patients with renal failure (from 50.0 to 4.0 %) and heart failure (from 17.9 to 5.2 %; both P risks, especially of the first hospital day and geriatric patients, significantly decreased over the last three decades, presumably from recent advances in emergency medical care. Mortality risk of gastric, but not duodenal, bleeding had the most significant reduction. Critical care improvements in patients with various comorbidities may explain significant UGIB mortality risk reductions. This study provides invaluable insight into the causes and trends of UGIB mortality risks for future studies.

  8. Unusual Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding due to Late Metastasis from Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tsan Chang

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A case of recurrent massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding originating from metastatic renal cell carcinoma is reported. A 63-year-old woman underwent right nephrectomy 9 years previously and experienced no recurrence during follow-up. A gradually enlarging ulcerative tumor over the bulb of the duodenum and four subsequent episodes of massive bleeding from this tumor occurred between June 2001 and March 2002. The patient underwent surgery in April 2002 for intractable bleeding from the tumor. Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the duodenum was confirmed from the surgical specimen. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is very rare and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Furthermore, a solitary late renal cell carcinoma metastasis 9 years after a nephrectomy is extremely uncommon. This case suggests that life-long follow-up of renal cell carcinoma patients is necessary, owing to unpredictable behavior and the possibility of long disease-free intervals. In nephrectomized patients suffering from gastrointestinal bleeding, complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination, is indicated. The possibility of late recurrent renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the gastrointestinal tract should be kept in mind, although it is rare. If the patient is fit for surgery, metastatectomy is the first choice of treatment.

  9. BLEEDING AND STARVING: fasting and delayed refeeding after upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge FONSECA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Early refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is safe and reduces hospital stay/costs. Objectives The aim of this study was obtaining objective data on refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Methods From 1 year span records of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients that underwent urgent endoscopy: clinical features; rockall score; endoscopic data, including severity of lesions and therapy; feeding related records of seven days: liquid diet prescription, first liquid intake, soft/solid diet prescription, first soft/solid intake. Results From 133 patients (84 men Rockall classification was possible in 126: 76 score ≥5, 50 score <5. One persistent bleeding, eight rebled, two underwent surgery, 13 died. Ulcer was the major bleeding cause, 63 patients underwent endoscopic therapy. There was 142/532 possible refeeding records, no record 37% patients. Only 16% were fed during the first day and half were only fed on third day or later. Rockall <5 patients started oral diet sooner than Rockall ≥5. Patients that underwent endoscopic therapy were refed earlier than those without endotherapy. Conclusions Most feeding records are missing. Data reveals delayed refeeding, especially in patients with low-risk lesions who should have been fed immediately. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients must be refed earlier, according to guidelines.

  10. New advances in lower gastrointestinal bleeding management with embolotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Urbano, Josè; De Marchi, Giuseppe; Micieli, Camilla; Duka, Ejona; Iacobellis, Francesca; Fontana, Federico; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2016-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Embolization is currently proposed as the first step in the treatment of acute, life-threatening LGIB, when endoscopic approach is not possible or is unsuccessful. Like most procedures performed in emergency setting, time represents a significant factor influencing outcome. Modern tools permit identifying and reaching the bleeding site faster than two-dimensional angiography. Non-selective cone-beam CT arteriography can identify a damaged vessel. Moreover, sophisticated software able to detect the vessel may facilitate direct placement of a microcatheter into the culprit vessel without the need for sequential angiography. A further important aspect is the use of an appropriate technique of embolization and a safe and effective embolic agent. Current evidence shows the use of detachable coils (with or without a triaxial system) and liquid embolics has proven advantages compared with other embolic agents. The present article analyses these modern tools, making embolization of acute LGIB safer and more effective.

  11. Multi-detector CT angiography for lower gastrointestinal bleeding: Can it select patients for endovascular intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, P T; Ganeshan, A; Anthony, S; Uberoi, R

    2010-02-01

    This is a retrospective review of the results at our institution of using multi-detector CT angiography (CTA) to localise lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. We hypothesised that in our patient population: (i) CTA was unlikely to demonstrate bleeding in patients who were haemodynamically stable; (ii) in haemodynamically unstable patients in whom CTA was undertaken, the results could be used to select patients who would benefit from catheter angiography; and (iii) in haemodynamically unstable patients in whom CTA was undertaken, a subgroup of patients could be identified who would benefit from primary surgical treatment, avoiding invasive angiography completely. A retrospective review was conducted of the clinical records of all patients undergoing CTA for lower GI haemorrhage at our institution between 1 January 2005 and 30 June 2007. Out of the 20 patients examined, 10 had positive CTAs demonstrating the bleeding site. Nine were haemodynamically unstable at the time of the study. Four patients with positive CT angiograms were able to be treated directly with surgery and avoided invasive angiography. Ten patients had negative CTAs. Four of these were haemodynamically unstable, six haemodynamically stable. Only one required intervention to secure haemostasis, the rest stopped spontaneously. No haemodynamically stable patient who had a negative CTA required intervention. CTA is a useful non-invasive technique for localising the site of lower GI bleeding. In our patient population, in the absence of haemodynamic instability, the diagnostic yield of CTA was low and bleeding was likely to stop spontaneously. In haemodynamically unstable patients, a positive CTA allowed patients to be triaged to surgery or angiography, whereas there was a strong association between a negative CTA and spontaneous cessation of bleeding.

  12. Abnormal Bleeding During Menopause Hormone Therapy: Insights for Clinical Management

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to review the involved mechanisms and propose actions for controlling/treating abnormal uterine bleeding during climacteric hormone therapy. Methods A systemic search of the databases SciELO, MEDLINE, and Pubmed was performed for identifying relevant publications on normal endometrial bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding, and hormone therapy bleeding. Results Before starting hormone therapy, it is essential to exclude any abnormal organic condition, identify women a...

  13. Capsule endoscopy: Current status in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R Gupta; Nageshwar Duvvuru Reddy

    2007-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a safe, non invasive diagnostic modality for the evaluation of small bowel lesions. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is one of the most important indications of capsule endoscopy.Capsule endoscopy has a very high diagnostic yield especially if the bleeding is ongoing. This technique appears to be superior to other techniques for the detection of suspected lesions and the source of bleeding. Capsule endoscopy has been shown to change the outcome in patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI)bleed.

  14. SITE COMPREHENSIVE LISTING (CERCLIS) (Superfund) - NPL Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — National Priorities List (NPL) Sites - The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) (Superfund) Public Access...

  15. Obesity and risk of bleeding : The SMART study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braekkan, S. K.; van der Graaf, Y.; Visseren, F. L J; Algra, A.

    2016-01-01

    Essentials: Whether obesity protects against clinically relevant bleeding is unclear. We investigated the risk of bleeding according to various measures of obesity in a cohort of 9736 patients. Obesity was not associated with a lower risk of bleeding. The procoagulant profile in obese subjects may

  16. Signs and Symptoms of a Bleeding Disorder in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... received treatment for anemia. I have experienced heavy bleeding after dental surgery, other surgery, or childbirth. I have experienced prolonged ... if they are not treated. Women with untreated bleeding disorders face serious ... dental surgery, other surgery, or injury. Bleeding disorders can be ...

  17. Status of Coral Communities in American Samoa: A Re-survey of Long-term Monitoring Sites in 2002 (NODC Accession 0001470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of an MS Word file which documents and summarizes data previously submitted as MS Excel spreadsheets to the NOAA data centers, NODC ACCESSION...

  18. Endoscopy for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Bae; Yoon, Soon Man; Youn, Sei Jin

    2014-07-01

    Endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding plays an important role in primary diagnosis and management, particularly with respect to identification of high-risk stigmata lesions and to providing endoscopic hemostasis to reduce the risk of rebleeding and mortality. Early endoscopy, defined as endoscopy within the first 24 hours after presentation, improves patient outcome and reduces the length of hospitalization when compared with delayed endoscopy. Various endoscopic hemostatic methods are available, including injection therapy, mechanical therapy, and thermal coagulation. Either single treatment with mechanical or thermal therapy or a treatment that combines more than one type of therapy are effective and safe for peptic ulcer bleeding. Newly developed methods, such as Hemospray powder and over-the-scope clips, may provide additional options. Appropriate decisions and specific treatment are needed depending upon the conditions.

  19. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Christopher W; Woods, Amanda G; Cederholm, Carmen K

    2013-12-01

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB), formerly known as hemorrhagic disease of the newborn (HDN), is a bleeding disorder in neonates that is caused by inadequate serum levels of vitamin K. Vitamin K is a nutrient essential for adequate function of the coagulation cascade. Certain internal and external factors place newborn infants at higher risk for VKDB. Therefore, vitamin K prophylaxis has become the standard of care for newborns. Although the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the administration of vitamin K to newborns, some parents are choosing to withhold vitamin K administration at birth. This case study describes an infant who developed VKDB in the absence of vitamin K prophylaxis. Although parents ultimately have the right to choose whether or not to administer vitamin K, as healthcare professionals, it is important to provide education regarding the potential complications of withholding vitamin K and the signs of VKDB if vitamin K prophylaxis at birth is withheld.

  20. Endovascular management of acute bleeding arterioenteric fistulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonhardt, H.; Mellander, S.; Snygg, J.

    2008-01-01

    . All had massive persistent bleeding with hypotension despite volume substitution and transfusion by the time of endovascular management. Outcome after treatment of these patients was investigated for major procedure-related complications, recurrence, reintervention, morbidity, and mortality. Mean...... immediate further open surgery. There were no procedure-related major complications. Mean hospital stay after the initial endovascular intervention was 19 days. Rebleeding occurred in four patients (80%) after a free interval of 2 weeks or longer. During the follow-up period three patients needed...... over the 3-year period between December 2002 and December 2005 at our institution, were retrospectively reviewed. Five patients with severe enteric bleeding underwent angiography and endovascular repair. Four presented primary arterioenteric fistulas, and one presented a secondary aortoenteric fistula...

  1. Hemospray application in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Lyn A; Stanley, Adrian J; Bergman, Jacques J

    2013-01-01

    patients, who otherwise may have required either surgery or interventional radiology, were treated with TC-325 as second-line therapy after failure of other endoscopic treatments, all of whom achieved hemostasis following the adjunct of TC-325. CONCLUSIONS: This multicentre registry identifies potentially......BACKGROUND: Hemospray TM (TC-325) is a novel hemostatic agent licensed for use in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) in Europe. GOALS: We present the operating characteristics and performance of TC-325 in the largest registry to date of patients presenting with NVUGIB in everyday...... in combination with other hemostatic modalities at the endoscopists' discretion. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients (44 men, 19 women), median age 69 (range, 21 to 98) years with NVUGIB requiring endoscopic hemostasis were treated with TC-325. There were 30 patients with bleeding ulcers and 33 with other NVUGIB...

  2. Reoperation for bleeding in cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Rauer, Line Juul; Mortensen, Poul Erik

    2012-01-01

    bleeding, we aim to identify risk factors that predict reoperation. A total of 1452 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery using extracorporeal circulation (ECC) between November 2005 and December 2008 at OUH were analysed. Statistical tests were used to identify risk factors for reoperation. We...... after cardiac surgery was low ejection fraction, high EuroSCORE, procedures other than isolated CABG, elongated time on ECC, low body mass index, diabetes mellitus and preoperatively elevated s-creatinine. Reoperated patients significantly had a greater increase in postoperative s-creatinine and higher......At Odense University Hospital (OUH), 5-9% of all unselected cardiac surgical patients undergo reoperation due to excessive bleeding. The reoperated patients have an approximately three times greater mortality than non-reoperated. To reduce the rate of reoperations and mortality due to postoperative...

  3. Helping mothers survive bleeding after birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelissen, Ellen; Ersdal, Hege; Ostergaard, Doris

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants, and ambul......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants...... and feasible, although more time should be allocated for training, and teaching materials should be translated into the local language. Knowledge, skills, and confidence of learners increased significantly immediately after training. However, overall pass rates for skills tests of learners after training were...

  4. Secondary prophylaxis for esophageal variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albillos, Agustín; Tejedor, Marta

    2014-05-01

    Combination therapy with beta-blockers and endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is the standard prophylaxis of esophageal variceal rebleeding in cirrhosis. Beta-blockers are the backbone of combination therapy, since their benefit extend to other complications of portal hypertension. EBL carries the risk of post-banding ulcer bleeding, which explains why overall rebleeding is reduced when beta-blockers are added to EBL, and not when EBL is added to beta-blockers. TIPS is the rescue treatment, but it could be considered as first choice in patients that first bleed while on beta-blockers, those with contraindications to beta-blockers or with refractory ascites, and those with fundal varices.

  5. The clinicopathological study of postmenopausal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita D.

    2016-11-01

    Results: In patients with post-menopausal bleeding, atrophic endometrium was seen in 31%, proliferative endometrium in 13%, isthmic endometrium in 5%, polyp in 5%, simple hyperplasia without atypia in 35%, simple hyperplasia with atypia in 3%, complex hyperplasia without atypia in 1%, complex hyperplasia with atypia in 1% and endometrial carcinoma in 6% of the patients with PMB. Benign conditions were seen in 94% and malignancy was seen in 6% cases. Conclusions: The most common causes for postmenopausal bleeding were endometrial hyperplasia (40%, atrophic endometrium (31%, isthmic endometrium (5%, polyp (5%, proliferative endometrium (13% and endometrial carcinoma (6%. A definitive diagnosis of PMB can be made by histological evaluation. Obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and age since menopause are the risk factors for PMB. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(11.000: 3671-3674

  6. Interventional management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weldon, Derik T.; Burke, Stephen J.; Sun, Shiliang; Mimura, Hidefumi; Golzarian, Jafar [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) arises from a number of sources and is a significant cause of hospitalization and mortality in elderly patients. Whereas most episodes of acute LGIB resolve spontaneously with conservative management, an important subset of patients requires further diagnostic workup and therapeutic intervention. Endovascular techniques such as microcatheter embolization are now recognized as safe, effective methods for controlling LGIB that is refractory to endoscopic intervention. In addition, multidetector CT has shown the ability to identify areas of active bleeding in a non-invasive fashion, enabling more focused intervention. Given the relative strengths and weaknesses of various diagnostic and treatment modalities, a close working relationship between interventional radiologists, gastroenterologists and diagnostic radiologists is necessary for the optimal management of LGIB patients. (orig.)

  7. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Markus; Geiß, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20 % of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediatric patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to our endoscopy unit from 2001 to 2009 (n = 154) were identified. Retrospective statistical and neural network analysis was used to assess outcome and to determine an investigative management algorithm. Results: The source of bleeding could be identified in 81 % (n = 124/154). Gastrointestinal bleeding was predominantly lower gastrointestinal bleeding (66 %, n = 101); upper gastrointestinal bleeding was much less common (14 %, n = 21). Hematochezia was observed in 94 % of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 95 of 101). Hematemesis (67 %, n = 14 of 21) and melena (48 %, n = 10 of 21) were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The sensitivity and specificity of a neural network to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 98 % and 63.6 %, respectively and to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 75 % and 96 % respectively. The sensitivity and specifity of hematochezia alone to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 94.2 % and 85.7 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for hematemesis and melena to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 82.6 % and 94 %, respectively. We then developed an investigative management algorithm based on the presence of hematochezia and hematemesis or melena. Conclusions: Hematochezia should prompt colonoscopy and hematemesis or melena should prompt esophagogastroduodenoscopy. If no

  8. Bleeding risk in 'real world' patients with atrial fibrillation: comparison of two established bleeding prediction schemes in a nationwide cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J B; Lip, G Y H; Hansen, P R

    2011-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation (OAC) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is a double-edged sword, because it decreases the risk of stroke at the cost of an increased risk of bleeding. We compared the performance of a new bleeding prediction scheme, HAS-BLED, with an older bleeding prediction scheme...

  9. Neurenteric Cyst Presenting with Bleeding Per Rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Taruna; Parmar, Padam; Rattan, Kamal Nain

    2016-01-01

    Neurenteric cyst in the thoracic cavity may produce a myriad of clinical features. We report a 7-month-old girl who presented with significant bleeding per rectum. On imaging, a mediastinal cystic structure with air-fluid levels was evident with cervico-thoracic vertebral anomalies. The cyst was excised and histopathology showed intestinal mucosal lining with heterotopic pancreatic tissue confirming the diagnosis of neurenteric cyst.

  10. Bleeding gums: Duloxetine may be the cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balhara YPS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Duloxetine is a newly introduced drug. It is being prescribed for the management of diabetic neuropathic pain and major depressive disorder. The most frequently observed adverse events with duloxetine are nausea, dry mouth and somnolence, constipation, diarrhea, decreased appetite, weight loss, feeling of fatigue, dizziness, somnolence, hypohidrosis, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction. One of the patients being prescribed the drug developed bleeding gums on being started with the drug which resolved on stopping it. We hereby report this case.

  11. [Bleeding non-epithelial gastrointestinal neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, V I; Galtsev, A P

    1993-01-01

    Inefficiency of x-ray and endoscopic examinations of a bleeding hollow organ of the gastrointestinal tract may be explained by the effection of its wall with nonepithelial tumor (lipoma, neurinoma, leiomyoma). In some cases only laparotomy and examination of the abdominal cavity succeed in localization of the tumor. Intraoperative cytodiagnosis of nonepithelial benign tumors is a method conducive to sparing surgery (partial resection, dissection).

  12. Massive rectal bleeding from acquired jejunal diverticula

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Small bowel diverticulosis is an uncommon and often asymptomatic condition that is sporadically observed during radiographic examination or laparotomy. Although it is frequently seen in duodenum, jejunal and ileal locations are very rare. The majority of patients with jejunal diverticula have no symptoms. However, they can present with a number of acute and emergent complications with a high rate of mortality. Bleeding from jejunal diverticula occurs in less than 3% - 8% of patients ...

  13. Endoscopic hemoclip treatment for bleeding peptic ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yung Chih Lai; Sien Sing Yang; Chi Hwa Wu; Tzen Kwan Chen

    2000-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic hemoclip in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer.METHODS Totally, 40 patients with F1a and F1b hemorrhagic activity of peptic ulcers were enrolled in this uncontrolled prospective study for endoscopic hemoclip treatment. We used a newly developed rotatable clip-device for the application of hemoclip (MD850) to stop bleeding. Endoscopy was repeated if there was any sign or suspicion of rebleeding, and reclipping was performed if necessary and feasible.RESULTS Initial hemostatic rate by clipping was 95%, and rebleeding rate was only 8%.Ultimate hemostatic rates were 87%, 96%, and 93% in the F1a and F1b subgroups, and total cases, respectively. In patients with shock on admission, hemoclipping achieved ultimate hemostasis of 71% and 83% in F1a and F1b subgroups, respectively. Hemostasis reached 100% in patients without shock regardless of hemorrhagic activity being F1a or F1b. The average number of clips used per case was 3.0 (range 2- 5). Spurting bleeders required more clips on average than did oozing bleeders (3.4 versus 2.8 ). We observed no obvious complications, no tissue injury, or impairment of ulcer healing related to hemoclipping.CONCLUSION Endoscopic hemoclip placement is an effective and safe method. With the improvement of the clip and application device,the procedure has become easier and much more efficient. Endoscopic hemoclipping deserves further study in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers.

  14. Invasive mole: a rare cause of postmenopausal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamour Guèye

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD describes a number of gynaecological tumours that originate in the trophoblast layer, including hydatidiform mole (complete or partial, placental site trophoblastic tumour, choriocarcinoma and invasive mole. Invasive moles are responsible of most cases of localized gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN. Invasive mole is a condition where a molar pregnancy, such as a partial hydatidiform mole or complete hydatidiform mole, invades the wall of the uterus. It is an extremely rare condition. As GTN is not considered in the differential diagnosis of postmenopausal uterine malignancies, its preoperative diagnosis is challenging. We report a case of invasive hydatidiform mole in a postmenopausal woman discovered in a context of postmenopausal bleeding. She underwent hysterectomy and followed up till her beta hCG levels were within normal limits. The patient is in complete remission in the first postoperative year. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2013; 2(3.000: 451-453

  15. Corpus luteum hemorrhage in women with bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ron; Brenner, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Bleeding into the corpus luteum following ovulation rarely has clinical significance in healthy women, but may lead to life-threatening hemorrhage in women with congenital or acquired bleeding disorders. Women who are at an increased risk for corpus luteum hemorrhage (CLH) can be divided in two categories; first, those taking anticoagulants because of a thrombotic disorder; and second, women with congenital bleeding disorders. The management and prevention of CLH is still unsettled and the literature dealing with this problem is based on case reports only. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment options of an acute bleeding event and prevention modalities of CLH in women with bleeding disorders.

  16. Emergency management of major bleeding in a case of maxillofacial trauma and anticoagulation: utility of prothrombin complex concentrates in the shock room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Morotti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Life-threatening bleeding in anticoagulation with Warfarin is an emergency challenging issue. Several approaches are available to treat bleeding in either over-anticoagulation or propeanticoagulation, including vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma and prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC administration. In coexisting trauma-induced bleeding and anticoagulation, reversal of anticoagulation must be a rapid and highly effective procedure. Furthermore the appropriate treatment must be directly available in each shock rooms to guarantee the rapid management of the emergency. PCC require a simple storage, rapid accessibility, fast administration procedures and high effectiveness. Here we report the utility of PCC in management of a craniofacial trauma in proper-anticoagulation.

  17. Endovascular management of immediate procedure-related complications of failed hemodialysis access recanalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hun [Chosun University Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Dong Erk; Yang, Seung Boo; Choi, Deuk Lin; Moon Cheul [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Chunan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    Endovascular procedures are becoming the standard type of care for the management of hemodialysis vascular access dysfunction. As with any type of medical procedure, these techniques can result in procedure-related complications, although the expected number of complications is low. The clinical extent of these complications varies from case to case. Management of these cases depends on the clinical presentation. Major complications such as vein rupture, arterial embolism, remote site bleeding or hematoma, symptomatic pulmonary embolism and puncture site complications necessitating treatment require major therapy. Minor complications such as non-flow compromising small puncture site hematoma or pseudoaneurysms require little or no therapy. It is essential that the interventionist be prepared to manage these complications appropriately when they arise.

  18. Scintigraphic localisation of colonic bleeding; Scintigrafisk lokalisasjon av colonbloedning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspevik, Ranveig K.; Miskowiak, Jerzy; I Bud, Margreta

    2001-07-01

    Background. Endoscopy and occasionally X-ray studies are used to discover the focus of a gastrointestinal bleeding. Material and methods. We describe a case of severe gastrointestinal bleeding where these methods failed. Scintigraphy after labelling of erythrocytes with 99m technetium was performed in a continuos manner for 60 minutes. Scintigrams were also taken three, ten and 23 hours after the injection. Results. No bleeding was revealed after 60 minutes but two hours later a slight radioactivity was encountered in the right part of the abdomen and the later images localised the bleeding in the right colon. The bleeding ceased after right-sided hemicolectomy. Interpretation. Scintigraphy is of value in localisation of gastrointestinal bleeding and should be performed in a continuos manner until the bleeding focus is localised. Secretion of unbound technetium through the mucosa of the stomach and its presence in the urinary tract should be taken in account.

  19. Incidence, Management, and Risk Factors for Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Renal Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rencuzogullari, A; Binboga, S; Aytac, E; Rabets, J; Stocchi, L; Ozuner, G

    2017-04-01

    There are limited convincing data regarding management and outcomes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGB) in renal transplant recipients (RTR). The aim of this study was to evaluate incidence, management strategies, and risk factors associated with LGB in RTR. Between January 2004 and December 2013, RTR with LGB were analyzed. LGB was defined as having clinical evidence of hemorrhage after upper gastrointestinal etiology was ruled out. There were 1578 RTR with a mean age of 50 ± 14 years at the time of transplantation. Mean follow-up time after transplantation was 57 ± 45 months. Forty-five (2.9%) patients had a documented site of LGB. The most common causes of bleeding were colitis and angiodysplasia (n = 17). Mean time to LGB after transplantation was 43 ± 36 months. Twelve patients with LGB required intervention. Three underwent colectomy, endoscopic treatment was utilized in 8, and 1 patient had angiographic embolization to control bleeding. Recurrent LGB developed in 11 patients of 42 patients who did not have surgery at the time of index bleeding. Surgical (n = 1) or endoscopic intervention (n = 4) was required in 5 of recurrent bleeders. LGB was more commonly seen in RTRs who had development of a nonfunctioning kidney (P bleeding episode) compared with those who did not have a LGB (P = .001). We did not observe any increased risk of LGB bleeding among patients who were receiving anticoagulant or anti-aggregant treatment agents (P = .76). Nonfunctioning kidney after transplant is a risk factor for LGB. Overall mortality rates increased after LGB in RTR. Strategies aiming to prolong transplanted kidney function may reduce the incidence of LGB and improve life expectancy in RTR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of endoscopic hemoclips for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Fatih; Çakır, Murat; Baran, Maşallah; Duygulu, Şengül; Aydoğdu, Sema

    2014-04-01

    Data about the efficiency and outcome of therapeutic endoscopic techniques in children with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) are scarce. We aimed to analyze our experience with endoscopic hemoclip application in children with non-variceal UGB. During a 3-year period, a total of 1715 endoscopies were performed in our pediatric endoscopy unit; 182 (10.6%) of them were performed for UGB to 158 patients. Fifty-six of them had emergent endoscopy. Among them, 15 cases with nonvariceal UGB were only given endoscopic hemoclips. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings at initial admission; endoscopic appearance of bleeding lesions; and outcome of hemoclip application were recorded from the hospital files and endoscopy records. Ten patients (66.6%) had gastric ulcer, 3 (20%) had duodenal ulcer, 1 (6.7%) had Dieulafoy lesion, and 1 (6.7%) had bleeding at the post-polypectomy site. Initial homeostasis after hemoclip application was achieved in all patients (100%). Rebleeding was seen in only one patient (6.5%) with a Dieulafoy lesion, who needed hemoclip application for a second time, and the bleeding was controlled successfully. Permanent hemostasis was 100%. The median number of hemoclips used per case and per application was 3.4 and 3.2, respectively. None of the patients experienced any complication related to hemoclip application. Median duration of hospitalization was 6 days. On follow-up, none of the patients received surgical therapy, and 30-d mortality related to bleeding was 0%. The use of hemoclips for nonvariceal UGB in children is an effective modality to control bleeding without any complications in children.

  1. Postoperative bleeding risk for cutaneous surgery in the head and neck region with continued phenprocoumon therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Wolfgang; Barsukov, Evgeny; Al-Dam, Ahmed; Gröbe, Alexander; Smeets, Ralf; Eichhorn, Marc; Heiland, Max; Kluwe, Lan; Blessmann, Marco

    2014-07-01

    In a total of 171 surgical procedures for lesions in the head and neck region in patients in whom phenprocoumon therapy was not stopped, 16 (9%) postoperative bleeding events were observed over a follow-up period of two weeks. Local measures were sufficient in all cases except one severe case where blood transfusion was needed and anticoagulant treatment was stopped for 7 days. The bleeding risk was significantly higher for the surgical procedures of the nose than those in other areas (21% versus 6%, P = 0.014), but was not influenced by the international normalized ratio (INR) of blood coagulation, size, site and type of the lesion, surgical procedure, and sex and age of the patients. The bleeding rate in patients not on any anticoagulation therapy was significantly lower (6/211 = 3%). Across both groups, just over 80% of the bleeding episodes were within the first two days (55% on the same day and 32% on the next day) of the surgery. No bleeding was recorded after 5 days. Our data suggest that cutaneous surgery in the head and neck region can be safely performed with continued phenprocoumon therapy in most cases in an INR range of 1.3-3.4, but rarely severe bleeding does occur and can be managed with a close-contact follow-up and with 24-h on call services during the first two days postoperatively. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hepatic artery stent-grafts for the emergency treatment of acute bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellemann, Nadine, E-mail: nadine.bellemann@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Sommer, Christof-Matthias; Mokry, Theresa; Kortes, Nikolas; Gnutzmann, Daniel; Gockner, Theresa; Schmitz, Anne [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Weitz, Jürgen [Department of Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department for Visceral, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery at the University Hospital, Technical University Dresden (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Radeleff, Boris; Stampfl, Ulrike [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We report our experiences with stent-grafts for the treatment of acute hemorrhage from the hepatic artery or the stump of the gastroduodenal artery. • The technical success of stent-graft implantation was 88%. • The bleeding ceased immediately after stent-graft implantation in 88%. • The complication rate was 21%. - Abstract: Purpose: We evaluated the technical success and clinical efficacy of stent-graft implantation for the emergency management of acute hepatic artery bleeding. Methods: Between January 2010 and July 2013, 24 patients with hemorrhage from the hepatic artery were scheduled for emergency implantation of balloon expandable stent-grafts. The primary study endpoints were technical and clinical success, which were defined as successful stent-graft implantation with sealing of the bleeding site at the end of the procedure, and cessation of clinical signs of hemorrhage. The secondary study endpoints were complications during the procedure or at follow-up and 30-day mortality rate. Results: In 23 patients, hemorrhage occurred after surgery, and in one patient hemorrhage occurred after trauma. Eight patients had sentinel bleeding. In most patients (n = 16), one stent-graft was implanted. In six patients, two overlapping stent-grafts were implanted. The stent-grafts had a target diameter between 4 mm and 7 mm. Overall technical success was 88%. The bleeding ceased after stent-graft implantation in 21 patients (88%). The mean follow-up was 137 ± 383 days. In two patients, re-bleeding from the hepatic artery occurred during follow-up after 4 and 29 days, respectively, which could be successfully treated by endovascular therapy. The complication rate was 21% (minor complication rate 4%, major complication rate 17%). The 30-day mortality rate was 21%. Conclusions: Implantation of stent-grafts in the hepatic artery is an effective emergency therapy and has a good technical success rate for patients with acute arterial hemorrhage.

  3. Effect of a Low-Dose Contraceptive Patch on Efficacy, Bleeding Pattern, and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegratz, Inka; Bassol, Susana; Weisberg, Edith; Mellinger, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    This Phase III, uncontrolled, open-label, multicenter study was conducted to investigate the contraceptive efficacy, bleeding pattern, and cycle control of a novel once-a-week contraceptive patch, delivering low-dose ethinyl estradiol (EE) and gestodene (GSD) at the same systemic exposure seen after oral administration of a combined oral contraceptive containing 0.02 mg EE/0.06 mg GSD. Participants were women aged 18 to 35 years, all of whom received the EE/GSD patch for 13 cycles each of 21 treatment days (one patch per week for 3 weeks) followed by a 7-day, patch-free interval. The primary efficacy variable was the occurrence of unintended pregnancies during the study period as assessed by life table analysis and the Pearl Index. Secondary efficacy variables were days with bleeding during four 90-day reference periods and during 1 treatment year, bleeding pattern, and cycle control. The Kaplan-Meier probability of contraceptive protection after 364 treatment days was 98.8% and the adjusted Pearl Index was 0.81. The percentage of participants with intracyclic bleeding/spotting decreased over time, from 11.4% to 6.8% in cycles 1 and 12, respectively. Almost all participants (range: 90.8%-97.6%) experienced withdrawal bleeding across the study period. Compliance was very high (mean: 97.9%; median: 100%). The most frequent adverse events were headache (9.5%) and application site reaction (8.5%); no clinically significant safety concerns were observed. Results suggest the EE/GSD patch is highly effective in preventing pregnancy. Menstrual bleeding pattern was favorable and within the ranges expected of a healthy female population. The patch was well tolerated and treatment compliance was high. PMID:24784719

  4. High-resolution CT features of bleeding foci in patients with massive hemoptysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Keum Soo; Lee, Ki Nam; Jung, Won Jung; Kim, Jae Ic; Kang, Myong Jin; Park, Byeong Ho [Donga Univ. College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    To compare the high-resolution CT features of bleeding foci in patients with massive hemoptysis during embolization with those revealed by angiography. Between June 1997 and June 1999, we evaluated 25 patients who from among a total of 49 with arterial embolization due to massive hemoptysis underwent HRCT prior to embolization. We retrospectively analyzed medical records, and angiographic and HRCT findings. The time interval between HRCT and arterial embolization varied from two hours to six days. Angiography indicated that the bronchial, intercostal and internal mammary artery, and branches of the subclavian, were the foci of bleeding, and indicated the location of these in each pulmonary lobe. The HRCT findings were evaluated in terms of cavity, air-meniscus sign, bronchial dilatation, consolidation, ground-glass opacity, and fibrotic scar. We anlayzed the corresponding sites of HRCT and the angiographic findings of the foci of bleeding. In 24 of 25 patients, the foci of bleeding were angiographically confirmed, their presence being noted in 28 pulmonary lobes. HRCT findings corresponding to the bleeding foci revealed by angiography were the air-meniscus sign (8 of 10 lobes, 80.0%), cavity (7 of 9 lobes, 77.8%), bronchial dilatation (21 of 30 lobes, 70.0%), and fibrotic scar (1 of 23 lobes, 4.3%). The findings in areas of consolidation and/or ground-glass opacity only did not correspond, however. As compared with those revealed by angiography, the HRCT features of bleeding foci in patients with massive hemoptysis during embolization are in order of frequency, the air-meniscus sign, cavity, and bronchial dilatation.

  5. Chromatin accessibility, p300, and histone acetylation define PML-RARalpha and AML1-ETO binding sites in acute myeloid leukemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, S.; Logie, C.; Francoijs, K.J.; Frige, G.; Romanenghi, M.; Nielsen, F.G.G.; Raats, L.; Shahhoseini, M.; Huynen, M.A.; Altucci, L.; Minucci, S.; Martens, J.H.; Stunnenberg, H.G.

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin accessibility plays a key role in regulating cell type specific gene expression during hematopoiesis but has also been suggested to be aberrantly regulated during leukemogenesis. To understand the leukemogenic chromatin signature, we analyzed acute promyelocytic leukemia, a subtype of leuk

  6. Predicting long-term bleeding after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Praneet K; Chhatriwalla, Adnan K; Cohen, David J; Jang, Jae-Sik; Baweja, Paramdeep; Gosch, Kensey; Jones, Philip; Bach, Richard G; Arnold, Suzanne V; Spertus, John A

    2017-02-01

    To construct a model to predict long-term bleeding events following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Treatment with dual antiplatelet therapy following PCI involves balancing the benefits of preventing ischemic events with the risks of bleeding. There are no models to predict long-term bleeding events after PCI. We analyzed 1-year bleeding outcomes from 3,128 PCI procedures in the Patient Risk Information Services Manager (PRISM) observational study. Patient-reported bleeding events were categorized according to Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) definitions. Logistic regression analysis was used to develop a model predicting BARC ≥ 1 bleeding. BARC 0, 1, 2 or 3 bleeding was observed in 574 (18.4%); 2382 (76.2%); 114 (3.6%); and 58 (1.8%) patients, respectively. Compared to patients who had no bleeding, patients with BARC ≥ 1 bleeding were more often female (30 vs. 23%), Caucasian (94 vs. 83%), had a higher incidence of drug eluting stent (DES) implantation (83 vs. 76%) and warfarin therapy (7.4 vs. 3.9%), and a lower incidence of diabetes (31 vs. 45%; P-value bleeding events as well (c-statistic = 0.653). Bleeding is common in the first year after PCI, and can be predicted by pre-procedural patient characteristics and use of DES. Objective estimates of bleeding risk may help support shared decision-making with respect to stent selection and duration of antiplatelet therapy following PCI. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Clopidogrel and bleeding after general surgery procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozao-Choy, Junko; Tammaro, Yolanda; Fradis, Martin; Weber, Kaare; Divino, Celia M

    2008-08-01

    Although many studies in the cardiothoracic literature exist about the relationship between clopidogrel and postoperative bleeding, there is scarce data in the general surgery literature. We assessed whether there are increased bleeding complications, morbidity, mortality, and resource utilization in patients who are on clopidogrel (Plavix) within 1 week before undergoing a general surgery procedure. Fifty consecutive patient charts were retrospectively reviewed after identifying patients who had pharmacy orders for clopidogrel and who underwent a general surgery procedure between 2003 and 2007. Patients who took clopidogrel within 6 days before surgery (group I, n = 28) were compared with patients who stopped clopidogrel for 7 days or more (group II, n = 22). A larger percentage of patients who took their last dose of clopidogrel within 1 week of surgery (21.4% vs 9.5%) had significant bleeding after surgery requiring blood transfusion. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in operative or postoperative blood transfusions (P = 0.12, 0.53), decreases in hematocrit (P = 0.21), hospital stay (P = 0.09), intensive care unit stay (P = 0.41), late complications (P = 0.45), or mortality (P = 0.42). Although our cohort is limited in size, these results suggest that in the case of a nonelective general surgery procedure where outcomes depend on timely surgery, clopidogrel taken within 6 days before surgery should not be a reason to delay surgery. However, careful attention must be paid to meticulous hemostasis, and platelets must be readily available for transfusion in the operating room.

  8. An Unusual Case of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin N. Fiorino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old boy presented with a 3-day history of worsening abdominal pain, fever, emesis and melena. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a right upper quadrant mass that was confirmed by computed tomography angiogram (CTA, which showed an 8 cm well-defined retroperitoneal vascular mass. 123Iodine metaiodobenzylguanidine (123MIBG scan indicated uptake only in the abdominal mass. Subsequent biopsy revealed a paraganglioma that was treated with chemotherapy. This case represents an unusual presentation of a paraganglioma associated with gastrointestinal (GI bleeding and highlights the utility of CTA and 123MIBG in evaluation and treatment.

  9. Somatostatin analogues for acute bleeding oesophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Hrobjartsson, A.

    2008-01-01

    or recent bleeding from oesophageal varices. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The outcome measures extracted were: mortality, blood transfusions, use of balloon tamponade, initial haemostasis and rebleeding. Intention-to-treat analyses including all randomised patients were conducted if possible; a random...... it was substantially reduced in the other trials, relative risk 0.36 (0.19 to 0.68). Use of balloon tamponade was rarely reported. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The need for blood transfusions corresponded to one half unit of blood saved per patient. It is doubtful whether this effect is worthwhile. The findings do...

  10. Somatostatin analogues for acute bleeding oesophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Hrobjartsson, A.

    2008-01-01

    or recent bleeding from oesophageal varices. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The outcome measures extracted were: mortality, blood transfusions, use of balloon tamponade, initial haemostasis and rebleeding. Intention-to-treat analyses including all randomised patients were conducted if possible; a random...... it was substantially reduced in the other trials, relative risk 0.36 (0.19 to 0.68). Use of balloon tamponade was rarely reported. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The need for blood transfusions corresponded to one half unit of blood saved per patient. It is doubtful whether this effect is worthwhile. The findings do...

  11. Benthic data for corals, macroalgae, invertebrates, and non-living bottom types from 12 sites in American Samoa, 2005-2009. (NODC Accession 0068364)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic transects were repeated at 12 sites around Tutuila at various depths on the reef slopes and flats. Benthic coverage categories include coral species,...

  12. Abundance data acquired in support of invasive species distribution studies at ten macroalgal ecology and taxonomic assessment sites in Hawaii during 2001 (NODC Accession 0000879)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abundance data represent estimates of percent cover of species type (coral or algal) in 10 randomly placed quadrats along two 50 meter transect lines of each site....

  13. Fish stock surveys from 41 sites on the islands of Oahu and Hawaii from September 11, 1952 to December 28, 2000 (NODC Accession 0002754)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data are from underwater visual surveys of fish stocks from 41 survey sites on the islands of Oahu and Hawaii, conducted by biologists and technicians of Hawaii's...

  14. Water temperature data from reef sites off the upper Florida Keys from 2003-09-18 to 2015-11-13 (NCEI Accession 0126994)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature loggers were deployed at various monitoring sites off the upper Florida Keys where other ecological studies were underway, most focused on aspects of...

  15. 2001 Abundance Data Acquired in Support of Invasive Species Distribution Studies at 10 Macroalgal Ecology and Taxonomic Assessment Sites in Hawaii (NODC Accession 0000879)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abundance data represent estimates of percent cover of species type (coral or algal) in 10 randomly placed quadrats along two 50 meter transect lines of each site....

  16. Coral species identification and occurrences from sites at Mandano and Wakatobi, Sulawesi, Indonesia and Raiatea, Society Islands, French Polynesia, March-May, 2002 (NODC Accession 0039738)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are coral species and occurrences data from Pacific reef areas (crest, flat, and slope) collected at sites in Manado, northern Sulawesi, Indonesia (app....

  17. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding: American College of Nurse-Midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Variations in uterine bleeding, termed abnormal uterine bleeding, occur commonly among women and often are physiologic in nature with no significant consequences. However, abnormal uterine bleeding can cause significant distress to women or may signify an underlying pathologic condition. Most women experience variations in menstrual and perimenstrual bleeding in their lifetimes; therefore, the ability of the midwife to differentiate between normal and abnormal bleeding is a key diagnostic skill. A comprehensive history and use of the PALM-COEIN classification system will provide clear guidelines for clinical management, evidence-based treatment, and an individualized plan of care. The purpose of this Clinical Bulletin is to define and describe classifications of abnormal uterine bleeding, review updated terminology, and identify methods of assessment and treatment using a woman-centered approach.

  18. [EMERGENCY TREATMENT OF BLEEDING IN PATIENTS TAKING WARFARIN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasolov, N V; Shulutko, E M; Bulanov, A Yu; Yatskov, K V; Shcherbakov, O V

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists (AVK) is an effective treatment and prevention of thrombosis. One of the major disadvantages of the AVK is a risk for serious bleeding. Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and vitamin K1 are available for control of these situations. The experience of special team ofthe Scientific Center for Hematology was the basis for presented retrospective study. Three regimens of warfarin-related bleeding were compared: PCC+ VK for several bleeding, FFP+ VK for different clinical situations and VKfor light bleeding. PCC showed himself as effective and safe hemostatic agent. Transfusions of FFP were sometimes not effective, sometimes led to TACO. Supplementation of vitamin K1 for patients of I and II groups provided more stable control of hemostasis. In III group VK vas effective to stop bleeding. Two impotent sings for conclusion: necessary of laboratory monitoring, TEG first of all; individual balance of hemostasis base of bleeding or thrombotic risks.

  19. Fatal aortoesophageal fistula bleeding after stenting for a leak post sleeve gastrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadi, Majid A; Bamihriz, Fahad; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M

    2013-01-01

    Bariatric surgeries have been used in an effort to curtail the obesity epidemic. The type of surgery used has changed over time, with sleeve gastrectomies being one of the preferred options. This has been associated with some complications, including staple line leaks. We report a 43-year old female who had undergone a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy that was complicated by a proximal gastric pouch leak at the gastroesophageal junction. We used self-expandable stents (SEMS) in the management of the leak. Seven weeks after the insertion of the initial SEMS, the patient presented with a massive gastrointestinal bleed that could not be localized due to profuse bleeding. The patient underwent a computerized tomography angiogram and then an angiogram that could not localize the site of the bleed. An emergency laparotomy was performed and identified the source of bleeding to be an aortoesophageal fistula. A graft of the diseased area was attempted but the patient unfortunately did not survive the procedure. An aortoesophageal fistula after an esophageal SEMS insertion for a benign disease has rarely been reported and only in cases where there was a thoracic neoplasm, thoracic aortic aneurism, endovascular stent repair, foreign body or esophageal surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first case that reports an aortoesophageal fistula as a result of a SEMS for the management of a gastric pouch leak after a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. PMID:24392186

  20. Identification of a Serratia marcescens virulence factor that promotes hemolymph bleeding in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Hara, Takashi; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-03-01

    Injection of culture supernatant of Serratia marcescens, a Gram-negative bacterium pathogenic to a wide range of host animals including insects and mammals, into the hemolymph of silkworm (Bombyx mori) larvae led to continuous flow of the hemolymph (blood of insects) from the injection site. The amount of hemolymph lost within 60 min reached 15-20% of the total larval weight. Using a bioassay with live silkworms, we purified Serralysin, a metalloprotease that requires divalent cations for its activity, as the factor responsible for the promotion of hemolymph bleeding from the culture supernatant of S. marcescens. Recombinant protein also induced hemolymph bleeding in silkworms. Moreover, the culture supernatant of an S. marcescens disruption mutant of the ser gene showed attenuated ability to promote hemolymph bleeding. In addition, this bleeding-promoting activity of the S. marcescens culture supernatant was attenuated by disruption of the wecA gene, which is involved in the biosynthesis of the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen. These findings suggest that Serralysin metalloprotease contributes to the pathogenesis of S. marcescens by inhibiting wound healing, which leads to a massive loss of hemolymph from silkworm larvae.

  1. Angiogenesis and vascular malformations: Antiangiogenic drugs for treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with angiodysplasias and Osler's disease (hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia) is clinically challenging.Frequently, vascular malformations occur as multiple disseminated lesions, making local treatment an unfavorable choice or impossible. After local therapy,lesions often recur at other sites of the intestine.However, as there are few therapeutic alternatives,repeated endoscopic coagulations or surgical resections are still performed to prevent recurrent bleeding.Hormonal therapy has been employed for more than 50 years but has recently been shown to be ineffective.Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are required.Understanding of the pathophysiology of angiogenesis and vascular malformations has recently substantially increased. Currently, multiple inhibitors of angiogenesis are under development for treatment of malignant diseases. Experimental and clinical data suggest that antiangiogenic substances, which were originally developed for treatment of malignant diseases, may also represent long-awaited specific drugs for the treatment of vascular malformations. However, antiangiogenics display significantly different actions and side-effects.Although antiangiogenics like thalidomide seem to inhibit gastrointestinal bleeding, other substances like bevacizumab can cause mucosal bleeding. Therefore differential and cautious evaluation of this therapeutic strategy is necessary.

  2. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding etiology score for predicting variceal and non-variceal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Supot Pongprasobchai; Sireethorn Nimitvilai; Jaroon Chasawat; Sathaporn Manatsathit

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To identify clinical parameters, and develop an Upper Gastrointesinal Bleeding (UGIB) Etiology Score for predicting the types of UGIB and validate the score.METHODS: Patients with UGIB who underwent endoscopy within 72 h were enrolled. Clinical and basic laboratory parameters were prospectively collected.Predictive factors for the types of UGIB were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses and were used to generate the UGIB Etiology Score. The best cutoff of the score was defined from the receiver operating curve and prospectively validated in another set of patients with UGIB.RESULTS: Among 261 patients with UGIB, 47 (18%) had variceal and 214 (82%) had non-variceal bleeding.Univariate analysis identified 27 distinct parameters significantly associated with the types of UGIB. Logistic regression analysis identified only 3 independent factors for predicting variceal bleeding;previous diagnosis of cirrhosis or signs of chronic liver disease (OR 22.4, 95% CI 8.3-60.4, P < 0.001), red vomitus (OR4.6, 95% CI 1.8-11.9, P = 0.02), and red nasogastric (NG) aspirate (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.3-8.3, P = 0.011).The UGIB Etiology Score was calculated from (3.1 x previous diagnosis of cirrhosis or signs of chronic liver disease) + (1.5 × red vornitus) + (1.2 × red NG aspirate), when 1 and 0 are used for the presence and absence of each factor, respectively. Using a cutoff ≥ 3.1, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) in predicting variceal bleeding were 85%, 81%,82%, 50%, and 96%, respectively. The score was prospectively validated in another set of 195 UGIB cases (46 variceal and 149 non-variceal bleeding). The PPV and NPV of a score ≥3.1 for variceal bleeding were 79% and 97%, respectively.CONCLUSION: The UGIB Etiology Score, composed of 3 parameters, using a cutoff ≥ 3.1 accurately predicted variceal bleeding and may help to guide the choice of initial therapy for UGIB before endoscopy.

  3. Risk of gastrointestinal bleeding during anticoagulant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas-Gimeno, Aitor; Lanas, Angel

    2017-06-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is a major problem in patients on oral anticoagulation therapy. This issue has become even more pressing since the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in 2009. Areas covered: Here we review current evidence related to GIB associated with oral anticoagulants, focusing on randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and post-marketing observational studies. Dabigatran 150 mg twice daily and rivaroxaban 20 mg once daily increase the risk of GIB compared to warfarin. The risk increase with edoxaban is dose-dependent, while apixaban shows apparently, no increased risk. We summarize what is known about GIB risk factors for individual anticoagulants, the location of GIB in patients taking these compounds, and prevention strategies that lower the risk of GIB. Expert opinion: Recently there has been an important shift in the clinical presentation of GIB. Specifically, upper GIB has decreased with the decreased incidence of peptic ulcers due to the broad use of proton pump inhibitors and the decreased prevalence of H. pylori infections. In contrast, the incidence of lower GIB has increased, due in part to colonic diverticular bleeding and angiodysplasia in the elderly. In this population, the addition of oral anticoagulation therapy, especially DOACs, seems to increase the risk of lower GIB.

  4. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding after open heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aithoussa Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The occurrence of digestive complications especially upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB has increased after cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of UGIB and identify the independent risk factors. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data of 1077 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB from 1994 to 2012 The group of patients with UGIB (n1 = 20 was compared with the population group (n2 = 1057. Demographic characteristics, therapeutic management, endoscopic findings, and outcomes were analyzed. Through a regression analysis we identified independent risk factors of UGIB. Results: The mean age of the group n1 was 58.2 ± 12.4 years and 50.18 ± 13.5 years in the group n2 . UGIB occurred about 13 ± 5.5 days after cardiac surgery. Gastroduodenal ulcer was the most common etiology of hemorrhage (n = 13, 65%. Renal insufficiency, previous gastric ulcer, increased lactate concentration during CPB, prolonged mechanical ventilation, use of vasopressor drug and pulmonary infection was likely contributing factors in UGIB. Conclusion: UGIB following open cardiac surgery is most frequently secondary to gastroduodenal ulceration. Many determinant factors of bleeding are incriminated. Surgeons must be aware of these factors to avoid fatal complications.

  5. Assessing Bleeding Risk in Patients Taking Anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoeb, Marwa; Fang, Margaret C.

    2013-01-01

    Anticoagulant medications are commonly used for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolism. Although highly effective, they are also associated with significant bleeding risks. Numerous individual clinical factors have been linked to an increased risk of hemorrhage, including older age, anemia, and renal disease. To help quantify hemorrhage risk for individual patients, a number of clinical risk prediction tools have been developed. These risk prediction tools differ in how they were derived and how they identify and weight individual risk factors. At present, their ability to effective predict anticoagulant-associated hemorrhage remains modest. Use of risk prediction tools to estimate bleeding in clinical practice is most influential when applied to patients at the lower spectrum of thromboembolic risk, when the risk of hemorrhage will more strongly affect clinical decisions about anticoagulation. Using risk tools may also help counsel and inform patients about their potential risk for hemorrhage while on anticoagulants, and can identify patients who might benefit from more careful management of anticoagulation. PMID:23479259

  6. Antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan

    2015-06-09

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in the course of liver cirrhosis. People with liver disease frequently have haemostatic abnormalities such as hyperfibrinolysis. Therefore, antifibrinolytic amino acids have been proposed to be used as supplementary interventions alongside any of the primary treatments for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with liver diseases. This is an update of this Cochrane review. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Controlled Trials Register (February 2015), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2 of 12, 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1946 to February 2015), EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1974 to February 2015), Science Citation Index EXPANDED (1900 to February 2015), LILACS (1982 to February 2015), World Health Organization Clinical Trials Search Portal (accessed 26 February 2015), and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (accessed 26 February 2015). We scrutinised the reference lists of the retrieved publications. Randomised clinical trials irrespective of blinding, language, or publication status for assessment of benefits and harms. Observational studies for assessment of harms. We planned to summarise data from randomised clinical trials using standard Cochrane methodologies and assessed according to the GRADE approach. We found no randomised clinical trials assessing antifibrinolytic amino acids for treating upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease. We did not identify quasi-randomised, historically controlled, or observational studies in which we could assess harms. This updated Cochrane review identified no randomised clinical trials assessing the benefits and harms of antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or

  7. Determination of the Risk of Recurrent Gastroduodenal Ulcer Bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances in endoscopic haemostasis, the incidence of recurrent ulcer bleeding remains to be high. It necessitates further search for its prognosis and methods of treatment.The objective of the research was to analyse risk factors for recurrent gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding.Materials and methods. The study included 203 patients with gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. There were 135 (66.5%) males and 68 (33.3%) females. All the patients were examined and received conservative treatment ...

  8. Factors that can minimize bleeding complications after renal biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, M. S.; J. Z. Chen; A.P. Xu

    2014-01-01

    Renal biopsy is a very important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of renal diseases. However, bleeding remains to be one of the most serious complications in this procedure. Many new techniques have been improved to make it safer. The risk factors and predictors of bleeding after percutaneous renal biopsy have been extensively reported in many literatures, and generally speaking, the common risk factors for renal biopsy complications focus on hypertension, high serum creatinine, bleeding dia...

  9. Bleeding After Endoscopic Procedures in Patients With Chronic Hematologic Thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Jin; Park, Jae Myung; Yoon, Seung Bae; Lee, Han Hee; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jin Su; Cho, Yu Kyung; Lee, Bo-In; Cho, Young-Seok; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2017-03-01

    Procedure-induced bleeding is a major complication after endoscopic intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the risk of endoscopy-related bleeding in patients with chronic hematologic thrombocytopenia. We investigated endoscopy-related bleeding in 175 procedures performed on 108 patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura or aplastic anemia. The outcomes were compared with those of 350 procedures on age-, sex-, and procedure-matched control subjects. Endoscopic interventions included low-risk procedures such as endoscopic biopsy and high-risk procedures including polypectomy, endoscopic resection, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram with sphincterotomy. Bleeding occurred in 17 (9.7%) procedures among the patients with thrombocytopenia. This rate was significantly higher than that in procedures on controls (3.1%, P = 0.003). About 60% of all bleeding events were observed within 24 h after the endoscopic procedure. Bleeding after endoscopic biopsy developed more frequently in the patient group than in the control group (7.1 vs. 0.7%; P Bleeding occurred after 20% of all high-risk procedures. The incidence of bleeding was significantly elevated in patients with a platelet count less than 50 × 10(3)/μl. Multivariate analysis revealed that high-risk procedures and low platelet count (less than 50 × 10(3)/μl) were significantly related to procedure-related bleeding. All bleeding events stopped spontaneously or were controlled with endoscopic hemostasis. Endoscopic procedure-related bleeding develops frequently in patients with chronic hematologic thrombocytopenia. Post-procedural bleeding should be observed carefully in these patients, especially when the platelet count is less than 50 × 10(3)/μl or high-risk endoscopic procedures are planned.

  10. Radiotherapy Can Cause Haemostasis in Bleeding Skin Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Sung-In Jang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy (RT can cause haemostasis in select cases of malignant bleeding. We present two cases where RT was used to prevent fatal exsanguination from bleeding skin malignancies. Treatment was with radical intent in one case and palliative intent in the other. The dose used in both cases was 20 Gray (Gy in 5 fractions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of radiation-induced haemostasis in bleeding skin malignancies.

  11. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Scintigraphy in the Early 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Erin

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding scintigraphy performed with (99m)Tc-labeled autologous erythrocytes or historically with (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid has been a clinically useful tool since the 1970s. This article reviews the history of the techniques, the different methods of radiolabeling erythrocytes, the procedure, useful indications, diagnostic accuracy, the use of SPECT/CT and CT angiography to evaluate gastrointestinal bleeding, and Meckel diverticulum imaging. The causes of pediatric bleeding are discussed by age.

  12. Recent Update of Embolization of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is a frequent complication with significant morbidity and mortality. Although endoscopic hemostasis remains the initial treatment modality, severe bleeding despite endoscopic management occurs in 5-10% of patients, necessitating surgery or interventional embolotherapy. Endovascular embolotherapy is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic management. Interventional radiologists need to be familiar with the choice of embolic materials, technical aspects of embolotherapy, and the factors affecting the favorable or unfavorable outcomes after embolotherapy for UGI bleeding. PMID:22563285

  13. Photocoagulation in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Wlodzimierz; Paczkowski, Pawel M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors present their experience in the endoscopic laser photocoagulation of bleeding peptic ulcer. From 1991 to June 1995, 203 patients admitted for UGI bleeding from peptic ulcer have been treated by this method. The source of bleeding was confirmed by endoscopy. The patients were divided into two groups: actively bleeding peptic ulcer (group IA and IB according to Forrest's classification) and ulcer with stigmata of recent bleeding (group IIA/IIB). The former group consisted of 106 patients, among whom over 40 percent (45 patients) presented signs of hypovolemic shock on admission. Nd:YAG laser (Surgical Laser Technologies) was used in a continuous mode with a contact (8 - 20 watts) or non-contact (over 50 watts) method of coagulation. In actively bleeding patients photocoagulation resulted in stopping the hemorrhage in 95 (90%). Recurrent bleeding occurred in 16 cases; in 9 of them it was stopped by repeated photocoagulation. In this group 18 patients required surgical intervention. The mortality was of 10.3% (11 patients). In 97 patients with recent bleeding stigmata photocoagulation provoked heavy hemorrhage in 3 (in 2 cases stopped by prolonged coagulation). In 9 of the remaining 94 patients recurrent bleeding occurred. Nine patients required surgical intervention. Mortality in this group was of 6%.

  14. CERVICAL ECTOPIC PREGNANCY WITH MASSIVE BLEEDING: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavcho Tomov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year-old patient with cervical ectopic pregnancy (CEP presented as "suspected" cervical mass, and irregular vaginal bleeding was directed to a gynecologic oncologist for consultation. During the examination a massive bleeding occurred. After an unsuccessful attempt to stop the bleeding with a balloon catheter and vaginal tamponade, a total abdominal hysterectomy was performed. The predisposing factors, the differential diagnostic possibilities and the clinical approaches in CEP are discussed. Total abdominal hysterectomy is the procedure of choice for treatment of cervical pregnancy under conditions of urgency and life-threatening bleeding.

  15. [Analysis of risk factors for bleeding after thyroid surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiaoping; Li, Zhengjiang; Liu, Jie; An, Changming; Yin, Yulin; Tang, Pingzhang; Xu, Zhengang

    2016-01-01

    To identify risk factors for bleeding after thyroid surgery, and discuss the potential relevance between the bleeding timing and sources. A total of 2568 cases that underwent thyroid operation from June 2012 to June 2013 were collected and analysed retrospectively the risk factors for postoperative bleeding by Cox and the potential relevance between the bleeding timing and sources. Among 2568 patients, 40 patients occurred postoperative bleeding Indentified risk factors were extent resection (P=0.0435) and surgeon (P=0.0071). Thyroid bed and strap muscles/sternocleidomastoid were the most common sources of bleeding after surgery within 6 hours; while thyroid bed was the most common source of bleeding after surgery between 6 and 8 h; wound errhysis was the most common source during 8-24 h after the operation; thyroid bed and strap muscles/sternocleidomastoid were the most common sources within 24 h after thgroid surgery. Bleeding after thyroid surgery is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication, and the extent of resection and the surgeon are risk factors. Thyroid bed and strap muscles/sternocleidomastoid are the most common sources of bleeding after surgery within 24 hours.

  16. Recent Update of Embolization of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is a frequent complication with significant morbidity and mortality. Although endoscopic hemostasis remains the initial treatment modality, severe bleeding despite endoscopic management occurs in 5-10% of patients, necessitating surgery or interventional embolotherapy. Endovascular embolotherapy is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic management. Interventional radiologists need to be familiar with the choice of embolic materials, technical aspects of embolotherapy, and the factors affecting the favorable or unfavorable outcomes after embolotherapy for UGI bleeding.

  17. Universal definition of perioperative bleeding in adult cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyke, Cornelius; Aronson, Solomon; Dietrich, Wulf; Hofmann, Axel; Karkouti, Keyvan; Levi, Marcel; Murphy, Gavin J; Sellke, Frank W; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; von Heymann, Christian; Ranucci, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Perioperative bleeding is common among patients undergoing cardiac surgery; however, the definition of perioperative bleeding is variable and lacks standardization. We propose a universal definition for perioperative bleeding (UDPB) in adult cardiac surgery in an attempt to precisely describe and quantify bleeding and to facilitate future investigation into this difficult clinical problem. The multidisciplinary International Initiative on Haemostasis Management in Cardiac Surgery identified a common definition of perioperative bleeding as an unmet need. The functionality and usefulness of the UDPB for clinical research was then tested using a large single-center, nonselected, cardiac surgical database. A multistaged definition for perioperative bleeding was created based on easily measured clinical end points, including total blood loss from chest tubes within 12 hours, allogeneic blood products transfused, surgical reexploration including cardiac tamponade, delayed sternal closure, and the need for salvage treatment. Depending on these components, bleeding is graded as insignificant, mild, moderate, severe, or massive. When applied to an established cardiac surgery dataset, the UDPB provided insight into the incidence and outcome of bleeding after cardiac surgery. The proposed UDPB in adult cardiac surgery provides a precise classification of bleeding that is useful in everyday practice as well as in clinical research. Once fully validated, the UDPB may be useful as an institutional quality measure and serve as an important end point in future cardiac surgical research. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Abnormal Bleeding During Menopause Hormone Therapy: Insights for Clinical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Sebastião Freitas; Yamamoto, Márcia Marly Winck; Barbosa, Jacklyne Silva

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to review the involved mechanisms and propose actions for controlling/treating abnormal uterine bleeding during climacteric hormone therapy. Methods A systemic search of the databases SciELO, MEDLINE, and Pubmed was performed for identifying relevant publications on normal endometrial bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding, and hormone therapy bleeding. Results Before starting hormone therapy, it is essential to exclude any abnormal organic condition, identify women at higher risk for bleeding, and adapt the regimen to suit eachwoman’s characteristics. Abnormal bleeding with progesterone/progestogen only, combined sequential, or combined continuous regimens may be corrected by changing the progestogen, adjusting the progestogen or estrogen/progestogen doses, or even switching the initial regimen to other formulation. Conclusion To diminish the occurrence of abnormal bleeding during hormone therapy (HT), it is important to tailor the regimen to the needs of individual women and identify those with higher risk of bleeding. The use of new agents as adjuvant therapies for decreasing abnormal bleeding in women on HT awaits future studies. PMID:24665210

  19. Risk factors for bleeding after endoscopic mucosal resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masatsugu Shiba; Toshio Watanabe; Kazunari Tominaga; Yoshihiro Fujiwara; Tomoshige Hayashi; Kei Tsumura; Tetsuo Arakawa; Kazuhide Higuchi; Kaori Kadouchi; Ai Montani; Kazuki Yamamori; Hirotoshi Okazaki; Makiko Taguchi; Tomoko Wada; Atsushi Itani

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the risk factors for bleeding after endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR).METHODS: A total of 297 consecutive patients who underwent EMR were enrolled. Some of the patients had multiple lesions. Bleeding requiring endoscopic treatment was defined as bleeding after EMR. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), calculated by logistic regression with multivariate adjustments for covariates,were the measures of association.RESULTS: Of the 297 patients, 57 (19.2%) patients with bleeding after EMR were confirmed. With multivariate adjustment, the cutting method of ENR, diameter, and endoscopic pattern of the tumor were associated with the risk of bleeding after ENR. The multivariate-adjusted OR for bleeding after EMR using endoscopic aspiration mucosectomy was 3.07 (95%CI, 1.59-5.92) compared with strip biopsy. The multiple-adjusted OR for bleeding after EMR for the highest quartile (16-50 mm) of tumor diameter was 5.63 (95%CI, 1.84-17.23) compared with that for the lowest (4-7 mm). The multiple-adjusted OR for bleeding after EM R for depressed type of tumor was 4.21 (95%CI, 1.75-10.10) compared with elevated type.CONCLUSION: It is important to take tumor characteristics (tumor size and endoscopic pattern) and cutting method of EMR into consideration in predicting bleeding after ENR.

  20. Transcatheter arterial embolization in gastric cancer patients with acute bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Joo; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Gwon, Dong-Il; Song, Ho-Young; Sung, Kyu-Bo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-04-15

    The safety and clinical effectiveness of transcatheter arterial embolization for bleeding associated with unresectable gastric cancer was evaluated. Twenty-three patients with bleeding from unresectable gastric cancer underwent transcatheter arterial embolization. Of the 23 patients, eight showed signs of active bleeding, such as contrast extravasation or pseudoaneurysm, seven showed only tumor staining, and the remaining eight patients showed negative angiographic findings. All embolization procedures were successful without procedure-related complications. In all eight active bleeding patients, immediate hemostasis was achieved. The overall clinical success rate was 52% (12/23). Recurrent bleeding within 1 month occurred in one (8%) in 12 patients with initial clinical success. One patient showed partial splenic infarction after embolization of the splenic artery for active bleeding from the short gastric artery. Overall 30-day mortality rate was 43% (10/23). The median overall survival period was 38 days. In patients with bleeding from unresectable gastric cancer, transcatheter arterial embolization was found to be safe and effective for achieving immediate hemostasis for active bleeding. Although the clinical success rate was not high, the recurrent bleeding rate was low at 1 month post procedure. (orig.)

  1. Angiography Diagnosis and Treatment of Traumatic Artery Bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; WANG Yan; LIU Jingzhang

    2002-01-01

    Objective After angiography and embolization of three cases suffering from traumatic artery bleeding we summarized the selective embolization of different artery bleeding cases and their treatment analysis. Methods The three cases were all female,among them,one suffering from hepatic artery bleeding by a traffic accident, the other two caused by iatrogenic damage. Of the two, one suffered from bleeding after the gall bladder removal, the other from bleeding after puncture biopsy through the kidney.Seldinger technique was used on the three cases, and puncture intubation was superselected and put through arterial femoralis. Catheters were put separately inside the target blood vessels to have radiography and contrast medium was found to have out flowed out to the bleeding artery. And then the mixed gelatin sponge particles were put into, Ultravist contrast medium to make suspension. Through fluoroscopy the suspension was injected into bleeding artery until no contrast medium out flowed. After that radiography was used to watch the result. Results After the embolization the three cases stopped bleeding at once with remarkable effects. Conclusion Therefore we conclude the embolization is the best method for treating artery bleeding.

  2. Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma with Synchronous Tumor Growth in Azygoesophageal Recess and Duodenum: A Rare Cause of Anemia and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamshidhar R. Vootla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC has potential to present with distant metastasis several years after complete resection. The common sites of metastases include the lungs, bones, liver, renal fossa, and brain. RCCs metastasize rarely to the duodenum, and duodenal metastasis presenting with acute gastrointestinal bleed is infrequently reported in literature. We present a case of synchronous presentation of duodenal and azygoesophageal metastasis manifesting as acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, four years after undergoing nephrectomy for RCC. The patient underwent further workup and was treated with radiation. The synchronous presentation is rare and stresses the importance of searching for recurrence of RCC in patients presenting with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  3. Radial Versus Femoral Access for Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routledge, Helen; Sastry, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    The feasibility and safety of transradial coronary intervention was demonstrated soon after the description of the transfemoral approach, despite which the use of the femoral artery still dominates in acute coronary syndrome intervention. The advantages of using the radial artery are virtual elimination of access site complications and an important reduction in bleeding, both of which are of utmost importance to the patient with myocardial infarction. Randomised controlled trials have now documented what seems inherent; that transradial intervention should bring with it an advantage in terms of morbidity and mortality in this cohort. The potential disadvantages in terms of speed of procedure and radiation exposure are negated by operator experience. Registries have illustrated that conversion on a large scale from the femoral to the transradial approach is safe and saves lives, most convincingly so in acute coronary syndrome intervention. This review discusses the potential benefits and risks of the alternative access sites in acute patients and explores how these are borne out in the published data.

  4. Importance of Heparin Provocation and SPECT/CT in Detecting Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding on 99mTc-RBC Scintigraphy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighatafshar, Mahdi; Gheisari, Farshid; Ghaedian, Tahereh

    2015-08-01

    We presented a pediatric case with a history of intermittent melena for 3 years because of angiodyplasia of small intestine. The results of frequent upper gastrointestinal endoscopies and colonoscopies as well as both Tc-red blood cell (RBC) and Meckel's scintigraphies for several times were negative in detection of bleeding site. However, Tc-RBC scintigraphy with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) after heparin augmentation detected a site of bleeding in the distal ileum which later was confirmed during surgery with final diagnosis of angiodysplasia.It could be stated that heparin provocation of bleeding before Tc-RBC scintigraphy accompanied by fused SPECT/CT images should be kept in mind for management of intestinal bleeding especially in difficult cases.

  5. Treatment for preventing bleeding in people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Antonio; Windyga, Jerzy; Tufano, Antonella; Yeung, Cindy; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

    2015-02-09

    In people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing surgical interventions, haemostatic treatment is needed in order to correct the underlying coagulation abnormalities and minimise the bleeding risk. This treatment varies according to the specific haemostatic defect, its severity and the type of surgical procedure. The aim of treatment is to ensure adequate haemostatic coverage for as long as the bleeding risk persists and until wound healing is complete. To assess the effectiveness and safety of different haemostatic regimens (type, dose and duration, modality of administration and target haemostatic levels) administered in people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders for preventing bleeding complications during and after surgical procedures. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of the last search: 20 November 2014. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing any hemostatic treatment regimen to no treatment or to another active regimen in children and adults with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing any surgical intervention. Two authors independently assessed trials (eligibility and risks of bias) and extracted data. Meta-analyses were performed on available and relevant data. Of the 16 identified trials, four (112 participants) were eligible for inclusion.Two trials evaluated 59 people with haemophilia A and B undergoing 63 dental extractions. Trials compared the use of a different type (tranexamic acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid) and regimen of antifibrinolytic agents as haemostatic support to the initial replacement treatment. Neither trial specifically addressed mortality (one of this review's primary outcomes); however, in the frame

  6. Impact of transseptal puncture site on acute and mid-term outcomes during cryoballoon ablation: A comparison between anterior, medial and posterior transatrial access

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chierchia, G.B.; Casado-Arroyo, R.; Asmundis, C. de; Rodriguez-Manero, M.; Sarkozy, A.; Conte, G.; Sieira, J.; Levinstein, M.; Baltogiannis, G.; Giovanni, G.; Overeinder, I.; Ocello, S.; Rosas, E.; Isola, F.; Brugada, P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryoballoon ablation (CBA) (Arctic Front, Medtronic, USA) has proven very effective in achieving pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). Different transseptal (TS) puncture sites might influence CBA procedure. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of different TS puncture sit

  7. Impact of transseptal puncture site on acute and mid-term outcomes during cryoballoon ablation: A comparison between anterior, medial and posterior transatrial access

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chierchia, G.B.; Casado-Arroyo, R.; Asmundis, C. de; Rodriguez-Manero, M.; Sarkozy, A.; Conte, G.; Sieira, J.; Levinstein, M.; Baltogiannis, G.; Giovanni, G.; Overeinder, I.; Ocello, S.; Rosas, E.; Isola, F.; Brugada, P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryoballoon ablation (CBA) (Arctic Front, Medtronic, USA) has proven very effective in achieving pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). Different transseptal (TS) puncture sites might influence CBA procedure. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of different TS puncture sit

  8. “Downhill” Esophageal Varices due to Dialysis Catheter-Induced Superior Vena Caval Occlusion: A Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar Nayudu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available “Downhill” varices are a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Rarely these varices are reported in patients receiving hemodialysis as a complication of chronic dialysis vascular access. We present a case of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an individual with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed “downhill” varices in the upper third of the esophagus without any active bleeding at the time of the procedure. An angiogram was performed disclosing superior vena caval occlusion, which was treated with balloon angioplasty. Gastroenterologists should have a high index of suspicion for these rare “downhill” varices when dealing with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving hemodialysis and manage it appropriately using endoscopic, radiological, and surgical interventions.

  9. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Benedeto-Stojanov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB is a common medical emergency problem with significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this paper is to establish the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in relation to sex and age, determine the prevalence of bleeding lesions and perform analysis of bleeding peptic ulcer in relation to the location, age, gender, Forrest classification and the need for endoscopic hemostasis. Thе prospective study included 70 patients with UGB, 42 men and 28 women, mean age 68.64±13.66 years. The diagnosis of bleeding lesions was made exclusively by means of esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Forrest classification was used in the evaluation of the activity of bleeding ulcers of the stomach and duodenum. The largest number of bleeding patients was of male sex (60%. Bleeding most commonly occurred in patients older than 60 years (84.29%. Statistically, female patients were significantly older than patients of male gender (p=0.001. The most common cause of bleeding was peptic ulcer (65.71%. The average age of patients with gastric ulcer was 70.57±15.68 years, with a duodenal ulcer 63.78±16.70 years. In the duodenum, Forrest Ib, IIa and IIb ulcers were usually confirmed, whereas Forrest IIc ulcers were identified in the stomach. Endoscopic hemostasis was required in 55.56% of patients with duodenal and in 23.81% of patients with gastric ulcer. The incidence of UGB is higher in men and it increases with age. The most common cause of bleeding is ulcer disease. Patients with gastric ulcer are older than patients with duodenal ulcer, while both gastric and duodenal ulcers are found in the oldest patients. Duodenal ulcers cause serious bleeding and more often require endoscopic hemostasis.

  10. Spontaneous bleeding or thrombosis in cirrhosis: Whatshould be feared the most?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The more modern and accurate concept of a rebalancedhemostatic status in cirrhosis is slowly replacing thetraditional belief of patients with cirrhosis being "autoanticoagulated",prone only to bleeding complications,and protected from thrombotic events. With greaterattention to clinical thrombotic events, their impact on thenatural history of cirrhosis, and with the emergence andincreased use of point-of-care and global assays, it is nowunderstood that cirrhosis results in profound hemostaticalterations that can lead to thrombosis as well as tobleeding complications. Although many clinical decisionsare still based on traditional coagulation parameters suchas prothrombin (PT), PT, and international normalizedratio, it is increasingly recognized that these tests donot adequately predict the risk of bleeding, nor theyshould guide pre-emptive interventions. Moreover,altered coagulation tests should not be considered as acontraindication to the use of anticoagulation, althoughthis therapeutic or prophylactic approach is not atpresent routinely undertaken. Gastroesophageal varicealbleeding continues to be one of the most feared anddeadly complications of cirrhosis and portal hypertension,but great progresses have been made in preventionand treatment strategies. Other bleeding sites that arefrequently part of end-stage liver disease are similar toclinical manifestations of thrombocytopenia, with gumbleeding and epistaxis being very common but fortunatelyonly rarely a cause of life-threatening bleeding. Onthe contrary, manifestations of coagulation factordeficiencies like soft tissue bleeding and hemartrosisare rare in patients with cirrhosis. As far as thromboticcomplications are concerned, portal vein thrombosis isthe most common event in patients with cirrhosis, butvenous thromboembolism is not infrequent, and resultsin important morbidity and mortality in patients withcirrhosis, especially those with decompensated disease.Future studies and the more widespread

  11. [Clinical pathway for bleeding peptic ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuki, Akira; Tatemichi, Masayuki; Nikaido, Mitsuhiro; Hosoe, Naoki; Funakoshi, Sinsuke; Fukui, Kazuto; Maeda, Norio; Shigematsu, Takeharu; Nishiya, Hiromi; Hayashi, Tatsuhiko; Nagata, Hiroshi; Hibi, Norifumi; Tsukada, Nobuhiro

    2006-03-01

    We devised and evaluated a clinical pathway (CP) protocol for patients with bleeding peptic ulcers (BPU). Patients without severe comorbidities, who had been diagnosed with BPU and who had undergone endoscopic treatment, were enrolled in our study. The CP adaptation rate for BPU patients was 78.8% (89/113). The variance rate was 13.5% (12/89). The median length of admission was 10.0 +/- 4.6 days (n = 78) before and 7.4 +/- 2.9 days (n = 77) after introducing CP. Our CP for BPU was safe and resulted in shorter hospital stays and, therefore, cost reductions. In elder patients, our CP was also successful, but the variance rate was higher than in younger patients.

  12. Abnormal uterine bleeding: a clinicohistopathological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupamasuresh Y

    2014-06-01

    Methods: In our prospective study of 359 Patients of the age between 46 and 73 years, clinical characteristics and the pattern of endometrial histopathology and their association in women, who present with abnormal uterine bleeding, are categorised into six groups. Results: In our study, a significant correlation of histopathology and BMI was observed with endometrial hyperplasia and malignancy in obese patient i.e. 37 out 96 and 13 out of 23 respectively. The incidence of malignancy has been increasing with the age being 1.6% in 46-50 years to 60% in 70-75 years. In our study 116 (32.3% had hypertension, 33 patients (9.2% had diabetes mellitus, 40 patients (11.1% had hypothyroidism. Conclusions: We found a maximum incidence of AUB in multiparous women. Clinicohistopathological analysis of AUB revealed endometrial hyperplasia in majority of patients. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(3.000: 656-661

  13. Thrombosis and bleeding disorders outside Western countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, P M

    2007-07-01

    The rapidly developing countries of Asia are witnessing substantial progress in the awareness of bleeding and thrombotic disorders as important health care problems. It has been thought for a long time that venous thromboembolism is very rare in Asia. Recent large studies that involved the majority of Asian countries demonstrated that this is not true, so that the practice of not using thromboprophylaxis in high-risk medical and surgical cases should be abandoned. The management of hemophilia and allied coagulation disorders has also dramatically improved in several Asian countries, due to the increased availability of blood products for replacement therapy coupled with the leadership role exerted by a few charismatic physicians, particularly in India and Thailand. As to the future, countries such as China and India have the capacity and expertise in biotechnology to consider the production of recombinant factors and gene transfer as the best strategies to tackle the management of persons with hemophilia in these densely populated and huge countries.

  14. Do statins protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Aalykke, Claus;

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Recently, an apparent protective effect of statins against upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) was postulated in a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. We aimed to evaluate the effect of statin use on acute nonvariceal UGB alone or in combinations with low-dose aspirin and other...... of statins with UGB were 0.94 (0.78-1.12) for current use, 1.40 (0.89-2.20) for recent use and 1.42 (0.96-2.10) for past use. The lack of effect was consistent across most patient subgroups, different cumulative or current statin doses and different statin substances. In explorative analyses, a borderline...... significant protective effect was observed for concurrent users of low-dose aspirin [OR 0.43 (0.18-1.05)]. CONCLUSION: Statins do not prevent UGB, except possibly in users of low-dose aspirin....

  15. A global quantitative survey of hemostatic assessment in postpartum hemorrhage and experience with associated bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Andra H; Cooper, David L; Paidas, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Coagulopathy may be a serious complicating or contributing factor to postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), and should be promptly recognized to ensure proper bleeding management. This study aims to evaluate the approaches of obstetrician-gynecologists worldwide towards assessing massive PPH caused by underlying bleeding disorders. A quantitative survey was completed by 302 obstetrician-gynecologists from 6 countries (the UK, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Japan). The survey included questions on the use of hematologic laboratory studies, interpretation of results, laboratory's role in coagulation assessments, and experience with bleeding disorders. Overall, the most common definitions of "massive" PPH were >2,000 mL (39%) and >1,500 mL (34%) blood loss. The most common criteria for rechecking a "stat" complete blood count and for performing coagulation studies were a drop in blood pressure (73%) and ongoing visible bleeding (78%), respectively. Laboratory coagulation (prothrombin time/activated partial thromboplastin time [PT/aPTT]) and factor VIII/IX assays were performed on-site more often than were mixing studies (laboratory coagulation studies, 93%; factor VIII/IX assays, 63%; mixing studies, 22%). Most commonly consulted sources of additional information were colleagues within one's own specialty (68%) and other specialists (67%). Most respondents had consulted with a hematologist (78%; least, Germany [56%]; greatest, UK [98%]). The most common reason for not consulting was hematologist unavailability (44%). The most commonly reported thresholds for concern with PT and aPTT were 13 to 20 seconds (36%) and 30 to 45 seconds (50%), respectively. Most respondents reported having discovered an underlying bleeding disorder (58%; least, Japan [35%]; greatest, Spain [74%]). Global survey results highlight similarities and differences between countries in how PPH is assessed and varying levels of obstetrician-gynecologist experience with identification of underlying

  16. Tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Cathy; Klingenberg, Sarah Louise; Langholz, Ebbe; Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2014-11-21

    Background Tranexamic acid reduces haemorrhage through its antifibrinolytic effects. In a previous version of the present review, we found that tranexamic acid may reduce mortality. This review includes updated searches and new trials.Objectives To assess the effects of tranexamic acid versus no intervention, placebo or other antiulcer drugs for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.Search methods We updated the review by performing electronic database searches (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL),MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index) and manual searches in July 2014.Selection criteriaRandomised controlled trials, irrespective of language or publication status.Data collection and analysis We used the standard methodological procedures of the The Cochrane Collaboration. All-cause mortality, bleeding and adverse events were the primary outcome measures. We performed fixed-effect and random-effects model meta-analyses and presented results as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and used I² as a measure of between-trial heterogeneity. We analysed tranexamic acid versus placebo or no intervention and tranexamic acid versus antiulcer drugs separately. To analyse sources of heterogeneity and robustness of the overall results, we performed subgroup, sensitivity and sequential analyses.Main results We included eight randomised controlled trials on tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Additionally, we identified one large ongoing pragmatic randomised controlled trial from which data are not yet available. Control groups were randomly assigned to placebo (seven trials) or no intervention (one trial). Two trials also included a control group randomly assigned to antiulcer drugs(lansoprazole or cimetidine). The included studies were published from 1973 to 2011. The number of participants randomly assigned ranged from 47 to 216 (median 204). All trials reported mortality. In total, 42 of 851 participants randomly assigned to

  17. SATNET Development and Operation. Pluribus Satellite IMP Development, Remote Site Maintenance. Internet Development. Mobile Access Terminal Network, TCP for the HP3000, TCP-TAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    7.2.3.4 Network Buffer Resources List Structures .... 64 8 TCP-TAC ............ . . . ............ 66 Report No. 4474 Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc. 1...circuit appeared to be due to a troublesome 9600 baud Codex modem at the London TIP. When malfunctioning, the modem hangs up in such a way that it performs...the modem momentarily in loopback mode. Site personnel have since replaced the Codex modem on the circuit in hopes of eliminating the problem. The high

  18. CERN access cards

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    Holders of CERN access cards are reminded that the card is an official document. It is important to carry it with you at all times when you are on the site. This applies also to those on standby duty who are called out for emergency interventions. As announced in Weekly Bulletin 13/2006, any loss or theft of access cards must be declared to the competent external authorities.

  19. PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY and LIGHT INTENSITY site samples data collected in the South Pacific Ocean on the NATHANIEL B. PALMER cruise NBP0103 as part of the Southern Ocean GLOBEC project from 2001-04-29 to 2001-06-02 (NODC Accession 0112637)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112637 includes discrete sample, site samples, biological and physical data collected aboard the NATHANIEL B. PALMER during cruise NBP0103 in the...

  20. PARTICULATE ORGANIC CARBON and PARTICULATE ORGANIC NITROGEN profile, discrete sample and site samples data collected in the South Atlantic Ocean and South Pacific Ocean on the NATHANIEL B. PALMER cruises NBP0103, NBP0104 and others as part of the Southern Ocean GLOBEC project from 2001-04-29 to 2002-09-12 (NODC Accession 0112164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112164 includes profile, discrete sample, site samples and chemical data collected aboard the NATHANIEL B. PALMER during cruises NBP0103, NBP0104,...

  1. CHLOROPHYLL A, growth rate and graze rate (or grazing rate) site samples data collected in the Gulf of Alaska on the ALPHA HELIX cruises HX242, HX244 and others as part of the NEP project from 2001-04-18 to 2003-08-10 (NODC Accession 0114241)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0114241 includes site samples and biological data collected aboard the ALPHA HELIX during cruises HX242, HX244, HX247, HX271 and HX275 in the Gulf of...

  2. CORE - BULK DENSITY, Snow thickness, Snow temperature, Snow type and other site samples data collected in the South Pacific Ocean on the LAURENCE M. GOULD cruises LMG0106 and LMG0205 as part of the Southern Ocean GLOBEC project from 2001-07-28 to 2002-09-08 (NODC Accession 0112865)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112865 includes site samples, meteorological and physical data collected aboard the LAURENCE M. GOULD during cruises LMG0106 and LMG0205 in the South...

  3. Snow thickness, Freeboard, cloud amount/frequency, Albedo and other site samples data collected in the South Pacific Ocean on the LAURENCE M. GOULD cruises LMG0106 and LMG0205 as part of the Southern Ocean GLOBEC project from 2001-08-07 to 2002-09-08 (NODC Accession 0112864)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112864 includes site samples, meteorological and physical data collected aboard the LAURENCE M. GOULD during cruises LMG0106 and LMG0205 in the South...

  4. PIGMENTS, growth rate and Condition factor site samples data collected in the South Atlantic Ocean and South Pacific Ocean on the LAURENCE M. GOULD cruises LMG0106 and LMG0205 as part of the Southern Ocean GLOBEC project from 2001-07-28 to 2002-09-09 (NODC Accession 0112636)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112636 includes site samples and biological data collected aboard the LAURENCE M. GOULD during cruises LMG0106 and LMG0205 in the South Atlantic...

  5. SPECIES IDENTIFICATION - ORGANISM LENGTH, growth rate and SPECIES IDENTIFICATION - LIFE STAGE site samples data collected in the South Atlantic Ocean and South Pacific Ocean on the LAURENCE M. GOULD cruises LMG0106 and LMG0205 as part of the Southern Ocean GLOBEC project from 2001-07-28 to 2002-09-05 (NODC Accession 0112634)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112634 includes site samples and biological data collected aboard the LAURENCE M. GOULD during cruises LMG0106 and LMG0205 in the South Atlantic...

  6. PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY and PHOTOSYNTHETIC ACTIVE RADIATION (PAR) site samples data collected in the South Atlantic Ocean and South Pacific Ocean on the NATHANIEL B. PALMER cruises NBP0103, NBP0104 and others as part of the Southern Ocean GLOBEC project from 2001-04-29 to 2002-09-12 (NODC Accession 0112168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112168 includes discrete sample, site samples, biological and physical data collected aboard the NATHANIEL B. PALMER during cruises NBP0103, NBP0104,...

  7. PIGMENTS, SPECIES IDENTIFICATION - LIFE STAGE and SPECIES IDENTIFICATION - WET WEIGHT site samples data collected in the South Pacific Ocean on the LAURENCE M. GOULD cruises LMG0106 and LMG0205 as part of the Southern Ocean GLOBEC project from 2001-08-06 to 2002-09-09 (NODC Accession 0112635)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112635 includes site samples and biological data collected aboard the LAURENCE M. GOULD during cruises LMG0106 and LMG0205 in the South Pacific Ocean...

  8. SPECIES IDENTIFICATION - DRY WEIGHT, SPECIES IDENTIFICATION - ORGANISM LENGTH, Condition factor, Carbon content of specimen and Nitrogen content of specimen site samples data collected in the South Atlantic Ocean and South Pacific Ocean on the LAURENCE M. GOULD cruises LMG0106 and LMG0205 as part of the Southern Ocean GLOBEC project from 2001-07-29 to 2002-09-09 (NODC Accession 0112563)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112563 includes site samples and biological data collected aboard the LAURENCE M. GOULD during cruises LMG0106 and LMG0205 in the South Atlantic...

  9. Coffee grounds emesis: not just an upper GI bleed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Abdallah, Jad Z; Murthy, Uma K; Mehta, Nilish; Prasad, Heramba N; Kaul, Vivek

    2012-07-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding manifests as hematemesis, melena, or hematochezia. Initial management is identical, irrespective of nasogastric (NG) aspirate results. Current practice includes early upper endoscopy. Significantly fewer high-risk bleeding lesions are found on endoscopy in patients with coffee grounds vs. bloody NG aspirates. We present a case series to illustrate that patients with coffee grounds emesis (CGE) often have other unsuspected illnesses that may be overlooked due to preoccupation with the GI bleed. A retrospective chart review of a series of 6 patients presenting with CGE and admitted for upper GI bleeding was performed. All 6 patients were hemodynamically stable at admission. NG lavage showed coffee grounds that cleared easily. None of the patients required blood transfusions during their hospital stay. Endoscopy in 3 of 6 patients failed to find any significant UGI lesions or stigmata of recent bleed. Although patients were admitted for UGI bleeding, the more significant associated diagnoses included acute myocardial infarction, urosepsis, small bowel obstruction, bilateral pulmonary emboli, and acute renal failure. Hemodynamically stable patients presenting with coffee grounds NG aspirate and no fall in hemoglobin/hematocrit should be evaluated for other non-GI bleeding-related conditions even as the GI bleed is being managed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hemospray treatment is effective for lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holster, I.L.; Brullet, E.; Kuipers, E.J.; Campo, R.; Fernandez-Atutxa, A.; Tjwa, E.T.

    2014-01-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is diverse in origin and can be substantial, requiring urgent hemostasis. Hemospray is a promising novel hemostatic agent for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). It has been claimed in a small series that the use of Hemospray is also feasible in LGIB.

  11. The Acute Management of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham AL Dhahab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The mortality from nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is still around 5%, despite the increased use of proton-pump inhibitors and the advancement of endoscopic therapeutic modalities. Aim. To review the state-of-the-art management of acute non variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the presentation to the emergency department, risk stratification, endoscopic hemostasis, and postendoscopic consolidation management to reduce the risk of recurrent bleeding from peptic ulcers. Methods. A PubMed search was performed using the following key words acute management, non variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and bleeding peptic ulcers. Results. Risk stratifying patients with acute non variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding allows the categorization into low risk versus high risk of rebleeding, subsequently safely discharging low risk patients early from the emergency department, while achieving adequate hemostasis in high-risk lesions followed by continuous proton-pump inhibitors for 72 hours. Dual endoscopic therapy still remains the recommended choice in controlling bleeding from peptic ulcers despite the emergence of new endoscopic modalities such as the hemostatic powder. Conclusion. The management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding involves adequate resuscitation, preendoscopic risk assessment, endoscopic hemostasis, and post endoscopic pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment.

  12. Jejunal diverticulosis as the obscure cause of overt gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyin, L Y; Zainun, A R; Tee, H P

    2011-08-01

    Jejunal diverticulosis is a rare gastrointestinal condition manifested as benign outpouching from the jejunal wall. It is usually asymptomatic, but may present as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. This condition is often found incidentally in the imaging work-up of patients with other gastrointestinal conditions. We present a case of jejunal diverticulosis in a 65-year-old gentleman with obscure overt gastrointestinal bleed.

  13. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system. The engine must supply bleed air without adverse effect on the engine, excluding reduced thrust or...

  14. Recombinant activated factor VII for uncontrolled bleeding postcardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Makram Habib

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: In this analysis, rFVIIa succefully reduced the chest tube bleeding and blood products transfused during severe post cardiac surgical bleeding. However, safety of rFVIIa remains unclear. Prospective controlled trials are still needed to confirm the role of rFVIIa.

  15. First-trimester vaginal bleeding and complications later in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Dideriksen, Katrine Lehrmann; Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the association of first-trimester bleeding without miscarriage and complications later in the first pregnancy as well as in the next pregnancy.......To evaluate the association of first-trimester bleeding without miscarriage and complications later in the first pregnancy as well as in the next pregnancy....

  16. The challenge of bleeding in antiphospholipid antibody-positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzola, Giulia; Zuily, Stéphane; Erkan, Doruk

    2015-02-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody-positive patients can develop bleeding due to capillaritis, microthrombosis, antiprothrombin antibodies, thrombocytopenia, and/or excessive antithrombotic therapy. Clinical characteristics of patients, e.g., renal impairment, elderly, or concomitant medications, are closely related to the risk of bleeding. The management of bleeding in antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-positive patients is challenging due to the baseline increased risk of thrombosis. If anticoagulation is stopped, it should be restarted as soon as possible once the acute bleeding is controlled; the continuation of anticoagulation despite active bleeding may be required in selected cases. High-dose corticosteroid is the mainstay treatment for diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome, and severe thrombocytopenia; immunosuppressive drugs are also required to improve the long-term outcomes. Hydrocortisone is critical in adrenal hemorrhage patients due to concomitant adrenal insufficiency; despite bleeding, anticoagulation should be maintained as much as possible. Plasma exchange should be considered in catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome patients with concurrent bleeding. This article will review the causes of bleeding in aPL-positive patients as well as the management strategies.

  17. Bleeding complications during anticoagulant treatment in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan

    Patients with cancer have an increased risk of bleeding complications, of which some are fatal. This risk is influenced by chemotherapy, cancer type and stage, thrombocytopenia, renal function, and previous bleeding. Since many cancer patients receive anticoagulant treatment for prophylaxis or

  18. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Cirrhotic Patients with Portal Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biecker, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding related to portal hypertension is a serious complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. Most patients bleed from esophageal or gastric varices, but bleeding from ectopic varices or portal hypertensive gastropathy is also possible. The management of acute bleeding has changed over the last years. Patients are managed with a combination of endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. The endoscopic treatment of choice for esophageal variceal bleeding is variceal band ligation. Bleeding from gastric varices is treated by injection with cyanoacrylate. Treatment with vasoactive drugs as well as antibiotic treatment is started before or at the time point of endoscopy. The first-line treatment for primary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding is nonselective beta blockers. Pharmacologic therapy is recommended for most patients; band ligation is an alternative in patients with contraindications for or intolerability of beta blockers. Treatment options for secondary prophylaxis include variceal band ligation, beta blockers, a combination of nitrates and beta blockers, and combination of band ligation and pharmacologic treatment. A clear superiority of one treatment over the other has not been shown. Bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy or ectopic varices is less common. Treatment options include beta blocker therapy, injection therapy, and interventional radiology. PMID:27335828

  19. Impact of inherited bleeding disorders on pregnancy and postpartum hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Shirin; Moghaddam-Banaem, Lida; Ekhtesari, Fatemeh; Ala, Fereydoun A

    2012-10-01

    Inherited bleeding disorders are caused by various genetic defects in the proteins involved in haemostasis. Female patients or carriers are faced with the risk of haemorrhage throughout life. During pregnancy and postpartum, this complication affects the health of either the mother or the baby, or both. This retrospective cohort study was designed to assess the occurrence of obstetric bleeding in the three trimesters of pregnancy, along with primary and secondary postpartum haemorrhage among 100 women with inherited bleeding disorders. A questionnaire was designed in order to collect historical data. The patients were evaluated in three groups: haemophilia carriers, von Willebrand disease (VWD) and rare bleeding disorders. In comparison with normal women, significantly severe bleeding was observed among patients in all of the five stages. VWD patients showed a higher frequency of bleeding in first trimester but the rate of miscarriage was lower. Haemophilia carriers were threatened with bleeding complications during the prenatal period, but they also had the highest frequency of postpartum haemorrhage. Based on our results, vaginal bleeding is a serious threat in all three patient groups, especially during the first trimester of pregnancy and in the postpartum period.

  20. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF POSTMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Arora

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: A woman is considered menopausal after 12 months of amenorrhea. The most feared symptom during menopause is postmenopausal bleeding which unless proved otherwise indicates genital malignancy. Objectives: To study Socio-demographic factors related to postmenopausal bleeding and to find time lapse between bleeding and reporting of these cases. Material and Methods: This cross sectional was done in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Pt. J. N. M. Medical College & DR. B. R. Ambedkar Memorial, Hospital, Raipur (C. G. The participants were 146 women who came with the complaint of postmenopausal bleeding. A detailed, preceded, pre-tested, structured, close ended questionnaire was used to collect the data. By interviewing these women, information was collected about different demographic factors like age, socio-economic status, parity etc. The collected data was put in the master chart and analyzed. Results: The proportion of postmenopausal bleeding cases was 3.5% .Maximum cases(50% with postmenopausal bleeding were found in the age group of 45-54yrs . 60 % of patients were from rural areas and 62% were illiterate. 65% of the patients were grand multipara (Parity4. Most of the patients belonged to lower socioeconomic strata. Almost half (48% of patients presented after, more than 6 months since the first episode of bleeding . Conclusions: The proportion of postmenopausal bleeding is high, requiring immediate investigation. Lack of awareness led to very late presentation of most of the patients, so education at community level is required to reduce this time lapse for earlier diagnosis and management

  1. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Kjeldsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in a number of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and may lead to a high transfusion need. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and severity of gastrointestinal bleeding in a geographically well defined HHT population....

  2. Opportunities and challenges in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies for people with Severe Mental Illness (IAPT-SMI): evaluating the first operational year of the South London and Maudsley (SLaM) demonstration site for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Suzanne; Garety, Philippa; Peters, Emmanuelle; Fornells-Ambrojo, Miriam; Onwumere, Juliana; Harris, Victoria; Brabban, Alison; Johns, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Despite its demonstrated clinical and economic effectiveness, access to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for psychosis (CBTp) in routine practice remains low. The UK National Health Service (NHS England) Improving Access to Psychological Therapies for people with Severe Mental Illness (IAPT-SMI) initiative aims to address this problem. We report 14-month outcomes for our psychosis demonstration site. Primary and secondary care and self-referrals were screened to check the suitability of the service for the person. Psychotic symptoms, distress, service use, functioning and satisfaction were measured before and after therapy, by trained assessors. User-defined wellbeing and goal-attainment were rated sessionally. Access to CBTp increased almost threefold (2011/12 accepted referrals/year n = 106; 2012/13, n = 300). The IAPT-SMI assessment protocol proved feasible and acceptable to service users, with paired primary outcomes for 97% of closed cases. Therapy completion (≥5 sessions) was high (83%) irrespective of ethnicity, age and gender. Preliminary pre-post outcomes showed clinical improvement and reduced service use, with medium/high effect sizes. User-rated satisfaction was high. We conclude that individual psychological interventions for people with psychosis can be successfully delivered in routine services using an IAPT approach. High completion rates for paired outcomes demonstrate good user experience, clinical improvement, and potential future cost savings.

  3. Web Accessibility and Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Simon; Yesilada, Yeliz

    Access to, and movement around, complex online environments, of which the World Wide Web (Web) is the most popular example, has long been considered an important and major issue in the Web design and usability field. The commonly used slang phrase ‘surfing the Web’ implies rapid and free access, pointing to its importance among designers and users alike. It has also been long established that this potentially complex and difficult access is further complicated, and becomes neither rapid nor free, if the user is disabled. There are millions of people who have disabilities that affect their use of the Web. Web accessibility aims to help these people to perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with, as well as contribute to, the Web, and thereby the society in general. This accessibility is, in part, facilitated by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) currently moving from version one to two. These guidelines are intended to encourage designers to make sure their sites conform to specifications, and in that conformance enable the assistive technologies of disabled users to better interact with the page content. In this way, it was hoped that accessibility could be supported. While this is in part true, guidelines do not solve all problems and the new WCAG version two guidelines are surrounded by controversy and intrigue. This chapter aims to establish the published literature related to Web accessibility and Web accessibility guidelines, and discuss limitations of the current guidelines and future directions.

  4. Open access

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Open access week Van 19 tot en met 25 oktober 2015 vond wereldwijd de Open Access Week plaats. Tijdens deze week werden er over de hele wereld evenementen georganiseerd waar open access een rol speelt. Ook in Nederland zijn er diverse symposia, workshops en debatten georganiseerd zoals het debat in

  5. The Mechanisms of Abnormal Bleeding in Patients with Anovulatory Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu LUO; Feng-chuan ZHU; Yao-ying ZENG

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanisms of abnormal bleeding in patients with anovulatory dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB) and to analyze the correlation between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and microvessel density in the endometrium Materials & Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to study the expression of VEGF protein in the proliferative and hyperplastic endometrium. CD34 ,a marker of microvessel, was selected to measure microvessel density (MVD) in the endometrium.Fifteen women who were found to have no condition with normal menstrual cycles were set as control group.Results VEGF immunoreactivity in glandular epithelia cells was significantly lower in the hyperplastic endometrium than that of controls(P < 0. 05). There was no significant difference in VEGF protein level between proliferative DUB endometrium and that of controls. A positive correlation was found between glandular VEGF and MVD in the endometrium(r=0. 666, P<0.05). Conclusion The anovulatory DUB is associated with down-regulation of VEGF in the endometrium, and decreased secretion of VEGF will result in the disruption of angiogenesis, as a clinical manifestation of irregular bleeding.

  6. Acoustic resonance phenomena in air bleed channels in aviation engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksentsev, A. A.; Sazhenkov, A. N.; Sukhinin, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The existence of axial-radial acoustic resonance oscillations of the basic air flow in bleed channels of aviation engines is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. Numerical and analytical methods are used to determine the frequency of acoustic resonance oscillations for the lowest modes of open and closed bleed channels of the PS-90A engine. Experimental investigations reveal new acoustic resonance phenomena arising in the air flow in bleed channel cavities in the core duct of this engine owing to instability of the basic air flow. The results of numerical, analytical, and experimental studies of the resonance frequencies reached in the flow in bleed channel cavities in the core duct of the PS-90A engine are found to be in reasonable agreement. As a result, various types of resonance oscillations in bleed channels can be accurately described.

  7. Diagnosis and management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owensby, Susan; Taylor, Kellee; Wilkins, Thad

    2015-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommon but potentially serious, life-threatening condition in children. Rapid assessment, stabilization, and resuscitation should precede all diagnostic modalities in unstable children. The diagnostic approach includes history, examination, laboratory evaluation, endoscopic procedures, and imaging studies. The clinician needs to determine carefully whether any blood or possible blood reported by a child or adult represents true upper gastrointestinal bleeding because most children with true upper gastrointestinal bleeding require admission to a pediatric intensive care unit. After the diagnosis is established, the physician should start a proton pump inhibitor or histamine 2 receptor antagonist in children with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Consideration should also be given to the initiation of vasoactive drugs in all children in whom variceal bleeding is suspected. An endoscopy should be performed once the child is hemodynamically stable. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  8. A sensitive venous bleeding model in haemophilia A mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastoft, Anne Engedahl; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Ezban, M.

    2012-01-01

    Haemostatic effect of compounds for treating haemophilia can be evaluated in various bleeding models in haemophilic mice. However, the doses of factor VIII (FVIII) for normalizing bleeding used in some of these models are reported to be relatively high. The aim of this study was to establish...... a sensitive venous bleeding model in FVIII knock out (F8-KO) mice, with the ability to detect effect on bleeding at low plasma FVIII concentrations. We studied the effect of two recombinant FVIII products, N8 and Advate(®), after injury to the saphenous vein. We found that F8-KO mice treated with increasing...... doses of either N8 or Advate(®) showed a dose-dependent increase in the number of clot formations and a reduction in both average and maximum bleeding time, as well as in average blood loss. For both compounds, significant effect was found at doses as low as 5 IU kg(-1) when compared with vehicle...

  9. New insights to occult gastrointestinal bleeding: From pathophysiology to therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio; Damián; Sánchez-Capilla; Paloma; De; La; Torre-Rubio; Eduardo; Redondo-Cerezo

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is still a clinical challenge for gastroenterologists. The recent development of novel technologies for the diagnosis and treatment of different bleeding causes has allowed a better management of patients, but it also determines the need of a deeper comprehension of pathophysiology and the analysis of local expertise in order to develop a rational management algorithm. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding can be divided in occult, when a positive occult blood fecal test is the main manifestation, and overt, when external sings of bleeding are visible. In this paper we are going to focus on overt gastrointestinal bleeding, describing the physiopathology of the most usual causes, analyzing the diagnostic procedures available, from the most classical to the novel ones, and establishing a standard algorithm which can be adapted depending on the local expertise or availability. Finally, we will review the main therapeutic options for this complex and not so uncommon clinical problem.

  10. Alternative Treatment for Bleeding Peristomal Varices: Percutaneous Parastomal Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabon-Ramos, Waleska M., E-mail: waly.pr@duke.edu [Duke University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Niemeyer, Matthew M. [Washington University Medical Center, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States); Dasika, Narasimham L., E-mail: narasimh@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To describe how peristomal varices can be successfully embolized via a percutaneous parastomal approach. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent this procedure between December 1, 2000, and May 31, 2008, were retrospectively reviewed. Procedural details were recorded. Median fluoroscopy time and bleeding-free interval were calculated. Results: Seven patients underwent eight parastomal embolizations. The technical success rate was 88 % (one failure). All embolizations were performed with coils combined with a sclerosant, another embolizing agent, or both. Of the seven successful parastomal embolizations, there were three cases of recurrent bleeding; the median time to rebleeding was 45 days (range 26-313 days). The remaining four patients did not develop recurrent bleeding during the follow-up period; their median bleeding-free interval was 131 days (range 40-659 days). Conclusion: This case review demonstrated that percutaneous parastomal embolization is a feasible technique to treat bleeding peristomal varices.

  11. Emergency and out of hours care of patients with inherited bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, H; Lacey, R; Keaney, J; Kay-Jones, C; Martlew, V; Thachil, J

    2012-05-01

    Recently, the United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Doctors Organisation published recommendations for the standard of care for assessment and treatment of patients with bleeding disorders in the emergency department (A&E). An audit was undertaken to compare the level of care to the acceptable standards in a tertiary hospital A&E, attached to a haemophilia comprehensive care centre. A&E attendances were found by cross referencing all patients with known bleeding disorders against the EDMS attendance system. Visits from the past 3 years were identified to produce sufficient data and electronic notes from these visits were then accessed, and marked against the proforma. Data were available from 45 of a total of 54 patients, who had a total of 75 emergency visits documented. In all aspects of care, the standards were not adequately met including the average length of time between booking and clinical assessment, early initiation of specific haemostatic treatment, seeking haematology advice and arrangement of follow-up. Also no specialist clotting investigations were done with only 9/11 patients admitted having their haematological diagnosis recorded. In addition, only very few patients had the severity of bleeding disorder noted and less than half their first line treatment documented. There were significant differences in the standard of care for haemophilia patients provided by the A&E department when compared with acceptable standards. Measures have been put in place and policies have been drafted to improve this situation and provide the best possible care to persons with haemophilia.

  12. [Diverticular bleeding. Diagnostics, non-surgical treatment, indications for surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labenz, J

    2014-04-01

    Diverticular bleeding is the most common cause of acute severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnostic and therapeutic approaches have not been standardized. Development of an evidence-based management algorithm. A systematic search of the literature (PubMed 1998-2013) was carried out and a review with consideration of current guidelines is given. The lifetime risk of clinically relevant bleeding is estimated to be 5 % in persons with colonic diverticula. Patients with clinically suspected diverticular hemorrhage should be admitted to hospital. Diverticular bleeding will cease spontaneously in around 70-90 % of the cases. In patients with severe lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, defined as instability of the circulation, persistent bleeding after 24 h, drop of the hemoglobin level to ≥ 2 g/dl or the necessity for transfusion, endoscopy of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract within the first 12-24 h is recommended. In patients with active diverticular bleeding or signs of recent hemorrhage (e.g. visible vessel or adherent clot) endoscopic therapy is strongly recommended because it significantly decreases the rate of early and late rebleeding. Angiography with superselective embolization is a therapeutic option in patients where endoscopy failed. Surgery should be considered in patients with ongoing bleeding and failure of interventional treatment and in patients who suffered from recurrent severe diverticular bleeding. Diverticulosis coli remains the most common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Colonoscopy is recommended as first-line diagnostic and therapeutic approach. In the vast majority of patients diverticular hemorrhage can be readily managed either conventionally or by interventional therapy.

  13. Genotypes of Helicobacter pylori in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chin-Lin Perng; Hwai-Jeng Lin; Wen-Ching Lo; Guan-Ying Tseng; I-Chen Sun; Yueh-Hsing Ou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Helicobacter pyloricauses chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer,gastric cancer and MALT-lymphoma. Different genotypes of Helicobacter pylori are confirmed from diverse geographic areas. Its association with bleeding peptic ulcer remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the Helicobacter pylori vac4 alleles, cagA and iceA in patients with bleeding peptic ulcer.METHODS: We enrolled patients with bleeding, nonbleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis. Biopsy specimens were obtained from the antrum of the stomach for rapid urease test, bacterial culture and PCR assay. DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction were used to detect the presence or absence of cagA and to assess the polymorphism of vac4 and iceA.RESULTS: A total of 168 patients (60.4%) (25 patients with chronic gastritis, 26 patients with bleeding gastric ulcer,51 patients with non-bleeding gastric ulcer, 26 patients with bleeding duodenal ulcer, and 40 patients with non-bleeding duodenal ulcer) were found to have positive PCR results between January 2001 and December 2002. Concerning genotypes, we found cagA (139/278, 50%), vacA s1a (127/278, 45.7%), and iceA1 (125/278, 45%) predominated in all studied patients. In patients with bleeding peptic ulcers,vac4 s1a and m1T were fewer than those in patients with non-bleeding peptic ulcers (37/106 vs69/135, P=0.017, and 4/106 vs21/135, P=0.002).CONCLUSION: In patients with peptic ulcers, Hpylori vacA s1a and m1T prevent bleeding complication.

  14. Prospective comparison of collagen plug (angio-seal{sup TM}) and suture-mediated (the closer S{sup TM}) closure devices at femoral access sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yulri; Roh, Hong Gee; Choo, Sung Wook; Lee, Sung Hoon; Shin, Sung Wook; Do, Young Soo; Byun, Hong Sik; Park, Kwang Bo; Jeon, Pyoung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    Rapid and effective hemostasis at femoral puncture sites minimizes both the hospital stay and patient discomfort. Therefore, a variety of arterial closure devices have been developed to facilitate the closure of femoral arteriotomy. The objective of this prospective study was to compare the efficacy of two different closure devices; a collagen plug device (Angio-Seal) and a suture-mediated closure device (the Closer S). From March 28, 2003 to August 31, 2004, we conducted a prospective study in which 1,676 cases of 1,180 patients were treated with two different types of closure device. Angio-Seal was used in 961 cases and the Closer S in 715 cases. The efficacy of the closure devices was assessed, as well as complications occurring at the puncture sites. Successful immediate hemostasis was achieved in 95.2% of the cases treated with Angio-Seal, and in 89.5% of the cases treated with the Closer S ({rho} < 0.05). The rates of minor and major complications occurring between the two groups were not significantly different. In the Closer S group, we observed four major complications (0.6%), that consisted of one massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage (surgically explored) and three pseudoaneurysms. In the Angio-Seal group, we observed three major complications (0.3%) that consisted of one femoral artery occlusion, one case of infection treated with intravenous antibiotics and one pseudoaneurysm. The use of Angio-Seal was found to be more effective than that of the Closer S with regard to the immediate hemostasis of the femoral puncture sites. However, we detected no significant differences in the rate at which complications occurred.

  15. The use of platelet reactivity testing in patients on antiplatelet therapy for prediction of bleeding events after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leunissen, Tesse C; Janssen, Paul W A; Ten Berg, Jurriën M; Moll, Frans L; Korporaal, Suzanne J A; de Borst, Gert Jan; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Urbanus, Rolf T

    2016-02-01

    Many patients are treated with platelet inhibitors such as aspirin and clopidogrel for prevention of thrombotic cardiovascular events. However, the inhibitory effect of antiplatelet therapy is variable between patients; in some, the platelets are hardly inhibited, while in others, the platelets are excessively inhibited. The newer and more potent platelet inhibitors, prasugrel and ticagrelor, often lead to low platelet reactivity, which potentially leads to bleeding events. Preoperative measurement of platelet reactivity in patients receiving platelet inhibitors who undergo cardiac surgery, could be useful to identify those with low platelet reactivity and thus have an increased risk of bleeding during or after surgery. In this review, we discuss the most commonly used platelet inhibitors and platelet function tests. Furthermore, we will provide an overview of the evidence for the prediction of post-operative bleeding at the operation site with preoperative platelet reactivity testing in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bleeding spectrum in children with moderate or severe von Willebrand disease : Relevance of pediatric-specific bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Yvonne V.; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Boender, Johan; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien P.; van der Bom, Johanna G.; de Meris, Joke; Smiers, Frans J.; Granzen, Bernd; Brons, Paul; Tamminga, Rienk Y J; Cnossen, Marjon H.; Leebeek, Frank W G

    2015-01-01

    The bleeding phenotype of children with von Willebrand disease (VWD) needs to be characterized in detail to facilitate diagnosis during childhood and aid in the planning and assessment of treatment strategies. The objective was to evaluate the occurrence, type, and severity of bleeding in a large

  17. Bleeding spectrum in children with moderate or severe von Willebrand disease: Relevance of pediatric-specific bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Yvonne V.; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Boender, Johan; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien P.; van der Bom, Johanna G.; de Meris, Joke; Smiers, Frans J.; Granzen, Bernd; Brons, Paul; Tamminga, Rienk Y J; Cnossen, Marjon H.; Leebeek, Frank W G

    2015-01-01

    The bleeding phenotype of children with von Willebrand disease (VWD) needs to be characterized in detail to facilitate diagnosis during childhood and aid in the planning and assessment of treatment strategies. The objective was to evaluate the occurrence, type, and severity of bleeding in a large co

  18. Bleeding spectrum in children with moderate or severe von Willebrand disease : Relevance of pediatric-specific bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Yvonne V.; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Boender, Johan; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien P.; van der Bom, Johanna G.; de Meris, Joke; Smiers, Frans J.; Granzen, Bernd; Brons, Paul; Tamminga, Rienk Y J; Cnossen, Marjon H.; Leebeek, Frank W G

    2015-01-01

    The bleeding phenotype of children with von Willebrand disease (VWD) needs to be characterized in detail to facilitate diagnosis during childhood and aid in the planning and assessment of treatment strategies. The objective was to evaluate the occurrence, type, and severity of bleeding in a large co

  19. The prevalence of underlying bleeding disorders in patients with heavy menstrual bleeding with and without gynecologic abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, H. Marieke; Mulder, Andre; Bogchelman, Dick H.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Meijer, Karina

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of underlying bleeding disorders in women with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) with and without gynecologic abnormalities. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a single-center prospective cohort study of 112 consecutive patients who were referre

  20. Arterial hemorrhage from cesarean scar: a rare cause of recurring massive uterine bleeding and successful surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Feng; Hu, Min

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding and other gynecologic complications associated with a previous cesarean section scar are only recently being identified and described. Herein we report a rare case of a woman with recurring massive uterine bleeding after 2 cesarean sections. Curettage and hormone therapy were unsuccessfully used in an attempt to control the bleeding. After she was transferred to our hospital, she had another episode of vaginal bleeding that was successfully managed with oxytocin and hemostatic. Diagnostic hysteroscopy performed under anesthesia revealed an abnormal transected artery in the cesarean section scar with a thrombus visible. In the treatment at the beginning of laparoscopic management, we adopted temporary bilateral uterine artery occlusion with titanium clips to prevent massive hemorrhage. Secondly, with the aid of hysteroscopy, the bleeding site was opened, and then the cesarean scar was wedge resected and stitched interruptedly with 1-0 absorbable sutures. The postoperative recovery was uneventful. It would seem that the worldwide use of cesarean section delivery may contribute to the risk of gynecologic disturbances including some unrecognized and complex conditions as seen in this case.

  1. A rare cause of bleeding after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy : pseudo-aneurysm of the gastro-omental artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mege, D; Louis, G; Berthet, B

    2013-01-01

    A serious complication of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is bleeding that is primarily located along the staples lines. Bleeding may be due to several causes, including hematomas, trocar sites, or visceral pseudo-aneurysms. We reported here a case of bleeding related to a pseudo-aneurysm of the gastro-omental artery. An LSG was performed on a 43-year-old woman (BMI = 46 kg/m2) without apparent surgical complications. Fifteen days later, she was admitted to the emergency department for hematemesis and symptoms of hemorrhagic shock. Abdominal computed tomography angiography revealed blood in the stomach, without a digestive leak, and active bleeding from a pseudo-aneurysm of the gastro-omental artery. An arterial embolisation was performed with the sandwich technique and angiographic guide wires and the placement of several detachable coils. The patient was discharged two days later. We demonstrated for the first time that post-LSG bleeding may involve a pseudo-aneurysm of the gastro-omental artery.

  2. [Late form of vitamin K deficiency bleeding. Description of four cases with various clinical picture and outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walas, Wojciech; Jasion, Anna; Piotrowski, Andrzej; Poradowska-Jeszke, Wanda

    2006-01-01

    Late form of vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) occurs in infants who received none, or inadequate vitamin K prophylaxis after birth. Exclusively breastfed infants are especially prone to development of this disease. We present 4 cases of late VKDB with different clinical picture and outcome. In two patients intracranial bleeding of variable magnitude was detected, in one, bleeding into pleural cavity and in the fourth severe bleeding from injection sites without internal haemorrhage. Diagnosis was based on the clinical picture with special emphasis on the child's past history and results of coagulation tests. Treatment consisted mainly of vitamin K administration and infusion of fresh frozen plasma. One patient developed severe and definite brain damage after intracranial bleeding, the second only a mild brain dysfunction, the remaining two infants recovered fully. These observations and literature data suggest that in exclusively breastfed infants who did not receive vitamin K after birth, late VKDB should be taken into account as a cause of haemorrhage with different localization and magnitude. There is a need for more emphasis on teaching of physicians about late VKDB and for parenteral vitamin K prophylaxis programme for all newborn infants.

  3. Unprecedented access of phenolic substrates to the heme active site of a catalase: substrate binding and peroxidase-like reactivity of Bacillus pumilus catalase monitored by X-ray crystallography and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Peter C; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jacek; Donald, Lynda J; Ivancich, Anabella

    2015-05-01

    Heme-containing catalases and catalase-peroxidases catalyze the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide as their predominant catalytic activity, but in addition, individual enzymes support low levels of peroxidase and oxidase activities, produce superoxide, and activate isoniazid as an antitubercular drug. The recent report of a heme enzyme with catalase, peroxidase and penicillin oxidase activities in Bacillus pumilus and its categorization as an unusual catalase-peroxidase led us to investigate the enzyme for comparison with other catalase-peroxidases, catalases, and peroxidases. Characterization revealed a typical homotetrameric catalase with one pentacoordinated heme b per subunit (Tyr340 being the axial ligand), albeit in two orientations, and a very fast catalatic turnover rate (kcat  = 339,000 s(-1) ). In addition, the enzyme supported a much slower (kcat  = 20 s(-1) ) peroxidatic activity utilizing substrates as diverse as ABTS and polyphenols, but no oxidase activity. Two binding sites, one in the main access channel and the other on the protein surface, accommodating pyrogallol, catechol, resorcinol, guaiacol, hydroquinone, and 2-chlorophenol were identified in crystal structures at 1.65-1.95 Å. A third site, in the heme distal side, accommodating only pyrogallol and catechol, interacting with the heme iron and the catalytic His and Arg residues, was also identified. This site was confirmed in solution by EPR spectroscopy characterization, which also showed that the phenolic oxygen was not directly coordinated to the heme iron (no low-spin conversion of the Fe(III) high-spin EPR signal upon substrate binding). This is the first demonstration of phenolic substrates directly accessing the heme distal side of a catalase.

  4. Hepatitis-C-virus-like internal ribosome entry sites displace eIF3 to gain access to the 40S subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Yaser; Des Georges, Amedee; Dhote, Vidya; Langlois, Robert; Liao, Hstau Y.; Grassucci, Robert A.; Pestova, Tatyana V.; Hellen, Christopher U. T.; Frank, Joachim

    2013-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and classical swine fever virus (CSFV) messenger RNAs contain related (HCV-like) internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) that promote 5'-end independent initiation of translation, requiring only a subset of the eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) needed for canonical initiation on cellular mRNAs. Initiation on HCV-like IRESs relies on their specific interaction with the 40S subunit, which places the initiation codon into the P site, where it directly base-pairs with eIF2-bound initiator methionyl transfer RNA to form a 48S initiation complex. However, all HCV-like IRESs also specifically interact with eIF3 (refs 2, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12), but the role of this interaction in IRES-mediated initiation has remained unknown. During canonical initiation, eIF3 binds to the 40S subunit as a component of the 43S pre-initiation complex, and comparison of the ribosomal positions of eIF3 and the HCV IRES revealed that they overlap, so that their rearrangement would be required for formation of ribosomal complexes containing both components. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of a 40S ribosomal complex containing eIF3 and the CSFV IRES. Remarkably, although the position and interactions of the CSFV IRES with the 40S subunit in this complex are similar to those of the HCV IRES in the 40S-IRES binary complex, eIF3 is completely displaced from its ribosomal position in the 43S complex, and instead interacts through its ribosome-binding surface exclusively with the apical region of domain III of the IRES. Our results suggest a role for the specific interaction of HCV-like IRESs with eIF3 in preventing ribosomal association of eIF3, which could serve two purposes: relieving the competition between the IRES and eIF3 for a common binding site on the 40S subunit, and reducing formation of 43S complexes, thereby favouring translation of viral mRNAs.

  5. Severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding in extraluminal diverticula in the third part of the duodenum

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The successful management of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding requires identification of the source of bleeding and when this is achieved the bleeding can often be treated endoscopically. However, the identification of the bleeding can be challenging due to the location of the bleeding or technical aspects. Therefore it might be necessary to use other measures than endoscopy such as CT angiography. Duodenal diverticula is a rare cause of upper GI bleeding and can be challenging to diagnos...

  6. The evaluation and management of obscure and occult gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common clinical presentation increasing in an aging population, frequently requiring hospitalization and emergent intervention, with significant morbidity, mortality, and costs. It may manifest overtly as hematemesis, melena, or hematochezia, or as an asymptomatic occult bleed. Management typically involves an esophagogastroduodenoscopy or a colonoscopy; these in combination sometimes do not identify a source of bleeding, with the source remaining obscure. Further work up to identify an obscure source frequently requires radiologically detecting the leakage of an intravascular tracer (using tagged red blood cells or angiography) with brisk bleeding or in other cases CT enterography (CTE) to detect bowel wall changes consistent with a bleeding source. Recent advances including capsule endoscopy, CTE, and double-balloon endoscopy have helped to identify bleeding sources beyond the reach of conventional endoscopy. Clinical decision-making about their use is complex and evolving. Knowing their relative merits and weaknesses including yield, contraindications, complications, and cost is essential in coming up with an appropriate management plan. This review covers the rationale for clinical management of obscure sources of GI bleeding, mentioning the approach to and the yield of conventional methods, with an emphasis on the recent advances mentioned above.

  7. Barriers to effective diagnosis and management of a bleeding patient with undiagnosed bleeding disorder across multiple specialties: results of a quantitative case-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reding MT

    2012-10-01

    PTT twice the upper limit of normal; emergency medicine physicians remained least likely to request a consult.Conclusion: Determining the cause of an abnormal coagulation study result should carry equal weight as looking for the site of bleeding and could be facilitated by consultation with a hematologist. Insight from this survey highlights knowledge and practice gaps that could be the target of focused educational initiatives.Keywords: acquired hemophilia, hemorrhage, aPTT, partial thromboplastin time, coagulation disorders

  8. Noncardiac surgery and bleeding after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Andrew C Y; Armstrong, Guy; Zeng, Irene; Webster, Mark W I

    2009-06-01

    The decision on whether to implant a drug-eluting or bare-metal stent during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) depends in part on the perceived likelihood of the patient developing late stent thrombosis. Noncardiac surgery and bleeding are associated with discontinuation of dual antiplatelet therapy and with increased stent thrombosis. We assessed the incidence of and predictors for subsequent noncardiac surgery and bleeding episodes in patients who had undergone PCI. Hospital discharge coding data were used to identify all adult patients undergoing public hospital PCI in New Zealand from 1996 to 2001. Hospital admissions during the ensuing 5 years were analyzed for noncardiac surgery and bleeding episodes. Eleven thousand one hundred fifty-one patients (age, 62+/-11 years; 30% women) underwent PCI, mainly for an acute coronary syndrome (73%). During the 5-year follow-up, 26% of the population underwent at least 1 noncardiac surgical procedure (23% orthopedic, 20% abdominal, 12% urologic, 10% vascular, 35% others) and 8.6% had at least 1 bleeding episode either requiring or occurring during hospitalization. Of those, half were gastrointestinal, and one quarter of bleeding events required blood transfusion. The main clinical predictors of noncardiac surgery were advanced age, previous noncardiac surgery, osteoarthritis, and peripheral vascular disease. A previous bleeding admission and age were the strongest predictors of subsequent bleeding. Noncardiac surgery is required frequently after PCI, whereas bleeding is less common. Before implanting a drug-eluting or bare-metal stent, individual patient risk stratification by the interventional cardiologist should include assessment of whether there is an increased likelihood of needing noncardiac surgery or developing bleeding.

  9. Intraoperative bleeding control by uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego; Stupnik, Tomaz; Fernandez, Ricardo; de la Torre, Mercedes; Velasco, Carlos; Yang, Yang; Lee, Wentao; Jiang, Gening

    2016-01-01

    Owing to advances in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), the majority of pulmonary resections can currently be performed by VATS in a safe manner with a low level of morbidity and mortality. The majority of the complications that occur during VATS can be minimized with correct preoperative planning of the case as well as careful pulmonary dissection. Coordination of the whole surgical team is essential when confronting an emergency such as major bleeding. This is particularly important during the VATS learning curve, where the occurrence of intraoperative complications, particularly significant bleeding, usually ends in a conversion to open surgery. However, conversion should not be considered as a failure of the VATS approach, but as a resource to maintain the patient's safety. The correct assessment of any bleeding is of paramount importance during major thoracoscopic procedures. Inadequate management of the source of bleeding may result in major vessel injury and massive bleeding. If bleeding occurs, a sponge stick should be readily available to apply pressure immediately to control the haemorrhage. It is always important to remain calm and not to panic. With the bleeding temporarily controlled, a decision must be made promptly as to whether a thoracotomy is needed or if the bleeding can be solved through the VATS approach. This will depend primarily on the surgeon's experience. The operative vision provided with high-definition cameras, specially designed or adapted instruments and the new sealants are factors that facilitate the surgeon's control. After experience has been acquired with conventional or uniportal VATS, the rate of complications diminishes and the majority of bleeding events are controlled without the need for conversion to thoracotomy.

  10. Perceptions of advantages and barriers to radial-access percutaneous coronary intervention in VA cardiac catheterization laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfrich, Christian D., E-mail: Christian.Helfrich@va.gov [VA Puget Sound Health Services Research and Development Center of Innovation, US Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Health Services, University of Washington School of Public Health, Seattle, WA (United States); Tsai, Thomas T. [VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver, CO (United States); Department of Medicine and the Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Rao, Sunil V. [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratories, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC (United States); Lemon, Jaclyn M.; Eugenio, Evercita C. [VA Puget Sound Health Services Research and Development Center of Innovation, US Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Vidovich, Mladen I.; Shroff, Adhir R. [Department of Cardiology, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Interventional Cardiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Speiser, Bernadette S. [Department of Cardiology, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Bryson, Chris L. [VA Puget Sound Health Services Research and Development Center of Innovation, US Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Background/Purpose: Compared with trans-femoral percutaneous coronary intervention (TFI), trans-radial PCI (TRI) has a lower risk of bleeding, access site complications and hospital costs, and is preferred by patients. However, TRI accounts for a minority of PCIs in the US, and there is currently little research that explores why. Methods/Material: We conducted a national survey in February 2013 to assess perceptions of TRI vs. TFI, and barriers to TRI adoption and implementation among interventional cardiologists employed by the US Veterans Health Administration (VHA), and linked these data to site-level TRI annual rates for 2013. Results: We received 78 completed surveys (32% response rate). Respondents at sites that perform few or no TRIs identified increased radiation exposure as the greatest barrier while at sites that perform a high percentage of TRIs respondents identified the steep learning curve as the greatest barrier. Majorities of survey respondents at all sites rated TRI as superior on 5 of 7 criteria, including patient comfort and bleeding complications, but rated TFI as superior on procedure time and procedure success. Conclusions: Even interventional cardiologists at sites that perform few or any TRIs recognized the superiority of TRI for patient comfort and safety, but rated it inferior to TFI on procedure time and technical results. Interventional cardiologists at high-TRI labs rated TRI as equivalent on procedure time and technical results. Efforts to increase TRI adoption and implementation may be more successful if they emphasize that procedure times and technical results depend on achieving proficiency. - Highlights: • Sites with few TRIs identified increased radiation exposure as the greatest barrier. • Sites with many TRIs identified the steep learning curve as the greatest barrier. • TFI was rated superior on procedure time and procedure success. • TRI was rated superior on all other criteria.

  11. Gastrointestinal bleeding from supraduodenal artery with aberrant origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Han, MD, PhD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Angiography and endovascular embolization play an important role in controlling acute arterial upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, particularly when endoscopic intervention fails to do so. In our case, the patient presented with recurrent life-threatening bleed in spite of multiple prior endoscopic interventions and gastroduodenal artery embolization. Our teaching points focus on the role of angiography in acute upper gastrointestinal bleed and when to conduct empiric embolization, while reviewing the supraduodenal artery as an atypical but important potential culprit for refractory upper gastrointestinal bleed.

  12. Therapeutic Options for Patients Bleeding with Peptic Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available It is likely that the best outcome for the patient with an acute upper gastrointestinal bleed (GIB includes early diagnosis: for a bleeding lesion with a high risk of rebleeding, in an older patient with systolic h.ypotension or in a person with multiple medical problems. Early therapeutic endoscopy with meticulous control of intragastric pH will Likely achieve the best outcome. The ideal pH criterion to stop bleeding or to prevent recurrence is unknown. An algorithm is presented to guide the clinical management of patients with GIB, and to focus on important questi.ons for future therapeutic studies.

  13. Transvaginal Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Karen C; Goldstein, Steven R

    2017-03-01

    Transvaginal ultrasound is the first-line imaging test for the evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Transvaginal ultrasound can be used to diagnose structural causes of abnormal bleeding such as polyps, adenomyosis, leiomyomas, hyperplasia, and malignancy, and can also be beneficial in making the diagnosis of ovulatory dysfunction. Traditional 2-dimensional imaging is often enhanced by the addition of 3-dimension imaging with coronal reconstruction and saline infusion sonohysterography. In this article we discuss specific ultrasound findings and technical considerations useful in the diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding.

  14. Splenic duplication: a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Alkadhi, Hatem; Gubler, Christoph; Bauerfeind, Peter; Pfammatter, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency. We report the rare case of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by varices in the gastric fundus secondary to splenic duplication. Splenic duplication has been only rarely reported in the literature, and no case so far has described the associated complication of gastrointestinal bleeding, caused by venous drainage of the upper spleen via varices in the gastric fundus. We describe the imaging findings from endoscopy, endosonography, computed tomography (CT), flat-panel CT, and angiography in this rare condition and illustrate the effective role of intra-arterial embolization.

  15. RECOMBINANT FACTOR VIIa – NEW TREATMENT OPTION FOR CONTROL OF INTRACTABLE BLEEDING IN SURGICAL AND TRAUMA PATIENTS AND IN OTHER HAEMOSTASIS DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samo Zver

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa, which is currently registered only for the treatment of haemophilia A and B patients with inhibitors, is seen increasingly as a possible universal haemostatic agent in untractable bleedings. One possible mechanism for the efficacy rFVIIa may be a consequence of it’s from the tissue factor (TF and from the level of disfunction in haemostatic system independant activity, which generates »thrombin burst« formation. It seems that rFVIIa remains active only at the site of tissue injury/bleeding.Conclusions. There are two components of bleeding in surgery and trauma patients. One is bleeding from large calibre arteries and veins which requires surgical intervention. The other, which goes along with the first one, is coagulopathic bleeding. The latter is a consequence of consumptional and dilutional coagulopathy, hypothermia, multitransfusion syndrom and metabolic disbalances in patients. rFVIIa effects coagulopathic component of the bleeding. For effective treatment with rFVIIa in such patients, replacement therapy with erythrocytes, platelets and fresh frozen plasma is mandatory and requires a haematologist assistance in the treatment strategy.Most reported cases of effective rFVIIa usage are from the field of traumatology. Until now, there have been no universal recommendations when to start treatment with rFVIIa in a bleeding trauma patient. Most experience with rFVIIa are from Israel and their recommendations are perhaps the most valuable ones. rFVIIa was used several times during intra-operative and post-operative bleeding episodes. There are reports of clinical studies and usage in patients with/ after prostate surgery, cardiovascular operations and liver transplants.There are data about effective rFVIIa usage in neurology and neurosurgery patients (intracranial haemorrhages, obstetrics and gynecology field. Possible future indications are thrombocytopenias, thrombocytopathias (Glanzmann

  16. Assessment of bleeding disorders in Sheehan's syndrome: are bleeding disorders the underlying cause of Sheehan's syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokalp, Deniz; Tuzcu, Alpaslan; Bahceci, Mithat; Ayyildiz, Orhan; Erdemoglu, Mahmut; Alpagat, Gulistan

    2011-01-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is an adenopituitary insufficiency caused by hypovolemia secondary to excessive blood loss during or after childbirth. However, the mechanism of postpartum hemorrhage and ischemia is not clear. We aimed to evaluate the bleeding disorders among patients with SS, in comparison with healthy controls. In addition, we investigated underlying causes in postpartum hemorrhage that begin the event. The present study was conducted at the Dicle University School of Medicine. Forty-eight patients with SS and 50 age-matched female healthy controls were included. Biochemical and hormonal variables were measured, as was platelet function by means of closure times (PFA-100 testing using collagen plus epinephrine and collagen plus ADP), von Willebrand factor (vWF) level, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), international normalized ratio (INR), and coagulation factors. Although PT and INR were significantly higher in patients with SS (both P<0.01), aPTT and levels of fibrinogen, vWF, and factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, and XII did not differ significantly. Closure times with collagen/epinephrine and collagen/ADP also did not differ significantly between patients with SS and control patients. The nonspecific etiology and presence of excessive postpartum hemorrhage in patients with SS suggest that coagulation disorders may play a role in their predisposition to bleeding. The increased PT and INR noted might implicate bleeding diathesis as the underlying etiology, although no significant decreases were noted in factor levels. Further studies are needed to elucidate this complex mechanism of this disorder.

  17. Association of Proton Pump Inhibitors With Reduced Risk of Warfarin-Related Serious Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Wayne A; Chung, Cecilia P; Murray, Katherine T; Smalley, Walter E; Daugherty, James R; Dupont, William D; Stein, C Michael

    2016-12-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) might reduce the risk of serious warfarin-related upper gastrointestinal bleeding, but the evidence of their efficacy for this indication is limited. A gastroprotective effect of PPIs would be particularly important for patients who take warfarin with antiplatelet drugs or nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which further increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. This retrospective cohort study of patients beginning warfarin treatment in Tennessee Medicaid and the 5% National Medicare Sample identified 97,430 new episodes of warfarin treatment with 75,720 person-years of follow-up. The study end points were hospitalizations for upper gastrointestinal bleeding potentially preventable by PPIs and for bleeding at other sites. Patients who took warfarin without PPI co-therapy had 119 hospitalizations for upper gastrointestinal bleeding per 10,000 person-years of treatment. The risk decreased by 24% among patients who received PPI co-therapy (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.63-0.91). There was no significant reduction in the risk of other gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.94-1.22) or non-gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.84-1.15) in this group. Among patients concurrently using antiplatelet drugs or NSAIDs, those without PPI co-therapy had 284 upper gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations per 10,000 person-years of warfarin treatment. The risk decreased by 45% (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.39-0.77) with PPI co-therapy. PPI co-therapy had no significant protective effect for warfarin patients not using antiplatelet drugs or NSAIDs (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.70-1.06). Findings were similar in both study populations. In an analysis of patients beginning warfarin treatment in Tennessee Medicaid and the 5% National Medicare Sample, PPI co-therapy was associated with reduced risk of warfarin-related upper gastrointestinal bleeding; the

  18. A multi-dimensional approach for describing internal bleeding in an artery: implications for Doppler ultrasound guiding HIFU hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di; Zhang, Dong; Guo, Xiasheng; Gong, Xiufen; Fei, Xingbo

    2008-09-01

    Doppler ultrasound has shown promise in detecting and localizing internal bleeding. A mathematical approach was developed to describe the internal bleeding of the injured artery surrounded by tissue. This approach consisted of a two-dimensional (2D) model describing the injured vessel and a one-dimensional model (1D) mimicking the downstream of the vessel system. The validity of this approach was confirmed by both the numerical simulation and in vivo measurement of a normal porcine femoral artery. Furthermore, the artery was injured using a 16-gauge needle to model a penetrating injury. The velocity waveform at the puncture site was modeled and compared with those at the upstream and downstream of the artery. The results demonstrated that there was a significant increase in magnitude and a phase lag for the peak systolic velocity at the injury site. These results were qualitatively in agreement with the in vivo experiment. Flow turbulence indicated by this approach was also observed in a color Doppler image in the form of a checkered color pattern. This approach might be useful for quantitative internal bleeding detection and localization. Also, the phase lag of the peak systolic velocity was indicated to be potential in the application of internal bleeding detection.

  19. A multi-dimensional approach for describing internal bleeding in an artery: implications for Doppler ultrasound guiding HIFU hemostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Di; Zhang Dong; Guo Xiasheng; Gong Xiufen [Institute of Acoustics, Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics (Nanjing University), Ministry of Education, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Fei Xingbo [Beijing Yuande Biomedical Company, Beijing 100176 (China)], E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn

    2008-09-21

    Doppler ultrasound has shown promise in detecting and localizing internal bleeding. A mathematical approach was developed to describe the internal bleeding of the injured artery surrounded by tissue. This approach consisted of a two-dimensional (2D) model describing the injured vessel and a one-dimensional model (1D) mimicking the downstream of the vessel system. The validity of this approach was confirmed by both the numerical simulation and in vivo measurement of a normal porcine femoral artery. Furthermore, the artery was injured using a 16-gauge needle to model a penetrating injury. The velocity waveform at the puncture site was modeled and compared with those at the upstream and downstream of the artery. The results demonstrated that there was a significant increase in magnitude and a phase lag for the peak systolic velocity at the injury site. These results were qualitatively in agreement with the in vivo experiment. Flow turbulence indicated by this approach was also observed in a color Doppler image in the form of a checkered color pattern. This approach might be useful for quantitative internal bleeding detection and localization. Also, the phase lag of the peak systolic velocity was indicated to be potential in the application of internal bleeding detection.

  20. Cesarean scar defects: an underrecognized cause of abnormal uterine bleeding and other gynecologic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Amanda M; Frishman, Gary N

    2013-01-01

    The gynecologic sequelae due to deficient uterine scar healing after cesarean section are only recently being identified and described. These include conditions such as abnormal bleeding, pelvic pain, infertility, and cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy, as well as a potentially higher risk of complications and difficulties during gynecologic procedures such as uterine evacuation, hysterectomy, endometrial ablation, and insertion of an intrauterine device. The proposed mechanism of abnormal uterine bleeding is a pouch or "isthmocele" in the lower uterine segment that causes delayed menstrual bleeding. The prevalence of symptomatic or clinically relevant cesarean scar defects (CSDs) ranges from 19.4% to 88%. Possible risk factors for CSD include number of cesarean sections, uterine position, labor before cesarean section, and surgical technique used to close the uterine incision. There are no accepted guidelines for the diagnostic criteria of CSD. We propose that a CSD be defined on transvaginal ultrasound or saline infusion sonohysterography as a triangular hypoechoic defect in the myometrium at the site of the previous hysterotomy. We also propose a classification system to aid in standardized classification for future research. Surgical techniques for repair of CSD include laparoscopic excision, resectoscopic treatment, vaginal revision, and endometrial ablation.

  1. A Beta Version of the GIS-Enabled NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Web Site With Expanded Data Accessibility and Analysis Functionality for Renewable Energy and Other Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, P. W.; Barnett, A. J.; Tisdale, M.; Tisdale, B.; Chandler, W.; Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Westberg, D. J.; Quam, B.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA LaRC Atmospheric Science Data Center has deployed it's beta version of an existing geophysical parameter website employing off the shelf Geographic Information System (GIS) tools. The revitalized web portal is entitled the "Surface meteorological and Solar Energy" (SSE - https://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/) and has been supporting an estimated 175,000 users with baseline solar and meteorological parameters as well as calculated parameters that enable feasibility studies for a wide range of renewable energy systems, particularly those systems featuring solar energy technologies. The GIS tools enable, generate and store climatological averages using spatial queries and calculations (by parameter for the globe) in a spatial database resulting in greater accessibility by government agencies, industry and individuals. The data parameters are produced from NASA science projects and reformulated specifically for the renewable energy industry and other applications. This first version includes: 1) processed and reformulated set of baseline data parameters that are consistent with Esri and open GIS tools, 2) development of a limited set of Python based functions to compute additional parameters "on-the-fly" from the baseline data products, 3) updated the current web sites to enable web-based displays of these parameters for plotting and analysis and 4) provided for the output of data parameters in geoTiff, ASCII and .netCDF data formats. The beta version is being actively reviewed through interaction with a group of collaborators from government and industry in order to test web site usability, display tools and features, and output data formats. This presentation provides an overview of this project and the current version of the new SSE-GIS web capabilities through to the end usage. This project supports cross agency and cross organization interoperability and access to NASA SSE data products and OGC compliant web services and aims also to provide mobile platform

  2. Access Denied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  3. Open Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  4. Open Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  5. So You Want the Public to Care About Your Favourite Submarine Vent-Site? An Art-School Approach to Making Deep-Ocean Science More Accessible

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, J. A.; German, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    In January 2012 the ROV Jason, part of UNOLS/DESSC's National Deep Submergence Facility, conducted the first dives to the world's deepest vent-sites at the Piccard Field, Mid Cayman Rise. The expedition was led by an internationally recognized team of senior scientists and the diverse and spectacular vents present, together with the unusual fauna that they host, were imaged using the new NDSF HDTV camera. Even so, this presentation starts with the premise that such experienced, senior, scientists may not be the best judges of what makes for the best or most engaging public outreach product. When producing a video for outreach, a first consideration must be "why should my viewer be interested?". For any outreach video, there is no incentive for anyone to view it, aside from mutual interests between the message of the video and the viewer. This is the fundamental theoretical application that must always be considered when making any outreach video, poster, banner, etc. For an oceanographic outreach video, viewers could be from any background, relating to science. It is important not to discriminate against any viewer. This requires reducing the informational content to its most fundamental form. We all start from the ground up, which is what outreaches' purpose is: exposing the content of the video to those who are unexposed, in an enticing way. With all this considered, you have to start somewhere. As an enticing artwork, music is a fundamental step to making an impact. It is emotional, and sets a firm narrative, that will underpin the other layers of the message of the outreach. It is important to retain your viewers' interest through a short, sweet experience; they may have no prior knowledge of your field and a harsh concentrated exposure to something new is rarely enjoyable. They need something inspiring, impactful, and unique. Accompanying this music should be video clips that match the patterns of the music. They should be compliant with the music's tone

  6. Modern issues on the treatment of peptic ulcer bleedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potakhin S.N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the success of therapeutic treatment of peptic ulcer and the introduction of endoscopic technologies, the problem of peptic ulcer hemorrhage remains valid. A large number of publications in foreign literature are dedicated to epidemiology and prevention of bleeding, evaluation of modern tactics and search for new methods of treatment. The works relating to organization of aid to patients with peptic ulcer bleeding are of particular interest. According to the recent data not all clinics even in economically developed countries manage to follow the recommendations of an international consensus-2010 for non-variceal bleeding treatment of upper gastrointestinal tract. Among the causes of non-compliance of international recommendations there are subjective and objective factors, the understanding of which can significantly affect the optimization of aid to patients with peptic ulcer bleeding.

  7. Endoscopic Management of Nonvariceal, Nonulcer Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjwa, E.T.; Holster, I.L.; Kuipers, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is the most common emergency condition in gastroenterology. Although peptic ulcer and esophagogastric varices are the predominant causes, other conditions account for up to 50% of UGIBs. These conditions, among others, include angiodysplasia, Dieulafoy and Mall

  8. Evaluation and Management of Adolescents with Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Tanya L Kowalczyk; Miller, Rachel J; Mullins, Eric S

    2015-09-01

    The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists support the use of new terminology for abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) to consistently categorize AUB by etiology. The term AUB can be further classified as AUB/heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) (replacing the term "menorrhagia") or AUB/intermenstrual bleeding (replacing the term "metrorrhagia"). Although many cases of AUB in adolescent women are attributable to immaturity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, underlying bleeding disorders should be considered in women with AUB/HMB. This article reviews the new terminology for AUB, discusses important relevant features of history and examination, presents the laboratory evaluation of HMB, and describes hormonal (oral contraceptive pills, progestin-only methods, long-acting reversible contraceptives including intrauterine systems), hematologic (tranexamic acid and desmopressin), and surgical management options for AUB/HMB.

  9. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimi, Mircelal; Ulas, Murat; Ibis, Cem; Unver, Mutlu; Ozsan, Nazan; Yilmaz, Funda; Ersoz, Galip; Zeytunlu, Murat; Kilic, Murat; Coker, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:19178725

  10. Pregnancy Complications: Bleeding and Spotting from the Vagina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bleeding. It happens when you have a few drops of blood on your underwear. Spotting is so ... Having sex An infection Implantation. When a fertilized egg (embryo) attaches to the lining of the uterus ( ...

  11. Haemophilia: a rare cause of bleeding after ear surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lalee Varghese; Saud Ahmed; Rajiv C Michael; Rupa V

    2016-01-01

      Introduction : Excessive bleeding during ear surgery is a troublesome problem which could be related to inadequate infiltration, active infection, trauma to the dura or jugular bulb or sudden hypertension...

  12. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeytunlu Murat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

  13. Factors that can minimize bleeding complications after renal biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, M S; Chen, J Z; Xu, A P

    2014-10-01

    Renal biopsy is a very important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of renal diseases. However, bleeding remains to be one of the most serious complications in this procedure. Many new techniques have been improved to make it safer. The risk factors and predictors of bleeding after percutaneous renal biopsy have been extensively reported in many literatures, and generally speaking, the common risk factors for renal biopsy complications focus on hypertension, high serum creatinine, bleeding diatheses, amyloidosis, advanced age, gender and so on. Our primary purpose of this review is to summarize current measures in recent years literature aiming at minimizing the bleeding complication after the renal biopsy, including the drug application before and after renal biopsy, operation details in percutaneous renal biopsies, nursing and close monitoring after the biopsy and other kinds of biopsy methods.

  14. Hormone Replacement Therapy: Can It Cause Vaginal Bleeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormone replacement therapy: Can it cause vaginal bleeding? I'm taking hormone therapy for menopause symptoms, and my monthly menstrual periods have returned. Is this normal? Answers from Shannon K. Laughlin- ...

  15. Evaluation of bleeding in patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellenbart, Erika L; Faulkenberg, Kathleen D; Finks, Shannon W

    2017-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are recognized by evidence-based treatment guidelines as the first-line option for the treatment of venous thromboembolism and prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. As use of these anticoagulants has become favored over the past several years, reported bleeding-related adverse drug events with these agents has increased. In randomized clinical trials, all DOACs have a reduced risk for intracranial hemorrhage, while major and other bleeding results have varied among the agents compared to vitamin K antagonists. We have reviewed the bleeding incidence and severity from randomized and real-world data in patients receiving DOACs in an effort to provide the clinician with a critical review of bleeding and offer practical considerations for avoiding adverse events with these anticoagulants.

  16. Challenges in the management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, James Y W; Barkun, Alan; Fan, Dai-ming; Kuipers, Ernst J; Yang, Yun-sheng; Chan, Francis K L

    2013-06-08

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency worldwide, a major cause of which are bleeding peptic ulcers. Endoscopic treatment and acid suppression with proton-pump inhibitors are cornerstones in the management of the disease, and both treatments have been shown to reduce mortality. The role of emergency surgery continues to diminish. In specialised centres, radiological intervention is increasingly used in patients with severe and recurrent bleeding who do not respond to endoscopic treatment. Despite these advances, mortality from the disorder has remained at around 10%. The disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities who use antiplatelet agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and anticoagulants. The management of such patients, especially those at high cardiothrombotic risk who are on anticoagulants, is a challenge for clinicians. We summarise the published scientific literature about the management of patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, identify directions for future clinical research, and suggest how mortality can be reduced.

  17. Anode reactive bleed and injector shift control strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun [Rochester, NY; Chowdhury, Akbar [Pittsford, NY; Lerner, Seth E [Honeoye Falls, NY; Marley, William S [Rush, NY; Savage, David R [Rochester, NY; Leary, James K [Rochester, NY

    2012-01-03

    A system and method for correcting a large fuel cell voltage spread for a split sub-stack fuel cell system. The system includes a hydrogen source that provides hydrogen to each split sub-stack and bleed valves for bleeding the anode side of the sub-stacks. The system also includes a voltage measuring device for measuring the voltage of each cell in the split sub-stacks. The system provides two levels for correcting a large stack voltage spread problem. The first level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack well before a normal reactive bleed would occur, and the second level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack and opening the bleed valve of the other sub-stack when the cell voltage spread is close to stack failure.

  18. Rectal bleeding and its management after irradiation for cervix cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Mi Son; Kang, Seung Hee; Kil, Hoon Jong; Oh, Young Taek; Sohn, Jeong Hye; Ryu, Hee Suk; Lee, Kwang Jae [School of Medicine, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hye Young [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    Radiotherapy is the main treatment modality for uterine cervix cancer. Since the rectum is in the radiation target volume, rectal bleeding is a common late side effect. The study evaluates the risk factors of radiation induced rectal bleeding and discusses its optimal management. A total of 213 patients who completed external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and intracavitary radiation (ICR) between September 1994 and December 1999 were included in this study. No patient had undergone concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. Ninety patients received radiotherapy according to a modified hyperfractionated schedule. A midline block was placed at a pelvic dose of between 30.6 Gy to 39.6 Gy. The total parametrial dose from the EBRT was 51 to 59 Gy depending on the extent of their disease. The point A dose from the HDR brachytherapy was 28 Gy to 30 Gy (4 Gy x 7, or 5 Gy x 6). The rectal point dose was calculated either by the ICRU 38 guideline, or by anterior rectal wall point seen on radiographs, with barium contrast. Rectal bleeding was scored by the LENT/SOMA criteria. For the management of rectal bleeding, we opted for observation, sucralfate enema or coagulation based on the frequency or amount of bleeding. The median follow-up period was 39 months (12 {approx} 86 months). The incidence of rectal bleeding was 12.7% (27/213); graded as 1 in 9 patients, grade 2 in 16 and grade 3 in 2. The overall moderate and severe rectal complication rate was 8.5%. Most complications (92.6%) developed within 2 years following completion of radiotherapy (median 16 months). No patient progressed to rectal fistula or obstruction during the follow-up period. In the univariate analysis, three factors correlated with a high incidence of bleeding: an icruCRBED greater than 100 Gy (19.7% vs. 4.2%), an EBRT dose to the parametrium over 55 Gy (22.1% vs. 5.1%) and higher stages of III and IV (31.8% vs. 10.5%). In the multivariate analysis, the icruCRBED was the only significant factor ({rho} > 0.0432). The

  19. Recent trends of study on esophageal variceal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Liu-fang; LI Chang-zheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB), a severe complication and main mortality cause of portal hypertension, had reached a relatively mature stage in its research. The mortality rate of EVB within 5 days showed decreased tendency in recent years, which may be due to wide adoption of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) and endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS).1 Endoscopic treatment had been widely used because of its simple procedure, high hemostasis rate and low recurrent bleeding rate, and had become a main measure in cease of first episode and prevention of recurrent bleeding. The technique of endoscopic procedures had less progress in the last 5 years. Recent studies on EVB mainly focused on further improvement of clinical outcome, including primary prevention by EVL, selection and combination of different hemostatic measures, minimizing complications, better long-term management and forecast of bleeding risk.

  20. Clinical approach to the patient with unexpected bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, J M

    2000-10-01

    Bleeding can be considered unexpected if it is disproportionate to the intensity of the haemostatic stress in a patient with no known haemorrhagic disorder or if it occurs in a patient in whom a bleeding disorder has been characterized but is adequately treated. A thorough history usually allows the clinician to predict reasonably accurately whether the patient is likely to have a systemic haemostatic defect (and if so whether it is congenital or acquired), or whether the bleeding likely has a purely anatomical basis. The nature of bleeding is instructive with respect to preliminary categorization. Thus, mucocutaneous bleeding suggests defects of primary haemostasis (disordered platelet-vascular interactions). Bleeding into deeper structures is more suggestive of coagulation defects leading to impaired fibrin clot formation, and delayed bleeding after primary haemostasis is characteristic of hyperfibrinolysis. Localized bleeding suggests an anatomical cause, although an underlying haemostatic defect may coexist. Where bleeding is so acutely threatening as to require urgent intervention, diagnosis and treatment must proceed simultaneously. In the case of minor haemorrhage (not threatening to life or limb) it may be preferable to defer therapy while the nature of the bleeding disorder is methodically investigated. Initial laboratory evaluation is guided by the preliminary clinical impression. The amount of blood loss can be inferred from the haematocrit or haemoglobin concentration, and the platelet count will quickly identify cases in which thrombocytopenia is the likely cause of bleeding. In the latter instance, examination of the red cell morphology, leucocyte differential, and mean platelet volume may allow the aetiological mechanism to be presumptively identified as hypoproliferative or consumptive. With regard to coagulation testing, the activated PTT, prothrombin time, and thrombin time usually constitute an adequate battery of screening tests, unless the