WorldWideScience

Sample records for access microbial populations

  1. Microbial diversity--insights from population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mes, Ted H M

    2008-01-01

    Although many environmental microbial populations are large and genetically diverse, both the level of diversity and the extent to which it is ecologically relevant remain enigmatic. Because the effective (or long-term) population size, N(e), is one of the parameters that determines population genetic diversity, tests and simulations that assume selectively neutral mutations may help to identify the processes that have shaped microbial diversity. Using ecologically important genes, tests of selective neutrality suggest that adaptive as well as non-adaptive types of selection act and that departure from neutrality may be widespread or restricted to small groups of genotypes. Population genetic simulations using population sizes between 10(3) and 10(7) suggest extremely high levels of microbial diversity in environments that sustain large populations. However, census and effective population sizes may differ considerably, and because we know nothing of the evolutionary history of environmental microbial populations, we also have no idea what N(e) of environmental populations is. On the one hand, this reflects our ignorance of the microbial world. On the other hand, the tests and simulations illustrate interactions between microbial diversity and microbial population genetics that should inform our thinking in microbial ecology. Because of the different views on microbial diversity across these disciplines, such interactions are crucial if we are to understand the role of genes in microbial communities.

  2. Microbial populations in contaminant plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Bekins, Barbara A.

    Efficient biodegradation of subsurface contaminants requires two elements: (1) microbial populations with the necessary degradative capabilities, and (2) favorable subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions. Practical constraints on experimental design and interpretation in both the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences have resulted in limited knowledge of the interaction between hydrogeological and microbiological features of subsurface environments. These practical constraints include: (1) inconsistencies between the scales of investigation in the hydrogeological and microbiological sciences, and (2) practical limitations on the ability to accurately define microbial populations in environmental samples. However, advances in application of small-scale sampling methods and interdisciplinary approaches to site investigations are beginning to significantly improve understanding of hydrogeological and microbiological interactions. Likewise, culture-based and molecular analyses of microbial populations in subsurface contaminant plumes have revealed significant adaptation of microbial populations to plume environmental conditions. Results of recent studies suggest that variability in subsurface geochemical and hydrological conditions significantly influences subsurface microbial-community structure. Combined investigations of site conditions and microbial-community structure provide the knowledge needed to understand interactions between subsurface microbial populations, plume geochemistry, and contaminant biodegradation. La biodégradation efficace des polluants souterrains requiert deux éléments: des populations microbiennes possédant les aptitudes nécessaires à la dégradation, et des conditions géochimiques et hydrologiques souterraines favorables. Des contraintes pratiques sur la conception et l'interprétation des expériences à la fois en microbiologie et en hydrogéologie ont conduit à une connaissance limitée des interactions entre les

  3. Modeling Approaches for Describing Microbial Population Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita

    , ethanol and biomass throughout the reactor. This work has proven that the integration of CFD and population balance models, for describing the growth of a microbial population in a spatially heterogeneous reactor, is feasible, and that valuable insight on the interplay between flow and the dynamics......Although microbial populations are typically described by averaged properties, individual cells present a certain degree of variability. Indeed, initially clonal microbial populations develop into heterogeneous populations, even when growing in a homogeneous environment. A heterogeneous microbial......) to predict distributions of certain population properties including particle size, mass or volume, and molecular weight. Similarly, PBM allow for a mathematical description of distributed cell properties within microbial populations. Cell total protein content distributions (a measure of cell mass) have been...

  4. Microbial diversity - insights from population genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mes, T.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Although many environmental microbial populations are large and genetically diverse, both the level of diversity and the extent to which it is ecologically relevant remain enigmatic. Because the effective (or long-term) population size, Ne, is one of the parameters that determines population genetic

  5. Septic tank additive impacts on microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, S; Hoover, M T; Clark, G H; Gumpertz, M; Wollum, A G; Cobb, C; Strock, J

    2008-01-01

    Environmental health specialists, other onsite wastewater professionals, scientists, and homeowners have questioned the effectiveness of septic tank additives. This paper describes an independent, third-party, field scale, research study of the effects of three liquid bacterial septic tank additives and a control (no additive) on septic tank microbial populations. Microbial populations were measured quarterly in a field study for 12 months in 48 full-size, functioning septic tanks. Bacterial populations in the 48 septic tanks were statistically analyzed with a mixed linear model. Additive effects were assessed for three septic tank maintenance levels (low, intermediate, and high). Dunnett's t-test for tank bacteria (alpha = .05) indicated that none of the treatments were significantly different, overall, from the control at the statistical level tested. In addition, the additives had no significant effects on septic tank bacterial populations at any of the septic tank maintenance levels. Additional controlled, field-based research iswarranted, however, to address additional additives and experimental conditions.

  6. Interactions between Ipomoea aquatica and Microbial Populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kan; Yuanqing; Sun; Ling; Zhang; Ying

    2014-01-01

    [Objective]This paper was to research the water purification mechanism of Ipomoea aquatica and its correlation with algae and rotifer. [Methods]Taking I. aquatica as the test material,Chlorella vulgaris,Scenedesmus obliquus,Microcystis aeroginosa and rotifer Adineta vaga with different densities were added to the hydroponics nutrients solutions of I. aquatica by the hydroponic ecological simulation method. The growth characteristics of I. aquatica,changes of microbial populations and the consumption status of nutrients in the nutritional solution were determined. And the interactions between the plant and the microbial populations were researched. [Results]When I. aquatica seedlings grew to a certain stage,growth of principal root stopped; while the lateral roots emerged greatly; and the nutrition absorption efficiency enhanced. As the inoculation concentration of C. vulgaris increased,root length of I. aquatica increased relatively great due to the competition for nutrients. The competition and allelopathy of M. aeroginosa and S. obliquus restricted the development of root system of I. aquatica. The grazing pressure of Chlorella vulgaris had little effects on M. aeroginosa,but restricted the rapid growth of S. obliquus. [Conclusions]This research provided data support for the application of fish-shrimp-vegetable aquaculture system.

  7. Cellulose accessibility and microbial community in solid state anaerobic digestion of rape straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiang-Hao; Pourcher, Anne-Marie; Bureau, Chrystelle; Peu, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Solid state anaerobic digestion (SSAD) with leachate recirculation is an appropriate method for the valorization of agriculture residues. Rape straw is a massively produced residue with considerable biochemical methane potential, but its degradation in SSAD remains poorly understood. A thorough study was conducted to understand the performance of rape straw as feedstock for laboratory solid state anaerobic digesters. We investigated the methane production kinetics of rape straw in relation to cellulose accessibility to cellulase and the microbial community. Improving cellulose accessibility through milling had a positive influence on both the methane production rate and methane yield. The SSAD of rape straw reached 60% of its BMP in a 40-day pilot-scale test. Distinct bacterial communities were observed in digested rape straw and leachate, with Bacteroidales and Sphingobacteriales as the most abundant orders, respectively. Archaeal populations showed no phase preference and increased chronologically.

  8. Diversity Generation in Evolving Microbial Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Trine

    in relation to chronic infection is a major concern as high population diversity has been predicted to result in survival and persistence of the infecting microbe. Therefore, understanding within-host dynamics and population diversification is necessary for optimal diagnosis and therapeutic treatment. Chronic...... diversity has been documented in contemporary respiratory specimens, it is less clear to what extent within-patient diversity contributes to the overall population structure and whether the population is geographically or homogeneously distributed throughout the airways. The focus of this thesis has been...... to get a better understanding of how bacterial populations adapt to new, complex and heterogeneous environments with multiple selective pressures over long periods, and to analyse diversification during this adaptation. Using the P. aeruginosa chronic infection as a model system, and by combining...

  9. Temporal variation in airborne microbial populations and microbially-derived allergens in a tropical urban landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Anthony C.; Brar, Manreetpal S.; Chan, Yuki; Lau, Maggie C. Y.; Leung, Frederick C. C.; Scott, James A.; Vrijmoed, Lilian L. P.; Zawar-Reza, Peyman; Pointing, Stephen B.

    2013-08-01

    The microbial component of outdoor aerosols was assessed along a gradient of urban development from inner-city to rural in the seasonal-tropical metropolis of Hong Kong. Sampling over a continuous one-year period was conducted, with molecular analyses to characterize bacterial and eukaryal microbial populations, immuno-assays to detect microbially-derived allergens and extensive environmental and meteorological observations. The data revealed bio-aerosol populations were not significantly impacted by the level of urban development as measured by anthropogenic pollutants and human population levels, but instead exhibited a strong seasonal trend related to general climatic variables. We applied back-trajectory analysis to establish sources of air masses and this allowed further explanation of urban bio-aerosols largely in terms of summer-marine and winter-continental origins. We also evaluated bio-aerosols for the potential to detect human health threats. Many samples supported bacterial and fungal phylotypes indicative of known pathogenic taxa, together with common indicators of human presence. The occurrence of allergenic endotoxins and beta-glucans generally tracked trends in microbial populations, with levels known to induce symptoms detected during summer months when microbial loading was higher. This strengthens calls for bio-aerosols to be considered in future risk assessments and surveillance of air quality, along with existing chemical and particulate indices.

  10. 2007 Microbial Population Biology (July 22-26, 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony M. Dean

    2008-04-01

    Microbial Population Biology covers a diverse range of cutting edge issues in the microbial sciences and beyond. Firmly founded in evolutionary biology and with a strongly integrative approach, past meetings have covered topics ranging from the dynamics and genetics of adaptation to the evolution of mutation rate, community ecology, evolutionary genomics, altruism, and epidemiology. This meeting is never dull: some of the most significant and contentious issues in biology have been thrashed out here. We anticipate the 2007 meeting being no exception. The final form of the 2007 meeting is yet to be decided, but the following topics are likely to be included: evolutionary emergence of infectious disease and antibiotic resistance, genetic architecture and implications for the evolution of microbial populations, ageing in bacteria, biogeography, evolution of symbioses, the role of microbes in ecosystem function, and ecological genomics.

  11. MICROBIAL POPULATION ANALYSIS AS A MEASURE OF ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    During a controlled oil spill study in a freshwater wetland, four methods were used to track changes in microbial populations in response to in situ remediation treatments, including nutrient amendments and the removal of surface vegetation. Most probable number (MPN) esimates o...

  12. Growth dynamics and the evolution of cooperation in microbial populations

    OpenAIRE

    Jonas Cremer; Anna Melbinger; Erwin Frey

    2012-01-01

    Microbes providing public goods are widespread in nature despite running the risk of being exploited by free-riders. However, the precise ecological factors supporting cooperation are still puzzling. Following recent experiments, we consider the role of population growth and the repetitive fragmentation of populations into new colonies mimicking simple microbial life-cycles. Individual-based modeling reveals that demographic fluctuations, which lead to a large variance in the composition of c...

  13. Minimal models of growth and decline of microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juška, Alfonsas

    2011-01-21

    Dynamics of growth and decline of microbial populations were analysed and respective models were developed in this investigation. Analysis of the dynamics was based on general considerations concerning the main properties of microorganisms and their interactions with the environment which was supposed to be affected by the activity of the population. Those considerations were expressed mathematically by differential equations or systems of the equations containing minimal sets of parameters characterizing those properties. It has been found that: (1) the factors leading to the decline of the population have to be considered separately, namely, accumulation of metabolites (toxins) in the medium and the exhaustion of resources; the latter have to be separated again into renewable ('building materials') and non-renewable (sources of energy); (2) decline of the population is caused by the exhaustion of sources of energy but no decline is predicted by the model because of the exhaustion of renewable resources; (3) the model determined by the accumulation of metabolites (toxins) in the medium does not suggest the existence of a separate 'stationary phase'; (4) in the model determined by the exhaustion of energy resources the 'stationary' and 'decline' phases are quite discernible; and (5) there is no symmetry in microbial population dynamics, the decline being slower than the rise. Mathematical models are expected to be useful in getting insight into the process of control of the dynamics of microbial populations. The models are in agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Self-driven jamming in growing microbial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, Morgan; Hartung, Jörn; Schreck, Carl; Gniewek, Pawel; Hu, Lucy; Herminghaus, Stephan; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2016-08-01

    In natural settings, microbes tend to grow in dense populations where they need to push against their surroundings to accommodate space for new cells. The associated contact forces play a critical role in a variety of population-level processes, including biofilm formation, the colonization of porous media, and the invasion of biological tissues. Although mechanical forces have been characterized at the single-cell level, it remains elusive how collective pushing forces result from the combination of single-cell forces. Here, we reveal a collective mechanism of confinement, which we call self-driven jamming, that promotes the build-up of large mechanical pressures in microbial populations. Microfluidic experiments on budding yeast populations in space-limited environments show that self-driven jamming arises from the gradual formation and sudden collapse of force chains driven by microbial proliferation, extending the framework of driven granular matter. The resulting contact pressures can become large enough to slow down cell growth, to delay the cell cycle in the G1 phase, and to strain or even destroy the micro-environment through crack propagation. Our results suggest that self-driven jamming and build-up of large mechanical pressures is a natural tendency of microbes growing in confined spaces, contributing to microbial pathogenesis and biofouling.

  15. Population Education Accessions List, September-December 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This issue of the Population Education Accessions List is an output from United Nation's Educational Social and Cultural Organization's (UNESCO) computerized bibliographic database. It categorizes entries into three parts. Part I, Population Education, consists of titles that address various aspects of population education arranged by country in…

  16. Population-reaction model and microbial experimental ecosystems for understanding hierarchical dynamics of ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Kazufumi; Tsuda, Soichiro; Kadowaki, Kohmei; Nakamura, Yutaka; Nakano, Tadashi; Ishii, Kojiro

    2016-02-01

    Understanding ecosystem dynamics is crucial as contemporary human societies face ecosystem degradation. One of the challenges that needs to be recognized is the complex hierarchical dynamics. Conventional dynamic models in ecology often represent only the population level and have yet to include the dynamics of the sub-organism level, which makes an ecosystem a complex adaptive system that shows characteristic behaviors such as resilience and regime shifts. The neglect of the sub-organism level in the conventional dynamic models would be because integrating multiple hierarchical levels makes the models unnecessarily complex unless supporting experimental data are present. Now that large amounts of molecular and ecological data are increasingly accessible in microbial experimental ecosystems, it is worthwhile to tackle the questions of their complex hierarchical dynamics. Here, we propose an approach that combines microbial experimental ecosystems and a hierarchical dynamic model named population-reaction model. We present a simple microbial experimental ecosystem as an example and show how the system can be analyzed by a population-reaction model. We also show that population-reaction models can be applied to various ecological concepts, such as predator-prey interactions, climate change, evolution, and stability of diversity. Our approach will reveal a path to the general understanding of various ecosystems and organisms.

  17. Facilitation as Attenuating of Environmental Stress among Structured Microbial Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Cláudia Silveira Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is currently an intense debate in microbial societies on whether evolution in complex communities is driven by competition or cooperation. Since Darwin, competition for scarce food resources has been considered the main ecological interaction shaping population dynamics and community structure both in vivo and in vitro. However, facilitation may be widespread across several animal and plant species. This could also be true in microbial strains growing under environmental stress. Pure and mixed strains of Serratia marcescens and Candida rugosa were grown in mineral culture media containing phenol. Growth rates were estimated as the angular coefficients computed from linearized growth curves. Fitness index was estimated as the quotient between growth rates computed for lineages grown in isolation and in mixed cultures. The growth rates were significantly higher in associated cultures than in pure cultures and fitness index was greater than 1 for both microbial species showing that the interaction between Serratia marcescens and Candida rugosa yielded more efficient phenol utilization by both lineages. This result corroborates the hypothesis that facilitation between microbial strains can increase their fitness and performance in environmental bioremediation.

  18. Single gene-based distinction of individual microbial genomes from a mixed population of microbial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Valtteri Tamminen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in environmental microbiology has revealed vast populations of microbes in any given habitat that cannot be detected by conventional culturing strategies. The use of sensitive genetic detection methods such as CARD-FISH and in situ PCR have been limited by the cell wall permeabilization requirement that cannot be performed similarly on all cell types without lysing some and leaving some unpermeabilized. Furthermore, the detection of low copy targets such as genes present in single copies in the microbial genomes, has remained problematic. We describe an emulsion-based procedure to trap individual microbial cells into picoliter-volume polyacrylamide droplets that provide a rigid support for genetic material and therefore allow complete degradation of cellular material to expose the individual genomes. The polyacrylamide droplets are subsequently converted into picoliter-scale reactors for genome amplification. The amplified genomes are labelled based on the presence of a target gene and differentiated from those that do not contain the gene by flow cytometry. Using the Escherichia coli strains XL1 and MC1061, which differ with respect to the presence (XL1 or absence (MC1061 of a single copy of a tetracycline resistance gene per genome, we demonstrate that XL1 genomes present at 0.1% of MC1061 genomes can be differentiated using this method. Using a spiked sediment microbial sample, we demonstrate that the method is applicable to highly complex environmental microbial communities as a target gene-based screen for individual microbes. The method provides a novel tool for enumerating functional cell populations in complex microbial communities. We envision that the method could be optimized for fluorescence-activated cell sorting to enrich genetic material of interest from complex environmental samples.

  19. Wireless-accessible sensor populations for monitoring biological variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzu, Marco; Scalvini, Simonetta; Giordano, A.; Frumento, E.; Wells, Hannah; Lokhorst, C.; Glisenti, Fulvio

    2008-01-01

    The current health-care infrastructure is generally considered to be inadequate to meet the needs of an increasingly older population. We have investigated the feasibility of a passive in-home monitoring system based on wireless accessible sensor populations (WASP). In an EU-funded project we have i

  20. Effect of oil spill on the microbial population in Andaman Sea around Nicobar Island

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, R.

    The microbial studiees of the follow up cruise by FORV Sagar Sampada (cruise No. 113), 9 months after the oil spill in the Andaman Sea due to accident of VLCC Maersk Navigator revealed disturbance in the natural microbial population. Higher...

  1. Multi-population model of a microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, R P; Srinivasan, B; Escapa, A; Tartakovsky, B

    2011-06-01

    This work presents a multi-population dynamic model of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). The model describes the growth and metabolic activity of fermentative, electricigenic, methanogenic acetoclastic, and methanogenic hydrogenophilic microorganisms and is capable of simulating hydrogen production in a MEC fed with complex organic matter, such as wastewater. The model parameters were estimated with the experimental results obtained in continuous flow MECs fed with acetate or synthetic wastewater. Following successful model validation with an independent data set, the model was used to analyze and discuss the influence of applied voltage and organic load on hydrogen production and COD removal.

  2. Population Education Accessions List. January-December 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This document consists of the two issues of the bi-annual Population Education Accessions list, an output from a computerized bibliographic database. The first issue lists the entries from January to June, and the second issue lists the entries from July to December. The issues categorize the total of 387 entries into four parts. Part I,…

  3. Characterization of Microbial Population Shifts During Sample Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath J. Mills

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine shifts in the microbial community structure and potential function based on standard Integrated Ocean Drilling Program storage procedures for sediment cores. Standard long-term storage protocols maintain sediment temperature at 4oC for mineralogy, geochemical, and/or geotechnical analysis whereas standard microbiological sampling immediately preserves sediments at -80oC. Storage at 4oC does not take into account populations may remain active over geologic time scales at temperatures similar to storage conditions. Identification of active populations within the stored core would suggest geochemical and geophysical conditions within the core change over time. To test this potential, the metabolically active fraction of the total microbial community was characterized from IODP Expedition 325 Great Barrier Reef sediment cores prior to and following a three-month storage period. Total RNA was extracted from complementary 2, 20, and 40 m below seafloor sediment samples, reverse transcribed to cDNA and then sequenced using 454 FLX sequencing technology, yielding over 14,800 sequences from the six samples. Interestingly, 97.3% of the sequences detected were associated with lineages that changed in detection frequency during the storage period including key biogeochemically relevant lineages associated with nitrogen, iron and sulfur cycling. These lineages have the potential to permanently alter the physical and chemical characteristics of the sediment promoting misleading conclusions about the in situ biogeochemical environment. In addition, the detection of new lineages after storage increases the potential for a wider range of viable lineages within the subsurface that may be underestimated during standard community characterizations.

  4. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF SEVEN AMIDES BY SUSPENDED BACTERIAL POPULATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial transformation rate constants were determined for seven amides in natural pond water. A second-order mathematical rate expression served as the model for describing the microbial transformation. Also investigated was the relationship between the infrared spectra and the...

  5. Microbial Character Related Sulfur Cycle under Dynamic Environmental Factors Based on the Microbial Population Analysis in Sewerage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian; Shi, Hanchang; Liu, Yanchen

    2017-01-01

    The undesired sulfur cycle derived by microbial population can ultimately causes the serious problems of sewerage systems. However, the microbial community characters under dynamic environment factors in actual sewerage system is still not enough. This current study aimed to character the distributions and compositions of microbial communities that participate in the sulfur cycle under the dynamic environmental conditions in a local sewerage system. To accomplish this, microbial community compositions were assessed using 454 high-throughput sequencing (16S rDNA) combined with dsrB gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The results indicated that a higher diversity of microbial species was present at locations in sewers with high concentrations of H2S. Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were dominant in the sewerage system, while Actinobacteria alone were dominant in regions with high concentrations of H2S. Specifically, the unique operational taxonomic units could aid to characterize the distinct microbial communities within a sewerage manhole. The proportion of sulfate-reducing bacteria, each sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) were strongly correlated with the liquid parameters (DO, ORP, COD, Sulfide, NH3-N), while the Mycobacterium and Acidophilic SOB (M&A) was strongly correlated with gaseous factors within the sewer, such as H2S, CH4, and CO. Identifying the distributions and proportions of critical microbial communities within sewerage systems could provide insights into how the microbial sulfur cycle is affected by the dynamic environmental conditions that exist in sewers and might be useful for explaining the potential sewerage problems. PMID:28261160

  6. feedback between population and evolutionary dynamics determines the fate of social microbial populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Sanchez

    Full Text Available The evolutionary spread of cheater strategies can destabilize populations engaging in social cooperative behaviors, thus demonstrating that evolutionary changes can have profound implications for population dynamics. At the same time, the relative fitness of cooperative traits often depends upon population density, thus leading to the potential for bi-directional coupling between population density and the evolution of a cooperative trait. Despite the potential importance of these eco-evolutionary feedback loops in social species, they have not yet been demonstrated experimentally and their ecological implications are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the presence of a strong feedback loop between population dynamics and the evolutionary dynamics of a social microbial gene, SUC2, in laboratory yeast populations whose cooperative growth is mediated by the SUC2 gene. We directly visualize eco-evolutionary trajectories of hundreds of populations over 50-100 generations, allowing us to characterize the phase space describing the interplay of evolution and ecology in this system. Small populations collapse despite continual evolution towards increased cooperative allele frequencies; large populations with a sufficient number of cooperators "spiral" to a stable state of coexistence between cooperator and cheater strategies. The presence of cheaters does not significantly affect the equilibrium population density, but it does reduce the resilience of the population as well as its ability to adapt to a rapidly deteriorating environment. Our results demonstrate the potential ecological importance of coupling between evolutionary dynamics and the population dynamics of cooperatively growing organisms, particularly in microbes. Our study suggests that this interaction may need to be considered in order to explain intraspecific variability in cooperative behaviors, and also that this feedback between evolution and ecology can critically affect the

  7. feedback between population and evolutionary dynamics determines the fate of social microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Gore, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary spread of cheater strategies can destabilize populations engaging in social cooperative behaviors, thus demonstrating that evolutionary changes can have profound implications for population dynamics. At the same time, the relative fitness of cooperative traits often depends upon population density, thus leading to the potential for bi-directional coupling between population density and the evolution of a cooperative trait. Despite the potential importance of these eco-evolutionary feedback loops in social species, they have not yet been demonstrated experimentally and their ecological implications are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the presence of a strong feedback loop between population dynamics and the evolutionary dynamics of a social microbial gene, SUC2, in laboratory yeast populations whose cooperative growth is mediated by the SUC2 gene. We directly visualize eco-evolutionary trajectories of hundreds of populations over 50-100 generations, allowing us to characterize the phase space describing the interplay of evolution and ecology in this system. Small populations collapse despite continual evolution towards increased cooperative allele frequencies; large populations with a sufficient number of cooperators "spiral" to a stable state of coexistence between cooperator and cheater strategies. The presence of cheaters does not significantly affect the equilibrium population density, but it does reduce the resilience of the population as well as its ability to adapt to a rapidly deteriorating environment. Our results demonstrate the potential ecological importance of coupling between evolutionary dynamics and the population dynamics of cooperatively growing organisms, particularly in microbes. Our study suggests that this interaction may need to be considered in order to explain intraspecific variability in cooperative behaviors, and also that this feedback between evolution and ecology can critically affect the demographic fate of

  8. Evaluating digestion efficiency in full-scale anaerobic digesters by identifying active microbial populations through the lens of microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Ran; Narihiro, Takashi; Nobu, Masaru K.; Kuroda, Kyohei; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a common technology to biologically stabilize wasted solids produced in municipal wastewater treatment. Its efficiency is usually evaluated by calculating the reduction in volatile solids, which assumes no biomass growth associated with digestion. To determine whether this assumption is valid and further evaluate digestion efficiency, this study sampled 35 digester sludge from different reactors at multiple time points together with the feed biomass in a full-scale water reclamation plant at Chicago, Illinois. The microbial communities were characterized using Illumina sequencing technology based on 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene (rDNA). 74 core microbial populations were identified and represented 58.7% of the entire digester community. Among them, active populations were first identified using the ratio of 16S rRNA and 16S rDNA (rRNA/rDNA) for individual populations, but this approach failed to generate consistent results. Subsequently, a recently proposed mass balance model was applied to calculate the specific growth rate (μ), and this approach successfully identified active microbial populations in digester (positive μ) that could play important roles than those with negative μ. It was further estimated that 82% of microbial populations in the feed sludge were digested in comparison with less than 50% calculated using current equations. PMID:27666090

  9. Evaluating digestion efficiency in full-scale anaerobic digesters by identifying active microbial populations through the lens of microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Ran; Narihiro, Takashi; Nobu, Masaru K.; Kuroda, Kyohei; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a common technology to biologically stabilize wasted solids produced in municipal wastewater treatment. Its efficiency is usually evaluated by calculating the reduction in volatile solids, which assumes no biomass growth associated with digestion. To determine whether this assumption is valid and further evaluate digestion efficiency, this study sampled 35 digester sludge from different reactors at multiple time points together with the feed biomass in a full-scale water reclamation plant at Chicago, Illinois. The microbial communities were characterized using Illumina sequencing technology based on 16S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene (rDNA). 74 core microbial populations were identified and represented 58.7% of the entire digester community. Among them, active populations were first identified using the ratio of 16S rRNA and 16S rDNA (rRNA/rDNA) for individual populations, but this approach failed to generate consistent results. Subsequently, a recently proposed mass balance model was applied to calculate the specific growth rate (μ), and this approach successfully identified active microbial populations in digester (positive μ) that could play important roles than those with negative μ. It was further estimated that 82% of microbial populations in the feed sludge were digested in comparison with less than 50% calculated using current equations.

  10. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to its molecular structure, accessibility, and microbial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagai, Rota; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Shirato, Yasuhito; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Yagasaki, Yasumi

    2013-04-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition may have a significant impact on global warming. Enzyme-kinetic hypothesis suggests that decomposition of low-quality substrate (recalcitrant molecular structure) requires higher activation energy and thus has greater temperature sensitivity than that of high-quality, labile substrate. Supporting evidence, however, relies largely on indirect indices of substrate quality. Furthermore, the enzyme-substrate reactions that drive decomposition may be regulated by microbial physiology and/or constrained by protective effects of soil mineral matrix. We thus tested the kinetic hypothesis by directly assessing the carbon molecular structure of low-density fraction (LF) which represents readily accessible, mineral-free SOM pool. Using five mineral soil samples of contrasting SOM concentrations, we conducted 30-days incubations (15, 25, and 35 °C) to measure microbial respiration and quantified easily soluble C as well as microbial biomass C pools before and after the incubations. Carbon structure of LFs (soil was measured by solid-state (13) C-NMR. Decomposition Q10 was significantly correlated with the abundance of aromatic plus alkyl-C relative to O-alkyl-C groups in LFs but not in bulk soil fraction or with the indirect C quality indices based on microbial respiration or biomass. The warming did not significantly change the concentration of biomass C or the three types of soluble C despite two- to three-fold increase in respiration. Thus, enhanced microbial maintenance respiration (reduced C-use efficiency) especially in the soils rich in recalcitrant LF might lead to the apparent equilibrium between SOM solubilization and microbial C uptake. Our results showed physical fractionation coupled with direct assessment of molecular structure as an effective approach and supported the enzyme-kinetic interpretation of widely observed C quality-temperature relationship for short-term decomposition. Factors

  11. Effect of Lanthanum on Major Microbial Populations in Red Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHUHAIYAN; WANGJUNHUA; 等

    2001-01-01

    Pure culture and pot culture experiments were carried out to study the effect of lanthanum(La)on bacteria,actinomyces and fungus,and some microbial physiological groups,nitrifir,azotobacter and phos-phobacteria in a red soil taken form the Ecological Experimental Station of Red Soil,the Chinese Academy of Sciences,Jiangxi Province.LaCl3 was added into media at levels of 0,25,50,100,150,200,250 and 500 mg L-1 in the pure culture experiment ,and into soil samples in porcelain pots before rice growing at levles of 0,6,30,150,300,600 and 900 mg kg-1 dry soil in the pot culture experiment.The populations of the three soil microbes in the pure cultre experiment decreased with the addition level of La,indicating that La was toxic to the soil microbes in pure culture ,and the sensitivity of the 3 major mircrobial types to La was in a decreasing order of actinomyces>bacteria>fungus.In the pot experiment,La had slightly stimulaive effect on soil bacteria and actinomyces when applied at olw concentrations while had inhibitory effect on soil bacteria,actinomyces and fungus at high concentrations.When the concentration of La Was low,soil azotobacter was stimulated slightly while soil nitrifier was stimulated strongly and the maximum increase was up to 50%.When the concentration of La was highy,both soil aztobacter and nitrifier ware inhibited ,and the inhibition of La to the nitrifier increased with La conentration,La added at all the levels had stimulative effect on soil inorgaic and organic phosphobacteria.Among the 4 physiological groups,soil nitrifier was most sensitive to La,so,it migh be reasonble to assume that soil nitrifier was a sensitive indicator for evaluating the biological and environmental effects of rare earths.

  12. Ileal and cecal microbial populations in broilers given specific essential oil blends and probiotics in two consecutive grow-outs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digestive microbial populations (MP) are key components for sustained healthy broiler production. Specific essential oil (EO) blends and probiotics used as feed additives have shown to promote healthy digestive microbials, resulting in improved poultry production. Two consecutive experiments were ...

  13. Controls upon microbial accessibility to soil organic matter following woody plant encroachment into grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, C. A.; Boutton, T. W.; Filley, T. R.

    2009-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment (WPE) into savannas and grasslands is a global phenomenon that alters soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics through changes in litter quality and quantity, soil structure, microbial ecology, and soil hydrology. To elucidate the controls upon microbial accessibility to SOM, bulk soils from a chronosequence of progressive WPE into native grasslands at the Texas A&M Agricultural Experimental Station La Copita Research Area were incubated for one year. The quantity and stable carbon isotope composition of respired CO2, plant biopolymer chemistry in SOM, and microbial community structure were tracked. Respiration rates declined steadily over the course of the experiment with 15-25% of the total CO2 respired released in the first month of incubation. Between 8 and 18% of the total carbon was mineralized to CO2 throughout the incubation. After day 84 a significantly (p cutin and suberin, as hypothesized by others. Quantitative and isotopic comparisons of these monomers prior to and following the incubation will determine if selective compound utilization is a reason for this depletion. The results discussed herein provide important insights into the dynamics of SOM accrual with WPE as well as respiration dynamics during laboratory incubations.

  14. Microbial populations responsible for specific soil suppressiveness to plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weller, D.M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; McSpadden Gardener, B.B.; Thomashow, L.S.

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural soils suppressive to soilborne plant pathogens occur worldwide, and for several of these soils the biological basis of suppressiveness has been described. Two classical types of suppressiveness are known. General suppression owes its activity to the total microbial biomass in soil and i

  15. MICROBIAL POPULATION CHANGES DURING BIOREMEDIATION OF AN EXPERIMENTAL OIL SPILL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three crude oil bioremediation techniques were applied in a randomized block field experiment simulating a coastal oil-spill. Four treatments (no oil control, oil alone, oil + nutrients, and oil + nutrients + an indigenous inoculum) were applied. In-situ microbial community str...

  16. Metagenomic approach for understanding microbial population from petroleum muck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, M N; Dhebar, S V; Dhebar, S V; Bhargava, P; Pandit, A S; Patel, R P; Saxena, A K; Bagatharia, S B

    2014-05-29

    Petroleum products play a major role in fueling the economy of the world but the pollution they create has become a critical issue. Understanding the diversity present in pipeline muck will help with the exploration of new microbial strains with better hydrocarbon degrading capacities for bioremediation of polluted sites. This study provides an analysis of petroleum muck using next generation sequencing.

  17. Metagenomic Approach for Understanding Microbial Population from Petroleum Muck

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, M. N.; Dhebar, S. V.; Bhargava, P.; Pandit, A. S.; Patel, R. P.; A K Saxena; Bagatharia, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum products play a major role in fueling the economy of the world but the pollution they create has become a critical issue. Understanding the diversity present in pipeline muck will help with the exploration of new microbial strains with better hydrocarbon degrading capacities for bioremediation of polluted sites. This study provides an analysis of petroleum muck using next generation sequencing.

  18. Ecological perspectives on synthetic biology: insights from microbial population biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, Ana E.; Rebolleda-Gómez, María; Benítez, Mariana; Travisano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic capabilities of microbes are the basis for many major biotechnological advances, exploiting microbial diversity by selection or engineering of single strains. However, there are limits to the advances that can be achieved with single strains, and attention has turned toward the metabolic potential of consortia and the field of synthetic ecology. The main challenge for the synthetic ecology is that consortia are frequently unstable, largely because evolution by constituent members affects their interactions, which are the basis of collective metabolic functionality. Current practices in modeling consortia largely consider interactions as fixed circuits of chemical reactions, which greatly increases their tractability. This simplification comes at the cost of essential biological realism, stripping out the ecological context in which the metabolic actions occur and the potential for evolutionary change. In other words, evolutionary stability is not engineered into the system. This realization highlights the necessity to better identify the key components that influence the stable coexistence of microorganisms. Inclusion of ecological and evolutionary principles, in addition to biophysical variables and stoichiometric modeling of metabolism, is critical for microbial consortia design. This review aims to bring ecological and evolutionary concepts to the discussion on the stability of microbial consortia. In particular, we focus on the combined effect of spatial structure (connectivity of molecules and cells within the system) and ecological interactions (reciprocal and non-reciprocal) on the persistence of microbial consortia. We discuss exemplary cases to illustrate these ideas from published studies in evolutionary biology and biotechnology. We conclude by making clear the relevance of incorporating evolutionary and ecological principles to the design of microbial consortia, as a way of achieving evolutionarily stable and sustainable systems. PMID

  19. Oxygen Effects on Thermophilic Microbial Populations in Biofilters Treating Nitric Oxide Containing Off-Gas Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Brady Douglas; Apel, William Arnold; Smith, William Aaron

    2004-04-01

    Electricity generation from coal has increased by an average of 51 billion kWh per year over the past 3 years. For this reason cost-effective strategies to control nitrogen oxides (NOx) from coal-fired power plant combustion gases must be developed. Compost biofilters operated at 55°C at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 13 seconds were shown to be feasible for removal of nitric oxide (NO) from synthetic flue gas. Denitrifying microbial populations in these biofilters were shown to reduce influent NO feeds by 90 to 95% at inlet NO concentrations of 500 ppmv. Oxygen was shown to have a significant effect on the NO removal efficiency demonstrated by these biofilters. Two biofilters were set up under identical conditions for the purpose of monitoring NO removal as well as changes in the microbial population in the bed medium under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Changes in the microbial population were monitored to determine the maximum oxygen tolerance of a denitrifying biofilter as well as methods of optimizing microbial populations capable of denitrification in the presence of low oxygen concentrations. Nitric oxide removal dropped to between 10 and 20% when oxygen was present in the influent stream. The inactive compost used to pack the biofilters may have also caused the decreased NO removal efficiency compared to previous biofiltration experiments. Analysis of the bed medium microbial population using environmental scanning electron microscopy indicated significant increases in biomass populating the surface of the compost when compared to unacclimated compost.

  20. Microbial populations causing off-flavour in recirculated aquaculture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Mie Bech; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Schramm, Edward

    Microbial production of geosmin, a secondary metabolite with an earthy off-flavour is a serious economic problem in wine production, drinking water and aquaculture. Geosmin is produced by a small group of bacteria all harboring the geosmin synthetase gene (geoA). Sequencing and analyzing the dist......Microbial production of geosmin, a secondary metabolite with an earthy off-flavour is a serious economic problem in wine production, drinking water and aquaculture. Geosmin is produced by a small group of bacteria all harboring the geosmin synthetase gene (geoA). Sequencing and analyzing...... and activity. These findings are useful for the future optimization and management of full-scale aquaculture plants, and can be used as a diagnostic tool in developing strategies to limit the presence and growth of geosmin-producing bacteria....

  1. Estimation of the Number of Microbial Species Comprising a Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    and journal articles. New methods for estimation are regularly being evaluated for use. It appears from this research that parametric methods hold...Experiments,” Biometrics: 427-438 (1989). Chao, Anne and Lee, Shen-Ming. “Estimating the Number of Classes via Sample Coverage,” Journal of the...Trends in Parasitology : 568-574 (2006). Hong et al.. “Predicting Microbial Species Richness,” PNAS: 117-122 (2006). 90 91 Hughes et al

  2. Microbial populations responsible for specific soil suppressiveness to plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, David M; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Gardener, Brian B McSpadden; Thomashow, Linda S

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural soils suppressive to soilborne plant pathogens occur worldwide, and for several of these soils the biological basis of suppressiveness has been described. Two classical types of suppressiveness are known. General suppression owes its activity to the total microbial biomass in soil and is not transferable between soils. Specific suppression owes its activity to the effects of individual or select groups of microorganisms and is transferable. The microbial basis of specific suppression to four diseases, Fusarium wilts, potato scab, apple replant disease, and take-all, is discussed. One of the best-described examples occurs in take-all decline soils. In Washington State, take-all decline results from the buildup of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. that produce the antifungal metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol. Producers of this metabolite may have a broader role in disease-suppressive soils worldwide. By coupling molecular technologies with traditional approaches used in plant pathology and microbiology, it is possible to dissect the microbial composition and complex interactions in suppressive soils.

  3. Modeling the impact of the indigenous microbial population on the maximum population density of Salmonella on alfalfa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijgersberg, H.; Nierop Groot, M.N.; Tromp, S.O.; Franz, E.

    2013-01-01

    Within a microbial risk assessment framework, modeling the maximum population density (MPD) of a pathogenic microorganism is important but often not considered. This paper describes a model predicting the MPD of Salmonella on alfalfa as a function of the initial contamination level, the total count

  4. [Formation of microbial populations on the surface of protective coatings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopteva, Zh P; Zanina, V V; Piliashenko-Novokhatnyĭ, A I; Kopteva, A E; Kozlova, I A

    2001-01-01

    Formation of microbial cenosis on the surface of polyethylene-, polyurethane- and oil-bitumen-based protective coatings was studied in dynamics during 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days. It has been shown that the biofilm was formed on the protective materials during 14 days and consisted of ammonifying, denitrifying, hydrocarbon-oxidizing and sulphate-reducing bacteria referred to Pseudomonas, Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Kesulfovibrio genera. The bacteria which form the biofilm on coatings possess high denitrifying and sulphate-reducing activities. Corrosion inhibitors-biocydes, introduced in composition of oil-bitumen coatings suppressed growth and metabolic activity of corrosion-active bacteria.

  5. Variations of dominant microbial populations in groundwater in response to the leachate from Laogang Landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yang-jie; YANG Hong; LI Dao-tang; LIN Zhi-xin

    2005-01-01

    Temporal changes of dominant microbial populations in groundwater in response to the leachate from Shanghai Laogang Landfill were investigated. Concentrations of dissolved redox-relevant species in groundwater suggested that the dominating redox process had changed from denitrification to methane-production/sulfate-reduction due to landfilling. Dominant microbial populations were determined using restriction fragment length polymorphism(RFLP) analyses of 16S rRNA gene libraries, which were further studied by sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. The results indicated that obvious shifts of dominant microbial populations had occurred in groundwater in response to the pollution of leachate. The closest relatives of some dominant clones are accordant with the dominating redox processes determined by hydrochemical analyses, based on the GenBank's indications on the ability to perform redox reactions.

  6. The Biodiversity Changes in the Microbial Population of Soils Contaminated with Crude Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasian, Firouz; Lockington, Robin; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-06-01

    Crude oil spills resulting from excavation, transportation and downstream processes can cause intensive damage to living organisms and result in changes in the microbial population of that environment. In this study, we used a pyrosequencing analysis to investigate changes in the microbial population of soils contaminated with crude oil. Crude oil contamination in soil resulted in the creation of a more homogenous population of microorganisms dominated by members of the Actinomycetales, Clostridiales and Bacillales (all belonging to Gram-positive bacteria) as well as Flavobacteriales, Pseudomonadales, Burkholderiales, Rhizobiales and Sphingomonadales (all belonging to Gram-negative bacteria). These changes in the biodiversity decreased the ratios of chemoheterotrophic bacteria at higher concentrations of crude oil contamination, with these being replaced by photoheterotrophic bacteria, mainly Rhodospirillales. Several of the dominant microbial orders in the crude oil contaminated soils are able to degrade crude oil hydrocarbons and therefore are potentially useful for remediation of crude oil in contaminated sites.

  7. Strain-level microbial epidemiology and population genomics from shotgun metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Matthias; Ward, Doyle V; Pasolli, Edoardo; Tolio, Thomas; Zolfo, Moreno; Asnicar, Francesco; Truong, Duy Tin; Tett, Adrian; Morrow, Ardythe L; Segata, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    Identifying microbial strains and characterizing their functional potential is essential for pathogen discovery, epidemiology and population genomics. We present pangenome-based phylogenomic analysis (PanPhlAn; http://segatalab.cibio.unitn.it/tools/panphlan), a tool that uses metagenomic data to achieve strain-level microbial profiling resolution. PanPhlAn recognized outbreak strains, produced the largest strain-level population genomic study of human-associated bacteria and, in combination with metatranscriptomics, profiled the transcriptional activity of strains in complex communities.

  8. Suppression of Beneficial Mutations in Dynamic Microbial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittihn, Philip; Hasty, Jeff; Tsimring, Lev S.

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative predictions for the spread of mutations in bacterial populations are essential to interpret evolution experiments and to improve the stability of synthetic gene circuits. We derive analytical expressions for the suppression factor for beneficial mutations in populations that undergo periodic dilutions, covering arbitrary population sizes, dilution factors, and growth advantages in a single stochastic model. We find that the suppression factor grows with the dilution factor and depends nontrivially on the growth advantage, resulting in the preferential elimination of mutations with certain growth advantages. We confirm our results by extensive numerical simulations.

  9. Genetic Diversity Affects the Daily Transcriptional Oscillations of Marine Microbial Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilova, Irina N; Robidart, Julie C; DeLong, Edward F; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Marine microbial communities are genetically diverse but have robust synchronized daily transcriptional patterns at the genus level that are similar across a wide variety of oceanic regions. We developed a microarray-inspired gene-centric approach to resolve transcription of closely-related but distinct strains/ecotypes in high-throughput sequence data. Applying this approach to the existing metatranscriptomics datasets collected from two different oceanic regions, we found unique and variable patterns of transcription by individual taxa within the abundant picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, the alpha Proteobacterium Pelagibacter and the eukaryotic picophytoplankton Ostreococcus. The results demonstrate that marine microbial taxa respond differentially to variability in space and time in the ocean. These intra-genus individual transcriptional patterns underlie whole microbial community responses, and the approach developed here facilitates deeper insights into microbial population dynamics.

  10. Controlling Salmonella infection in weanling pigs through water delivery of direct-fed microbials or organic acids; Part I. Effects on growth performance, microbial populations and immune status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigs (n=88) weaned at 19 ± 2 d of age were used in a 14 d study to evaluate the effects of water-delivered direct-fed microbials (DFM) or organic acids on immune status, Salmonella infection and shedding, and intestinal microbial populations following a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge. Pigs were ch...

  11. An age-structured population balance model for microbial dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte M.V.E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an age-structured population balance model (ASPBM for a bioprocess in a continuous stirred-tank fermentor. It relates the macroscopic properties and dynamic behavior of biomass to the operational parameters and microscopic properties of cells. Population dynamics is governed by two time- and age-dependent density functions for living and dead cells, accounting for the influence of substrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations on cell division, aging and death processes. The ASPBM described biomass and substrate oscillations in aerobic continuous cultures as experimentally observed. It is noteworthy that a small data set consisting of nonsegregated measurements was sufficient to adjust a complex segregated mathematical model.

  12. Aerobic Microbial Community of Insectary Population of Phlebotomus papatasi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseh Maleki-Ravasan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbes particularly bacteria presenting in the gut of haematophagous insects may have an important role in the epidemiology of human infectious disease.The microbial flora of gut and surrounding environmental of a laboratory strain of Phlebotomus papatasi, the main vector of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ZCL in the old world, was investigated. Biochemical reactions and 16s rDNA sequencing of the isolated bacteria against 24 sugars and amino acids were used for bacteria species identification. Common mycological media used for fungi identification as well.Most isolates belonged to the Enterobacteriaceae, a large, heterogeneous group of gram-negative rods whose natural habitat is the intestinal tract of humans and animals. Enterobacteriaceae groups included Edwardsiella, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Klebsiella, Kluyvera, Leminorella, Pantoea, Proteus, Providencia, Rahnella, Serratia, Shigella, Tatumella, and Yersinia and non Enterobacteriaceae groups included Bacillus, Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas. The most prevalent isolates were Proteus mirabilis and P. vulgaris. These saprophytic and swarming motile bacteria were isolated from all immature, pupae, and mature fed or unfed male or female sand flies as well as from larval and adult food sources. Five fungi species were also isolated from sand flies, their food sources and colonization materials where Candida sp. was common in all mentioned sources.Midgut microbiota are increasingly seen as an important factor for modulating vector competence in insect vectors so their possible effects of the mirobiota on the biology of P. papatasi and their roles in the sandfly-Leishmania interaction are discussed.

  13. A RESTful API for accessing microbial community data for MG-RAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Andreas; Bischof, Jared; Harrison, Travis; Brettin, Tom; D'Souza, Mark; Gerlach, Wolfgang; Matthews, Hunter; Paczian, Tobias; Wilkening, Jared; Glass, Elizabeth M; Desai, Narayan; Meyer, Folker

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomic sequencing has produced significant amounts of data in recent years. For example, as of summer 2013, MG-RAST has been used to annotate over 110,000 data sets totaling over 43 Terabases. With metagenomic sequencing finding even wider adoption in the scientific community, the existing web-based analysis tools and infrastructure in MG-RAST provide limited capability for data retrieval and analysis, such as comparative analysis between multiple data sets. Moreover, although the system provides many analysis tools, it is not comprehensive. By opening MG-RAST up via a web services API (application programmers interface) we have greatly expanded access to MG-RAST data, as well as provided a mechanism for the use of third-party analysis tools with MG-RAST data. This RESTful API makes all data and data objects created by the MG-RAST pipeline accessible as JSON objects. As part of the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase project (KBase, http://kbase.us) we have implemented a web services API for MG-RAST. This API complements the existing MG-RAST web interface and constitutes the basis of KBase's microbial community capabilities. In addition, the API exposes a comprehensive collection of data to programmers. This API, which uses a RESTful (Representational State Transfer) implementation, is compatible with most programming environments and should be easy to use for end users and third parties. It provides comprehensive access to sequence data, quality control results, annotations, and many other data types. Where feasible, we have used standards to expose data and metadata. Code examples are provided in a number of languages both to show the versatility of the API and to provide a starting point for users. We present an API that exposes the data in MG-RAST for consumption by our users, greatly enhancing the utility of the MG-RAST service.

  14. A RESTful API for accessing microbial community data for MG-RAST.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Wilke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomic sequencing has produced significant amounts of data in recent years. For example, as of summer 2013, MG-RAST has been used to annotate over 110,000 data sets totaling over 43 Terabases. With metagenomic sequencing finding even wider adoption in the scientific community, the existing web-based analysis tools and infrastructure in MG-RAST provide limited capability for data retrieval and analysis, such as comparative analysis between multiple data sets. Moreover, although the system provides many analysis tools, it is not comprehensive. By opening MG-RAST up via a web services API (application programmers interface we have greatly expanded access to MG-RAST data, as well as provided a mechanism for the use of third-party analysis tools with MG-RAST data. This RESTful API makes all data and data objects created by the MG-RAST pipeline accessible as JSON objects. As part of the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase project (KBase, http://kbase.us we have implemented a web services API for MG-RAST. This API complements the existing MG-RAST web interface and constitutes the basis of KBase's microbial community capabilities. In addition, the API exposes a comprehensive collection of data to programmers. This API, which uses a RESTful (Representational State Transfer implementation, is compatible with most programming environments and should be easy to use for end users and third parties. It provides comprehensive access to sequence data, quality control results, annotations, and many other data types. Where feasible, we have used standards to expose data and metadata. Code examples are provided in a number of languages both to show the versatility of the API and to provide a starting point for users. We present an API that exposes the data in MG-RAST for consumption by our users, greatly enhancing the utility of the MG-RAST service.

  15. Microbial population heterogeneity versus bioreactor heterogeneity: evaluation of Redox Sensor Green as an exogenous metabolic biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baert, Jonathan; Delepierre, Anissa; Telek, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    performances (i.e. microbial population heterogeneity). In this work, we have evaluated the relevance of Redox Sensor Green (RSG) as an exogenous biosensor of metabolic activity at the single cell level. RSG signal is proportional to the activity of the electron transport chain and its signal is strongly...

  16. In situ examination of microbial populations in a model drinking water distribution system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Adam Camillo; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Arvin, Erik

    2002-01-01

    A flow cell set-up was used as a model drinking water distribution system to analyze the in situ microbial population. Biofilm growth was followed by transmission light microscopy for 81 days and showed a biofilm consisting of microcolonies separated by a monolayer of cells. Protozoans (ciliates...

  17. Physiological heterogeneities in microbial populations and implications for physical stress tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlquist, Magnus; Fernandes, Rita Lencastre; Helmark, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    may be unfavourable on the one hand (reduces yields and productivities), but also beneficial on the other hand (facilitates quick adaptation to new conditions - i.e. increases the robustness of the fermentation process). Understanding and control of microbial population heterogeneity is thus of major...

  18. Population Education Accessions List. January-April 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This bibliography addresses the subject of population education. Entries are categorized into three parts. Part 1, "Population Education," consists of titles of books and other documents addressing various aspects of population education arranged by country in the first section and general materials in the second section. Part 2,…

  19. Population Education Accessions List. May-August 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This annotated bibliography lists available resources that address many issues involved in population education. Entries are categorized into three parts. Part I, "Population Education," consists of titles on various aspects of population education arranged by country in the first section and by general materials in the second section.…

  20. Controls on microbial accessibility to soil organic carbon following woody plant encroachment into grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, Courtney; Boutton, Thomas; Olk, Dan; Filley, Timothy

    2010-05-01

    Woody plant encroachment (WPE) into savannas and grasslands is a global phenomenon that alters soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics through changes in litter quality and quantity, soil structure, microbial ecology, and hydrology. To elucidate the controls on microbial accessibility to SOC, bulk soils from a chronosequence of progressive WPE into native grasslands at the Texas Agrilife La Copita Research Area were incubated for one year. The quantity and stable carbon isotope composition of respired CO2, and plant biopolymer chemistry in SOC were tracked. Respiration rates declined exponentially over the course of the experiment with 15-25% of the total CO2 respired released in the first month of incubation. Between 8 and 18% of the total SOC was mineralized to CO2 throughout the incubation. After day 84 a significantly (pproductivity. Despite documented SOC accrual following WPE at La Copita, we observed no evidence of enhanced SOC stabilization in these respiration experiments. In fact, a greater proportion of total SOC was lost from the soil of mature woody stands than from young stands, suggesting SOC accumulation observed with WPE may be due to greater input rates or microbial dynamics not captured in the laboratory incubation. Compound-specific analyses indicated there was a significant (pamino acids, and amino sugars during the incubation. Amino nitrogen tended to become more concentrated during the incubation, although the trend was not significant. Relatively few significant trends of these compounds in response to woody stand age were observed, indicating that these compounds were generally degraded to the same extent during the incubation. We hypothesize that biochemical recalcitrance is not an important mechanism for the stabilization of SOC at this site. By day 184 of the incubation, CO2 respired from older woody clusters (34-86 years) was significantly (p<0.05) less 13C-depleted with respect to bulk SOC than CO2 respired from younger woody clusters (14

  1. STATUS OF SOIL MICROBIAL POPULATION, ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY AND BIOMASS OF SELECTED NATURAL, SECONDARY AND REHABILITATED FORESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Daljit Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Substantial clearance of forests and conversion of forest into various land use types contribute to deterioration of soil fertility and associated nutrients loss. Soils from natural and rehabilitated forest in Chikus Forest Reserve and also enrichment planting forest and secondary forest of Tapah Hill Forest Reserve, Perak, Malaysia were selected in order to assess the influence of land use change on biological properties. This study was carried out to provide fundamental information on soil biological properties and also to compare the differences between natural forest, mono-rehabilitated forest, mixed planting forest and natural regenerated forest (secondary forest. Six subplots (20×20 m were established at each study plot and soil samples were collected at the depths of 0-15 cm (topsoil and 15-30 cm (subsoil. Soil microbial population was determined using spread-plate technique. Fluorescein Diacetate (FDA hydrolysis was used to assess the amount of microbial enzymatic activity for each forest plot. Soil Microbial Biomass C (MBC and N (MBN were extracted using chloroform fumigation extraction technique and the amount of MBC was determined by dichromate digestion, while MBN via Kjeldahl digestion technique. Soil acidity was determined by pH meter and moisture content was elucidated using gravimetric method. The levels of microbial population of bacterial and fungal at natural significantly exceeded the corresponding values of rehabilitated and secondary forest. However, microbial population is much higher in rehabilitated forest of Tapah Hill compared to that of secondary forest and also Chikus Forest Reserve planted forest which proves that rehabilitation activities do help increase the level of microbial community in the soils. Longer period of time after planting as in enrichment planting compared to mono planting of S. leprosula plantation showed that restoring and recovery of the planted forest needed time. Deforestation activities

  2. Phosphatase Activity of Microbial Populations in Different Milk Samples in Relation to Protein and Carbohydrate Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sosanka Protim SANDILYA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cattle milk is a rich source of protein, carbohydrate, vitamins, minerals and all other major and micro nutrients. At a moderate pH, milk is an excellent media for the growth of microbes and thus, intake of raw milk is precarious. In this study, attempt was made for a qualitative study of eight raw milk samples of different varieties of cow and goat milk, collected from Jorhat district of Assam, India, on the basis of nutritional value and microbial population. The highest microbial population was found in the milk collected from cross hybrid variety of cow, whereas microbial contamination was the least in Jersey cow milk. Samples of C1 (Jersey cow variety showed presence of the highest amount of protein and carbohydrate content as compared to the others. Almost all the milk samples showed positive acid and alkaline phosphatase activity. Maximum acid phosphatase activity was observed in cross hybrid cow milk, whereas local cow milk exhibited the highest alkaline phosphatase activity. Phosphatase activity did not show any co-relationship with microbial population of the milk samples. Similarly, the protein and carbohydrate content of the samples did not have any significant impact on both acid and alkaline phosphatase activity.

  3. Effects of fertilizers on soil’s microbial growth and populations: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojo OI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil nutrients availability and decomposition of organic matter depends on microorganism but there are little available literatures on the possible effects of nutrients fixing chemicals and substances on the survival and population distribution of various microbes. Also, because of importance of organic and inorganic fertilizers to increase the soil microorganisms needed for the growth of plants there is need for comprehensive review of existing literature on the subject. This paper reviewed the effects of fertilizers on soil’s microbial growth and populations in available literatures. Various studies agreed that low microbe population due to lack of organic matter can be easily rectified by amending the soil with fertilizers and organic matter and allowing time for microbial growth therefore jump-starting the reproduction of microbes by adding beneficial microbes along with organic matter. Microbe improves soil structure by the humus they create while digesting organic matter and also help in nitrogen fixing.

  4. Environmental Whole-Genome Amplification to Access Microbial Diversity in Contaminated Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abulencia, C.B.; Wyborski, D.L.; Garcia, J.; Podar, M.; Chen, W.; Chang, S.H.; Chang, H.W.; Watson, D.; Brodie,E.I.; Hazen, T.C.; Keller, M.

    2005-12-10

    Low-biomass samples from nitrate and heavy metal contaminated soils yield DNA amounts that have limited use for direct, native analysis and screening. Multiple displacement amplification (MDA) using ?29 DNA polymerase was used to amplify whole genomes from environmental, contaminated, subsurface sediments. By first amplifying the genomic DNA (gDNA), biodiversity analysis and gDNA library construction of microbes found in contaminated soils were made possible. The MDA method was validated by analyzing amplified genome coverage from approximately five Escherichia coli cells, resulting in 99.2 percent genome coverage. The method was further validated by confirming overall representative species coverage and also an amplification bias when amplifying from a mix of eight known bacterial strains. We extracted DNA from samples with extremely low cell densities from a U.S. Department of Energy contaminated site. After amplification, small subunit rRNA analysis revealed relatively even distribution of species across several major phyla. Clone libraries were constructed from the amplified gDNA, and a small subset of clones was used for shotgun sequencing. BLAST analysis of the library clone sequences showed that 64.9 percent of the sequences had significant similarities to known proteins, and ''clusters of orthologous groups'' (COG) analysis revealed that more than half of the sequences from each library contained sequence similarity to known proteins. The libraries can be readily screened for native genes or any target of interest. Whole-genome amplification of metagenomic DNA from very minute microbial sources, while introducing an amplification bias, will allow access to genomic information that was not previously accessible.

  5. Efficacy of gaseous ozone against Salmonella and microbial population on dried oregano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torlak, Emrah; Sert, Durmuş; Ulca, Pelin

    2013-08-01

    Interest in potential food applications of ozone has expanded in recent years in response to consumer demands for green technologies. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of gaseous ozone for the microbial reduction and elimination of Salmonella on dried oregano. Ozone treatment was performed up to 120min under continuous stream of two different constant ozone concentrations (2.8 and 5.3mg/L). Significant (Poregano determined as 5.8logCFU/g decreased significantly by 2.8 and 3.7 log after ozonation at 2.8 and 5.3mg/L for 120min, respectively. Sensory evaluation results suggested that over the 2 log reduction in the microbial population can be obtained on dried oregano by gaseous ozone treatments with an acceptable taste, flavor and appearance. The results demonstrated that the gaseous ozone treatment is an effective alternative microbial reduction technique for dried oregano.

  6. Targeted access to the genomes of low-abundance organisms in complex microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Mircea; Abulencia, Carl B; Walcher, Marion; Hutchison, Don; Zengler, Karsten; Garcia, Joseph A; Holland, Trevin; Cotton, David; Hauser, Loren; Keller, Martin

    2007-05-01

    Current metagenomic approaches to the study of complex microbial consortia provide a glimpse into the community metabolism and occasionally allow genomic assemblies for the most abundant organisms. However, little information is gained for the members of the community present at low frequencies, especially those representing yet-uncultured taxa, which include the bulk of the diversity present in most environments. Here we used phylogenetically directed cell separation by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry, followed by amplification and sequencing of a fraction of the genomic DNA of several bacterial cells that belong to the TM7 phylum. Partial genomic assembly allowed, for the first time, a look into the evolution and potential metabolism of a soil representative from this group of organisms for which there are no species in stable laboratory cultures. Genomic reconstruction from targeted cells of uncultured organisms isolated directly from the environment represents a powerful approach to access any specific members of a community and an alternative way to assess the community's metabolic potential.

  7. Population Education Accessions List. January-April, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    This document features output from a computerized bibliographic database. The list categorizes entries into three parts. Part I, Population Education, consists of titles that address various aspects of population education arranged by country in the first section and general materials in the second. Part II, Knowledge Base Information, consists of…

  8. Population Education Accessions List, May-August 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This document is comprised of output from the Regional Clearinghouse on Population Education and Communication (RCPEC) computerized bibliographic database on reproductive and sexual health and geography. Entries are categorized into four parts: (1) "Population Education"; (2) "Knowledge-base Information"; (3) "Audio-Visual and IEC Materials; and…

  9. Population Education Accessions List. July-December 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    Identified in this pamphlet are 317 resources about population education. Compiled by UNESCO's Population Education Clearing House in Thailand, the list contains references to journal articles, monographs, research reports, teaching guides, and curriculum materials. Most were published in Asian countries and the United States during the period…

  10. Monitoring the microbial populations and temperatures of fresh broccoli from harvest to retail display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallaire, R; LeBlanc, D I; Tranchant, C C; Vasseur, L; Delaquis, P; Beaulieu, C

    2006-05-01

    Microbial populations and the temperature of fresh broccoli were monitored at several steps of a supply chain by sampling 33 distinct lots of locally grown produce over two seasons during harvest, storage, wholesale handling, and retail display. Imported broccoli was also sampled, but only at retail display. Microbiological analyses were conducted on the florets of 201 local and 60 imported broccoli samples to determine populations of total aerobic bacteria (aerobic colony count), fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes. All the samples had mean aerobic colony counts ranging between 4 and 6 log CFU/g, but L. monocytogenes was not detected (limit of detection =100 CFU/g). Fecal coliforms and E. coli (limit of detection =20 most probable number per 100 g) were found in 22 of 126 samples of local broccoli collected at various steps of the production and distribution system during the first season. None was found in 75 samples collected in the second season. Fecal coliforms and E. coli were found in 2 of 60 imported broccoli samples. Broccoli temperatures were relatively well controlled throughout the production and distribution system. No clear change in produce microbial populations was evident between harvest and retail display, during both sampling seasons. However, a large experimental variability was found, possibly associated with the high variability of the initial levels of microbial populations on broccoli at harvest.

  11. Milankovitch-scale correlations between deeply buried microbial populations and biogenic ooze lithology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, I.W.; Bekins, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    The recent discoveries of large, active populations of microbes in the subseafloor of the world's oceans supports the impact of the deep biosphere biota on global biogeochemical cycles and raises important questions concerning the functioning of these extreme environments for life. These investigations demonstrated that subseafloor microbes are unevenly distributed and that cell abundances and metabolic activities are often independent from sediment depths, with increased prokaryotic activity at geochemical and/or sedimentary interfaces. In this study we demonstrate that microbial populations vary at the scale of individual beds in the biogenic oozes of a drill site in the eastern equatorial Pacific (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201, Site 1226). We relate bedding-scale changes in biogenic ooze sediment composition to organic carbon (OC) and microbial cell concentrations using high-resolution color reflectance data as proxy for lithology. Our analyses demonstrate that microbial concentrations are an order of magnitude higher in the more organic-rich diatom oozes than in the nannofossil oozes. The variations mimic small-scale variations in diatom abundance and OC, indicating that the modern distribution of microbial biomass is ultimately controlled by Milankovitch-frequency variations in past oceanographic conditions. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  12. Microbial Diversity and Population Structure of Extremely Acidic Sulfur-Oxidizing Biofilms From Sulfidic Caves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D.; Stoffer, T.; Lyon, E. H.; Macalady, J. L.

    2005-12-01

    Extremely acidic (pH 0-1) microbial biofilms called snottites form on the walls of sulfidic caves where gypsum replacement crusts isolate sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms from the buffering action of limestone host rock. We investigated the phylogeny and population structure of snottites from sulfidic caves in central Italy using full cycle rRNA methods. A small subunit rRNA bacterial clone library from a Frasassi cave complex snottite sample contained a single sequence group (>60 clones) similar to Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Bacterial and universal rRNA clone libraries from other Frasassi snottites were only slightly more diverse, containing a maximum of 4 bacterial species and probably 2 archaeal species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of snottites from Frasassi and from the much warmer Rio Garrafo cave complex revealed that all of the communities are simple (low-diversity) and dominated by Acidithiobacillus and/or Ferroplasma species, with smaller populations of an Acidimicrobium species, filamentous fungi, and protists. Our results suggest that sulfidic cave snottites will be excellent model microbial ecosystems suited for ecological and metagenomic studies aimed at elucidating geochemical and ecological controls on microbial diversity, and at mapping the spatial history of microbial evolutionary events such as adaptations, recombinations and gene transfers.

  13. Characteristics of the soil microbial population in forest land irrigated with saline water in the desert area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The study of soil microbial populations and diversity is an important way to understanding the soil energy process.In this study we analyzed the characteristics of soil microbial populations of the Tarim Desert Highway shelter-forest,by identifying microbial fatty acids and using methods of conventional cul-tivation.The results illustrated that the amount of soil microbial activity and the diversity of soil microbial fatty acid increased significantly with the plantation age of the shelter-forest;the soil microbial population was dominated by bacteria.The fatty acids of C14︰0,C15︰0,C16︰0,C17︰0,C18︰1ω9,C18︰0,C18︰2ω6 and C21︰0 were found to be dominant soil microbial fatty acids in the shelter-forest soil.Prin-cipal analysis and regression analysis showed that(1) concentrations of fatty acids of C14︰0,C16︰0 and C18︰0 could be used as indicators of total soil microbial population;(2) soil bacteria and actinomycetes populations were closely correlated with the amount of fatty acids of C15︰0 and C17︰0;and(3) soil fungi were closely correlated with the amount of fatty acids of C18︰1ω9 and C18︰2ω6.

  14. Physiological heterogeneities in microbial populations and implications for physical stress tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlquist, Magnus; Fernandes, Rita Lencastre; Helmark, Søren

    2012-01-01

    may be unfavourable on the one hand (reduces yields and productivities), but also beneficial on the other hand (facilitates quick adaptation to new conditions - i.e. increases the robustness of the fermentation process). Understanding and control of microbial population heterogeneity is thus of major...... importance for improving microbial cell factory processes. Results: In this work, a dual reporter system was developed and applied to map growth and cell fitness heterogeneities within budding yeast populations during aerobic cultivation in well-mixed bioreactors. The reporter strain, which was based...... it was possible to distinguish subpopulations with high and low cell membrane robustness and hence ability to withstand freeze-thaw stress. A strong inverse correlation between growth and cell membrane robustness was observed, which further supports the hypothesis that cellular resources are limited and need...

  15. Seasonal Microbial Population Shifts in a Bioremediation System Treating Metal and Sulfate-Rich Seepage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan A. Baldwin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical reactors (BCRs using complex organics for bioremediation of mine-influenced water must operate successfully year round. In cold climates, where many mines in Canada are located, survival of the important microorganisms through the winter months is a concern. In this work, broad phylogenetic surveys, using metagenomics, of the microbial populations in pulp mill biosolids used to remediate metal leachate containing As, Zn, Cd and sulfate were performed to see if the types of microorganisms present changed over the seasons of one year (August 2008 to July 2009. Despite temperature variations between 0 and 17 °C the overall structure of the microbial population was fairly consistent. A cyclical pattern in relative abundance was detected in certain taxa. These included fermenter-related groups, which were out of phase with other taxa such as Desulfobulbus that represented potential consumers of fermentation byproducts. Sulfate-reducers in the BCR biosolids were closely related to psychrotolerant species. Temperature was not a factor that shaped the microbial population structure within the BCR biosolids. Kinetics of organic matter degradation by these microbes and the rate of supply of organic carbon to sulfate-reducers would likely affect the metal removal rates at different temperatures.

  16. Dynamics of organic matter and microbial populations in amended soil: a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Giovanni; Pezzolla, Daniela; Zadra, Claudia; Albertini, Emidio; Marconi, Gianpiero; Turchetti, Benedetta; Buzzini, Pietro

    2013-04-01

    The application of organic amendments to soils, such as pig slurry, sewage sludge and compost is considered a tool for improving soil fertility and enhancing C stock. The addition of these different organic materials allows a good supply of nutrients for plants but also contributes to C sequestration, affects the microbial activity and the transformation of soil organic matter (SOM). Moreover, the addition of organic amendment has gained importance as a source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and then as a cause of the "Global Warming". Therefore, it is important to investigate the factors controlling the SOM mineralization in order to improve soil C sequestration and decreasing at the same time the GHG emissions. The quality of organic matter added to the soil will play an important role in these dynamics, affecting the microbial activity and the changes in microbial community structure. A laboratory, multidisciplinary experiment was carried out to test the effect of the amendment by anaerobic digested livestock-derived organic materials on labile organic matter evolution and on dynamics of microbial population, this latter both in terms of consistence of microbial biomass, as well as in terms of microbial biodiversity. Different approaches were used to study the microbial community structure: chemical (CO2 fluxes, WEOC, C-biomass, PLFA), microbiological (microbial enumeration) and molecular (DNA extraction and Roche 454, Next Generation Sequencing, NGS). The application of fresh digestate, derived from the anaerobic treatment of animal wastes, affected the short-term dynamics of microbial community, as reflected by the increase of CO2 emissions immediately after the amendment compared to the control soil. This is probably due to the addition of easily available C added with the digestate, demonstrating that this organic material was only partially stabilized by the anaerobic process. In fact, the digestate contained a high amounts of available C, which led to

  17. Population Education Accessions Lists, July-December 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    Part I of this resource guide contains listings of instructional materials, computer-assisted instructions, classroom activities and teaching methods. Part II deals with the knowledge base of population education. These publications are divided into 11 topics including: (1) demography; (2) documentation; (3) education (including environmental,…

  18. Population Education Accessions List, January-April 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    This document contains output from a computerized bibliographic database. This issue is divided into four parts. Part I consists of titles that address various aspects of population education and is arranged by country in the first section, and general materials in the second section. Part II presents knowledge base information and consists of…

  19. Bioremediation of hydrocarbon degradation in a petroleum-contaminated soil and microbial population and activity determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Manli; Li, Wei; Dick, Warren A; Ye, Xiqiong; Chen, Kaili; Kost, David; Chen, Liming

    2017-02-01

    Bioremediation of hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum-polluted soil is carried out by various microorganisms. However, little information is available for the relationships between hydrocarbon degradation rates in petroleum-contaminated soil and microbial population and activity in laboratory assay. In a microcosm study, degradation rate and efficiency of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), alkanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in a petroleum-contaminated soil were determined using an infrared photometer oil content analyzer and a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Also, the populations of TPH, alkane, and PAH degraders were enumerated by a modified most probable number (MPN) procedure, and the hydrocarbon degrading activities of these degraders were determined by the Biolog (MT2) MicroPlates assay. Results showed linear correlations between the TPH and alkane degradation rates and the population and activity increases of TPH and alkane degraders, but no correlation was observed between the PAH degradation rates and the PAH population and activity increases. Petroleum hydrocarbon degrading microbial population measured by MPN was significantly correlated with metabolic activity in the Biolog assay. The results suggest that the MPN procedure and the Biolog assay are efficient methods for assessing the rates of TPH and alkane, but not PAH, bioremediation in oil-contaminated soil in laboratory.

  20. Soil-specific limitations for access and analysis of soil microbial communities by metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombard, Nathalie; Prestat, Emmanuel; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Simonet, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomics approaches represent an important way to acquire information on the microbial communities present in complex environments like soil. However, to what extent do these approaches provide us with a true picture of soil microbial diversity? Soil is a challenging environment to work with. It

  1. Soil-specific limitations for access and analysis of soil microbial communities by metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Nathalie; Prestat, Emmanuel; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Simonet, Pascal

    2011-10-01

    Metagenomics approaches represent an important way to acquire information on the microbial communities present in complex environments like soil. However, to what extent do these approaches provide us with a true picture of soil microbial diversity? Soil is a challenging environment to work with. Its physicochemical properties affect microbial distributions inside the soil matrix, metagenome extraction and its subsequent analyses. To better understand the bias inherent to soil metagenome 'processing', we focus on soil physicochemical properties and their effects on the perceived bacterial distribution. In the light of this information, each step of soil metagenome processing is then discussed, with an emphasis on strategies for optimal soil sampling. Then, the interaction of cells and DNA with the soil matrix and the consequences for microbial DNA extraction are examined. Soil DNA extraction methods are compared and the veracity of the microbial profiles obtained is discussed. Finally, soil metagenomic sequence analysis and exploitation methods are reviewed.

  2. Access to general health care services by a New Zealand population with serious mental illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wheeler A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Literature suggests that good quality health care access can have a positive impact on the health of people with serious mental illness (SMI, but literature relating to patterns of access by this group is equivocal. AIM: This study was designed to explore health care access patterns in a group of people with SMI and to compare them with a general New Zealand population group, in order for health providers to understand how they might contribute to positive health outcomes for this group. METHODS: The study surveyed 404 mental health consumers aged 18-65 years receiving care from one district health board in Auckland about their patterns of health care access. Results were compared with those from the New Zealand Health Survey of the general population. RESULTS: Findings suggest that the SMI consumer respondents had poorer physical health than the general population respondents, accessed health care services in more complex ways and were more particular about who they accessed for their care than the general population respondents. There was some concern from SMI consumers around discrimination from health care providers. The study also suggested that some proactive management with SMI consumers for conditions such as metabolic syndrome was occurring within the health care community. DISCUSSION: The first point of access for SMI consumers with general health problems is not always the family general practitioner and so other health professionals may sometimes need to consider the mental and physical health of such consumers in a wider context than their own specialism.

  3. Diets of differentially processed wheat alter ruminal fermentation parameters and microbial populations in beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S Z; Yang, Z B; Yang, W R; Li, Z; Zhang, C Y; Liu, X M; Wan, F C

    2015-11-01

    The influences of differently processed wheat products on rumen fermentation, microbial populations, and serum biochemistry profiles in beef cattle were studied. Four ruminally cannulated Limousin × Luxi beef cattle (400 ± 10 kg) were used in the experiment with a 4 × 4 Latin square design. The experimental diets contained (on a DM basis) 60% corn silage as a forage source and 40% concentrate with 4 differently processed wheat products (extruded, pulverized, crushed, and rolled wheat). Concentrations of ruminal NH-N and microbial protein (MCP) in cattle fed crushed and rolled wheat were greater ( cattle fed pulverized and extruded wheat. Ruminal concentrations of total VFA and acetate and the ratio of acetate to propionate decreased ( cattle fed extruded wheat had the lowest concentrations of total VFA and acetate among all treatments. The relative abundance of , , ciliated protozoa, and was lower in cattle fed the pulverized wheat diet than in the other 3 diets ( cattle fed extruded wheat compared with cattle fed crushed and rolled wheat ( 0.05). Our findings suggest that the method of wheat processing could have a significant effect on ruminal fermentation parameters and microbial populations in beef cattle and that crushed and rolled processing is better in terms of ruminal NH-N and MCP content, acetate-to-propionate ratio, and relative abundance of rumen microorganisms.

  4. Functional single-cell analyses: flow cytometry and cell sorting of microbial populations and communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Susann; Nebe-von-Caron, Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    The still poorly explored world of microbial functioning is about to be uncovered by a combined application of old and new technologies. Bacteria, especially, are still in the dark with respect to their phylogenetic affiliations as well as their metabolic capabilities and functions. However, with the advent of sophisticated flow cytometric and cell sorting technologies in microbiological labs, there is now the possibility to gain this knowledge at the single-cell level without cumbersome cultivation approaches. Cytometry also facilitates the understanding of physiological diversity in seemingly likewise acting populations. Both individuality and diversity lead to the complex and concerted actions of microbial consortia. This review provides an overview of the state of the art in the field. It deals with the handling of microorganisms from the very beginning (i.e. sampling, and detachment and fixation procedures) and goes on to discuss the pitfalls and problems in analysing cells without any further treatment. If information cannot be gained by specific staining procedures, phylogenetic technologies, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches may be options for achieving advanced insights. All in all, flow cytometry will be a mediator technology to gain a deeper insight into the heterogeneity of populations and the functioning of microbial communities.

  5. Household computer and Internet access: The digital divide in a pediatric clinic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Aaron E; Rivara, Frederick P; Ebel, Beth; Zimmerman, Frederick J; Christakis, Dimitri A

    2005-01-01

    Past studies have noted a digital divide, or inequality in computer and Internet access related to socio-economic class. This study sought to measure how many households in a pediatric primary care outpatient clinic had household access to computers and the Internet, and whether this access differed by socio-economic status or other demographic information. We conducted a phone survey of a population-based sample of parents with children ages 0 to 11 years old. Analyses assessed predictors of having home access to a computer, the Internet, and high-speed Internet service. Overall, 88.9% of all households owned a personal computer, and 81.4% of all households had Internet access. Among households with Internet access, 48.3% had high speed Internet at home. There were significant associations between home computer ownership or Internet access and parental income or education. There was no relationship these factors and high speed Internet access. Over 60% of families with annual household income of $10,000-$25,000, and nearly 70% of families with only a high-school education had Internet access at home. While income and education remain significant predictors of household computer and internet access, many patients and families at all economic levels have access, and might benefit from health promotion interventions using these modalities.

  6. New methods for analysis of spatial distribution and coaggregation of microbial populations in complex biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almstrand, Robert; Daims, Holger; Persson, Frank; Sörensson, Fred; Hermansson, Malte

    2013-10-01

    In biofilms, microbial activities form gradients of substrates and electron acceptors, creating a complex landscape of microhabitats, often resulting in structured localization of the microbial populations present. To understand the dynamic interplay between and within these populations, quantitative measurements and statistical analysis of their localization patterns within the biofilms are necessary, and adequate automated tools for such analyses are needed. We have designed and applied new methods for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital image analysis of directionally dependent (anisotropic) multispecies biofilms. A sequential-FISH approach allowed multiple populations to be detected in a biofilm sample. This was combined with an automated tool for vertical-distribution analysis by generating in silico biofilm slices and the recently developed Inflate algorithm for coaggregation analysis of microbial populations in anisotropic biofilms. As a proof of principle, we show distinct stratification patterns of the ammonia oxidizers Nitrosomonas oligotropha subclusters I and II and the nitrite oxidizer Nitrospira sublineage I in three different types of wastewater biofilms, suggesting niche differentiation between the N. oligotropha subclusters, which could explain their coexistence in the same biofilms. Coaggregation analysis showed that N. oligotropha subcluster II aggregated closer to Nitrospira than did N. oligotropha subcluster I in a pilot plant nitrifying trickling filter (NTF) and a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR), but not in a full-scale NTF, indicating important ecophysiological differences between these phylogenetically closely related subclusters. By using high-resolution quantitative methods applicable to any multispecies biofilm in general, the ecological interactions of these complex ecosystems can be understood in more detail.

  7. Quantitative Modeling of Microbial Population Responses to Chronic Irradiation Combined with Other Stressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shuryak

    Full Text Available Microbial population responses to combined effects of chronic irradiation and other stressors (chemical contaminants, other sub-optimal conditions are important for ecosystem functioning and bioremediation in radionuclide-contaminated areas. Quantitative mathematical modeling can improve our understanding of these phenomena. To identify general patterns of microbial responses to multiple stressors in radioactive environments, we analyzed three data sets on: (1 bacteria isolated from soil contaminated by nuclear waste at the Hanford site (USA; (2 fungi isolated from the Chernobyl nuclear-power plant (Ukraine buildings after the accident; (3 yeast subjected to continuous γ-irradiation in the laboratory, where radiation dose rate and cell removal rate were independently varied. We applied generalized linear mixed-effects models to describe the first two data sets, whereas the third data set was amenable to mechanistic modeling using differential equations. Machine learning and information-theoretic approaches were used to select the best-supported formalism(s among biologically-plausible alternatives. Our analysis suggests the following: (1 Both radionuclides and co-occurring chemical contaminants (e.g. NO2 are important for explaining microbial responses to radioactive contamination. (2 Radionuclides may produce non-monotonic dose responses: stimulation of microbial growth at low concentrations vs. inhibition at higher ones. (3 The extinction-defining critical radiation dose rate is dramatically lowered by additional stressors. (4 Reproduction suppression by radiation can be more important for determining the critical dose rate, than radiation-induced cell mortality. In conclusion, the modeling approaches used here on three diverse data sets provide insight into explaining and predicting multi-stressor effects on microbial communities: (1 the most severe effects (e.g. extinction on microbial populations may occur when unfavorable environmental

  8. Accessing the population of high redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Mereghetti, S; Tagliaferri, G; Campana, S; Osborne, J P; O'Brien, P; Tanvir, N; Willingale, R; Amati, L; Basa, S; Bernardini, M G; Burlon, D; Covino, S; D'Avanzo, P; Frontera, F; Gotz, D; Melandri, A; Nava, L; Piro, L; Vergani, S D

    2015-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are a powerful probe of the high redshift Universe. We present a tool to estimate the detection rate of high-z GRBs by a generic detector with defined energy band and sensitivity. We base this on a population model that reproduces the observed properties of GRBs detected by Swift, Fermi and CGRO in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray bands. We provide the expected cumulative distributions of the flux and fluence of simulated GRBs in different energy bands. We show that scintillator detectors, operating at relatively high energies (e.g. tens of keV to the MeV), can detect only the most luminous GRBs at high redshifts due to the link between the peak spectral energy and the luminosity (Ep-Liso) of GRBs. We show that the best strategy for catching the largest number of high-z bursts is to go softer (e.g. in the soft X-ray band) but with a very high sensitivity. For instance, an imaging soft X-ray detector operating in the 0.2-5 keV energy band reaching a sensitivity, corresponding to a fluence o...

  9. Molecular Analysis of Dominant Microbial Populations in Heavily and Slightly Polluted Aquifers by a Seaside Landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yangjie; YANG Hong; LI Daotang; WU Xiujuan

    2005-01-01

    The microbial populations were investigated in two groundwater samples, GW-H and GW-S, which represented heavily and slightly polluted aquifers by a seaside landfill. The concentrations of dissolved redox-relevant species suggested that iron-reduction/sulfate-reduction and denitrification were major redox processes for GW-H and GW-S. The dominant microbial populations were determined using restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. These microbes were then further studied by sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. The results indicate an obvious variation of the dominant populations between the two samples. The coexistence of sequences related to denitrifiers, sulfur-reducers, and methanotrophic bacteria was found in the GW-S sample, and a sequence associated with a sulfate-reducer was also found in the GW-H sample using molecular analyses. These results suggest that the molecular approach may be an important supplement to other approaches in characterizing the redox processes in polluted aquifers.

  10. Population cycles and species diversity in dynamic Kill-the-Winner model of microbial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Determinants of species diversity in microbial ecosystems remain poorly understood. Bacteriophages are believed to increase the diversity by the virtue of Kill-the-Winner infection bias preventing the fastest growing organism from taking over the community. Phage-bacterial ecosystems are traditionally described in terms of the static equilibrium state of Lotka-Volterra equations in which bacterial growth is exactly balanced by losses due to phage predation. Here we consider a more dynamic scenario in which phage infections give rise to abrupt and severe collapses of bacterial populations whenever they become sufficiently large. As a consequence, each bacterial population in our model follows cyclic dynamics of exponential growth interrupted by sudden declines. The total population of all species fluctuates around the carrying capacity of the environment, making these cycles cryptic. While a subset of the slowest growing species in our model is always driven towards extinction, in general the overall ecosystem diversity remains high. The number of surviving species is inversely proportional to the variation in their growth rates but increases with the frequency and severity of phage-induced collapses. Thus counter-intuitively we predict that microbial communities exposed to more violent perturbations should have higher diversity.

  11. Microbial populations related to PAH biodegradation in an aged biostimulated creosote-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lladó, Salvador; Jiménez, Nuria; Viñas, Marc; Solanas, Anna Maria

    2009-09-01

    A previous bioremediation survey on a creosote-contaminated soil showed that aeration and optimal humidity promoted depletion of three-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), but residual concentrations of four-ringed benzo(a)anthracene (B(a)A) and chrysene (Chry) remained. In order to explain the lack of further degradation of heavier PAHs such as four-ringed PAHs and to analyze the microbial population responsible for PAH biodegradation, a chemical and microbial molecular approach was used. Using a slurry incubation strategy, soil in liquid mineral medium with and without additional B(a)A and Chry was found to contain a powerful PAH-degrading microbial community that eliminated 89% and 53% of the added B(a)A and Chry, respectively. It is hypothesized that the lack of PAH bioavailability hampered their further biodegradation in the unspiked soil. According to the results of the culture-dependent and independent techniques Mycobacterium parmense, Pseudomonas mexicana, and Sphingobacterials group could control B(a)A and Chry degradation in combination with several microorganisms with secondary metabolic activity.

  12. Assessment of microbial populations in methyl ethyl ketone degrading biofilters by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Moe, W M

    2004-05-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified genes coding for 16S rRNA was used to assess differences in bacterial community structure as a function of spatial location along the height of two biofilters used to treat a model waste gas stream containing methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). One of the laboratory-scale biofilters was operated as a conventional continuous-flow biofilter (CFB) and the other was operated as a sequencing batch biofilter (SBB). Both biofilters, inoculated with an identical starting culture and operated over a period lasting more than 300 days, received the same influent MEK concentration and same mass of MEK on a daily basis. The systems differed, however, in terms of the fraction of time during which contaminated air was supplied and the overall operating strategy employed. DGGE analysis indicated that microbial community structures differed as a function of height in each of the biofilters. The DGGE banding patterns also differed between the two biofilters, suggesting that operating strategies imposed on the biofilters imparted a sufficiently large selective pressure to influence microbial community structures. This may explain, in part, the superior performance of the SBB over the CFB during model transient loading conditions, and it may open new possibilities for purposely manipulating the microbial populations in biofilters treating gas-phase contaminants in a manner that leads to more favorable treatment performance.

  13. Changes in microbial populations and enzyme activities during the bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xin; Li, Xiaojun; Sun, Tieheng; Li, Peijun; Zhou, Qixing; Sun, Lina; Hu, Xiaojun

    2009-10-01

    In the process of bioremediation in the soil contaminated by different oil concentrations, the changes in the microbial numbers (bacteria and fungi) and the enzyme (catalase (CAT), polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and lipase) activities were evaluated over a 2-year period. The results showed that the microbial numbers after 2-year bioremediation were one to ten times higher than those in the initial. The changes in the bacterial and the fungal populations were different during the bioremediation, and the highest microbial numbers for bacteria and fungi were 5.51 x 10(9) CFU g(-1) dry soil in treatment 3 (10,000 mg kg(-1)) in the initial and 5.54 x 10(5) CFU g(-1) dry soil in treatment 5 (50,000 mg kg(-1)) after the 2-year bioremediation period, respectively. The CAT and PPO activities in the contaminated soil decreased with increasing oil concentration, while the lipase activity increased. The activities of CAT and PPO improved after the bioremediation, but lipase activity was on the contrary. The CAT activity was more sensible to the oil than others, and could be alternative to monitor the bioremediation process.

  14. SPSmart: adapting population based SNP genotype databases for fast and comprehensive web access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last five years large online resources of human variability have appeared, notably HapMap, Perlegen and the CEPH foundation. These databases of genotypes with population information act as catalogues of human diversity, and are widely used as reference sources for population genetics studies. Although many useful conclusions may be extracted by querying databases individually, the lack of flexibility for combining data from within and between each database does not allow the calculation of key population variability statistics. Results We have developed a novel tool for accessing and combining large-scale genomic databases of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in widespread use in human population genetics: SPSmart (SNPs for Population Studies. A fast pipeline creates and maintains a data mart from the most commonly accessed databases of genotypes containing population information: data is mined, summarized into the standard statistical reference indices, and stored into a relational database that currently handles as many as 4 × 109 genotypes and that can be easily extended to new database initiatives. We have also built a web interface to the data mart that allows the browsing of underlying data indexed by population and the combining of populations, allowing intuitive and straightforward comparison of population groups. All the information served is optimized for web display, and most of the computations are already pre-processed in the data mart to speed up the data browsing and any computational treatment requested. Conclusion In practice, SPSmart allows populations to be combined into user-defined groups, while multiple databases can be accessed and compared in a few simple steps from a single query. It performs the queries rapidly and gives straightforward graphical summaries of SNP population variability through visual inspection of allele frequencies outlined in standard pie-chart format. In addition, full

  15. Root Zone Microbial Populations, Urease Activities, and Purification Efficiency for a Constructed Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Wei; WU Zhen-Bin; ZHAN Fa-Cui; DENG Jia-Qi

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of microorganisms and their urease activities in macrophytic root zones on pollutant removal, four small-scale plots (SSPs) of vertical/reverse-vertical flow wetlands were set up to determine: a) the relationship between the abundance of microorganisms in the root zones and water purification efficiency; and b) the relationship between urease activities in the root zones and pollutant removal in a constructed wetland system. Total numbers of the microbial population (bacteria, fungi, and actinomyces) along with urease activities in the macrophytic root zones were determined. In addition, the relationships between microbial populations and urease activities as well as the wastewater purification efficiencies of total phosphorus (TP), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), biochemical oxygen demand in 5 days (BOD5), and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were also analyzed. The results showed that there was a highly significant positive correlation (r = 0.9772, P < 0.01) between the number of bacteria in the root zones and BOD5 removal efficiency and a significant negative correlation (r = -0.9092, P < 0.05) between the number of fungi and the removal efficiency of TKN. Meanwhile, there was a significant positive correlation (r -- 0.8830, P < 0.05) between urease activities in the root zones and the removal efficiency of TKN. Thus, during wastewater treatment in a constructed wetland system,microorganism and urease activities in the root zones were very important factors.

  16. Molecular characterization of microbial populations in groundwater sources and sand filters for drinking water production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vet, W W J M; Dinkla, I J T; Muyzer, G; Rietveld, L C; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2009-01-01

    In full-scale drinking water production from groundwater, subsurface aeration is an effective means of enhancing the often troublesome process of nitrification. Until now the exact mechanism, however, has been unknown. By studying the microbial population we can improve the understanding of this process. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments of bacteria, archaea and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria was used to characterize the microbial populations in raw groundwater and trickling filters of an active nitrifying surface aerated system and an inactive non-surface aerated system. Only in the active filter were nitrifying microorganisms found above the detection limit of the method. In ammonia oxidation in this groundwater filter both bacteria and archaea played a role, while members belonging to the genus Nitrospira were the only nitrite-oxidizing species found. The subsurface aerated groundwater did not contain any of the nitrifying organisms active in the filter above the detection limit, but did contain Gallionella species that might play a major role in iron oxidation in the filter.

  17. Effects of methane on the microbial populations and oxidation rates in different landfill cover soil columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Ruan, Aidong; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2007-05-01

    A considerable fraction of methane produced in landfills is oxidized by landfill cover soils. In this work, microbial populations and oxidation rates developed in response to the presence of methane were studied in three soil columns simulated landfill cover soil environments. The population of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria was highest in the waste soil, middle in the clay soil, and lowest in the red soil. After exposure to methane-rich environments, the populations of methanotrophic bacteria showed increases in the waste and clay soils. The population of methanotrophic bacteria increased from 30.77x10(4) to 141.77x10(4) cfu g d.w.-1 in the middle layer of the waste soil column as a function of exposure to methane for 120 days. The populations of methanotrophic bacteria were correlated with the potential methane oxidation rates in the waste and clay soils, respectively. The topsoil was observed to be dried in the three soil columns. Most of methane oxidation occurred at the depth of between 10 and 20 cm in the waste soil column, while it took place mainly at the depth of between 20 and 30 cm in the clay soil column.

  18. Microbial Population Differentials between Mucosal and Submucosal Intestinal Tissues in Advanced Crohn's Disease of the Ileum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrick J Chiodini

    Full Text Available Since Crohn's disease is a transmural disease, we hypothesized that examination of deep submucosal tissues directly involved in the inflammatory disease process may provide unique insights into bacterial populations transgressing intestinal barriers and bacterial populations more representative of the causes and agents of the disease. We performed deep 16s microbiota sequencing on isolated ilea mucosal and submucosal tissues on 20 patients with Crohn's disease and 15 non-inflammatory bowel disease controls with a depth of coverage averaging 81,500 sequences in each of the 70 DNA samples yielding an overall resolution down to 0.0001% of the bacterial population. Of the 4,802,328 total sequences generated, 98.9% or 4,749,183 sequences aligned with the Kingdom Bacteria that clustered into 8545 unique sequences with <3% divergence or operational taxonomic units enabling the identification of 401 genera and 698 tentative bacterial species. There were significant differences in all taxonomic levels between the submucosal microbiota in Crohn's disease compared to controls, including organisms of the Order Desulfovibrionales that were present within the submucosal tissues of most Crohn's disease patients but absent in the control group. A variety of organisms of the Phylum Firmicutes were increased in the subjacent submucosa as compared to the parallel mucosal tissue including Ruminococcus spp., Oscillospira spp., Pseudobutyrivibrio spp., and Tumebacillus spp. In addition, Propionibacterium spp. and Cloacibacterium spp. were increased as well as large increases in Proteobacteria including Parasutterella spp. and Methylobacterium spp. This is the first study to examine the microbial populations within submucosal tissues of patients with Crohn's disease and to compare microbial communities found deep within the submucosal tissues with those present on mucosal surfaces. Our data demonstrate the existence of a distinct submucosal microbiome and ecosystem

  19. Gaining Access to Economically Marginalized Rural Populations: Lessons Learned from Nonprobability Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, Sheila; Sano, Yoshie

    2012-01-01

    Poverty is a significant problem in rural America. Gaining access to economically marginalized rural populations in order to recruit individuals to participate in a research study, however, is often a challenge. This article compares three different nonprobability sampling techniques that have been used to recruit rural, low-income…

  20. Impact of nanoscale zero valent iron on geochemistry and microbial populations in trichloroethylene contaminated aquifer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschling, Teresa L; Gregory, Kelvin B; Minkley, Edwin G; Lowry, Gregory V; Tilton, Robert D

    2010-05-01

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles are a promising technology for reducing trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination in the subsurface. Prior to injecting large quantities of nanoparticles into the groundwater it is important to understand what impact the particles will have on the geochemistry and indigenous microbial communities. Microbial populations are important not only for nutrient cycling, but also for contaminant remediation and heavy metal immobilization. Microcosms were used to determine the effects of NZVI addition on three different aquifer materials from TCE contaminated sites in Alameda Point, CA, Mancelona, MI, and Parris Island, SC. The oxidation and reduction potential of the microcosms consistently decreased by more than 400 mV when NZVI was added at 1.5 g/L concentrations. Sulfate concentrations decreased in the two coastal aquifer materials, and methane was observed in the presence of NZVI in Alameda Point microcosms, but not in the other two materials. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed significant shifts in Eubacterial diversity just after the Fe(0) was exhausted, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses showed increases of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) and Archaeal 16s rRNA genes, indicating that reducing conditions and hydrogen created by NZVI stimulate both sulfate reducer and methanogen populations. Adding NZVI had no deleterious effect on total bacterial abundance in the microcosms. NZVI with a biodegradable polyaspartate coating increased bacterial populations by an order of magnitude relative to controls. The lack of broad bactericidal effect, combined with the stimulatory effect of polyaspartate coatings, has positive implications for NZVI field applications.

  1. Effects of feed intake on composition of sheep rumen contents and their microbial population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, C A; González, J; Alvir, M R; Redondo, R; Cajarville, C

    2003-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of feed intake on the composition of the rumen contents of sheep and on their bacterial densities. Whole rumen contents were sampled after a period of continuous inter-rumen infusion of 15NH3 from four rumen-cannulated wethers successively fed on a hay-concentrate diet (2:1, w/w on a DM basis) at two rates of feed intake: 40 and 80 g DM/kg body weight0.75. Total weight and chemical composition of rumen contents, as well as the distribution by size and chemical composition of particles, were determined. The populations of bacteria associated with the liquid (liquid-associated bacteria, LAB) and solid (solid-associated bacteria, SAB) fractions of rumen digesta and the distribution of SAB according to feed particle size were also examined. The greater feed intake caused an increase in the mass of the rumen contents, while its chemical composition did not change, except for a higher content of organic matter (P=0.023). The distribution of feed particles by size was similar at both levels of intake. The concentrations of neutral- and acid-detergent fibre in feed particles decreased and those of total, dietary, and microbial N increased, both with a quadratic response (P=0.001), as particle size decreased. The proportion of LAB in the microbial biomass of rumen digesta reached only 8.0 %. This proportion and the density of LAB were unaffected by the level of feed intake, whereas an apparent reduction (10.4 %) occurred with the SAB biomass in whole rumen contents. A systematic, but not significant, reduction (mean value 11.9 %) in the level of microbial colonisation in the different particle fractions with the increase of feed intake was also observed.

  2. Distribution of Microbial Populations and Their Relationship with Environmental Variables in the North Yellow Sea, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Xiaoge; WANG Min; LIANG Yantao; ZHANG Zhifeng; WANG Fang; JIANG Xuejiao

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the large-scale spatial distribution characteristics of picoplankton,nanophytoplankton and vireoplankton and their relationship with environmental variables in coastal and offshore waters,flow cytometry (FCM) was used to analyze microbial abundance of samples collected in summer from four depths at 36 stations in the North Yellow Sea (NYS).The data revealed spatial heterogeneity in microbial populations in the offshore and near-shore waters of the NYS during the summer.For the surface layer,picoeukaryotes were abundant in the near-shore waters,Synechococcus was abundant in the offshore areas,and bacterial and viral abundances were high in the near-shore waters around the Liaodong peninsula.In the near-shore waters,no significant vertical variation of picophytoplankton (0.2-2μm) abundance was found.However,the nanophytoplankton abundance was higher in the upper layers (from the surface to 10m depth) than in the bottom layer.For the offshore waters,both pico- and nanophytoplankton (2-20μm) abundance decreased sharply with depth in the North Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (NYSCWM).But,for the vertical distribution of virus and bacteria abundance,no significant variation was observed in both near-shore and offshore waters.Autotrophic microbes were more sensitive to environmental change than heterotrophic microbes and viruses.Viruses showed a positive correlation with bacterial abundance,suggesting that the bacteriophage might be prominent for virioplankton (about 0.45μm) in summer in the NYS and that viral abundance might play an important role in microbial loop functions.

  3. Long-term effects of timber harvesting on hemicellulolytic microbial populations in coniferous forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Hilary T C; Maas, Kendra R; Wilhelm, Roland C; Mohn, William W

    2016-02-01

    Forest ecosystems need to be sustainably managed, as they are major reservoirs of biodiversity, provide important economic resources and modulate global climate. We have a poor knowledge of populations responsible for key biomass degradation processes in forest soils and the effects of forest harvesting on these populations. Here, we investigated the effects of three timber-harvesting methods, varying in the degree of organic matter removal, on putatively hemicellulolytic bacterial and fungal populations 10 or more years after harvesting and replanting. We used stable-isotope probing to identify populations that incorporated (13)C from labeled hemicellulose, analyzing (13)C-enriched phospholipid fatty acids, bacterial 16 S rRNA genes and fungal ITS regions. In soil microcosms, we identified 104 bacterial and 52 fungal hemicellulolytic operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Several of these OTUs are affiliated with taxa not previously reported to degrade hemicellulose, including the bacterial genera Methylibium, Pelomonas and Rhodoferax, and the fungal genera Cladosporium, Pseudeurotiaceae, Capronia, Xenopolyscytalum and Venturia. The effect of harvesting on hemicellulolytic populations was evaluated based on in situ bacterial and fungal OTUs. Harvesting treatments had significant but modest long-term effects on relative abundances of hemicellulolytic populations, which differed in strength between two ecozones and between soil layers. For soils incubated in microcosms, prior harvesting treatments did not affect the rate of incorporation of hemicellulose carbon into microbial biomass. In six ecozones across North America, distributions of the bacterial hemicellulolytic OTUs were similar, whereas distributions of fungal ones differed. Our work demonstrates that diverse taxa in soil are hemicellulolytic, many of which are differentially affected by the impact of harvesting on environmental conditions. However, the hemicellulolytic capacity of soil communities appears

  4. Visualizing the population dynamics of microbial communities in the larval zebrafish gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    In each of our digestive tracts, trillions of microbes representing hundreds of different species colonize local environments, reproduce, and compete with one another. The resulting ecosystems influence many aspects their host's development and health. Little is known about how gut microbial communities vary in space and time: how they grow, fluctuate, and respond to various perturbations. To address this and investigate microbial colonization of the vertebrate gut, we apply light sheet fluorescence microscopy to a model system that combines a realistic in vivo environment with a high degree of experimental control: larval zebrafish with defined subsets of commensal bacterial species. Light sheet microscopy enables three-dimensional imaging with high resolution over the entire intestine, providing visualizations that would be difficult or impossible to achieve with other techniques. Quantitative analysis of image data enables measurement of bacterial abundances and distributions. I will describe this approach and focus especially on recent experiments in which a colonizing bacterial species is challenged by the invasion of a second species, which leads to the decline of the first group. Imaging reveals dramatic population collapses that differentially affect the two species due to their different biogeographies and morphologies. The collapses are driven by the peristaltic motion of the zebrafish intestine, indicating that the physical activity of the host environment can play a major role in mediating inter-species competition. role in mediating inter-species competition. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0922951 and the National Institutes of Health under Award Number 1P50GM098911.

  5. Ecological differentiation in planktonic and sediment-associated chemotrophic microbial populations in Yellowstone hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Daniel R; Feyhl-Buska, Jayme; Robinson, Kirtland J; Fecteau, Kristopher M; Xu, Huifang; Shock, Everett L; Boyd, Eric S

    2016-09-01

    Chemosynthetic sediment and planktonic community composition and sizes, aqueous geochemistry and sediment mineralogy were determined in 15 non-photosynthetic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). These data were used to evaluate the hypothesis that differences in the availability of dissolved or mineral substrates in the bulk fluids or sediments within springs coincides with ecologically differentiated microbial communities and their populations. Planktonic and sediment-associated communities exhibited differing ecological characteristics including community sizes, evenness and richness. pH and temperature influenced microbial community composition among springs, but within-spring partitioning of taxa into sediment or planktonic communities was widespread, statistically supported (P < 0.05) and could be best explained by the inferred metabolic strategies of the partitioned taxa. Microaerophilic genera of the Aquificales predominated in many of the planktonic communities. In contrast, taxa capable of mineral-based metabolism such as S(o) oxidation/reduction or Fe-oxide reduction predominated in sediment communities. These results indicate that ecological differentiation within thermal spring habitats is common across a range of spring geochemistry and is influenced by the availability of dissolved nutrients and minerals that can be used in metabolism.

  6. 2009 MICROBIAL POPULATION BIOLOGY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCES JULY 19-24,2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANTHONY DEAN

    2009-07-24

    The 2009 Gordon Conference on Microbial Population Biology will cover a diverse range of cutting edge issues in the microbial sciences and beyond. Firmly founded in evolutionary biology and with a strongly integrative approach, past Conferences have covered a range of topics from the dynamics and genetics of adaptation to the evolution of mutation rate, community ecology, evolutionary genomics, altruism, and epidemiology. The 2009 Conference is no exception, and will include sessions on the evolution of infectious diseases, social evolution, the evolution of symbioses, experimental evolution, adaptive landscapes, community dynamics, and the evolution of protein structure and function. While genomic approaches continue to make inroads, broadening our knowledge and encompassing new questions, the conference will also emphasize the use of experimental approaches to test hypotheses decisively. As in the past, this Conference provides young scientists and graduate students opportunities to present their work in poster format and exchange ideas with leading investigators from a broad spectrum of disciplines. This meeting is never dull: some of the most significant and contentious issues in biology have been thrashed out here. The 2009 meeting will be no exception.

  7. Evaluation of cocomposted coal fly ash on dynamics of microbial populations and heavy metal uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallini, G.; Vaccari, F.; Pera, A.; Agnolucci, M.; Scatena, S.; Varallo, G. [University of Verona, Verona (Italy). Science and Technology Dept.

    1999-06-01

    Vicia faba, in a pot experiment with sandy and clayey soils under greenhouse conditions, was checked for growth response to different amendments with coal alkaline fly ash or cocomposted fly ash mixed with lignocellulosic residues. Soil microbial populations, pH and electrical conductivity as well as heavy metal uptake by plants were monitored. At rates of five and ten percent (on a dry matter basis) in both soils, neither fly ash alone nor cocomposted fly ash exerted any negative effect. Plant biomass production was not influenced in either clayey or sandy soil. Alkaline fly ash did not promote microbial growth when applied alone to the soils. However, cocomposted fly ash generally increased bacterial and actinomycetes counts in both soils. Fungi were not affected by ash. Due to the increase of soil pH by alkaline fly ash or cocomposted fly ash, plant uptake of heavy metals was depressed in the sandy soil. Heavy metal mobility did not cause change in the clayey soil where a high buffering capacity mitigated the effects of fly ash amendments.

  8. Effects of Exogenous Yeast and Bacteria on the Microbial Population Dynamics and Outcomes of Olive Fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Jose; Bendiks, Zachary; Tyler, Charlotte; Kable, Mary E; Williams, Thomas R; Luchkovska, Yelizaveta; Chow, Elaine; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Marco, Maria L

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we examined Sicilian-style green olive fermentations upon the addition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448 and/or Pichia kudriazevii UCDFST09-427 or the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) Lactobacillus plantarum AJ11R and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides BGM3R. Olives containing S. cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448, a strain able to hydrolyze pectin, but not P. kudriazevii UCDFST 09-427, a nonpectinolytic strain, exhibited excessive tissue damage within 4 weeks. DNA sequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and comparisons to a yeast-specific ITS sequence database remarkably showed that neither S. cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448 nor P. kudriazevii UCDFST 09-427 resulted in significant changes to yeast species diversity. Instead, Candida boidinii constituted the majority (>90%) of the total yeast present, independent of whether S. cerevisiae or P. kudriazevii was added. By comparison, Lactobacillus species were enriched in olives inoculated with potential starter LAB L. plantarum AJ11R and L. pseudomesenteroides BGM3R according to community 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The bacterial diversity of those olives was significantly reduced and resembled control fermentations incubated for a longer period of time. Importantly, microbial populations were highly dynamic at the strain level, as indicated by the large variations in AJ11R and BGM3R cell numbers over time and reductions in the numbers of yeast isolates expressing polygalacturonase activity. These findings show the distinct effects of exogenous spoilage and starter microbes on indigenous communities in plant-based food fermentations that result in very different impacts on product quality. IMPORTANCE Food fermentations are subject to tremendous selective pressures resulting in the growth and persistence of a limited number of bacterial and fungal taxa. Although these foods are vulnerable to spoilage by unintended contamination of certain microorganisms, or alternatively, can be

  9. Effects of Exogenous Yeast and Bacteria on the Microbial Population Dynamics and Outcomes of Olive Fermentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Jose; Bendiks, Zachary; Tyler, Charlotte; Kable, Mary E.; Williams, Thomas R.; Luchkovska, Yelizaveta; Chow, Elaine; Boundy-Mills, Kyria

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, we examined Sicilian-style green olive fermentations upon the addition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448 and/or Pichia kudriazevii UCDFST09-427 or the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) Lactobacillus plantarum AJ11R and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides BGM3R. Olives containing S. cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448, a strain able to hydrolyze pectin, but not P. kudriazevii UCDFST 09-427, a nonpectinolytic strain, exhibited excessive tissue damage within 4 weeks. DNA sequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and comparisons to a yeast-specific ITS sequence database remarkably showed that neither S. cerevisiae UCDFST 09-448 nor P. kudriazevii UCDFST 09-427 resulted in significant changes to yeast species diversity. Instead, Candida boidinii constituted the majority (>90%) of the total yeast present, independent of whether S. cerevisiae or P. kudriazevii was added. By comparison, Lactobacillus species were enriched in olives inoculated with potential starter LAB L. plantarum AJ11R and L. pseudomesenteroides BGM3R according to community 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The bacterial diversity of those olives was significantly reduced and resembled control fermentations incubated for a longer period of time. Importantly, microbial populations were highly dynamic at the strain level, as indicated by the large variations in AJ11R and BGM3R cell numbers over time and reductions in the numbers of yeast isolates expressing polygalacturonase activity. These findings show the distinct effects of exogenous spoilage and starter microbes on indigenous communities in plant-based food fermentations that result in very different impacts on product quality. IMPORTANCE Food fermentations are subject to tremendous selective pressures resulting in the growth and persistence of a limited number of bacterial and fungal taxa. Although these foods are vulnerable to spoilage by unintended contamination of certain microorganisms, or alternatively, can

  10. [Factors affecting access to health care institutions by the internally displaced population in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; Vázquez, María Luisa

    2008-04-01

    In Colombia, the on-going armed conflict causes displacement of thousands of persons that suffer its economic, social, and health consequences. Despite government regulatory efforts, displaced people still experience serious problems in securing access to health care. In order to analyze the institutional factors that affect access to health care by the internally displaced population, a qualitative, exploratory, and descriptive study was carried out by means of semi-structured individual interviews with a criterion sample of stakeholders (81). A narrative content analysis was performed, with mixed generation of categories and segmentation of data by themes and informants. Inadequate funding, providers' problems with reimbursement by insurers, and lack of clear definition as to coverage under the Social Security System in Health pose barriers to access to health care by the internally displaced population. Bureaucratic procedures, limited inter- and intra-sector coordination, and scarce available resources for public health service providers also affect access. Effective government action is required to ensure the right to health care for this population.

  11. Linking TFT-LCD wastewater treatment performance to microbial population abundance of Hyphomicrobium and Thiobacillus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Toshikazu; Whang, Liang-Ming; Chen, Po-Chun; Putri, Dyah Wulandari; Chang, Ming-Yu; Wu, Yi-Ju; Lee, Ya-Ching

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the linkage between performance of two full-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems treating thin-film transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) wastewater and the population dynamics of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)/dimethylsulfide (DMS) degrading bacteria. High DMSO degradation efficiencies were achieved in both MBRs, while the levels of nitrification inhibition due to DMS production from DMSO degradation were different in the two MBRs. The results of real-time PCR targeting on DMSO/DMS degrading populations, including Hyphomicrobium and Thiobacillus spp., indicated that a higher DMSO oxidation efficiency occurred at a higher Hyphomicrobium spp. abundance in the systems, suggesting that Hyphomicrobium spp. may be more important for complete DMSO oxidation to sulfate compared with Thiobacillus spp. Furthermore, Thiobacillus spp. was more abundant during poor nitrification, while Hyphomicrobium spp. was more abundant during good nitrification. It is suggested that microbial population of DMSO/DMS degrading bacteria is closely linking to both DMSO/DMS degradation efficiency and nitrification performance.

  12. Effect of wastewater COD/N ratio on aerobic nitrifying sludge granulation and microbial population shift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Wu; Chengyao Peng; Yongzhen Peng; Lingyun Li; Shuying Wang; Yong Ma

    2012-01-01

    The effect of COD/N ratio on the granulation process and microbial population succession was investigated.Four identical sequencing batch reactors,R1,R2,R3 and R4,were operated with various initial COD/N ratios ranging from 0/200 to 800/200 (m/n).Ethanol was fed as the source of COD.Aerobic granules were successfully cultivated in R2 and R3,operating with the COD/N ratio of 200/200 and 400/200,respectively.Scanning electron microscope observations indicated that short rod-shaped and spherical bacteria were dominant in R2,while granules produced in R3 were surrounded with a large amount of filamentous bacteria.The average specific nitritation rate in R2 and R3 were 0.019 and 0.008 mg N/(mg MLVSS.hr),respectively.Fluorescence in situ hybridization results demonstrated that nitrifying bacteria population was enriched remarkably in R2.It indicated that nitrification ability and nitrifying bacteria population were enriched remarkably at low COD/N ratio.However,no granules were formed in R1and R4 which might attribute to either limited or excessive extracellular polymeric substances production.This study contributed to a better understanding of the role of COD/N ratio in nitrifying sludge granulation.

  13. Thermodynamic concepts in the study of microbial populations: age structure in Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Ferrer

    Full Text Available Variability is a hallmark of microbial systems. On the one hand, microbes are subject to environmental heterogeneity and undergo changeable conditions in their immediate surroundings. On the other hand, microbial populations exhibit high cellular diversity. The relation between microbial diversity and variability of population dynamics is difficult to assess. This connection can be quantitatively studied from a perspective that combines in silico models and thermodynamic methods and interpretations. The infection process of Plasmodium falciparum parasitizing human red blood cells under laboratory cultivation conditions is used to illustrate the potential of Individual-based models in the context of predictive microbiology and parasitology. Experimental data from several in vitro cultures are compared to the outcome of an individual-based model and analysed from a thermodynamic perspective. This approach allows distinguishing between intrinsic and external constraints that give rise to the diversity in the infection forms, and it provides a criterion to quantitatively define transient and stationary regimes in the culture. Increasing the ability of models to discriminate between different states of microbial populations enhances their predictive capability which finally leads to a better the control over culture systems. The strategy here presented is of general application and it can substantially improve modelling of other types of microbial communities.

  14. Thermodynamic concepts in the study of microbial populations: age structure in Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Jordi; Prats, Clara; López, Daniel; Vidal-Mas, Jaume; Gargallo-Viola, Domingo; Guglietta, Antonio; Giró, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Variability is a hallmark of microbial systems. On the one hand, microbes are subject to environmental heterogeneity and undergo changeable conditions in their immediate surroundings. On the other hand, microbial populations exhibit high cellular diversity. The relation between microbial diversity and variability of population dynamics is difficult to assess. This connection can be quantitatively studied from a perspective that combines in silico models and thermodynamic methods and interpretations. The infection process of Plasmodium falciparum parasitizing human red blood cells under laboratory cultivation conditions is used to illustrate the potential of Individual-based models in the context of predictive microbiology and parasitology. Experimental data from several in vitro cultures are compared to the outcome of an individual-based model and analysed from a thermodynamic perspective. This approach allows distinguishing between intrinsic and external constraints that give rise to the diversity in the infection forms, and it provides a criterion to quantitatively define transient and stationary regimes in the culture. Increasing the ability of models to discriminate between different states of microbial populations enhances their predictive capability which finally leads to a better the control over culture systems. The strategy here presented is of general application and it can substantially improve modelling of other types of microbial communities.

  15. Spatial analysis of cattle and shoat population in Ethiopia: growth trend, distribution and market access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leta, Samson; Mesele, Frehiwot

    2014-01-01

    The livestock subsector has an enormous contribution to Ethiopia's national economy and livelihoods of many Ethiopians. The subsector contributes about 16.5% of the national Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and 35.6% of the agricultural GDP. It also contributes 15% of export earnings and 30% of agricultural employment. The livestock subsector currently support and sustain livelihoods for 80% of all rural population. The GDP of livestock related activities valued at 59 billion birr. Ethiopian livestock population trends, distribution and marketing vary considerably across space and time due to a variety of reasons. This study was aimed to assess cattle and shoat population growth trend, distribution and their access to market. Regression analysis was used to assess the cattle and shoat population growth trend and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques were used to determine the spatial distribution of cattle and shoats, and their relative access to market. The data sets used are agricultural census (2001/02) and annual CSA agricultural sample survey (1995/96 to 2012/13). In the past eighteen years, the livestock population namely cattle, sheep and goat grew from 54.5 million to over 103.5 million with average annual increment of 3.4 million. The current average national cattle, sheep and goat population per km(2) are estimated to be 71, 33 and 29 respectively (excluding Addis Ababa, Afar and Somali regions). From the total livestock population the country owns about 46% cattle, 43% sheep and 40% goats are reared within 10 km radius from major livestock market centres and all-weather roads. On the other hand, three fourth of the country's land mass which comprises 15% of the cattle, 20% of the sheep and 21% of goat population is not accessible to market (greater than 30 km from major livestock market centres). It is found that the central highland regions account for the largest share of livestock population and also more accessible to market. Defining the

  16. MbT-Tool: An open-access tool based on Thermodynamic Electron Equivalents Model to obtain microbial-metabolic reactions to be used in biotechnological process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Pablo Granda; Gras, Anna; Ginovart, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Modelling cellular metabolism is a strategic factor in investigating microbial behaviour and interactions, especially for bio-technological processes. A key factor for modelling microbial activity is the calculation of nutrient amounts and products generated as a result of the microbial metabolism. Representing metabolic pathways through balanced reactions is a complex and time-consuming task for biologists, ecologists, modellers and engineers. A new computational tool to represent microbial pathways through microbial metabolic reactions (MMRs) using the approach of the Thermodynamic Electron Equivalents Model has been designed and implemented in the open-access framework NetLogo. This computational tool, called MbT-Tool (Metabolism based on Thermodynamics) can write MMRs for different microbial functional groups, such as aerobic heterotrophs, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, methanogens, sulphate reducers, sulphide oxidizers and fermenters. The MbT-Tool's code contains eighteen organic and twenty inorganic reduction-half-reactions, four N-sources (NH4 (+), NO3 (-), NO2 (-), N2) to biomass synthesis and twenty-four microbial empirical formulas, one of which can be determined by the user (CnHaObNc). MbT-Tool is an open-source program capable of writing MMRs based on thermodynamic concepts, which are applicable in a wide range of academic research interested in designing, optimizing and modelling microbial activity without any extensive chemical, microbiological and programing experience.

  17. MbT-Tool: An open-access tool based on Thermodynamic Electron Equivalents Model to obtain microbial-metabolic reactions to be used in biotechnological process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Araujo Granda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling cellular metabolism is a strategic factor in investigating microbial behaviour and interactions, especially for bio-technological processes. A key factor for modelling microbial activity is the calculation of nutrient amounts and products generated as a result of the microbial metabolism. Representing metabolic pathways through balanced reactions is a complex and time-consuming task for biologists, ecologists, modellers and engineers. A new computational tool to represent microbial pathways through microbial metabolic reactions (MMRs using the approach of the Thermodynamic Electron Equivalents Model has been designed and implemented in the open-access framework NetLogo. This computational tool, called MbT-Tool (Metabolism based on Thermodynamics can write MMRs for different microbial functional groups, such as aerobic heterotrophs, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, methanogens, sulphate reducers, sulphide oxidizers and fermenters. The MbT-Tool's code contains eighteen organic and twenty inorganic reduction-half-reactions, four N-sources (NH4+, NO3−, NO2−, N2 to biomass synthesis and twenty-four microbial empirical formulas, one of which can be determined by the user (CnHaObNc. MbT-Tool is an open-source program capable of writing MMRs based on thermodynamic concepts, which are applicable in a wide range of academic research interested in designing, optimizing and modelling microbial activity without any extensive chemical, microbiological and programing experience.

  18. Demographic population model for American shad: will access to additional habitat upstream of dams increase population sizes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Julianne E.; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    American shad Alosa sapidissima are in decline in their native range, and modeling possible management scenarios could help guide their restoration. We developed a density-dependent, deterministic, stage-based matrix model to predict the population-level results of transporting American shad to suitable spawning habitat upstream of dams on the Roanoke River, North Carolina and Virginia. We used data on sonic-tagged adult American shad and oxytetracycline-marked American shad fry both above and below dams on the Roanoke River with information from other systems to estimate a starting population size and vital rates. We modeled the adult female population over 30 years under plausible scenarios of adult transport, effective fecundity (egg production), and survival of adults (i.e., to return to spawn the next year) and juveniles (from spawned egg to age 1). We also evaluated the potential effects of increased survival for adults and juveniles. The adult female population size in the Roanoke River was estimated to be 5,224. With no transport, the model predicted a slow population increase over the next 30 years. Predicted population increases were highest when survival was improved during the first year of life. Transport was predicted to benefit the population only if high rates of effective fecundity and juvenile survival could be achieved. Currently, transported adults and young are less likely to successfully out-migrate than individuals below the dams, and the estimated adult population size is much smaller than either of two assumed values of carrying capacity for the lower river; therefore, transport is not predicted to help restore the stock under present conditions. Research on survival rates, density-dependent processes, and the impacts of structures to increase out-migration success would improve evaluation of the potential benefits of access to additional spawning habitat for American shad.

  19. Molecular characterization of microbial populations in full-scale biofilters treating iron, manganese and ammonia containing groundwater in Harbin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-kun; Chu, Zhao-rui; Liu, Ya-jun; Zhu, Meng-ting; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Jie

    2013-11-01

    In iron and manganese-containing groundwater treatment for drinking water production, biological filter is an effective process to remove such pollutants. Until now the exact microbial mechanism of iron and manganese removal, especially coupled with other pollutants, such as ammonia, has not been clearly understood. To assess this issue, the performance of a full-scale biofilter located in Harbin, China was monitored over four months. Microbial populations in the biofilter were investigated using T-RFLP and clone library technique. Results suggested that Gallionella, Leptothrix, Nitrospira, Hyphomicrobium and Pseudomonas are dominant in the biofilter and play major roles in the removal of iron, manganese and ammonia. The spatial distribution of microbial populations along the depth of the biofilter demonstrated the stratification of the removal of iron, manganese and ammonia. Additionally, the absence of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the biofilter implicated that ammonia-oxidizing archaea might be responsible for the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite.

  20. Supplementation of direct-fed microbials as an alternative to antibiotic on growth performance, immune response, cecal microbial population, and ileal morphology of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, H M; Kang, H K; Akter, N; Kim, D W; Kim, J H; Kim, M J; Na, J C; Jong, H B; Choi, H C; Suh, O S; Kim, W K

    2013-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the supplementation of direct-fed microbials (DFM) as an alternative to antibiotics on growth performance, immune response, cecal microbial population, and ileal morphology of broiler chickens. A total of 800 one-day-old male broiler chicks (Ross × Ross) were randomly allotted to 4 dietary treatments with 4 replicate pens per treatment (50 birds/replicate pen). The 4 dietary treatments fed for 35 d were a corn-soybean meal basal diet (control); control plus 0.1% virginiamycin, as an antibiotic growth promoter (AGP); control plus 0.1% direct-fed microbials that contained Lactobacillus reuteri (DFM 1); and control plus 0.1% direct-fed microbials that contained a mixture of L. reuteri, Bacillus subtilis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (DFM 2). Results showed that dietary AGP and DFM supplementation significantly increased (P chickens fed DFM and AGP. The ileal villus height, and width and total thickness of muscularis externa were significantly increased when birds were fed DFM compared with AGP and control. These results indicate that the dietary supplementation of DFM increases the growth performance of birds at an early age, stimulates the immune response, decreases the number of E. coli, and improves the ileal morphology of broiler chickens. Thus, DFM that contained a mixture of several beneficial microorganisms could be a viable alternative to antibiotics in the broiler diets.

  1. Optimal resting-growth strategies of microbial populations in fluctuating environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisel, Nico; Vilar, Jose M G; Rubi, J Miguel

    2011-04-15

    Bacteria spend most of their lifetime in non-growing states which allow them to survive extended periods of stress and starvation. When environments improve, they must quickly resume growth to maximize their share of limited nutrients. Cells with higher stress resistance often survive longer stress durations at the cost of needing more time to resume growth, a strong disadvantage in competitive environments. Here we analyze the basis of optimal strategies that microorganisms can use to cope with this tradeoff. We explicitly show that the prototypical inverse relation between stress resistance and growth rate can explain much of the different types of behavior observed in stressed microbial populations. Using analytical mathematical methods, we determine the environmental parameters that decide whether cells should remain vegetative upon stress exposure, downregulate their metabolism to an intermediate optimum level, or become dormant. We find that cell-cell variability, or intercellular noise, is consistently beneficial in the presence of extreme environmental fluctuations, and that it provides an efficient population-level mechanism for adaption in a deteriorating environment. Our results reveal key novel aspects of responsive phenotype switching and its role as an adaptive strategy in changing environments.

  2. Optimal resting-growth strategies of microbial populations in fluctuating environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Geisel

    Full Text Available Bacteria spend most of their lifetime in non-growing states which allow them to survive extended periods of stress and starvation. When environments improve, they must quickly resume growth to maximize their share of limited nutrients. Cells with higher stress resistance often survive longer stress durations at the cost of needing more time to resume growth, a strong disadvantage in competitive environments. Here we analyze the basis of optimal strategies that microorganisms can use to cope with this tradeoff. We explicitly show that the prototypical inverse relation between stress resistance and growth rate can explain much of the different types of behavior observed in stressed microbial populations. Using analytical mathematical methods, we determine the environmental parameters that decide whether cells should remain vegetative upon stress exposure, downregulate their metabolism to an intermediate optimum level, or become dormant. We find that cell-cell variability, or intercellular noise, is consistently beneficial in the presence of extreme environmental fluctuations, and that it provides an efficient population-level mechanism for adaption in a deteriorating environment. Our results reveal key novel aspects of responsive phenotype switching and its role as an adaptive strategy in changing environments.

  3. Microbial populations of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating wastewater from a gelatin industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, A M; Bergamasco, R; Gimenes, M L; Nakamura, C V; Dias Filho, B P

    2001-12-01

    The microbial populations of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor, used for treating wastewater from the gelatin industry, were studied by microbiological methods and phase-contrast and electron microscopy. Microscopy examination of the sludge showed a complex mixture of various rod-shaped and coccoid bacterial pluslong filaments and verymobile curved rods. In addition free-living anaerobic ciliates and flagellates were also observed. The trophic group population observed in decreasing order of dominance were hydrolytic and acetogenic at 10(6) and sulfate reducing and methanogenic at 10(5). The rate of methane production in anaerobic granular sludge cultivated in growth medium supplement with formate pressurized with H2:CO2 showed a significant increase in methane yield compared with theseed culture containingthe same substrate and atmosphere of N2:CO2. Similar rates of methane production were observed when the growth medium was supplemented with acetate pressurized either with H2:CO2 or N2:CO2. The number of total anaerobic bacteria at 10(7), fecal coliforms and total coliforms at 10(6), and fecal streptococci at 10(3) is based on colony counts on solid media. The four prevalent species of facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacteria that belong to the family of Enterobacteriaceae were identified as Escherichia coli, Esherichia fergusonii, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Citrobacter freundii. The species Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas veronii, Acinetobacter iwoffi and Stenotrophomonas maltophila were the most frequently isolated glucose fermenting and nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli.

  4. Effect of Portulaca oleracea extracts on growth performance and microbial populations in ceca of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X H; He, X; Yang, X F; Zhong, X H

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Portulaca oleracea extracts on growth performance and microbial populations in the ceca of broilers. A total of 120 one-day-old broilers were randomly divided into 3 groups. Portulaca oleracea extracts were added to diets at 0.2 and 0.4% (wt/wt; POL-0.2, POL-0.4), respectively. The control (CON) group was administered with no P. oleracea extract supplementation. Body weight gain and feed conversion ratio were recorded every 2 wk. On d 28 and 42, the cecal contents were collected and assayed for Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus, and Bifidobacterium populations. Additionally, the pH of the ileum and cecum was measured. The results showed that both on d 28 and 42 BW gain of P. oleracea extract supplementation groups was significantly higher, whereas the feed conversion ratio was lower (P < 0.05) compared with CON. On d 28 and 42, significantly (P < 0.05) fewer E. coli were recovered from ceca of broilers provided with the POL-0.2 diet than from broilers provided with the control diet. The quantities of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium of POL-0.2 were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than CON. Results showed P. oleracea extracts have no distinct influence on intestinal pH. These data suggest that P. oleracea extract supplementation significantly altered the cecal bacterial community without affecting the intestinal pH.

  5. Soil microbial population and enzyme activity related to grazing pressure in alpine meadows of Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjeeva K; Rai, J P N

    2004-01-01

    The present study aims to analyze the interaction of prevailing biotic pressure on soil environment with emphasis on its physicochemical and microbiological characteristics determining soil fertility status and thus supporting plant and animal biodiversity in Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve (NDBR) which is located in northern part of Uttaranchal hills between 79 degrees 40'E to 80 degrees 05'E longitude and 30 degrees 17'N to 30 degrees 41'E latitude. The experimental results revealed that the physico-chemical characteristics (viz., moisture, pH, EC, C, N, P, K, CEC) of soil were maximum in moderately grazed meadow and minimum in intensively grazed meadow. Soil microbial analysis measured in terms of total viable count (TVC) exhibited grazing sensitivity trend being maximum population of bacteria > fungi > actinomycetes. The soil microbial population was positively correlated with soil respiration, dehydrogenase activity, acid phosphatase and microbial biomass, which exhibited uneven trend with grazing pressure. Soil from moderately grazed meadow showed highest microbial count and enzyme activities, whilst intensively grazed meadow showed lowest microbial count and enzyme activities. This depicts the beneficial role of prescribed grazing up to limited extent in management of soil fertility, which might have supported luxuriant growth of a variety of grasses.

  6. Combined Effect of Nutrient and Pest Managements on Substrate Utilization Pattern of Soil Microbial Population in Hybrid Rice Cropping System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the combined effect of nutrient and pest managements on soil biomass phospholipid contents, functional biodiversity and substrate utilization patterns of soil microbial populations in hybrid rice cropping system. The mineral N, P and K fertilizers (as urea, calcium superphosphate and KCl respectively) were incorporated at 100, 25, and 100 kg ha-1, respectively, and the various pesticides were applied at the recommended rates. The results of the experiment demonstrated a decline in the microbial abundance and soil microbial biomass phospholipid contents with the advancement of crop growth, and significant changes in substrate utilization pattern of soil microbial population studied were observed with different management practices and at different growth stages. The principal component analysis (PGA) using all 95-carbon sources (BIOLOG plates) gave good differentiation among the treatments, indicating that they have different patterns of carbon utilization under different habitats. The data showed that diversity in microbial community continuously changed with the progression in crop stage, particularly at physiological maturity (PM) stage that was evident from the utilization of different carbon sources at various crop stages.

  7. Microbial population dynamics and changes in main nutrients during the acidification process of pig manures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongdong Zhang; Xufeng Yuan; Peng Guo; Yali Suo; Xiaofen Wang; Weidong Wang; Zongjun Cui

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of pig manure acidification on anaerobic treatment and composition of the fecal microbial community.According to the different chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the anaerobic treatment processes, pig manure was diluted 4 times (×4), 16 times (×l6), or 64 times (×64) and subjected to acidification.During the acidification process, pH, soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) were determined along with microbial population dynamics.The pH of the three dilutions first declined, and then slowly increased.The total VFAs of ×4 and ×l6 dilutions peaked on day 15 and 20, respectively.The content of acetic acid, propanoic acid, butanoic acid and valeric acid of the × 4 dilution were 23.6, 11.4, 8.8 and 0.6 g/L respectively, and that of the ×l6 dilution was 5.6, 2.3, 0.9 and 0.2 g/L respectively.Only acetic acid was detected in the ×64 dilution, and its level peaked on day 10.The results showed that the liquid pig manure was more suitable to enter the anaerobic methanogenic bioreactors after two weeks of acidification.During the acidification process, total P concentration increased during the first ten days, then dropped sharply, and rose again to a relatively high final concentration, while total N concentration rose initially and then declined.Based on the analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rRNA gene clone library, we concluded that the acidification process reduced the number of pathogenic bacteria species in pig manure.

  8. Identification of microbial populations driving biopolymer degradation in acidic peatlands by metatranscriptomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Anastasia A; Wegner, Carl-Eric; Kim, Yongkyu; Liesack, Werner; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2016-10-01

    Northern peatlands play a crucial role in the global carbon balance, serving as a persistent sink for atmospheric CO2 and a global carbon store. Their most extensive type, Sphagnum-dominated acidic peatlands, is inhabited by microorganisms with poorly understood degradation capabilities. Here, we applied a combination of barcoded pyrosequencing of SSU rRNA genes and Illumina RNA-Seq of total RNA (metatranscriptomics) to identify microbial populations and enzymes involved in degrading the major components of Sphagnum-derived litter and exoskeletons of peat-inhabiting arthropods: cellulose, xylan, pectin and chitin. Biopolymer addition to peat induced a threefold to fivefold increase in bacterial cell numbers. Functional community profiles of assembled mRNA differed between experimental treatments. In particular, pectin and xylan triggered increased transcript abundance of genes involved in energy metabolism and central carbon metabolism, such as glycolysis and TCA cycle. Concurrently, the substrate-induced activity of bacteria on these two biopolymers stimulated grazing of peat-inhabiting protozoa. Alveolata (ciliates) was the most responsive protozoa group as confirmed by analysis of both SSU rRNA genes and SSU rRNA. A stimulation of alphaproteobacterial methanotrophs on pectin was consistently shown by rRNA and mRNA data. Most likely, their significant enrichment was due to the utilization of methanol released during the degradation of pectin. Analysis of SSU rRNA and total mRNA revealed a specific response of Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria to chitin and pectin, respectively. Relatives of Telmatobacter bradus were most responsive among the Acidobacteria, while the actinobacterial response was primarily affiliated with Frankiales and Propionibacteriales. The expression of a wide repertoire of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) corresponded well to the detection of a highly diverse peat-inhabiting microbial community, which is dominated by yet uncultivated

  9. Genome-Centric Analysis of Microbial Populations Enriched by Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Additives in a Coal Bed Methane Production Well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Steven J; Evans, Paul N; Parks, Donovan H; Golding, Suzanne D; Tyson, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) is generated primarily through the microbial degradation of coal. Despite a limited understanding of the microorganisms responsible for this process, there is significant interest in developing methods to stimulate additional methane production from CBM wells. Physical techniques including hydraulic fracture stimulation are commonly applied to CBM wells, however the effects of specific additives contained in hydraulic fracture fluids on native CBM microbial communities are poorly understood. Here, metagenomic sequencing was applied to the formation waters of a hydraulically fractured and several non-fractured CBM production wells to determine the effect of this stimulation technique on the in-situ microbial community. The hydraulically fractured well was dominated by two microbial populations belonging to the class Phycisphaerae (within phylum Planctomycetes) and candidate phylum Aminicenantes. Populations from these phyla were absent or present at extremely low abundance in non-fractured CBM wells. Detailed metabolic reconstruction of near-complete genomes from these populations showed that their high relative abundance in the hydraulically fractured CBM well could be explained by the introduction of additional carbon sources, electron acceptors, and biocides contained in the hydraulic fracture fluid.

  10. Biofilm removal technique using sands as a research tool for accessing microbial attachment on surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanon Trachoo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms have profound impacts on improved survival of the constituent microorganisms in nature. Biofilms were believed to protect constituent microorganisms from sanitizer treatment, provide a more suitable habitat for microorganisms, and become a site for genetic material exchanges between microorganisms. As we realize more about the significance of biofilm, methods used for biofilm study should be consistently developed and evaluated. To determine microbial attachment on surfaces, usually biofilms are grown on substratum surfaces and removed by vortexing with glass beads or scraping. However, scraping is not as effective as vortexing with glass beads. Another approach is direct-agar overlaying which cannot be used with high density biofilm. In this experiment, we compared effectiveness of glass beads (298±28 μm in diameter and sands (width: 221±55 μm and length: 329±118 μm in removing biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by vortexing method. The results suggested that acid-washed sands, which are significantly less inexpensive than glass beads, were as effective as (P>0.05 analytical grade glass beads in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm removal without inhibiting growth of the organism.

  11. In situ exposure to low herbicide concentrations affects microbial population composition and catabolic gene frequency in an aerobic shallow aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lipthay, J.R.; Tuxen, Nina; Johnsen, Kaare

    2003-01-01

    and were analyzed for the presence of general microbial populations, Pseudomonas bacteria, and specific phenoxy acid degraders. Both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods were applied. The abundance of microbial phenoxy acid degraders (10(0) to 10(4) g(-1) sediment) was determined by most...... measured by either PCR or plating on selective agar media was higher in sediments subjected to high levels of phenoxy acid. Furthermore, high numbers of CFU compared to direct counting of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained cells in the microscope suggested an increased culturability of the indigenous...... of the aquifer. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism measurements demonstrated the presence of different populations of tfd genes, suggesting that the in situ herbicide degradation was caused by the activity of a heterogeneous population of phenoxy acid degraders. The number of Pseudomonas bacteria...

  12. 16S rRNA gene sequencing as a tool to study microbial populations in foods and process environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buschhardt, Tasja; Hansen, Tina Beck; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Methodological constraints during culturing and biochemical testing have left the true microbiological diversity of foods and process environments unexplored. Culture-independent molecular methods, such as 16S rRNA gene sequencing, may provide deeper insight into microbial communities...... and their role in food safety. During method optimization, we have identified several factors which distort the characterization of microbial populations, including DNA extraction methods, DNA polymerases, and most importantly the analyzed fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. Methods: This study investigated microbial...... communities in meat and the meat process environment with special focus on the Enterobacteriaceae family as a subpopulation comprising enteropathogens including Salmonella. Samples were analyzed by a nested PCR approach combined with MiSeq® Illumina®16S DNA sequencing and standardized culture methods as cross...

  13. Fermentation and microbial population dynamics during the ensiling of native grass and subsequent exposure to air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Wu, Baiyila; Nishino, Naoki; Wang, Xianguo; Yu, Zhu

    2016-03-01

    To study the microbial population and fermentation dynamics of large needlegrass (LN) and Chinese leymus (CL) during ensiling and subsequent exposure to air, silages were sampled and analyzed using culture-based techniques and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). A total of 112 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains were isolated and identified using the 16S rRNA sequencing method. Lactic acid was not detected in the first 20 days in LN silage and the pH decreased to 6.13 after 45 days of ensiling. The temperature of the LN silage increased after approximately 30 h of air exposure and the CL silage showed a slight temperature variation. Enterococcus spp. were mainly present in LN silage. The proportion of Lactobacillus brevis in CL silage increased after exposure to air. LN silage with a higher proportion of Enterococcus spp. and propionic acid concentration did not show higher fermentation quality or aerobic stability than CL silage, which had a higher concentration of acetic acid, butyric acid and increased proportion of L. brevis after exposure to air.

  14. Biodegradation of 4-nitrophenol by indigenous microbial populations in Everglades soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laha, S; Petrova, K P

    The Everglades in South Florida are a unique ecological system. As a result of the widespread use of pesticides and herbicides in agricultural areas upstream from these wetlands, there is a serious potential for pollution problems in the Everglades. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of indigenous microbial populations to degrade xenobiotic organic compounds introduced by agricultural and other activities. Such biodegradation may facilitate the remediation of contaminated soils and water in the Everglades. The model compound selected in this study is 4-nitrophenol, a chemical commonly used in the manufacture of pesticides. The mineralization of 4-nitrophenol at various concentrations was studied in soils collected from the Everglades. At concentrations of 10 and 100 microg/g soil, considerable mineralization occurred within a week. At a higher concentration, i.e., 10 mg/g soil, however, no mineralization of 4-nitrophenol occurred over a 4-month period; such a high concentration apparently produced an inhibitory effect. The rate and extent of 4-nitrophenol mineralization was enhanced on inoculation with previously isolated nitrophenol-degrading microorganisms. The maximum mineralization extent measured, however, was less than 30% suggesting conversion to biomass and/or unidentified intermediate products. These results indicate the potential for natural mechanisms to mitigate the adverse effects of xenobiotic pollutants in a complex system such as the Everglades.

  15. Unequal Accessibility of Nurseries for Sick Children in Over- and Under-Populated Areas of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehara, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Infants and toddlers are prone to rapidly contracting illnesses, which are usually attributed to infectious diseases. Most nurseries and schools in Japan, however, refuse to accept children even with mild illnesses. For working parents, a sick child may therefore create new problems as the situation requires new day-care arrangements. To support such families, the Japanese government subsidizes construction and management of nurseries that operate especially for sick children. However, it has not been known whether most families are able to access such nurseries. To clarify the accessibility of these services, I calculated the distance to the nurseries from each of the 211,012 "blocks" (small residential areas with a median of 0.18 km(2)) in Japan and determined the proportion of children aged 0-4 years who lived within 3, 5, 10, 20 or 30 km of the nearest such nursery. Overall, 82.1% of these children lived within 10 km. However, the proportion was lower in northern parts of Japan such as Hokkaido and Tohoku, which have expansive land areas and low population and pediatric department densities. The proportion of children who lived within that same distance of the nearest nursery was also much lower in small towns and villages with 10,000 or fewer residents. Nurseries for sick children were not evenly distributed, and children and their caregivers in under-populated areas had to travel further to access these facilities. As the national government subsidizes such services, children and caregivers throughout Japan should have equal access to them.

  16. Microbiota contaminante em repolho minimamente processado Microbial population in minimally processed cabbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete Fantuzzi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A microbiota contaminante de repolho minimamente processado foi avaliada durante as etapas de sanitização e estocagem sob atmosfera modificada passiva em embalagens com diferentes taxas de permeabilidade a O2 e CO2 e a 1ºC, 5ºC e 12ºC. A sanitização do repolho por 10min., à temperatura ambiente, em soluções sanitizantes de hipoclorito de sódio a 200mgL-1, de composto orgânico clorado a 200mgL-1 ou ácido acético a 1% reduziu em, no máximo, 1,8log10 UFCg-1 a população de microrganismos aeróbios mesófilos. A concentração de CO2 no interior das embalagens variou significativamente (PThe microbial populations associated with minimally processed cabbage after sanitation and storage at 1ºC, 5ºC and 12ºC under modified atmosphere was analyzed. Sanitation of cabbage for ten minutes at room temperature in 200mgL-1 sodium hypochlorite and chlorinated organic compound or 1% acetic acid resulted in the reduction of up to 1.8log10CFUg-1 in the aerobic mesophilic bacteria population (P0.05 differences in concentrations of CO2 were found in the interior of the packages during fifteen days of storage. No variation was found in the mesophilic aerobic or anaerobic counts, and psycrotrophic microorganisms during storage at 1ºC and 5ºC for the three packaging materials used. The minimally processed cabbage was in good sensorial conditions for up to 20 days of storage at 1ºC and 5ºC in the packaging materials of high O2 permeability. The samples packed in transparent plastic trays sealed with thermal-shrinking PVC presented undesirable sensorial characteristics on the twentieth day of storage at 5ºC. After five days of storage at 12ºC the fresh-cut cabbage presented evident signs of deterioration, as dark spots, slime and off odor. There was a 3log10 CFUg-1 increase in the aerobic and anaerobic mesophiles and psycrotrophic populations in these samples.

  17. Diversity and evolution of the microbial populations during manufacture and ripening of Casín, a traditional Spanish, starter-free cheese made from cow's milk

    OpenAIRE

    Alegría, Ángel; Álvarez Martín, Pablo; Sacristán, Noelia; Fernández, Elena; Delgado, Susana; Mayo Pérez, Baltasar

    2009-01-01

    Classical culturing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) techniques have been used for studying the microbial diversity and dynamics of the traditional Spanish Casín cheese during manufacturing and ripening. As with other starter-free cheeses made from raw milk, the microbial diversity of Casín was shown to be high by both culturing and DGGE analyses. The culture technique showed that lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species constituted the majority of the microbial populations. Of th...

  18. Microbial metagenomes from three aquifers in the Fennoscandian shield terrestrial deep biosphere reveal metabolic partitioning among populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaofen; Holmfeldt, Karin; Hubalek, Valerie; Lundin, Daniel; Åström, Mats; Bertilsson, Stefan; Dopson, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Microorganisms in the terrestrial deep biosphere host up to 20% of the earth's biomass and are suggested to be sustained by the gases hydrogen and carbon dioxide. A metagenome analysis of three deep subsurface water types of contrasting age (from 86% coverage. The populations were dominated by Proteobacteria, Candidate divisions, unclassified archaea and unclassified bacteria. The estimated genome sizes of the biosphere. The data were finally used to create a combined metabolic model of the deep terrestrial biosphere microbial community.

  19. The chemical composition, fermentation profile, and microbial populations in tropical grass silages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Sampaio Rigueira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the fermentation profile, chemical composition and microbial population and losses in the silages of signalgrass and Mombasa grass fertilized with the following levels of nitrogen (N: 0, 30, 60 and 90 kg/ha. The grasses were harvested at 70 days of regrowth, chopped and then ensiled in laboratory silos that had 20 kg of capacity and a snap-top cover and were fitted with Bunsen valves. Before ensiling, samples of the plants were used for the isolation and identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB in epiphytic microbiota. The design adopted was a 4 × 2 factorial arrangement, with four doses of N and two forage species, in a completely randomized design, with four replicates. The predominant species of LAB was Lactobacillus fermentum. The interaction between the N dose and forage species affected the dry matter (DM, crude protein (CP, neutral detergent fiber (NDF, acid detergent fiber (ADF and water soluble carbohydrates (WSC of the silages. The pH values and gas losses were influenced only by the forage species, with higher values for the Mombasa grass. For the ammonia (NH3-N levels and effluent losses, there was an effect of the interaction between the forage species and N doses, and the highest values of NH3-N and effluent losses were found in the Mombasa grass silage fertilized with 60 kg N/ha. Nitrogen fertilization reduces the levels of DM and WSC in the silages and also increases the levels of CP, NH3-N and effluent losses.

  20. Effects of butachlor on microbial populations and enzyme activities in paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, H; Ye, Y F; Chen, Z Y; Wu, W X; Yufeng, D

    2001-09-01

    This paper reports the influences of the herbicide butachlor (n-butoxymethlchloro -2', 6'-diethylacetnilide) on microbial populations, respiration, nitrogen fixation and nitrification, and on the activities of dehydrogenase and hydrogen peroxidase in paddy soil. The results showed that the number of actinomycetes declined significantly after the application of butachlor at different concentrations ranging from 5.5 microg g(-1) to 22.0 microg g(-1) dried soil, while that of bacteria and fungi increased. Fungi were easily affected by butachlor compared to the bacteria. The growth of fungi was retarded by butachlor at higher concentrations. Butachlor however, stimulated the growth of anaerobic hydrolytic fermentative bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and denitrifying bacteria. The increased concentration of butachlor applied resulted in the higher number of SRB. Butachlor inhibited the growth of hydrogen-producing acetogenic bacteria. The effect of butachlor varied on methane-producing bacteria (MPB) at different concentrations. Butachlor at the concentration of 1.0 microg g(-1) dried soil or less than this concentration accelerated the growth of MPB, while at 22.0 microg g(-1) dried soil showed an inhibition. Butachlor enhanced the activity of dehydrogenase at increasing concentrations. The soil dehydrogenase showed the highest activity on the 16th day after application of 22.0 microg g(-1) dried soil of butachlor. The hydrogen peroxidase could be stimulated by butachlor. The soil respiration was depressed during the period from several days to more than 20 days, depending on concentrations of butachlor applied. Both the nitrogen fixation and nitrification were stimulated in the beginning but reduced greatly afterwards in paddy soil.

  1. Effects of Fructooligosaccharides,compared with Direct-Fed Microbial Bacteria,and Zinc Bacitracin on Cecal Microbial Populations and Performance of Broilers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of dietary fructooligosaccharides(FOS),compared with direct-fed microbial bacteria (DFM),and zinc bacitracin ,on cecal microbial populations and performance of broiler Chickens. One hundred and ninety-two broilers (Avian) were randomly assigned to four groups,with four replicates of 12 birds each. The control group was fed with the basal diet,without any drug additive. FOS,DFM and zine bacitracin was respectively added to the basal diet at the level of 1.5% ,800 mg@kg-1 and 300 mg@ kg-1 to form the experimental diets. Body weight ,feed intake and feed efficiency were measured weekly. The feeding trial started at 1 d and ended at 21 d. At day 14 and day 21 ,four broilers per group were killed and cecum waa taken to determined microflors and pH. The results showed that dietary FOS increased bifidobactrial concentration by 1. 75-fold( P <0. 05) at 14 d of age and 1.45-fold( P <0. 05) at 21 d of age compared with control. FOS had no effect on concnetrations of E. coli and pH. There were no dietary effects of FOS,DFM,and zinc bacitracin on weight gain,feed intake,feed conversion( P >0. 05).

  2. A bayesian approach to inferring the genetic population structure of sugarcane accessions from INTA (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Inés Pocovi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the population structure and genetic diversity in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. accessions from INTA germplasm bank (Argentina will be of great importance for germplasm collection and breeding improvement as it will identify diverse parental combinations to create segregating progenies with maximum genetic variability for further selection. A Bayesian approach, ordination methods (PCoA, Principal Coordinate Analysis and clustering analysis (UPGMA, Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean were applied to this purpose. Sixty three INTA sugarcane hybrids were genotyped for 107 Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR and 136 Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP loci. Given the low probability values found with AFLP for individual assignment (4.7%, microsatellites seemed to perform better (54% for STRUCTURE analysis that revealed the germplasm to exist in five optimum groups with partly corresponding to their origin. However clusters shown high degree of admixture, F ST values confirmed the existence of differences among groups. Dissimilarity coefficients ranged from 0.079 to 0.651. PCoA separated sugarcane in groups that did not agree with those identified by STRUCTURE. The clustering including all genotypes neither showed resemblance to populations find by STRUCTURE, but clustering performed considering only individuals displaying a proportional membership > 0.6 in their primary population obtained with STRUCTURE showed close similarities. The Bayesian method indubitably brought more information on cultivar origins than classical PCoA and hierarchical clustering method.

  3. Development of a Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service—Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo): Study Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Gary; Navarro-Ruan, Tamara; McEneny-King, Alanna; Edginton, Andrea N; Thabane, Lehana

    2016-01-01

    Background Individual pharmacokinetic assessment is a critical component of tailored prophylaxis for hemophilia patients. Population pharmacokinetics allows using individual sparse data, thus simplifying individual pharmacokinetic studies. Implementing population pharmacokinetics capacity for the hemophilia community is beyond individual reach and requires a system effort. Objective The Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service—Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo) project aims to assemble a database of patient pharmacokinetic data for all existing factor concentrates, develop and validate population pharmacokinetics models, and integrate these models within a Web-based calculator for individualized pharmacokinetic estimation in patients at participating treatment centers. Methods Individual pharmacokinetic studies on factor VIII and IX concentrates will be sourced from pharmaceutical companies and independent investigators. All factor concentrate manufacturers, hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs), and independent investigators (identified via a systematic review of the literature) having on file pharmacokinetic data and willing to contribute full or sparse pharmacokinetic data will be eligible for participation. Multicompartmental modeling will be performed using a mixed-model approach for derivation and Bayesian forecasting for estimation of individual sparse data. NONMEM (ICON Development Solutions) will be used as modeling software. Results The WAPPS-Hemo research network has been launched and is currently joined by 30 HTCs from across the world. We have gathered dense individual pharmacokinetic data on 878 subjects, including several replicates, on 21 different molecules from 17 different sources. We have collected sparse individual pharmacokinetic data on 289 subjects from the participating centers through the testing phase of the WAPPS-Hemo Web interface. We have developed prototypal population pharmacokinetics models for 11 molecules. The WAPPS-Hemo website

  4. Microbial population dynamics in an anaerobic CSTR treating a chemical synthesis-based pharmaceutical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Nilgun Ayman; Ince, Orhan; Ince, Bahar Kasapgil; Akarsubasi, Alper Tunga; Eyice, Ozge

    2003-01-01

    Effects of a chemical synthesis based pharmaceutical wastewater on performance of an anaerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR), activity of acetoclastic methanogens and microbial composition were evaluated under various influent compositions. Initially, the CSTR was fed with glucose up to an organic loading rate (OLR) of 6 kg COD/m3 x d corresponding to an F/M ratio of 0.43 with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2.5 days. A COD removal efficiency of 92% and a methane yield of 0.32 m3 CH4/kg COD(removed) were achieved whilst specific methanogenic activity (SMA) was found to be 336mL CH4/gTVS x d. After the CSTR was fed with pre-aerated wastewater diluted by glucose in different dilution ratios of 10% (w/v), 30% (w/v), 70% (w/v), and 100% (w/v) pre-aerated wastewater, gradual decreases in COD removal efficiency to 71%, methane yield to 0.28 m3CH4/kg COD(removed) and SMA to 166 mL CH4/gTVS d occurred whilst volatile fatty acid concentration reached to 1474 mg/L. After the raw wastewater diluted with the pre-aerated wastewater was fed into the CSTR in increasing ratios of 10% (w/v), 30% (w/v), and 60% (w/v), there was a proportional deterioration in performance in terms of COD removal efficiency, methane yield and acetoclastic methanogenic activity. Epifluorescence microscopy of the seed sludge revealed that Methanococcus-like species, short, and medium rods were found to be equally dominant. The short and medium rod species remained equally dominant groups in the CSTR throughout the feeding regime whilst Methanococcus-like species and long rods were found to be in insignificant numbers at the end of the study. Changes in archael diversity were determined using molecular analyses such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and denaturent gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Results showed that overall archeal diversity did not change much whereas changes in composition of eubacterial population occurred.

  5. Microbial Diversity Analysis of the Bacterial and Archaeal Population in Present Day Stromatolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Maya C.

    2011-01-01

    Stromatolites are layered sedimentary structures resulting from microbial mat communities that remove carbon dioxide from their environment and biomineralize it as calcium carbonate. Although prevalent in the fossil record, stromatolites are rare in the modem world and are only found in a few locations including Highbome Cay in the Bahamas. The stromatolites found at this shallow marine site are analogs to ancient microbial mat ecosystems abundant in the Precambrian period on ancient Earth. To understand how stromatolites form and develop, it is important to identify what microorganisms are present in these mats, and how these microbes contribute to geological structure. These results will provide insight into the molecular and geochemical processes of microbial communities that prevailed on ancient Earth. Since stromatolites are formed by lithifying microbial mats that are able to mineralize calcium carbonate, understanding the biological mechanisms involved may lead to the development of carbon sequestration technologies that will be applicable in human spaceflight, as well as improve our understanding of global climate and its sustainability. The objective of my project was to analyze the archaeal and bacterial dIversity in stromatolites from Highborn Cay in the Bahamas. The first step in studying the molecular processes that the microorganisms carry out is to ascertain the microbial complexity within the mats, which includes identifying and estimating the numbers of different microbes that comprise these mats.

  6. Distance matters: a population based study examining access to maternity services for rural women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornelsen Jude

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past fifteen years there has been a wave of closures of small maternity services in Canada and other developed nations which results in the need for rural parturient women to travel to access care. The purpose of our study is to systematically document newborn and maternal outcomes as they relate to distance to travel to access the nearest maternity services with Cesarean section capabililty. Methods Study population is all women carrying a singleton pregnancy beyond 20 weeks and delivering between April 1, 2000 and March 31, 2004 and residing outside of the core urban areas of British Columbia. Maternal and newborn data was linked to specific geographic catchments by the B.C. Perinatal Health Program. Catchments were stratified by distance to nearest maternity service with Cesarean section capabililty if greater than 1 hour travel time or level of local service. Hierarchical logistic regression was used to test predictors of adverse newborn and maternal outcomes. Results 49,402 cases of women and newborns resident in rural catchments were included. Adjusted odds ratios for perinatal mortality for newborns from catchments greater than 4 hours from services was 3.17 (95% CI 1.45-6.95. Newborns from catchments 2 to 4 hours, and 1 to 2 hours from services generated rates of 179 and 100 NICU 3 days per thousand births respectively compared to 42 days for newborns from catchments served by specialists. Conclusions Distance matters: rural parturient women who have to travel to access maternity services have increased rates of adverse perinatal outcomes.

  7. Microbial population responses in three stratified Antarctic meltwater ponds during the autumn freeze

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safi, Karl; Hawes, Ian; Sorrell, Brian Keith

    2012-01-01

    The planktonic microbial communities of three meltwater ponds, located on the McMurdo Ice Shelf, were investigated from the end of January 2008 to early April, during which almost the entire pond volumes froze. The ponds were comprised of an upper mixed layer overlying a salt-stabilized density g...... for increasing heterotrophy within the remaining microbial communities, although all components of the food web eventually decline as the final freeze approaches....... role of autotrophic and heterotrophic microplankton within the ponds. The results showed that microbial groups responded to the onset of winter by declining in abundance, though an exception was the appearance of filamentous cyanobacteria in the water column in March. As freezing progressed, autotrophs...... declined more rapidly than heterotrophs and grazing rates and abundances of mixotrophic and heterotrophic organisms increased. Grazing pressure on bacteria and picophytoplankton also increased, in part explaining their decline over time. The results indicate that stressors imposed during freezing select...

  8. Effect of untreated sewage effluent irrigation on heavy metal content, microbial population and enzymatic activities of soils in Aligarh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, O P; Singh, Gajraj; Katiyar, Pragati

    2014-07-01

    The study pertains to the impact of domestic and industrial sewage water irrigation on the chemical, biological and enzymatic activities in alluvial soils of Aligarh District. Results showed that soil enzymatic [dehydogenase (DHA), acid and alkaline phosphatase, urease and catalase] activities in the soils increased up to 14 days of incubation and thereafter inhibited significantly. The enzymatic activity were in the order sewage effluent > partial sewage effluent > ground water irrigated soils. Increase in soil enzymatic activities up to 2nd week of incubation was due to decomposition of organic matter. Maximum inhibition of enzymatic activities, after 14 days of incubation were found in sewage effluent irrigated soils and minimum in ground water irrigated soils. Similar trend was also seen for microbial population. Soil enzymatic activities and microbial population were significantly and positively correlated with soil organic matter. Results also indicated that the microbial population and enzymatic activities in sewage irrigated soils decreased continually with irrigation period. The average concentration of total heavy metals in sewage irrigated soils and partial sewage irrigated soils increased and was 3 and 2 times higher for Zn; 4.5 and 1.7 times higher for Cu; 3.8 and 2.4 times higher for Cr; 5.7 and 3.5 times higher for Pb; 3.5 and 2.2 times higher for Cd and 2.7 and 2.0 times higher for Ni respectively than that of ground water irrigated soils. Results also showed that though total heavy metals concentration increased with period of sewage irrigation but the concentration of diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) extractable heavy metals in partial sewage irrigated and sewage irrigated soils remained almost same, which might be due to deposition of heavy metals in crops grown on the soils.

  9. Shifts in the Microbial Population in Relation to in situ Caries Progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, R. Z.; Zijnge, V.; Cicek, A.; de Soet, J. J.; Harmsen, H. J. M.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The shift in microbial diversity from young to mature plaque, related to caries activity on sound and restored surfaces, was studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. During a 20-week in situ study on caries progression 8 subjects wearing restored and unrestored dentin and enamel sectio

  10. In Silico Gene-Level Evolution Explains Microbial Population Diversity through Differential Gene Mobility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Bram; Hogeweg, P.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial communities can show astonishing ecological and phylogenetic diversity. What is the role of pervasive horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in shaping this diversity in the presence of clonally expanding "killer strains"? Does HGT of antibiotic production and resistance genes erase phylogenetic s

  11. Heterotrophic and autotrophic microbial populations in cold perennial springs of the high arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Nancy N; Greer, Charles W; Andersen, Dale T; Tille, Stefanie; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Whyte, Lyle G

    2008-11-01

    The saline springs of Gypsum Hill in the Canadian high Arctic are a rare example of cold springs originating from deep groundwater and rising to the surface through thick permafrost. The heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (up to 40% of the total microbial community) isolated from the spring waters and sediments were classified into four phyla (Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria) based on 16S rRNA gene analysis; heterotrophic isolates were primarily psychrotolerant, salt-tolerant, facultative anaerobes. Some of the isolates contained genes for thiosulfate oxidation (soxB) and anoxygenic photosynthesis (pufM), possibly enabling the strains to better compete in these sulfur-rich environments subject to long periods of illumination in the Arctic summer. Although leucine uptake by the spring water microbial community was low, CO(2) uptake was relatively high under dark incubation, reinforcing the idea that primary production by chemoautotrophs is an important process in the springs. The small amounts of hydrocarbons in gases exsolving from the springs (0.38 to 0.51% CH(4)) were compositionally and isotopically consistent with microbial methanogenesis and possible methanotrophy. Anaerobic heterotrophic sulfur oxidation and aerobic autotrophic sulfur oxidation activities were demonstrated in sediment slurries. Overall, our results describe an active microbial community capable of sustainability in an extreme environment that experiences prolonged periods of continuous light or darkness, low temperatures, and moderate salinity, where life seems to rely on chemolithoautotrophy.

  12. A study of microbial population dynamics associated with corrosion rates influenced by corrosion control materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Yu Jie; Hung, Chun Hsiung; Lee, Jyh Wei; Chang, Yi Tang; Lin, Fen Yu; Chuang, Chun Jie

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to analyze the variations of microbial community structure under anaerobic corrosive conditions, using molecular fingerprinting method. The effect of adding various materials to the environment on the corrosion mechanism has been discussed. In the initial experiment, sulfate-re

  13. Progression of natural attenuation processes at a crude oil spill site: II. Controls on spatial distribution of microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekins, B A; Cozzarelli, I M; Godsy, E M; Warren, E; Essaid, H I; Tuccillo, M E

    2001-12-15

    A multidisciplinary study of a crude-oil contaminated aquifer shows that the distribution of microbial physiologic types is strongly controlled by the aquifer properties and crude oil location. The microbial populations of four physiologic types were analyzed together with permeability, pore-water chemistry, nonaqueous oil content, and extractable sediment iron. Microbial data from three vertical profiles through the anaerobic portion of the contaminated aquifer clearly show areas that have progressed from iron-reduction to methanogenesis. These locations contain lower numbers of iron reducers, and increased numbers of fermenters with detectable methanogens. Methanogenic conditions exist both in the area contaminated by nonaqueous oil and also below the oil where high hydrocarbon concentrations correspond to local increases in aquifer permeability. The results indicate that high contaminant flux either from local dissolution or by advective transport plays a key role in determining which areas first become methanogenic. Other factors besides flux that are important include the sediment Fe(II) content and proximity to the water table. In locations near a seasonally oscillating water table, methanogenic conditions exist only below the lowest typical water table elevation. During 20 years since the oil spill occurred, a laterally continuous methanogenic zone has developed along a narrow horizon extending from the source area to 50-60 m downgradient. A companion paper [J. Contam. Hydrol. 53, 369-386] documents how the growth of the methanogenic zone results in expansion of the aquifer volume contaminated with the highest concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes.

  14. Microbial populations identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in a constructed wetland treating acid coal mine drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicomrat, D.; Dick, W.A.; Tuovinen, O.H. [Ohio State University, Wooster, OH (United States). Environmental Science Graduate Programme

    2006-07-15

    Microorganisms are an integral part of the biogeochemical processes in wetlands, yet microbial communities in sediments within constructed wetlands receiving acid mine drainage (AMD) are only poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize the microbial diversity and abundance in a wetland receiving AMD using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Seasonal samples of oxic surface sediments, comprised of Fe(III) precipitates, were collected from two treatment cells of the constructed wetland system. The pH of the bulk samples ranged between pH 2.1 and 3.9. Viable counts of acidophilic Fe and S oxidizers and heterotrophs were determined with a most probable number (MPN) method. The MPN counts were only a fraction of the corresponding FISH counts. The sediment samples contained microorganisms in the Bacteria (including the subgroups of acidophilic Fe- and S-oxidizing bacteria and Acidiphilium spp.) and Eukarya domains. Archaea were present in the sediment surface samples at < 0.01% of the total microbial community. The most numerous bacterial species in this wetland system was Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, comprising up to 37% of the bacterial population. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was also abundant.

  15. Access to primary care and visits to emergency departments in England: a cross-sectional, population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Cowling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The number of visits to hospital emergency departments (EDs in England has increased by 20% since 2007-08, placing unsustainable pressure on the National Health Service (NHS. Some patients attend EDs because they are unable to access primary care services. This study examined the association between access to primary care and ED visits in England. METHODS: A cross-sectional, population-based analysis of patients registered with 7,856 general practices in England was conducted, for the time period April 2010 to March 2011. The outcome measure was the number of self-referred discharged ED visits by the registered population of a general practice. The predictor variables were measures of patient-reported access to general practice services; these were entered into a negative binomial regression model with variables to control for the characteristics of patient populations, supply of general practitioners and travel times to health services. MAIN RESULT AND CONCLUSION: General practices providing more timely access to primary care had fewer self-referred discharged ED visits per registered patient (for the most accessible quintile of practices, RR = 0.898; P<0.001. Policy makers should consider improving timely access to primary care when developing plans to reduce ED utilisation.

  16. Access to Primary Care and Visits to Emergency Departments in England: A Cross-Sectional, Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, Thomas E.; Cecil, Elizabeth V.; Soljak, Michael A.; Lee, John Tayu; Millett, Christopher; Majeed, Azeem; Wachter, Robert M.; Harris, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of visits to hospital emergency departments (EDs) in England has increased by 20% since 2007-08, placing unsustainable pressure on the National Health Service (NHS). Some patients attend EDs because they are unable to access primary care services. This study examined the association between access to primary care and ED visits in England. Methods A cross-sectional, population-based analysis of patients registered with 7,856 general practices in England was conducted, for the time period April 2010 to March 2011. The outcome measure was the number of self-referred discharged ED visits by the registered population of a general practice. The predictor variables were measures of patient-reported access to general practice services; these were entered into a negative binomial regression model with variables to control for the characteristics of patient populations, supply of general practitioners and travel times to health services. Main Result and Conclusion General practices providing more timely access to primary care had fewer self-referred discharged ED visits per registered patient (for the most accessible quintile of practices, RR = 0.898; P<0.001). Policy makers should consider improving timely access to primary care when developing plans to reduce ED utilisation. PMID:23776694

  17. Microbial Nitrogen Transformations in the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Peru, 01 February 1985 to 05 March 1985 (NODC Accession 9200026)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NITROP - 85 was the major field of experiment of an N.S.F. funded program entitled "Microbial Nitrogen Transformations in the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Peru". this...

  18. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria and microbial populations in drinking water distribution systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Briancesco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on the occurrence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM, in parallel with those obtained for bacterial indicators and amoebae, are presented with the aim to collect information on the spread of NTM in drinking water distribution systems in Italy. Samples were collected from taps of hospitals and households in Central and Southern Italy. The concentration values obtained for the more traditional microbial parameters complied with the mandatory requirements for drinking water. Conversely, moderate-to-high microbial loads (till 300 CFU/L were observed for the NTM. Positive samples were obtained from 62% of the investigated water samples. Analogous results were observed for amoebae showing a higher percentage of positive samples (76%. In terms of public health, the presence of mycobacteria in water distribution systems may represent a potential risk especially for vulnerable people such as children, the elderly or immunocompromised individuals.

  19. Involvement of microbial populations during the composting of olive mill wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, N; Chamkha, M; Godon, J J; Sayadi, S

    2007-07-01

    Olive mill waste water sludge obtained by the electro-Fenton oxidation of olive mill waste water was composted in a bench scale reactor. The evolution of microbial species within the composter was investigated using a respirometric test and by means of both cultivation-dependent and independent approaches (Polymerase Chain Reaction-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism, PCR SSCP). During the period of high respiration rate (7-24 days), cultivation method showed that thermophilic bacteria as well as actinomycetes dominated over eumycetes. During the composting process, the PCR-SSCP method showed a higher diversity of the bacterial community than the eukaryotic one. After 60 days of composting, the compost exhibited a microbial stability and a clear absence of phytotoxicity.

  20. Microbial populations in Antarctic permafrost: biodiversity, state, age, and implication for astrobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilichinsky, D A; Wilson, G S; Friedmann, E I; McKay, C P; Sletten, R S; Rivkina, E M; Vishnivetskaya, T A; Erokhina, L G; Ivanushkina, N E; Kochkina, G A; Shcherbakova, V A; Soina, V S; Spirina, E V; Vorobyova, E A; Fyodorov-Davydov, D G; Hallet, B; Ozerskaya, S M; Sorokovikov, V A; Laurinavichyus, K S; Shatilovich, A V; Chanton, J P; Ostroumov, V E; Tiedje, J M

    2007-04-01

    Antarctic permafrost soils have not received as much geocryological and biological study as has been devoted to the ice sheet, though the permafrost is more stable and older and inhabited by more microbes. This makes these soils potentially more informative and a more significant microbial repository than ice sheets. Due to the stability of the subsurface physicochemical regime, Antarctic permafrost is not an extreme environment but a balanced natural one. Up to 10(4) viable cells/g, whose age presumably corresponds to the longevity of the permanently frozen state of the sediments, have been isolated from Antarctic permafrost. Along with the microbes, metabolic by-products are preserved. This presumed natural cryopreservation makes it possible to observe what may be the oldest microbial communities on Earth. Here, we describe the Antarctic permafrost habitat and biodiversity and provide a model for martian ecosystems.

  1. Turnover of microbial lipids in the deep biosphere and growth of benthic archaeal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sitan; Lipp, Julius S; Wegener, Gunter; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Deep subseafloor sediments host a microbial biosphere with unknown impact on global biogeochemical cycles. This study tests previous evidence based on microbial intact polar lipids (IPLs) as proxies of live biomass, suggesting that Archaea dominate the marine sedimentary biosphere. We devised a sensitive radiotracer assay to measure the decay rate of ([(14)C]glucosyl)-diphytanylglyceroldiether (GlcDGD) as an analog of archaeal IPLs in continental margin sediments. The degradation kinetics were incorporated in model simulations that constrained the fossil fraction of subseafloor IPLs and rates of archaeal turnover. Simulating the top 1 km in a generic continental margin sediment column, we estimated degradation rate constants of GlcDGD being one to two orders of magnitude lower than those of bacterial IPLs, with half-lives of GlcDGD increasing with depth to 310 ky. Given estimated microbial community turnover times of 1.6-73 ky in sediments deeper than 1 m, 50-96% of archaeal IPLs represent fossil signals. Consequently, previous lipid-based estimates of global subseafloor biomass probably are too high, and the widely observed dominance of archaeal IPLs does not rule out a deep biosphere dominated by Bacteria. Reverse modeling of existing concentration profiles suggest that archaeal IPL synthesis rates decline from around 1,000 pg⋅mL(-1) sediment⋅y(-1) at the surface to 0.2 pg⋅mL(-1)⋅y(-1) at 1 km depth, equivalent to production of 7 × 10(5) to 140 archaeal cells⋅mL(-1) sediment⋅y(-1), respectively. These constraints on microbial growth are an important step toward understanding the relationship between the deep biosphere and the carbon cycle.

  2. Population dynamics and spatial distribution of microbial species in multispecies biofilms under the action of direct electric current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Hongbin; LI Xingang; WU Jinchuan; ZHONG Fangli; ZHANG Yi

    2003-01-01

    The metabolism, population dynamics and spatial distribution of nitrifying bacteria and heterotrophs in biofilms under the action of direct electric current were investigated by using the micro-slicing technique. The nitrification rate of nitrifying bacteria was severely inhibited by a current over 10 Am-2 at lower C/N ratios. Compared to heterotrophs, the nitrifying bacteria in the surface biofilms were severely inhibited, resulting in a significant decrease in bacterial density. An increase in current density narrowed the less current-sensitive inner biofilm region, and in addition the density of NO2-oxidizers decreased more significantly than that of NH4-oxidizers in the surface biofilms probably due to electrochemical reactions at the anode. However, the effect of current on both the population dynamics and the spatial distribution of the microbial species was less significant at larger C/N ratios.

  3. The Influence of Age and Gender on Skin-Associated Microbial Communities in Urban and Rural Human Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Ying

    Full Text Available Differences in the bacterial community structure associated with 7 skin sites in 71 healthy people over five days showed significant correlations with age, gender, physical skin parameters, and whether participants lived in urban or rural locations in the same city. While body site explained the majority of the variance in bacterial community structure, the composition of the skin-associated bacterial communities were predominantly influenced by whether the participants were living in an urban or rural environment, with a significantly greater relative abundance of Trabulsiella in urban populations. Adults maintained greater overall microbial diversity than adolescents or the elderly, while the intragroup variation among the elderly and rural populations was significantly greater. Skin-associated bacterial community structure and composition could predict whether a sample came from an urban or a rural resident ~5x greater than random.

  4. Archaeal populations in hypersaline sediments underlying orange microbial mats in the Napoli mud volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; L'haridon, Stéphane; Pignet, Patricia; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Microbial mats in marine cold seeps are known to be associated with ascending sulfide- and methane-rich fluids. Hence, they could be visible indicators of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and methane cycling processes in underlying sediments. The Napoli mud volcano is situated in the Olimpi Area that lies on saline deposits; from there, brine fluids migrate upward to the seafloor. Sediments associated with a brine pool and microbial orange mats of the Napoli mud volcano were recovered during the Medeco cruise. Based on analysis of RNA-derived sequences, the "active" archaeal community was composed of many uncultured lineages, such as rice cluster V or marine benthic group D. Function methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes were affiliated with the anaerobic methanotrophic Archaea (ANME) of the ANME-1, ANME-2a, and ANME-2c groups, suggesting that AOM occurred in these sediment layers. Enrichment cultures showed the presence of viable marine methylotrophic Methanococcoides in shallow sediment layers. Thus, the archaeal community diversity seems to show that active methane cycling took place in the hypersaline microbial mat-associated sediments of the Napoli mud volcano.

  5. The assessment of land exploitation by enumerating microbial population: Case study in several locations at Dieng Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Sumarsih

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural intensification program in Indonesia which is carried out by using high yield variety, high chemicals use and soil disturbances tends to trigger land exploitation. Land exploitation, performed without considering the land’s capability can generate degradations on the land itself. Various methods have been used to determine land exploitation level, including evaluation of soil microbe resources as on soil component. This research is aimed to assess land exploitation level, based on the amount of microbial population. The result of this research is expected to add the soil quality standard criteria. In the case study performed in Dieng plateau, representative soil sampling method was used. The amount of microbial population can be enumerated using plating and MPN method. Based on nutrient availability to indicate the soil biological characteristics, the soil under the trees, shrub, and Colocasia were classified as “below normal”, and the soil under the grass, tobacco, cabbage and potato were classified as “normal”. It shows that the land exploitation at the agricultural soils were still in the range of its land capability.

  6. Enhancement of the sweep efficiency of waterflooding operations by the in-situ microbial population of petroleum reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.R.; Vadie, A.A.; Stephens, J.O.; Azadpour, A.

    1995-12-31

    Live cores were obtained from five reservoirs using special precautions to prevent contamination by exogenous microorganisms and minimize exposure to oxygen. The depths from which the cores were obtained ranged from 2,705 ft to 6,568 ft. Core plugs were cut radially from live cores, encased in heat-shrink plastic tubes, placed in core holders, and fitted with inlets and outlets. Nutrient additions stimulated the in-situ microbial population to increase, dissolve stratal material, produce gases, and release oil. Reduction in flow through the core plugs was observed in some cases, while in other cases flow was increased, probably due to the dissolution of carbonates in the formation. A field demonstration of the ability of the in-situ microbial population to increase oil recovery by blocking the more permeable zones of the reservoir is currently underway. This demonstration is being conducted in the North Blowhorn Creek Unit situated in Lamar County, Alabama. Live cores were obtained from a newly drilled well in the field and tested as described above. The field project involves four test patterns each including one injector, four to five producers, and a comparable control injector with its four to five producers. Nutrient injection in the field began November 1994.

  7. Microbial population in the rumen of swamp buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) as influenced by coconut oil and mangosteen peel supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilajun, R; Wanapat, M

    2013-06-01

    Four, rumen fistulated swamp buffalo bulls were used to study microbial populations in the rumen when supplemented with coconut oil and mangosteen peel. Animals were randomly assigned to a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Four treatments were un-supplemented (Control), supplementation with coconut oil at 50 g/kg (CO5), supplementation with mangosteen peel at 30 g/kg (MP3) and supplementation with CO5 and MP3 (COM), of total DM intake. Animals received concentrate at 10 g/kg of BW, and rice straw was given ad libitum. Abundance of total bacteria was increased by CO5 supplementation, whereas populations of protozoa and Fibrobacter succinogenes were reduced by CO5 and COM supplementation. Dietary supplementation did not affect methanogen, Ruminococcus flavefaciens or Ruminococcus albus abundances. Dietary treatments changed denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) band patterns of methanogens and protozoa when compared with the control group, especially when supplemented with MP3. Supplementation of COM resulted in the greatest difference in pattern of DGGE bands for total bacteria compared with the control. Coconut oil and mangosteen peel supplementation resulted in changing of rumen microbial abundances and communities; however, combination of them could be more benefit to improve rumen fermentation of swamp buffalo fed on rice straw.

  8. Access and Attitudes to HPV Vaccination amongst Hard-To-Reach Populations in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Watson-Jones

    Full Text Available Sub-Saharan Africa bears the greatest burden of cervical cancer. Human papillomavirus (HPV vaccination programmes to prevent the disease will need to reach vulnerable girls who may not be able access health and screening services in the future. We conducted formative research on facilitators and barriers to HPV vaccination and potential acceptability of a future HPV vaccination programme amongst girls living in hard-to-reach populations in Kenya.Stakeholder interviews with Ministry of Health staff explored barriers to and support for the uptake of HPV vaccination. A situation assessment was conducted to assess community services in Maasai nomadic pastoralist communities in Kajiado County and in Korogocho informal settlement in Nairobi city, followed by focus group discussions (n=14 and semi-structured interviews (n=28 with health workers, parents, youth, and community and religious leaders. These covered marriage, knowledge of cervical cancer and HPV, factors that might inhibit or support HPV vaccine uptake and intention to accept HPV vaccine if a programme was in place.Reported challenges to an HPV vaccination programme included school absenteeism and drop-out, early age of sex and marriage, lack of parental support, population mobility and distance from services. Despite little prior knowledge of cervical cancer and HPV, communities were interested in receiving HPV vaccination. Adequate social mobilisation and school-based vaccination, supplemented by out-reach activities, were considered important facilitating factors to achieve high coverage. There was some support for a campaign approach to vaccine delivery.Given the high level of support for a vaccine against cervical cancer and the experience of reaching pastoralist and slum-dwellers for other immunizations, implementing an HPV vaccine programme should be feasible in such hard-to-reach communities. This may require additional delivery strategies in addition to the standard school

  9. Work-First Federal Policies: Eroding Access to Community Colleges for Latinos and Low-Income Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kathleen M.; Goldrick-Rab, Sara

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes how the implementation of the 1996 welfare reform and the 1998 Workforce Investment Acts affected community colleges' willingness and capacity to provide access to postsecondary education and training for Latinos and other low-income populations. (Contains 3 figures.)

  10. Are barriers in accessing health services in the Roma population associated with worse health status among Roma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarcuska, P.; Bobakova, D.; Uhrin, J.; Bobak, L.; Babinska, I.; Kolarcik, P.; Veselska, Z.; Madarasova-Geckova, A.

    2013-01-01

    The health of Roma has been found to be poorer than that of the majority population. The aim of this study was to explore the differences between Roma and non-Roma regarding perceived barriers in accessing health services. Furthermore, we aimed to assess the association between self-rated health sta

  11. Population-Sequencing as a Biomarker of Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei Evolution through Microbial Forensic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Jakupciak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale genomics projects are identifying biomarkers to detect human disease. B. pseudomallei and B. mallei are two closely related select agents that cause melioidosis and glanders. Accurate characterization of metagenomic samples is dependent on accurate measurements of genetic variation between isolates with resolution down to strain level. Often single biomarker sensitivity is augmented by use of multiple or panels of biomarkers. In parallel with single biomarker validation, advances in DNA sequencing enable analysis of entire genomes in a single run: population-sequencing. Potentially, direct sequencing could be used to analyze an entire genome to serve as the biomarker for genome identification. However, genome variation and population diversity complicate use of direct sequencing, as well as differences caused by sample preparation protocols including sequencing artifacts and mistakes. As part of a Department of Homeland Security program in bacterial forensics, we examined how to implement whole genome sequencing (WGS analysis as a judicially defensible forensic method for attributing microbial sample relatedness; and also to determine the strengths and limitations of whole genome sequence analysis in a forensics context. Herein, we demonstrate use of sequencing to provide genetic characterization of populations: direct sequencing of populations.

  12. Comparative study on the rumen microbial populations, hydrolytic enzyme activities and dry matter degradability between different species of ruminant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yea Hwang; Ok, Ji Un; Lee, Shin Ja; Ha, Jong Kyu; Lee, Sung Sill

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study among Korean native cow (Hanwoo), Holstein dairy cow, Korean native goat and crossbred sheep on the population and marker concentration of ruminal microbes, the activities of carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase), xylanase and amylase, and in situ dry matter (DM) degradability were conducted. Twelve ruminally cannulated animals, three of each species, were used. Animals were fed the same diet containing 40% formula feed and 60% rice straw at the level of 2.5% of body weight. Total viable microbial populations in the rumen fluid were significantly (P < 0.01) greater for bacteria and fungi in goat than those of Holstein. The protozoan population among ruminant species was the reverse from that of bacteria. The concentrations of 2,6-diaminopimelic acid and chitin as markers for bacteria and fungi in the rumen fluid, respectively, were highest in goat, which is in accordance with the above population data. The concentration of aminoethylphosphonic acid as marker of protozoa was highest in Hanwoo and lowest in sheep (P < 0.01). Goat had the highest (P < 0.01) activities of all the enzymes investigated among ruminants. In situ effective degradation of the DM of rice straw was approximately 19% higher in the rumen of goat compared with other animals.

  13. Using populations of human and microbial genomes for organism detection in metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Sasha K.; Gardner, Shea N.; Marti, Jose Manuel; Slezak, Tom R.; Gokhale, Maya B.; Allen, Jonathan E.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying causative disease agents in human patients from shotgun metagenomic sequencing (SMS) presents a powerful tool to apply when other targeted diagnostics fail. Numerous technical challenges remain, however, before SMS can move beyond the role of research tool. Accurately separating the known and unknown organism content remains difficult, particularly when SMS is applied as a last resort. The true amount of human DNA that remains in a sample after screening against the human reference genome and filtering nonbiological components left from library preparation has previously been underreported. In this study, we create the most comprehensive collection of microbial and reference-free human genetic variation available in a database optimized for efficient metagenomic search by extracting sequences from GenBank and the 1000 Genomes Project. The results reveal new human sequences found in individual Human Microbiome Project (HMP) samples. Individual samples contain up to 95% human sequence, and 4% of the individual HMP samples contain 10% or more human reads. Left unidentified, human reads can complicate and slow down further analysis and lead to inaccurately labeled microbial taxa and ultimately lead to privacy concerns as more human genome data is collected. PMID:25926546

  14. Dynamics of Microbial Populations during Fermentation of Wines from the Utiel-Requena Region of Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Pardo, Isabel; García, María José; Zúñiga, Manuel; Uruburu, Federico

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of fungi, yeasts, and lactic acid bacteria during fermentation of four musts were studied. Fungi disappeared quickly in the fermenting must. The lactic acid bacteria population diminished during alcoholic fermentation, then they increased and performed malolactic fermentation. Yeasts grew quickly, reaching maximum populations at different times depending on the vinification treatment.

  15. Spatial distribution of microbial populations and carbon cycle in the subsurface environment of the Horonobe area, Hokkaido, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Y.; Ise, K.; Terashima, M.; Sasaki, Y.; Amamiya, H.; Yoshikawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms are widely distributed in the subsurface environments. However, the distribution, role and rate of metabolisms, and the source of their activity are not well known. In this study, we investigated deep groundwater samples from sedimentary rocks, containing saturated methane and CO2, using boreholes at the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory (URL), northern Hokkaido, Japan. The hydrochemical conditions of groundwaters, such as in-situ water pressure, temperature, electric conductivity, pH, redox potential, were monitored without degassing at multiple intervals along the borehole. Groundwater samples were taken periodically and chemical composition was analyzed using ICP-MS, etc. Cell counts were in the range of 103 to 105 cells ml-1. Molecular analyses revealed the spatial distribution and heterogeneity of the microbial population. Abundant methanogens were detected in the groundwater, and 80% of them were related to either Methanoregula boonei or Methanobacterium flexile that can utilize H2/CO2 by methanogenesis. Phylotypes clustered within the phylum Firmicutes, beta-Proteobacteria, delta-Proteobacteria and candidate division TM7 were dominant in the groundwater samples. Laboratory experiments using a culture technique showed that humic substances purified from the groundwater at Horonobe area appear to be degraded by microorganisms. Our results suggest that microbial spatial distributions in the subsurface environment were correlated closely with geochemical conditions, such as redox condition and carbon sources. In addition, it is inferred that humic substances are one of the important carbon sources for the subsurface microbial redox processes in the environment. This study was partly funded by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan.

  16. Population, Population and Family Education, and Family Planning: A Bibliography, Supplement to Bibliography, and Accessions List, February-June 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    This is a bibliography of books, periodical articles and pamphlets on population and family education which are available in the library of the Population Education Clearing House Service of the Unesco Regional Office for Education in Asia, Bangkok. Most of the documents cited were published in the 60's and 70's with the exception of a few which…

  17. A consumer register: an acceptable and cost-effective alternative for accessing patient populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Bryant

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population-based registries are increasingly used to recruit patient samples for research, however, they have several limitations including low consent and participation rates, and potential selection bias. To improve access to samples for research, the utility of a new model of recruitment termed the ‘Consumer Register’, that allows for direct patient recruitment from hospitals, was examined. This paper reports: (i consent rates onto the register; (ii preferred methods and frequency of contact; and (iii the feasibility of establishing the register, including: (a cost per person recruited to the register; (b the differential cost and consent rates of volunteer versus paid data collectors; and (c participant completion rates. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in five outpatient clinics in Australia. Patients were approached by volunteers or paid data collectors and asked to complete a touch-screen electronic survey. Consenting individuals were asked to indicate their willingness and preferences for enrolment onto a research register. Descriptive statistics were used to examine patient preferences and linear regression used to model the success of volunteer versus paid data collectors. The opportunity and financial costs of establishing the register were calculated. Results A total of 1947 patients (80.6 % consented to complete the survey, of which, 1486 (76.3 % completed the questionnaire. Of the completers, the majority (69.4 %, or 1032 participants were willing to be listed on the register and preferred to be contacted by email (50.3 %. Almost 39 % of completers were willing to be contacted three or more times in a 12 month period. The annual opportunity cost of resources consumed by the register was valued at $37,187, giving an opportunity cost per person recruited to the register of $36. After amortising fixed costs, the annual financial outlay was $23,004 or $22 per person recruited to the

  18. Mapping the Centimeter-Scale Spatial Variability of PAHs and Microbial Populations in the Rhizosphere of Two Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélia Bourceret

    Full Text Available Rhizoremediation uses root development and exudation to favor microbial activity. Thus it can enhance polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH biodegradation in contaminated soils. Spatial heterogeneity of rhizosphere processes, mainly linked to the root development stage and to the plant species, could explain the contrasted rhizoremediation efficiency levels reported in the literature. Aim of the present study was to test if spatial variability in the whole plant rhizosphere, explored at the centimetre-scale, would influence the abundance of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi, and the abundance and activity of PAH-degrading bacteria, leading to spatial variability in PAH concentrations. Two contrasted rhizospheres were compared after 37 days of alfalfa or ryegrass growth in independent rhizotron devices. Almost all spiked PAHs were degraded, and the density of the PAH-degrading bacterial populations increased in both rhizospheres during the incubation period. Mapping of multiparametric data through geostatistical estimation (kriging revealed that although root biomass was spatially structured, PAH distribution was not. However a greater variability of the PAH content was observed in the rhizosphere of alfalfa. Yet, in the ryegrass-planted rhizotron, the Gram-positive PAH-degraders followed a reverse depth gradient to root biomass, but were positively correlated to the soil pH and carbohydrate concentrations. The two rhizospheres structured the microbial community differently: a fungus-to-bacterium depth gradient similar to the root biomass gradient only formed in the alfalfa rhizotron.

  19. Detailed analysis of the microbial population in Malaysian spontaneous cocoa pulp fermentations reveals a core and variable microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Meersman

    Full Text Available The fermentation of cocoa pulp is one of the few remaining large-scale spontaneous microbial processes in today's food industry. The microbiota involved in cocoa pulp fermentations is complex and variable, which leads to inconsistent production efficiency and cocoa quality. Despite intensive research in the field, a detailed and comprehensive analysis of the microbiota is still lacking, especially for the expanding Asian production region. Here, we report a large-scale, comprehensive analysis of four spontaneous Malaysian cocoa pulp fermentations across two time points in the harvest season and two fermentation methods. Our results show that the cocoa microbiota consists of a "core" and a "variable" part. The bacterial populations show a remarkable consistency, with only two dominant species, Lactobacillus fermentum and Acetobacter pasteurianus. The fungal diversity is much larger, with four dominant species occurring in all fermentations ("core" yeasts, and a large number of yeasts that only occur in lower numbers and specific fermentations ("variable" yeasts. Despite this diversity, a clear pattern emerges, with early dominance of apiculate yeasts and late dominance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results provide new insights into the microbial diversity in Malaysian cocoa pulp fermentations and pave the way for the selection of starter cultures to increase efficiency and consistency.

  20. Brain microbial populations in HIV/AIDS: α-proteobacteria predominate independent of host immune status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branton, William G; Ellestad, Kristofor K; Maingat, Ferdinand; Wheatley, B Matt; Rud, Erling; Warren, René L; Holt, Robert A; Surette, Michael G; Power, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The brain is assumed to be a sterile organ in the absence of disease although the impact of immune disruption is uncertain in terms of brain microbial diversity or quantity. To investigate microbial diversity and quantity in the brain, the profile of infectious agents was examined in pathologically normal and abnormal brains from persons with HIV/AIDS [HIV] (n = 12), other disease controls [ODC] (n = 14) and in cerebral surgical resections for epilepsy [SURG] (n = 6). Deep sequencing of cerebral white matter-derived RNA from the HIV (n = 4) and ODC (n = 4) patients and SURG (n = 2) groups revealed bacterially-encoded 16 s RNA sequences in all brain specimens with α-proteobacteria representing over 70% of bacterial sequences while the other 30% of bacterial classes varied widely. Bacterial rRNA was detected in white matter glial cells by in situ hybridization and peptidoglycan immunoreactivity was also localized principally in glia in human brains. Analyses of amplified bacterial 16 s rRNA sequences disclosed that Proteobacteria was the principal bacterial phylum in all human brain samples with similar bacterial rRNA quantities in HIV and ODC groups despite increased host neuroimmune responses in the HIV group. Exogenous viruses including bacteriophage and human herpes viruses-4, -5 and -6 were detected variably in autopsied brains from both clinical groups. Brains from SIV- and SHIV-infected macaques displayed a profile of bacterial phyla also dominated by Proteobacteria but bacterial sequences were not detected in experimentally FIV-infected cat or RAG1⁻/⁻ mouse brains. Intracerebral implantation of human brain homogenates into RAG1⁻/⁻ mice revealed a preponderance of α-proteobacteria 16 s RNA sequences in the brains of recipient mice at 7 weeks post-implantation, which was abrogated by prior heat-treatment of the brain homogenate. Thus, α-proteobacteria represented the major bacterial component of the primate brain's microbiome

  1. The Long-Run Impact on Population and Income of Open Access to Land in a Model with Parental Altruism

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Steady state levels of population and per capita income are examined using a Becker-Barro (1988) style of model of an economy with identical altruistic parents bearing costly children who receive bequests of capital and land. Inspired by the work of North (1981) and others, the problem of open access land with ancillary negative effects on private (but not public) productivity of capital is examined. It is seen that open access to land can lead to overpopulation in a ceteris paribus sense, an...

  2. Mucin dynamics and microbial populations in chicken small intestine are changed by dietary probiotic and antibiotic growth promoter supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A; Perez, R; Amit-Romach, E; Sklan, D; Uni, Z

    2005-02-01

    The mucous layer that covers the intestinal absorptive surface acts as a barrier against bacterial translocation. The chicken gut contains a diverse bacterial population which interacts with the mucous layer. In this report, we studied the effect of changing the intestinal microbial populations on mucin dynamics by feeding 1-d-old chicks a control diet or that diet containing either antibiotic growth promoter (AGP) or a probiotic product for 14 d. Dietary AGP increased the proportions of Bifidobacterium species in the duodenum compared with the other groups. In AGP-fed chicks, the villous surface area was increased in the jejunum, goblet cell density was greater in the jejunum and ileum, and mucin glycoprotein levels in the duodenum were lower than in the other groups (P small intestine compared with the other groups. Expression of mucin mRNA and the levels of mucin glycoprotein were greater in the jejunum of the probiotic-fed chicks compared with controls (P thickness of the mucous adherent layer. These results indicate that both probiotic and AGP altered processes of mucin biosynthesis and/or degradation mediated via changes in the intestinal bacterial populations. These modifications in mucin dynamics influence gut function and health and may change nutrient uptake.

  3. Influence of pulsed magnetic field on soybean (Glycine max L.) seed germination, seedling growth and soil microbial population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Kumari, Bollipo Dyana Ranjitha

    2013-08-01

    The effects of pulsed magnetic field (PMF) treatment of soybean (Glycine max L. cv CO3) seeds were investigated on rate of seed germination, seedling growth, physico-chemical properties of seed leachates and soil microbial population under laboratory conditions. Seeds were exposed to PMF of 1500 nT at 0.1, 1.0 10.0 and 100.0 Hz for 5 h per day for 20 days, induced by enclosure coil systems. Non-treated seeds were considered as controls. All PMF treatments significantly increased the rate of seed germination, while 10 and 100 Hz PMFs showed the most effective response. The 1.0 and 10 Hz PMFs remarkably improved the fresh weight of shoots and roots, leaf area and plant height from seedlings from magnetically-exposed seeds compared to the control, while 10 Hz PMF increased the total soluble sugar, total protein and phenol contents. The leaf chlorophyll a, b and total chlorophyll were higher in PMF (10 and 100 Hz) pretreated plants, as compared to other treatments. In addition, activities of alpha-amylase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, nitrate reductase, peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase were increased, while beta-amylase and protease activities were declined in PMF (10 Hz)-exposed soybean plants. Similarly, the capacity of absorbance of water by seeds and electrical conductivity of seed leachates were significantly enhanced by 10 Hz PMF exposure, whereas PMF (10 Hz) pretreated plants did not affect the microbial population in rhizosphere soil. The results suggested the potential of 10 Hz PMF treatment to enhance the germination and seedling growth of soybean.

  4. Abundance, viability and diversity of the indigenous microbial populations at different depths of the NEEM Greenland ice core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanya Miteva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The 2537-m-deep North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM core provided a first-time opportunity to perform extensive microbiological analyses on selected, recently drilled ice core samples representing different depths, ages, ice structures, deposition climates and ionic compositions. Here, we applied cultivation, small subunit (SSU rRNA gene clone library construction and Illumina next-generation sequencing (NGS targeting the V4–V5 region, to examine the microbial abundance, viability and diversity in five decontaminated NEEM samples from selected depths (101.2, 633.05, 643.5, 1729.75 and 2051.5 m deposited 300–80 000 years ago. These comparisons of the indigenous glacial microbial populations in the ice samples detected significant spatial and temporal variations. Major findings include: (a different phylogenetic diversity of isolates, dominated by Actinobacteria and fungi, compared to the culture-independent diversity, in which Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were more frequent; (b cultivation of a novel alphaproteobacterium; (c dominance of Cyanobacteria among the SSU rRNA gene clones from the 1729.75-m ice; (d identification of Archaea by NGS that are rarely detected in glacial ice; (e detection of one or two dominant but different genera among the NGS sequences from each sample; (f finding dominance of Planococcaceae over Bacillaceae among Firmicutes in the brittle and the 2051.5-m ice. The overall beta diversity between the studied ice core samples examined at the phylum/class level for each approach showed that the population structure of the brittle ice was significantly different from the two deep clathrated ice samples and the shallow ice core.

  5. Effects of supercritical fluid extraction pressure on chemical composition, microbial population, polar lipid profile, and microstructure of goat cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Macías, D; Laubscher, A; Castro, N; Argüello, A; Jiménez-Flores, R

    2013-03-01

    The consumer trend for healthier food choices and preferences for low-fat products has increased the interest in low-fat cheese and nutraceutical dairy products. However, consumer preference is still for delicious food. Low- and reduced-fat cheeses are not completely accepted because of their unappealing properties compared with full-fat cheeses. The method reported here provides another option to the conventional cheese-making process to obtain lower fat cheese. Using CO(2) as a supercritical fluid offers an alternative to reduce fat in cheese after ripening, while maintaining the initial characteristics and flavor. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of pressure (10, 20, 30, and 40 × 10(6) Pa) of supercritical CO(2) on the amount of fat extracted, microbial population, polar lipid profile, and microstructure of 2 varieties of goat cheese: Majorero, a protected denomination of origin cheese from Spain, and goat Gouda-type cheese. The amount of fat was reduced 50 to 57% and 48 to 55% for Majorero and goat Gouda-type cheeses, respectively. Higher contents (on a fat basis) of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine were found in Majorero cheese compared with control and goat Gouda-type cheeses. The microbial population was reduced after supercritical fluid extraction in both cheeses, and the lethality was higher as pressure increased in Majorero cheese, most noticeably on lactococcus and lactobacillus bacteria. The Gouda-type cheese did not contain any lactobacilli. Micrographs obtained from confocal laser scanning microscopy showed a more open matrix and whey pockets in the Majorero control cheese. This could explain the ease of extracting fat and reducing the microbial counts in this cheese after treatment with supercritical CO(2). Supercritical fluid extraction with CO(2) has great potential in the dairy industry and in commercial applications. The Majorero cheese obtained after the supercritical fluid extraction treatment was an excellent

  6. Soil microbial biomass and population in response to seasonal variation and age in Gmelina arborea plantations in south-western Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonathan C.Onyekwelu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: We investigated the Effects of plantation development,seasons,and soil depth on soil microbial indices in Gmelina arborea plantations in south-western Nigeria.Soil samples were obtained from the soil depths of 0-15 and 15-30 cm from plantations of six different ages during the rainy season,dry seasons,and their transitions.We used plate count and fumigation-extraction methods to determine microbe population and microbial biomass carbon (MB-C) and nitrogen (MB-N),respectively.Plantation age did not affect microbial indices,implying a non-significant effect of plantation development on microbial communities.It could also imply that soil microbial indices had already stabilized in the sampled plantations.Seasonal variation and soil depth had significant effects on microbial indices.At 0-15 cm soil depth,mean MB-C increased from 50.74 μg·g-1 during the peak of the dry season (i.e.March) to 99.58 μg·g-1 during the peak of the rainy season (i.e.September),while it increased from 36.22 μg·g-1 to 75.31 μg·g-1 at 15-30 cm soil depth between the same seasonal periods.Bacteria populations and MB-N showed similar increasing trends.Correlations.between MB-C,MB-N,microbe populations,and rainfall were positive and linear.Significantly higher microbial activities took place in the plantations during the rainy season,increased with soil wetness,and decreased at greater soil depth.

  7. Genetic diversity and population structure of Pisum sativum accessions for marker-trait association of lipid content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sajjad Ahmad; Simerjeet Kaur; Neil Dylan Lamb-Palmer; Mark Lefsrud; Jaswinder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Field pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important protein-rich pulse crop produced globally. Increasing the lipid content of Pisum seeds through conventional and contemporary molecular breeding tools may bring added value to the crop. However, knowledge about genetic diversity and lipid content in field pea is limited. An understanding of genetic diversity and population structure in diverse germplasm is important and a prerequisite for genetic dissection of complex characteristics and marker-trait associations. Fifty polymorphic microsatellite markers detecting a total of 207 alleles were used to obtain information on genetic diversity, population structure and marker-trait associations. Cluster analysis was performed using UPGMA to construct a dendrogram from a pairwise similarity matrix. Pea genotypes were divided into five major clusters. A model-based population structure analysis divided the pea accessions into four groups. Percentage lipid content in 35 diverse pea accessions was used to find potential associations with the SSR markers. Markers AD73, D21, and AA5 were significantly associated with lipid content using a mixed linear model (MLM) taking population structure (Q) and relative kinship (K) into account. The results of this preliminary study suggested that the population could be used for marker-trait association mapping studies.

  8. Genetic diversity and population structure of Pisum sativum accessions for marker-trait association of lipid content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Ahmad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Field pea (Pisum sativum L. is an important protein-rich pulse crop produced globally. Increasing the lipid content of Pisum seeds through conventional and contemporary molecular breeding tools may bring added value to the crop. However, knowledge about genetic diversity and lipid content in field pea is limited. An understanding of genetic diversity and population structure in diverse germplasm is important and a prerequisite for genetic dissection of complex characteristics and marker-trait associations. Fifty polymorphic microsatellite markers detecting a total of 207 alleles were used to obtain information on genetic diversity, population structure and marker-trait associations. Cluster analysis was performed using UPGMA to construct a dendrogram from a pairwise similarity matrix. Pea genotypes were divided into five major clusters. A model-based population structure analysis divided the pea accessions into four groups. Percentage lipid content in 35 diverse pea accessions was used to find potential associations with the SSR markers. Markers AD73, D21, and AA5 were significantly associated with lipid content using a mixed linear model (MLM taking population structure (Q and relative kinship (K into account. The results of this preliminary study suggested that the population could be used for marker-trait association mapping studies.

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of Pisum sativum accessions for marker-trait association of lipid content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sajjad; Ahmad; Simerjeet; Kaur; Neil; Dylan; Lamb-Palmer; Mark; Lefsrud; Jaswinder; Singh

    2015-01-01

    Field pea(Pisum sativum L.) is an important protein-rich pulse crop produced globally. Increasing the lipid content of Pisum seeds through conventional and contemporary molecular breeding tools may bring added value to the crop. However, knowledge about genetic diversity and lipid content in field pea is limited. An understanding of genetic diversity and population structure in diverse germplasm is important and a prerequisite for genetic dissection of complex characteristics and marker-trait associations. Fifty polymorphic microsatellite markers detecting a total of 207 alleles were used to obtain information on genetic diversity, population structure and marker-trait associations. Cluster analysis was performed using UPGMA to construct a dendrogram from a pairwise similarity matrix. Pea genotypes were divided into five major clusters. A model-based population structure analysis divided the pea accessions into four groups. Percentage lipid content in 35 diverse pea accessions was used to find potential associations with the SSR markers. Markers AD73, D21, and AA5 were significantly associated with lipid content using a mixed linear model(MLM) taking population structure(Q) and relative kinship(K) into account. The results of this preliminary study suggested that the population could be used for marker-trait association mapping studies.

  10. Effects of corn silage and grass silage in ruminant rations on diurnal changes of microbial populations in the rumen of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengowski, Melanie B; Witzig, Maren; Möhring, Jens; Seyfang, Gero M; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2016-12-01

    Here, we examined diurnal changes in the ruminal microbial community and fermentation characteristics of dairy cows fed total mixed rations containing either corn silage (CS) or grass silage (GS) as forage. The rations, which consisted of 52% concentrate and 48% GS or CS, were offered for ad libitum intake over 20 days to three ruminal-fistulated lactating Jersey cows during three consecutive feeding periods. Feed intake, ruminal pH, concentrations of short chain fatty acids and ammonia in rumen liquid, as well as abundance change in the microbial populations in liquid and solid fractions, were monitored in 4-h intervals on days 18 and 20. The abundance of total bacteria and Fibrobacter succinogenes increased in solids in cows fed CS instead of GS, and that of protozoa increased in both solid and liquid fractions. Feeding GS favored numbers of F. succinogenes and Selenomonas ruminantium in the liquid fraction as well as the numbers of Ruminobacter amylophilus, Prevotella bryantii and ruminococci in both fractions. Minor effects of silage were detected on populations of methanogens. Despite quantitative changes in the composition of the microbial community, fermentation characteristics were less affected by forage source. These results suggest a functional adaptability of the ruminal microbiota to total mixed rations containing either GS or CS as the source of forage. Diurnal changes in microbial populations were primarily affected by feed intake and differed between species and fractions, with fewer temporal fluctuations evident in the solid than in the liquid fraction. Interactions between forage source and sampling time were of minor importance to most of the microbial species examined. Thus, diurnal changes of microbial populations and fermentative activity were less affected by the two silages.

  11. On the use of antibiotics to reduce rhizoplane microbial populations in root physiology and ecology investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, D. R.; Ferro, A.; Ritchie, K.; Bugbee, B. G.

    1995-01-01

    No straightforward method exists for separating the proportion of ion exchange and respiration due to rhizoplane microbial organisms from that of root ion exchange and respiration. We examined several antibiotics that might be used for the temporary elimination of rhizoplane bacteria from hydroponically grown wheat roots (Triticum aestivum cv. Veery 10). Each antibiotic was tested for herbicidal activity and plate counts were used to enumerate bacteria and evaluate antibiotic kinetics. Only lactam antibiotics (penicillins and cephalosporins) did not reduce wheat growth rates. Aminoglycosides, the pyrimidine trimethoprim, colistin and rifampicin reduced growth rates substantially. Antibiotics acted slowly, with maximum reductions in rhizoplane bacteria occurring after more than 48 h of exposure. Combinations of nonphytotoxic antibiotics reduced platable rhizoplane bacteria by as much as 98%; however, this was generally a reduction from about 10(9) to 10(6) colony forming units per gram of dry root mass, so that many viable bacteria remained on root surfaces. We present evidence which suggests that insufficient bacterial biomass exists on root surfaces of nonstressed plants grown under well-aerated conditions to quantitatively interfere with root nitrogen absorption measurements.

  12. Anaerobic treatment performance and microbial population of thermophilic upflow anaerobic filter reactor treating awamori distillery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yue-Qin; Fujimura, Yutaka; Shigematsu, Toru; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2007-10-01

    Distillery wastewater from awamori making was anaerobically treated for one year using thermophilic upflow anaerobic filter (UAF) reactors packed with pyridinium group-containing nonwoven fabric material. The microbial structure and spatial distribution of microorganisms on the support material were characterized using molecular biological methods. The reactor steadily achieved a high TOC loading rate of 18 g/l/d with approximately 80% TOC removal efficiency when non-diluted wastewater was fed. The maximum TOC loading rate increased to 36 g/l/d when treating thrice-diluted wastewater. However, the TOC removal efficiency and gas evolution rate decreased compared with that when non-diluted wastewater was used. Methanogens closely related to Methanosarcina thermophila and Methanoculleus bourgensis and bacteria in the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were predominant methanogens and bacteria in the thermophilic UFA reactor, as indicated by 16S rRNA gene clone analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) results showed that a large quantity of bacterial cells adhered throughout the whole support, and Methanosarcina-like methanogens existed mainly in the relative outside region while Methanoculleus cells were located in the relative inner part of the support. The support material used proved to be an excellent carrier for microorganisms, and a UAF reactor using this kind of support can be used for high-rate treatment of awamori/shochu distillery wastewater.

  13. Identification of the microbial population found in water sources in and around San Salvador Island, Bahamas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelletier, Michel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available San Salvador Island in The Bahamas is home to approximately 1,200 people, and a popular vacation destination. In order to expand our knowledge of the bacterial population found on and around the island, and to assess possible health risks, we analyzed and identified the cultivable bacterial population found in several lakes and ponds throughout the island. The sites tested were located on the northern, north-eastern, eastern, and western districts, as well as one lake located inland. Ten sites with varying salinity, levels of oxygen, visibility, and distance from the ocean were analyzed. The nature of the bacteria present in these sites was identified by microscopy, as well as a series of biochemical tests based on bacterial metabolism. Seven bacterial species, predominantly from the genera Staphylococcus and Klebsiella were identified. Most bacteria identified are part of the normal microbiota of the skin and the gastro-intestinal tract of human and mammals, and should not be considered a danger for the health of the majority of the population and tourists of the island. We also isolated bacteria capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen, a hallmark of marine bacterial populations. Overall, this study enabled us to add to the repertoire of bacterial species isolated and identified in the diverse marine environments found on San Salvador Island.

  14. Effect of fermented feed on the microbial population of the gastrointestinal tracts of pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winsen, van R.L.; Urlings, B.A.P.; Lipman, L.J.A.; Snijders, J.M.A.; Keuzenkamp, D.; Verheijden, J.H.M.; Knapen, van F.

    2001-01-01

    An in vivo experiment was performed with pigs to study the inhibitory effect of fermented feed on the bacterial population of the gastrointestinal tract. Results demonstrated a significant positive correlation between pH and lactobacilli in the stomach contents of pigs in dry feed as well as in the

  15. Effects of chestnut tannins and coconut oil on growth performance, methane emission, ruminal fermentation, and microbial populations in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H; Vaddella, V; Zhou, D

    2011-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of chestnut tannins (CT) and coconut oil (CO) on growth performance, methane (CH₄) emission, ruminal fermentation, and microbial populations in sheep. A total of 48 Rideau Arcott sheep (average body weight 31.5±1.97 kg, 16 wk old) were randomly assigned into 6 treatment groups in a 3 × 2 factorial design, with CT and CO as the main effects (8 sheep per group). The treatments were control diet (CTR), 10 or 30 g of CT/kg of diet (CT10 and CT30), 25 g of CO/kg of concentrate (CO25), and 10 or 30 g of CT/kg of diet+25 g of CO/kg of concentrate (CT10CO25 and CT30CO25). After the feeding trial (60 d), all sheep were moved to respiratory chambers to measure CH₄ emission. After CH₄ emission measurements, all sheep were slaughtered to obtain rumen fluid samples. Results showed that the addition of CT, CO, and CT+CO had no significant effects on growth performance of sheep but reduced CH₄ emission. Addition of CT reduced the NH₃-N concentration in rumen fluid in CT30. Addition of CO decreased the concentration of total volatile fatty acids in rumen fluid. No significant differences were observed in pH and molar proportion of volatile fatty acids among treatments. Addition of CT, CO, and CT+CO significantly decreased methanogen and protozoa populations. Moreover, CO decreased counts of Fibrobacter succinogenes. No significant differences were observed in populations of fungi, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, or Ruminococcus albus among treatments. In conclusion, supplementation of CT and CO seemed to be a feasible means of decreasing emissions of CH₄ from sheep by reduction of methanogen and protozoa populations with no negative effect on growth performance.

  16. 施氮肥对荒漠草原土壤微生物种群及微生物量的影响%Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization on Desert Grassland Soil Microbial Population and Microbial Biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭永盛; 李俊华; 李鲁华; 危常州; 褚贵新; 王飞; 董鹏

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim of the article was set to analyze the effects of nitrogen fertilization on soil microbial population and microbial biomass in desert grassland to know their response to nitrogen fertilizer and to clarify the indication effects of microorganism on environmental qualtiy change . [ Method ] The dilution plate count chloroform and fumigation - K2SO4 extraction of nitrogen were used to study the effect of nitrogen fertilization on three different environments: the microbial population and desert grassland microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass N ( Bc, BN) . [ Result]Soil bacteria is the main specie in the soil, followed by actinomycetes and fungi is the least ; N fertilizer can significantly increase all three populations of soil rmcrobial, the ratio was increased by 13 . 5% - 427 . 6% , 7. 8% - 88. 2% and 16. 7% - 180. 6 % , respectively; N fertilizer can significantly increas microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen, the ratio was 29 .8% - 110.8% and 51.2% - 161.7% , respectively , effect of N fercilization on soil microbial populations and microbial biomass of the extent of precipitation and fertilization in the environment is related to the precipitation,the greater precipitation, the more obvious influence, the effect of fertilization is less obvious with the deepening of the soil. [ Conclusion] Nitrogen changes in soil microbial populations and SMBc, SMBN, different fertilization environment can also lead to the difference of soil microbial populations and SMBc, SMBN .%[目的]通过分析施氮肥对土壤微生物种群及微生物量,认识荒漠草原土壤微生物种群及微生物量对氮肥的响应,明确微生物对环境质量变化的指示作用.[方法]应用稀释平板计数法和氯仿熏蒸-K2SO4提取法分别研究施氮肥对三种不同环境的荒漠草原土壤微生物种群及微生物量碳、微生物量氮(Bc,BN)之间的影响.[结果]在土壤中细菌为土壤微生物的主要种群,其次

  17. Influence of Organic Manures (Biofertilizers on Soil Microbial Population in the Rhizosphere of Mulberry (Morus Indica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Christilda Louis Mary

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different kinds of organic manures on soil microbial population and mulberry production was assessed. A field experiment wascarried out at Periyar EVR College, Tamil Nadu, India in basic soil to study the influence of organic manures on soil bacterial population andmulberry production. The 4 groups of mulberry plants of MR2 variety were biofertilized with FYM, Azospirillum, Phosphobacteria andVermicompost respectively. The biofertilizers lodged bacteria on the rhizosphere of mulberry plants. When the root microorganism areanalyzed Farm yard manure biofertilized mulberry plant root tips had Gluconacobacter diazotrophicus, Bacillus pumilus, Pseudomonas putida,Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus sonorensis, Azotobacter chrococcum; Azospirillum biofertilized mulberry plants root tips had Bacillus coaculans,Azotobactor chrococcum, Azotobactor vinelandii, Bacillus subtilis and Azospirillum brasilense. Phosphobacteria biofertilized mulberry plantroot tips had Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Brevibacillus borslelansis and Streptomycies thermonitrificans andvermicompost biofertilized mulberry plant root tips had lodged bacterias like Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis, Gluconacobacterdiazotrophicus, Pseudomonas putida, Azotobacter chrococcum, Azotobacter vinelandi, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Brevibacillus borslelansisand Bacillus sonorensis. Microbiology work reveals luxuriant growth of bacteria in all the biofertizer treated rhizosphere in the order FYM

  18. Wetland restoration and methanogenesis: the activity of microbial populations and competition for substrates at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Jerman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Ljubljana marsh in Slovenia is a 16 000 ha area of partly drained fen, intended to be flooded to restore its ecological functions. The resultant water-logging may create anoxic conditions, eventually stimulating production and emission of methane, the most important greenhouse gas next to carbon dioxide. We examined the upper layer (~30 cm of Ljubljana marsh soil for microbial processes that would predominate in water-saturated conditions, focusing on the potential for iron reduction, carbon mineralization (CO2 and CH4 production, and methane emission. Methane emission from water-saturated microcosms was near minimum detectable levels even after extended periods of flooding (>5 months. Methane production in anoxic soil slurries started only after a lag period and was inversely related to iron reduction, which suggested that iron reduction out-competed methanogenesis for electron donors, such as H2 and acetate. Methane production was observed only in samples incubated at 14–38°C. At the beginning of methanogenesis, acetoclastic methanogenesis dominated. In accordance with the preferred substrate, most (91% mcrA (encoding the methyl coenzyme-M reductase, a key gene in methanogenesis clone sequences could be affiliated to the acetoclastic genus Methanosarcina. No methanogens were detected in the original soil. However, a diverse community of iron-reducing Geobacteraceae was found. Our results suggest that methane emission can remain transient and low if water-table fluctuations allow re-oxidation of ferrous iron, sustaining iron reduction as the most important process in terminal carbon mineralization.

  19. Wetland restoration and methanogenesis: the activity of microbial populations and competition for substrates at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Jerman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Ljubljana marsh in Slovenia is a 16 000 ha area of partly drained fen, intended to be flooded to restore its ecological functions. The resultant water-logging may create anoxic conditions, eventually stimulating production and emission of methane, the most important greenhouse gas next to carbon dioxide. We examined the upper layer (~30 cm of Ljubljana marsh soil for microbial processes that would predominate in water-saturated conditions, focusing on the potential for iron reduction, carbon mineralization (CO2 and CH4 production, and methane emission. Methane emission from water-saturated microcosms was near minimum detectable levels even after extended periods of flooding (>5 months. Methane production in anoxic soil slurries started only after a lag period of 84 d at 15°C and a minimum of 7 d at 37°C, the optimum temperature for methanogenesis. This lag was inversely related to iron reduction, which suggested that iron reduction out-competed methanogenesis for electron donors, such as H2 and acetate. Methane production was observed only in samples incubated at 14–38°C. At the beginning of methanogenesis, acetoclastic methanogenesis dominated. In accordance with the preferred substrate, most (91% mcrA (encoding the methyl coenzyme-M reductase, a key gene in methanogenesis clone sequences could be affiliated to the acetoclastic genus Methanosarcina. No methanogens were detected in the original soil. However, a diverse community of iron-reducing Geobacteraceae was found. Our results suggest that methane emission can remain transient and low if water-table fluctuations allow re-oxidation of ferrous iron, sustaining iron reduction as the most important process in terminal carbon mineralization.

  20. Reduction of Microbial Population in Cheese Whey by UV in a Single and Series Conventional Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel E. Ghaly

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effectiveness of two conventional UV reactors in series for the online sterilization of cheese whey was compared to that of a single conventional reactor. The single reactor and the two reactor series were tested at eleven flow rates (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 50, 60 and 70 mL min-1 and five flow rates, (35, 40, 50, 60, 70 mL min-1, respectively. 100% destruction efficiency could not be achieved in the single reactor. When two reactors were connected in series, the destruction efficiency reached 100% at the flow rate of 35 mL min-1 and lasted for 25 min. The temperature of the effluent decreased with the increase in flow rate in both systems. The rate of microbial destruction in the single reactor and the two reactor series was described by an exponential equation. The maximum effluent temperatures in the single reactor and the two reactor series were 45.8 and 36.0°C, respectively. The flow in both reactors was laminar (Re=1.39 at 5mL min-1 and Re= 20.10 at 70 mL min-1. Visual observation revealed less fouling on the UV lamps of two reactor series than the single reactor. A different design in which there is no contact between the liquid and the UV lamp should be investigated. The quartz sleeve could also be replaced with fluropolymer coiled tube around the UV lamp. The smooth surface of the fluropolymer would reduce scaling and extend the effective operating time.

  1. Degradation of chlorpyrifos alone and in combination with chlorothalonil and their effects on soil microbial populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Xiaoqiang; FANG Hua; PAN Xuedong; WANG Xiao; SHAN Min; FENG Bo; YU Yunlong

    2008-01-01

    In practice, pesticides are usually applied simultaneously or one after another for crop protection, and this type of pesticide application often leads to a combined contamination of pesticide residues in the soil environment. A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the influence of chlorothalonil on chlorpyrifos degradation and its effects on soil bacterial, fungal, and actinomycete populations. Under the experimental conditions here, the half-lives of chlorpyrifos alone, and in combination with chlorothalonil, at the recommended and double dosages, were measured to be 3.24, 2.77, and 2.63 d, respectively. Chlorpyrifos degradation was not significantly altered by its combination with chlorothalonil. However, the inhibitory effect of chlorpyrifos on soil microorganisms was increased by its combination with chlorothalonil, and the increase was related to the levels of chlorothalonil added. Compared to those in the controls, the populations of bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes were significantly reduced by 44.1%, 61.1%, and 72.8%, respectively, on the first day after treatment (DAT) by chlorpyrifos alone. With the addition of chlorothalonil, the inhibition was increased to 55.2%, 79.3%, and 85.8% at the recommended dosage, and 86.0%, 94.1%, and 90.8% at the double dosage, at one DAT, respectively. The results suggested that combined effects should be taken into account to assess the actual impacts of pesticide applications.

  2. Improvement in shelf life of minimally processed cilantro leaves through integration of kinetin pretreatment and packaging interventions: Studies on microbial population dynamics, biochemical characteristics and flavour retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjitha, K; Shivashankara, K S; Sudhakar Rao, D V; Oberoi, Harinder Singh; Roy, T K; Bharathamma, H

    2017-04-15

    Effect of integrating optimized combination of pretreatment with packaging on shelf life of minimally processed cilantro leaves (MPCL) was appraised through analysis of their sensory attributes, biochemical characteristics, microbial population and flavour profile during storage. Minimally pretreated cilantro leaves pretreated with 50ppm kinetin and packed in 25μ polypropylene bags showed a shelf life of 21days. Optimized combination helped in efficiently maintaining sensory parameters, flavour profile, and retention of antioxidants in MPCL until 21days. Studies conducted on the effect of optimized combination on microbial population and flavour profile revealed that among different microorganisms, pectinolysers had a significant effect on spoilage of MPCL and their population of ⩽3.59logcfu/g was found to be acceptable. Principal component analysis of headspace volatiles revealed that (E)-2-undecenal, (E)-2-hexadecenal, (E)-2-tetradecenal & (E)-2-tetradecen-1-ol in stored samples clustered with fresh samples and therefore, could be considered as freshness indicators for MPCL.

  3. How to Show the Real Microbial Biodiversity? A Comparison of Seven DNA Extraction Methods for Bacterial Population Analyses in Matrices Containing Highly Charged Natural Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaden, Rene; Krolla-Sidenstein, Peter

    2015-10-20

    A DNA extraction that comprises the DNA of all available taxa in an ecosystem is an essential step in population analysis, especially for next generation sequencing applications. Many nanoparticles as well as naturally occurring clay minerals contain charged surfaces or edges that capture negatively charged DNA molecules after cell lysis within DNA extraction. Depending on the methodology of DNA extraction, this phenomenon causes a shift in detection of microbial taxa in ecosystems and a possible misinterpretation of microbial interactions. With the aim to describe microbial interactions and the bio-geo-chemical reactions during a clay alteration experiment, several methods for the detection of a high number of microbial taxa were examined in this study. Altogether, 13 different methods of commercially available DNA extraction kits provided by seven companies as well as the classical phenol-chloroform DNA extraction were compared. The amount and the quality of nucleic acid extracts were determined and compared to the amplifiable amount of DNA. The 16S rRNA gene fragments of several taxa were separated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to determine the number of different species and sequenced to get the information about what kind of species the microbial population consists of. A total number of 13 species was detected in the system. Up to nine taxa could be detected with commercially available DNA extraction kits while phenol-chloroform extraction lead to three detected species. In this paper, we describe how to combine several DNA extraction methods for the investigation of microbial community structures in clay.

  4. Microbial infections in a declining wild turkey population in Texas (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, T.E.; Yuill, Thomas M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey was conducted at 5 locations in Texas for avian pathogens that might adversely affect wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) productivity and survival. At 1 site, the Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Refuge (WWR), turkeys have declined precipitously in recent years. During the winters of 1983-85, 442 wild turkeys were caught with cannon and drop nets, 161 of these on WWR. Blood samples were drawn for serologic evaluation, and cloacal and tracheal swabs were collected for isolation attempts. Salmonella spp. bacteria, Newcastle disease virus (NDV), and avian influenza virus (AIV) were not detected in any samples tested. Serologic tests for antibodies to NDV and AIV also were negative. Many mycoplasma isolates were recovered from turkeys from every location. Characterization of these isolates indicated that several species were present. None were species typically associated with mycoplasmosis in domestic turkeys, such as Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), M. meleagridis (MM), or M. synoviae (MS), although antibodies to these pathogens were detected in turkeys at every location sampled. There was no evidence to link any of these disease causing agents to the decline observed in the population of wild turkeys on the WWR.

  5. Impact of Fungicide Mancozeb at Different Application Rates on Soil Microbial Populations, Soil Biological Processes, and Enzyme Activities in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Walia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of fungicides is the continuous exercise particularly in orchard crops where fungal diseases, such as white root rot, have the potential to destroy horticultural crops rendering them unsaleable. In view of above problem, the present study examines the effect of different concentrations of mancozeb (0–2000 ppm at different incubation periods for their harmful side effects on various microbiological processes, soil microflora, and soil enzymes in alluvial soil (pH 6.8 collected from apple orchards of Shimla in Himachal Pradesh (India. Low concentrations of mancozeb were found to be deleterious towards fungal and actinomycetes population while higher concentrations (1000 and 2000 ppm were found to be detrimental to soil bacteria. Mancozeb impaired the process of ammonification and nitrification. Similar results were observed for nitrifying and ammonifying bacteria. Phosphorus solubilization was increased by higher concentration of mancozeb, that is, 250 ppm and above. In unamended soil, microbial biomass carbon and carbon mineralization were adversely affected by mancozeb. Soil enzymes, that is, amylase, invertase, and phosphatase showed adverse and disruptive effect when mancozeb used was above 10 ppm in unamended soil. These results conclude that, to lessen the harmful effects in soil biological processes caused by this fungicide, addition of higher amount of nitrogen based fertilizers is required.

  6. Effect of supplemental nitrogen from urea on digestibility, rumen fermentation pattern, microbial populations and nitrogen balance in growing goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanwisa Ngampongsai

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available For this study, four Thai Native (TN x Anglo Nubian (AN crossbred growing goats with an average liveweight of 19.0+1 kg were randomly used in a 4x4 Latin square design to determine the effect of supplemental nitrogen from urea on digestibility, rumen fermentation pattern, microbial populations and nitrogen balance in growing goats. Fresh elephant grass(FEG was offered ad libitum as the roughage. Four dietary treatments with supplemental nitrogen from urea were T1 = urea at 0% cassava chip, (CC = 30%, T2 = urea at 1% (CC = 40%, T3 = urea at 2% (CC = 50% and T4 = urea at 3% (CC = 60%,respectively. Based on this experiment, it was found that there was no significant difference (p>0.05 among treatment groups regarding nutrient intake (OMI, CPI, NDFI and ADFI and digestion coefficients of nutrients (DM, OM, CP, NDF and ADF, while digestible nutrient intake of CP (g/d was affected by increasing urea levels. Ruminal volatile fatty acidprofiles were similar among treatments. Moreover, rumen microorganism populations were not affected (p>0.05 by increasing urea levels. The amount of N absorption and retention were similar among treatments, except for T4 which tended to be slightly lower in N absorption as compared to control diet, but higher N output retained (% of N intake than the control-fed goats. From the overall results, it can be concluded that a higher level of urea (3% could be used with a high level of CC (60% in concentrate when fed with FEG and it was found to be a good approach to exploiting the use of local feedresources for goat production.

  7. Patterns of ecological specialization among microbial populations in the Red Sea and diverse oligotrophic marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Luke R; Field, Chris; Romanuk, Tamara; Ngugi, David; Siam, Rania; El Dorry, Hamza; Stingl, Ulrich

    2013-06-01

    Large swaths of the nutrient-poor surface ocean are dominated numerically by cyanobacteria (Prochlorococcus), cyanobacterial viruses (cyanophage), and alphaproteobacteria (SAR11). How these groups thrive in the diverse physicochemical environments of different oceanic regions remains poorly understood. Comparative metagenomics can reveal adaptive responses linked to ecosystem-specific selective pressures. The Red Sea is well-suited for studying adaptation of pelagic-microbes, with salinities, temperatures, and light levels at the extreme end for the surface ocean, and low nutrient concentrations, yet no metagenomic studies have been done there. The Red Sea (high salinity, high light, low N and P) compares favorably with the Mediterranean Sea (high salinity, low P), Sargasso Sea (low P), and North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (high light, low N). We quantified the relative abundance of genetic functions among Prochlorococcus, cyanophage, and SAR11 from these four regions. Gene frequencies indicate selection for phosphorus acquisition (Mediterranean/Sargasso), DNA repair and high-light responses (Red Sea/Pacific Prochlorococcus), and osmolyte C1 oxidation (Red Sea/Mediterranean SAR11). The unexpected connection between salinity-dependent osmolyte production and SAR11 C1 metabolism represents a potentially major coevolutionary adaptation and biogeochemical flux. Among Prochlorococcus and cyanophage, genes enriched in specific environments had ecotype distributions similar to nonenriched genes, suggesting that inter-ecotype gene transfer is not a major source of environment-specific adaptation. Clustering of metagenomes using gene frequencies shows similarities in populations (Red Sea with Pacific, Mediterranean with Sargasso) that belie their geographic distances. Taken together, the genetic functions enriched in specific environments indicate competitive strategies for maintaining carrying capacity in the face of physical stressors and low nutrient availability.

  8. Influence of erythromycin A on the microbial populations in aquaculture sediment microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Hak; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2005-07-01

    Degradation of erythromycin A was studied using two sediment samples obtained from the salmon and trout hatchery sites at Hupp Springs (HS) and Goldendale (GD), Washington, United States. The former site had been treated for 3 years with erythromycin-medicated feed prior to the experiments, and the latter site had not been treated with any antibiotic for at least 6 years. The two sediment microcosms treated with either N-[methyl-14C]erythromycin A or [1,3,5,7,9,11,13-14C]erythromycin A showed S-curves for erythromycin A mineralization with a prolonged lag time of 120 days, except for GD microcosms treated with [1,3,5,7,9,11,13-14C]erythromycin A. We proposed a simplified logistic model to interpret the mineralization curves under the assumption of the low densities of initial populations metabolizing erythromycin A. The model was helpful for knowing the biological potential for erythromycin A degradation in sediments. Although erythromycin A added to the two sediment microcosms did not significantly alter the numbers of total viable aerobic bacteria or erythromycin-resistant bacteria, it affected the bacterial composition. The influence on the bacterial composition appeared to be greater in GD microcosms without pre-exposure to antibiotics. PCR-RFLP and DNA sequence analyses of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene and the erythromycin esterase (ere) gene revealed that ereA type 2 (ereA2) was present in potentially erythromycin-degrading Pseudomonas spp. strains GD100, GD200, HS100, HS200 and HS300, isolated from erythromycin-treated and non-treated GD and HS microcosms. Erythromycin A appeared to influence the development and proliferation of strain GD200, possibly via the lateral gene transfer of ereA2.

  9. Influence of erythromycin A on the microbial populations in aquaculture sediment microcosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong-Hak [Division of Microbiology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)]. E-mail: yhkim660628@hotmail.com; Cerniglia, Carl E. [Division of Microbiology, National Center for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)]. E-mail: ccerniglia@nctr.fda.gov

    2005-07-01

    Degradation of erythromycin A was studied using two sediment samples obtained from the salmon and trout hatchery sites at Hupp Springs (HS) and Goldendale (GD), Washington, United States. The former site had been treated for 3 years with erythromycin-medicated feed prior to the experiments, and the latter site had not been treated with any antibiotic for at least 6 years. The two sediment microcosms treated with either N-[methyl-{sup 14}C]erythromycin A or [1,3,5,7,9,11,13-{sup 14}C]erythromycin A showed S-curves for erythromycin A mineralization with a prolonged lag time of 120 days, except for GD microcosms treated with [1,3,5,7,9,11,13-{sup 14}C]erythromycin A. We proposed a simplified logistic model to interpret the mineralization curves under the assumption of the low densities of initial populations metabolizing erythromycin A. The model was helpful for knowing the biological potential for erythromycin A degradation in sediments. Although erythromycin A added to the two sediment microcosms did not significantly alter the numbers of total viable aerobic bacteria or erythromycin-resistant bacteria, it affected the bacterial composition. The influence on the bacterial composition appeared to be greater in GD microcosms without pre-exposure to antibiotics. PCR-RFLP and DNA sequence analyses of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene and the erythromycin esterase (ere) gene revealed that ereA type 2 (ereA2) was present in potentially erythromycin-degrading Pseudomonas spp. strains GD100, GD200, HS100, HS200 and HS300, isolated from erythromycin-treated and non-treated GD and HS microcosms. Erythromycin A appeared to influence the development and proliferation of strain GD200, possibly via the lateral gene transfer of ereA2.

  10. Patterns of ecological specialization among microbial populations in the Red Sea and diverse oligotrophic marine environments

    KAUST Repository

    Thompson, Luke R

    2013-05-11

    Large swaths of the nutrient-poor surface ocean are dominated numerically by cyanobacteria (Prochlorococcus), cyanobacterial viruses (cyanophage), and alphaproteobacteria (SAR11). How these groups thrive in the diverse physicochemical environments of different oceanic regions remains poorly understood. Comparative metagenomics can reveal adaptive responses linked to ecosystem-specific selective pressures. The Red Sea is well-suited for studying adaptation of pelagic-microbes, with salinities, temperatures, and light levels at the extreme end for the surface ocean, and low nutrient concentrations, yet no metagenomic studies have been done there. The Red Sea (high salinity, high light, low N and P) compares favorably with the Mediterranean Sea (high salinity, low P), Sargasso Sea (low P), and North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (high light, low N). We quantified the relative abundance of genetic functions among Prochlorococcus, cyanophage, and SAR11 from these four regions. Gene frequencies indicate selection for phosphorus acquisition (Mediterranean/Sargasso), DNA repair and high-light responses (Red Sea/Pacific Prochlorococcus), and osmolyte C1 oxidation (Red Sea/Mediterranean SAR11). The unexpected connection between salinity-dependent osmolyte production and SAR11 C1 metabolism represents a potentially major coevolutionary adaptation and biogeochemical flux. Among Prochlorococcus and cyanophage, genes enriched in specific environments had ecotype distributions similar to nonenriched genes, suggesting that inter-ecotype gene transfer is not a major source of environment-specific adaptation. Clustering of metagenomes using gene frequencies shows similarities in populations (Red Sea with Pacific, Mediterranean with Sargasso) that belie their geographic distances. Taken together, the genetic functions enriched in specific environments indicate competitive strategies for maintaining carrying capacity in the face of physical stressors and low nutrient availability. 2013 The

  11. Effects of Seasonal Changes (The Spring and The Autumn on Microbial Population of the Surface Soils Planted the Various Tree Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin Koç

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial population of soil and its structure is affected with chemical and biological changes such as plant-root secretions. Upper layer of the soil is exposed to mixture of stems, fruiting bodies and leaves of trees. Seven trees growing at same area were chosen. Their upper layers of the soil were collected from depth 5-10 cm as samples in spring and autumn. Their microbial populations were investigated in order to determine in terms of climate changes. In order to determine the number of the total microorganisms, gram-negative bacteria and spore-forming bacteria (cfu/g were used by the serial dilution techniques. As a result, the highest numbers of microorganisms from the soil of the apple tree were determined as the total microbial count in the autumn, although the lowest number of microorganisms was obtained from the soil of the pine tree. However, the number of the gram-negative bacteria was the highest in the soil of linden tree, although the number of gram negative bacteria was the lowest in the soil of apricot, mulberry and apple trees. For spore - forming bacterium, the highest number from the mulberry soil and the lowest number from the linden tree have been obtained. In the spring, the highest numbers of microorganisms from the soil of the apple tree were obtained as the total microbial count, although the lowest number of microorganisms was obtained from the soil of the apricot tree. For the number of the gram-negative bacteria was the highest in the soil of walnut tree, although the number of gram negative bacteria was the lowest in the soil of apricot trees. However spore - forming bacterium, the highest number from the soil of the poplar tree and the lowest number from the mulberry tree have been obtained. In general, the rich diversity of the microbial population was shown morphologically in autumn.

  12. Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Anaerolineae populations are enriched on anodes of root exudate-driven microbial fuel cells in rice field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, Angela; Pommerenke, Bianca; Boon, Nico; Friedrich, Michael W

    2015-06-01

    Plant-based sediment microbial fuel cells (PMFCs) couple the oxidation of root exudates in living rice plants to current production. We analysed the composition of the microbial community on anodes from PMFC with natural rice field soil as substratum for rice by analysing 16S rRNA as an indicator of microbial activity and diversity. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis indicated that the active bacterial community on anodes from PMFCs differed strongly compared with controls. Moreover, clones related to Deltaproteobacteria and Chloroflexi were highly abundant (49% and 21%, respectively) on PMFCs anodes. Geobacter (19%), Anaeromyxobacter (15%) and Anaerolineae (17%) populations were predominant on anodes with natural rice field soil and differed strongly from those previously detected with potting soil. In open circuit (OC) control PMFCs, not allowing electron transfer, Deltaproteobacteria (33%), Betaproteobacteria (20%), Chloroflexi (12%), Alphaproteobacteria (10%) and Firmicutes (10%) were detected. The presence of an electron accepting anode also had a strong influence on methanogenic archaea. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were more active on PMFC (21%) than on OC controls (10%), whereas acetoclastic Methanosaetaceae were more active on OC controls (31%) compared with PMFCs (9%). In conclusion, electron accepting anodes and rice root exudates selected for distinct potential anode-reducing microbial populations in rice soil inoculated PMFC.

  13. Geographic distribution of need and access to health care in rural population: an ecological study in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najafi Behzad

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Equity in access to and utilization of health services is a common goal of policy-makers in most countries. The current study aimed to evaluate the distribution of need and access to health care services among Iran's rural population between 2006 and 2009. Methods Census data on population's characteristics in each province were obtained from the Statistical Centre of Iran and National Organization for civil registration. Data about the Rural Health Houses (RHHs were obtained from the Ministry of Health. The Health Houses-to-rural population ratio (RHP, crude birth rate (CBR and crude mortality rate (CMR in rural population were calculated in order to compare their distribution among the provinces. Lorenz curves of RHHs, CMR and CBR were plotted and their decile ratio, Gini Index and Index of Dissimilarity were calculated. Moreover, Spearman rank-order correlation was used to examine the relation between RHHs and CMR and CBR. Results There were substantial differences in RHHs, CMR and CBR across the provinces. CMR and CBR experienced changes toward more equal distributions between 2006 and 2009, while inverse trend was seen for RHHs. Excluding three provinces with markedly changes in data between 2006 and 2009 as outliers, did not change observed trends. Moreover; there was a significant positive relationship between CMR and RHP in 2009 and a significant negative association between CBR and RHP in 2006 and 2009. When three provinces with outliers were excluded, these significant associations were disappeared. Conclusion Results showed that there were significant variations in the distribution of RHHs, CMR and CBR across the country. Moreover, the distribution of RHHs did not reflect the needs for health care in terms of CMR and CBR in the study period.

  14. Comparison of fermentation of diets of variable composition and microbial populations in the rumen of sheep and Rusitec fermenters. I. Digestibility, fermentation parameters, and microbial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M E; Ranilla, M J; Tejido, M L; Ramos, S; Carro, M D

    2010-08-01

    Four ruminally and duodenally cannulated sheep and 8 Rusitec fermenters were used to determine the effects of forage to concentrate (F:C) ratio and type of forage in the diet on ruminal fermentation and microbial protein synthesis. The purpose of the study was to assess how closely fermenters can mimic the dietary differences found in vivo. The 4 experimental diets contained F:C ratios of 70:30 or 30:70 with either alfalfa hay or grass hay as the forage. Microbial growth was determined in both systems using (15)N as a microbial marker. Rusitec fermenters detected differences between diets similar to those observed in sheep by changing F:C ratio on pH; neutral detergent fiber digestibility; total volatile fatty acid concentrations; molar proportions of acetate, propionate, butyrate, isovalerate, and caproate; and amylase activity. In contrast, Rusitec fermenters did not reproduce the dietary differences found in sheep for NH(3)-N and lactate concentrations, dry matter (DM) digestibility, proportions of isobutyrate and valerate, carboxymethylcellulase and xylanase activities, and microbial growth and its efficiency. Regarding the effect of the type of forage in the diet, Rusitec fermenters detected differences between diets similar to those found in sheep for most determined parameters, with the exception of pH, DM digestibility, butyrate proportion, and carboxymethylcellulase activity. Minimum pH and maximal volatile fatty acid concentrations were reached at 2h and at 6 to 8h postfeeding in sheep and fermenters, respectively, indicating that feed fermentation was slower in fermenters compared with that in sheep. There were differences between systems in the magnitude of most determined parameters. In general, fermenters showed lower lactate concentrations, neutral detergent fiber digestibility, acetate:propionate ratios, and enzymatic activities. On the contrary, fermenters showed greater NH(3)-N concentrations, DM digestibility, and proportions of propionate

  15. Demand for and Accessibility to Reproductive Health Service of Urban Floating Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The demand for knowledge of productive health and the current status of productive health services provided by relevant governmental institutions were qualitatively and quantitatively studied. The study identified the key factors that influenced the demand for the productive health services and results of the services. It also discussed the effective approaches to control, planning and sustainable development of the reproductive health services for the floating populations.

  16. Effects of coconut and fish oils on ruminal methanogenesis, fermentation, and abundance and diversity of microbial populations in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, A K; Yu, Z

    2013-03-01

    Coconut (CO) and fish (FO) oils were previously shown to inhibit rumen methanogenesis and biohydrogenation, which mitigates methane emission and helps improve beneficial fatty acids in meat and milk. This study aimed at investigating the comparative effects of CO and FO on the methanogenesis, fermentation, and microbial abundances and diversity in vitro rumen cultures containing different doses (0, 3.1, and 6.2 mL/L) of each oil and 400mg feed substrate using rumen fluid from lactating dairy cows as inocula. Increasing doses of CO and FO quadratically decreased concentrations of methane, but hydrogen concentrations were only increased quadratically by CO. Both oils linearly decreased dry matter and neutral detergent fiber digestibility of feeds but did not affect the concentration of total volatile fatty acids. However, CO reduced acetate percentage and acetate to propionate ratio and increased the percentages of propionate and butyrate to a greater extent than FO. Ammonia concentration was greater for CO than FO. As determined by quantitative real-time PCR, FO had greater inhibition to methanogens than CO, but the opposite was true for protozoal, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, and Fibrobacter succinogenes. Ruminococcus albus was not affected by either oil. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles revealed that bacterial and archaeal community composition were changed differently by oil type. Based on Pareto-Lorenz evenness curve analysis of the DGGE profiles, CO noticeably changed the functional organization of archaea compared with FO. In conclusion, although both CO and FO decreased methane concentrations to a similar extent, the mode of reduction and the effect on abundances and diversity of archaeal and bacterial populations differed between the oils. Thus, the use of combination of CO and FO at a low dose may additively lower methanogenesis in the rumen while having little adverse effect on rumen fermentation.

  17. Performance, meat quality, meat mineral contents and caecal microbial population responses to humic substances administered in drinking water in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, E; Coskun, I; Ocak, N; Erener, G; Dervisoglu, M; Turhan, S

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effect of different levels of humic substances (HS) administered in drinking water on caecal microflora and mineral composition and colour characteristics of breast and thigh meats and the growth performance, carcass and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) traits of broiler chicks. A total of 480 3-d-old broiler chickens were randomly allocated to 4 treatments with 4 cages per treatment and 30 bird (15 males and 15 females) chicks per cage. All birds were fed on commercial basal diet. The control birds (HS0) received drinking water with no additions, whereas birds in the other treatment groups received a drinking water with 7.5 (HS7.5), 15.0 (HS15.0) and 22.5 (HS22.5) g/kg HS. Mush feed were provided on an ad libitum basis. Body weight and feed intake of broilers were determined at d 0, 21, and 42, and feed conversion ratio was calculated. On d 42, 4 broilers (2 males and 2 females) from each cage were slaughtered and the breast and thigh meats were collected for mineral composition and quality measurements. Performance, carcass and GIT traits and caecal microbial population of broiler chicks at d 42 were not affected by the dietary treatments. The lightness (L*) of breast and thigh meat decreased in broilers supplemented with 15 and 22.5 g/kg HS in drinking water. Although the redness (a*) of breast meat increased, yellowness of thigh meat decreased in broilers supplemented with 15 and 22.5 g/kg HS in drinking water (P water can be applied for broiler chicks to maintain growth performance and improve meat quality without changing caecal microflora.

  18. Effects of rumen fluid collection site on microbial population structure during in vitro fermentation of the different substrates quantified by 16S rRNA hybridisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muetzel, S; Krishnamoorthy, U; Becker, K

    2001-01-01

    Rumen fluid samples from a cow were withdrawn manually from the feed mat (solid phase) or the liquid phase below this mat and incubated in vitro with wheat straw, sorghum hay and a concentrate mixture. From the inoculum and several samples collected during in vitro incubation RNA was extracted to assess microbial population size and structure. RNA content recovered from the solid phase rumen fluid was significantly higher than from the liquid phase. The composition of the microbial population in the solid phase material was characterised by a high proportion of Ruminococci. Neither the proportion of other cell wall degrading organisms (Fibrobacter and Chytridiomycetes) nor the Eukarya and Archaea populations differed between the two sampling sites. Gas production was higher when substrates were incubated with solid phase than with liquid phase rumen fluid regardless of sampling time. However, the higher level of gas production was not accompanied by a corresponding increase in true digestibility. The RNA probes showed that during in vitro incubation with liquid phase rumen fluid, the eukaryotic population was inactive no matter which substrate was used and the activity of methanogens (Archaea) was lower than with solid phase rumen fluid. The population pattern of the cell wall degrading organisms was influenced mainly by the substrate fermented, and to a smaller extent by the inoculum used for in vitro fermentation.

  19. Improved Yield of High Molecular Weight DNA Coincides with Increased Microbial Diversity Access from Iron Oxide Cemented Sub-Surface Clay Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley [ORNL; Moberly, James G [ORNL; Shakya, Migun [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Despite more than three decades of progress, efficient nucleic acid extraction from microbial communities has remained difficult, particularly from clay environments. Lysis with concentrated guanidine followed by concentrated sodium phosphate extraction supported DNA and RNA recovery from high iron, low humus content clay. Alterating the extraction pH or using other ionic solutions (Na2SO4 and NH4H2PO4) yielded no detectable nucleic acid. DNA recovered using a lysis solution with 500 mM phosphate buffer (PB) followed by a 1 M PB wash was 15.22 2.33 g DNA/g clay, with most DNA consisting of >20 Kb fragments, compared to 2.46 0.25 g DNA/g clay with the Powerlyzer soil DNA system (MoBio). Increasing [PB] in the lysis reagent coincided with increasing DNA fragment length. Rarefaction plots based on16S rRNA (V1/V3 region) pyrosequencing libraries from A-horizon and clay soils showed an ~80% and ~400% larger accessed diversity compared to a previous grinding protocol or the Powerlyzer soil DNA system, respectively. The observed diversity from the Firmicutes showed the strongest increase with >3-fold more bacterial species recovered using this system. Additionally, some OTU s having more than 100 sequences in these libraries were absent in samples extracted using the PowerLyzer reagents or the previous lysis method.

  20. Distress syndromes, illness behavior, access to care and medical utilization in a defined population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanic, D; Cleary, P D; Greenley, J R

    1982-04-01

    This article examines the use of general medical services in a representative sample from a defined geographic area and in a sample of persons seeking psychiatric care from the same area. Psychiatric patients made 100 per cent more general medical care visits in the retrospective period and 83 per cent more in the prospective period than persons who did not seek mental health care. The analysis focuses on the determinants in general medical care use between those who sought mental health care and those who did not. The first hypothesis is that physical symptoms and dysfunction concomitant with psychologic disorder explain the difference. The second argues that the association is a product of help-seeking orientations and illness behavior. The third focuses on variations due to differences in access. The first two types of factors are the most important. Using sex, physical symptoms and illness behavior measures, we explain 50 per cent of the differences in retrospective utilization and 40 per cent of the differences in prospective data.

  1. Increasing Public Awareness of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Health Care Access, Internet Use, and Population Density Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila J. Finney Rutten

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainty around the value of and appropriate regulatory models for direct-to-consumer (DTC genetic testing underscores the importance of tracking public awareness of these services. We analyzed nationally representative, cross-sectional data from the Health Information National Trends Survey in 2008 (n=7,674 and 2011 (n=3,959 to assess population-level changes in awareness of DTC genetic testing in the U.S. and to explore sociodemographic, health care, Internet use, and population density correlates. Overall, awareness increased significantly from 29% in 2008 to 37% in 2011. The observed increase in awareness from 2008 to 2011 remained significant (OR=1.39 even when adjusted for sociodemographic variables, health care access, Internet use, and population density. Independent of survey year, the odds of awareness of DTC genetic tests were significantly higher for those aged 50–64 (OR=1.64, and 65–74 (OR=1.60; college graduates (OR=2.02; those with a regular source of health care (OR=1.27; those with a prior cancer diagnosis (OR=1.24; those who use the Internet (OR=1.27; and those living in urban areas (OR=1.25. Surveillance of awareness—along with empirical data on use of and response to genetic risk information—can inform public health and policy efforts to maximize benefits and minimize risks of DTC genetic testing.

  2. People living with HIV travel farther to access healthcare: a population-based geographic analysis from rural Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam N Akullian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The availability of specialized HIV services is limited in rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa where the need is the greatest. Where HIV services are available, people living with HIV (PLHIV must overcome large geographic, economic and social barriers to access healthcare. The objective of this study was to understand the unique barriers PLHIV face when accessing healthcare compared with those not living with HIV in a rural area of sub-Saharan Africa with limited availability of healthcare infrastructure. Methods: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study of 447 heads of household on Bugala Island, Uganda. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare travel time, cost and distance to access healthcare, and log binomial models were used to test for associations between HIV status and access to nearby health services. Results: PLHIV travelled an additional 1.9 km (95% CI (0.6, 3.2 km, p=0.004 to access healthcare compared with those not living with HIV, and they were 56% less likely to access healthcare at the nearest health facility to their residence, so long as that facility lacked antiretroviral therapy (ART services (aRR=0.44, 95% CI (0.24 to 0.83, p=0.011. We found no evidence that PLHIV travelled further for care if the nearest facility supplies ART services (aRR=0.95, 95% CI (0.86 to 1.05, p=0.328. Among those who reported uptake of care at one of two facilities on the island that provides ART (81% of PLHIV and 68% of HIV-negative individuals, PLHIV tended to seek care at a higher tiered facility that provides ART, even when this facility was not their closest facility (30% of PLHIV travelled further than the closest ART facility compared with 16% of HIV-negative individuals, and travelled an additional 2.2 km (p=0.001 to access that facility, relative to HIV-negative individuals (aRR=1.91, 95% CI (1.00 to 3.65, p=0.05. Among PLHIV, residential distance was associated with access to facilities providing

  3. From the Margins to the Spotlight: Diverse Deaf and Hard of Hearing Student Populations and Standardized Assessment Accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Designing assessments and tests is one of the more challenging aspects of creating an accessible learning environment for students who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH), particularly for deaf students with a disability (DWD). Standardized assessments are a key mechanism by which the educational system in the United States measures student progress, teacher effectiveness, and the impact of school reform. The diversity of student characteristics within DHH and DWD populations is only now becoming visible in the research literature relating to standardized assessments and their use in large-scale accountability reforms. The purpose of this article is to explore the theoretical frameworks surrounding assessment policy and practice, current research related to standardized assessment and students who are DHH and DWD, and potential implications for practice within both the assessment and instruction contexts.

  4. Ileal MUC2 gene expression and microbial population, but not growth performance and immune response, are influenced by in ovo injection of probiotics in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi-Mosleh, A; Sadeghi, A A; Mousavi, S N; Chamani, M; Zarei, A

    2017-02-01

    1. The objective of present study was to evaluate the effects of intra-amniotic injection of different probiotic strains (Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecium and Pediococcus acidilactici) on the intestinal MUC2 gene expression, microbial population, growth performance and immune response in broiler chicken. 2. In a completely randomised design, different probiotic strains were injected into the amniotic fluid of the 480 live embryos (d 18 of incubation), with 4 treatments and 5 replicates. Ileal MUC2 gene expression, microbial profile, growth performance and immune response were determined. 3. Injection of probiotic strains, especially B. subtilis, had significant effect on expression of the MUC2 on d 21 of incubation and d 3 post-hatch, but not on d 19 of incubation. 4. Injection of the probiotic strains decreased significantly the Escherichia coli population and increased the lactic acid bacteria population during the first week post-hatch. 5. Inoculation of probiotics had no significant effect on antibody titres against Newcastle disease virus, antibody titres against sheep red blood cell and cell-mediated immune response of chickens compared to control. 6. In ovo injection of the probiotic strains had no significant effect on growth performance of broiler chickens. 7. It was concluded that injection of probiotic bacteria especially B. subtilis into the amniotic fluid has a beneficial effect on ileal MUC2 gene expression and bacteria population during the first week post-hatch, but has no effect on growth performance and immune response in broiler chickens.

  5. Probiotic table olives: microbial populations adhering on olive surface in fermentation sets inoculated with the probiotic strain Lactobacillus paracasei IMPC2.1 in an industrial plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bellis, Palmira; Valerio, Francesca; Sisto, Angelo; Lonigro, Stella Lisa; Lavermicocca, Paola

    2010-05-30

    This study reports the dynamics of microbial populations adhering on the surface of debittered green olives cv. Bella di Cerignola in fermentation sets inoculated with the probiotic strain Lactobacillus paracasei IMPC2.1 in different brining conditions (4% and 8% (w/v) NaCl) at room temperature and 4 degrees C. The probiotic strain successfully colonized the olive surface dominating the natural LAB population and decreasing the pH of brines to fermentation. The dynamics of microbial populations associated with olive surface and belonging to the different groups indicated that inoculated olives held at room temperature did not host Enterobacteriaceae at the end of fermentation. Yeast populations were present in a low number (fermentation in all processes except for the one held at 4 degrees C. Also a notable incidence of Leuc. mesenteroides on olives was highlighted in this study during all fermentation. Results indicated that the human strain L. paracasei IMPC2.1 can be considered an example of a strain used in the dual role of starter and probiotic culture which allowed the control of fermentation processes and the realization of a final probiotic product with functional appeal.

  6. "Population and poverty: major barriers to food accessibility" -- a panel discussion on civil society and people's participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes conference statements on poverty and food policies that were made by parliamentary members from Malaysia, the Philippines, and India. These presentations were made after the main panel discussion on barriers to food accessibility. In Malaysia the government adopted a National Agricultural Policy in 1984. This policy encouraged increased productivity, effective use of resources, agricultural credit and incentives, and integrated pest management. Strong support was given to the food processing industry. Poverty was the main reason for food inaccessibility. Through government efforts, poverty was reduced from 16.5% in 1990 to 8.9% in 1995. The Filipino member reported that government efforts had focused on national campaigns to combat hunger and to encourage community participation. The government was forced to implement a national Plan of Action for Food Security due to increased population, environmental degradation, closing land frontiers, and the global economy. The Plan encouraged increases in productivity, price and supply stabilization, maintenance of stocks, and rice subsidies for the poor. Gender concerns were being incorporated into development programs. The Indian member linked food insecurity to world resource problems. He stated that food problems included imbalances between supply and demand, but more importantly inequalities in access to food and differences in nutritional content of food. Populations in developing countries spent a larger proportion of income on food of lesser quality and variety that contributed to nutritional deficiencies, particularly among women and children. Food insecurity was part of the cycle of poverty, hunger, low productivity, and high mortality. Poverty was the primary cause and a major consequence of hunger and chronic food insecurity. Although India increased food productivity, food insecurity remained. Multidisciplinary approaches are needed.

  7. Is the Brazilian pharmaceutical policy ensuring population access to essential medicines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertoldi Andréa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate medicine prices, availability and affordability in Brazil, considering the differences across three types of medicines (originator brands, generics and similar medicines and different types of facilities (private pharmacies, public sector pharmacies and “popular pharmacies”. Methods Data on prices and availability of 50 medicines were collected in 56 pharmacies across six cities in Southern Brazil using the World Health Organization / Health Action International methodology. Median prices obtained were divided by international reference prices to derive the median price ratio (MPR. Results In the private sector, prices were 8.6 MPR for similar medicines, 11.3 MRP for generics and 18.7 MRP for originator brands, respectively. Mean availability was 65%, 74% and 48% for originator brands, generics and similar medicines, respectively. In the public sector, mean availability of similar medicines was 2–7 times higher than that of generics. Mean overall availability in the public sector ranged from 68.8% to 81.7%. In “popular pharmacies”, mean availability was greater than 90% in all cities. Conclusions Availability of medicines in the public sector does not meet the challenge of supplying essential medicines to the entire population, as stated in the Brazilian constitution. This has unavoidable repercussions for affordability, particularly amongst the lower socio-economic strata.

  8. Effect of packaging during storage time on retail display microbial population of beef strip loins from two different production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzardo, S; Woerner, D R; Geornaras, I; Hess, A M; Belk, K E

    2016-06-01

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate the influence of packaging during storage of strip loins (to simulate export shipment) from steers fattened on intensive grazing systems (Uruguay; UR) or on a high-concentrate diet (United States; US) on retail display life microbial growth. Four or 3 different packaging treatments were applied to UR and US strip loin roasts or steaks during 35 d of storage; treatments were applied 7 d following slaughter. After 35 d of storage, the samples were evaluated during simulated retail display for up to 6 d. In Exp. 1, the treatments were vacuum packaging (VP), low-oxygen modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) with N and CO (MAP/CO), low-oxygen MAP with N plus CO and CO, and VP plus an application of peroxyacetic acid (VP/PAA). In Exp. 2, block 1, the treatments were VP, MAP/CO, and VP with ethyl--lauroyl--arginate HCl incorporated into the film as an antimicrobial agent (VP/AM). In Exp. 2, block 2, the treatments were VP, MAP/CO, MAP/CO, and VP/AM. For retail display, VP treatments were sliced and repackaged in PVC overwrap, and MAP treatments were actually PVC overwrap trays that were removed from a master bag with the prescribed gas treatment. Regardless of production system and packaging treatment, mesophilic and psychrotrophic counts of 6.9 to 7.8 and 6.7 to 7.7 log10 CFU/cm, respectively, were obtained at the end of retail display, except for US samples in Exp. 2 (5.5 to 6.3 log CFU/cm). No differences ( > 0.05) were detected for spp. counts among packaging treatments in US steaks at the end of the display time in Exp.1, whereas, for UR steaks, both MAP treatments had lower ( retail display for Exp. 2. At the end of display time and for Exp. 1, US steaks under MAP/CO had greater ( 0.05) among packaging were detected for UR steaks. Both MAP and VP/AM treatments in the US samples for Exp. 2 had lower ( 0.05) were found among packaging treatments for the UR samples. To maximize shelf life (storage and display life) of exported fresh

  9. Effects of Neutral Detergent Soluble Fiber and Sucrose Supplementation on Ruminal Fermentation, Microbial Synthesis, and Populations of Ruminal Cellulolytic Bacteria Using the Rumen Simulation Technique (RUSITEC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiang-hui; LIU Chan-juan; LI Chao-yun; YAO Jun-hu

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of neutral detergent soluble fiber (NDSF) and sucrose supplementation on ruminal fermentation, microbial synthesis, and populations of ruminal cellulolytic bacteria using the rumen simulation technique (RUSITEC). The experiment had a 2×2 factorial design with two dosages of sucrose, low (ca. 0.26 g d-1, low-sucrose) and high (ca. 1.01 g d-1, high-sucrose), and two dosages of supplied NDSF, low (1.95 g d-1, low-NDSF) and high (2.70 g d-1, high-NDSF). Interactions between NDSF and sucrose were detected for xylanase activity from solid fraction and apparent disappearance of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and hemicellulose, with the lowest values observed for high-NDSF and high-sucrose treatment. Supplemental NDSF appeared to increase the molar proportion of acetate and reduce that of butyrate;however, the effects of supplemental sucrose on VFA profiles depended upon NDSF amount. There was a NDSF×sucrose interaction for the production of methane. High-NDSF fermenters had lower ammonia-N production, greater daily N flow of solid-associated microbial pellets and total microorganisms, and greater microbial synthesis efficiency compared with low-NDSF fermenters. Supplementation with NDSF resulted in an increase in 16S rDNA copies of Ruminococcus flavefaciens and a reduction in copies of Ruminococcus albus. Supplementation with sucrose tended to increase the 16S rDNA copies of R. albus from liquid fraction, but did not affect daily total microbial N flow and cellulolytic bacterium populations from solid fraction. These data indicate that the effects of the interaction between NDSF and sugars on ruminal fermentation and fiber digestion should be taken into account in diet formulation. Ruminal fermentation and metabolism of sugars warrant further investigation.

  10. Mapping socio-environmentally vulnerable populations access and exposure to ecosystem services at the U.S.-Mexico borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Villarreal, Miguel L.; Lara-Valencia, Francisco; Yuan, Yongping; Nie, Wenming; Wilson, Sylvia; Amaya, Gladys; Sleeter, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Socio-environmental vulnerable populations are often unrepresented in land-use planning yet have great potential for loss when exposed to changes in ecosystem services. Administrative boundaries, cultural differences, and language barriers increase the disassociation between land-use management and marginalized populations living in the U.S.–Mexico borderlands. This paper describes the development of a Modified Socio-Environmental Vulnerability Index (M-SEVI), using determinants from binational census and neighborhood data that describe levels of education, access to resources, migratory status, housing, and number of dependents, to provide a simplified snapshot of the region's populace that can be used in binational planning efforts. We apply this index at the SCW, located on the border between Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. For comparison, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool is concurrently applied to assess the provision of erosion- and flood control services over a 9-year period. We describe how this coupling of data can form the base for an ecosystem services assessment across political boundaries that can be used by land-use planners. Results reveal potential disparities in environmental risks and burdens throughout the binational watershed in residential districts surrounding and between urban centers. The M-SEVI can be used as an important first step in addressing environmental justice for binational decision-making.

  11. Access to HIV community services by vulnerable populations: evidence from an enhanced HIV/AIDS surveillance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, H C E; Phillips-Howard, P A; Hargreaves, S C; Downing, J; Bellis, M A; Vivancos, R; Morley, C; Syed, Q; Cook, P A

    2011-05-01

    HIV disproportionately affects vulnerable populations such as black and minority ethnic groups, men who have sex with men (MSM) and migrants, in many countries including those in the UK. Community organisations in the UK are charitable non-governmental organisations with a proportion of the workforce who volunteer, and provide invaluable additional support for people living with HIV (PLWHIV). Information on their contribution to HIV care in vulnerable groups is relatively sparse. Data generated from an enhanced HIV surveillance system in North West England, UK, was utilised for this study. We aimed to determine the characteristics of individuals who chose to access community services in addition to clinical services (1375 out of 4195 records of PLWHIV in clinical services). Demographic information, risk factors including residency status, uniquely gathered in this region, and deprivation scores were examined. Multivariate logistic regression modelling was conducted to predict the relative effect of patient characteristics on attendance at community services. Attendance at community services was highest in those living in the most, compared with least, deprived areas (prefugees (AOR = 5.75, 95% CI 3.3-10.03; pmigrant workers (AOR = 5.48, 95% CI 2.22-13.51; pmigrant populations, community services are vital for the management of HIV in black and minority groups. Paradoxically, this coincides with increasing funding pressures on these services.

  12. Three-dimensional soil organic matter distribution, accessibility and microbial respiration in macroaggregates using osmium staining and synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, Barry G.; Wragg, Joanna; Reinhard, Christina; Atwood, Robert C.; Houston, Alasdair; Lark, R. Murray; Rudolph, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    The spatial distribution and accessibility of organic matter (OM) to soil microbes in aggregates - determined by the fine-scale, 3-D distribution of OM, pores and mineral phases - may be an important control on the magnitude of soil heterotrophic respiration (SHR). Attempts to model SHR on fine scales requires data on the transition probabilities between adjacent pore space and soil OM, a measure of microbial accessibility to the latter. We used a combination of osmium staining and synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (CT) to determine the 3-D (voxel) distribution of these three phases (scale 6.6 µm) throughout nine aggregates taken from a single soil core (range of organic carbon (OC) concentrations: 4.2-7.7 %). Prior to the synchrotron analyses we had measured the magnitude of SHR for each aggregate over 24 h under controlled conditions (moisture content and temperature). We test the hypothesis that larger magnitudes of SHR will be observed in aggregates with (i) shorter length scales of OM variation (more aerobic microsites) and (ii) larger transition probabilities between OM and pore voxels. After scaling to their OC concentrations, there was a 6-fold variation in the magnitude of SHR for the nine aggregates. The distribution of pore diameters and tortuosity index values for pore branches was similar for each of the nine aggregates. The Pearson correlation between aggregate surface area (normalized by aggregate volume) and normalized headspace C gas concentration was both positive and reasonably large (r = 0.44), suggesting that the former may be a factor that influences SHR. The overall transition probabilities between OM and pore voxels were between 0.07 and 0.17, smaller than those used in previous simulation studies. We computed the length scales over which OM, pore and mineral phases vary within each aggregate using 3-D indicator variograms. The median range of models fitted to variograms of OM varied between 38 and 175 µm and was generally larger than

  13. Dissolved carbon dioxide and oxygen concentrations in purge of vacuum-packaged pork chops and the relationship to shelf life and models for estimating microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, K R; Niebuhr, S E; Dickson, J S

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the dissolved CO2 and O2 concentrations in the purge of vacuum-packaged pork chops over a 60 day storage period, and to elucidate the relationship of dissolved CO2 and O2 to the microbial populations and shelf life. As the populations of spoilage bacteria increased, the dissolved CO2 increased and the dissolved O2 decreased in the purge. Lactic acid bacteria dominated the spoilage microflora, followed by Enterobacteriaceae and Brochothrix thermosphacta. The surface pH decreased to 5.4 due to carbonic acid and lactic acid production before rising to 5.7 due to ammonia production. A mathematical model was developed which estimated microbial populations based on dissolved CO2 concentrations. Scanning electron microscope images were also taken of the packaging film to observe the biofilm development. The SEM images revealed a two-layer biofilm on the packaging film that was the result of the tri-phase growth environment.

  14. Diversity and evolution of the microbial populations during manufacture and ripening of Casín, a traditional Spanish, starter-free cheese made from cow's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría, Angel; Alvarez-Martín, Pablo; Sacristán, Noelia; Fernández, Elena; Delgado, Susana; Mayo, Baltasar

    2009-11-30

    Classical culturing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) techniques have been used for studying the microbial diversity and dynamics of the traditional Spanish Casín cheese during manufacturing and ripening. As with other starter-free cheeses made from raw milk, the microbial diversity of Casín was shown to be high by both culturing and DGGE analyses. The culture technique showed that lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species constituted the majority of the microbial populations. Of the 14 bacterial species identified, Lactococcus garvieae was predominant in the three-day-old cheese sample, although it was replaced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis at day 30. As expected, the DGGE profiles obtained were complex, consisting, depending on the sample, in five to ten different amplification bands. Among these, a band corresponding to Streptococcus thermophilus was observed throughout the whole manufacturing process. This species had never been identified from traditional Spanish cheeses previously. Culturing and molecular methods showed high populations of undesirable microorganisms, arguing for a required improvement in the hygiene of Casín manufacture. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiling suggested that the L. garvieae and L. lactis populations were composed of one and five strains, respectively. In addition, only a single L. lactis RAPD pattern was stably maintained from day three to day 30, indicating high succession of strains along ripening. After a thoroughly characterisation, strains of the two Lactococcus species could be used in designing specific starter cultures for Casín. Additional species (such as Lactobacillus plantarum and Corynebacterium variabile) might be included as adjunct cultures.

  15. Deep Diversity: Novel Approach to Overcoming the PCR Bias Encountered During Environmental Analysis of Microbial Populations for Alpha-Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Gustavo A; Vaishampayan, Parag A.

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-diversity studies are of crucial importance to environmental microbiologists. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method has been paramount for studies interrogating microbial environmental samples for taxon richness. Phylogenetic studies using this technique are based on the amplification and comparison of the 16S rRNA coding regions. PCR, due disproportionate distribution of microbial species in the environment, increasingly favors the amplification of the most predominant phylotypes with every subsequent reaction cycle. The genetic and chemical complexity of environmental samples are intrinsic factors that exacerbate an inherit bias in PCR-based quantitative and qualitative studies of microbial communities. We report that treatment of a genetically complex total genomic environmental DNA extract with Propidium Monoazide (PMA), a DNA intercalating molecule capable of forming a covalent cross-linkage to organic moieties upon light exposure, disproportionally inactivates predominant phylotypes and results in the exponential amplification of previously shadowed microbial ?-diversity quantified as a 19.5% increase in OUTs reported via phylogenetic screening using PhyloChip.

  16. The sociality of bioremediation: Hijacking the social lives of microbial populations to clean up heavy metal contamination

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Siobhan; Buckling, Angus

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation to remove toxic heavy metals from the environment relies on metal‐tolerant plants or microbes to do the job, but with varying degrees of success. Understanding the ecology and evolution of metal‐resistant bacterial societies could drastically improve the efficiency of microbial bioremediation.

  17. Soil Microbial Population in the Vicinity of the Bean Caper(Zygophyllum dumosum) Root Zone in a Desert System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to gain a better understanding of the changes in soil microbial biomass and basal respiration dynamics in the vicinity of the bean caper (Zygophyllum dumosum) perennial desert shrub and the inter-shrub sites. Microbial biomasses as well as basal respiration were found to be significantly greater in the soil samples taken beneath the Z. dumosum shrubs than from the inter-shrub sampling sites, with no differences between the two sampling layers (0-10 and 10-20 cm) throughout the study period. However, seasonal changes were observed due to autumn dew formation, which significantly affected microbial biomass and basal respiration in the upper-layer inter-shrub locations.The calculated metabolic coefficient (qCO2) revealed significant differences between the two sampling sites as well as between the two soil layers, elucidating the abiotic effect between the sites throughout the study period. The substrate availability index was found to significantly demonstrate the differences between the two sites, elucidating the significant contribution of Z. dumosum in food source availability and in moderating harsh abiotic components. The importance of basal microbial parameters and the derived indices as tools demonstrated the importance and need for basic knowledge in understanding plant-soil interactions determined by an unpredictable and harsh desert environment.

  18. Phenetic relationships among natural population accessions of Glycyrrhiza glabra L. (Fabaceae in central Zagros region of Iran, based on quantitative morphology, flavonoids and glycyrrhizin contents data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Sharifi-Tehrani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenetic relationships among thirty five accessions from natural populations of two varieties of Glycyrrhiza glabra in central Zagros region of Iran were studied. Twenty one quantitative morphological characters were measured for twenty seven accessions. PCO, clustering, K-means and MDS analyses were performed on morphological dataset. Polar flavonoid constituents of twenty four accessions were extracted, purified using TLC and characterized at the skeleton class level. Glycyrrhizin contents of rhizomes in twenty four accessions were quantified using image processing methods. Results of multivariate analysis of both morphological and flavonoid spot profile data showed that accessions could be partitioned into two main groups based on geographical locality of the populations. The most variable morphological trait based on CV values, was seed area and the least variable one was Legume width in the widest portion. Accessions of both varieties produced various flavonoids of class flavones and flavonols. Seven flavonoid constituents from the two varieties were separated based on different Rf values. The results revealed that there were moderate (not prominent levels of variation between the studied accessions. Separation of the varieties based on the single qualitative character in the available literature, was confirmed. Rhizomes of both varieties showed similar amounts of glycyrrhizin and almost similar types of flavonoids in their TLC profiles, suggesting that both were equivalent as herbal drugs in folk medicine.

  19. [Health status and access to health services by the population of L'Aquila (Abruzzo Region, Italy) six years after the earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altobelli, Emma; Vittorini, Pierpaolo; Leuter, Cinzia; Bianchini, Valeria; Angelone, Anna Maria; Aloisio, Federica; Cofini, Vincenza; Zazzara, Francesca; Di Orio, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Natural disasters, such as the earthquake that occurred in the province of L'Aquila in central Italy, in 2009, generally increase the demand for healthcare. A survey was conducted to assess perception of health status an d use of health services in a sample of L'Aquila's resident population, five years after the event, and in a comparison population consisting of a sample of the resident population of Avezzano, a town in the same region, not affected by the earthquake. No differences were found in perception of health status between the two populations. Both groups reported difficulties in accessing specialized healthcare and rehabilitation services.

  20. Decline in Performance of Biochemical Reactors for Sulphate Removal from Mine-Influenced Water is Accompanied by Changes in Organic Matter Characteristics and Microbial Population Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parissa Mirjafari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Successful long-term bioremediation of mining-influenced water using complex organic matter and naturally-occurring microorganisms in sub-surface flow constructed wetlands requires a balance between easily and more slowly degrading material. This can be achieved by combining different types of organic materials. To provide guidance on what mixture combinations to use, information is needed on how the ratio of labile to recalcitrant components affects the degradation rate and the types of microbial populations supported. To investigate this, different ratios of wood and hay were used in up-flow column bioreactors treating selenium- and sulphate-containing synthetic mine-influenced water. The degradation rates of crude fibre components appeared to be similar regardless of the relative amounts of wood and hay. However, the nature of the degradation products might have differed in that those produced in the hay-rich bioreactors were more biodegradable and supported high sulphate-reduction rates. Microorganisms in the sulphate-reducing and cellulose-degrading inocula persisted in the bioreactors indicating that bio-augmentation was effective. There was a shift in microbial community composition over time suggesting that different microbial groups were involved in decomposition of more recalcitrant material. When dissolved organic carbon (DOC was over-supplied, the relative abundance of sulphate-reducers was low even through high sulphate-reduction rates were achieved. As DOC diminished, sulphate-reducers become more prevalent and their relative abundance correlated with sulphate concentrations rather than sulphate-reduction rate.

  1. Milk fatty acid composition, rumen microbial population, and animal performances in response to diets rich in linoleic acid supplemented with chestnut or quebracho tannins in dairy ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccioni, A; Pauselli, M; Viti, C; Minieri, S; Pallara, G; Roscini, V; Rapaccini, S; Marinucci, M Trabalza; Lupi, P; Conte, G; Mele, M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate milk fatty acid (FA) profile, animal performance, and rumen microbial population in response to diets containing soybean oil supplemented or not with chestnut and quebracho tannins in dairy ewes. Eighteen Comisana ewes at 122±6 d in milking were allotted into 3 experimental groups. Diets were characterized by chopped grass hay administered ad libitum and by 800 g/head and day of 3 experimental concentrates containing 84.5 g of soybean oil/kg of dry matter (DM) and 52.8 g/kg of DM of bentonite (control diet), chestnut tannin extract (CHT diet), or quebracho tannin extract (QUE diet). The trial lasted 4 wk. Milk yield was recorded daily, and milk composition and blood parameters were analyzed weekly. At the end of the experiment, samples of rumen fluid were collected to analyze pH, volatile fatty acid profile, and the relative proportions of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus in the rumen microbial population. Hepatic functionality, milk yield, and gross composition were not affected by tannin extracts, whereas milk FA composition was characterized by significant changes in the concentration of linoleic acid (CHT +2.77% and QUE +9.23%), vaccenic acid (CHT +7.07% and QUE +13.88%), rumenic acid (CHT -1.88% and QUE +24.24%), stearic acid (CHT + 8.71% and QUE -11.45%), and saturated fatty acids (CHT -0.47% and QUE -3.38%). These differences were probably due to the ability of condensed versus hydrolyzable tannins to interfere with rumen microbial metabolism, as indirectly confirmed by changes in the relative proportions of B. fibrisolvens and B. proteoclasticus populations and by changes in the molar proportions of volatile fatty acids. The effect of the CHT diet on the milk FA profile and microbial species considered in this trial was intermediate between that of QUE and the control diet, suggesting a differential effect of condensed and hydrolyzable tannins on rumen microbes. Compared with control animals

  2. Influence of cereal non-starch polysaccharides on ileo-caecal and rectal microbial populations in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgberg, Ann; Lindberg, Jan; Leser, Thomas;

    2004-01-01

    were collected from the ileum, via intestinal post valve T-caecum (PVTC) cannulas surgically inserted at the ileo-caecal ostium, and from the rectum. The total microbial flora of the ileal samples were analysed for by defining base pair length with terminal restriction fraction length polymorphism (T......-RFLP). The microbial diversity of the coliform flora of the ileal and rectal samples were defined by biochemical fingerprinting. It was observed that many terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) disappeared when new diets were introduced and that some characteristic TRFs were found in the high and low NSP diets......, respectively. Both the total gut microflora and the coliform flora were influenced by the dietary NSP content....

  3. Abundance, viability and diversity of the indigenous microbial populations at different depths of the NEEM Greenland ice core

    OpenAIRE

    Miteva, Vanya; Rinehold, Kaitlyn; Sowers, Todd; Sebastian, Aswathy; Brenchley, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The 2537-m-deep North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) core provided a first-time opportunity to perform extensive microbiological analyses on selected, recently drilled ice core samples representing different depths, ages, ice structures, deposition climates and ionic compositions. Here, we applied cultivation, small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene clone library construction and Illumina next-generation sequencing (NGS) targeting the V4–V5 region, to examine the microbial abundance, viability an...

  4. Impact of rhizobial populations and their host legumes on microbial activity in soils of arid regions in Tunisia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fterich, A.; Mahdhi, M.; Mars, M.

    2009-07-01

    Nitrogen fixing legumes and their microsymbionts are a fundamental contributor to soil fertility and prevent their degradation in arid and semi arid ecosystems. In Tunisia, few data are available on the contribution of these legumes in microbial activity in the arid soil. In this objective, a study was undertaken on five leguminous species from different arid regions to evaluate their ability to regenerate microbiological processes of the soil: Genista saharea, Genista microcephala, Acacia tortilis sspr raddiana, Retama raetam and Prosopis stephaniana. (Author)

  5. Dynamics of bacterial populations during bench-scale bioremediation of oily seawater and desert soil bioaugmented with coastal microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nidaa; Dashti, Narjes; Salamah, Samar; Sorkhoh, Naser; Al-Awadhi, Husain; Radwan, Samir

    2016-03-01

    This study describes a bench-scale attempt to bioremediate Kuwaiti, oily water and soil samples through bioaugmentation with coastal microbial mats rich in hydrocarbonoclastic bacterioflora. Seawater and desert soil samples were artificially polluted with 1% weathered oil, and bioaugmented with microbial mat suspensions. Oil removal and microbial community dynamics were monitored. In batch cultures, oil removal was more effective in soil than in seawater. Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria associated with mat samples colonized soil more readily than seawater. The predominant oil degrading bacterium in seawater batches was the autochthonous seawater species Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. The main oil degraders in the inoculated soil samples, on the other hand, were a mixture of the autochthonous mat and desert soil bacteria; Xanthobacter tagetidis, Pseudomonas geniculata, Olivibacter ginsengisoli and others. More bacterial diversity prevailed in seawater during continuous than batch bioremediation. Out of seven hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial species isolated from those cultures, only one, Mycobacterium chlorophenolicum, was of mat origin. This result too confirms that most of the autochthonous mat bacteria failed to colonize seawater. Also culture-independent analysis of seawater from continuous cultures revealed high-bacterial diversity. Many of the bacteria belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, and were hydrocarbonoclastic. Optimal biostimulation practices for continuous culture bioremediation of seawater via mat bioaugmentation were adding the highest possible oil concentration as one lot in the beginning of bioremediation, addition of vitamins, and slowing down the seawater flow rate.

  6. Responses in digestion, rumen fermentation and microbial populations to inhibition of methane formation by a halogenated methane analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumori, Makoto; Shinkai, Takumi; Takenaka, Akio; Enishi, Osamu; Higuchi, Koji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Nonaka, Itoko; Asanuma, Narito; Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2012-08-01

    The effects of the anti-methanogenic compound, bromochloromethane (BCM), on rumen microbial fermentation and ecology were examined in vivo. Japanese goats were fed a diet of 50 % Timothy grass and 50 % concentrate and then sequentially adapted to low, mid and high doses of BCM. The goats were placed into the respiration chambers for analysis of rumen microbial function and methane and H2 production. The levels of methane production were reduced by 5, 71 and 91 %, and H2 production was estimated at 545, 2941 and 3496 mmol/head per d, in response to low, mid and high doses of BCM, respectively, with no effect on maintenance feed intake and digestibility. Real-time PCR quantification of microbial groups showed a significant decrease relative to controls in abundance of methanogens and rumen fungi, whereas there were increases in Prevotella spp. and Fibrobacter succinogenes, a decrease in Ruminococcus albus and R. flavefaciens was unchanged. The numbers of protozoa were also unaffected. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative PCR analysis revealed that several Prevotella spp. were the bacteria that increased most in response to BCM treatment. It is concluded that the methane-inhibited rumen adapts to high hydrogen levels by shifting fermentation to propionate via Prevotella spp., but the majority of metabolic hydrogen is expelled as H2 gas.

  7. Effect of levels of urea and cassava chip on feed intake, rumen fermentation, blood metabolites and microbial populations in growing goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metha Wanapat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to assess effect of levels of urea and cassava chip (CC on feed intake, rumen ecology, blood metabolites and microbial populations. Four, Thai Native X Anglo Nubian crossbred growing male goats with an average liveweight 19.0+1 kg were randomly assigned according to a 4x4 Latin square design to receive one of four diets: T1=urea at 0 % (CC=30%, T2=urea at 1% (CC=40%, T3=urea at 2% (CC = 50% and T4=urea at 3%(CC=60%, of DM basis, respectively. Elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum was offered on an ad lib basis. The results revealed that total DM intake (%BW and g/kg W0.75 and BW change were similar among treatments (p>0.05. Likewise, rumen pH, BUN, blood glucose, PCV and microbial populations were similar among treatments (p>0.05, while NH3-N increased as the urea level increased and were found highest (p<0.05 in T4 at 12.8 mg/dL. Based on this experiment, it can be concluded that a higher level of urea (3% could be used with a high level of CC in concentrate and it was good approach in exploiting the use of local feed resources for goat production.

  8. The study on county accessibility in China:Characteristics and effects on population agglomeration%中国县域可达性研究——特征及其对人口分布的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王振波; 徐建刚; 方创琳; 徐璐; 祁毅

    2011-01-01

    This paper calculated spatial accessibility of all counties (city, urban district) inChina with cost weighted distance method. Region divisions of county accessibility wereconducted, and relation of traffic accessibility and population aggregation was discussed inthis paper. The results indicated that county accessibility in China had mainly Iow values anda distribution structure of circle layer and reverse-to-natural gradient. There was an obviouscorrelation between county accessibility and population density in China. With these analyses,inner mechanisms of population migration in different traffic conditions and region types wererevealed, and can provide useful proposals to regional planning, traffic planning and smartdistribution of people in China.

  9. Data Analysis Protocol for the Development and Evaluation of Population Pharmacokinetic Models for Incorporation Into the Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service - Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEneny-King, Alanna; Foster, Gary; Edginton, Andrea N

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency in a specific clotting factor. This results in spontaneous bleeding episodes and eventual arthropathy. The mainstay of hemophilia treatment is prophylactic replacement of the missing factor, but an optimal regimen remains to be determined. Rather, individualized prophylaxis has been suggested to improve both patient safety and resource utilization. However, uptake of this approach has been hampered by the demanding sampling schedules and complex calculations required to obtain individual estimates of pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters. The use of population pharmacokinetics (PopPK) can alleviate this burden by reducing the number of plasma samples required for accurate estimation, but few tools incorporating this approach are readily available to clinicians. Objective The Web-accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service - Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo) project aims to bridge this gap by providing a Web-accessible service for the reliable estimation of individual PK parameters from only a few patient samples. This service is predicated on the development of validated brand-specific PopPK models. Methods We describe the data analysis plan for the development and evaluation of each PopPK model to be incorporated into the WAPPS-Hemo platform. The data sources and structure of the dataset are discussed first, followed by the procedures for handling both data below limit of quantification (BLQ) and absence of such BLQ data. Next, we outline the strategies for building the appropriate structural and covariate models, including the possible need for a process algorithm when PK behavior varies between subjects or significant covariates are not provided. Prior to use in a prospective manner, the models will undergo extensive evaluation using a variety of techniques such as diagnostic plots, bootstrap analysis and cross-validation. Finally, we describe the incorporation of a validated PopPK model into the

  10. Neonatal microbial colonization in mice promotes prolonged dominance of CD11b+Gr-1+cells and accelerated establishment of the CD4+T cell population in the spleen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Matilde Bylov; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Bergström, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    To assess the microbial influence on postnatal hematopoiesis, we examined the role of early life microbial colonization on the composition of leukocyte subsets in the neonatal spleen. A high number of CD11b+Gr-1+ splenocytes present perinatally was sustained for a longer period in conventionally...... event, which we suggest impacts the subsequent development of the T cell population in the murine spleen....

  11. Socio economic position in TB prevalence and access to services: results from a population prevalence survey and a facility-based survey in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahed Hossain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Bangladesh DOTS has been provided free of charge since 1993, yet information on access to TB services by different population group is not well documented. The objective of this study was to assess and compare the socio economic position (SEP of actively detected cases from the community and the cases being routinely detected under National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTP in Bangladesh. METHODS AND FINDINGS: SEP was assessed by validated asset item for each of the 21,427 households included in the national tuberculosis prevalence survey 2007-2009. A principal component analysis generated household scores and categorized in quartiles. The distribution of 33 actively identified cases was compared with the 240 NTP cases over the identical SEP quartiles to evaluate access to TB services by different groups of the population. The population prevalence of tuberculosis was 5 times higher in the lowest quartiles of population (95.4, 95% CI: 48.0-189.7 to highest quartile population (19.5, 95% CI: 6.9-55.0. Among the 33 cases detected during survey, 25 (75.8% were from lower two quartiles, and the rest 8 (24.3% were from upper two quartiles. Among TB cases detected passively under NTP, more than half of them 137 (57.1% were from uppermost two quartiles, 98 (41% from the second quartile, and 5 (2% in the lowest quartile of the population. This distribution is not affected when adjusted for other factors or interactions among them. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that despite availability free of charge, DOTS is not equally accessed by the poorer sections of the population. However, these figures should be interpreted with caution since there is a need for additional studies that assess in-depth poverty indicators and its determinants in relation to access of the TB services provided in Bangladesh.

  12. Optimising locational access of deprived populations to farmers’ markets at a national scale: one route to improved fruit and vegetable consumption?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber L. Pearson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidence suggests that improved locational access to farmers’ markets increases fruit and vegetable (FV consumption, particularly for low-income groups. Therefore, we modelled potential alternative distributions of farmers’ markets in one country (New Zealand to explore the potential impact for deprived populations and an indigenous population (Māori. Methods. Data were collected on current farmers’ markets (n = 48, population distributions, area deprivation, and roads. Geographic analyses were performed to optimize market locations for the most deprived populations. Results. We found that, currently, farmers’ markets provided fairly poor access for the total population: 7% within 12.5 km (15 min driving time; 5% within 5 km; and 3% within 2 km. Modelling the optimal distribution of the 48 markets substantially improved access for the most deprived groups: 9% (vs 2% currently within 12.5 km; 5% (vs 1% within 5 km; and 3% (vs 1% within 2 km. Access for Māori also improved: 22% (vs 7% within 12.5 km; 12% (vs 4% within 5 km; and 6% (vs 2% within 2 km. Smaller pro-equity results arose from optimising the locations of the 18 least pro-equity markets or adding 10 new markets. Conclusion. These results highlight the potential for improving farmers’ market locations to increase accessibility for groups with low FV consumption. Given that such markets are easily established and relocated, local governments could consider these results to inform decisions, including subsidies for using government land and facilities. Such results can also inform central governments planning around voucher schemes for such markets and exempting them from taxes (e.g., VAT/GST.

  13. Community Characterization of Microbial Populations Found at a Cold Water Sulfidic Spring in the Canadian High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, C.; Lau, G. E.; Templeton, A. S.; Grasby, S. E.; Spear, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The unique environment on Europa makes it an ideal target for astrobiological investigation. One such earth-based analogue to aid in this investigation is the sulfur-dominated glacial spring system found at Borup Fiord Pass (BFP), Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada. In this system, subsurface microbial sulfate reduction produces hydrogen sulfide, which is transported through the glacier along spring channels [1]. As the surface oxidation of H2S occurs, resultant deposition of elemental sulfur (S0) and other minerals becomes visible (attached image). The energy released from these reactions can support potential microbial metabolisms and may be a valuable representation of microbial processes occurring on Europa. The resulting sulfur minerals provide sensitive records of dynamic atmospheric, geological, hydrological, chemical, and biological processes on planetary surfaces. Moreover, we expect that the S0-rich deposits of this glacial spring system will serve as a mineralogical record for biological activity and will provide a valuable tool for recognizing potential sulfur-based life on Europa. During a recent collaborative expedition (2014) to BFP, samples were taken from the toe of the glacier in an area called the 'Blister Crust' (attached image). At this location, glacial channels reach the surface, representing an active interface between subsurface and surface processes. Initial geochemical characterization at the site revealed high amounts of aqueous sulfide (1.8 mM) and hydrogen (29 nM), which likely serve as the electron donation potential in the system. Furthermore, preliminary 16S rRNA gene sequencing has shown a high abundance of the genus Sulfurimonas, which is a known sulfur metabolizer. Our research seeks to further characterize microbial communities found at this interface in order to elucidate information regarding in situ sulfur cycling and the potential to tie this into subsurface/surface processes on Europa. Continued work will provide guidance

  14. Planetary resources and astroecology. Planetary microcosm models of asteroid and meteorite interiors: electrolyte solutions and microbial growth--implications for space populations and panspermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mautner, Michael N

    2002-01-01

    Planetary microcosms were constructed using extracts from meteorites that simulate solutions in the pores of carbonaceous chondrites. The microcosms were found to support the growth of complex algal and microbial populations. Such astroecology experiments demonstrate how a diverse ecosystem could exist in fluids within asteroids, and in meteorites that land on aqueous planets. The microcosm solutions were obtained by extracting nutrient electrolytes under natural conditions from powders of the Allende (CV3) and Murchison (CM2) meteorites at low (0.02 g/ml) and high (10.0 g/ml) solid/solution ratios. The latter solutions contain > 3 mol/L electrolytes and about 10 g/L organics, that simulate natural fluids in asteroids during aqueous alteration and in the pores of meteorites, which can help prebiotic synthesis and the survival of early microorganisms. These solutions and wet solids were in fact found to support complex self-sustaining microbial communities with populations of 4 x 10(5) algae and 6 x 10(6) bacteria and fungi for long periods (> 8 months). The results show that planetary microcosms based on meteorites can: assay the fertilities of planetary materials; identify space bioresources; target astrobiology exploration; and model past and future space-based ecosystems. The results show that bioresources in the carbonaceous asteroids can sustain a biomass of 10(18) kg, comprising 10(32) microorganisms and a human population of 10(14). The results also suggest that protoplanetary nebulae can support and disperse microorganisms and can be therefore effective environments for natural and directed panspermia.

  15. Temperature and solids retention time control microbial population dynamics and volatile fatty acid production in replicated anaerobic digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanwonterghem, Inka; Jensen, Paul D.; Rabaey, Korneel; Tyson, Gene W.

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a widely used technology for waste stabilization and generation of biogas, and has recently emerged as a potentially important process for the production of high value volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and alcohols. Here, three reactors were seeded with inoculum from a stably performing methanogenic digester, and selective operating conditions (37°C and 55°C 12 day and 4 day solids retention time) were applied to restrict methanogenesis while maintaining hydrolysis and fermentation. Replicated experiments performed at each set of operating conditions led to reproducible VFA production profiles which could be correlated with specific changes in microbial community composition. The mesophilic reactor at short solids retention time showed accumulation of propionate and acetate (42 +/- 2% and 15 +/- 6% of CODhydrolyzed, respectively), and dominance of Fibrobacter and Bacteroidales. Acetate accumulation (>50% of CODhydrolyzed) was also observed in the thermophilic reactors, which were dominated by Clostridium. Under all tested conditions, there was a shift from acetoclastic to hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, and a reduction in methane production by >50% of CODhydrolyzed. Our results demonstrate that shortening the SRT and increasing the temperature are effective strategies for driving microbial communities towards controlled production of high levels of specific volatile fatty acids.

  16. Dynamics and persistence of Dead Sea microbial populations as shown by high-throughput sequencing of rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Matthew E; Oren, Aharon; House, Christopher H

    2012-04-01

    16S rRNA amplicon libraries from a haloarchaeal bloom in the hypersaline Dead Sea in 1992 were analyzed together with the 2007 residual population and simulated blooms in experimental mesocosms. Significant population shifts were observed during the bloom, and surprisingly a signature from the bloom was retained 15 years later.

  17. Difficulties in accessing and availing of public health care systems among rural population in Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Lakshmi Sreerama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Despite policies to make health care accessible to all, it is not universally accessible. Frequent evaluation of barriers to accessibility of health care services paves path for improvement. Hence, present study is undertaken to evaluate the factors and public health policies influencing health care access to rural people in Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh, which can be interpolated for other regions. Aims: To assess knowledge, perceptions, availing of public health care services, barriers to health care access in Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional, hospital-based survey in the Government Maternity Hospital (GMH, Tirupati, a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Fifty women delivered normally in GMH through convenient sampling technique. Data collected on standardized pro forma as per IMS Institute of Healthcare Informatics. Statistical Analysis Used: Is done through MS Excel 2007, Epi Info 7 (of Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA and frequencies were described. Results: Distance, waiting hours, societal responsibility, nature of the illness, presumed commercialization of Medicare system, attitudes of health care providers, and loss of wages were not barriers for accessing health care. Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA and availability of ambulance services made great improvements in health care accessibility. Absenteeism of health care providers is a problem. Conclusions: Expanding the ambulance services and ASHA network will be an effective measure for further accessibility to health care. Absenteeism of health care providers needs correction.

  18. Effects of diets containing different concentrations of mannanoligosaccharide or antibiotics on growth performance, intestinal development, cecal and litter microbial populations, and carcass parameters of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurhoo, B; Ferket, P R; Zhao, X

    2009-11-01

    The effects of 2 levels of mannanoligosaccharide (MOS) in feed were compared with antibiotic growth promoters on growth performance, intestinal morphology, cecal and litter microbial populations, and carcass parameters in broilers raised in a sanitary environment. Dietary treatments included: 1) antibiotic growth promoter-free diet (control), 2) VIRG (diet 1 + 16.5 mg/kg of virginiamycin), 3) BACT (diet 1 + 55 mg/kg of bacitracin), 4) LMOS (diet 1 + 0.2% MOS), and 5) HMOS (diet 1 + 0.5% MOS). Birds were randomly assigned to 3 replicate pens/treatment (n = 55/pen). Body weight and feed intake were recorded weekly throughout 38 d. At d 14, 24, and 34, a 1-cm segment of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum was used in morphological analysis (n = 9 birds/d per treatment). At the same bird ages, cecal contents were assayed for lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Escherichia coli, whereas litter was analyzed for Salmonella, Campylobacter, and E. coli. Carcass yields (breast fillet and tenders, thigh, drumstick, and wing) were determined at d 38. Body weight, feed conversion, and carcass yields did not differ among treatments. In contrast to birds fed VIRG or BACT, LMOS and HMOS consistently increased (P microbial ecology. But, there were no additional benefits of the higher MOS dosage.

  19. Ocean microbial metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhof, Lee J.; Goodman, Robert M.

    2009-09-01

    Technology for accessing the genomic DNA of microorganisms, directly from environmental samples without prior cultivation, has opened new vistas to understanding microbial diversity and functions. Especially as applied to soils and the oceans, environments on Earth where microbial diversity is vast, metagenomics and its emergent approaches have the power to transform rapidly our understanding of environmental microbiology. Here we explore select recent applications of the metagenomic suite to ocean microbiology.

  20. Changes of the microbial population structure in an overloaded fed-batch biogas reactor digesting maize silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampmann, Kristina; Ratering, Stefan; Geißler-Plaum, Rita; Schmidt, Michael; Zerr, Walter; Schnell, Sylvia

    2014-12-01

    Two parallel, stable operating biogas reactors were fed with increasing amounts of maize silage to monitor microbial community changes caused by overloading. Changes of microorganisms diversity revealed by SSCP (single strand conformation polymorphism) indicating an acidification before and during the pH-value decrease. The earliest indicator was the appearance of a Methanosarcina thermophila-related species. Diversity of dominant fermenting bacteria within Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and other Bacteria decreased upon overloading. Some species became dominant directly before and during acidification and thus could be suitable as possible indicator organisms for detection of futurity acidification. Those bacteria were related to Prolixibacter bellariivorans and Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius. An early detection of community shifts will allow better feeding management for optimal biogas production.

  1. Population dynamics of transgenic strain Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7 in freshwater and saline lake water microcosms with differing microbial community structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, L. Yu.; Kargatova, T. V.; Ganusova, E. E.; Lobova, T. I.; Boyandin, A. N.; Mogilnaya, O. A.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    Populations of Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7, a transgenic microorganism, were heterogenic in the expression of plasmid genes when adapting to the conditions of water microcosms of various mineralization levels and structure of microbial community. This TM has formed two subpopulations (ampicillin-resistant and ampicillin-sensitive) in every microcosm. Irrespective of mineralization level of a microcosm, when E. coli Z905/pPHL7 alone was introduced, the ampicillin-resistant subpopulation prevailed, while introduction of the TM together with indigenous bacteria led to the dominance of the ampicillin-sensitive subpopulation. A high level of lux gene expression maintained longer in the freshwater microcosms than in sterile saline lake water microcosms. A horizontal gene transfer has been revealed between the jointly introduced TM and Micrococcus sp. 9/pSH1 in microcosms with the Lake Shira sterile water.

  2. Effect of Scrophularia striata and Ferulago angulata, as alternatives to virginiamycin, on growth performance, intestinal microbial population, immune response, and blood constituents of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Farhad; Ghasemi, Hossein A; Taherpour, Kamran

    2015-09-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the comparative effect of Scrophularia striata, Ferulago angulata, and virginiamycin (VM) on performance, intestinal microbial population, immune response, and blood constituents of broilers. A total of 300 Ross 308 male broiler chickens were randomly assigned to 5 treatments, with 5 replicates/treatment (10 chickens/pen). Birds were fed either a corn-soybean meal basal diet (control) or the basal diet supplemented with 200 mg/kg VM; 4 g/kg S. striata (SS1); 8 g/kg S. striata (SS2); 4 g/kg F. angulata (FA1); or 8 g/kg F. angulata (FA2). After 6 wk, the BW, ADG, and feed-to-gain ratio (F:G) of the VM, SS1, and FA1 groups were better (Pantibiotic growth promoter. Furthermore, a high dose of both herbs (8 g/kg diet) could beneficially affect the intestinal health and immune status of broilers.

  3. Effect of Dietary Supplementation of Red Ginseng By-product on Laying Performance, Blood Biochemistry, Serum Immunoglobulin and Microbial Population in Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H K; Park, S-B; Kim, C H

    2016-10-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation of red ginseng by-product (RGB) on the laying performance, blood biochemistry, and microbial population in laying hens. A total of 120 Hy-Line Brown laying hens (75 weeks old) were randomly allotted to 1 of 3 dietary treatments with 4 replicates per treatment. A commercial-type basal diet was prepared, and 2 additional diets were prepared by supplementing 5.0 or 10.0 g/kg of RGB to the basal diet at the expense of corn. The diets were fed to hens on an ad libitum basis for 4 weeks. There were no differences in feed intake, egg weight, and feed conversion ratio during 4 weeks of the feeding trial. However, hen-day egg production was significantly greater (phen-day production, there were positive effects of dietary RGB supplementation on serum immunoglobulin and cholesterol levels in laying hens.

  4. Population dynamics of transgenic strain Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7 in freshwater and saline lake water microcosms with differing microbial community structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, L. Yu; Kargatova, T. V.; Ganusova, E. E.; Lobova, T. I.; Boyandin, A. N.; Mogilnaya, O. A.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    2005-01-01

    Populations of Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7, a transgenic microorganism, were heterogenic in the expression of plasmid genes when adapting to the conditions of water microcosms of various mineralization levels and structure of microbial community. This TM has formed two subpopulations (ampicillin-resistant and ampicillin-sensitive) in every microcosm. Irrespective of mineralization level of a microcosm, when E. coli Z905/pPHL7 alone was introduced, the ampicillin-resistant subpopulation prevailed, while introduction of the TM together with indigenous bacteria led to the dominance of the ampicillin-sensitive subpopulation. A high level of lux gene expression maintained longer in the freshwater microcosms than in sterile saline lake water microcosms. A horizontal gene transfer has been revealed between the jointly introduced TM and Micrococcus sp. 9/pSH1 in microcosms with the Lake Shira sterile water. c2005 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Populations of selected microbial and fungal species growing on the surface of rape seeds following treatment with desiccants or plant growth regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frac, Magdalena; Jezierska-Tys, Stefania; Tys, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of desiccants and plant growth regulators on selected microbial species affecting rape seeds, with special emphasis on the growth of fungi and identification of the genus and species composition. The experimental material in the study was seeds of winter rape cv. Californium that were collected from the field during combine harvest. The chemical agents applied, both desiccants and growth regulators, generally decreased the populations of bacteria occurring on the surface of rape seeds. The responses of fungi depended upon the type of agent applied and were manifested as either stimulation or inhibition of the growth of the fungal species. The fungi isolated from the surface of rape seeds were characteristic of those found in the field environment (Cladosporium and Penicillium) and typical for those present on the surface of rape seeds (Alternaria).

  6. Microbial Populations in Naked Neck Chicken Ceca Raised on Pasture Flock Fed with Commercial Yeast Cell Wall Prebiotics via an Illumina MiSeq Platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Hong Park

    Full Text Available Prebiotics are non-digestible carbohydrate dietary supplements that selectively stimulate the growth of one or more beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract of the host. These bacteria can inhibit colonization of pathogenic bacteria by producing antimicrobial substances such as short chain fatty acids (SCFAs and competing for niches with pathogens within the gut. Pasture flock chickens are generally raised outdoors with fresh grass, sunlight and air, which represents different environmental growth conditions compared to conventionally raised chickens. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference in microbial populations from naked neck chicken ceca fed with commercial prebiotics derived from brewer's yeast cell wall via an Illumina MiSeq platform. A total of 147 day-of-hatch naked neck chickens were distributed into 3 groups consisted of 1 C: control (no prebiotic, 2 T1: Biolex® MB40 with 0.2%, and 3 T2: Leiber® ExCel with 0.2%, consistently supplemented prebiotics during the experimental period. At 8 weeks, a total of 15 birds from each group were randomly selected and ceca removed for DNA extraction. The Illumina Miseq platform based on V4 region of 16S rRNA gene was applied for microbiome analysis. Both treatments exhibited limited impact on the microbial populations at the phylum level, with no significant differences in the OTU number of Bacteroidetes among groups and an increase of Proteobacteria OTUs for the T1 (Biolex® MB40 group. In addition there was a significant increase of genus Faecalibacterium OTU, phylum Firmicutes. According to the development of next generation sequencing (NGS, microbiome analysis based on 16S rRNA gene proved to be informative on the prebiotic impact on poultry gut microbiota in pasture-raised naked neck birds.

  7. The influence of mineral fertilizer combined with a nitrification inhibitor on microbial populations and activities in calcareous Uzbekistanian soil under cotton cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egamberdiyeva, D; Mamiev, M; Poberejskaya, S K

    2001-10-30

    Application of fertilizers combined with nitrification inhibitors affects soil microbial biomass and activity. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of fertilizer application combined with the nitrification inhibitor potassium oxalate (PO) on soil microbial population and activities in nitrogen-poor soil under cotton cultivation in Uzbekistan. Fertilizer treatments were N as urea, P as ammophos, and K as potassium chloride. The nitrification inhibitor PO was added to urea and ammophos at the rate of 2%. Three treatments--N200 P140 K60 (T1), N200 PO P140 K60 (T2), and N200 P140 PO K60 (T3) mg kg(-1) soil--were applied for this study. The control (C) was without fertilizer and PO. The populations of oligotrophic bacteria, ammonifying bacteria, nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, mineral assimilating bacteria, oligonitrophilic bacteria, and bacteria group Azotobacter were determined by the most probable number method. The treatments T2 and T3 increased the number of oligonitrophilic bacteria and utilization mineral forms of nitrogen on the background of reducing number of ammonifying bacteria. T2 and T3 also decreased the number of nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, and net nitrification. In conclusion, our experiments showed that PO combined with mineral fertilizer is one of the most promising compounds for inhibiting nitrification rate, which was reflected in the increased availability and efficiency of fertilizer nitrogen to the cotton plants. PO combined with mineral fertilizer has no negative effects on nitrogen-fixing bacteria Azotobacter and oligo-nitrophilic bacteria.

  8. The Influence of Mineral Fertilizer Combined With a Nitrification Inhibitor on Microbial Populations and Activities in Calcareous Uzbekistanian Soil Under Cotton Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilfuza Egamberdiyeva

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of fertilizers combined with nitrification inhibitors affects soil microbial biomass and activity. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of fertilizer application combined with the nitrification inhibitor potassium oxalate (PO on soil microbial population and activities in nitrogen-poor soil under cotton cultivation in Uzbekistan. Fertilizer treatments were N as urea, P as ammophos, and K as potassium chloride. The nitrification inhibitor PO was added to urea and ammophos at the rate of 2%. Three treatments—N200P140K60 (T1, N200 P140 POK60 (T2, and N200 P140 POK60 (T3 mg kg-1 soil—were applied for this study. The control (C was without fertilizer and PO. The populations of oligotrophic bacteria, ammonifying bacteria, nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, mineral assimilating bacteria, oligonitrophilic bacteria, and bacteria group Azotobacter were determined by the most probable number method. The treatments T2 and T3 increased the number of oligonitrophilic bacteria and utilization mineral forms of nitrogen on the background of reducing number of ammonifying bacteria. T2 and T3 also decreased the number of nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, and net nitrification. In conclusion, our experiments showed that PO combined with mineral fertilizer is one of the most promising compounds for inhibiting nitrification rate, which was reflected in the increased availability and efficiency of fertilizer nitrogen to the cotton plants. PO combined with mineral fertilizer has no negative effects on nitrogen-fixing bacteria Azotobacter and oligo-nitrophilic bacteria.

  9. Effects of various plant protein sources in high-quality feed block on feed intake, rumen fermentation, and microbial population in swamp buffalo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foiklang, Suban; Wanapat, Metha; Toburan, Wetchasit

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to determine effect of various plant protein sources in high-quality feed block (HQFB) on feed intake, rumen fermentation, and microbial population in swamp buffalo. Four rumen-fistulated swamp buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) were randomly assigned according to a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Four kinds of plant protein sources (coarse rice bran (CRB), cassava hay (CH), Phaseolus calcaratus hay, and mulberry hay (MH)) were mixed in the HQFB. HQFBs were allowed to be licked at free choice, and urea-lime-treated rice straw (ULRS) were fed ad libitum. It was found that bacterial population and fungal zoospores in CH-fed group tended to be higher than those in other groups. Moreover, protozoal population in CH, P. calcaratus hay, and MH were lower than those in CRB supplemented group (P < 0.05). Cellulolytic bacterial population was highest in CH-fed group while proteolytic bacteria population was highest in P. calcaratus hay-fed group (P < 0.05). CH-fed group had higher ULRS intake than those in other groups (P < 0.05). Nutrient digestibility of CP, NDF, and ADF in CH-fed group was significantly higher than those in other groups (P < 0.05). Total VFA was highest in CH-fed group (P < 0.05). N absorption was highest in CH-fed group (P < 0.05). Based on this study, it could be concluded that cassava hay, P. calcaratus hay, and mulberry hay are potential to be used as protein sources in the HQFBs especially cassava hay.

  10. Direct and indirect effects of temperature on the population dynamics and ecosystem functioning of aquatic microbial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Oliver S; Petchey, Owen L; Humphries, Stuart

    2010-11-01

    1. While much is known about the direct effect that temperature can have on aquatic communities, less is known about its indirect effect via the temperature dependence of viscosity and temperature-dependent trophic interactions. 2. We manipulated the temperature (5-20 °C) and the viscosity (equivalent to 5-20 °C) of water in laboratory-based bacteria-protist communities. Communities contained food chains with one, two or three trophic levels. Responses measured were population dynamics (consumer carrying capacity and growth rate, average species population density, and the coefficient of variation of population density through time) and ecosystem function (decomposition). 3. Temperature, viscosity and food chain length produced significant responses in population dynamics. Temperature-dependent viscosity had a significant effect on the carrying capacity and growth rates of consumers, as well as the average density of the top predator. Overall, indirect effects of temperature via changes in viscosity were subtle in comparison to the indirect effect of temperature via trophic interactions. 4. Our results highlight the importance of direct and indirect effects of temperature, mediated through trophic interactions and physical changes in the environment, both for population dynamics and ecosystem processes. Future mechanistic modelling of effects of environmental change on species will benefit from distinguishing the different mechanisms of the overall effect of temperature.

  11. Quantitative comparisons of select cultured and uncultured microbial populations in the rumen of cattle fed different diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Minseok

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number and diversity of uncultured ruminal bacterial and archaeal species revealed by 16S rRNA gene (rrs sequences greatly exceeds that of cultured bacteria and archaea. However, the significance of uncultured microbes remains undetermined. The objective of this study was to assess the numeric importance of select uncultured bacteria and cultured bacteria and the impact of diets and microenvironments within cow rumen in a comparative manner. Results Liquid and adherent fractions were obtained from the rumen of Jersey cattle fed hay alone and Holstein cattle fed hay plus grain. The populations of cultured and uncultured bacteria present in each fraction were quantified using specific real-time PCR assays. The population of total bacteria was similar between fractions or diets, while total archaea was numerically higher in the hay-fed Jersey cattle than in the hay-grain-fed Holstein cattle. The population of the genus Prevotella was about one log smaller than that of total bacteria. The populations of Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, the genus Butyrivibrio, and R. albus was at least one log smaller than that of genus Prevotella. Four of the six uncultured bacteria quantified were as abundant as F. succinogenes, R. flavefaciens and the genus Butyrivibrio. In addition, the populations of several uncultured bacteria were significantly higher in the adherent fractions than in the liquid fractions. These uncultured bacteria may be associated with fiber degradation. Conclusions Some uncultured bacteria are as abundant as those of major cultured bacteria in the rumen. Uncultured bacteria may have important contribution to ruminal fermentation. Population dynamic studies of uncultured bacteria in a comparative manner can help reveal their ecological features and importance to rumen functions.

  12. Comparison of indigenous and exogenous microbial populations during slurry phase biodegradation of long-term hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburto-Medina, Arturo; Adetutu, Eric M; Aleer, Sam; Weber, John; Patil, Sayali S; Sheppard, Petra J; Ball, Andrew S; Juhasz, Albert L

    2012-11-01

    In this study, a number of slurry-phase strategies were trialled over a 42 day period in order to determine the efficacy of bioremediation for long-term hydrocarbon-contaminated soil (145 g kg(-1) C(10)-C(40)). The addition of activated sludge and nutrients to slurries (bioaugmentation) resulted in enhanced hydrocarbon removal (51.6 ± 8.5 %) compared to treatments receiving only nutrients (enhanced natural attenuation [ENA]; 41.3 ± 6.4 %) or no amendments (natural attenuation; no significant hydrocarbon removal, P hydrocarbons in ENA slurries. Microbial diversity in slurries was monitored using DGGE with dominant bands excised and sequenced for identification. Applying the different bioremediation strategies resulted in the formation of four distinct community clusters associated with the activated sludge (inoculum), bioaugmentation strategy at day 0, bioaugmentation strategy at weeks 2-6 and slurries with autoclaved sludge and nutrient additions (bioaugmentation negative control). While hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria genera (e.g. Aquabacterium and Haliscomenobacter) were associated with the hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, bioaugmentation of soil slurries with activated sludge resulted in the introduction of bacteria associated with hydrocarbon degradation (Burkholderiales order and Klebsiella genera) which presumably contributed to the enhanced efficacy for this slurry strategy.

  13. Effect of conventional chemical treatment on the microbial population in a biofouling layer of reverse osmosis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereschenko, L A; Prummel, H; Euverink, G J W; Stams, A J M; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2011-01-01

    The impact of conventional chemical treatment on initiation and spatiotemporal development of biofilms on reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was investigated in situ using flow cells placed in parallel with the RO system of a full-scale water treatment plant. The flow cells got the same feed (extensively pre-treated fresh surface water) and operational conditions (temperature, pressure and membrane flux) as the full-scale installation. With regular intervals both the full-scale RO membrane modules and the flow cells were cleaned using conventional chemical treatment. For comparison some flow cells were not cleaned. Sampling was done at different time periods of flow cell operation (i.e., 1, 5, 10 and 17 days and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months). The combination of molecular (FISH, DGGE, clone libraries and sequencing) and microscopic (field emission scanning electron, epifluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy) techniques made it possible to thoroughly analyze the abundance, composition and 3D architecture of the emerged microbial layers. The results suggest that chemical treatment facilitates initiation and subsequent maturation of biofilm structures on the RO membrane and feed-side spacer surfaces. Biofouling control might be possible only if the cleaning procedures are adapted to effectively remove the (dead) biomass from the RO modules after chemical treatment.

  14. Effects of Secondary Plant Metabolites on Microbial Populations: Changes in Community Structure and Metabolic Activity in Contaminated Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Polivkova, Marketa; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Secondary plant metabolites (SPMEs) play an important role in plant survival in the environment and serve to establish ecological relationships between plants and other organisms. Communication between plants and microorganisms via SPMEs contained in root exudates or derived from litter decomposition is an example of this phenomenon. In this review, the general aspects of rhizodeposition together with the significance of terpenes and phenolic compounds are discussed in detail. We focus specifically on the effect of SPMEs on microbial community structure and metabolic activity in environments contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Furthermore, a section is devoted to a complex effect of plants and/or their metabolites contained in litter on bioremediation of contaminated sites. New insights are introduced from a study evaluating the effects of SPMEs derived during decomposition of grapefruit peel, lemon peel, and pears on bacterial communities and their ability to degrade PCBs in a long-term contaminated soil. The presented review supports the “secondary compound hypothesis” and demonstrates the potential of SPMEs for increasing the effectiveness of bioremediation processes. PMID:27483244

  15. Predominant Acidilobus-like populations from geothermal environments in yellowstone national park exhibit similar metabolic potential in different hypoxic microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Z J; Rusch, D B; Tringe, S G; Bailey, C; Jennings, R M; Inskeep, W P

    2014-01-01

    High-temperature (>70°C) ecosystems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an unparalleled opportunity to study chemotrophic archaea and their role in microbial community structure and function under highly constrained geochemical conditions. Acidilobus spp. (order Desulfurococcales) comprise one of the dominant phylotypes in hypoxic geothermal sulfur sediment and Fe(III)-oxide environments along with members of the Thermoproteales and Sulfolobales. Consequently, the primary goals of the current study were to analyze and compare replicate de novo sequence assemblies of Acidilobus-like populations from four different mildly acidic (pH 3.3 to 6.1) high-temperature (72°C to 82°C) environments and to identify metabolic pathways and/or protein-encoding genes that provide a detailed foundation of the potential functional role of these populations in situ. De novo assemblies of the highly similar Acidilobus-like populations (>99% 16S rRNA gene identity) represent near-complete consensus genomes based on an inventory of single-copy genes, deduced metabolic potential, and assembly statistics generated across sites. Functional analysis of coding sequences and confirmation of gene transcription by Acidilobus-like populations provide evidence that they are primarily chemoorganoheterotrophs, generating acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) via the degradation of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins, and auxotrophic with respect to several external vitamins, cofactors, and metabolites. No obvious pathways or protein-encoding genes responsible for the dissimilatory reduction of sulfur were identified. The presence of a formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) and other protein-encoding genes involved in mixed-acid fermentation supports the hypothesis that Acidilobus spp. function as degraders of complex organic constituents in high-temperature, mildly acidic, hypoxic geothermal systems.

  16. 污水处理活性污泥微生物群落多样性研究%Microbial Population Diversity of Activated Sludge for Wastewater Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金浩; 李柏林; 欧杰; 陈兰明

    2012-01-01

    为研究污水处理活性污泥微生物多样性,提取了活性污泥宏基因组DNA,并采用细菌通用引物27F和1492R扩增了上海污泥厂活性污泥细菌16S rDNA片段,构建了细菌16S rDNA克隆文库,并对该文库中的微生物群落进行了分析.共获得200条高质量序列并建立系统发育树,结果显示活性污泥主要的细菌类群为变形菌门(Proteobacteria)(91.9%)、厚壁菌门(Firmicures)(4.6%)、拟杆菌门(Bacteroidetes)(2%)、绿弯菌门(Chloroflexi)(0.5%)、硝化螺菌门(Nitrospirae)(1%).其中,明显的优势菌群为Alcaligenes feacalis(55%)、Pseudomonas aeruginosa(12.8%)和Stenotrophomonas(12.8%),优势菌的产酶能力在活性污泥中显示生态修复功能菌的作用.%In order to study the microbial diversity of activated sludge (AS) for wastewater treatment, the macro-ge-nomic DNA of the AS was extracted from a wastewater factory in Shanghai. The 16S rDNA of the AS bacteria was amplified using bacteria general primers 27F and 1492R to construct the bacterial 16S rDNA clone library, and analyzed the microbial population of the library. All together 200 bands of high quality sequences were obtained and established a phylogenetic tree. The results showed that the main bacterial population of the AS was the phyla of Proteobacteria (91.9% ) , Firmicutes (4.6% ) , Bacteroidetes (2% ) , Chloroflexi (0.5% ) , Nitrospirae (1% ). Among them Al-caligenes feacalis (55% ) , Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( 12. 8% ) , and Stenolrophomonas ( 12. 8% ) were noticeably dominant bacterial population, enzyme production capacity of the dominant bacteria showed the ecological restoration function in the AS.

  17. Evaluation of microbial population and functional genes during the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated soil as an effective monitoring approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Aiyoub; Aydin, Sevcan; Ince, Bahar; Ince, Orhan

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the abundance and diversity of soil n-alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacterial communities. It also investigated the quantity of the functional genes, the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the identified bacterial communities and the effect that such HGT can have on biostimulation process. Illumina sequencing was used to detect the microbial diversity of petroleum-polluted soil prior to the biostimulation process, and quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine changes in the bacterial community and functional genes (alkB, phnAc and nah) expressions throughout the biostimulation of petroleum-contaminated soil. The illumine results revealed that γ-proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, and δ-proteobacteria were the most dominant bacterial phyla in the contaminated site, and that most of the strains were Gram-negative. The results of the gene expression results revealed that gram-negative bacteria and alkB are critical to successful bioremediation. Failure to maintain the stability of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and functional gene will reduce the extend to which alkanes and PAHs are degraded. According to the results of the study, the application of a C:N:P ratio of was 100:15:1 in the biodegradation experiment resulted in the highest rate at which petroleum hydrocarbons were biodegraded. The diversity of pollutant-degrading bacteria and the effective transfer of degrading genes among resident microorganisms are essential factors for the successful biostimulation of petroleum hydrocarbons. As such, screening these factors throughout the biostimulation process represents an effective monitoring approach by which the success of the biostimulation can be assessed.

  18. [Effects of returning straw to soil and different tillage methods on paddy field soil fertility and microbial population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wan-Jun; Liu, Dai-Yin; Wu, Jin-Xiu; Wu, Ju-Xian; De, Chen-Chun; Yang, Wen-Yu

    2009-04-01

    A field experiment was conducted on a paddy field to study the effects of returning straw to soil and different tillage methods (no-tillage + returning straw, no-tillage, tillage + returning straw, and tillage) on the fertility level and microbial quantities of different soil layers. The results showed that in upper soil layer, the organic matter content in treatment 'no-tillage + returning straw' was 5.33, 2.79, and 5.37 g x kg(-1) higher than that in treatments 'no-tillage', 'tillage + returning straw', and 'tillage', respectively, and the contents of total and available N, P and K in treatment 'no-tillage + returning straw' were also the highest, followed by in treatments 'no-tillage' and 'tillage + returning straw', and in treatment 'tillage'. In deeper soil layer, all the fertility indices were higher in treatment 'tillage + returning straw'. Treatments of 'returning straw to soil' had the highest quantities of soil microbes. The quantities of bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes in upper soil layer were the highest in treatment 'no-tillage + returning straw', and thus, the cellulose decomposition intensity in this treatment at maturity period was 26.44%, 79.01%, and 98. 15% higher than that in treatments 'tillage + returning straw', 'no-tillage', and 'tillage', respectively. In deeper soil layer, the quantities of bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes were the highest in treatment 'tillage + returning straw'. Treatment 'no-tillage + returning straw' had the features of high fertility and abundant microbes in surface soil layer. The quantities of soil bacteria and actinomycetes and the decomposition intensity of soil cellulose were significantly positively correlated with soil fertility level.

  19. Lack of correlation between Legionella colonization and microbial population quantification using heterotrophic plate count and adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Scott; Baron, Julianne L; Wagener, Marilyn M; Vidic, Radisav D; Stout, Janet E

    2015-07-01

    This investigation compared biological quantification of potable and non-potable (cooling) water samples using pour plate heterotrophic plate count (HPC) methods and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration measurement using bioluminescence. The relationship between these measurements and the presence of Legionella spp. was also examined. HPC for potable and non-potable water were cultured on R2A and PCA, respectively. Results indicated a strong correlation between HPC and ATP measurements in potable water (R = 0.90, p ATP and HPC were much weaker but statistically significant (make-up water: R = 0.37, p = 0.005; cooling tower 1: R = 0.52, p ATP. However, ATP measurements showed higher microbial concentrations than HPC measurements. Following chlorination of the cooling towers, ATP measurements indicated very low bacterial concentrations (1000 CFU/mL) which consisted primarily of non-tuberculous mycobacteria. HPC concentrations have been suggested to be predictive of Legionella presence, although this has not been proven. Our evaluation showed that HPC or ATP demonstrated a fair predictive capacity for Legionella positivity in potable water (HPC: receiver operating characteristic (ROC) = 0.70; ATP: ROC = 0.78; p = 0.003). However, HPC or ATP correctly classified sites as positive only 64 and 62% of the time, respectively. No correlation between HPC or ATP and Legionella colonization in non-potable water samples was found (HPC: ROC = 0.28; ATP: ROC = 0.44; p = 0.193).

  20. Faecal microbiota of forage-fed horses in New Zealand and the population dynamics of microbial communities following dietary change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlette A Fernandes

    Full Text Available The effects of abrupt dietary transition on the faecal microbiota of forage-fed horses over a 3-week period were investigated. Yearling Thoroughbred fillies reared as a cohort were exclusively fed on either an ensiled conserved forage-grain diet ("Group A"; n = 6 or pasture ("Group B"; n = 6 for three weeks prior to the study. After the Day 0 faecal samples were collected, horses of Group A were abruptly transitioned to pasture. Both groups continued to graze similar pasture for three weeks, with faecal samples collected at 4-day intervals. DNA was isolated from the faeces and microbial 16S and 18S rRNA gene amplicons were generated and analysed by pyrosequencing. The faecal bacterial communities of both groups of horses were highly diverse (Simpson's index of diversity > 0.8, with differences between the two groups on Day 0 (P < 0.017 adjusted for multiple comparisons. There were differences between Groups A and B in the relative abundances of four genera, BF311 (family Bacteroidaceae; P = 0.003, CF231 (family Paraprevotellaceae; P = 0.004, and currently unclassified members within the order Clostridiales (P = 0.003 and within the family Lachnospiraceae (P = 0.006. The bacterial community of Group A horses became similar to Group B within four days of feeding on pasture, whereas the structure of the archaeal community remained constant pre- and post-dietary change. The community structure of the faecal microbiota (bacteria, archaea and ciliate protozoa of pasture-fed horses was also identified. The initial differences observed appeared to be linked to recent dietary history, with the bacterial community of the forage-fed horses responding rapidly to abrupt dietary change.

  1. Impact of Irradiation and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Spiking on Microbial Populations in Marine Sediment for Future Aging and Biodegradability Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Melcher, Rebecca J.; Apitz, Sabine E; Hemmingsen, Barbara B.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to develop methods to generate well-characterized, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-spiked, aged but minimally altered sediments for fate, biodegradation, and bioavailability experiments. Changes in indigenous bacterial populations were monitored in mesocosms constructed of relatively clean San Diego Bay sediments, with and without exposure to gamma radiation, and then spiked with five different PAHs and hexadecane. While phenanthrene and chrysene degraders w...

  2. Distinct microbial populations are tightly linked to the profile of dissolved iron in the methanic sediments of the Helgoland mud area, North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwatobi Emmanuel Oni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron reduction in subseafloor sulfate-depleted and methane-rich marine sediments is currently a subject of interest in subsurface geomicrobiology. While iron reduction and microorganisms involved have been well studied in marine surface sediments, little is known about microorganisms responsible for iron reduction in deep methanic sediments. Here, we used quantitative PCR (Q-PCR-based 16S rRNA gene copy numbers and pyrosequencing-based relative abundances of bacteria and archaea to investigate covariance between distinct microbial populations and specific geochemical profiles in the top 5 m of sediment cores from the Helgoland mud area, North Sea. We found that gene copy numbers of bacteria and archaea were specifically higher around the peak of dissolved iron in the methanic zone (250-350 cm. The higher copy numbers at these depths were also reflected by the relative sequence abundances of members of the candidate division JS1, methanogenic and Methanohalobium/ANME-3 related archaea. The distribution of these populations was strongly correlated to the profile of pore-water Fe2+ while that of Desulfobacteraceae corresponded to the pore-water sulfate profile. Furthermore, specific JS1 populations also strongly co-varied with the distribution of Methanosaetaceae in the methanic zone. Our data suggest that the interplay among JS1 bacteria, methanogenic archaea and Methanohalobium/ANME-3-related archaea may be important for iron reduction and methane cycling in deep methanic sediments of the Helgoland mud area and perhaps in other methane-rich depositional environments.

  3. Comparison of Antibiotic, Probiotic and Great Plantain (Plantago major L. on Growth Performance, Serum Metabolites, Immune Response and Ileal Microbial Population of Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhari M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare the effects of antibiotic virginiamycin, probiotic Protexin® and Plantago major L. (plantain on performance, serum metabolites, immune response, and the ileal microbial population of broilers. The experiment was carried out with a total of 200 day-old male Ross 308 broiler chickens in a completely randomized design. Chickens were allocated to five groups consisting of T1: control diet (Con, T2: Con+0.02% virginiamycin, T3: Con+0.01% Protexin, T4: Con+0.5% plantain and T5: Con+1% plantain. Each group was divided into four replicates consisting of ten chicks each. In comparison with the control group, body weight gain increased in chickens fed Protexin and 0.5% plantain groups in the starter period, as well as by antibiotic in grower and finisher periods and by 1% plantain in all periods (P < 0.01. Supplementation of plantain and virginiamycin increased (P < 0.01 feed intake in the starter and finisher periods, respectively. Feed conversion ratio improved (P < 0.05 in finisher period only by virginiamycin. All treated birds showed an elevated relative weight of carcass and bursa, and plantain increased relative weight of the spleen (P < 0.01. All treatments demonstrated a hypocholesterolemic effect (P < 0.01 and higher level of plantain (1% decreased (P < 0.05 serum glucose, triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol as well. The inclusion of Protexin and plantain enhanced immune system with increased white and red blood cells as well as second anti-SRBC immune response and reduced heterophil/lymphocyte ratio in SRBC injected birds (P < 0.05. Virginiamycin decreased ileal microbial population of Lactobacillus while Protexin and plantain increased it (P < 0.01. Meanwhile, 1% plantain suppressed ileal E. coli counts. In conclusion, 1% Plantago major L. performed the best in this study because it led to increased body and carcass weight, lowered serum cholesterol and triglyceride, reduced

  4. NODC Standard Format Herring Survey Population Density and Distribution (F057) Data (1976-1977) (NODC Accession 0014189)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data type contains data from aircraft surveys of herring schools. These data were collected to provide information on herring population density and...

  5. Using geographical information systems to identify populations in need of improved accessibility to antivenom treatment for snakebite envenoming in Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hansson

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Snakebite accidents are an important health problem in rural areas of tropical countries worldwide, including Costa Rica, where most bites are caused by the pit-viper Bothrops asper. The treatment of these potentially fatal accidents is based on the timely administration of specific antivenom. In many regions of the world, insufficient health care systems and lack of antivenom in remote and poor areas where snakebites are common, means that efficient treatment is unavailable for many snakebite victims, leading to unnecessary mortality and morbidity. In this study, geographical information systems (GIS were used to identify populations in Costa Rica with a need of improved access to antivenom treatment: those living in areas with a high risk of snakebites and long time to reach antivenom treatment. METHOD/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Populations living in areas with high risk of snakebites were identified using two approaches: one based on the district-level reported incidence, and another based on mapping environmental factors favoring B. asper presence. Time to reach treatment using ambulance was estimated using cost surface analysis, thereby enabling adjustment of transportation speed by road availability and quality, topography and land use. By mapping populations in high risk of snakebites and the estimated time to treatment, populations with need of improved treatment access were identified. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates the usefulness of GIS for improving treatment of snakebites. By mapping reported incidence, risk factors, location of existing treatment resources, and the time estimated to reach these for at-risk populations, rational allocation of treatment resources is facilitated.

  6. On the discrepancy of access to higher education in a province with a large ethnic minority population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yunchuan; ZHANG Jianxin

    2007-01-01

    Based on a survey of students from different social strata,different family backgrounds and different levels of access to higher education in 10 higher education institutions (HEIs)in Yunnan,an ethnic minority (EM)province,this essay tries to find out the discrepancy in the enrollment opportunity of higher education for children from different strata in the EM province in order to find a breakthrough to narrow the gap.

  7. Progress towards the child mortality millennium development goal in urban sub-Saharan Africa: the dynamics of population growth, immunization, and access to clean water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madise Nyovani

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improvements in child survival have been very poor in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. Since the 1990s, declines in child mortality have reversed in many countries in the region, while in others, they have either slowed or stalled, making it improbable that the target of reducing child mortality by two thirds by 2015 will be reached. This paper highlights the implications of urban population growth and access to health and social services on progress in achieving MDG 4. Specifically, it examines trends in childhood mortality in SSA in relation to urban population growth, vaccination coverage and access to safe drinking water. Methods Correlation methods are used to analyze national-level data from the Demographic and Health Surveys and from the United Nations. The analysis is complemented by case studies on intra-urban health differences in Kenya and Zambia. Results Only five of the 22 countries included in the study have recorded declines in urban child mortality that are in line with the MDG target of about 4% per year; five others have recorded an increase; and the 12 remaining countries witnessed only minimal decline. More rapid rate of urban population growth is associated with negative trend in access to safe drinking water and in vaccination coverage, and ultimately to increasing or timid declines in child mortality. There is evidence of intra-urban disparities in child health in some countries like Kenya and Zambia. Conclusion Failing to appropriately target the growing sub-group of the urban poor and improve their living conditions and health status – which is an MDG target itself – may result in lack of improvement on national indicators of health. Sustained expansion of potable water supplies and vaccination coverage among the disadvantaged urban dwellers should be given priority in the efforts to achieve the child mortality MDG in SSA.

  8. Effects of essential oils on digestion, ruminal fermentation, rumen microbial populations, milk production, and milk composition in dairy cows fed alfalfa silage or corn silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchaar, C; Petit, H V; Berthiaume, R; Ouellet, D R; Chiquette, J; Chouinard, P Y

    2007-02-01

    Four Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design (28-d periods) with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to investigate the effects of addition of a specific mixture of essential oil compounds (MEO; 0 vs. 750 mg/d) and silage source [alfalfa silage (AS) vs. corn silage (CS)] on digestion, ruminal fermentation, rumen microbial populations, milk production, and milk composition. Total mixed rations containing either AS or CS as the sole forage source were balanced to be isocaloric and isonitrogenous. In general, no interactions between MEO addition and silage source were observed. Except for ruminal pH and milk lactose content, which were increased by MEO supplementation, no changes attributable to the administration of MEO were observed for feed intake, nutrient digestibility, end-products of ruminal fermentation, microbial counts, and milk performance. Dry matter intake and milk production were not affected by replacing AS with CS in the diet. However, cows fed CS-based diets produced milk with lower fat and higher protein and urea N concentrations than cows fed AS-based diets. Replacing AS with CS increased the concentration of NH(3)-N and reduced the acetate-to-propionate ratio in ruminal fluid. Total viable bacteria, cellulolytic bacteria, and protozoa were not influenced by MEO supplementation, but the total viable bacteria count was higher with CS- than with AS-based diets. The apparent digestibility of crude protein did not differ between the AS and CS treatments, but digestibilities of neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber were lower when cows were fed CS-based diets than when they were fed AS-based diets. Duodenal bacterial N flow, estimated using urinary purine derivatives and the amount of N retained, increased in cows fed CS-based diets compared with those fed AS-based diets. Feeding cows AS increased the milk fat contents of cis-9, trans-11 18:2 (conjugated linoleic acid) and 18:3 (n-3 fatty

  9. Changes in Access to Health Services of the Immigrant and Native-Born Population in Spain in the Context of Economic Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Garcia-Subirats

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze changes in access to health care and its determinants in the immigrant and native-born populations in Spain, before and during the economic crisis. Methods: Comparative analysis of two iterations of the Spanish National Health Survey (2006 and 2012. Outcome variables were: unmet need and use of different healthcare levels; explanatory variables: need, predisposing and enabling factors. Multivariate models were performed (1 to compare outcome variables in each group between years, (2 to compare outcome variables between both groups within each year, and (3 to determine the factors associated with health service use for each group and year. Results: unmet healthcare needs decreased in 2012 compared to 2006; the use of health services remained constant, with some changes worth highlighting, such as the decline in general practitioner visits among autochthons and a narrowed gap in specialist visits between the two populations. The factors associated with health service use in 2006 remained constant in 2012. Conclusion: Access to healthcare did not worsen, possibly due to the fact that, until 2012, the national health system may have cushioned the deterioration of social determinants as a consequence of the financial crisis. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the effects of health policy responses to the crisis after 2012.

  10. The burden of drinking water-associated cryptosporidiosis in China: the large contribution of the immunodeficient population identified by quantitative microbial risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shumin; An, Wei; Chen, Zhimin; Zhang, Dongqing; Yu, Jianwei; Yang, Min

    2012-09-01

    A comprehensive quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) of Cryptosporidium infection, considering pathogen removal efficiency, different exposure pathways and different susceptible subpopulations, was performed based on the result of a survey of source water from 66 waterworks in 33 major cities across China. The Cryptosporidium concentrations in source water were 0-6 oocysts/10 L, with a mean value of 0.7 oocysts/10 L. The annual diarrhea morbidity caused by Cryptosporidium in drinking water was estimated to be 2701 (95% confidence interval (CI): 138-9381) cases per 100,000 immunodeficient persons and 148 (95% CI: 1-603) cases per 100,000 immunocompetent persons, giving an overall rate of 149.0 (95% CI: 1.3-606.4) cases per 100,000 population. The cryptosporidiosis burden associated with drinking water treated with the conventional process was calculated to be 8.31 × 10(-6) (95% CI: 0.34-30.93 × 10(-6)) disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) per person per year, which was higher than the reference risk level suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO), but lower than that suggested by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Sixty-six percent of the total health burden due to cryptosporidiosis that occurred in the immunodeficient subpopulation, and 90% of the total DALYs was attributed to adults aged 15-59 years. The sensitivity analysis highlighted the great importance of stability of the treatment process and the importance of watershed protection. The results of this study will be useful in better evaluating and reducing the burden of Cryptosporidium infection.

  11. Development of a predictive model for the growth kinetics of aerobic microbial population on pomegranate marinated chicken breast fillets under isothermal and dynamic temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytou, Anastasia; Panagou, Efstathios Z; Nychas, George-John E

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was the development of a model to describe the growth kinetics of aerobic microbial population of chicken breast fillets marinated in pomegranate juice under isothermal and dynamic temperature conditions. Moreover, the effect of pomegranate juice on the extension of the shelf life of the product was investigated. Samples (10 g) of chicken breast fillets were immersed in marinades containing pomegranate juice for 3 h at 4 °C following storage under aerobic conditions at 4, 10, and 15 °C for 10 days. Total Viable Counts (TVC), Pseudomonas spp and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were enumerated, in parallel with sensory assessment (odor and overall appearance) of marinated and non-marinated samples. The Baranyi model was fitted to the growth data of TVC to calculate the maximum specific growth rate (μmax) that was further modeled as a function of temperature using a square root-type model. The validation of the model was conducted under dynamic temperature conditions based on two fluctuating temperature scenarios with periodic changes from 6 to 13 °C. The shelf life was determined both mathematically and with sensory assessment and its temperature dependence was modeled by an Arrhenius type equation. Results showed that the μmax of TVC of marinated samples was significantly lower compared to control samples regardless temperature, while under dynamic temperature conditions the model satisfactorily predicted the growth of TVC in both control and marinated samples. The shelf-life of marinated samples was significantly extended compared to the control (5 days extension at 4 °C). The calculated activation energies (Ea), 82 and 52 kJ/mol for control and marinated samples, respectively, indicated higher temperature dependence of the shelf life of control samples compared to marinated ones. The present results indicated that pomegranate juice could be used as an alternative ingredient in marinades to prolong the shelf life of chicken.

  12. Application of spatial analysis technology to the planning of access to oral health care for at-risk populations in Australian capital cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almado, Haidar; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Australians are one of the healthiest populations in the world but there is strong evidence that health inequalities exist. Australia has 23.1 million people spread very unevenly over -20 million square kilometres. This study aimed to apply spatial analysis tools to measure the spatial distribution of fixed adult public dental clinics in the eight metropolitan capital cities of Australia. All population data for metropolitan areas of the eight capital cities were integrated with socioeconomic data and health-service locations, using Geographic Information Systems, and then analysed. The adult population was divided into three subgroups according to age, consisting of 15-year-olds and over (n = 7.2 million), retirees 65 years and over (n = 1.2 million), and the elderly, who were 85 years and over (n = 0.15 million). It was evident that the States fell into two groups; Tasmania, Northern Territory, Australian Capital Territory and Western Australia in one cluster, and Victoria, New South Wales, Queensland and South Australia in the other. In the first group, the average proportion of the population of low socioeconomic status living in metropolitan areas within 2.5 km of a government dental clinic is 13%, while for the other cluster, it is 42%. The clustering remains true at 5 km from the clinics. The first cluster finds that almost half (46%) of the poorest 30% of the population live within 5km of a government dental clinic. The other cluster of States finds nearly double that proportion (86%). The results from this study indicated that access distances to government dental services differ substantially in metropolitan areas of the major Australian capital cities.

  13. Understanding benefits and addressing misperceptions and barriers to intrauterine device access among populations in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoost J

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Jennie Yoost Marshall University Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Huntington, WV, USA Abstract: Three intrauterine devices (IUDs, one copper and two containing the progestin levonorgestrel, are available for use in the United States. IUDs offer higher rates of contraceptive efficacy than nonlong-acting methods, and several studies have demonstrated higher satisfaction rates and continuation rates of any birth control method. This efficacy is not affected by age or parity. The safety of IUDs is well studied, and the risks of pelvic inflammatory disease, perforation, expulsion, and ectopic pregnancy are all of very low incidence. Noncontraceptive benefits include decreased menstrual blood loss, improved dysmenorrhea, improved pelvic pain associated with endometriosis, and protection of the endometrium from hyperplasia. The use of IUDs is accepted in patients with multiple medical problems who may have contraindications to other birth control methods. Yet despite well-published data, concerns and misperceptions still persist, especially among younger populations and nulliparous women. Medical governing bodies advocate for use of IUDs in these populations, as safety and efficacy is unchanged, and IUDs have been shown to decrease unintended pregnancies. Dispersion of accurate information among patients and practitioners is needed to further increase the acceptability and use of IUDs. Keywords: IUD, contraception, levonorgestrel, copper

  14. Differences and determinants in access to essential public health services in China: a case study with hypertension people and under-sixes as target population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Hongli; Tian Miaomiao; Ma Anning; Wang Chunping; Zhang Liang

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2009,health reform had launched in China and essential public health services were provided for all residents to ensure service equity and accessibility,and to achieve sustained population-wide health improvement.This study aimed to investigate the differences and determinants among populations with different characteristics access to essential public health services in China,especially hypertension people and children aged 0-6 years.Methods A cross-sectional study with socio-demographic data analysis was undertaken to estimate distribution characteristics of receiving essential public health services of hypertension patients and children.Regular follow-ups and effective blood pressure control reflected the effective management for hypertension patients,and for children,public services provided were vaccination on schedule and regular physical check-up.Logistic regression was used to determine the predictors for effective management.Results A total of 1 505 hypertension patients and 749 children were involved; 39.14% of hypertension participants could control their blood pressure in the normal range,and the rate in urban areas (43.61%) was higher than that in rural (31.88%).And 34.68% of them could receive more than 4 times follow-ups by the medical technician.Of 754 children,79.84% could receive the periodic physical examination and 98.40% had vaccinated regularly.Children living in rural areas were more likely to have regular check-ups (83.96%) and regular vaccination (nearly 99%).Overall,geographic location and education level were the determinants of people access to essential public health services.Conclusions Implementation of the health reform since 2009 has headed China's public health system in the right direction and promoted the improvement of public health system development.Our study highlights the growing needs for more public health services in China,and China's public health system needs to be greatly improved in

  15. Teaching Microbial Growth by Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, A. Fernandez; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presented is a simulation program for Apple II computer which assays the effects of a series of variables on bacterial growth and interactions between microbial populations. Results of evaluation of the program with students are summarized. (CW)

  16. Access to Difficult-to-reach Population Subgroups: A Family Midwife Based Home Visiting Service for Implementing Nutrition-related Preventive Activities - A Mixed Methods Explorative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Walz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Health and social inequality are tightly linked and still pose an important public health problem. However, vulnerable and disadvantaged populations are difficult to reach for health-related interventions. Given the long-lasting effects of an adverse, particular nutrition-related, intrauterine and neonatal environment on health development (perinatal programming, an early and easy access is essential for sustainable interventions. The goal of this explorative study was therefore to elucidate whether an existing access of family midwives (FMs to families in need of support could be an option to implement effective public health and nutrition interventions. To that end three research objectives were formulated: (1 to determine whether a discernible impact of home visits by FMs can be described; (2 to identify subgroups among these families in need of more specific interventions; (3 to determine how relevant nutrition-related topics are for both FMs and the supported families. For addressing these objectives a mixed methods design was used: Routine documentation data from 295 families visited by a family midwife (FM were analyzed (secondary analysis, and structured expert interviews with FMs were conducted and analyzed. Study reporting followed the STROBE (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology statement. Based on the FMs reports, a significant improvement (p < 0.001 regarding psycho-social variables could be determined after the home visits. Single mothers, however, seemed to benefit less from the FMs service compared to their counterparts (p = 0.015. Nutritional counseling was demanded by 89% of the families during the home visits. In addition, nutrition-related topics were reported in the interviews to be of high interest to both families and the FMs. Based on the obtained results it is concluded that FMs home visits offer a promising access to vulnerable and disadvantaged families for implementing nutrition

  17. Challenges in access to health services and its impact on quality of life: a randomised population-based survey within Turkish speaking immigrants in London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topal Kenan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim There are a significant number of Turkish speaking immigrants living in London. Their special health issues including women's health, mental health, and alcohol and smoking habits has been assessed. The aim of this study was to explore the ongoing challenges in access to health care services and its impact on Quality of Life of immigrants. Material and methods This cross-sectional population-based study was conducted between March and August 2010 with Turkish immigrants (n = 416 living in London. Of these, 308 (74% were Turkish and 108 (26% were Turkish Cypriots. All healthy or unhealthy adults of 17-65 years of age were enrolled. A structured questionnaire with 44 items in five subcategories and 26-items WHOQOL BREF were used. Results Mean duration of stay for Turkish Cypriots (26.9 ± 13.9 years was significantly longer than Turkish immigrants (13.3 ± 7.5 (p Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate how the health and well-being of members of the Turkish speaking community living in London are affected by social aspects of their lives. Providing culturally competent care and interpretation services and advocacy may improve the accessibility of the health care.

  18. Effects of Different Rotation Modes on Microbial Population in Gravel Mulched Field%砂田轮作模式对土壤微生物区系的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亚慧; 吴宏亮; 康建宏; 许强; 杨金娟; 姚姗; 尹冠华

    2012-01-01

    [目的]研究砂田轮作模式对土壤微生物区系的影响,从而通过制定合理的栽培制度创造良好的土壤生态环境,为促进农业的可持续发展提供理论依据.[方法]对宁夏中卫市香山地区压砂地土壤进行取样,并进行了微生物区系的分析.[结果]西瓜(Citrullus lanatus)与绿豆(Vigna radiata)、南瓜(Cucurbita moschata)、油葵(Helianthus annuus)、西葫芦(Cucurbita pepo L.)、芝麻(Sesamum indicum)轮作,土壤微生物多样性指数均高于西瓜连作.[结论]轮作能有效调节土壤微生物区系,有利于微生物群落的多样性和稳定性的提高,最终改善了土壤的微生态环境,其中以西瓜→南瓜效果最好.%[ Objective] The purpose was to study the effects of different rotation modes on microbial population in gravel mulched field, then create good soil ecological environment by drawing up reasonable cultivation system to provide a theoretical basis for promoting agricultural sustainable development of agriculture, [Method] Soil samples were taken from gravel mulched field in Xiangshan Area, Zhongwei City, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region and their microbial population was analyzed. [Result] Compared with the watermelon continuous crop, the microbial diversity index was higher in the planting mode of mung bean( Vigna radiata) , pumpkins( Cucurbita moschata) , oil sunflower(Helianthus arm-uus) , squash(Cucurbitapepo L. ) and sesame(Sesamum indicum) rotating with watermelon( Citrultus lanatus). [Conclusion] Rotating effectively adjusts soil microbial population, which is conducive to improving microbial population diversity and stability, and eventually improving the soil ecology environment. Among these rotation modes, squash rotation with watermelon was the best.

  19. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE FINANCIAL COSTS FOR ACCESSING THE SAME BASIC KINESIS-THERAPEUTIC SERVICE AVAILABLE TO THE POPULATION FROM DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexe Dan Iulian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Discriminating the type of ratio between a basic kinesis-therapeutic service available to the population and its corresponding costs in different EU areas. Performing a comparative analysis of the costs for different types of massage for the European market for the relaxation-recovery services can offer new data and reference points to future specialists in these areas when they plan and design their access on such a competitive market. Knowledge of the massage services, of the national economic characteristic, of the principles governing the recovery-rehabilitation –relaxation activities in every EU country can reveal real and positive evidences for the professional career orientation, but also regarding the massage service appreciation within such a large market, as the European Union’s. For the same type of basic kinesis-therapeutic service available to the population (massage, establishing extreme limits for the corresponding costs can represent a challenge difficult to accomplish at the level of EU areas, and this aspect shows, in our opinion, a lack of financial stability and “standardization” of the services for which a kinesiotherapist is trained and specialized.

  20. Monitoring microbial metabolites using an inductively coupled resonance circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnaushenko, Daniil; Baraban, Larysa; Ye, Dan; Uguz, Ilke; Mendes, Rafael G.; Rümmeli, Mark H.; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Makarov, Denys

    2015-08-01

    We present a new approach to monitor microbial population dynamics in emulsion droplets via changes in metabolite composition, using an inductively coupled LC resonance circuit. The signal measured by such resonance detector provides information on the magnetic field interaction with the bacterial culture, which is complementary to the information accessible by other detection means, based on electric field interaction, i.e. capacitive or resistive, as well as optical techniques. Several charge-related factors, including pH and ammonia concentrations, were identified as possible contributors to the characteristic of resonance detector profile. The setup enables probing the ionic byproducts of microbial metabolic activity at later stages of cell growth, where conventional optical detection methods have no discriminating power.

  1. Microbial community and population dynamics of single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal for dilute wastewater at the benchmark oxygen rate supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Tzu; Chen, Shiou-Shiou; Lee, Po-Heng; Bae, Jaeho

    2013-11-01

    Microbial communities and their kinetic performance in a single-stage autotrophic nitrogen-removal filter at an optimal oxygen supply were examined to determine the presence and activity of denitrifiers, anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox), ammonia-oxidizing, and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. To this end, different molecular biology techniques such as real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and biomarkers such as 16S rRNA revealed a diverse microbial community along the filter. It was important to survey the specific species of anammox bacteria using a newly designed Candidatus Brocadiafulgida (BF) specific primer, as well as Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans (BA) and Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis (KS) specific primers. An unexpected finding was that the predominant anammox species switched from KS in concentrated wastewater to BA in dilute wastewaters. The Eckenfelder model of the NH3-N transformation along the filter was Se=S0 exp(-0.192D/L(2.3217)). These results provide a foundational understanding of the microbial structure and reaction kinetics in such systems.

  2. Dynamic changes in microbial community structure and function in phenol-degrading microcosms inoculated with cells from a contaminated aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David R; Scholes, Julie D; Thornton, Steven F; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Banwart, Steven A; Rolfe, Stephen A

    2010-02-01

    Contamination of aquifers by organic pollutants threatens groundwater supplies and the environment. In situ biodegradation of organic pollutants by microbial communities is important for the remediation of contaminated sites, but our understanding of the relationship between microbial development and pollutant biodegradation is poor. A particular challenge is understanding the in situ status of microorganisms attached to solid surfaces, but not accessible via conventional sampling of groundwater. We have developed novel flow-through microcosms and examined dynamic changes in microbial community structure and function in a phenol-degrading system. Inoculation of these microcosms with a complex microbial community from a plume in a phenol-contaminated aquifer led to the initial establishment of a population dominated by a few species, most attached to the solid substratum. Initially, phenol biodegradation was incomplete, but as the microbial community structure became more complex, phenol biodegradation was more extensive and complete. These results were replicated between independent microcosms, indicating a deterministic succession of species. This work demonstrates the importance of examining community dynamics when assessing the potential for microbial biodegradation of organic pollutants. It provides a novel system in which such measurements can be made readily and reproducibly to study the temporal development and spatial succession of microbial communities during biodegradation of organic pollutants at interfaces within such environments.

  3. 广东陈香茶渥堆发酵过程中优势微生物群系的演变%The Evolution of Dominant Microbial Populations in the Guangdong Chenxiang Tea during Pile-Fermentation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方祥; 陈株; 李晶晶; 赵超艺; 李斌; 黄国资

    2011-01-01

    Guangdong Chenxiang Tea is a special black tea of Guangdong province. The dominant microbial populations in the Guangdong Chenxiang Tea were studied. The results showed Aspergillus niger, A. Gloucus, Fenicillium chrysogenum, Candida parapsilosis, Rhizopus sp. And Trichoderma sp. Were the dominant fungi species during pile-fermentation process. P. Chrysogenum accounted for 47.9%~91.9% of the total number of fungi colonies in the beginning of pile-fermentation, but A. Niger grew rapidly and become the absolutely dominant species and accounting for 83.1%~ 97.9% in the late period of fermentation process. The water content had a significant effection on the evolution of microbial populations, reasonably high levels (30%~35%) of moisture promoted the growth and reproduction of A. Niger and Candida parapsilosis, so the microbial populations can be controlled by control of water content so as to improve quality of Chenxiang tea.%对具有地方特色的黑茶品种——广东陈香茶渥堆发酵过程中的优势微生物群系演化进行研究,结果发现其优势种群为黑曲霉(A spergillus niger)、灰绿曲霉(A.gloucus)、产黄青霉(Penicillium chrysogenum)、近平滑假丝酵母(Candida parapsilosis)、根霉(Rhizopus sp.)和木霉(Trichoderma sp.).开潮渥堆开始发酵时,以产黄青霉为主,占47.9%~91.9%.黑曲霉繁殖迅速,在发酵中、后期其占绝对优势(83.1%~97.9%).开潮渥堆时茶堆的含水量对微生物种群演化有显著影响,当其含水量30%~35%时,黑曲霉和酵母的生长繁殖较含水量20%~25%时快.通过水分调控微生物群系,可以达到提高陈香茶品质的目的.

  4. The microbial ocean from genomes to biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Edward F

    2009-05-14

    Numerically, microbial species dominate the oceans, yet their population dynamics, metabolic complexity and synergistic interactions remain largely uncharted. A full understanding of life in the ocean requires more than knowledge of marine microbial taxa and their genome sequences. The latest experimental techniques and analytical approaches can provide a fresh perspective on the biological interactions within marine ecosystems, aiding in the construction of predictive models that can interrelate microbial dynamics with the biogeochemical matter and energy fluxes that make up the ocean ecosystem.

  5. Advanced Microscopy of Microbial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Regenberg, Birgitte; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    microscopy, super-resolution optical microscopy (STED, SIM, PALM) as well as atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using examples of bistability in microbial populations as well as biofilm development and differentiation in bacterial and yeast consortia, we demonstrate the importance of microscopy......Growing awareness of heterogeneity in cells of microbial populations has emphasized the importance of advanced microscopy for visualization and understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cell-to-cell variation. In this review, we highlight some of the recent advances in confocal...

  6. Prediction of Competitive Microbial Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

     Prediction of competitive microbial growth is becoming important for microbial food safety. There would be two approaches to predict competitive microbial growth with mathematical models. The first approach is the development of a growth model for competitive microbes. Among several candidates for the competition model considered, the combination of the primary growth model of the new logistic (NL) model and the competition model of the Lotka-Vorttera (LV) model showed the best performance in predicting microbial competitive growth in the mixed culture of two species. This system further successfully predicted the growth of three competitive species in mixed culture. The second approach is the application of the secondary model especially for the parameter of the maximum cell population in the primary growth model. The combination of the NL model and a polynomial model for the maximum population successfully predicted Salmonella growth in raw ground beef. This system further successfully predicted Salmonella growth in beef at various initial concentrations and temperatures. The first approach requires microbial growth data in monoculture for analysis. The second approach to the prediction of competitive growth from the viewpoint of microbial food safety would be more suitable for practical application.

  7. Microbial biosensors for environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David VOGRINC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biosensors are analytical devices capable of sensing substances in the environment due to the specific biological reaction of the microorganism or its parts. Construction of a microbial biosensor requires knowledge of microbial response to the specific analyte. Linking this response with the quantitative data, using a transducer, is the crucial step in the construction of a biosensor. Regarding the transducer type, biosensors are divided into electrochemical, optical biosensors and microbial fuel cells. The use of the proper configuration depends on the selection of the biosensing element. With the use of transgenic E. coli strains, bioluminescence or fluorescence based biosensors were developed. Microbial fuel cells enable the use of the heterogeneous microbial populations, isolated from wastewater. Different microorganisms are used for different pollutants – pesticides, heavy metals, phenolic compounds, organic waste, etc. Biosensing enables measurement of their concentration and their toxic or genotoxic effects on the microbes. Increasing environmental awareness has contributed to the increase of interest for biomonitoring. Although technologies, such as bioinformatics and genetic engineering, allow us to design complex and efficient microbial biosensors for environmental pollutants, the transfer of the laboratory work to the field still remains a problem to solve.

  8. Microbial biosurfactants and biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Owen P

    2010-01-01

    Microbial biosurfactants are amphipathic molecules having typical molecular weights of 500-1500 Da, made up of peptides, saccharides or lipids or their combinations. In biodegradation processes they mediate solubilisation, mobilization and/or accession of hydrophobic substrates to microbes. They may be located on the cell surface or be secreted into the extracellular medium and they facilitate uptake of hydrophobic molecules through direct cellular contact with hydrophobic solids or droplets or through micellarisation. They are also involved in cell physiological processes such as biofilm formation and detachment, and in diverse biofilm associated processes such as wastewater treatment and microbial pathogenesis. The protection of contaminants in biosurfactants micelles may also inhibit uptake of contaminants by microbes. In bioremediation processes biosurfactants may facilitate release of contaminants from soil, but soils also tend to bind surfactants strongly which makes their role in contaminant desorption more complex. A greater understanding of the underlying roles played by biosurfactants in microbial physiology and in biodegradative processes is developing through advances in cell and molecular biology.

  9. Microbial Forensics: A Scientific Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keim, Paul

    2003-02-17

    procedures and training to meet these initial challenges so as minimize disturbance of the evidence. While epidemiology and forensics are similar sciences with similar goals when applied to biocrimes, forensics has additional and more stringent requirements. Maintaining a chain of custody on evidentiary samples is one example of an extra requirement imposed on an investigation of a biocrime. Another issue is the intent in microbial forensics to identify a bioattack organism in greatest detail. If possible, forensic investigations will strive to identify the precise strain and substrain, rather than just to the species level, which might be sufficient in an epidemiological investigation. Although multiple groups have developed lists of bioterrorism target pathogens, these lists are too narrow. An expansion of microorganisms relevant to food and water threats should be considered. Computerized networks should be established to track infectious disease outbreaks in real time. These systems could alert public health and agricultural officials to the existence of a potential bioattack earlier than simply waiting for a report of a suspicious cluster of similar patients. Once a biocrime is suspected, a wide variety of methods are available to identify the microorganism used in the bioattack and to analyze features that might lead to the source of the event. A multi-pronged approach to such an investigation may be preferable, using many available methods-ranging from genomics to sequencing to physiology to analysis of substances in the sample. Microbial forensics will be most effective if there is sufficient basic scientific information concerning microbial genetics, evolution, physiology, and ecology. Strain subtyping analysis will be difficult to interpret if we do not understand some of the basic evolutionary mechanisms and population diversity of pathogens. Phenotypic features associated with evidentiary pathogens also may provide investigative leads, but full exploitation of

  10. Microbial xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Prakash; Bernstein, Paul S

    2005-09-01

    Xanthophylls are oxygenated carotenoids abundant in the human food supply. Lutein, zeaxanthin, and cryptoxanthin are major xanthophyll carotenoids in human plasma. The consumption of these xanthophylls is directly associated with reduction in the risk of cancers, cardiovascular disease, age-related macular degeneration, and cataract formation. Canthaxanthin and astaxanthin also have considerable importance in aquaculture for salmonid and crustacean pigmentation, and are of commercial interest for the pharmaceutical and food industries. Chemical synthesis is a major source for the heavy demand of xanthophylls in the consumer market; however, microbial producers also have potential as commercial sources. In this review, we discuss the biosynthesis, commercial utility, and major microbial sources of xanthophylls. We also present a critical review of current research and technologies involved in promoting microbes as potential commercial sources for mass production.

  11. A microbial perspective of human developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, Mark R; Blanton, Laura V; DiGiulio, Daniel B; Relman, David A; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Mills, David A; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2016-07-07

    When most people think of human development, they tend to consider only human cells and organs. Yet there is another facet that involves human-associated microbial communities. A microbial perspective of human development provides opportunities to refine our definitions of healthy prenatal and postnatal growth and to develop innovative strategies for disease prevention and treatment. Given the dramatic changes in lifestyles and disease patterns that are occurring with globalization, we issue a call for the establishment of 'human microbial observatories' designed to examine microbial community development in birth cohorts representing populations with diverse anthropological characteristics, including those undergoing rapid change.

  12. Oral chlorhexidine and microbial contamination during endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donatsky, Anders Meller; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane; Arpi, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the biggest concerns associated with transgastric surgery is contamination and risk of intra-abdominal infection with microbes introduced from the access route. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral decontamination with chlorhexidine on microbial contamin......BACKGROUND: One of the biggest concerns associated with transgastric surgery is contamination and risk of intra-abdominal infection with microbes introduced from the access route. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral decontamination with chlorhexidine on microbial...... contamination of the endoscope. METHODS: In a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial the effect of chlorhexidine mouth rinse was evaluated. As a surrogate for the risk of intra-abdominal contamination during transgastric surgery, microbial contamination of the endoscope during upper endoscopy...... microbial contamination of the endoscope, but micro-organisms with abscess forming capabilities were still present. PPI treatment significantly increased CFU and should be discontinued before transgastric surgery....

  13. Coamplification of eukaryotic DNA with 16S rRNA gene-based PCR primers: possible consequences for population fingerprinting of complex microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huys, Geert; Vanhoutte, Tom; Joossens, Marie; Mahious, Amal S; De Brandt, Evie; Vermeire, Severine; Swings, Jean

    2008-06-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the specificity of three commonly used 16S rRNA gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets for bacterial community analysis of samples contaminated with eukaryotic DNA. The specificity of primer sets targeting the V3, V3-V5, and V6-V8 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene was investigated in silico and by community fingerprinting of human and fish intestinal samples. Both in silico and PCR-based analysis revealed cross-reactivity of the V3 and V3-V5 primers with the 18S rRNA gene of human and sturgeon. The consequences of this primer anomaly were illustrated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiling of microbial communities in human feces and mixed gut of Siberian sturgeon. DGGE profiling indicated that the cross-reactivity of 16S rRNA gene primers with nontarget eukaryotic DNA might lead to an overestimation of bacterial biodiversity. This study has confirmed previous sporadic indications in literature indicating that several commonly applied 16S rRNA gene primer sets lack specificity toward bacteria in the presence of eukaryotic DNA. The phenomenon of cross-reactivity is a potential source of systematic error in all biodiversity studies where no subsequent analysis of individual community amplicons by cloning and sequencing is performed.

  14. The reproductive tracts of two malaria vectors are populated by a core microbiome and by gender- and swarm-enriched microbial biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segata, Nicola; Baldini, Francesco; Pompon, Julien; Garrett, Wendy S.; Truong, Duy Tin; Dabiré, Roch K.; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Levashina, Elena A.; Catteruccia, Flaminia

    2016-01-01

    Microbes play key roles in shaping the physiology of insects and can influence behavior, reproduction and susceptibility to pathogens. In Sub-Saharan Africa, two major malaria vectors, Anopheles gambiae and An. coluzzii, breed in distinct larval habitats characterized by different microorganisms that might affect their adult physiology and possibly Plasmodium transmission. We analyzed the reproductive microbiomes of male and female An. gambiae and An. coluzzii couples collected from natural mating swarms in Burkina Faso. 16S rRNA sequencing on dissected tissues revealed that the reproductive tracts harbor a complex microbiome characterized by a large core group of bacteria shared by both species and all reproductive tissues. Interestingly, we detected a significant enrichment of several gender-associated microbial biomarkers in specific tissues, and surprisingly, similar classes of bacteria in males captured from one mating swarm, suggesting that these males originated from the same larval breeding site. Finally, we identified several endosymbiotic bacteria, including Spiroplasma, which have the ability to manipulate insect reproductive success. Our study provides a comprehensive analysis of the reproductive microbiome of important human disease vectors, and identifies a panel of core and endosymbiotic bacteria that can be potentially exploited to interfere with the transmission of malaria parasites by the Anopheles mosquito. PMID:27086581

  15. Population Abundance of Potentially Pathogenic Organisms in Intestinal Microbiome of Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos Shown with 16S rRNA Gene-Based Microbial Community Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isamu Maeda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing techniques was applied to the taxonomic classification of intestinal microbiome for three jungle crows. Clustering of the reads into 130 operational taxonomic units showed that at least 70% of analyzed sequences for each crow were highly homologous to Eimeria sp., which belongs to the protozoan phylum Apicomplexa. The microbiotas of three crows also contained potentially pathogenic bacteria with significant percentages, such as the genera Campylobacter and Brachyspira. Thus, the profiling of a large number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in crow intestinal microbiomes revealed the high-frequency existence or vestige of potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

  16. Adding mucins to an in vitro batch fermentation model of the large intestine induces changes in microbial population isolated from porcine feces depending on the substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, T H T; Boudry, C; Everaert, N; Théwis, A; Portetelle, D; Daube, G; Nezer, C; Taminiau, B; Bindelle, J

    2016-02-01

    Adding mucus to in vitro fermentation models of the large intestine shows that some genera, namely lactobacilli, are dependent on host-microbiota interactions and that they rely on mucosal layers to increase their activity. This study investigated whether this dependence on mucus is substrate dependent and to what extent other genera are impacted by the presence of mucus. Inulin and cellulose were fermented in vitro by a fecal inoculum from pig in the presence or not of mucin beads in order to compare fermentation patterns and bacterial communities. Mucins increased final gas production with inulin and shifted short-chain fatty acid molar ratios (P inulin was fermented. A more in-depth community analysis indicated that the mucins increased Proteobacteria (0.55 vs 0.25%, P = 0.013), Verrucomicrobia (5.25 vs 0.03%, P = 0.032), Ruminococcaceae, Bacteroidaceae and Akkermansia spp. Proteobacteria (5.67 vs 0.55%, P < 0.001) and Lachnospiraceae (33 vs 10.4%) were promoted in the mucus compared with the broth, while Ruminococcaceae decreased. The introduction of mucins affected many microbial genera and fermentation patterns, but from PCA results, the impact of mucus was independent of the fermentation substrate.

  17. Microbial ecology on the microcosm level: Activity and population dynamics of methanotrophic bacteria during early succession in a flooded rice field soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, S.; Frenzel, P.

    2009-04-01

    Methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) play an important role in natural wetlands and rice fields preventing large amounts of methane from escaping into the atmosphere. The occurrence of both type I and type II methanotrophs in the soil surface layer has been demonstrated in many studies. However, there is no profound understanding which of them are responsible for the oxidizing activity and how they differ ecologically. Hence, a gradient microcosm system was applied simulating oxic-anoxic interfaces of water saturated soils to unravel population dynamics in early succession of methanotrophs in a flooded rice paddy. Additionally, environmental parameters were analyzed to link environment, populations, and their specific activity. We measured pmoA-based (particulate methane monooxygenase) terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles both on transcription and population level. DNA T-RFLP patterns showed no major differences in the methanotrophic community structure remaining relatively constant over time. In contrast the active methanotrophic community structure as detected by pmoA mRNA T-RFLP analysis clearly demonstrated a distinct pattern from DNA T-RFLP profiles. While type II represented the most prominent group on the population level it seems to play a minor role on the transcription level. Furthermore there were no clear implications towards a link between soil parameters (e.g. NH4+ concentration) and methanotrophic community structure.

  18. Towards lag phase of microbial populations at growth-limiting conditions: The role of the variability in the growth limits of individual cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Juan S; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-05-02

    The water activity (aw) growth limits of unheated and heat stressed Listeria monocytogenes individual cells were studied. The aw limits varied from 0.940 to 0.997 and 0.951 to 0.997 for unheated and heat stressed cells, respectively. Due to the above variability a decrease in aw results in the presence of a non-growing fraction in the population leading to an additional pseudo-lag in population growth. In this case the total apparent lag of the population is the sum of the physiological lag of the growing cells (time required to adjust to the new environment) and the pseudo-lag. To investigate the effect of aw on the above lag components, the growth kinetics of L. monocytogenes on tryptone soy agar with aw adjusted to values ranging from 0.997 to 0.940 was monitored. The model of B&R was fitted to the data for the estimation of the apparent lag. In order to estimate the physiological lag of the growing fraction of the inoculum, the model was refitted to the growth data using as initial population level the number of cells that were able to grow (estimated from the number of colonies formed on the agar at the end of storage) and excluding the rest data during the lag. The results showed that for the unheated cells the apparent lag was almost identical to the physiological lag for aw values ranging from 0.997 to 0.970, as the majority of the cells in the initial population was able to grow in these conditions. As the aw decreased from 0.970 to 0.940 however, the number of cells in the population which were able to grow, decreased resulting to an increase in the pseudo-lag. The maximum value of pseudo-lag was 13.1h and it was observed at aw=0.940 where 10% of the total inoculated cells were able to grow. For heat stressed populations a pseudo-lag started to increase at higher aw conditions (0.982) compared to unheated cells. In contrast to the apparent lag, a linear relation between physiological lag and aw was observed for both unheated and heat stressed cells.

  19. Advanced microscopy of microbial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Regenberg, Birgitte; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Growing awareness of heterogeneity in cells of microbial populations has emphasized the importance of advanced microscopy for visualization and understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cell-to-cell variation. In this review, we highlight some of the recent advances in confocal...... for visualization of variation between cells in phenotypic traits such as gene expression....

  20. Influence of the Application of Sewage Sludge and Presence of Pesticides on the Development of the Microbial Population of the Soil and on the Transformation of Organic Carbon and Nutrient Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E.  Sanchez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The laboratory trial consisted in incubating samples of soil and soil treated with sewage sludge, with the application of organophosphate pesticides with different active ingredients under controlled conditions of temperature and moisture. On the basis of a previous study of the influence of the application of sludge on the degradation of pesticides in the soil, a kinetic study is included of the degradation process and we concentrate on its effects on the development of the microbial population and the mineralization of organic carbon, together with the transformation of the main nutritive elements for plants: nitrogen and phosphorus. Three different active ingredients were used: fenitrothion, diazinon and dimethoate, all of them organophosphates with different chemical structures. From the results, it is to be observed that for all the conditions studied, degradation followed first-order kinetics. The presence of pesticides in the soil produces an increase in micro-organism populations in comparison with the control sample in the different matrices assayed, favouring the mineralization of organic carbon. As for available nitrogen, the predominant form, either ammonia or nitrates, depends on the active ingredient applied. On the other hand, the use of pesticides favours the process of mineralization/solubilization of phosphorus.

  1. Mapping and introgression of QTL for yield and related traits in two backcross populations derived from Oryza sativa cv. Swarna and two accessions of O. nivara

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. P. Mallikarjuna Swamy; K. Kaladhar; G. Ashok Reddy; B. C. Viraktamath; N. Sarla

    2014-12-01

    Advanced backcross QTL (AB-QTL) analysis was carried out in two Oryza nivara-derived BC2F2 populations. For nine traits, we identified 28 QTL in population 1 and 26 QTL in population 2. The two most significant yield-enhancing QTL, yldp9.1 and yldp2.1 showed an additive effect of 16 and 7 g per plant in population 1, while yld2.1 and yld11.1 showed an additive effect of 11 and 10 g per plant in population 2. At least one O. nivara-derived QTL with a phenotypic variance of >15% was detected for seven traits in population 1 and three traits in population 2. The O. nivara-derived QTL ph1.1, nt12.1, nsp1.1, nfg1.1, bm11.1, yld2.1 and yld11.1 were conserved at the same chromosomal locations in both populations. Two major QTL clusters were detected at the marker intervals RM488–RM431 and RM6–RM535 on chromosomes 1 and 2, respectively. The colocation of O. nivara-derived yield QTL with yield meta-QTL on chromosomes 1, 2 and 9 indicates their accuracy and consistency. The major-effect QTL reported in this study are useful for marker-assisted breeding and are also suitable for further fine mapping and candidate gene identification.

  2. Microbial Metalloproteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter-Leon Hagedoorn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metalloproteomics is a rapidly developing field of science that involves the comprehensive analysis of all metal-containing or metal-binding proteins in a biological sample. The purpose of this review is to offer a comprehensive overview of the research involving approaches that can be categorized as inductively coupled plasma (ICP-MS based methods, X-ray absorption/fluorescence, radionuclide based methods and bioinformatics. Important discoveries in microbial proteomics will be reviewed, as well as the outlook to new emerging approaches and research areas.

  3. Microbial Ecosystems, Protection of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Nelson, K.E.

    2014-01-01

    Synonyms Conservation of microbial diversity and ecosystem functions provided by microbes; Preservation of microbial diversity and ecosystem functions provided by microbes Definition The use, management, and conservation of ecosystems in order to preserve microbial diversity and functioning. Introdu

  4. The Microbial Database for Danish wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal (MiDas-DK) – a tool for understanding activated sludge population dynamics and community stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielczarek, Artur Tomasz; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Larsen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    ecosystems, and, besides many scientific articles on fundamental issues on mixed communities encompassing nitrifiers, denitrifiers, bacteria involved in P-removal, hydrolysis, fermentation, and foaming, the project has provided results that can be used to optimize the operation of full-scale plants and carry...... plants, there seemed to be plant-specific factors that controlled the population composition thereby keeping it unique in each plant over time. Statistical analyses of FISH and operational data revealed some correlations, but less than expected. MiDas-DK (www.midasdk.dk) will continue over the next years...

  5. Systems biology of Microbial Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navid, A; Ghim, C; Fenley, A; Yoon, S; Lee, S; Almaas, E

    2008-04-11

    Microbes exist naturally in a wide range of environments, spanning the extremes of high acidity and high temperature to soil and the ocean, in communities where their interactions are significant. We present a practical discussion of three different approaches for modeling microbial communities: rate equations, individual-based modeling, and population dynamics. We illustrate the approaches with detailed examples. Each approach is best fit to different levels of system representation, and they have different needs for detailed biological input. Thus, this set of approaches is able to address the operation and function of microbial communities on a wide range of organizational levels.

  6. Influencia de la agricultura de conservación en la temperatura del suelo y su relación con las poblaciones microbianas Influence of conservation agriculture over soil temperature and the relation with microbial populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Muñoz

    2009-01-01

    óptimos de temperatura para el crecimiento microbiano en los manejos de agricultura de conservación.The temperature of the soil is a key factor in the growth of the maize, a sensible culture to the temperature variations, with high optimal temperature for germination of the seed, growth of plant and fruition. The conservation agriculture tends to diminish the temperature of the soil, due to the stubbles that are left in surface, in whose decomposition the microorganisms of the soil play a fundamental role, and to the associated increase of humidity this type of management. For a suitable management of soils under conservation agriculture is recommendable the study of the temperature and the microbial populations in the surface horizon. For these reasons, the objective of this study has been to make a comparative study of the oscillations of temperature in different managements from agriculture of conservation as opposed to the obtained with a conventional management, and to determine how affect these variations of temperature to the microbial populations associated to the rhizosphere of the culture. Field experiences have been made in four different managements under a same soil, located in contiguous subparcels; one of direct seeding (DS, two of direct seeding with cover (DSC with different antiquity from implantation and a conventional tillage (CT. It has been made an exhaustive measurement of the temperature of the soil during three years and a monitoring of the evolution of the microbial populations. The analysis of the results allows to conclude that during the period of culture takes place a diminution of the temperature in SD and SDC with respect to LC, with smaller oscillations of temperature for the conservation agriculture. In addition, an increase in the microbial populations associated to SD and SDC with respect to LC is observed, that would indicate the existence of optimal intervals of temperature for the microbial growth in the managements of

  7. Improving access to oral health care services among underserved populations in the U.S.: is there a role for mid-level dental providers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaefer, H Luke; Miller, Matthew

    2011-08-01

    Nearly one-third of U.S. citizens lack access to basic preventive and primary oral health care services, which is primarily the result of the high costs of care and the uneven geographic distribution of dental providers. This article examines the case for and against one possible solution to address these barriers to oral health care: the introduction of a mid-level dental provider (MDP) position within the dental field.

  8. 日粮中添加维基尼亚霉素对肉牛瘤胃微生物数量的影响%Influence of adding virginiamycin to diets of steers on ruminal microbial populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭同军; 王加启; 卜登攀; 王建平; 刘开朗; 李旦; 栾绍宇; 哈斯额尔敦

    2009-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of adding virginiamycin to diets of steers on ruminal microbial populations. Four ruminally cannulated steers (559.4±30.1 kg) were utilized in a repeat crossover design. Treatment group added virginiamycin. Ruminal fluid was collected on 28 d of experimental period, starting at 8:00 prefeeding and at 12:00 and 16:00 post-feeding from the anterior, dorsal, and mid-ventral region of the rumen. The Amount of microbial was counted after culturing using roll-tube technique. We detected that adding virginiamycin to diets of steers could active suppression and regulate amylolytic bacteria populations and proteolytic bacteria populations (P<0.01). But the populations of cellulolytic bacteria, total viable bacteria and protozoon were no difference between control group and treatment group. Statistics result of virginiamycin regulated that the different sampling time showed: viginiamycin could inhibite and regulate amylolytic bacteria populations when the sampling time was at 8:00 (P<0.05). Viginiamycin could inhibite and regulate amylolytic bacteria populations and proteolytic bacteria populations when the sampling time was at 12: 00(P<0.05). But the populations of cellulolytic bacteria, total viable bacteria and protozoon were no difference between control group and treatment group at the different sampling time. But the populations of total viable bacteria and protozoon to showed a tendency that "high-low-high" with time changed between control group and treatment group. The results showed that virginiamycin could active suppression and regulate amylolytic bacteria populations and proteolytic bacteria populations on high concentration. Therefore, virginiamycin potentially could prevent ruminal acidosis.%选用4头体重为559.4±30.1 kg,健康且装有瘤胃瘘管的4岁龄杂交肉牛,进行重复交叉试验设计,处理组添加维吉尼亚霉素,旨在观察日粮中添加维基尼亚霉素对瘤胃微生物

  9. The role of gender inequities in women's access to reproductive health care: a population-level study of Namibia, Kenya, Nepal, and India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namasivayam A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Amrita Namasivayam,1 Donatus C Osuorah,2 Rahman Syed,3 Diddy Antai3,41Department of Public Health, Division of Global Health (IHCAR, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Department of Pediatrics, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Anambra, Nigeria; 3Department of Public Health, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; 4Division of Global Health and Inequalities, The Angels Trust, Abuja, NigeriaBackground: The role of gender inequities in explaining women's access to reproductive health care was examined in four countries (two sub-Saharan African and two South Asian countries. The extent of gender inequities varies across and within countries, and is rooted in the different cultural practices and gender norms within these different countries, and differences in the status and autonomy of women.Methods: Demographic and Health Survey data from women aged 15–49 years within these countries were analyzed with multivariate logistic regression analysis to examine the role of multidimensional characteristics of gender inequities, operationalized as access to skilled antenatal care, tetanus toxoid injection during pregnancy, and access to skilled antenatal care.Results: Significant associations were found between several dimensions of gender inequities (with the exception of decision-making autonomy and reported use of maternal reproductive health care services. Several pathways of influence between the outcome and exposure variables were also identified.Conclusion: Dimensions of gender inequities (with the exception of decision-making autonomy differentially influenced woman's use of reproductive health care services, thus highlighting the urgent need for concerted and sustained efforts to change these harmful traditional values if several of these countries are to meet Millennium Development Goal-5.Keywords: women, gender inequities, reproductive health care, Namibia, Kenya, Nepal, India

  10. A polyphasic approach to study the dynamics of microbial population of an organic wheat sourdough during its conversion to gluten-free sourdough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhomme, Emilie; Mezaize, Sandra; Ducasse, Maren Bonnand; Chiron, Hubert; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine; Chaillou, Stéphane; Zagorec, Monique; Dousset, Xavier; Onno, Bernard

    2014-03-01

    To develop a method for organic gluten-free (GF) sourdough bread production, a long-term and original wheat sourdough was refreshed with GF flours. The dynamics of the sourdough microbiota during five months of back-slopping were analyzed by classical enumeration and molecular methods, including PCR-temporal temperature gel electrophoresis (PCR-TTGE), multiplex PCR, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The results showed that the yeast counts remained constant, although Saccharomyces cerevisiae, present in the initial wheat sourdough, was no longer detected in the GF sourdough, while lactic acid bacteria (LAB) counts increased consistently. In the first phase, which was aimed at obtaining a GF sourdough from wheat sourdough, Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis, L. plantarum, and L. spicheri were the main LAB species detected. During the second phase, aimed at maintaining the GF sourdough, the L. plantarum and L. spicheri populations decreased whereas L. sanfranciscensis persisted and L. sakei became the predominant species. Multiplex PCRs also revealed the presence of several L. sakei strains in the GF sourdough. In a search for the origin of the LAB species, PCR-TTGE was performed on the flour samples but only L. sanfranciscensis was detected, suggesting a flour origin for this typical sourdough species. Thus, while replacement of the wheat flour by GF flour influenced the sourdough microbiota, some of the original sourdough LAB and yeast species remained in the GF sourdough.

  11. Effects of dietary inclusion of fermented cottonseed meal on growth, cecal microbial population, small intestinal morphology, and digestive enzyme activity of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Tang, Jiang-wu; Yao, Xiao-hong; Wu, Yi-fei; Wang, Xin; Feng, Jie

    2013-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to test the feeding value of fermented cottonseed meal (FCSM) in broilers. In experiment 1, 480 1-day-old male yellow-feathered broilers were allocated into 4 dietary treatments with 6 replicates (20 birds per replicate) to examine the effects of FCSM on the growth response of chickens. Experimental feeding was performed for 6 weeks in two phases (starter, days 0 to 21; finisher, days 22 to 42). FCSM was used at 0, 40, 80, and 120 g/kg levels to replace soybean meal in the basal diet. The dietary inclusion of 40 and 80 g/kg FCSM increased (quadratic (Q): pmicrobial populations, intestinal morphology, and digestive enzyme activity of broilers. The number of lactobacilli in the cecal digesta increased at day 21 (pamylase and protease at day 21, as well as protease at day 42. In conclusion, the appropriate inclusion of FCSM improves growth, cecal microflora, intestinal morphology, and digestive enzyme activity in yellow-feathered broilers.

  12. Bioremediation of chlorimuron-ethyl-contaminated soil by Hansschlegelia sp. strain CHL1 and the changes of indigenous microbial population and N-cycling function genes during the bioremediation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liqiang; Li, Xinyu; Li, Xu; Su, Zhencheng; Zhang, Chenggang; Zhang, Huiwen

    2014-06-15

    Long-term and excessive application of the herbicide chlorimuron-ethyl has led to soil degradation and crop rotation barriers. In the current study, we isolated bacterial strain Hansschlegelia sp. CHL1, which can utilize chlorimuron-ethyl as its sole carbon and energy source, and investigated its application in soil bioremediation. Indigenous microbial populations and N-cycling function in the soil were also investigated during the bioremediation process by monitoring the copy numbers of bacterial and fungal marker genes, as well as N-cycling functional genes (nifH, amoA, nirS, and nirK). Results showed that >95% of chlorimuron-ethyl could be degraded within 45 days in soils inoculated with CHL1. Inoculation at two time points resulted in a higher remediation efficiency and longer survival time than a single inoculation. At the end of the 60-day incubation, the copy numbers of most indicator genes were recovered to the level of the control, even in the single-inoculation soils. A double inoculation was necessary for recovery of nifH. However, the abundance of nirK and ammonia-oxidizing bacterial genes were significantly inhibited regardless of inoculum. The results suggested that CHL1 is effective for the remediation of chlorimuron-ethyl-contaminated soil, and could partially reduce the toxic effects of chlorimuron-ethyl on soil microorganisms.

  13. Respondent-driven sampling (rds as a new method to access vulnerable populations to hiv: its application in men who have sex with men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Estrada M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 30 million people are living with hiv all around the world in 2010. The most vulnerable hiv/aids groups are sex workers, intravenous drug users, transgender people and population of men who have sex with men (msm. Up to now, the surveillance and behavioral studies on sexual transmitted diseases (sti and hiv have been conducted using intentional sampling methods like the snowball methodology, but this kind of sampling does not achieve representation and does not represent a conclusive method for the study of hidden populations in order to extend and apply its results to the general population. Furthermore, it is necessary to add to this limitation the lack of knowledge about the size of these groups that must face situations of stigma and discrimination. A decade ago a new method was designed to sample hidden and hard to reach populations based on Markov theories and on chain recruitment. This new method is known as respondent-driven sampling (rds and it has been used in several behavioral and hiv prevalence studies. This review article presents the background, the theoretical support and a description of the method. It also analyzes some studies carried out using this new methodology.

  14. Open Access Resources for Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) in rice (Oryza sativa) illustrate the power of population-specific mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing food production is essential to meet the demands of a growing human population, with its rising income levels and nutritional expectations. New sources of genetic variation are key to enhancing the productivity, sustainability and resilience of crop varieties and agricultural systems that...

  15. Factores que inciden en el acceso de la población desplazada a las instituciones prestadoras de servicios de salud en Colombia Factors affecting access to health care institutions by the internally displaced population in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Susana Mogollón-Pérez

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available En Colombia, el desplazamiento por conflicto armado genera importantes repercusiones económicas y sociales, que afectan, entre otros, a la salud. A pesar de los esfuerzos normativos, el acceso a los servicios de salud de la población desplazada es limitado. Con el objetivo de analizar los factores que desde las instituciones inciden en el acceso potencial de la población desplazada a los servicios de salud, se desarrolló un estudio cualitativo descriptivo, exploratorio, mediante 81 entrevistas individuales semiestructuradas a actores principales. Una insuficiente financiación y dificultades de los proveedores para recibir el pago de las aseguradoras, junto a las indefiniciones y límites del aseguramiento del Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud, son las principales barreras al acceso a la atención en salud de la población desplazada. Acceso que también se ve afectado por los numerosos procedimientos establecidos para la atención, la escasa coordinación inter e intrasectorial y los limitados recursos de las instituciones prestadoras de servicios de salud de carácter público. Se requiere una acción gubernamental efectiva que garantice el derecho a la salud en este colectivo.In Colombia, the on-going armed conflict causes displacement of thousands of persons that suffer its economic, social, and health consequences. Despite government regulatory efforts, displaced people still experience serious problems in securing access to health care. In order to analyze the institutional factors that affect access to health care by the internally displaced population, a qualitative, exploratory, and descriptive study was carried out by means of semi-structured individual interviews with a criterion sample of stakeholders (81. A narrative content analysis was performed, with mixed generation of categories and segmentation of data by themes and informants. Inadequate funding, providers' problems with reimbursement by insurers, and lack of

  16. Open Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  17. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  18. População microbiana total e solubilizadora de fosfato em solo submetido a diferentes sistemas de cultivo Total microbial and phosphate-solubilizing population in soil submitted to different cultivation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIOVANE BARROTI

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de diferentes espécies de plantas, fontes de fósforo e calagem sobre a população microbiana total e solubilizadora de fosfato. Foram isolados fungos e bactérias capazes de solubilizar hidroxiapatita, proporcionando P solúvel. O experimento utilizado foi em blocos ao acaso com fatorial 3x3x2. E os fatores avaliados foram espécies de plantas (controle, braquiária e guandu, fertilizantes (controle, superfosfato simples e fosfato de rocha, ambos na dose de 400 kg ha-1 de P(20(5 e calagem (com e sem calcário. A população bacteriana cresceu pelo efeito da calagem, e a de fungos aumentou, independentemente da calagem, nas parcelas cultivadas com braquiária e fertilizadas com superfosfato. Foi constatado incremento de biomassa-P microbiana sobre o controle por influência da braquiária (23,9%, do superfosfato (30,9% e da calagem (46,9%. O número de bactérias solubilizadoras foi favorecido pela calagem ou pelo plantio de guandu adubado com fosfato natural ou com braquiária sem adubação. Os fungos solubilizadores aumentaram na ausência de planta ou de adubação e na presença de guandu com fosfato natural. Finalmente, a calagem favoreceumais o crescimento dos fungos solubilizadores, em comparação com o controle, nos tratamentos fosfato natural, braquiária ou guandu.The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different plant species, phosphorus sources, and liming on the total microbial and phosphate-solubilizing population. In order to achieve that, bacteria and fungi capable of solubilizing hydroxyapatite providing available P were isolated. An experiment was carried out in a randomized factorial block design 3x3x2. The factors evaluated were plant species (control, Brachiaria ruziziensis and Cajanus cajan, fertilizers (control, simple superphosphate and rock phosphate, both at the dose of 400 kg ha-1 of P(20(5 and liming (with and without lime. While the bacterial

  19. Neonatal microbial colonization in mice promotes prolonged dominance of CD11b+Gr-1+cells and accelerated establishment of the CD4+T cell population in the spleen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Matilde Bylov; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Bergström, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    To assess the microbial influence on postnatal hematopoiesis, we examined the role of early life microbial colonization on the composition of leukocyte subsets in the neonatal spleen. A high number of CD11b+Gr-1+ splenocytes present perinatally was sustained for a longer period in conventionally...

  20. A Study to Establish Baseline Data on the Retiree Population’s Perceptions of Access and Health Care Delivered through Outpatient Services at Ireland Army Community Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    common household products, there are many ideas and principles that are used in marketing consumer products that can be applied to primary health care...Design & Analysis, Chicago: Free Press, 1955. Kotler , Phillip., Marketing for Nonprofit Organizations, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1975...to recapture ’the retiree population around IACH, Ft. Knox, KY. and to implement a marketing strategy which would attempt to recapture a portion of

  1. Sensing microbial RNA in the cytosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eVABRET

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system faces the difficult task of keeping a fine balance between sensitive detection of microbial presence and avoidance of autoimmunity. To this aim, key mechanisms of innate responses rely on isolation of pathogens in specialized subcellular compartments, or sensing of specific microbial patterns absent from the host. Efficient detection of foreign RNA in the cytosol requires an additional layer of complexity from the immune system. In this particular case, innate sensors should be able to distinguish self and non-self molecules that share several similar properties. In this review, we discuss this interplay between cytosolic pattern recognition receptors and the microbial RNA they detect. We describe how microbial RNAs gain access to the cytosol, which receptors they activate and counter-strategies developed by microorganisms to avoid this response.

  2. Effects of different forest stand improvement models on soil enzyme activities and microbial population%不同林分改造模式对土壤酶活性及微生物数量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭雄飞; 陈璇; 黎华寿; 冼丽铧; 董奇妤; 陈红跃

    2015-01-01

    以广东省佛山市南海区的4种宫胁法改造林地、传统法改造林地和不进行林分改造的对照样地为研究对象,对不同样地的土壤酶活性和土壤微生物数量进行研究,以探讨不同林分改造类型的土壤生物学特性。结果显示:不同林分改造类型的林地土壤酶活性差异显著,其中宫胁法2和传统法林地土壤酶活性显著高于其它改造类型,宫胁法2改造林地土壤脲酶、磷酸酶和过氧化氢酶活性均居最高水平,宫胁法3和宫胁法4最低;不同的林分改造措施土壤微生物各生理类群的数量差异显著,但均表现为细菌数量最多,放线菌次之,真菌最少;各改造类型中,宫胁法2在土壤细菌、真菌、放线菌数量和微生物总量中均表现最高,宫胁法1在细菌、真菌和微生物总量均表现最低,说明宫胁法2在增加土壤微生物数量上表现最为显著。因此,宫胁法2最有利于改善土壤生物学特性,从而能创造植被恢复过程中良好的微生态环境。%In order to investigate the improvement effects of soil biological characteristics in different types of forest stand in Nanhai District, Foshan city, Guangdong province (with 4 kinds of Miyawaki methods, traditional transforming method and no improved), the soil enzyme activities and microbial population of the sample plots were studied toifnd out the soil biological properties with different forest transforming types. The results show that soil enzyme activities under different stand improvement models was different, of them Miyawaki method No.2 and traditional method had signiifcantly higher soil enzyme activities than those of other improvement models; The activities of soil urease, phosphatase and catalase in the lands transformed with Miyawaki method No.2 were the highest of all, those of Miyawaki method No.3 and Miyawaki method No.4were the lowest; The soil microbial quantity of different physiological

  3. Mathematical modeling of microbial growth in milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhony Tiago Teleken

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model to predict microbial growth in milk was developed and analyzed. The model consists of a system of two differential equations of first order. The equations are based on physical hypotheses of population growth. The model was applied to five different sets of data of microbial growth in dairy products selected from Combase, which is the most important database in the area with thousands of datasets from around the world, and the results showed a good fit. In addition, the model provides equations for the evaluation of the maximum specific growth rate and the duration of the lag phase which may provide useful information about microbial growth.

  4. EVIDENCE FOR MICROBIAL ENHANCED ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY IN HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electrical conductivity of sediments during microbial mineralization of diesel was investigated in a mesoscale column experiment consisting of biotic contaminated and uncontaminated columns. Microbial population numbers increased with a clear pattern of depth zonation within the ...

  5. Understanding Rural Population Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranahan, David A.; Beale, Calvin L.

    2002-01-01

    A quarter of nonmetro counties lost population in the 1990s, but population loss was not related to poverty rate or low educational levels, perhaps because low-skill workers can no longer expect better wages in urban areas. Population loss was related to low population density and remoteness (which decrease access to services), lack of natural…

  6. Universality of human microbial dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashan, Amir; Gibson, Travis E.; Friedman, Jonathan; Carey, Vincent J.; Weiss, Scott T.; Hohmann, Elizabeth L.; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Human-associated microbial communities have a crucial role in determining our health and well-being, and this has led to the continuing development of microbiome-based therapies such as faecal microbiota transplantation. These microbial communities are very complex, dynamic and highly personalized ecosystems, exhibiting a high degree of inter-individual variability in both species assemblages and abundance profiles. It is not known whether the underlying ecological dynamics of these communities, which can be parameterized by growth rates, and intra- and inter-species interactions in population dynamics models, are largely host-independent (that is, universal) or host-specific. If the inter-individual variability reflects host-specific dynamics due to differences in host lifestyle, physiology or genetics, then generic microbiome manipulations may have unintended consequences, rendering them ineffective or even detrimental. Alternatively, microbial ecosystems of different subjects may exhibit universal dynamics, with the inter-individual variability mainly originating from differences in the sets of colonizing species. Here we develop a new computational method to characterize human microbial dynamics. By applying this method to cross-sectional data from two large-scale metagenomic studies—the Human Microbiome Project and the Student Microbiome Project—we show that gut and mouth microbiomes display pronounced universal dynamics, whereas communities associated with certain skin sites are probably shaped by differences in the host environment. Notably, the universality of gut microbial dynamics is not observed in subjects with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection but is observed in the same set of subjects after faecal microbiota transplantation. These results fundamentally improve our understanding of the processes that shape human microbial ecosystems, and pave the way to designing general microbiome-based therapies.

  7. The association between self-reported grocery store access, fruit and vegetable intake, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, and obesity in a racially diverse, low-income population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Nichol Gase

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to examine the relationship between self-reported time and distance to the nearest retail grocery store, healthy and unhealthy food consumption, and objectively measured body mass index. We conducted a survey with 1,503 racially diverse, low-income residents at five public health centers in Los Angeles County. Most participants reported shopping at a supermarket (86.7% and driving (59.9% to their usual source for groceries. Over half reported living less than a mile from (58.9% and traveling five minutes or less to reach (50.3% the nearest grocery store. In the multivariable regression models, neither self-reported distance nor time to the nearest grocery store was consistently associated with fruit and vegetable intake, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, or body mass index. Results suggest the need to consider access and quality as well as urban planning and transportation, when examining the relationship between the retail food environment and health outcomes.

  8. Effects of Aluminum Phosphide on Soil Microbial Population and Enzyme Activities%磷化铝对土壤微生物数量和酶活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仉欢; 朱玉坤; 乔康; 王开运

    2012-01-01

    Effects of aluminum phosphide (0.1, 1 mg·g-1 and 10 mg·g-1) on soil microbial population and enzyme activities were studied under laboratory control condition. The results indicated that, all concentrations of aluminum phosphide had inhibitory effect on soil bacteria, fungi and actinomyces and the inhibitory effect was more obvious with concentration increased. However, the effect caused by low concentration (0.1 mg·g-1) returned to the control level after a period of treatment. Aluminum phosphide had inhibitory effect on soil urease, and the inhibitory effect increased with the increasing concentration. Low concentration of aluminum phosphide had no significant inhibitory effect on soil invertase, while the treatment with the highest concentration (10 mg·g-1) had the greatest inhibition all the time. All concentrations of aluminum phosphide had inhibitory or stimulatory effect on soil hydrogen peroxidase in the early stage, while the effect returned to the control level on 30 days after treatment. The present data supported the conclusion that aluminum phosphide at the routine dose had certain effect on soil microbial population and enzyme activities, but the effect disappeared and recovered to the control level after a period.%为明确磷化铝对土壤微生物数量和酶活性的影响,采用室内培养的方法,研究了经0.1、1 mg? g4和10 mg?g-1 3个浓度磷化铝熏蒸处理后,供试土壤中微生物数量和土壤酶活性的变化.结果表明,磷化铝处理土壤后,各个浓度的磷化铝对土壤细菌、真菌和放线菌数量具有抑制作用,浓度越高,抑制作用越强,但一段时间后低浓度(0.1 mg?g-1)处理对土壤微生物数量的影响恢复至对照水平.磷化铝对土壤脲酶表现为抑制作用,并随浓度升高而增强;低浓度处理对土壤中的蔗糖酶活性抑制作用不明显,而高浓度(10mg?g-1)处理表现为强烈的抑制作用;各浓度处理初期对土壤过氧化氢酶表现为

  9. Designing the Microbial Research Commons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlir, Paul F. [Board on Research Data and Information Policy and Global Affairs, Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Recent decades have witnessed an ever-increasing range and volume of digital data. All elements of the pillars of science--whether observation, experiment, or theory and modeling--are being transformed by the continuous cycle of generation, dissemination, and use of factual information. This is even more so in terms of the re-using and re-purposing of digital scientific data beyond the original intent of the data collectors, often with dramatic results. We all know about the potential benefits and impacts of digital data, but we are also aware of the barriers, the challenges in maximizing the access, and use of such data. There is thus a need to think about how a data infrastructure can enhance capabilities for finding, using, and integrating information to accelerate discovery and innovation. How can we best implement an accessible, interoperable digital environment so that the data can be repeatedly used by a wide variety of users in different settings and with different applications? With this objective: to use the microbial communities and microbial data, literature, and the research materials themselves as a test case, the Board on Research Data and Information held an International Symposium on Designing the Microbial Research Commons at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC on 8-9 October 2009. The symposium addressed topics such as models to lower the transaction costs and support access to and use of microbiological materials and digital resources from the perspective of publicly funded research, public-private interactions, and developing country concerns. The overall goal of the symposium was to stimulate more research and implementation of improved legal and institutional models for publicly funded research in microbiology.

  10. Sprawl and Accessibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bruegmann

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay argues that many of the assumptions that have been made about sprawl are misleading or just wrong. Nowhere has this been more the case than in debates about transportation and access. Because of this, it is not surprising that a good many of the policies advocated by proponents of Smart Growth would almost certainly lead to reduced mobility and impaired accessibility for a large part of the population. At very least, the debates over sprawl have pitted private vs. public transportation in a way that has contributed to serious underfunding of transportation infrastructure of all kinds.

  11. Populações microbianas em solo agrícola sob aplicação de lodos de curtume Microbial populations affected by the soil disposal of tannery sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Ermindo Cavallet

    2008-12-01

    estado natural.Tannery residues are potential pollution sources in several regions of Brazil, mainly in the State of Rio Grande do Sul. One of the alternatives for the final destination of the sludge resulting from the waste water treatment of tanning industries is the disposal and recycling in the soil. To evaluate the effects of two waste types originated from primary treatment of tannery residual water on soil microbial populations, an open air pot experiment was carried out in a Paleudult soil with ten percent clay from Estância Velha, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, where several tannery industries are located. Mineral fertilization was compared to sludge application of 15, 30 and 60 t ha-1 of sludge originated either from tannin or Cr tanning agents. One treatment with cattle manure and a control were also included. Chromium soil, organic C concentrations, pH and bacteria, fungi and actinomyces populations were determined. Biological degradation was efficient for sludge with Cr up to 60 t ha-1 level and for tannin sludge up to 30 t ha-1 dose. Except for the sludge with Cr on the fungus population, the bacteria, fungi and actinomyces populations were stimulated by tannery sludge application. Due to the organic matter concentration in the soil, bacteria microbial populations were stimulated more than fungi and actinomyces. Chromium, pH and organic C increased as a result of the soil disposal of tannery sludges. The application of both tannery residues did not decrease the biological degradation process when compared to normal soil levels.

  12. Enhancing the microbial population within poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent research advances have led to an explosion in information on the composition and impact of the microbiome on health and productivity that is nothing short of revolutionary. The accelerating rate of discoveries is dizzying, and we see in a way that we never could before the importance of the ...

  13. Accessible Knowledge - Knowledge on Accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Inge Mette

    2015-01-01

    Although serious efforts are made internationally and nationally, it is a slow process to make our physical environment accessible. In the actual design process, architects play a major role. But what kinds of knowledge, including research-based knowledge, do practicing architects make use of when...... designing accessible environments? The answer to the question is crucially important since it affects how knowledge is distributed and how accessibility can be ensured. In order to get first-hand knowledge about the design process and the sources from which they gain knowledge, 11 qualitative interviews...... were conducted with architects with experience of designing for accessibility. The analysis draws on two theoretical distinctions. The first is research-based knowledge versus knowledge used by architects. The second is context-independent knowledge versus context-dependent knowledge. The practitioners...

  14. Microbial conversions of terpenoids

    OpenAIRE

    Parshikov, Igor A

    2015-01-01

    The monograph describes examples of the application of microbial technology for obtaining of derivatives of terpenoids. Obtaining new derivatives of terpenoids, including artemisinin derivatives with increased antimalarial activity, is an important goal of research in microbial biotechnology and medicinal chemistry.

  15. Belém’s built form and its developments to the formation of a system of open spaces accessible to population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Duarte Cardoso

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a characterization of the built space of Belém highlighting, its estuarine condition, physical geography and its economic, social and spacial development. It is based on Quapá-SEL Workshop conclusions held in Belém, in May 2015, in which teachers and students from São Paulo and Pará Federal Universities assessed the conditions of urban open spaces of the city. The results highlight a disarticulation between real estate agents strategies and of urban management towards structuring an Open Spaces System (SEL in Portuguese, as well as its limited appropriation by the population. There is a remarkable differentiation between the landscapes of central area in opposition / contraposition to that at the city’s expansion area. This debate showed how much permanent preservation areas on the banks of inland rivers and islands (the main green spaces of the city and main linkage with the Amazonian biome, with its landscape potentials, have been unevenly appropriated in the city, through gentrification.

  16. Genetic divergence among populations and accessions of the spineless peach palm from Pampa Hermosa landrace used in the heart-of-palm agribusiness in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Alves-Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although originally domesticated for its fruit, exploitation of the peach palm (Bactris gasipaes Kunth in the production of gourmet heart-of-palm has also become an important activity, hence the need for improved material for large-scale production, on employing the Pampa Hermosa landrace as the seed source. In this study 11 microsatellite markers were used to evaluate genetic divergence among 96 elite plants representing four populations of spineless peach palm from the above cited source. Genetic variability was high (H T = 0.82. The low levels of divergence [F ST (0.023, G ST' (0.005] and the high number of migrants (Nm -3.8 to 52.2 indicated significant interpopulation gene flow. Some of the plants presented high levels of genetic divergence, but the plants were grouped independently of their geographic origins. When combined with morpho-agronomic evaluation, the results found could substantially contribute towards mounting an efficient tool for obtaining superior genotypes with wide genetic variability for improvement programs.

  17. Genetic divergence among populations and accessions of the spineless peach palm from Pampa Hermosa landrace used in the heart-of-palm agribusiness in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Pereira, Alessandro; Clement, Charles R; Picanço-Rodrigues, Doriane

    2012-04-01

    Although originally domesticated for its fruit, exploitation of the peach palm (Bactris gasipaes Kunth) in the production of gourmet heart-of-palm has also become an important activity, hence the need for improved material for large-scale production, on employing the Pampa Hermosa landrace as the seed source. In this study 11 microsatellite markers were used to evaluate genetic divergence among 96 elite plants representing four populations of spineless peach palm from the above cited source. Genetic variability was high (H(T) = 0.82). The low levels of divergence [F(ST) (0.023), G(ST)' (0.005)] and the high number of migrants (Nm - 3.8 to 52.2) indicated significant interpopulation gene flow. Some of the plants presented high levels of genetic divergence, but the plants were grouped independently of their geographic origins. When combined with morpho-agronomic evaluation, the results found could substantially contribute towards mounting an efficient tool for obtaining superior genotypes with wide genetic variability for improvement programs.

  18. Open access

    CERN Document Server

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispe...

  19. Childhood microbial keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah G Al Otaibi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Children with suspected microbial keratitis require comprehensive evaluation and management. Early recognition, identifying the predisposing factors and etiological microbial organisms, and instituting appropriate treatment measures have a crucial role in outcome. Ocular trauma was the leading cause of childhood microbial keratitis in our study.

  20. Microfluidics and microbial engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Songzi; Cheng, Danhui; Sun, Fei; Hsing, I-Ming

    2016-02-01

    The combination of microbial engineering and microfluidics is synergistic in nature. For example, microfluidics is benefiting from the outcome of microbial engineering and many reported point-of-care microfluidic devices employ engineered microbes as functional parts for the microsystems. In addition, microbial engineering is facilitated by various microfluidic techniques, due to their inherent strength in high-throughput screening and miniaturization. In this review article, we firstly examine the applications of engineered microbes for toxicity detection, biosensing, and motion generation in microfluidic platforms. Secondly, we look into how microfluidic technologies facilitate the upstream and downstream processes of microbial engineering, including DNA recombination, transformation, target microbe selection, mutant characterization, and microbial function analysis. Thirdly, we highlight an emerging concept in microbial engineering, namely, microbial consortium engineering, where the behavior of a multicultural microbial community rather than that of a single cell/species is delineated. Integrating the disciplines of microfluidics and microbial engineering opens up many new opportunities, for example in diagnostics, engineering of microbial motors, development of portable devices for genetics, high throughput characterization of genetic mutants, isolation and identification of rare/unculturable microbial species, single-cell analysis with high spatio-temporal resolution, and exploration of natural microbial communities.

  1. An Economic Framework of Microbial Trade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Tasoff

    Full Text Available A large fraction of microbial life on earth exists in complex communities where metabolic exchange is vital. Microbes trade essential resources to promote their own growth in an analogous way to countries that exchange goods in modern economic markets. Inspired by these similarities, we developed a framework based on general equilibrium theory (GET from economics to predict the population dynamics of trading microbial communities. Our biotic GET (BGET model provides an a priori theory of the growth benefits of microbial trade, yielding several novel insights relevant to understanding microbial ecology and engineering synthetic communities. We find that the economic concept of comparative advantage is a necessary condition for mutualistic trade. Our model suggests that microbial communities can grow faster when species are unable to produce essential resources that are obtained through trade, thereby promoting metabolic specialization and increased intercellular exchange. Furthermore, we find that species engaged in trade exhibit a fundamental tradeoff between growth rate and relative population abundance, and that different environments that put greater pressure on group selection versus individual selection will promote varying strategies along this growth-abundance spectrum. We experimentally tested this tradeoff using a synthetic consortium of Escherichia coli cells and found the results match the predictions of the model. This framework provides a foundation to study natural and engineered microbial communities through a new lens based on economic theories developed over the past century.

  2. An Economic Framework of Microbial Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasoff, Joshua; Mee, Michael T; Wang, Harris H

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of microbial life on earth exists in complex communities where metabolic exchange is vital. Microbes trade essential resources to promote their own growth in an analogous way to countries that exchange goods in modern economic markets. Inspired by these similarities, we developed a framework based on general equilibrium theory (GET) from economics to predict the population dynamics of trading microbial communities. Our biotic GET (BGET) model provides an a priori theory of the growth benefits of microbial trade, yielding several novel insights relevant to understanding microbial ecology and engineering synthetic communities. We find that the economic concept of comparative advantage is a necessary condition for mutualistic trade. Our model suggests that microbial communities can grow faster when species are unable to produce essential resources that are obtained through trade, thereby promoting metabolic specialization and increased intercellular exchange. Furthermore, we find that species engaged in trade exhibit a fundamental tradeoff between growth rate and relative population abundance, and that different environments that put greater pressure on group selection versus individual selection will promote varying strategies along this growth-abundance spectrum. We experimentally tested this tradeoff using a synthetic consortium of Escherichia coli cells and found the results match the predictions of the model. This framework provides a foundation to study natural and engineered microbial communities through a new lens based on economic theories developed over the past century.

  3. Access French

    CERN Document Server

    Grosz, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Access is the major new language series designed with the needs of today's generation of students firmly in mind. Whether learning for leisure or business purposes or working towards a curriculum qualification, Access French is specially designed for adults of all ages and gives students a thorough grounding in all the skills required to understand, speak, read and write contemporary French from scratch. The coursebook consists of 10 units covering different topic areas, each of which includes Language Focus panels explaining the structures covered and a comprehensive glossary. Learning tips

  4. Hemodialysis access - self care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - ...

  5. Atividade e população microbiana envolvida nas transformações do enxofre em solos com diferentes vegetações Activity and microbial populations involved in sulfur cycling in soils with different vegetations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Rêgo Oliveira Pinto

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar as populações microbianas e suas atividades envolvidas no ciclo do S, de solos virgem e cultivado, e as suas relações com as diferentes frações de S no solo. Das populações de microrganismos pesquisados, apenas foram encontradas as bactérias autótrofas oxidantes de S0 em pH 5,0 e as heterótrofas oxidantes de tiossulfato, que representaram menos de 0,1% das bactérias totais. A média das bactérias autótrofas foi o dobro das heterótrofas. As maiores contagens de bactérias totais, autótrofas e heterótrofas foram encontradas nos solos com milho, de pastagem e de floresta integrada, respectivamente. A atividade da arilsulfatase foi maior em solo de floresta integrada e a da rodanase em solo de pastagem. A arilsulfatase correlacionou com as populações de heterotróficos, C orgânico, S total, S orgânico, matéria orgânica e umidade do solo; e a rodanase com C orgânico, S total e S orgânico. Os teores de S orgânico e sulfato foram de 94-98% e 2-6% do S total, respectivamente. Os maiores teores de S total e orgânico foram encontrados no solo de floresta integrada. O S total correlacionou com o S orgânico, umidade e matéria orgânica, e o S orgânico com a matéria orgânica.The objective of this work was to assess the microbial populations and its activities involved in the S cycle, of virgin and cultivated soils, and its relationships with the different fractions of S in the soil. The influence of soils with different vegetations on microbiological and biochemical characteristics was investigated. Out of the different populations of microorganisms examined, only the S0-oxidizing autotrophic bacteria and thiosulfate-oxidizing heterotrophs that represented less than 0.1% of the total bacteria were found. The average of autotrophs was double that of the heterotrophs. The highest counts of total bacteria, autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms were found in corn, pasture and forest

  6. A thermodynamic theory of microbial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond-Le Quéméner, Elie; Bouchez, Théodore

    2014-08-01

    Our ability to model the growth of microbes only relies on empirical laws, fundamentally restricting our understanding and predictive capacity in many environmental systems. In particular, the link between energy balances and growth dynamics is still not understood. Here we demonstrate a microbial growth equation relying on an explicit theoretical ground sustained by Boltzmann statistics, thus establishing a relationship between microbial growth rate and available energy. The validity of our equation was then questioned by analyzing the microbial isotopic fractionation phenomenon, which can be viewed as a kinetic consequence of the differences in energy contents of isotopic isomers used for growth. We illustrate how the associated theoretical predictions are actually consistent with recent experimental evidences. Our work links microbial population dynamics to the thermodynamic driving forces of the ecosystem, which opens the door to many biotechnological and ecological developments.

  7. Phylogenetic & Physiological Profiling of Microbial Communities of Contaminated Soils/Sediments: Identifying Microbial consortia...

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terence L. Marsh

    2004-05-26

    The goals of this study were: (1) survey the microbial community in soil samples from a site contaminated with heavy metals using new rapid molecular techniques that are culture-independent; (2) identify phylogenetic signatures of microbial populations that correlate with metal ion contamination; and (3) cultivate these diagnostic strains using traditional as well as novel cultivation techniques in order to identify organisms that may be of value in site evaluation/management or bioremediation.

  8. Effects of Herbicide 2,4-D on Soil Microbial Population%除草剂2,4-D 对土壤微生物类群的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩丽珍; 赵德刚; 罗信旭

    2014-01-01

    为了评价除草剂2,4-D 对土壤生态系统的影响,采用构建人工微生态的方法,在42 d 内动态评估供试土壤中微生物类群的变化。结果表明:当2,4-D 使用浓度为5 mg/kg 时,对土壤细菌及放线菌均没有显著影响,对真菌的影响也可以较快地恢复;浓度为25 mg/kg 和50 mg/kg 的处理,细菌和真菌总数均表现下降,但细菌的适应性更强;放线菌总数则表现出一定的波动性。2,4-D 处理浓度越高,对真菌的抑制作用也越强。因此,建议将土壤中真菌总数作为评估除草剂2,4-D 污染土壤生态环境效应的敏感指标。%In order to assess the effects of herbicide 2,4-D on soil microecological systems,the dynamic changes of soil microbial population were evaluated during 42 days incubation times by constructing manual micro-ecology.The results showed that bacteria and actinomyces were not suffered significant effects,and the influence on fungus was recovered soon when soils were treated with 5 mg/kg 2,4-D.Whenever 25 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg of 2,4-D were added to the soils,the number of bacteria and fungus was decreased, whereas the adaptability of bacteria was stronger than fungus.Meanwhile actinomyces number was risen and fallen,too.And the inhibition on fungus was increased with the higher treated concentration of 2,4-D.It suggested that fungus number could be a sensitive indicator which assessed the ecological effect of environment herbicide 2,4-D polluted.

  9. Rumen microbial (meta)genomics and its application to ruminant production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgavi, D P; Kelly, W J; Janssen, P H; Attwood, G T

    2013-03-01

    Meat and milk produced by ruminants are important agricultural products and are major sources of protein for humans. Ruminant production is of considerable economic value and underpins food security in many regions of the world. However, the sector faces major challenges because of diminishing natural resources and ensuing increases in production costs, and also because of the increased awareness of the environmental impact of farming ruminants. The digestion of feed and the production of enteric methane are key functions that could be manipulated by having a thorough understanding of the rumen microbiome. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and bioinformatics are transforming our understanding of complex microbial ecosystems, including the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. The application of these techniques to the rumen ecosystem has allowed the study of the microbial diversity under different dietary and production conditions. Furthermore, the sequencing of genomes from several cultured rumen bacterial and archaeal species is providing detailed information about their physiology. More recently, metagenomics, mainly aimed at understanding the enzymatic machinery involved in the degradation of plant structural polysaccharides, is starting to produce new insights by allowing access to the total community and sidestepping the limitations imposed by cultivation. These advances highlight the promise of these approaches for characterising the rumen microbial community structure and linking this with the functions of the rumen microbiota. Initial results using high-throughput culture-independent technologies have also shown that the rumen microbiome is far more complex and diverse than the human caecum. Therefore, cataloguing its genes will require a considerable sequencing and bioinformatic effort. Nevertheless, the construction of a rumen microbial gene catalogue through metagenomics and genomic sequencing of key populations is an attainable goal. A rumen

  10. Microbial Profiling Of Cyanobacteria From VIT Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Singh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The application of molecular biological methods to study the diversity and ecology of micro-organisms in natural environments has been practice in mid-1980. The aim of our research is to access the diversity composition and functioning of complex microbial community found in VIT Lake. Molecular ecology is a new field in which microbes can be recognized and their function can be understood at the DNA or RNA level which is useful for constructing genetically modified microbes by recombinant DNA technology for reputed use in the environment. In this research first we will isolate cyanobacteria in lab using conventional methods like broth culture and spread plate method then we will analyze their morphology using various staining methods and DNA and protein composition using electrophoresis method. The applications of community profiling approaches will advance our understanding of the functional role of microbial diversity in VIT Lake controls on microbial community composition.

  11. Access to Local Agriculture and Weight Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua P. Berning

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies examine the impact of the built environment on health outcomes such as obesity. Several studies find for certain populations that access to unhealthy food has a positive effect on obesity, whereas access to healthy choices has a negative effect. Given the growth and popularity of locally grown food, we examine how individual weight outcomes are affected by access to direct-to-consumer local food. After controlling for potential endogeneity, we find that greater access to local ...

  12. A new access scheme in OFDMA systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Xue-lin; YAN Wei; TIAN Hui; ZHANG Ping

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a dynamic random access scheme for orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA) systems. The key features of the proposed scheme are:it is a combination of both the distributed and the centralized schemes, it can accommodate several delay sensitivity classes,and it can adjust the number of random access channels in a media access control (MAC) frame and the access probability according to the outcome of Mobile Terminals access attempts in previous MAC frames. For floating populated packet-based networks, the proposed scheme possibly leads to high average user satisfaction.

  13. Microbial Diversity of Impact-Generated Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontefract, Alexandra; Osinski, Gordon R.; Cockell, Charles S.; Southam, Gordon; McCausland, Phil J. A.; Umoh, Joseph; Holdsworth, David W.

    2016-10-01

    Impact-generated lithologies have recently been identified as viable and important microbial habitats, especially within cold and arid regions such as the polar deserts on Earth. These unique habitats provide protection from environmental stressors, such as freeze-thaw events, desiccation, and UV radiation, and act to trap aerially deposited detritus within the fissures and pore spaces, providing necessary nutrients for endoliths. This study provides the first culture-independent analysis of the microbial community structure within impact-generated lithologies in a Mars analog environment, involving the analysis of 44,534 16S rRNA sequences from an assemblage of 21 rock samples that comprises three shock metamorphism categories. We find that species diversity increases (H = 2.4-4.6) with exposure to higher shock pressures, which leads to the development of three distinct populations. In each population, Actinobacteria were the most abundant (41%, 65%, and 59%), and the dominant phototrophic taxa came from the Chloroflexi. Calculated porosity (a function of shock metamorphism) for these samples correlates (R2 = 0.62) with inverse Simpson indices, accounting for overlap in populations in the higher shock levels. The results of our study show that microbial diversity is tied to the amount of porosity in the target substrate (as a function of shock metamorphism), resulting in the formation of distinct microbial populations.

  14. Structural insights of microbial community of Deulajhari (India hot spring using 16s-rRNA based metagenomic sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Singh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Insights about the distribution of the microbial community prove to be the major goal of understanding microbial ecology which remains to be fully deciphered. Hot springs being hub for the thermophilic microbiota attract the attention of the microbiologists. Deulajhari hot spring cluster is located in the Angul district of Odisha. Covered within a wooded area, Deulajhari hot spring is also fed by the plant litter resulting in a relatively high amount of total organic content (TOC. For the first time, Illumina sequencing based biodiversity analysis of microbial composition is studied through amplicon metagenome sequencing of 16s rRNA targeting V3‐V4 region using metagenomic DNA from the hot spring sediment. Over 28 phyla were detected through the amplicon metagenome sequencing of which the most dominating phyla at the existing physiochemical parameters like; temperature 69 °C, pH 8.09, electroconductivity 0.025 dSm−1 and total organic carbon 0.356%, were Proteobacteria (88.12%, Bacteriodetes (10.76%, Firmicutes (0.35%, Spirochetes (0.18% and chloroflexi (0.11%. Approximately 713 species were observed at the above physiochemical parameters. The analysis of the metagenome provides the quantitative insights into microbial populations based on the sequence data in Deulajhari hot spring. Metagenome sequence is deposited to SRA database which is available at NCBI with accession no. SRX1459736.

  15. Evolution of Microbial Biomasses C and N during the Composting of Municipal solid Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Fourti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The aim of this study was mainly focused on the evolution of microbial biomasses C and N during the composting of municipal solid wastes. Approach: The carbon and the nitrogen of the microbial biomass (BC and BN were studied using the fumigation-extraction method. Results: The dynamics of the BC/BN ratio, index of the chemical composition of the whole microbial population suggested a shift in the composition of microbial populations during the process from prevailing bacteria and actinomycetes to prevailing fungi. Conclusion/Recommendations: Microbial characterization of composting is of importance for the optimization of the process and the quality of the end product.

  16. Mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeger Karl E; Eggert Thorsten; Franken Benjamin; Pohl Martina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Microbial lipases represent the most important class of biocatalysts used for a wealth of applications in organic synthesis. An often applied reaction is the lipase-catalyzed transesterification of vinyl esters and alcohols resulting in the formation of acetaldehyde which is known to deactivate microbial lipases, presumably by structural changes caused by initial Schiff-base formation at solvent accessible lysine residues. Previous studies showed that several lipases were ...

  17. Microbial astronauts: assembling microbial communities for advanced life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, M. S.; Garland, J. L.; Mills, A. L.

    2004-01-01

    Extension of human habitation into space requires that humans carry with them many of the microorganisms with which they coexist on Earth. The ubiquity of microorganisms in close association with all living things and biogeochemical processes on Earth predicates that they must also play a critical role in maintaining the viability of human life in space. Even though bacterial populations exist as locally adapted ecotypes, the abundance of individuals in microbial species is so large that dispersal is unlikely to be limited by geographical barriers on Earth (i.e., for most environments "everything is everywhere" given enough time). This will not be true for microbial communities in space where local species richness will be relatively low because of sterilization protocols prior to launch and physical barriers between Earth and spacecraft after launch. Although community diversity will be sufficient to sustain ecosystem function at the onset, richness and evenness may decline over time such that biological systems either lose functional potential (e.g., bioreactors may fail to reduce BOD or nitrogen load) or become susceptible to invasion by human-associated microorganisms (pathogens) over time. Research at the John F. Kennedy Space Center has evaluated fundamental properties of microbial diversity and community assembly in prototype bioregenerative systems for NASA Advanced Life Support. Successional trends related to increased niche specialization, including an apparent increase in the proportion of nonculturable types of organisms, have been consistently observed. In addition, the stability of the microbial communities, as defined by their resistance to invasion by human-associated microorganisms, has been correlated to their diversity. Overall, these results reflect the significant challenges ahead for the assembly of stable, functional communities using gnotobiotic approaches, and the need to better define the basic biological principles that define ecosystem

  18. Microbial astronauts: assembling microbial communities for advanced life support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, M S; Garland, J L; Mills, A L

    2004-02-01

    Extension of human habitation into space requires that humans carry with them many of the microorganisms with which they coexist on Earth. The ubiquity of microorganisms in close association with all living things and biogeochemical processes on Earth predicates that they must also play a critical role in maintaining the viability of human life in space. Even though bacterial populations exist as locally adapted ecotypes, the abundance of individuals in microbial species is so large that dispersal is unlikely to be limited by geographical barriers on Earth (i.e., for most environments "everything is everywhere" given enough time). This will not be true for microbial communities in space where local species richness will be relatively low because of sterilization protocols prior to launch and physical barriers between Earth and spacecraft after launch. Although community diversity will be sufficient to sustain ecosystem function at the onset, richness and evenness may decline over time such that biological systems either lose functional potential (e.g., bioreactors may fail to reduce BOD or nitrogen load) or become susceptible to invasion by human-associated microorganisms (pathogens) over time. Research at the John F. Kennedy Space Center has evaluated fundamental properties of microbial diversity and community assembly in prototype bioregenerative systems for NASA Advanced Life Support. Successional trends related to increased niche specialization, including an apparent increase in the proportion of nonculturable types of organisms, have been consistently observed. In addition, the stability of the microbial communities, as defined by their resistance to invasion by human-associated microorganisms, has been correlated to their diversity. Overall, these results reflect the significant challenges ahead for the assembly of stable, functional communities using gnotobiotic approaches, and the need to better define the basic biological principles that define ecosystem

  19. Microbial changes during pregnancy, birth and infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meital Nuriel-Ohayon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Several healthy developmental processes such as pregnancy, fetal development and infant development include a multitude of physiological changes: weight gain, hormonal and metabolic changes, as well as immune changes. In this review we present an additional important factor which both influences and is affected by these physiological processes- the microbiome. We summarize the known changes in microbiota composition at a variety of body sites including gut, vagina, oral cavity and placenta, throughout pregnancy, fetal development and early childhood. There is still a lot to be discovered; yet several pieces of research point to the healthy desired microbial changes. Future research is likely to unravel precise roles and mechanisms of the microbiota in gestation; perhaps linking the metabolic, hormonal and immune changes together. Although some research has started to link microbial dysbiosis and specific microbial populations with unhealthy pregnancy complications, it is important to first understand the context of the natural healthy microbial changes occurring. Until recently the placenta and developing fetus were considered to be germ free, containing no apparent microbiome. We present multiple study results showing distinct microbiota compositions in the placenta and meconium, alluding to early microbial colonization. These results may change dogmas and our overall understanding of the importance and roles of microbiota from the beginning of life. We further review the main factors shaping the infant microbiome- modes of delivery, feeding, weaning, and exposure to antibiotics. Taken together, we are starting to build a broader understanding of healthy vs. abnormal microbial alterations throughout major developmental time-points.

  20. Effect of rhizosphere on soil microbial community and in-situ pyrene biodegradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhong SU; Xueyun YANG; Cary T CHIOU

    2008-01-01

    To access the influence of a vegetation on soil microorganisms toward organic pollutant biogegration, this study examined the rhizospheric effects of four plant species (sudan grass, white clover, alfalfa, and rescue) on the soil microbial community and in-situ pyrene (PYR) bio-degradation. The results indicated that the spiked PYR levels in soils decreased substantially compared to the con-trol soil without planting. With equal planted densities, the efficiencies of PYR degradation in rhizosphere with sudan grass, white clover, alfalfa and fescue were 34.0%, 28.4%, 27.7%, and 9.9%, respectively. However, on the basis of equal root biomass the efficiencies were in order of white clover >> alfalfa > sudan > rescue, The increased PYR biodegradation was attributed to the enhanced bacterial population and activity induced by plant roots in the rhizo-sphere. Soil microbial species and biomasses were eluci-dated in terms of microbial phospholipid ester-linked fatty acid (PLFA) biomarkers. The principal component analysis (PCA) revealed significant changes in PLFA pat-tern in planted and non-planted soils spiked with PYR. Total PLFAs in planted soils were all higher than those in non-planted soils. PLFA assemblages indicated that bac-teria were the primary PYR degrading microorganisms, and that Gram-positive bacteria exhibited higher tolerance to PYR than Gram-negative bacteria did.

  1. Effect of rhizosphere on soil microbial community and in-situ pyrene biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y.; Yang, X.; Chiou, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    To access the influence of a vegetation on soil microorganisms toward organic pollutant biogegration, this study examined the rhizospheric effects of four plant species (sudan grass, white clover, alfalfa, and fescue) on the soil microbial community and in-situ pyrene (PYR) biodegradation. The results indicated that the spiked PYR levels in soils decreased substantially compared to the control soil without planting. With equal planted densities, the efficiencies of PYR degradation in rhizosphere with sudan grass, white clover, alfalfa and fescue were 34.0%, 28.4%, 27.7%, and 9.9%, respectively. However, on the basis of equal root biomass the efficiencies were in order of white clover >> alfalfa > sudan > fescue. The increased PYR biodegradation was attributed to the enhanced bacterial population and activity induced by plant roots in the rhizosphere. Soil microbial species and biomasses were elucidated in terms of microbial phospholipid ester-linked fatty acid (PLFA) biomarkers. The principal component analysis (PCA) revealed significant changes in PLFA pattern in planted and non-planted soils spiked with PYR. Total PLFAs in planted soils were all higher than those in non-planted soils. PLFA assemblages indicated that bacteria were the primary PYR degrading microorganisms, and that Gram-positive bacteria exhibited higher tolerance to PYR than Gram-negative bacteria did. ?? 2008 Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH.

  2. The electric picnic: synergistic requirements for exoelectrogenic microbial communities

    KAUST Repository

    Kiely, Patrick D

    2011-06-01

    Characterization of the various microbial populations present in exoelectrogenic biofilms provides insight into the processes required to convert complex organic matter in wastewater streams into electrical current in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). Analysis of the community profiles of exoelectrogenic microbial consortia in BESs fed different substrates gives a clearer picture of the different microbial populations present in these exoelectrogenic biofilms. Rapid utilization of fermentation end products by exoelectrogens (typically Geobacter species) relieves feedback inhibition for the fermentative consortia, allowing for rapid metabolism of organics. Identification of specific syntrophic processes and the communities characteristic of these anodic biofilms will be a valuable aid in improving the performance of BESs. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. 不同底物对海洋混合菌群产氢的影响%Effects of Different Substrates on Hydrogen Production of Mixed Microbial Population from Marine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪艳

    2011-01-01

    将采自天津潮间带的污泥进行热休克处理,厌氧条件下富集混合菌群进行产氢试验.混合菌群分别接种于含葡萄糖、蔗糖、乳糖、淀粉和蛋白胨的培养液中,测定不同底物培养条件下混合菌群产氢量及菌群组成.结果表明,以蔗糖为底物时,混合菌群产氢量最高,为(787±24) mL/L;混合菌群以葡糖糖、乳糖和淀粉为底物时,产氢量依次为(530±20)、(46±5)和(455±35) mL/L;混合菌群不能利用蛋白胨为底物产氢.变性梯度凝胶电泳( DGGE)分析不同底物培养条件下的产氢混合菌群组成.混合菌群16S rRNA基因的DGGE分离结果表明,在蛋白胨培养条件下,混合菌群没有能够形成优势菌,其他底物培养时,混合菌群的优势菌是Clostridium sp..%Sludge collected from the intertidal zone beach in Tianjin, was treated with heat shock and the enriched mixed microbial population (MMP) was carried out hydrogen production experiment in anaerobic condition. The MMP was respectively inoculated in liquid media of glucose, sucrose, lactose, starch, and peptone to determine the effects under the conditions of different substrates on hydrogen production and the constituents of the MMP. The results showed that when using sucrose as substrate it produced hydrogen at (787 ±24) mL/L, the highest amount among the five substrates. When using glucose, lactose, and starch as substrates, the MMP produced (530 ±20) mL/L, (46 ± S) mL/L, and (455 ±35) mL/L of hydrogen respectively, however, the MMP could not utilized peptone as a substrate to produce hydrogen. The composition the MMP producing hydrogen under culture conditions in different substrates was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The DCCE isolation result of 16S rRNA gene of the MMP showed that there were no dominant strains in it when cultured with peptone. When cultured with other substrates the dominant strain of the MMP was Closlridium sp.

  4. Microbial Community Structure of a Leachfield Soil: Response to Intermittent Aeration and Tetracycline Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Potts

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil-based wastewater treatment systems, or leachfields, rely on microbial processes for improving the quality of wastewater before it reaches the groundwater. These processes are affected by physicochemical system properties, such as O2 availability, and disturbances, such as the presence of antimicrobial compounds in wastewater. We examined the microbial community structure of leachfield mesocosms containing native soil and receiving domestic wastewater under intermittently-aerated (AIR and unaerated (LEACH conditions before and after dosing with tetracycline (TET. Community structure was assessed using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA, analysis of dominant phylotypes using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR–DGGE, and cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Prior to dosing, the same PLFA biomarkers were found in soil from AIR and LEACH treatments, although AIR soil had a larger active microbial population and higher concentrations for nine of 32 PLFA markers found. AIR soil also had a larger number of dominant phylotypes, most of them unique to this treatment. Dosing of mesocosms with TET had a more marked effect on AIR than LEACH soil, reducing the size of the microbial population and the number and concentration of PLFA markers. Dominant phylotypes decreased by ~15% in response to TET in both treatments, although the AIR treatment retained a higher number of phylotypes than the LEACH treatment. Fewer than 10% of clones were common to both OPEN ACCESS Water 2013, 5 506 AIR and LEACH soil, and fewer than 25% of the clones from either treatment were homologous with isolates of known genus and species. These included human pathogens, as well as bacteria involved in biogeochemical transformations of C, N, S and metals, and biodegradation of various organic contaminants. Our results show that intermittent aeration has a marked effect on the size and structure of the microbial community that develops in

  5. Understanding differences in access and use of healthcare between international immigrants to Chile and the Chilean-born: a repeated cross-sectional population-based study in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabieses Baltica

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction International evidence indicates consistently lower rates of access and use of healthcare by international immigrants. Factors associated with this phenomenon vary significantly depending on the context. Some research into the health of immigrants has been conducted in Latin America, mostly from a qualitative perspective. This population-based study is the first quantitative study to explore healthcare provision entitlement and use of healthcare services by immigrants in Chile and compare them to the Chilean-born. Methods Data come from the nationally representative CASEN (Socioeconomic characterization of the population in Chile surveys, conducted in 2006 and 2009. Self-reported immigrants were compared to the Chilean-born, by demographic characteristics (age, sex, urban/rural, household composition, ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES: education, household income, contractual status, healthcare provision entitlement (public, private, other, none, and use of primary services. Weighted descriptive, stratified and adjusted regression models were used to analyse factors associated with access to and use of healthcare. Results There was an increase in self-reported immigrant status and in household income inequality among immigrants between 2006 and 2009. Over time there was a decrease in the rate of immigrants reporting no healthcare provision and an increase in reporting of private healthcare provision entitlement. Compared to the Chilean-born, immigrants reported higher rates of use of antenatal and gynaecological care, lower use of well-baby care, and no difference in the use of Pap smears or the number of attentions received in the last three months. Immigrants in the bottom income quintile were four times more likely to report no healthcare provision than their equivalent Chilean-born group (with different health needs, i.e. vertical inequity. Disabled immigrants were more likely to have no healthcare provision compared

  6. Understanding differences in access and use of healthcare between international immigrants to Chile and the Chilean-born: a repeated cross-sectional population-based study in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction International evidence indicates consistently lower rates of access and use of healthcare by international immigrants. Factors associated with this phenomenon vary significantly depending on the context. Some research into the health of immigrants has been conducted in Latin America, mostly from a qualitative perspective. This population-based study is the first quantitative study to explore healthcare provision entitlement and use of healthcare services by immigrants in Chile and compare them to the Chilean-born. Methods Data come from the nationally representative CASEN (Socioeconomic characterization of the population in Chile) surveys, conducted in 2006 and 2009. Self-reported immigrants were compared to the Chilean-born, by demographic characteristics (age, sex, urban/rural, household composition, ethnicity), socioeconomic status (SES: education, household income, contractual status), healthcare provision entitlement (public, private, other, none), and use of primary services. Weighted descriptive, stratified and adjusted regression models were used to analyse factors associated with access to and use of healthcare. Results There was an increase in self-reported immigrant status and in household income inequality among immigrants between 2006 and 2009. Over time there was a decrease in the rate of immigrants reporting no healthcare provision and an increase in reporting of private healthcare provision entitlement. Compared to the Chilean-born, immigrants reported higher rates of use of antenatal and gynaecological care, lower use of well-baby care, and no difference in the use of Pap smears or the number of attentions received in the last three months. Immigrants in the bottom income quintile were four times more likely to report no healthcare provision than their equivalent Chilean-born group (with different health needs, i.e. vertical inequity). Disabled immigrants were more likely to have no healthcare provision compared to the disabled Chilean

  7. MICROBIAL FUEL CELL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A novel microbial fuel cell construction for the generation of electrical energy. The microbial fuel cell comprises: (i) an anode electrode, (ii) a cathode chamber, said cathode chamber comprising an in let through which an influent enters the cathode chamber, an outlet through which an effluent...

  8. Biofilms: A microbial home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms. PMID:21976832

  9. Biofilms: A microbial home

    OpenAIRE

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms.

  10. 丁草胺污染对高产水稻土微生物区系的影响%Effects of butachlor-contamination on population of microbial communities in high-yield paddy soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张仕颖; 夏运生; 肖炜; 崔晓龙; 王永霞; 史静; 张乃明

    2014-01-01

    处理抑制作用微弱,中、高浓度处理磷酸盐溶解菌数量则始终显著低于CK,表现为丁草胺浓度越高,抑制作用越明显;低浓度丁草胺对硅酸盐细菌数量影响不明显,中、高浓度则对其有抑制作用,B150在施药7和15 d时分别比CK低60.7%和58.1%,表现为浓度越高抑制作用越明显。%Soil microorganism is the most potential indicator of soil quality evaluation, and is closely related to the stability and productivity of agricultural ecosystem. Taoyuan, Yunnan province is a special eco-site which keeps the highest yield records of rice cultivation in small planting areas, and butachlor is applied at the pre-emergence stage of rice year in and year out in Taoyuan. Therefore, it is significant to understand the ecological effects of the herbicide butachlor on microbial communities in high-yield paddy soils. Effects of butachlor-contamination on population of aerobic bacteria, actinobacteria, fungi, nitrogen fixing bacteria、phosphate solubilizing bacteria and silicate dissolving bacteria in high-yield paddy soils were investigated under laboratory conditions, and the microbial communities structures under different butachlor concentrations (calculated by active ingredient 0.15, 0.30 and 1.5 mg·kg-1) were evaluated using plate count. The results showed that the number of aerobic bacteria were higher than CK 78.6% and 153.8% after application of butachlor at high or middle concentrations (0.30 and 1.50 mg/kg dried soil) 7d later, and then declined significantly, while the number did not change significantly at low butachlor concentration (0.15 mg·kg-1 dried soil). The number of actinomycetes was higher than CK 75.1% after application of butachlor at high concentrations 7 d later, and 125.0% at middle concentrations 15 d later, butachlor at high or middle concentrations accelerated the growth of actinomycetes, while showed an inhibition at low concentration. The proliferation and growth of fungi

  11. Microbial survival in deep space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Review of the knowledge available on the extent to which microorganisms (mainly microbial spores, vegetative cells, and fungi) are capable of surviving the environment of deep space, based on recent simulation experiments of deep space. A description of the experimental procedures used is followed by a discussion of deep space ecology, the behavior of microorganisms in ultrahigh vacuum, and factors influencing microbial survival. It is concluded that, so far, simulation experiments have proved far less lethal to microorganisms than to other forms of life. There are, however, wide gaps in the knowledge available, and no accurate predictions can as yet be made on the degree of lethality that might be incurred by a microbial population on a given mission. Therefore, sterilization of spacecraft surfaces is deemed necessary if induced panspermia (i.e., interplanetary life propagation) is to be avoided.

  12. Las barreras de acceso a los servicios de salud en la población indígena de Rabinal en Guatemala Barriers to accessing health care services for the indigenous population in Rabinal, Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maeve Hautecoeur

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar y documentar las barreras de acceso a los servicios de salud en la población indígena de Rabinal en Guatemala. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se privilegió el análisis cualitativo y la recopilación de datos se realizó en Rabinal durante dos meses (Guatemala. Se realizaron quince entrevistas semi dirigidas a indígenas achís y cinco entrevistas a profesionales de la salud. Un grupo de discusión fue formado para validar la información recogida durante las entrevistas individuales; la retranscripción de éstas y la compilación de los datos permitieron hacer el análisis de contenido. RESULTADOS: Las barreras de acceso están interrelacionadas y las barreras geográficas están relacionadas con la distancia y con la escasez de transporte; las barreras económicas son los precios de las consultas y de los medicamentos, además, entre las barreras culturales, la lengua española es un obstáculo. Los indígenas tienen otra concepción de la medicina y de los tratamientos y se quejan en ocasiones de trato abusivo por parte de los profesionales sanitarios. A su vez, los profesionales de la salud reconocen que el trauma de la guerra está presente y critican las malas condiciones de vida y la falta de recursos. CONCLUSIONES: Los servicios de salud no son adecuados ni suficientes para responder a las necesidades de la población local.OBJECTIVE: To identify and document access barriers to health care services for the indigenous population in Rabinal, Guatemala. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A qualitative analysis was used. Over a period of two months, 20 semi-directional interviews were conducted in Rabinal, Guatemala: 15 with Achis indigenous people and five with health professionals. A focus group was done to verify the information collected during the individual interviews. The qualitative analysis was based on the transcription of interviews and the compilation of the data. RESULTS: Barriers to access are inter-relational. Geographic

  13. Research advances on microbial genetics in China in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianping, Xie; Yubo, Han; Gang, Liu; Linquan, Bai

    2016-09-01

    In 2015, there are significant progresses in many aspects of the microbial genetics in China. To showcase the contribution of Chinese scientists in microbial genetics, this review surveys several notable progresses in microbial genetics made largely by Chinese scientists, and some key findings are highlighted. For the basic microbial genetics, the components, structures and functions of many macromolecule complexes involved in gene expression regulation have been elucidated. Moreover, the molecular basis underlying the recognition of foreign nucleic acids by microbial immune systems was unveiled. We also illustrated the biosynthetic pathways and regulators of multiple microbial compounds, novel enzyme reactions, and new mechanisms regulating microbial gene expression. And new findings were obtained in the microbial development, evolution and population genetics. For the industrial microbiology, more understanding on the molecular basis of the microbial factory has been gained. For the pathogenic microbiology, the genetic circuits of several pathogens were depicted, and significant progresses were achieved for understanding the pathogen-host interaction and revealing the genetic mechanisms underlying antimicrobial resistance, emerging pathogens and environmental microorganisms at the genomic level. In future, the genetic diversity of microbes can be used to obtain specific products, while gut microbiome is gathering momentum.

  14. Turning Russian specialized microbial culture collections into resource centers for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivshina, Irena B; Kuyukina, Maria S

    2013-11-01

    Specialized nonmedical microbial culture collections contain unique bioresources that could be useful for biotechnology companies. Cooperation between collections and companies has suffered from shortcomings in infrastructure and legislation, hindering access to holdings. These challenges may be overcome by the transformation of collections into national bioresource centers and integration into international microbial resource networks.

  15. Microbial activity in soils following steam treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ruth E; James, C Andrew; Bhupathiraju, Vishvesh K; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Steam enhanced extraction (SEE) is an aquifer remediation technique that can be effective at removing the bulk of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination from the subsurface, particularly highly volatile contaminants. However, low volatility compounds such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are less efficiently removed by this process. This research evaluated the effects of steam injection on soil microbial activity, community structure, and the potential for biodegradation of contaminants following steam treatment. Three different soils were evaluated: a laboratory-prepared microbially-enriched soil, soil from a creosote contaminated field site, and soil from a chlorinated solvent and waste oil contaminated field site. Results from field-scale steaming are also presented. Microbial activity before and after steam treatment was evaluated using direct epifluorescent microscopy (DEM) using the respiratory activity dye 5-cyano-2,3, ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) in conjunction with the fluorochrome 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl) aminofluorescein (DTAF) to yield a quantitative assessment of active and total microbial numbers. DEM results indicate that steamed soils that were analyzed while still hot exhibited microbial activity levels that were below detection. However, soil samples that were slowly cooled, more closely reflecting the conditions of applied SEE, exhibited microbial activity levels that were comparable to presteamed soils. Samples from a field-site where steam was applied continuously for 6 weeks also showed high levels of microbial activity following cooling. The metabolic capabilities of the steamed communities were investigated by measuring cell growth in enrichment cultures on various substrates. These studies provided evidence that organisms capable of biodegradation were among the mesophilic populations that survived steam treatment. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of the soils with domain-level rRNA probes suggest

  16. Microbial control over carbon cycling in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua eSchimel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A major thrust of terrestrial microbial ecology is focused on understanding when and how the composition of the microbial community affects the functioning of biogeochemical processes at the ecosystem scale (meters-to-kilometers and days-to-years. While research has demonstrated these linkages for physiologically and phylogenetically narrow processes such as trace gas emissions and nitrification, there is less conclusive evidence that microbial community composition influences the broad processes of decomposition and organic matter turnover in soil. In this paper, we consider how soil microbial community structure influences C-cycling. We consider the phylogenetic level at which microbes form meaningful guilds, based on overall life history strategies, and suggest that these are associated with deep evolutionary divergences, while much of the species-level diversity probably reflects functional redundancy. We then consider under what conditions it is possible for differences among microbes to affect process dynamics, and argue that while microbial community structure may be important in the rate of OM breakdown in the rhizosphere and in detritus, it is likely not important in the mineral soil. In mineral soil, physical access to occluded or sorbed substrates is the rate-limiting process. Microbial community influences on OM turnover in mineral soils are based on how organisms allocate the C they take up—not only do the fates of the molecules differ, but they can affect the soil system differently as well. For example, extracellular enzymes and extracellular polysaccharides can be key controls on soil structure and function. How microbes allocate C may also be particularly important for understanding the long-term fate of C in soil—is it sequestered or not?

  17. IMPROVING ACCESS TO DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Joseph Herman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Although essentially not all therapies need drug intervention, drugs is still an important components in health sector, either in preventive, curative, rehabilitative or promotion efforts. Hence the access to drugs is a main problem, either in international or national scale even to the smallest unit. The problem on access to drugs is very complicated and cannot be separated especially from pharmacy management problems; moreover in general from the overall lack of policy development and effective of health policy, and also the implementation process. With the policy development and effective health policy, rational drug uses, sufficient health service budget so a country can overcome the health problems. Besides infrastructures, regulations, distribution and cultural influences; the main obstacles for drug access is drugs affordability if the price of drugs is an important part and determined by many factors, especially the drug status whether is still patent orgenerics that significantly decrease cost of health cares and enhance the drugs affordability. The determination of essential drug prices in developing countries should based on equity principal so that poor people pay cheaper and could afford the essential drugs. WHO predicts two third of world population can not afford the essential drugs in which in developing countries, some are because of in efficient budget allocation in consequence of drug distribution management, including incorrect selection and allocation and also irrational uses. In part these could be overcome by enhancing performances on the allocation pharmacy needs, including the management of information system, inventory management, stock management and the distribution. Key words: access, drugs, essential drugs, generic drugs

  18. Microbial Inoculants and Their Impact on Soil Microbial Communities: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darine Trabelsi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the survival of inoculated fungal and bacterial strains in field and the effects of their release on the indigenous microbial communities has been of great interest since the practical use of selected natural or genetically modified microorganisms has been developed. Soil inoculation or seed bacterization may lead to changes in the structure of the indigenous microbial communities, which is important with regard to the safety of introduction of microbes into the environment. Many reports indicate that application of microbial inoculants can influence, at least temporarily, the resident microbial communities. However, the major concern remains regarding how the impact on taxonomic groups can be related to effects on functional capabilities of the soil microbial communities. These changes could be the result of direct effects resulting from trophic competitions and antagonistic/synergic interactions with the resident microbial populations, or indirect effects mediated by enhanced root growth and exudation. Combination of inoculants will not necessarily produce an additive or synergic effect, but rather a competitive process. The extent of the inoculation impact on the subsequent crops in relation to the buffering capacity of the plant-soil-biota is still not well documented and should be the focus of future research.

  19. Functionally stable and phylogenetically diverse microbial enrichments from microbial fuel cells during wastewater treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun'ichi Ishii

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are devices that exploit microorganisms as biocatalysts to recover energy from organic matter in the form of electricity. One of the goals of MFC research is to develop the technology for cost-effective wastewater treatment. However, before practical MFC applications are implemented it is important to gain fundamental knowledge about long-term system performance, reproducibility, and the formation and maintenance of functionally-stable microbial communities. Here we report findings from a MFC operated for over 300 days using only primary clarifier effluent collected from a municipal wastewater treatment plant as the microbial resource and substrate. The system was operated in a repeat-batch mode, where the reactor solution was replaced once every two weeks with new primary effluent that consisted of different microbial and chemical compositions with every batch exchange. The turbidity of the primary clarifier effluent solution notably decreased, and 97% of biological oxygen demand (BOD was removed after an 8-13 day residence time for each batch cycle. On average, the limiting current density was 1000 mA/m(2, the maximum power density was 13 mW/m(2, and coulombic efficiency was 25%. Interestingly, the electrochemical performance and BOD removal rates were very reproducible throughout MFC operation regardless of the sample variability associated with each wastewater exchange. While MFC performance was very reproducible, the phylogenetic analyses of anode-associated electricity-generating biofilms showed that the microbial populations temporally fluctuated and maintained a high biodiversity throughout the year-long experiment. These results suggest that MFC communities are both self-selecting and self-optimizing, thereby able to develop and maintain functional stability regardless of fluctuations in carbon source(s and regular introduction of microbial competitors. These results contribute significantly toward the

  20. Microbial Forensics: A Scientific Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keim, Paul

    2003-02-17

    procedures and training to meet these initial challenges so as minimize disturbance of the evidence. While epidemiology and forensics are similar sciences with similar goals when applied to biocrimes, forensics has additional and more stringent requirements. Maintaining a chain of custody on evidentiary samples is one example of an extra requirement imposed on an investigation of a biocrime. Another issue is the intent in microbial forensics to identify a bioattack organism in greatest detail. If possible, forensic investigations will strive to identify the precise strain and substrain, rather than just to the species level, which might be sufficient in an epidemiological investigation. Although multiple groups have developed lists of bioterrorism target pathogens, these lists are too narrow. An expansion of microorganisms relevant to food and water threats should be considered. Computerized networks should be established to track infectious disease outbreaks in real time. These systems could alert public health and agricultural officials to the existence of a potential bioattack earlier than simply waiting for a report of a suspicious cluster of similar patients. Once a biocrime is suspected, a wide variety of methods are available to identify the microorganism used in the bioattack and to analyze features that might lead to the source of the event. A multi-pronged approach to such an investigation may be preferable, using many available methods-ranging from genomics to sequencing to physiology to analysis of substances in the sample. Microbial forensics will be most effective if there is sufficient basic scientific information concerning microbial genetics, evolution, physiology, and ecology. Strain subtyping analysis will be difficult to interpret if we do not understand some of the basic evolutionary mechanisms and population diversity of pathogens. Phenotypic features associated with evidentiary pathogens also may provide investigative leads, but full exploitation of

  1. Systems biology: Functional analysis of natural microbial consortia using community proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Denef, Vincent J; Hettich, Robert L; Banfield, Jillian F

    2009-03-01

    We know very little about the metabolic functioning and evolutionary dynamics of microbial communities. Recent advances in comprehensive, sequencing-based methods, however, are laying a molecular foundation for new insights into how microbial communities shape the Earth's biosphere. Here we explore the convergence of microbial ecology, genomics, biological mass spectrometry and informatics that form the new field of microbial community proteogenomics. We discuss the first applications of proteogenomics and its potential for studying the physiology, ecology and evolution of microbial populations and communities.

  2. PERN : An EU-Russia initiative for rhizosphere microbial resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Declerck, Stéphane; Willems, Anne; van der Heijden, Marcel G A; Varese, Giovanna Cristina; Turkovskaya, Olga; Evtushenko, Lyudmila; Ivshina, Irena; Desmeth, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Millions of microbial taxa inhabit the rhizosphere and could be used as biofertilizers, biopesticides, and/or for bioremediation. Only a fraction of these microbes have been described and/or are being utilized. Most are dispersed in collections, but coordination of their accessibility and availabili

  3. Use of Geographical Information Systems to influence the selection of sampling site locations for the evaluation of microbial diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil microbial population densities can easily reach one billion cells per gram of soil; and soil microbial diversity has been estimated to reach ten thousand individual species per gram of soil. Soil type and underlying soil structure are considered primary determinants of microbial community struc...

  4. Targeted isolation of proteins from natural microbial communities living in an extreme environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms from extreme environments are often very difficult to cultivate, precluding detailed study by biochemical and physiological techniques. Recent advances in genomic sequencing and proteomic measurements of samples obtained from natural communities have allowed new access to these uncultivated extremophiles and identified abundant proteins that can be isolated directly from natural samples. Here we report the isolation of two abundant heme proteins from low-diversity biofilm microbial communities that thrive in very acidic (pH ~ 1), metal-rich water in a subsurface mine. Purification and detailed characterization of these proteins has afforded new insight into the possible mechanism of Fe(II) oxidation by Leptospirillum Group II, the dominant population in most of these biofilms, and demonstrated that the abundance and posttranslational modifications of one of these proteins is dependent on the lifecycle of the biofilm.

  5. Bioremediation strategies of hydrocarbons and microbial diversity in the Trindade Island shoreline--Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Edmo M; Kalks, Karlos H M; Fernandes, Péricles L; Tótola, Marcos R

    2015-12-30

    This study analyzed the microbial diversity colonizing the surface of an oil sample during its contact with water, off the Trindade Island coast and simulated the efficiency of eight different bioremediation strategies for this environment. The diversity analysis was performed using acrylic coupons that served as the support for an oil inclusion at sea. The coupons were sampled over 30 days, and T-RFLP multiplex was employed to access the diversity of fungi, Bacteria and Archaea present on the oil surface. The bioremediation strategies were simulated in a respirometer. The results showed that the bacterial domain was the most dominant in oil colonization and that the richness of the species attached to the oil gradually increases with the exposure time of the coupons. The combination of biostimulation and bioaugmentation with a native population was proven to be an effective strategy for the remediation of oil off the Trindade Island shoreline.

  6. Manipulation of Biofilm Microbial Ecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.C.; Palmer, R.J., Jr.; Zinn, M.; Smith, C.A.; Burkhalter, R.; Macnaughton, S.J.; Whitaker, K.W.; Kirkegaard, R.D.

    1998-08-15

    The biofilm mode of growth provides such significant advantages to the members of the consortium that most organisms in important habitats are found in biofilms. The study of factors that allow manipulation of biofilm microbes in the biofilm growth state requires that reproducible biofilms be generated. The most effective monitoring of biofilm formation, succession and desaturation is with on-line monitoring of microbial biofilms with flowcell for direct observation. The biofilm growth state incorporates a second important factor, the heterogeneity in distribution in time and space of the component members of the biofilm consortium. This heterogeneity is reflected not only in the cellular distribution but in the metabolic activity within a population of cells. Activity and cellular distribution can be mapped in four dimensions with confocal microscopy, and function can be ascertained by genetically manipulated reporter functions for specific genes or by vital stains. The methodology for understanding the microbial ecology of biofilms is now much more readily available and the capacity to manipulate biofilms is becoming an important feature of biotechnology.

  7. Redox regime shifts in microbially-mediated biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, T.; Butler, I. B.; Free, A.; Allen, R. J.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding how the Earth's biogeochemical cycles respond to environmental change is a prerequisite for the prediction and mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic perturbations. Microbial populations mediate key steps in these cycles, yet are often crudely represented in biogeochemical models. Here, we show that microbial population dynamics can qualitatively affect the response of biogeochemical cycles to environmental change. Using simple and generic mathematical models, we find that nutrient limitations on microbial population growth can lead to regime shifts, in which the redox state of a biogeochemical cycle changes dramatically as the availability of a redox-controlling species, such as oxygen or acetate, crosses a threshold (a "tipping point"). These redox regime shifts occur in parameter ranges that are relevant to the sulfur and nitrogen cycles in the present-day natural environment, and may also have relevance to iron cycling in the iron-containing Proterozoic and Archean oceans. We show that redox regime shifts also occur in models with physically realistic modifications, such as additional terms, chemical states, or microbial populations. Our work reveals a possible new mechanism by which regime shifts can occur in nutrient-cycling ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles, and highlights the importance of considering microbial population dynamics in models of biogeochemical cycles.

  8. Redox regime shifts in microbially mediated biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, T.; Butler, I. B.; Free, A.; Allen, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how the Earth's biogeochemical cycles respond to environmental change is a prerequisite for the prediction and mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic perturbations. Microbial populations mediate key steps in these cycles, yet they are often crudely represented in biogeochemical models. Here, we show that microbial population dynamics can qualitatively affect the response of biogeochemical cycles to environmental change. Using simple and generic mathematical models, we find that nutrient limitations on microbial population growth can lead to regime shifts, in which the redox state of a biogeochemical cycle changes dramatically as the availability of a redox-controlling species, such as oxygen or acetate, crosses a threshold (a "tipping point"). These redox regime shifts occur in parameter ranges that are relevant to the present-day sulfur cycle in the natural environment and the present-day nitrogen cycle in eutrophic terrestrial environments. These shifts may also have relevance to iron cycling in the iron-containing Proterozoic and Archean oceans. We show that redox regime shifts also occur in models with physically realistic modifications, such as additional terms, chemical states, or microbial populations. Our work reveals a possible new mechanism by which regime shifts can occur in nutrient-cycling ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles, and highlights the importance of considering microbial population dynamics in models of biogeochemical cycles.

  9. IN-VITRO EFFECTS OF HERBICIDES ON SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AABID HUSSAIN LONE

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Effect of six different herbicides representing four chemical families on soil microbial communities was studied using laboratory microcosm approach. The herbicides tested were isoproturon, metribuzin, clodinafop propargyl, atlantis (Mesosulfuron methyl 3% + Idosulfuron Methyl Sodium 0.6% WG and sulfosulfuron applied at normal agricultural rates, and UPH-110 (Clodinafop propargyl 12% + Metribuzin 42% WG tested at four different application rates. Microbial response to the applied herbicides was studied following cultivation dependent approach. The microbial community showed a mixed response towards applied herbicides. With a few exceptions, metribuzin displayed a negative, clodinafop a positive and sulphonylurea herbicides a neutral effect while as the effect of isoproturon was variable. Significant toxic impact of UPH-110 was mostly observed at higher concentrations (@ 600 and 1000 g ha-1. The magnitude of hazard and duration of toxicity increased as the dose of UPH-110 increased. The influence whether positive or negative, was only transitory in nature and recovered to the level of untreated microcosms by or before 30th day of application. Among the microbial groups studied, fungal population was least affected at field rate, bacteria, actinomycetes and Azotobacter showed mixed response while as the phosphorus solubilizers population showed a tendency to increase in response to the applied herbicides.The herbicidal impact on soil microbial population was found to depend on the nature and dose of herbicide used and also the type of microbial group

  10. Hemodialysis access procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007641.htm Hemodialysis access procedures To use the sharing features on ... An access is needed for you to get hemodialysis. The access is where you receive hemodialysis . Using ...

  11. Access For All

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove Kjeld; Hjulmand, Christian

    2005-01-01

    . There is a clear need for a free internet based Danish text-to-speech synthesizer. Furthermore, the current state of technology i.e. internet bandwidth, response time and server technology is sufficient for setting up an online automatic reading service that is used by steadily growing number of individuals......Approximately 30% of the Danish population has severe problems in reading everyday text. In the light of the increasing amount of text available on the Internet this poses a democratic challenge to ensure “equal access” to information. The Talking Internet service - Access For All (AFA) - offers...... a free Internet-based tool for reading aloud any marked text with a synthetic voice. The only requirements are a standard equipped PC running a recent Windows OS and an Internet connection. Experiences gathered from running the service for more than 28 months underline the viability of the concept...

  12. Fishing Access Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department maintains developed fishing access areas. These sites provide public access to waters in Vermont for shore fishing...

  13. The Microbial Olympics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youle, Merry; Rohwer, Forest; Stacy, Apollo; Whiteley, Marvin; Steel, Bradley C.; Delalez, Nicolas J.; Nord, Ashley L.; Berry, Richard M.; Armitage, Judith P.; Kamoun, Sophien; Hogenhout, Saskia; Diggle, Stephen P.; Gurney, James; Pollitt, Eric J. G.; Boetius, Antje; Cary, S. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Every four years, the Olympic Games plays host to competitors who have built on their natural talent by training for many years to become the best in their chosen discipline. Similar spirit and endeavour can be found throughout the microbial world, in which every day is a competition to survive and thrive. Microorganisms are trained through evolution to become the fittest and the best adapted to a particular environmental niche or lifestyle, and to innovate when the ‘rules of the game’ are changed by alterations to their natural habitats. In this Essay, we honour the best competitors in the microbial world by inviting them to take part in the inaugural Microbial Olympics. PMID:22796885

  14. Microbial Life in Soil - Linking Biophysical Models with Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, Dani; Tecon, Robin; Ebrahimi, Ali; Kleyer, Hannah; Ilie, Olga; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Microbial life in soil occurs within fragmented aquatic habitats formed in complex pore spaces where motility is restricted to short hydration windows (e.g., following rainfall). The limited range of self-dispersion and physical confinement promote spatial association among trophically interdepended microbial species. Competition and preferences for different nutrient resources and byproducts and their diffusion require high level of spatial organization to sustain the functioning of multispecies communities. We report mechanistic modeling studies of competing multispecies microbial communities grown on hydrated surfaces and within artificial soil aggregates (represented by 3-D pore network). Results show how trophic dependencies and cell-level interactions within patchy diffusion fields promote spatial self-organization of motile microbial cells. The spontaneously forming patterns of segregated, yet coexisting species were robust to spatial heterogeneities and to temporal perturbations (hydration dynamics), and respond primarily to the type of trophic dependencies. Such spatially self-organized consortia may reflect ecological templates that optimize substrate utilization and could form the basic architecture for more permanent surface-attached microbial colonies. Hydration dynamics affect structure and spatial arrangement of aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities and their biogeochemical functions. Experiments with well-characterized artificial soil microbial assemblies grown on porous surfaces provide access to community dynamics during wetting and drying cycles detected through genetic fingerprinting. Experiments for visual observations of spatial associations of tagged bacterial species with known trophic dependencies on model porous surfaces are underway. Biophysical modeling provide a means for predicting hydration-mediated critical separation distances for activation of spatial self-organization. The study provides new modeling and observational tools

  15. JISC Open Access Briefing Paper

    OpenAIRE

    Swan, Alma

    2005-01-01

    What Open Access is. What Open Access is not. How is Open Access provided? Open Access archives or repositories. Open Access journals. Why should authors provide Open Access to their work? Further information and resources

  16. Nutrient and physical profile data from four Microbial Exchanges and Coupling in Coastal Atlantic Systems (MECCAS) cruises collected aboard the R/V Gyre at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay and northern Atlantic Ocean from February 17, 1985 to September 7, 1986 (NODC Accession 8800324)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Microbial Exchanges and Coupling in Coastal Atlantic Systems (MECCAS) cruise data collected aboard the R/V Gyre at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay and northern...

  17. Segregation of the anodic microbial communities in a microbial fuel cell cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas eHodgson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic interactions within microbial communities are essential for the efficient degradation of complex organic compounds, and underpin natural phenomena driven by microorganisms, such as the recycling of carbon-, nitrogen-, and sulphur-containing molecules. These metabolic interactions ultimately determine the function, activity and stability of the community, and therefore their understanding would be essential to steer processes where microbial communities are involved. This is exploited in the design of microbial fuel cells (MFCs, bioelectrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy present in substrates into electrical energy through the metabolic activity of microorganisms, either single species or communities. In this work, we analysed the evolution of the microbial community structure in a cascade of microbial fuel cells (MFCs inoculated with an anaerobic microbial community and continuously fed with a complex medium. The analysis of the composition of the anodic communities revealed the establishment of different communities in the anodes of the hydraulically connected MFCs, with a decrease in the abundance of fermentative taxa and a concurrent increase in respiratory taxa along the cascade. The analysis of the metabolites in the anodic suspension showed a metabolic shift between the first and last MFC, confirming the segregation of the anodic communities. Those results suggest a metabolic interaction mechanism between the predominant fermentative bacteria at the first stages of the cascade and the anaerobic respiratory electrogenic population in the latter stages, which is reflected in the observed increase in power output. We show that our experimental system represents an ideal platform for optimization of processes where the degradation of complex substrates is involved, as well as a potential tool for the study of metabolic interactions in complex microbial communities.

  18. Genomics, environmental genomics and the issue of microbial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D M; Cohan, F M; Bhaya, D; Heidelberg, J F; Kühl, M; Grossman, A

    2008-02-01

    A microbial species concept is crucial for interpreting the variation detected by genomics and environmental genomics among cultivated microorganisms and within natural microbial populations. Comparative genomic analyses of prokaryotic species as they are presently described and named have led to the provocative idea that prokaryotes may not form species as we think about them for plants and animals. There are good reasons to doubt whether presently recognized prokaryotic species are truly species. To achieve a better understanding of microbial species, we believe it is necessary to (i) re-evaluate traditional approaches in light of evolutionary and ecological theory, (ii) consider that different microbial species may have evolved in different ways and (iii) integrate genomic, metagenomic and genome-wide expression approaches with ecological and evolutionary theory. Here, we outline how we are using genomic methods to (i) identify ecologically distinct populations (ecotypes) predicted by theory to be species-like fundamental units of microbial communities, and (ii) test their species-like character through in situ distribution and gene expression studies. By comparing metagenomic sequences obtained from well-studied hot spring cyanobacterial mats with genomic sequences of two cultivated cyanobacterial ecotypes, closely related to predominant native populations, we can conduct in situ population genetics studies that identify putative ecotypes and functional genes that determine the ecotypes' ecological distinctness. If individuals within microbial communities are found to be grouped into ecologically distinct, species-like populations, knowing about such populations should guide us to a better understanding of how genomic variation is linked to community function.

  19. Environmental Drivers of Differences in Microbial Community Structure in Crude Oil Reservoirs across a Methanogenic Gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, Jenna L.; Akob, Denise M.; Jennifer C McIntosh; Noah Fierer; Spear, John R.; Warwick, Peter D.; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulating in situ microbial communities in oil reservoirs to produce natural gas is a potentially viable strategy for recovering additional fossil fuel resources following traditional recovery operations. Little is known about what geochemical parameters drive microbial population dynamics in biodegraded, methanogenic oil reservoirs. We investigated if microbial community structure was significantly impacted by the extent of crude oil biodegradation, extent of biogenic methane production, a...

  20. Molecular ecology of microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Bolhuis; M.S. Cretoiu; L.J. Stal

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are ideal model systems for ecological and evolutionary analysis of highly diverse microbial communities. Microbial mats are small-scale, nearly closed, and self-sustaining benthic ecosystems that comprise the major element cycles, trophic levels, and food webs. The steep

  1. Glitch Statistics of Radio Pulsars : Multiple populations

    CERN Document Server

    Konar, Sushan

    2014-01-01

    There appears to be more than one statistically different populations in the energy distribution of glitches, strongly indicative of different mechanisms accessing different energy ranges responsible for them.

  2. Microbial stratification in low pH oxic and suboxic macroscopic growths along an acid mine drainage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Méndez-García, Celia; Mesa, Victoria; Sprenger, Richard Remko

    2014-01-01

    Macroscopic growths at geographically separated acid mine drainages (AMDs) exhibit distinct populations. Yet, local heterogeneities are poorly understood. To gain novel mechanistic insights into this, we used OMICs tools to profile microbial populations coexisting in a single pyrite gallery AMD (...

  3. Using Accession to investigate accessibility induced social exclusion in Edinburgh and the Lothians

    OpenAIRE

    Weir, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    An exploratory analysis of accessibility-based social exclusionary mechanisms in Edinburgh and the Lothians is presented, with the aim of highlighting the benefits of a technique that incorporates socio-geodemographic variables. Accession software is used to produce accessibility times to three different types of services. Postcode centroids are used to represent centres of population, while the Navteq road network and latest public transport timetables are used to model the transport network...

  4. Final Report: Role of microbial synergies in immobilization of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slava Epstein, Ph.D. and Kim Lewis, Ph.D.

    2012-11-14

    This Subsurface Microbial Ecology and Community Dynamics project tested the following hypothesis: synergistic groups of microorganisms immobilize heavy elements more efficiently than do individual species. We focused on groundwater at several DOE FRC and their microbial communities affecting the fate of U, Tc, and Cr. While we did not obtain evidence to support the original hypothesis, we developed a platform to accessing novel species from the target environments. We implemented this technology and discovered and isolated novel species capable of immobilization of uranium and species with exceptionally high resistances to the extant toxic factors. We have sequenced their genomes are are in the process of investigating the genomic contents behind these surprising resistances.

  5. Microbial Energy Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Merry [American Society for Microbiology (ASM), Washington, DC (United States); Wall, Judy D. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2006-10-01

    The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium March 10-12, 2006, in San Francisco, California, to discuss the production of energy fuels by microbial conversions. The status of research into various microbial energy technologies, the advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches, research needs in the field, and education and training issues were examined, with the goal of identifying routes for producing biofuels that would both decrease the need for fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Currently, the choices for providing energy are limited. Policy makers and the research community must begin to pursue a broader array of potential energy technologies. A diverse energy portfolio that includes an assortment of microbial energy choices will allow communities and consumers to select the best energy solution for their own particular needs. Funding agencies and governments alike need to prepare for future energy needs by investing both in the microbial energy technologies that work today and in the untested technologies that will serve the world’s needs tomorrow. More mature bioprocesses, such as ethanol production from starchy materials and methane from waste digestors, will find applications in the short term. However, innovative techniques for liquid fuel or biohydrogen production are among the longer term possibilities that should also be vigorously explored, starting now. Microorganisms can help meet human energy needs in any of a number of ways. In their most obvious role in energy conversion, microorganisms can generate fuels, including ethanol, hydrogen, methane, lipids, and butanol, which can be burned to produce energy. Alternatively, bacteria can be put to use in microbial fuel cells, where they carry out the direct conversion of biomass into electricity. Microorganisms may also be used some day to make oil and natural gas technologies more efficient by sequestering carbon or by assisting in the recovery of oil and

  6. Microbial Weathering of Olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D. S.; Longazo, T. G.; Wentworth, S. J.; Southam, G.

    2002-01-01

    Controlled microbial weathering of olivine experiments displays a unique style of nanoetching caused by biofilm attachment to mineral surfaces. We are investigating whether the morphology of biotic nanoetching can be used as a biosignature. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Diazotrophic microbial mats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severin, I.; Stal, L.J.; Seckbach, J.; Oren, A.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial mats have been the focus of scientific research for a few decades. These small-scale ecosystems are examples of versatile benthic communities of microorganisms, usually dominated by phototrophic bacteria (e.g., Krumbein et al., 1977; Jørgensen et al., 1983). They develop as vertically stra

  8. Accessibility and sensory experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryhl, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a new design concept; sensory accessibility. While acknowledging the importance of sensory experiences in architectural quality, as well as the importance of accommodating user needs the concept combines three equally important factors; architecture, the senses and accessi......This article introduces a new design concept; sensory accessibility. While acknowledging the importance of sensory experiences in architectural quality, as well as the importance of accommodating user needs the concept combines three equally important factors; architecture, the senses...... and accessibility. Sensory accessibility accommodates aspects of a sensory disability and describes architectural design requirements needed to ensure access to architectural experiences. In the context of architecture accessibility has become a design concept of its own. It is generally described as ensuring...... physical access to the built environment by accommodating physical disabilities. While the existing concept of accessibility ensures the physical access of everyone to a given space, sensory accessibility ensures the choice of everyone to stay and be able to participate and experience....

  9. Microbial diversity and metabolic networks in acid mine drainage habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia eMendez-Garcia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD emplacements are low-complexity natural systems. Low-pH conditions appear to be the main factor underlying the limited diversity of the microbial populations thriving in these environments, although temperature, ionic composition, total organic carbon and dissolved oxygen are also considered to significantly influence their microbial life. This natural reduction in diversity driven by extreme conditions was reflected in several studies on the microbial populations inhabiting the various micro-environments present in such ecosystems. Early studies based on the physiology of the autochthonous microbiota and the growing success of omics technologies have enabled a better understanding of microbial ecology and function in low-pH mine outflows; however, complementary omics-derived data should be included to completely describe their microbial ecology. Furthermore, recent updates on the distribution of eukaryotes and ultra-micro-archaea demand their inclusion in the microbial characterisation of AMD systems. In this review, we present a complete overview of the bacterial, archaeal (including ultra-micro-archaeal and eukaryotic diversity in these ecosystems and include a thorough depiction of the metabolism and element cycling in AMD habitats. We also review different metabolic network structures at the organismal level, which is necessary to disentangle the role of each member of the AMD communities described thus far.

  10. A low-cost, multiplexable, automated flow cytometry procedure for the characterization of microbial stress dynamics in bioreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brognaux, Alison; Han, Shanshan; Sørensen, Søren Johannes;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Microbial cell population heterogeneity is now recognized as a major source of issues in the development and optimization of bioprocesses. Even if single cell technologies are available for the study of microbial population heterogeneity, only a few of these methods are available in or...

  11. CERN Access Cards and Access Authorisations

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    From the 01/05/2003, all problems relating to access cards and refusal of access to any zone, building or experiment within CERN must be addressed to the Centrale de Surveillance des Accès (CSA building 120) on 78877 or send an e-mail to Access.Surveillance@cern.ch. The responsibles for CERN access control have put into place a procedure with the CSA, Service Enregistrement and the Technical Control Room, to make sure that all problems get resolved in a proper and timely manner.

  12. Sewage impact on shellfish microbial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommepuy, M; Dumas, F; Caprais, M P; Camus, P; Le Mennec, C; Parnaudeau, S; Haugarreau, L; Sarrette, B; Vilagines, P; Pothier, P; Kholi, E; Le Guyader, F

    2004-01-01

    Coastal areas are frequently contaminated by microorganisms of human origin, due to high population density and low seawater renewal. To evaluate the impact of wastewater input on shellfish quality, a study was conducted in Brittany (France) over a period of 20 months. A hydrodynamic model was used to simulate wastewater impact on microbial water quality. To validate the model, wastewater from the three main sewage treatment plants and shellfish from three sites were sampled monthly. Bacterial indicators (E. coli), F-RNA phages were searched for by culture and noroviruses by RT-PCR and hybridisation. These microorganisms were detected in the three effluents and clams, with no marked seasonal variation. The microbial concentrations in the two oyster beds, distant from the effluent outfall, were low, and only three of the samples were positive for norovirus. For simulation, the winter wastewater inputs of E. coli and phages were calculated and an estimation for norovirus flux was made from the epidemic situation in the population. The microbial behaviour was included in the model by a decay-rate factor. Results from the model calculations were found to be very similar to E. coli and phage concentrations observed in shellfish. For noroviruses, the model indicated that shellfish distant from the wastewater input were under the detection limit of the RT-PCR method. This study demonstrated the use of modelisation to interpret norovirus contamination in various areas.

  13. Accessibility of adolescent health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Richter

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents represent a large proportion of the population. As they mature and become sexually active, they face more serious health risks. Most face these risks with too little factual information, too little guidance about sexual responsibility and multiple barriers to accessing health care. A typical descriptive and explanatory design was used to determine what the characteristics of an accessible adolescent health service should be. Important results and conclusions that were reached indicate that the adolescent want a medical doctor and a registered nurse to be part of the health team treating them and they want to be served in the language of their choice. Family planning, treatment of sexually transmitted diseases and psychiatric services for the prevention of suicide are services that should be included in an adolescent accessible health service. The provision of health education concerning sexual transmitted diseases and AIDS is a necessity. The service should be available thought out the week (included Saturdays and within easy reach. It is recommended that minor changes in existing services be made, that will contribute towards making a health delivery service an adolescent accessible service. An adolescent accessible health service can in turn make a real contribution to the community’s efforts to improve the health of its adolescents and can prove to be a rewarding professional experience to the health worker.

  14. Effect of wildfires on the genetic microbial diversity in forest soils from Canary Islands (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rodríguez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Wildfires produce several ecological and environmental impacts on the physical and chemical soil characteristics, as well as on the properties and dynamics of soil microbial populations. Microorganisms are good indicators of ecosystem function and sustainability and therefore the studies about the impact of fire on microbial communities is relevant to understand the role of fire in ecosystem functioning. Although several authors have provided data about total microbial biomass and activity in soils affected by fires, there is little information about the composition and evolution of soil microbial populations after the passage of fire. In this work the effect of wildfires on the genetic diversity of microbial populations in soils from the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain is studied. The final objective was to get information about the recovery of soil functionality after wildfires.

  15. A biophysical index for predicting hydration-mediated microbial diversity in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G.; Or, D.

    2012-04-01

    Exploring the origins of soil microbial diversity represents an immense and uncharted scientific frontier. Progress in resolving mechanisms that promote and sustain the unparalleled soil microbial diversity found in soil requires development of process-based predictive tools that consider dynamic biophysical interactions at highly resolved spatial and temporal scales. We report a novel biophysical metric for hydration-mediated microbial coexistence in soils by integrating key biophysical variables, such as aquatic habitat size and connectivity, nutrient diffusion affecting microbial growth, and aqueous films controlling motility and dispersal, into a predictive index. Results show a surprisingly narrow range of hydration conditions (a few kPa) that mark a sharp transition from suppression (wet) to promotion (dry) of microbial diversity in unsaturated soils in agreement with limited observations and with simulation results based on individual-based models of competing populations. The framework enables systematic hypothesis testing for key factors that regulate microbial populations and affect soil bio-geochemical functions, and represents a step towards deciphering key mechanisms that support soil microbial diversity. New insights into the different roles of biophysical mechanisms in promoting soil microbial diversity enable predictions concerning microbial consortia function and bioremediation activities in soils, and may shape how we quantify microbial diversity within the context of land resources and biogeochemical cycling.

  16. Microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep groundwater environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliina eRajala

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The metallic low and intermediate level radioactive waste generally consists of carbon steel and stainless steels. The corrosion rate of carbon steel in deep groundwater is typically low, unless the water is very acidic or microbial activity in the environment is high. Therefore, the assessment of microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep bedrock environment has become important for evaluating the safety of disposal of radioactive waste. Here we studied the corrosion inducing ability of indigenous microbial community from a deep bedrock aquifer. Carbon steel coupons were exposed to anoxic groundwater from repository site 100 m depth (Olkiluoto, Finland for periods of three and eight months. The experiments were conducted at both in situ temperature and room temperature to investigate the response of microbial population to elevated temperature. Our results demonstrate that microorganisms from the deep bedrock aquifer benefit from carbon steel introduced to the nutrient poor anoxic deep groundwater environment. In the groundwater incubated with carbon steel the planktonic microbial community was more diverse and 100-fold more abundant compared to the environment without carbon steel. The betaproteobacteria were the most dominant bacterial class in all samples where carbon steel was present, whereas in groundwater incubated without carbon steel the microbial community had clearly less diversity. Microorganisms induced pitting corrosion and were found to cluster inside the corrosion pits. Temperature had an effect on the species composition of microbial community and also affected the corrosion deposits layer formed on the surface of carbon steel.

  17. Emerging trends in genomic approaches for microbial bioprospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akondi, K B; Lakshmi, V V

    2013-02-01

    Microorganisms constitute two out of the three domains of life on earth. They exhibit vast biodiversity and metabolic versatility. This enables the microorganisms to inhabit and thrive in even the most extreme environmental conditions, making them all pervading. The magnitude of biodiversity observed among microorganisms substantially supersedes that exhibited by the eukaryotes. These characteristics make the microbial world a very lucrative and inexhaustible resource for prospecting novel bioactive molecules. Despite their vast potential, over 99% of the microbial world still remains to be explored. The primary reason for this is that the culture-dependent methods used in the laboratories are grossly insufficient, as they support the growth of under 1% of the microorganisms found in nature. This limitation necessitated the development of techniques to circumvent culture dependency and gain access to the outstanding majority of the microorganisms. The development of culture-independent techniques has essentially reshaped the study of microbial diversity and community dynamics. Application of genomic and metagenomic approaches is contributing substantially towards characterization of the real microbial diversity. The amenability of these techniques to high throughput has opened the doors to explore the vast number of "uncultivable" microbial forms in substantially lesser time. The present article provides an update on the recent technological advances and emerging trends in exploring microbial community.

  18. The Microbial Resource Research Infrastructure MIRRI: Strength through Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackebrandt, Erko; Schüngel, Manuela; Martin, Dunja; Smith, David

    2015-11-18

    Microbial resources have been recognized as essential raw materials for the advancement of health and later for biotechnology, agriculture, food technology and for research in the life sciences, as their enormous abundance and diversity offer an unparalleled source of unexplored solutions. Microbial domain biological resource centres (mBRC) provide live cultures and associated data to foster and support the development of basic and applied science in countries worldwide and especially in Europe, where the density of highly advanced mBRCs is high. The not-for-profit and distributed project MIRRI (Microbial Resource Research Infrastructure) aims to coordinate access to hitherto individually managed resources by developing a pan-European platform which takes the interoperability and accessibility of resources and data to a higher level. Providing a wealth of additional information and linking to datasets such as literature, environmental data, sequences and chemistry will enable researchers to select organisms suitable for their research and enable innovative solutions to be developed. The current independent policies and managed processes will be adapted by partner mBRCs to harmonize holdings, services, training, and accession policy and to share expertise. The infrastructure will improve access to enhanced quality microorganisms in an appropriate legal framework and to resource-associated data in a more interoperable way.

  19. Applying landscape genetics to the microbial world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudaniec, Rachael Y; Tesson, Sylvie V M

    2016-07-01

    Landscape genetics, which explicitly quantifies landscape effects on gene flow and adaptation, has largely focused on macroorganisms, with little attention given to microorganisms. This is despite overwhelming evidence that microorganisms exhibit spatial genetic structuring in relation to environmental variables. The increasing accessibility of genomic data has opened up the opportunity for landscape genetics to embrace the world of microorganisms, which may be thought of as 'the invisible regulators' of the macroecological world. Recent developments in bioinformatics and increased data accessibility have accelerated our ability to identify microbial taxa and characterize their genetic diversity. However, the influence of the landscape matrix and dynamic environmental factors on microorganism genetic dispersal and adaptation has been little explored. Also, because many microorganisms coinhabit or codisperse with macroorganisms, landscape genomic approaches may improve insights into how micro- and macroorganisms reciprocally interact to create spatial genetic structure. Conducting landscape genetic analyses on microorganisms requires that we accommodate shifts in spatial and temporal scales, presenting new conceptual and methodological challenges not yet explored in 'macro'-landscape genetics. We argue that there is much value to be gained for microbial ecologists from embracing landscape genetic approaches. We provide a case for integrating landscape genetic methods into microecological studies and discuss specific considerations associated with the novel challenges this brings. We anticipate that microorganism landscape genetic studies will provide new insights into both micro- and macroecological processes and expand our knowledge of species' distributions, adaptive mechanisms and species' interactions in changing environments.

  20. Role of cryptic genes in microbial evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, B G; Yokoyama, S; Calhoun, D H

    1983-12-01

    Cryptic genes are phenotypically silent DNA sequences, not normally expressed during the life cycle of an individual. They may, however, be activated in a few individuals of a large population by mutation, recombination, insertion elements, or other genetic mechanisms. A consideration of the microbial literature concerning biochemical evolution, physiology, and taxonomy provides the basis for a hypothesis of microbial adaptation and evolution by mutational activation of cryptic genes. Evidence is presented, and a mathematical model is derived, indicating that powerful and biologically important mechanisms exist to prevent the loss of cryptic genes. We propose that cryptic genes persist as a vital element of the genetic repertoire, ready for recall by mutational activation in future generations. Cryptic genes provide a versatile endogenous genetic reservoir that enhances the adaptive potential of a species by a mechanism that is independent of genetic exchange.

  1. Rhizosphere microbial community and its response to plant species and soil history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbeva, P.V.; van Elsas, J.D.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The plant rhizosphere is a dynamic environment in which many parameters may influence the population structure, diversity and activity of the microbial community. Two important factors determining the structure of microbial community present in the vicinity of plant roots are plant species and soil

  2. Effect of temperature and cycle length on microbial competition in PHB-producing sequencing batch reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Y.; Marang, L.; Kleerebezem, R.; Muyzer, G.; van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of temperature and cycle length on microbial competition between polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)-producing populations enriched in feast-famine sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) was investigated at temperatures of 20 °C and 30 °C, and in a cycle length range of 1-18 h. In this study, the microbi

  3. Assembly-driven community genomics of a hypersaline microbial ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Podell

    Full Text Available Microbial populations inhabiting a natural hypersaline lake ecosystem in Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, Australia, have been characterized using deep metagenomic sampling, iterative de novo assembly, and multidimensional phylogenetic binning. Composite genomes representing habitat-specific microbial populations were reconstructed for eleven different archaea and one bacterium, comprising between 0.6 and 14.1% of the planktonic community. Eight of the eleven archaeal genomes were from microbial species without previously cultured representatives. These new genomes provide habitat-specific reference sequences enabling detailed, lineage-specific compartmentalization of predicted functional capabilities and cellular properties associated with both dominant and less abundant community members, including organisms previously known only by their 16S rRNA sequences. Together, these data provide a comprehensive, culture-independent genomic blueprint for ecosystem-wide analysis of protein functions, population structure, and lifestyles of co-existing, co-evolving microbial groups within the same natural habitat. The "assembly-driven" community genomic approach demonstrated in this study advances our ability to push beyond single gene investigations, and promotes genome-scale reconstructions as a tangible goal in the quest to define the metabolic, ecological, and evolutionary dynamics that underpin environmental microbial diversity.

  4. World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper considers the application of "universal design" principles to Web page design in order to increase accessibility for people with disabilities. Suggestions are based on the World Wide Web Consortium's accessibility initiative, which has proposed guidelines for all Web authors and federal government standards. Seven guidelines for…

  5. Access Nets: Modeling Access to Physical Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohardt, Robert; Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan; Sankaranarayanan, Sriram

    Electronic, software-managed mechanisms using, for example, radio-frequency identification (RFID) cards, enable great flexibility in specifying access control policies to physical spaces. For example, access rights may vary based on time of day or could differ in normal versus emergency situations. With such fine-grained control, understanding and reasoning about what a policy permits becomes surprisingly difficult requiring knowledge of permission levels, spatial layout, and time. In this paper, we present a formal modeling framework, called AccessNets, suitable for describing a combination of access permissions, physical spaces, and temporal constraints. Furthermore, we provide evidence that model checking techniques are effective in reasoning about physical access control policies. We describe our results from a tool that uses reachability analysis to validate security policies.

  6. Unravelling the active microbial community in a thermophilic anaerobic digester-microbial electrolysis cell coupled system under different conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrillo, Míriam; Viñas, Marc; Bonmatí, August

    2017-03-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic digestion (AD) of pig slurry coupled to a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with a recirculation loop was studied at lab-scale as a strategy to increase AD stability when submitted to organic and nitrogen overloads. The system performance was studied, with the recirculation loop both connected and disconnected, in terms of AD methane production, chemical oxygen demand removal (COD) and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations. Furthermore, the microbial population was quantitatively and qualitatively assessed through DNA and RNA-based qPCR and high throughput sequencing (MiSeq), respectively to identify the RNA-based active microbial populations from the total DNA-based microbial community composition both in the AD and MEC reactors under different operational conditions. Suppression of the recirculation loop reduced the AD COD removal efficiency (from 40% to 22%) and the methane production (from 0.32 to 0.03 m(3) m(-3) d(-1)). Restoring the recirculation loop led to a methane production of 0.55 m(3) m(-3) d(-1) concomitant with maximum MEC COD and ammonium removal efficiencies of 29% and 34%, respectively. Regarding microbial analysis, the composition of the AD and MEC anode populations differed from really active microorganisms. Desulfuromonadaceae was revealed as the most active family in the MEC (18%-19% of the RNA relative abundance), while hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanobacteriaceae) dominated the AD biomass.

  7. Effect of Stalk-Degradable Microbial Preparation on the Number of Microbial Population in the Soil Using Stalks as Fertilizer for the Fields%秸秆降解菌剂对秸秆还田土壤中细菌种群数量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴红艳; 王智学; 陈飞; 郭玲玲; 修翠娟

    2012-01-01

    要研究秸秆降解菌剂施用后1个生长季秸秆中细菌的数量和纤维素酶活力,了解其动态变化,为进一步研究分析土壤中微生物结构变化规律提供可靠的理论依据.利用分子生物学方法,对秸秆降解菌剂施用后不同生长阶段耕层中细菌基因组DNA纯化后PCR扩增其16S rDNA V3可变区,对扩增产物进行DGGE电泳,并对结果进行分析.初步分析表明,菌落数量呈现前期上升、中期最高、后期逐渐降低的趋势.%The number of bacteria and the cellulase activities in the soil after the application of stalk-degradable microbial preparation (SDMP) were studied in a growing season, to find out their dynamic variation in order to provide reliable theoretical foundation for further research and analysis of the variable laws of microbiological structural in the soil. Using molecular biology the 16S rDNA V3 variable domain in the ploughing layers of different growing stages after the application of SDMP was amplified by PCR after the bacterial genome DNA was purified. The amplified products were carried out DCGE electrophoresis, and analyzed the results. Initial analyses indicated that the number of colonies appeared a trend of rising in early stage, hit to the peak in middle stage, and gradually declined in the later stage.

  8. Professional Access 2013 programming

    CERN Document Server

    Hennig, Teresa; Hepworth, George; Yudovich, Dagi (Doug)

    2013-01-01

    Authoritative and comprehensive coverage for building Access 2013 Solutions Access, the most popular database system in the world, just opened a new frontier in the Cloud. Access 2013 provides significant new features for building robust line-of-business solutions for web, client and integrated environments.  This book was written by a team of Microsoft Access MVPs, with consulting and editing by Access experts, MVPs and members of the Microsoft Access team. It gives you the information and examples to expand your areas of expertise and immediately start to develop and upgrade projects. Exp

  9. Engineering microbial consortia to enhance biomining and bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Dietrich Brune

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In natural environments microorganisms commonly exist as communities of multiple species that are capable of performing more varied and complicated tasks than clonal populations. Synthetic biologists have engineered clonal populations with characteristics such as differentiation, memory and pattern formation, which are usually associated with more complex multicellular organisms. The prospect of designing microbial communities has alluring possibilities for environmental, biomedical and energy applications and is likely to reveal insight into how natural microbial consortia function. Cell signaling and communication pathways between different species are likely to be key processes for designing novel functions in synthetic and natural consortia. Recent efforts to engineer synthetic microbial interactions will be reviewed here, with particular emphasis given to research with significance for industrial applications in the field of biomining and bioremediation of acid mine drainage.

  10. Microbial biomass and activity in subsurface sediments from Vejen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Winding, Anne

    1992-01-01

    of bacteria varied from 0.5 to 1,203 x 103 colony forming units/g dry weight (gdw); total numbers of bacteria acridine orange direct counts (AODC) varied from 1.7 to 147 × 107 cells/gdw; growth rates (incorporation of [3H]-thymidine) varied from 1.4 to 60.7 × 104 cells/(gdw · day); and rate constants...... a single abiotic parameter that could explain the variation of size and activity of the microbial population. The microbial data obtained in these geologically young sediments were compared to literature data from older sediments, and this comparison showed that age and type of geological formation might...... be important for the size and activity of the microbial populations....

  11. Microbial Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. M.; Mena, K. D.; Nickerson, C.A.; Pierson, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, microbiological spaceflight requirements have been established in a subjective manner based upon expert opinion of both environmental and clinical monitoring results and the incidence of disease. The limited amount of data, especially from long-duration missions, has created very conservative requirements based primarily on the concentration of microorganisms. Periodic reevaluations of new data from later missions have allowed some relaxation of these stringent requirements. However, the requirements remain very conservative and subjective in nature, and the risk of crew illness due to infectious microorganisms is not well defined. The use of modeling techniques for microbial risk has been applied in the food and potable water industries and has exceptional potential for spaceflight applications. From a productivity standpoint, this type of modeling can (1) decrease unnecessary costs and resource usage and (2) prevent inadequate or inappropriate data for health assessment. In addition, a quantitative model has several advantages for risk management and communication. By identifying the variable components of the model and the knowledge associated with each component, this type of modeling can: (1) Systematically identify and close knowledge gaps, (2) Systematically identify acceptable and unacceptable risks, (3) Improve communication with stakeholders as to the reasons for resource use, and (4) Facilitate external scientific approval of the NASA requirements. The modeling of microbial risk involves the evaluation of several key factors including hazard identification, crew exposure assessment, dose-response assessment, and risk characterization. Many of these factors are similar to conditions found on Earth; however, the spaceflight environment is very specialized as the inhabitants live in a small, semi-closed environment that is often dependent on regenerative life support systems. To further complicate modeling efforts, microbial dose

  12. Standing variation in spatially growing populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Diana; Gralka, Matti; Kayser, Jona; Hallatschek, Oskar

    Patterns of genetic diversity not only reflect the evolutionary history of a species but they can also determine the evolutionary response to environmental change. For instance, the standing genetic diversity of a microbial population can be key to rescue in the face of an antibiotic attack. While genetic diversity is in general shaped by both demography and evolution, very little is understood when both factors matter, as e.g. for biofilms with pronounced spatial organization. Here, we quantitatively explore patterns of genetic diversity by using microbial colonies and well-mixed test tube populations as antipodal model systems with extreme and very little spatial structure, respectively. We find that Eden model simulations and KPZ theory can remarkably reproduce the genetic diversity in microbial colonies obtained via population sequencing. The excellent agreement allows to draw conclusions on the resilience of spatially-organized populations and to uncover new strategies to contain antibiotic resistance.

  13. A comparison between a yeast cell wall extract (Bio-Mos® and palm kernel expeller as mannan-oligosaccharides sources on the performance and ileal microbial population of broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Navidshad

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine the effect of a yeast cell wall extract (Bio- Mos and palm kernel expeller (PKE on the performance, nutrient digestibility, and ileal bacteria population of broiler chickens. A total of 60 1-d-old male broiler chicks (Cobb 500 were fed one of the 3 isonitrogenous and isocaloric diet including a control diet, or a control diet supplemented with 2 g/kg Bio-Mos (1-42 d, and for the third group, the control diet at 1-28 d following a diet containing 200 g/kg of an enzymatically-treated PKE at 29-42 d. The weight gains of birds fed the PKE containing diet (96.17 g/d were less than other groups (109.10 and 104.42 g/d for the Bio-Mos and control diet, respectively (P0.05, but the birds fed PKE or Bio-Mos containing diets had a lower population of Escherichia coli than the control group (P<0.05. The results showed that PKE potentially has a prebiotic property for chicken; however, a 200 g/kg dietary inclusion rate of PKE is not commercially recommendable because of its negative effects on the nutrients digestibility.

  14. Microbial desulfurization of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danzet, C.; Buonfiglio, V.; Polidoro, M.; Valenti, P. (Rome Univ. La Sapienza (Italy). Ist. di Microbiologia)

    This paper reviews the biochemical and economics aspects of coal desulfurization processes involving the use of thermophile microorganisms such as sulfolobus, currently believed to be the the only type of microorganism capable of degrading both inorganic (pyrite-containing) and organic sulfur compounds. Comments are also made on the feasibility of the development of an in-lab, microbial based method for the transformation of the lignin component, obtained in the processing, by anaerobic fermentation, of lignocellulosic biomass, into humic acid.

  15. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  16. Microbial field pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  17. Microbial malaise: how can we classify the microbiome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiko, Robert G

    2015-11-01

    The names and lineages of microorganisms are critical to our understanding of the microbiome. However, microbial taxonomy and phylogeny are in perpetual flux, with emerging criteria being used to rename and reshape our views of the microbial world. Different candidate molecular and nonmolecular criteria are often broadly consistent with one another, which underpins the pluralistic approach to taxonomy. However, the taxonomic picture is clouded when underlying criteria are not in agreement, or when reference datasets contain erroneously named organisms. How does the shifting taxonomic landscape impact our interpretation of microbial communities, especially in the face of inconsistencies and errors? How can taxonomy be applied in a consistent way when different users have different requirements of the classifications that emerge? The key path forward involves finding ways to integrate conflicting taxonomic criteria, choosing the right units of analysis for microbiomic studies, and making molecular taxonomy transparent and accessible in a way that complements current genomic resources.

  18. Advances in microbial amylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, A; Nigam, P; Soccol, C R; Soccol, V T; Singh, D; Mohan, R

    2000-04-01

    This review makes a comprehensive survey of microbial amylases, i.e. alpha-amylase, beta-amylase and glucoamylase. Amylases are among the most important enzymes and are of great significance in present-day biotechnology. Although they can be derived from several sources, such as plants, animals and micro-organisms, the enzymes from microbial sources generally meet industrial demands. Microbial amylases could be potentially useful in the pharmaceutical and fine-chemical industries if enzymes with suitable properties could be prepared. With the advent of new frontiers in biotechnology, the spectrum of amylase application has widened in many other fields, such as clinical, medicinal and analytical chemistries, as well as their widespread application in starch saccharification and in the textile, food, brewing and distilling industries. In this review, after a brief description of the sources of amylases, we discuss the molecular biology of amylases, describing structures, cloning, sequences, and protoplast fusion and mutagenesis. This is followed by sections on their production and finally the properties of various amylases.

  19. Microbial reduction of iodate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Councell, T.B.; Landa, E.R.; Lovley, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    The different oxidation species of iodine have markedly different sorption properties. Hence, changes in iodine redox states can greatly affect the mobility of iodine in the environment. Although a major microbial role has been suggested in the past to account for these redox changes, little has been done to elucidate the responsible microorganisms or the mechanisms involved. In the work presented here, direct microbial reduction of iodate was demonstrated with anaerobic cell suspensions of the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans which reduced 96% of an initial 100 ??M iodate to iodide at pH 7 in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, whereas anaerobic cell suspensions of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens were unable to reduce iodate in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer (pH 7). Both D. desulfuricans and S. putrefaciens were able to reduce iodate at pH 7 in 10 mM HEPES buffer. Both soluble ferrous iron and sulfide, as well as iron monosulfide (FeS) were shown to abiologically reduce iodate to iodide. These results indicate that ferric iron and/or sulfate reducing bacteria are capable of mediating both direct, enzymatic, as well as abiotic reduction of iodate in natural anaerobic environments. These microbially mediated reactions may be important factors in the fate and transport of 129I in natural systems.

  20. Microbial nitrogen metabolism: response to warming and resource supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckeridge, K. M.; Min, K.; Lehmeier, C.; Ballantyne, F.; Billings, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Ecosystem nitrogen (N) dynamics are dependent on microbial metabolic responses to a changing climate. Most studies that investigate soil microbial N dynamics in response to temperature employ measurements reflective of many interacting and confounding phenomena, as altering soil temperature can simultaneously alter moisture regime, substrate availability, and competitive dynamics between microbial populations. As a result, it is difficult to discern how temperature alone can alter patterns of microbial N metabolism using whole soils. Without that knowledge, it is impossible to parse temperature effects on soil N fluxes from other drivers. We address this issue by exploring the sensitivity of microbial partitioning of N between assimilation (growing biomass) and dissimilation (releasing N to the environment) in response to changes in temperature and quality (C:N ratio) of substrate, using a chemostat approach in which a microbial population is maintained at steady state. We perform our experiments using a Gram-negative bacterium (Pseudomonas fluorescens), ubiquitous in soils and dependent on organic compounds to satisfy its resource demand. Individual chemostat runs, all conducted at similar microbial growth rates, generate data describing microbial biomass N, solution N pools and microbial biomass and solution d15N. With these data we can calculate d15N enrichment (d15N microbial biomass - d15N nutrient solution) a proxy for microbial N partitioning. From a recently published model of microbial biomass d15N drivers, fractionation of N occurs with both uptake and excretion of NH3+ so that microbes with a net dissimilation become 15N enriched relative to their source. Because a related study has demonstrated increased microbial C demand with temperature, we predict that in a warming environment microorganisms will become relatively C limited. Accordingly, we hypothesize that warming will enhance microbial dissimilation, and that this N release will be exacerbated as

  1. Relating MEC population dynamics to anode performance from DGGE and electrical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croese, Elsemiek; Keesman, Karel J.; Widjaja-Greefkes, (Aura) H. C. A.; Geelhoed, Jeanine S.; Plugge, Caroline M.; Sleutels, Tom H. J. A.; Stams, A; Euverink, Gert-Jan W.

    2013-01-01

    The microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is a promising system for H-2 production, but little is known about the active microbial population in MEC systems. Therefore, the microbial community of five different MEC graphite felt anodes was analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) pr

  2. Microbial population and nutritional compounds in the organs of tanzania-grass before and after ensilage/Populações microbianas e componentes nutricionais nos órgãos do capim-tanzânia antes e após a ensilagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele de Jesus Ferreira

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was carried with the objective of evaluating the microbial populations and the nutritional value of different organs of plants of the tanzânia-grass (Panicum maximum before and after the ensilage. Ten samples were collected at random at the pasture with the use of a square of 1 m2, were taken the botanical separation of the leaves in expansion, expanded leaves, leaves senesce, stem and the plant. Counting of microorganisms and the nutritional value were made in the different organs of the plant. Was determined the number of lactic bacterium, enterobacterium, fungi and yeasts and dry matter values, crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber and hemicellulose. The microbial populations were variable in function of the organ of the plant, and the stem is the organ that assures the growth of lactic bacteria and inhibition of growth of undesirable microorganisms during the ensilage of the tanzânia- grass. In the nutritional extent, a decreasing hierarchy of the value bromatológic exists: leafs in expansion, expanded leaf, plant completes and stem before and after the ensilage process.Este experimento foi conduzido com o objetivo de avaliar as populações microbianas e o valor nutricionaldos diferentes órgãos das plantas do capim-tanzânia (Panicum maximum antes e após a ensilagem. Foram coletadas dez amostras do pasto, ao acaso com o uso de um quadrado de 1 m2. Foram feitos as separações botânica das folhas em expansão, folhas expandidas, folhas senescente, colmo e a planta inteira. Foram efetuadas contagens de microrganismos e o valor nutricional dos diferentes órgãos da planta. Determinou-se o número de bactérias láticas, enterobactérias, fungos e leveduras e os valores de matéria seca, proteína bruta, fibra em detergente neutro, fibra em detergente ácido e hemicelulose. As populações microbianas foram variáveis em função do órgão da planta, e o colmo foi o órgão que assegurou o

  3. 元素硫对黄铜矿生物浸出行为及群落结构的影响%Relationships among bioleaching performance, additional elemental sulfur,microbial population dynamics and its energy metabolism in bioleaching of chalcopyrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏乐先; 汤露; 夏金兰; 尹礎; 柴立元; 赵小娟; 聂珍媛; 柳建设; 邱冠周

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the relationships among bioleaching performance,additional elemental sulfur (S0),microbial population dynamics and its energy metabolism,bioleaching of chalcopyrite by three typical sulfur- and/or iron-oxidizing bacteria,Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans,Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans with different levels of sulfur were studied in batch shake flask cultures incubated at 30 ℃.Copper dissolution capability (71%) was increased with the addition of 3.193 g/L S0,compared to that (67%) without S0.However,lower copper extraction was obtained in bioleaching with excessive sulfur.Microbial population dynamics during chalcopyrite bioleaching process was monitored by using PCR-restrietion fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP).Additional S0 accelerated the growth of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria,inhibited the iron-oxidizing metabolism and led to the decrease of iron-oxidizing microorganisms,finally affected iron concentration,redox potential and bioleaching performance.It is suggested that mixed iron and sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms with further optimized additional S0 concentration could improve copper recovery from chalcopyrite.%研究3种典型铁/硫代谢菌-Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans,Leptospirillum ferriphilum及Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans混合浸出黄铜矿过程中铁/硫氧化活性、群落结构(PCR-RFLP)的变化,以及不同浓度的元素硫对其影响.结果发现,加入3.193 g/L元素硫能促进细菌的表观硫氧化活性,改变浸矿体系的群落结构,并进一步影响钝化层的形成、金属离子的溶出,其浸出率(71%)较未添加硫的(67%)有一定程度的提高.而过量的元素硫会抑制铜的浸出(浸出率44%).

  4. Physical Access Control Database -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This data set contains the personnel access card data (photo, name, activation/expiration dates, card number, and access level) as well as data about turnstiles and...

  5. Design for Accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herriott, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A report on how nine rail builder, operators and transport designers deal with design for accessibility......A report on how nine rail builder, operators and transport designers deal with design for accessibility...

  6. Monitoring and Surveillance of Hemodialysis Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koirala, Nischal; Anvari, Evamaria; McLennan, Gordon

    2016-03-01

    Access surveillance using invasive or noninvasive methods with an objective to improve access patency and decrease hospital admissions for access dysfunction in dialysis population has been promoted, but its success to predict incipient thrombosis and subsequent access failure is a controversial topic. Some studies have shown improvement in access outcomes, while others have failed to demonstrate an ideal method to diagnose access problems. Furthermore, the use of endovascular interventions such as percutaneous transluminal angioplasty to timely correct access problem might itself be a promoter of neointimal hyperplasia and restenosis during balloon angioplasty. There are significant costs and efforts associated with routine dialysis surveillance; therefore, it is necessary to understand whether such programs will help improve access-related problems and guarantee adequate dialysis care. It is generally agreed upon that despite the lack of guaranteed success of surveillance, such strategies have helped improve dialysis management, resulted in decreased costs and hospitalizations, and represented clinically relevant indications of failure prior to planning any radiological or surgical intervention. In this study, the authors review monitoring and surveillance measures in place, and their associated merits and limitations to detect stenosis and prevent incidences of vascular access thrombosis.

  7. Modeling spatial accessibility to parks: a national study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Hua

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parks provide ideal open spaces for leisure-time physical activity and important venues to promote physical activity. The spatial configuration of parks, the number of parks and their spatial distribution across neighborhood areas or local regions, represents the basic park access potential for their residential populations. A new measure of spatial access to parks, population-weighted distance (PWD to parks, combines the advantages of current park access approaches and incorporates the information processing theory and probability access surface model to more accurately quantify residential population's potential spatial access to parks. Results The PWD was constructed at the basic level of US census geography - blocks - using US park and population data. This new measure of population park accessibility was aggregated to census tract, county, state and national levels. On average, US residential populations are expected to travel 6.7 miles to access their local neighborhood parks. There are significant differences in the PWD to local parks among states. The District of Columbia and Connecticut have the best access to local neighborhood parks with PWD of 0.6 miles and 1.8 miles, respectively. Alaska, Montana, and Wyoming have the largest PWDs of 62.0, 37.4, and 32.8 miles, respectively. Rural states in the western and Midwestern US have lower neighborhood park access, while urban states have relatively higher park access. Conclusions The PWD to parks provides a consistent platform for evaluating spatial equity of park access and linking with population health outcomes. It could be an informative evaluation tool for health professionals and policy makers. This new method could be applied to quantify geographic accessibility of other types of services or destinations, such as food, alcohol, and tobacco outlets.

  8. Incidence of contact lens-associated microbial keratitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, K.H.; Leung, S.L.; Hoekman, J.W.; Beekhuis, W.H.; Mulder, P.G.H.; Geerards, A.J.M.; Kijlstra, A.

    1999-01-01

    Background. The incidence of contact-lens-associated microbial keratitis is uncertain and its related morbidity in the general population of contact-lens wearers is not known. We examined these issues in a prospective epidemiological study. Methods. We surveyed all practising ophthalmologists in the

  9. Monitoring microbial metabolites using an inductively coupled resonance circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karnaushenko, Daniil; Baraban, Larysa; Ye, Dan; Uguz, Ilke; Mendes, Rafael G.; Rümmeli, Mark H.; Visser, de Arjan; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Makarov, Denys

    2015-01-01

    We present a new approach to monitor microbial population dynamics in emulsion droplets via changes in metabolite composition, using an inductively coupled LC resonance circuit. The signal measured by such resonance detector provides information on the magnetic field interaction with the bacteria

  10. Soil microbial community diversity and driving mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To study the structure of soil microbial communities, DNA was extracted from different environmental soil samples, and 16S rDNA clone libraries were constructed. The diversity of these 16S libraries were analyzed with restriction fragment length polymorphism based on amplification ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (RFLP-ARDRA)method. The results reveal a high diversity of the soil microbial communities, and striking differences in community structure at different depths. In the surface soil environment, there is no dominant gene pattern, but in the subsurface samples some dominant gene patterns are much more common. With the increasing depth the preference dominance becomes more significant. A spatial isolation hypothesis is proposed to explain the different community structures at different soil depths. Microcosms are set to simulate competition between populations at different degrees of spatial isolation. These studies reveal that spatial isolation caused by low moisture affects the competitive interactions of the two populations. In the two-strain microcosm there is one dominant population at high moisture, and no dominance in very dry environments

  11. Metagenomics: an inexhaustible access to nature's diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Martin; Gabor, Esther M; Liebeton, Klaus; Meurer, Guido; Niehaus, Frank; Schulze, Renate; Eck, Jürgen; Lorenz, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The chemical industry has an enormous need for innovation. To save resources, energy and time, currently more and more established chemical processes are being switched to biotechnological routes. This requires white biotechnology to discover and develop novel enzymes, biocatalysts and applications. Due to a limitation in the cultivability of microbes living in certain habitats, technologies have to be established which give access to the enormous resource of uncultivated microbial diversity. Metagenomics promises to provide new and diverse enzymes and biocatalysts as well as bioactive molecules and has the potential to make industrial biotechnology an economic, sustainable success.

  12. An exogenous surfactant-producing Bacillus subtilis facilitates indigenous microbial enhanced oil recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peike eGao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study used an exogenous lipopeptide-producing Bacillus subtilis to strengthen the indigenous microbial enhanced oil recovery (IMEOR process in a water-flooded reservoir in the laboratory. The microbial processes and driving mechanisms were investigated in terms of the changes in oil properties and the interplay between the exogenous Bacillus subtilis and indigenous microbial populations. The exogenous Bacillus subtilis is a lipopeptide producer, with a short growth cycle and no oil-degrading ability. The Bacillus subtilis facilitates the IMEOR process through improving oil emulsification and accelerating microbial growth with oil as the carbon source. Microbial community studies using quantitative PCR and high-throughput sequencing revealed that the exogenous Bacillus subtilis could live together with reservoir microbial populations, and did not exert an observable inhibitory effect on the indigenous microbial populations during nutrient stimulation. Core-flooding tests showed that the combined exogenous and indigenous microbial flooding increased oil displacement efficiency by 16.71%, compared with 7.59% in the control where only nutrients were added, demonstrating the application potential in enhanced oil recovery in water-flooded reservoirs, in particular, for reservoirs where IMEOR treatment cannot effectively improve oil recovery.

  13. Functional Ecological Gene Networks to Reveal the Changes Among Microbial Interactions Under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ye; Zhou, Jizhong; Luo, Feng; He, Zhili; Tu, Qichao; Zhi, Xiaoyang

    2010-05-17

    Biodiversity and its responses to environmental changes is a central issue in ecology, and for society. Almost all microbial biodiversity researches focus on species richness and abundance but ignore the interactions among different microbial species/populations. However, determining the interactions and their relationships to environmental changes in microbial communities is a grand challenge, primarily due to the lack of information on the network structure among different microbial species/populations. Here, a novel random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework for identifying functional ecological gene networks (fEGNs) is developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data from the grassland microbial communities in a long-term FACE (Free Air CO2 Enrichment) experiment. Both fEGNs under elevated CO2 (eCO2) and ambient CO2 (aCO2) possessed general characteristics of many complex systems such as scale-free, small-world, modular and hierarchical. However, the topological structure of the fEGNs is distinctly different between eCO2 and aCO2, suggesting that eCO2 dramatically altered the interactions among different microbial functional groups/populations. In addition, the changes in network structure were significantly correlated with soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, and plant productivity, indicating the potential importance of network interactions in ecosystem functioning. Elucidating network interactions in microbial communities and their responses to environmental changes are fundamentally important for research in microbial ecology, systems microbiology, and global change.

  14. Microbial life in a fjord: metagenomic analysis of a microbial mat in Chilean patagonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Ugalde

    Full Text Available The current study describes the taxonomic and functional composition of metagenomic sequences obtained from a filamentous microbial mat isolated from the Comau fjord, located in the northernmost part of the Chilean Patagonia. The taxonomic composition of the microbial community showed a high proportion of members of the Gammaproteobacteria, including a high number of sequences that were recruited to the genomes of Moritella marina MP-1 and Colwelliapsycherythraea 34H, suggesting the presence of populations related to these two psychrophilic bacterial species. Functional analysis of the community indicated a high proportion of genes coding for the transport and metabolism of amino acids, as well as in energy production. Among the energy production functions, we found protein-coding genes for sulfate and nitrate reduction, both processes associated with Gammaproteobacteria-related sequences. This report provides the first examination of the taxonomic composition and genetic diversity associated with these conspicuous microbial mat communities and provides a framework for future microbial studies in the Comau fjord.

  15. Microbial Life in a Fjord: Metagenomic Analysis of a Microbial Mat in Chilean Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, Juan A.; Gallardo, Maria J.; Belmar, Camila; Muñoz, Práxedes; Ruiz-Tagle, Nathaly; Ferrada-Fuentes, Sandra; Espinoza, Carola; Allen, Eric E.; Gallardo, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The current study describes the taxonomic and functional composition of metagenomic sequences obtained from a filamentous microbial mat isolated from the Comau fjord, located in the northernmost part of the Chilean Patagonia. The taxonomic composition of the microbial community showed a high proportion of members of the Gammaproteobacteria, including a high number of sequences that were recruited to the genomes of Moritella marina MP-1 and Colwelliapsycherythraea 34H, suggesting the presence of populations related to these two psychrophilic bacterial species. Functional analysis of the community indicated a high proportion of genes coding for the transport and metabolism of amino acids, as well as in energy production. Among the energy production functions, we found protein-coding genes for sulfate and nitrate reduction, both processes associated with Gammaproteobacteria-related sequences. This report provides the first examination of the taxonomic composition and genetic diversity associated with these conspicuous microbial mat communities and provides a framework for future microbial studies in the Comau fjord. PMID:24015199

  16. Microbial diversity in restored wetlands of San Francisco Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theroux, Susanna [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Hartman, Wyatt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; He, Shaomei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Tringe, Susannah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2013-12-09

    Wetland ecosystems may serve as either a source or a sink for atmospheric carbon and greenhouse gases. This delicate carbon balance is influenced by the activity of belowground microbial communities that return carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere. Wetland restoration efforts in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region may help to reverse land subsidence and possibly increase carbon storage in soils. However, the effects of wetland restoration on microbial communities, which mediate soil metabolic activity and carbon cycling, are poorly studied. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors which shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities in a suite of restored and historic wetlands in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of the wetland soil microbial communities along biogeochemical and wetland age gradients. Our results show relationships among geochemical gradients, availability of electron acceptors, and microbial community composition. Our study provides the first genomic glimpse into microbial populations in natural and restored wetlands of the San Francisco Bay-Delta region and provides a valuable benchmark for future studies.

  17. Allelopathy-mediated Competition in Microbial Mats from Antarctic Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Marc; Lesser, Michael P

    2017-02-18

    Microbial mats are vertically stratified communities that host a complex consortium of microorganisms, dominated by cyanobacteria, that compete for available nutrients and environmental niches, within these extreme habitats. The Antarctic Dry Valleys near McMurdo Sound include a series of lakes within the drainage basin that are bisected by glacial traverses. These lakes are traditionally independent, but recent increases in glacial melting have allowed two lakes (Chad and Hoare) to become connected by a meltwater stream. Microbial mats were collected from these lakes, and cultured under identical conditions at the McMurdo Station laboratory. Replicate pairings of the microbial mats exhibited consistent patterns of growth inhibition indicative of competitive dominance. Natural products were extracted from the microbial mats, and a disc diffusion assay was utilized to show that allelochemical compounds mediate competitive interactions. Both microscopy and 16S rRNA sequencing show that these mats contain significant populations of cyanobacteria known to produce allelochemicals. Two compounds were isolated from these microbial mats that might be important in the chemical ecology of these psychrophiles. In other disc:mat pairings, including extract versus mat of origin, the allelochemicals exhibited no effect. Taken together, these results indicate that Antarctic lake microbial mats can compete via allelopathy.

  18. Identification of Microbial and Proteomic Biomarkers in Early Childhood Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Hart

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to provide a univariate and multivariate analysis of genomic microbial data and salivary mass-spectrometry proteomic profiles for dental caries outcomes. In order to determine potential useful biomarkers for dental caries, a multivariate classification analysis was employed to build predictive models capable of classifying microbial and salivary sample profiles with generalization performance. We used high-throughput methodologies including multiplexed microbial arrays and SELDI-TOF-MS profiling to characterize the oral flora and salivary proteome in 204 children aged 1–8 years (n=118 caries-free, n=86 caries-active. The population received little dental care and was deemed at high risk for childhood caries. Findings of the study indicate that models incorporating both microbial and proteomic data are superior to models of only microbial or salivary data alone. Comparison of results for the combined and independent data suggests that the combination of proteomic and microbial sources is beneficial for the classification accuracy and that combined data lead to improved predictive models for caries-active and caries-free patients. The best predictive model had a 6% test error, >92% sensitivity, and >95% specificity. These findings suggest that further characterization of the oral microflora and the salivary proteome associated with health and caries may provide clinically useful biomarkers to better predict future caries experience.

  19. Pro Access 2010 Development

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Pro Access 2010 Development is a fundamental resource for developing business applications that take advantage of the features of Access 2010 and the many sources of data available to your business. In this book, you'll learn how to build database applications, create Web-based databases, develop macros and Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) tools for Access applications, integrate Access with SharePoint and other business systems, and much more. Using a practical, hands-on approach, this book will take you through all the facets of developing Access-based solutions, such as data modeling, co

  20. Android Access Control Extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Baláž

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to analyze and extend security model of mobile devices running on Android OS. Provided security extension is a Linux kernel security module that allows the system administrator to restrict program's capabilities with per-program profiles. Profiles can allow capabilities like network access, raw socket access, and the permission to read, write, or execute files on matching paths. Module supplements the traditional Android capability access control model by providing mandatory access control (MAC based on path. This extension increases security of access to system objects in a device and allows creating security sandboxes per application.

  1. Access 2013 for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Ulrich Fuller, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    The easy guide to Microsoft Access returns with updates on the latest version! Microsoft Access allows you to store, organize, view, analyze, and share data; the new Access 2013 release enables you to build even more powerful, custom database solutions that integrate with the web and enterprise data sources. Access 2013 For Dummies covers all the new features of the latest version of Accessand serves as an ideal reference, combining the latest Access features with the basics of building usable databases. You'll learn how to create an app from the Welcome screen, get support

  2. Organic nitrogen rearranges both structure and activity of the soil-borne microbial seedbank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Márcio F. A.; Pan, Yao; Bloem, Jaap; Berge, Hein ten; Kuramae, Eiko E.

    2017-01-01

    Use of organic amendments is a valuable strategy for crop production. However, it remains unclear how organic amendments shape both soil microbial community structure and activity, and how these changes impact nutrient mineralization rates. We evaluated the effect of various organic amendments, which range in Carbon/Nitrogen (C/N) ratio and degradability, on the soil microbiome in a mesocosm study at 32, 69 and 132 days. Soil samples were collected to determine community structure (assessed by 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequences), microbial biomass (fungi and bacteria), microbial activity (leucine incorporation and active hyphal length), and carbon and nitrogen mineralization rates. We considered the microbial soil DNA as the microbial seedbank. High C/N ratio favored fungal presence, while low C/N favored dominance of bacterial populations. Our results suggest that organic amendments shape the soil microbial community structure through a feedback mechanism by which microbial activity responds to changing organic inputs and rearranges composition of the microbial seedbank. We hypothesize that the microbial seedbank composition responds to changing organic inputs according to the resistance and resilience of individual species, while changes in microbial activity may result in increases or decreases in availability of various soil nutrients that affect plant nutrient uptake. PMID:28198425

  3. Construction of a microbial natural product library for chemical biology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoki; Takahashi, Shunji; Nogawa, Toshihiko; Saito, Tamio; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2012-04-01

    The RIKEN Natural Products Depository (NPDepo) is a public depository of small molecules. Currently, the NPDepo chemical library contains 39,200 pure compounds, half of which are natural products and their derivatives. In order to reinforce the uniqueness of our chemical library, we have improved our strategies for the collection of microbial natural products. Firstly, a microbial metabolite fraction library coupled with an MP (microbial products) plot database provides a powerful resource for the efficient isolation of microbial metabolites. Secondly, biosynthetic studies of microbial metabolites have enabled us to not only access ingenious biosynthetic machineries, but also obtain a variety of biosynthetic intermediates. Our chemical library contributes to the discovery of molecular probes for increasing our understanding of complex biological processes and for eventually developing new drug leads.

  4. Microbial Cell Dynamics Lab (MCDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microbial Cell Dynamics Laboratory at PNNL enables scientists to study the molecular details of microbes under relevant environmental conditions. The MCDL seeks...

  5. Principal methods for isolation and identification of soil microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanis, Christos; Alexopoulos, Athanasios; Voidarou, Chrissa; Vavias, Stavros; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Soil microbial populations play crucial role in soil properties and influence below-ground ecosystem processes. Microbial composition and functioning changes the soil quality through decomposition of organic matter, recycling of nutrients, and biological control of parasites of plants. Moreover, the discovery that soil microbes may translate into benefits for biotechnology, management of agricultural, forest, and natural ecosystems, biodegradation of pollutants, and waste treatment systems maximized the need of scientists for the isolation and their characterization. Operations such as the production of antibiotics and enzymic activities from microorganisms of soil constitute objectives of industry in her effort to cope with the increase of population of earth and disturbance of environment and may ameliorate the effects of global climate change. In the past decades, new biochemical and molecular techniques have been developed in our effort to identify and classify soil bacteria. The goal of measuring the soil microbial diversity is difficult because of the limited knowledge about bacteria species and classification through families and orders. Molecular techniques extend our knowledge about microbial diversity and help the taxonomy of species. Measuring and monitoring soil microbial communities can lead us to better understanding of their composition and function in many ecosystem processes.

  6. Halitosis: An oral microbial faction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Saini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Halitosis is a widespread condition and believed to affect one-quarter of the population around the world; also, most people have this condition from time to time. Breath malodour may be an important factor in social communication, and therefore may be the origin of concern not only for a possible health condition but also for frequent psychological alterations, leading to social and personal isolation. The most conspicuous malodorous compounds are termed volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs, with hydrogen sulphide, methyl mercaptan, and dimethyl sulphide accounting for roughly 90% of the VSCs. A number of oral bacteria, especially Gram-negative anaerobic species found in the subgingival plaque, produce a diverse array of malodorous compounds as byproducts of their metabolism, including VSCs and short-chain organic acids. Assessment and management of halitosis is of paramount importance in enhancing the overall health; moreover, dentists play a significant role in combating halitosis by reducing the oral microbial stack. Thus, the aim of the present review was to describe the aetiological factors, assessment tools, and therapeutic approaches related to halitosis.

  7. Urban Railway Accessibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Hongzhi; YIN Yuanfei; YAN Hai; HAN Yan; QIN Huanmei

    2007-01-01

    Effective use of urban rapid railway systems requires that the railway systems be effectively connected with other transportation modes so that they are accessible. This paper uses the logit model and data to analyze the factors influencing railway access choices in a railway choice access model. The results indicate that access time, access cost, and access distance are factors significantly affecting railway access choices. The user's income significantly affects the probability of choosing to walk rather than to take a taxi,but is not related to choosing buses or bicycles. Vehicle ownership significantly affects the probability of choosing a taxi, but is not significantly related to the other modes. The conclusions provide an analysis tool for urban railway planning and construction.

  8. Open Access @ DTU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrøm, Jeannette

    Open Access is high on the agenda in Denmark and internationally. Denmark has announced a national strategy for Open Access that aims to achieve Open Access to 80% in 2017 and 100% in 2022 to peer review research articles. All public Danish funders as well as H2020 requires that all peer review...... articles that is an outcome of their funding will be Open Access. Uploading your full texts (your final author manuscript after review ) to DTU Orbit is a fundamental part of providing Open Access to your research. We are here to answer all your questions with regards to Open Access and related topics...... such as copyright, DTU Orbit, Open Access journals, APCs, Vouchers etc....

  9. Microbial lifestyles that enable survival in lithifying habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, M.; Dossing, L. N.; Tamez, P.; Ziegler, S.; Hanselmann, K.; Sessions, A. L.; Spear, J. R.; Johnson, H.; Berelson, W.; Corsetti, F. A.; Dawson, S.; de la Torre, J. R.; Usc Wrigley Institute, I.

    2010-12-01

    The precipitation of carbonates in the travertine forming Narrow Gauge hot spring in Yellowstone National Park occurs at a rapid rate, whereby microorganisms that colonize the ponds and apron facies are required to overcome lithification. CO2-fixation by autotrophic microorganisms in this cation-rich environment further promotes carbonate encapsulation. Microorganisms that alter their micro-habitat through dissimilative metabolic processes such as H2S and NH4+oxidation, can decrease acid neutralizing capacity (ANCcarb = [HCO3-] + 2[CO32-] + [OH-] - [H+] ) and locally delay CaCO3 mineralization. Genomic and geochemical approaches were combined to study the metabolic processes and microbial populations in a sulfidic hot spring emerging from a carbonate fissure ridge. Samples from locations close to the discharge vent and along its outflow channel were preserved for DNA sequencing, ATP measurements, microscopy, ion chromatographic and ICP-MS analyses of the major solutes and for ANC titration. Temperature, conductivity and pH were measured at the sampling sites. A pyrotagged 16S rRNA gene sequencing approach at both sites was used along with a publicly accessible metagenome of a similar site at the same location. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses reveal a great diversity of phylotypes related to species with known physiological potentials. The diversity at the vent is greater and more even than at the cooler site 6m downstream. A number of genes for C-1 fixing enzymes point to the presence of the reductive citric acid cycle, as well as to parts of the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway, the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle and the serine cycle as dominant forms of carbon metabolism. A complete set of genes for all enzymes of the reductive citric acid cycle were found, which indicates a dominance of this pathway for carbon fixation. Surprisingly, genes for RubisCo appear to be absent. Almost all genes found for enzymes that catalyze the conversion of sulfur compounds are involved

  10. Microbial Response to Carbon Dioxide Injection in a Shallow Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rook, A.; Faehndrich, D.; O'Mullan, G.; Mailloux, B.; Matter, J.; Stute, M.; Goldberg, D.

    2007-12-01

    Extensive research is underway to investigate the geophysical and geochemical dynamics of subsurface carbon sequestration, but there has been only theoretical consideration of the microbial response. Microbial dynamics are capable of altering the range and rates of geochemical reactions in the subsurface. The goal of this field experiment is to link geochemical changes due to CO2 injection to alterations in the microbial community and to provide an initial characterization of the microbial response. A seven week push-pull experiment was conducted at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Test Well. 200L of groundwater was extracted, bubbled with carbon dioxide, augmented with a bromide tracer, and injected to 230m depth below ground surface. The hydraulically isolated injection zone marked the contact area between dolerite sill and sedimentary rock. Samples were taken on a weekly basis. Geochemically, a drop in pH from 9.4 to 4.5 at injection was coupled with a release of Fe2+ from the formation. As neutralization and mixing caused pH to return toward background levels, Fe2+ concentrations decreased. The aquifer remained anoxic throughout the experiment. DNA was successfully extracted and the gene encoding 16S ribosomal RNA was amplified from all samples with the exception of the injection fluid. Sequencing from clone libraries and tRFLP analyses were used to characterize microbial dynamics during the seven week study. Whereas the number of microbial groups detected remained relatively constant over the course of the experiment, changes were observed in both the dominant microbes phylogenetic identity and relative abundance. Methane concentrations increased from background levels (below 50 nM) to 4.2 nM after injection, but initial attempts to amplify archaeal and methanogen-specific genes were unsuccessful, bringing into question the presence of a significant methanogenic population. These results confirm that there is a microbial response to carbon dioxide

  11. Microbial bebop: creating music from complex dynamics in microbial ecology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Larsen

    Full Text Available In order for society to make effective policy decisions on complex and far-reaching subjects, such as appropriate responses to global climate change, scientists must effectively communicate complex results to the non-scientifically specialized public. However, there are few ways however to transform highly complicated scientific data into formats that are engaging to the general community. Taking inspiration from patterns observed in nature and from some of the principles of jazz bebop improvisation, we have generated Microbial Bebop, a method by which microbial environmental data are transformed into music. Microbial Bebop uses meter, pitch, duration, and harmony to highlight the relationships between multiple data types in complex biological datasets. We use a comprehensive microbial ecology, time course dataset collected at the L4 marine monitoring station in the Western English Channel as an example of microbial ecological data that can be transformed into music. Four compositions were generated (www.bio.anl.gov/MicrobialBebop.htm. from L4 Station data using Microbial Bebop. Each composition, though deriving from the same dataset, is created to highlight different relationships between environmental conditions and microbial community structure. The approach presented here can be applied to a wide variety of complex biological datasets.

  12. Microbial bebop: creating music from complex dynamics in microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Peter; Gilbert, Jack

    2013-01-01

    In order for society to make effective policy decisions on complex and far-reaching subjects, such as appropriate responses to global climate change, scientists must effectively communicate complex results to the non-scientifically specialized public. However, there are few ways however to transform highly complicated scientific data into formats that are engaging to the general community. Taking inspiration from patterns observed in nature and from some of the principles of jazz bebop improvisation, we have generated Microbial Bebop, a method by which microbial environmental data are transformed into music. Microbial Bebop uses meter, pitch, duration, and harmony to highlight the relationships between multiple data types in complex biological datasets. We use a comprehensive microbial ecology, time course dataset collected at the L4 marine monitoring station in the Western English Channel as an example of microbial ecological data that can be transformed into music. Four compositions were generated (www.bio.anl.gov/MicrobialBebop.htm.) from L4 Station data using Microbial Bebop. Each composition, though deriving from the same dataset, is created to highlight different relationships between environmental conditions and microbial community structure. The approach presented here can be applied to a wide variety of complex biological datasets.

  13. EVAPORITE MICROBIAL FILMS, MATS, MICROBIALITES AND STROMATOLITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R; Penny Morris, P; Garriet Smith, G

    2008-01-28

    Evaporitic environments are found in a variety of depositional environments as early as the Archean. The depositional settings, microbial community and mineralogical composition vary significantly as no two settings are identical. The common thread linking all of the settings is that evaporation exceeds precipitation resulting in elevated concentrations of cations and anions that are higher than in oceanic systems. The Dead Sea and Storrs Lake are examples of two diverse modern evaporitic settings as the former is below sea level and the latter is a coastal lake on an island in the Caribbean. Each system varies in water chemistry as the Dead Sea dissolved ions originate from surface weathered materials, springs, and aquifers while Storrs Lake dissolved ion concentration is primarily derived from sea water. Consequently some of the ions, i.e., Sr, Ba are found at significantly lower concentrations in Storrs Lake than in the Dead Sea. The origin of the dissolved ions are ultimately responsible for the pH of each system, alkaline versus mildly acidic. Each system exhibits unique biogeochemical properties as the extreme environments select certain microorganisms. Storrs Lake possesses significant biofilms and stromatolitic deposits and the alkalinity varies depending on rainfall and storm activity. The microbial community Storrs Lake is much more diverse and active than those observed in the Dead Sea. The Dead Sea waters are mildly acidic, lack stromatolites, and possess a lower density of microbial populations. The general absence of microbial and biofilm fossilization is due to the depletion of HCO{sub 3} and slightly acidic pH.

  14. Microbially Mediated Glass Alteration in the Geological Record: Textural clues for Microbial Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudigel, H.; Furnes, H.; McLoughlin, N.; Banerjee, N.

    2007-12-01

    Fe and Mn oxidizing microbes interact with their environment through the microbially mediated formation of Fe/Mn oxides and through the corrosion textures they may leave behind in the solids they colonize and from which they extract nutrients. Understanding the geo-biology of Fe and Mn oxidation may focus on the study of the microbes themselves, the mineral products, its biocorrosion features and the relationships between these types of observations. We have reviewed our own data on glass bio-corrosion and in particular the wider literature on microbial mineral tunneling to develop a two stage biocorrosion model for volcanic glass that offers feedback for our understanding of the mechanisms and the dynamics of microbial dissolution. Traces of microbially mediated dissolution of volcanic glass are commonly observed in volcanic glass found in submarine volcanoes on the seafloor, and in uplifted submarine volcanoes of almost any geological age back to the origin of life. Two main bioalteration textures care observed, granular and tubular. Based on a comparison of these features in particular with tunneling by ectomycorrhizal fungi, we propose two distinct types of biocorrosion that affects glass: (1) Granular alteration textures, made up of colonies of microbe-sized, near spherical mineral - filled cavities that form irregular clusters ranging to a tens of micron thick bands at the glas surfaces. These granular textures are interpreted as the result of microbial colonization. accompanied by dissolution of the glass in their contact surface, deposition of authigenic minerals and the formation of a biofilm, that eventually seals the glass from easy access by seawater for hydration, or from microbes accessing Fe (II) in the glass. (2) The most spectacular bioalteration feature, repesented by the formation of tubes cannot be easily formed by the former mechanism because near spherical, individual microbes are likely not to produce the directionality that is required to

  15. Research on seasonal dynamic change of microbial population structure in Jialu River%贾鲁河水体微生物菌群结构季节动态变迁研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王风芹; 侯淑芬; 谢慧; 于鲁冀; 宋安东

    2012-01-01

    采用稀释平板分离计数法和最大或然数法(MPN法)研究了贾鲁河水体和底泥中细菌、真菌、放线菌和脱氮功能微生物数量的季节变化.结果表明,水体和底泥中细菌数量显著高于真菌和放线菌,但季节变化不明显;脱氮功能微生物硝化细菌和反硝化细菌数量相当,夏秋季水体和底泥中脱氮功能微生物数量高于冬春季,且下游数量高于上游;与水体中微生物数量季节变化相比,底泥中微生物数量季节变化较稳定.16S rDNA PCR-DGGE分析表明,底泥中四季微生物种群结构差异显著,且存在明显的消涨变迁,拟杆菌、弓形菌等是贾鲁河底泥中的优势微生物.%The total number of bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes and denitrification microorganisms in water and sediment of Jialu River were determined seasonally by the serial dilution plate count technique and most probable number (MPN) method. The results showed that the number of bacteria in water and sediment was much higher than that of fungi or actinomycetes; but little difference of bacteria number was found among the seasons. As for the denitrification microorganisms, the quantity of nitrifying bacteria was equivalent to those of denitrifying bacteria. Denitrification microorganisms in summer and autumn were much more abundant than those in winter and spring, and the number in upstream was higher than that in downstream; the seasonal variation of microorganism number in sediment remained steadier than that in water. 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that bacteria population structure of sediment changed remarkably among seasons. Bacteroidetes sp. and Arcobacter sp. were the dominant microoganisms in sediment of Jialu River.

  16. Microbial response to triepthylphosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, T.C.; Santo Domingo, J.W.; Berry, C.J.

    1997-05-01

    The effect of triethylphosphate (TEP) on the activity of a landfill aquifer microbial community was evaluated using standard techniques and in situ hybridizations with phylogenetic probes. Benzene was used as an external carbon source to monitor degradation of an aromatic compound in TEP amended microcosms. Microscopical and viable counts were higher in TEP containing microcosms when compared to unamended controls. A significant increase in metabolic activity was also observed for TEP amended samples as determined by the number of cells hybridizing to an eubacterial probe. In addition, the number of beta and gamma Proteobacteria increased from undetectable levels prior to the study to 15-29% of the total bacteria in microcosms containing TEP and benzene. In these microcosms, nearly 40% of the benzene was degraded during the incubation period compared to less than 5% in unamended microcosms. While TEP has previously been used as an alternate phosphate source in the bioremediation of chlorinated aliphatics, this study shows that it can also stimulate the microbial degradation of aromatics in phosphate limited aquifers.

  17. Effect of Ultra-high Pressure on Microbial Population and Shelf Life of Vacuum-packaged Frankfurters during 4 ~C Storage%鳌高压处理对法兰克福香肠中主要微生物的影响及其变化规律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高杨; 周国兴; 王洋; 郑海涛; 李平兰

    2011-01-01

    Vacuum-packaged frankfurters were subjected to ultra-high pressure treatments at (20±5) ℃ and different pressure levels: 200, 400 MPa and 600 MPa for 5 or 10 min before storage at 4 ℃ for 60 days with the aim of investigating the effect of ultra-high pressure on the microbial population and shelf life of vacuum-packaged frankfurters. Compared with control samples without receiving any sterilization treatment, ultra-high pressure treatment could dramatically reduce initial microbial count in frankfurters, and inhibit the growth of dominant spoilage bacteria including total bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, psychrophiles, enterobacteriaceae and bacillaceae, which was positively related to pressure and length of treatment time. Ultra-high pressure treatment at 600 MPa for 10 min could prolong the shelf-life of vacuum-packaged frankfurters from 9 to over 60 days during 4 ℃ storage.%为探讨超高压处理对真空包装法兰克福香肠微生物货架期的影响,在(20±5)℃对真空包装法兰克福香肠进行200MPa(5min与1Omin)、400MPa(5min与1Omin)和600MPa(5min与1Omin)的超高压处理。样品处理后于4℃保藏60d,每隔1Od取样分析,直至样品微生物数量达到峰值并趋于稳定为止。与空白对照组(不进行二次灭菌的法兰克福香肠)相比,超高压处理能显著降低法兰克福香肠初始微生物数量,并对保藏过程中的腐败微生物:嗜冷菌、乳酸菌和大肠菌群的生长有显著抑制作用,抑制程度与压力(200

  18. Potencial poluidor de rejeitos carboníferos: II- efeitos da recuperação com camadas de solo sobre as plantas e a população microbiana Pollutant potencial of coal rejects: II- recuperation effects with soil layers in plants and microbial population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Ho Bech Gaivizzo

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A minimização do impacto sobre o ambiente advindo da mineração do carvão pode ser obtida pela recomposição topográfica da área minerada, seguida da cobertura dos rejeitos com uma camada de solo e de práticas de revegetação. Em vista disso, desenvolveu-se o presente trabalho com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito da adição de camadas de solo com diferentes espessuras aplicadas na superfície do rejeito carbonífero (RC, em posições de subsuperfície e do solo misturado ao rejeito sobre a produção de matéria seca das plantas de trevo-branco, milho e aveia-preta, e sobre a população microbiana. A utilização de uma camada de solo de 10cm na superfície do RC mostrou-se a mínima necessária ao estabelecimento de trevo e aveia. As culturas não apresentaram concentrações tóxicas de metais pesados. A elevada acidez do RC reduziu a densidade populacional de bactérias, actinomicetos e fungos, principalmente nas camadas de solo de subsuperfície.The landscape recomposition with soil layer and the introduction of plants have been used as an alternative to minimize the environmental impact caused by coal mining. The main concern for this practice is the low avaibility of soil from surface horizons and economic viability, consequently it is basic to determine the minimum soil layer thickness to be disposed on the reject. An experiment was carried out with addition of soil (Paleudult layers with different thickness disposed on the surface of coal rejects, and in subsurface positions, and soil mixed with rejects, concerning effects on biomass yield of white clover (Trifolium repens L., corn (Zea mays L., and oat (Avena strigosa L. as well as on soil microbial abundance. It was established that a soil layer of 10cm thickness was the minimum necessary for clover and oat growth. Toxic concentrations of heavy metals in plants were not detected. However, soil microbial population represented by bacteria, fungi and actinomyces showed a lower

  19. Microbial community dynamics of an urban drinking water distribution system subjected to phases of chloramination and chlorination treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chiachi; Ling, Fangqiong; Andersen, Gary L; LeChevallier, Mark W; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2012-11-01

    Water utilities in parts of the U.S. control microbial regrowth in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) by alternating postdisinfection methods between chlorination and chloramination. To examine how this strategy influences drinking water microbial communities, an urban DWDS (population ≅ 40,000) with groundwater as the source water was studied for approximately 2 years. Water samples were collected at five locations in the network at different seasons and analyzed for their chemical and physical characteristics and for their microbial community composition and structure by examining the 16S rRNA gene via terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA pyrosequencing technology. Nonmetric multidimension scaling and canonical correspondence analysis of microbial community profiles could explain >57% of the variation. Clustering of samples based on disinfection types (free chlorine versus combined chlorine) and sampling time was observed to correlate to the shifts in microbial communities. Sampling location and water age (analysis revealed that among major core populations, Cyanobacteria, Methylobacteriaceae, Sphingomonadaceae, and Xanthomonadaceae were more abundant in chlorinated water, and Methylophilaceae, Methylococcaceae, and Pseudomonadaceae were more abundant in chloraminated water. No correlation was observed with minor populations that were detected frequently (water and survived through the treatment process. Transient microbial populations including Flavobacteriaceae and Clostridiaceae were also observed. Overall, reversible shifts in microbial communities were especially pronounced with chloramination, suggesting stronger selection of microbial populations from chloramines than chlorine.

  20. Effect of biodiesel addition on microbial community structure in a simulated fuel storage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan-Manuel; Bassi, Amarjeet; Rehmann, Lars; Thompson, Michael R

    2013-11-01

    Understanding changes in microbial structure due to biodiesel storage is important both for protecting integrity of storage systems and fuel quality management. In this work a simulated storage system was used to study the effect of biodiesel (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) on a microbial population, which was followed by community level physiological profiling (CLPP), 16s rDNA analysis and plating in selective media. Results proved that structure and functionality were affected by biodiesel. CLPP showed at least three populations: one corresponding to diesel, one to biodiesel and one to blends of diesel and biodiesel. Analysis of 16s rDNA revealed that microbial composition was different for populations growing in diesel and biodiesel. Genera identified are known for degradation of hydrocarbons and emulsifier production. Maximum growth was obtained in biodiesel; however, microbial counts in standard media were lower for this samples. Acidification of culture media was observed at high biodiesel concentration.