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Sample records for acceptance test plan

  1. Acceptance Test Plan for ANSYS Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CREA, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    This plan governs the acceptance testing of the ANSYS software (Full Mechanical Release 5.5) for use on Project Word Management Contract (PHMC) computer systems (either UNIX or Microsoft Windows/NT). There are two phases to the acceptance testing covered by this test plan: program execution in accordance with the guidance provided in installation manuals; and ensuring results of the execution are consistent with the expected physical behavior of the system being modeled

  2. Surface moisture measurement system acceptance testing work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    This work plan addresses testing of the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS) at the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The purpose of this plan is to define the scope of work, identify organizational responsibilities, describe test control requirements, and provide estimated costs and schedule associated with acceptance testing

  3. Acceptance test plan for the Waste Information Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, D.F.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the acceptance test plan for the WICS system. The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Hazardous Material Control Group (HMC) of the 222-S Laboratory has requested the development of a system to help resolve many of the difficulties associated with tracking and data collection of containers and drums of waste. This system has been identified as Waste Information and Control System (WICS). The request for developing and implementing WICS has been made to the Automation and Simulation Engineering Group (ASE)

  4. Acceptance Test Plan for Fourth-Generation Corrosion Monitoring Cabinet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the third-generation corrosion monitoring cabinet (Hiline Engineering Part No.0004-CHM-072-C01). This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer of the cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinet. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation

  5. Specification and acceptance testing of radiotherapy treatment planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    Quality assurance (QA) in the radiation therapy treatment planning process is essential to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient and to minimize the possibility of accidental exposure. The computerized radiotherapy treatment planning systems (RTPSs) are now widely available in industrialized and developing countries and it is of special importance to support hospitals in Member States in developing procedures for acceptance testing, commissioning and QA of their RTPSs. Responding to these needs, a group of experts developed an IAEA publication with such recommendations, which was published in 2004 as IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 430. This report provides a general framework and describes a large number of tests and procedures that should be considered by the users of new RTPSs. However, small hospitals with limited resources or large hospitals with high patient load and limited staff are not always able to perform complete characterization, validation and software testing of algorithms used in RTPSs. Therefore, the IAEA proposed more specific guidelines that provide a step-by-step recommendation for users at hospitals or cancer centres how to implement acceptance and commissioning procedures for newly purchased RTPSs. The current publication was developed in the framework of the Coordinated Research Project on Development of Procedures for Quality Assurance for Dosimetry Calculations in Radiotherapy and uses the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard IEC 62083, Requirements for the Safety of Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems as its basis. The report addresses the procedures for specification and acceptance testing of RTPSs to be used by both manufacturers and users at the hospitals. Recommendations are provided for specific tests to be performed at the manufacturing facility known as type tests, and for acceptance tests to be performed at the hospital known as site tests. The purpose of acceptance testing is to demonstrate to the

  6. Planning and acceptance testing of MV therapy installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almond, Peter R.; Horton, John L.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This course is designed for practitioners and beginners in brachytherapy. The aim is to review biological principles equipment are aware of all aspects involved. The object is to cover in a broad overview the considerations that go into selecting, installing, testing and accepting megavoltage therapy equipment and to provide a resource for more detailed information. Planning and acceptance testing of a megavoltage therapy installation is a major undertaking for any size group, institution or department. It can take approximately two years from the time a decision is made to get a machine to where the first patient is treated. Because the equipment and site preparation are expensive, and most of the machines are complex and can be supplied by several different manufacturers, it is imperative that a great deal of thought and care go into the decision: the aim being that the specifications of the machine that is installed meet the immediate need of the department and the needs for the projected lifetime of the equipment. A general survey of the types of equipment available will be presented. This will concentrate on general purpose linear accelerators, although Cobalt 60 machines, microtrons and special purpose machines (intra-operative equipment) will also be covered. General descriptions of the machines along with typical specifications will be given. Selecting the best machine to meet specific needs can be quite complex and criteria for making the selection are presented in a series of twelve steps. site selection and room design, including the console area, are also critical. The general principles for shielding calculations will be provided. Critical to any installation is the acceptance testing of the equipment including material and radiation oncology performance tests. These tests will be outlined. A reading list of suitable references describing in detail many of the aspects of this course will be provided

  7. Project W-151 flexible receiver radiation detector system acceptance test plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troyer, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    The attached document is the Acceptance Test Plan for the portion of Project W-151 dealing with acceptance of gamma-ray detectors and associated electronics manufactured at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The document provides a written basis for testing the detector system, which will take place in the 305 building (300 Area)

  8. Acceptance Sampling Plans Based on Truncated Life Tests for Sushila Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Ibrahim Al-Omari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available An acceptance sampling plan problem based on truncated life tests when the lifetime following a Sushila distribution is considered in this paper. For various acceptance numbers, confidence levels and values of the ratio between fixed experiment time and particular mean lifetime, the minimum sample sizes required to ascertain a specified mean life were found. The operating characteristic function values of the suggested sampling plans and the producer’s risk are presented. Some tables are provided and the results are illustrated by an example of a real data set.

  9. Resolve. Version 2.5: Flammable Gas Accident Analysis Tool Acceptance Test Plan and Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LAVENDER, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    RESOLVE. Version 2 .5 is designed to quantify the risk and uncertainty of combustion accidents in double-shell tanks (DSTs) and single-shell tanks (SSTs). The purpose of the acceptance testing is to ensure that all of the options and features of the computer code run; to verify that the calculated results are consistent with each other; and to evaluate the effects of the changes to the parameter values on the frequency and consequence trends associated with flammable gas deflagrations or detonations

  10. Commissioning and acceptance testing of Cadplan plus- a 3D treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, H.K.; Kinhikar, R.K.; Deshpande, D.D.; Dinshaw, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    3D treatment planning systems are finding wide acceptance in the radiotherapy community due to their improved dose calculation accuracy as well as the 3D visualization tools. Cadplan plus, a 3D treatment planning system from Varian, has been commissioned at the Tata Memorial Hospital in accordance to various international guidelines

  11. Displacement compressors - acceptance tests

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    ISO 1217:2009 specifies methods for acceptance tests regarding volume rate of flow and power requirements of displacement compressors. It also specifies methods for testing liquid-ring type compressors and the operating and testing conditions which apply when a full performance test is specified.

  12. 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test Gamma Cart Acceptance Test Procedure and Quality Test Plan (ATP and QTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WHITE, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Shop test of the sludge mobilization cart system to be used in the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test Tests hardware and software. This procedure involves testing the Instrumentation involved with the Gamma Cart System, local and remote, including depth indicators, speed controls, interface to data acquisition software and the raising and lowering functions. This Procedure will be performed twice, once for each Gamma Cart System. This procedure does not test the accuracy of the data acquisition software

  13. 241-AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test Gamma Cart Acceptance Test Procedure and Quality Test Plan (ATP and QTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WHITE, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Shop Test of the Gamma Cart System to be used in the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test. Tests hardware and software. This procedure involves testing the Instrumentation involved with the Gamma Cart System, local and remote, including: depth indicators, speed controls, interface to data acquisition software and the raising and lowering functions. This Procedure will be performed twice, once for each Gamma Cart System. This procedure does not test the accuracy of the data acquisition software

  14. Sharing Data between Mobile Devices, Connected Vehicles and Infrastructure Task 10: D2X Hub Prototype Acceptance Test Plan and Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-27

    This Devices to Everything (D2X) Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) and Summary Report provides the plan, test cases, and test procedures that were used to verify Prototype System (version 2.0) system requirements, as well as a summary of results of the test...

  15. Plans for modeling rational acceptance of technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houkes, W.N.; Pols, A.J.K.; Michelfelder, D.P.; McCarthy, N.; Goldberg, D.E.

    2013-01-01

    We argue that the use-plan analysis of artefact use and design can be combined with the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT), a well-tested model for predicting the adoption of information systems in organizational contexts. After presenting the outlines of the use-plan

  16. Cone penetrometer acceptance test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boechler, G.N.

    1996-09-19

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATR-151. Included in this report is a summary of the tests, the results and issues, the signature and sign- off ATP pages, and a summarized table of the specification vs. ATP section that satisfied the specification.

  17. First Stage Acceptance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-01-01

    This photograph shows the intense smoke and fire created by the five F-1 engines from a test firing of the Saturn V first stage (S-1C) in the S-1C test stand at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  18. L-286, Acceptance Test Record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HARMON, B.C.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides a detailed account of how the acceptance testing was conducted for Project L-286, ''200E Area Sanitary Water Plant Effluent Stream Reduction''. The testing of the L-286 instrumentation system was conducted under the direct supervision

  19. Nitrogen trailer acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0249. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-108 Rev.0. The equipment being tested is a portable contained nitrogen supply. The test was conducted at Norco's facility

  20. W-025, acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roscha, V.

    1994-01-01

    This acceptance test report (ATR) has been prepared to establish the results of the field testing conducted on W-025 to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation systems functioned as intended by design. This is part of the RMW Land Disposal Facility

  1. Sharing Data between Mobile Devices, Connected Vehicles and Infrastructure Task 6: Prototype Acceptance Test Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-30

    The Task 6 Prototype Acceptance Test Summary Report summarizes the results of Acceptance Testing carried out at Battelle facilities in accordance with the Task 6 Acceptance Test Plan. The Acceptance Tests were designed to verify that the prototype sy...

  2. W-026, acceptance test report manipulator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the WRAP Manipulator System Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) is to verify that the 4 glovebox sets of WRAP manipulator components, including rail/carriage, slave arm, master controller and auxiliary equipment, meets the requirements of the functional segments of 14590 specification. The demonstration of performance elements of the ATP are performed as a part of the Assembly specifications. Manipulator integration is integrated in the performance testing of the gloveboxes. Each requirement of the Assembly specification will be carried out in conjunction with glovebox performance tests

  3. User acceptance testing a step-by-step guide

    CERN Document Server

    Hambling, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Every information system brought into service in every type of organisation requires user acceptance testing. This book is a hands-on manual for non-testing specialists to plan and carry out an effective acceptance test of an information system. It also identifies ways of making the process as simple and cost-effective as possible.

  4. Test planning and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zola, Maurizio

    2001-01-01

    Testing plan should include Safety guide Q4 - Inspection and testing - A testing plan should be prepared including following information: General information (facility name, item or system reference, procurement document reference, document reference number and status, associated procedures and drawings); A sequential listing of all testing activities; Procedure, work instruction, specification or standard to be followed in respect of each operation and test; Acceptance criteria; Identification of who is performing tests; Identification of hold points; Type of records to be prepared for each test; Persons and organizations having authority for final acceptance. Proposed activities sequence is: visual, electrical and mechanical checks; environmental tests (thermal aging, vibrations aging, radioactive aging); performance evaluation in extreme conditions; dynamic tests with functional checks; final electrical and mechanical checks The planning of the tests should always be performed taking into account an interpretative model: a very tight cooperation is advisable between experimental people and numerical people dealing with the analysis of more or less complex models for the seismic assessment of structures and components. Preparatory phase should include the choice of the following items should be agreed upon with the final user of the tests: Excitation points, Excitation types, Excitation amplitude with respect to frequency, Measuring points. Data acquisition, recording and storage, should take into account the characteristics of the successive data processing: to much data can be cumbersome to be processed, but to few data can make unusable the experimental results. The parameters for time history acquisition should be chosen taking into account data processing: for Shock Response Spectrum calculation some special requirements should be met: frequency bounded signal, high frequency sampling, shock noise. For stationary random-like excitation, the sample length

  5. Improving acceptance in wind power planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammarlund, K. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Social and Economic Geography

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents important factors and planning procedures for public acceptance of wind power. Opinion surveys in Sweden show that acceptance is connected to the concept of utility rather than the aesthetic values. If wind turbines are confined by the authorities to marginal areas, they will not earn their rightful place in the landscape by being of use. A positive attitude in general promotes a positive experience of the effects of wind turbines. It is therefore essential to establish a sense of cooperation between the project management and the public. An open dialogue and continuous information will increase the possibilities for acceptance of future development. We must establish new codes of practice in permit processing because policies today contains ideological and practical contradictions between development and preservation of landscapes. 16 refs, 2 tabs

  6. Improving acceptance in wind power planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammarlund, K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents important factors and planning procedures for public acceptance of wind power. Opinion surveys in Sweden show that acceptance is connected to the concept of utility rather than the aesthetic values. If wind turbines are confined by the authorities to marginal areas they will not earn their rightful place in the landscape by being of use. A positive attitude in general promotes positive experience of the effects of wind turbines. It is therefore essential to establish a sense of cooperation between the project management and the public. An open dialogue and continuous information will increase the possibilities for acceptance of future development. We must establish new codes of practice in permit processing because policies today contains idealogical and practical contradictions between the development and preservation of landscapes. (author)

  7. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  8. Acceptance test procedure for Project W-280

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stites, C.G.

    1994-01-01

    This Document is the Acceptance Test Procedure for 200 Area C and SY Tank Farm Lighting Upgrade. This Acceptance Test Procedure has been prepared to demonstrate that the Tank Farm Lighting Systems function correctly as required by project criteria and as intended by design

  9. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-01-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal

  10. MITS Data Acquisition Subsystem Acceptance Test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, R.

    1980-01-01

    This is an acceptance procedure for the Data Acquisition Subsystem of the Machine Interface Test System (MITS). Prerequisites, requirements, and detailed step-by-step instruction are presented for inspecting and performance testing the subsystem

  11. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Waste Acceptance Criteria

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the Nevada Test Site

  12. Aircraft Assessment and Acceptance Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    telaque le pilote automatique, et lautomnanette, lee syst.-mes de stabilit6 artificielle etc.. A5 - La v~rification des dispositifs de odcuritd B - Essais...signals should be monitored on an oscilloscope, and modulation meter to assist in diagnosis or reasons for poor intelligibility . 7 Qualitative...conditioning in origin, so tests of the effect on com- munications intelligibility should be made in the flight regime that is operationally most

  13. DACS upgrade acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuehlke, A.C.

    1994-01-01

    The DACS, which is housed in a trailer located just outside of the north fence at the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors located in and around the SY-101 tank. These sensors provide information such as: (1) tank vapor space and ventilation system H 2 concentration; (2) tank waste temperature; (3) tank pressure; (4) waste density; (5) operating pump parameters such as speed, flow, rotational position, discharge pressure, and internal temperature; (6) strain (for major equipment); and (7) waste level. The output of these sensors is conditioned and transmitted to the DACS computers where these signals are displayed, recorded, and monitored for out-of-specification conditions. If abnormal conditions are detected, then, in certain situations, the DACS automatically generates alarms and causes the system to abort pump operations. The report documents testing performed per WHC-SD-WM-ATP-082. Rev. 0-13

  14. ANALYSING ACCEPTANCE SAMPLING PLANS BY MARKOV CHAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mirabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: In this research, a Markov analysis of acceptance sampling plans in a single stage and in two stages is proposed, based on the quality of the items inspected. In a stage of this policy, if the number of defective items in a sample of inspected items is more than the upper threshold, the batch is rejected. However, the batch is accepted if the number of defective items is less than the lower threshold. Nonetheless, when the number of defective items falls between the upper and lower thresholds, the decision-making process continues to inspect the items and collect further samples. The primary objective is to determine the optimal values of the upper and lower thresholds using a Markov process to minimise the total cost associated with a batch acceptance policy. A solution method is presented, along with a numerical demonstration of the application of the proposed methodology.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: In hierdie navorsing word ’n Markov-ontleding gedoen van aannamemonsternemingsplanne wat plaasvind in ’n enkele stap of in twee stappe na gelang van die kwaliteit van die items wat geïnspekteer word. Indien die eerste monster toon dat die aantal defektiewe items ’n boonste grens oorskry, word die lot afgekeur. Indien die eerste monster toon dat die aantal defektiewe items minder is as ’n onderste grens, word die lot aanvaar. Indien die eerste monster toon dat die aantal defektiewe items in die gebied tussen die boonste en onderste grense lê, word die besluitnemingsproses voortgesit en verdere monsters word geneem. Die primêre doel is om die optimale waardes van die booonste en onderste grense te bepaal deur gebruik te maak van ’n Markov-proses sodat die totale koste verbonde aan die proses geminimiseer kan word. ’n Oplossing word daarna voorgehou tesame met ’n numeriese voorbeeld van die toepassing van die voorgestelde oplossing.

  15. Cone penetrometer moisture probe acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-146 (Prototype Cone Penetrometer Moisture Probe Acceptance Test Procedure) and WHC-SD-WM-ATP-145 (Cone Penetrometer Moisture Probe Acceptance Test Procedure). The master copy of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-145 can be found in Appendix A and the master copy of WHC-SD-WM-ATP-146 can be found in Appendix B. Also included with this report is a matrix showing design criteria of the cone penetrometer moisture probe and the verification method used (Appendix C)

  16. Generator acceptance test and inspection report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Report(ATR) is the completed testing and inspection of the new portable generator. The testing and inspection is to verify that the generator provided by the vendor meets the requirements of specification WHC-S-0252, Revision 2. Attached is various other documentation to support the inspection and testing

  17. Gas characterization system software acceptance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, C.V.

    1996-01-01

    This document details the Software Acceptance Testing of gas characterization systems. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases

  18. Gas characterization system software acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, C.V.

    1996-01-01

    This document details the results of software acceptance testing of gas characterization systems. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases

  19. Preparation of acceptance tests and criteria for the Test Blanket Systems to be operated in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laan, J.G. van der, E-mail: JaapG.vanderLaan@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Cuquel, B. [AIRBUS Defence and Space S.A.S., 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Demange, D.; Ghidersa, B.-E. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Giancarli, L.M.; Iseli, M.; Jourdan, T. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Nevière, J.-C. [Comex-Nucleaire, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Pascal, R.; Ring, W. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Initial guideline for acceptance testing and acceptance criteria for Test Blanket Systems in ITER. • These tests complement those required by the applicable codes and standards, and regulations. • Completion of TBS manufacture will be followed by Factory Acceptance Testing, prior to shipment. • Next steps are “Reception Inspection Tests”, and on-site pre-installation and components tests. • This guideline allows the detailing of the TBS specific test plans and their scheduling. - Abstract: This paper describes the main acceptance criteria and required acceptance tests for the components of the six Test Blanket Systems to be installed and operated in ITER. It summarizes the guide-line toward the establishment of detailed test plans for the TBS, starting from the end-product at the ITER Members factories, and to generally define the type of tests that have to be performed on the ITER site after shipment, and/or prior to the systems final commissioning phase.

  20. RISK ANALYSES USED IN ACCEPTANCE TESTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana STOROJ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is talking about risk based testing approach in user acceptance testing UAT (User Acceptance Testing. There are presented definitions of risk and risk based testing. In addition, we are talking about risks that can appear during UAT and we are describing the process of testing based on risks. We propose some techniques and methods of identifying risks such as using Brainstorming, Delphi method,probability analysis method and others. Also, risk traceability matrix is presented as a method of prioritizing risks.

  1. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-01-01

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal

  2. Acceptance test procedure for core sample trucks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalley, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure is to provide instruction and documentation for acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks, HO-68K-4600 and HO-68K-4647. The rotary mode core sample trucks were based upon the design of the second core sample truck (HO-68K-4345) which was constructed to implement rotary mode sampling of the waste tanks at Hanford. Acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks will verify that the design requirements have been met. All testing will be non-radioactive and stand-in materials shall be used to simulate waste tank conditions. Compressed air will be substituted for nitrogen during the majority of testing, with nitrogen being used only for flow characterization

  3. Pregnancy planning and acceptance among Danish pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, V; Knudsen, L B; Wielandt, H

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study how living conditions influence pregnancy planning and acceptance among Danish women. METHOD: A cross-sectional questionnaire study performed among 3516 pregnant women attending Odense University Hospital, Denmark. The study population consisted of women with spontaneous...... abortion, women with ectopic pregnancies, women attending antenatal care and women with induced abortion. They were divided into four groups: women with planned and accepted pregnancies (accepting planners, n=2137), women who accepted an initially unplanned pregnancy (accepting non-planners, n=1006), women...... who rejected an initially planned pregnancy (rejecting planners, n=31), and women with unplanned and rejected pregnancies (rejecting non-planners, n=342). The association between socio-economic characteristics and pregnancy planning and acceptance was evaluated by comparing accepting non...

  4. Inspection and test planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, T.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose of Quality Plan - arrangement of all necessary tests or inspections as far as possible filted to certain components or systems. Subject of Quality Plan - precise determination of tests or inspections and - according to the actual safety significance - the certificates to be done. Disposition of Quality Plan - accommodation of tests to the actual state of fabrication. Application of Quality Plan - to any component or system that is regarded. Supervision of Employment - by authorized personnel of manufacturer, customer or authority providing exact employment of quality plan. Overservance of Instructions - certificates given by authorized personnel. (orig./RW)

  5. Breathing air trailer acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0251, Rev.0 and ECNs 613530 and 606113. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-104. The equipment tested is a Breathing Air Supply Trailer purchased as a design and fabrication procurement activity. The ATP was written by the Seller and was performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing portions of the test at the Seller's location

  6. W-087 Acceptance test procedure. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, A.W.

    1997-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure/Operational Test Procedure (ATP/OTP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Electrical/Instrumentation and Mechanical systems function as required by project criteria and to verify proper operation of the integrated system including the interlocks

  7. W-087 Acceptance test procedure. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, A.W.

    1997-06-10

    This Acceptance Test Procedure/Operational Test Procedure (ATP/OTP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Electrical/Instrumentation and Mechanical systems function as required by project criteria and to verify proper operation of the integrated system including the interlocks.

  8. Acceptance test report: Backup power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, D.B.

    1996-01-01

    Acceptance Test Report for construction functional testing of Project W-030 Backup Power System. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. Backup power includes a single 125 KW diesel generator, three 10-kva uninterruptible power supply units, and all necessary control

  9. Biodiesel Test Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Biodiesel Test Plan Distribution Statement A: Approved for Public Release; distribution is unlimited. July 2014 Report No. CG-D-07-14...Appendix C) Biodiesel Test Plan ii UNCLAS//Public | CG-926 R&DC | G. W. Johnson, et al. Public | July 2014 N O T I C E This...Development Center 1 Chelsea Street New London, CT 06320 Biodiesel Test Plan iii UNCLAS//Public | CG-926 R&DC | G. W. Johnson, et al

  10. Acceptance test report 2721-Z upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keck, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    This test procedure provides instructions for acceptance testing of modifications to the 2721-Z diesel-generator system made by Project C-189. The modifications include (1) replacing the generator NUMA-LOGIC controller with connection to the PFP distributed control system (DCS), (2) replacing ATSI with a breaker switching scheme for 2736-ZB backup power and (3) providing a method for generator load and system testing

  11. Diesel generator trailer acceptance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of WHC-S-0252 Rev. 1 and ECNs 609271, and 609272. The equipment being tested is a 150KW Diesel Generator mounted on a trailer with switchgear. The unit was purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity. The ATP was written by the Seller and will be performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing the test at the Seller's location

  12. Void fraction instrument acceptance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, T.I.; Pearce, K.L.

    1994-01-01

    This document presents the results of the acceptance test for the mechanical and electrical features (not specifically addressed by the software ATP) of the void fraction instrument (VFI). Acceptance testing of the VFI, control console, and decontamination spray assembly was conducted in the 306E building high bay and area adjacent to the facility. The VFI was tested in the horizontal position supported in multiple locations on rolling tables. The control console was located next to the VFI pneumatic control assembly. The VFI system was operated exactly as is expected in the tank farm, with the following exceptions: power was provided from a building outlet and the VFI was horizontal. The testing described in this document verifies that the mechanical and electrical features are operating as designed and that the unit is ready for field service

  13. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-01-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal

  14. Test plans for availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rise, J.L.; Bjoerklund, O.

    1978-12-01

    In this work is developed principles for statistical test plans for availability compliance tests. Failure terminated and time terminated fixed size plans are considered as well as sequential test plans without and with failure and time truncation. The suggested methods are evaluated with respect to some important characteristics, namely the average number of failures to termination, the duration of the test and the operating characteristic function. The methods used are based on the assumption that up- and down-times can be considered gamma distributed. Simulation studies indicate that the methods are robust against reasonable deviations in distribution assumptions for the down-times. In the work is also outlined technical conditions and prerequisites applicable to availability compliance tests in general. The approach choosen seems very promising and is worth further development. It is based on the same fundamental principles as present is used in International standardization of equipment reliability testing. (author)

  15. Acceptance Testing Of Web Applications With Test Description Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Olek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acceptance tests are usually created by a client after a part of a system is implemented. However, some methodologies propose the elaboration of test cases before implementing a system. This approach increases the probability of system implementation that fulfills requirements, but may be problematic for customers and testers. To allow acceptance testing in such conditions, we propose to define test cases by recording them on an interactive mockup (a low detailed user-interface prototype. The paper focuses on Test Description Language, a notation used to store test cases.

  16. Family Planning: Between Rejection And Acceptance In Islam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Family Planning: Between Rejection And Acceptance In Islam. ... factor for health workers and policy makers to impact positively on their communities. ... who are likely to work in such communities for effective negotiation and application of ...

  17. 105K West Isolation Barrier Acceptance Test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, K.J.; Irwin, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this document is to report and interpret the findings of the isolation barrier acceptance tests performed in 105KW/100K. The tests were performed in accordance with the test plan and acceptance test procedure. The test report contains the test data. This document compares the test data against the criteria. A discussion of the leak rate analytical characterization describes how the flow characteristics flow rate will be determined using the test data from the test report. Two modes of water loss were considered; basin and/or discharge chute leakage, and evaporation. An initial test established baseline leakage data and instrumentation performance. Test 2 evaluated the sealing performance of the isolation barrier by inducing an 11 in. (27.9 cm) level differential across the barrier. The leak rate at this 11 in. (27.9 cm) level is extrapolated to the 16 ft. (4.9 m) level differential postulated in the DBE post seismic event. If the leak rate, adjusted for evaporation and basin leakage (determined from Test 1), is less than the SAR limit of 1,500 gph (5,680 lph) at a 16 ft (4.9 m) level differential, the barriers pass the acceptance test

  18. Nevada test site waste acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document

  19. Nevada test site waste acceptance criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

  20. Group Acceptance Sampling Plan for Lifetime Data Using Generalized Pareto Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aslam

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a group acceptance sampling plan (GASP is introduced for the situations when lifetime of the items follows the generalized Pareto distribution. The design parameters such as minimum group size and acceptance number are determined when the consumer’s risk and the test termination time are specified. The proposed sampling plan is compared with the existing sampling plan. It is concluded that the proposed sampling plan performs better than the existing plan in terms of minimum sample size required to reach the same decision.

  1. Pregnancy planning and acceptance among Danish pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, V; Knudsen, L B; Wielandt, H

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study how living conditions influence pregnancy planning and acceptance among Danish women. METHOD: A cross-sectional questionnaire study performed among 3516 pregnant women attending Odense University Hospital, Denmark. The study population consisted of women with spontaneous......-planners with accepting planners and by comparing rejecting planners with rejecting non-planners. The variables studied comprise age, number of children, partner relationship, education, occupation, economic situation and contraceptives. RESULTS: The characteristics of accepting non-planners and accepting planners were...... in accordance and in contrast to those of rejecting planners and in particular of rejecting non-planners. The contraceptive prevalence rate among accepting non-planners was 15%. Among rejecting non-planners the same figure was 51%. CONCLUSION: Accepting non-planners seemed to be in a situation which could...

  2. Acceptance Test Report for 241-U compressed air system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance testing of a newly upgraded compressed air system at 241-U Farm. The system was installed and the test successfully performed under work package 2W-92-01027

  3. Acceptance Testing of Thermoluminescent Dosimeter Holders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanyukha, Alexander; Grypp, Matthew D; Sharp, Thad J; DiRito, John N; Nelson, Martin E; Mavrogianis, Stanley T; Torres, Jeancarlo; Benevides, Luis A

    2018-05-01

    The U.S. Navy uses the Harshaw 8840/8841 dosimetric (DT-702/PD) system, which employs LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), developed and produced by Thermo Fisher Scientific (TFS). The dosimeter consists of four LiF:Mg,Cu,P elements, mounted in Teflon® on an aluminum card and placed in a plastic holder. The holder contains a unique filter for each chip made of copper, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), Mylar®, and tin. For accredited dosimetry labs, the ISO/IEC 17025:2005(E) requires an acceptance procedure for all new equipment. The Naval Dosimetry Center (NDC) has developed and tested a new non-destructive procedure, which enables the verification and the evaluation of embedded filters in the holders. Testing is based on attenuation measurements of low-energy radiation transmitted through each filter in a representative sample group of holders to verify that the correct filter type and thickness are present. The measured response ratios are then compared with the expected response ratios. In addition, each element's measured response is compared to the mean response of the group. The test was designed and tested to identify significant nonconformities, such as missing copper or tin filters, double copper or double tin filters, or other nonconformities that may impact TLD response ratios. During the implementation of the developed procedure, testing revealed a holder with a double copper filter. To complete the evaluation, the impact of the nonconformities on proficiency testing was examined. The evaluation revealed failures in proficiency testing categories III and IV when these dosimeters were irradiated to high-energy betas.

  4. Preliminary waste acceptance requirements for the planned Konrad repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.; Brennecke, P.

    1987-01-01

    The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has established Preliminary Waste Acceptance Requirements for the planned Konrad repository. These requirements were developed, in accordance with the Safety Criteria of the Reactor Safety Commission, with the help of a site specific safety assessment; they are under the reservation of the plan approval procedure, which is still in progress. In developing waste acceptance requirements, the PTB fulfills one of its duties as the institute responsible for waste disposal and gives guidelines for waste conditioning to waste producers and conditioners. (orig.) [de

  5. In situ treatability test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This document describes the plans for the in situ treatment zone (ISTZ) treatability test for groundwater contaminated with strontium-90. The treatability test is to be conducted at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, in a portion of the 100-N Area adjacent to the Columbia River referred to as N-Springs. The purpose of the treatability test is to evaluate the effectiveness of an innovative technology to prevent the discharge of strontium-90 contaminated groundwater into the Columbia River. The ISTZ is a passive technology that consists of placing a treatment agent in the path of the groundwater. The treatment agent must restrict target radioactive contaminants and provide time for the contaminant to decay to acceptable levels. The permeability of the treatment zone must be greater than or equal to that of the surrounding sediments to ensure that the contaminated groundwater flows through the treatment zone agent and not around the agent

  6. Test Room Stability Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This plan documents the combination of designs, installations, programs, and activities that ensures that the underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), in which transuranic (TRU) waste may be emplaced during the Test Phase, will remain sufficiently stable and safe during that time. The current ground support systems installed at the WIPP are the result of over ten years of data collection from hundreds of geomechanical instruments and thousands of hours of direct observation of the changing conditions of the openings. In addition, some of the world's most respected experts on salt rock mechanics have provided input in the design process and concurrence on the suitability of the final design. The general mine rockbolt pattern and the ground support system for the test rooms are designed to specifically address the fracture and deformation geometries observed today at the WIPP. After an introductory chapter, this plan describes the general underground design, then proceeds to an account of general ground support performance, and finally focuses on the details of the special test room ground support systems. One such system already installed in Room 1, Panel 1, is described in comprehensive detail. Other test rooms in Panel 1, whether full-size or smaller, will be equipped with systems that ensure stability to the same or equivalent extent. They will benefit from the experience gained in the first test room, which in turn benefitted from the data and knowledge accumulated during previous stages (e.g., the Site and Preliminary Design Validation program) of the project

  7. MCO Engineering Test Report Fuel Basket Handling Grapple Acceptance Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHENAULT, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Acceptance testing of the production SNF Fuel Basket lift grapples to the required 150 percent maximum lift load is documented herein. The report shows the results affirming the proof test passage. The primary objective of this test was to confirm the load rating of the grapple per applicable requirements of ANSI 14 6 American National Standard For Radioactive Materials Special Lifting Devices for Shipping Containers Weighing 10,000 pounds (4500kg) or More. The above Standard requires a load test of 150% of the design load which must be held for a minimum of 10 minutes followed by a Liquid Penetrant or Magnetic Particle examination of critical areas and welds in accordance with the ANSI/ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code 1989 Section 111 Division 1 section NF 5350

  8. Aquaponics in Urban Agriculture: Social Acceptance and Urban Food Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Georgia Pollard; James D. Ward; Barbara Koth

    2017-01-01

    Aquaponics is emerging as a novel technology with particular potential for urban agriculture (UA). The social acceptance of aquaponics and its place in urban food planning has not previously been studied. This study used focus groups, key informant interviews, and scenario analyses to investigate the reactions of Adelaide’s urban food opinion leaders and local government area (LGA) officials to aquaponics. Most of the focus group participants were unfamiliar with aquaponics. The perceived neg...

  9. Some factors affecting acceptance of family planning in Manus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avue, B; Freeman, P

    1991-12-01

    This paper examines selected factors affecting the acceptance and delivery of modern family planning from health centres in Manus. A survey was carried out of mothers attending Maternal and Child Health clinics and a written questionnaire was given to health workers. The survey of mothers demonstrated the importance of the husband's approval for contraceptive practice and showed that knowledge about traditional methods of family planning is widespread. The health workers' questionnaire demonstrated a high level of dissatisfaction with the current family planning program delivered by health clinics: 45% found the program ineffective; 68% wrote that health workers' attitudes discouraged mothers from attending for family planning. The perceived and actual benefits and costs of children and the role of men should be assessed locally before planning future family planning programs. Widespread retraining and motivating of health workers is essential if improved coverage is to be achieved through health services. The efficacy of alternative methods of delivery of family planning such as local community-based and social marketing programs should also be investigated.

  10. Probabilistic Requirements (Partial) Verification Methods Best Practices Improvement. Variables Acceptance Sampling Calculators: Empirical Testing. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; White, K. Preston, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center was requested to improve on the Best Practices document produced for the NESC assessment, Verification of Probabilistic Requirements for the Constellation Program, by giving a recommended procedure for using acceptance sampling by variables techniques as an alternative to the potentially resource-intensive acceptance sampling by attributes method given in the document. In this paper, the results of empirical tests intended to assess the accuracy of acceptance sampling plan calculators implemented for six variable distributions are presented.

  11. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria, December 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    This document establishes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office waste acceptance criteria. The waste acceptance criteria provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites for storage or disposal.

  12. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria, December 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This document establishes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office waste acceptance criteria. The waste acceptance criteria provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites for storage or disposal

  13. Acceptance test procedure for High Pressure Water Jet System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    The overall objective of the acceptance test is to demonstrate a combined system. This includes associated tools and equipment necessary to perform cleaning in the 105 K East Basin (KE) for achieving optimum reduction in the level of contamination/dose rate on canisters prior to removal from the KE Basin and subsequent packaging for disposal. Acceptance tests shall include necessary hardware to achieve acceptance of the cleaning phase of canisters. This acceptance test procedure will define the acceptance testing criteria of the high pressure water jet cleaning fixture. The focus of this procedure will be to provide guidelines and instructions to control, evaluate and document the acceptance testing for cleaning effectiveness and method(s) of removing the contaminated surface layer from the canister presently identified in KE Basin. Additionally, the desired result of the acceptance test will be to deliver to K Basins a thoroughly tested and proven system for underwater decontamination and dose reduction. This report discusses the acceptance test procedure for the High Pressure Water Jet

  14. Acceptance of Colonoscopy Requires more than Test Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Condon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colon cancer screening, including colonoscopy, lags behind other forms of cancer screening for participation rates. The intrinsic nature of the endoscopic procedure may be an important barrier that limits patients from finding this test acceptable and affects willingness to undergo screening. With colon cancer screening programs emerging in Canada, test characteristics and their impact on acceptance warrant consideration.

  15. Large shaft development test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, A.D.

    1984-03-01

    This test plan proposes the conduct of shaft liner tests as part of the large shaft development test proposed for the Hanford Site in support of the repository development program. The objectives of these tests are to develop techniques for measuring liner alignment (straightness), both construction assembly alignment and downhole cumulative alignment, and to assess the alignment information as a real time feedback to aid the installation procedure. The test plan is based upon installing a 16 foot ID shaft liner into a 20 foot diameter shaft to a depth of 1000 feet. This test plan is considered to be preliminary in that it was prepared as input for the decision to determine if development testing is required in this area. Should the decision be made to proceed with development testing, this test plan shall be updated and revised. 6 refs., 2 figs

  16. Acceptance inspection plan 105KE Facility modifications for fuel retrieval subproject

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    The acceptance inspection of construction by Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) is performed to provide assurance that fabrication, construction, and installation are in accordance with approved contract documents. Approved contract documents used to perform inspections may include specifications, drawings, and contractor submittals such as fabrication drawings, procedures, etc. The amount or degree of inspection activity is tailored to the project as determined by the project team so that the effort and cost expended are commensurate with the importance of the facility in terms of function and safety. Inspections are documented to provide verification of the acceptability of the work performed. This document identifies the inspections and documentation forms to be provided. It is prepared and implemented with the understanding that the construction contractor is fully responsible for compliance with contract documents and for the quality of work performed. Inspections performed are in accordance with approved procedures. The Manager of Acceptance Inspection is responsible for the implementation of this plan and assignment of personnel for the work. Inspections are conducted by personnel who are qualified and certified, to perform their assigned task. The Acceptance Inspection Plan is organized in the Construction Specification Institute (CSI) format to cross reference design specification sections with sections of the AI Plan. In each AI Plan section the applicable specification section subject will be identified followed by the appropriate inspection requirements. General surveillances will be listed when applicable. Acceptance Inspection Reports are provided to document inspections not documented on a test report (i.e., Soil Test Data, Concrete Test Report, NDE/Weld Record, Leak/Pressure Test Certification, Backflow Device Test Report, Nonconformance Report, Deficiency Report, and/or Contractors testing forms)

  17. Acceptance inspection plan 105KW Facility modifications for fuel retrieval subproject

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    The acceptance inspection of construction by Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) is performed to provide assurance that fabrication, construction, and installation are in accordance with approved contract documents. Approved contract documents used to perform inspections may include specifications, drawings, and contractor submittals such as fabrication drawings, procedures, etc. The amount or degree of inspection activity is tailored to the project as determined by the project team so that the effort and cost expended are commensurate with the importance of the facility in terms of function and safety. Inspections are documented to provide verification of the acceptability of the work performed. This document identifies the inspections and documentation forms to be provided. It is prepared and implemented with the understanding that the construction contractor is fully responsible for compliance with contract documents and for the quality of.work performed. Inspections performed are in accordance with approved procedures. The Manager of Acceptance Inspection is responsible for the implementation of this plan and assignment of personnel for the work. Inspections are conducted by personnel who are qualified and certified to perform their assigned task. The Acceptance Inspection Plan is organized in the Construction Specification Institute (CSI) format to cross reference design specification sections with sections of the AI Plan. In each AI Plan section the applicable specification section subject will be identified followed by the appropriate inspection requirements. General surveillances will be listed when applicable. Acceptance Inspection Reports are provided to document inspections not documented on a test report (i.e., Soil Test Data, Concrete Test Report, NDE/Weld Record, Leak/Pressure Test Certification, Backflow Device Test Report, Nonconformance Report, Deficiency Report, and/or Contractors testing forms)

  18. Evaluation of acceptance strength tests for concrete pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-30

    The North Carolina Department of Transportation has used traditionally flexural strength tests for acceptance : testing of Portland cement concrete pavements. This report summarizes a research project implemented to : investigate the feasibility of u...

  19. Enraf Series 854 advanced technology gauge (ATG) acceptance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure was written to test the Enraf Series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) prior to installation in the Tank Farms. The procedure sets various parameters and verifies that the gauge is functional

  20. Operator coil monitoring Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software's ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY-101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations is correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ''ENABLE'' and ''DISABLE'' controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords

  1. Aquaponics in Urban Agriculture: Social Acceptance and Urban Food Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Pollard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aquaponics is emerging as a novel technology with particular potential for urban agriculture (UA. The social acceptance of aquaponics and its place in urban food planning has not previously been studied. This study used focus groups, key informant interviews, and scenario analyses to investigate the reactions of Adelaide’s urban food opinion leaders and local government area (LGA officials to aquaponics. Most of the focus group participants were unfamiliar with aquaponics. The perceived negatives of the technology received greater attention than the perceived benefits. Aquaponics was thought to be most competitive in either niche or wholesale markets, with a need for scaled guidelines from backyard to large-scale commercial production. For aquaponics in urban settings the influence of urban planning and policy is an important, but to date unstudied, consideration. The urban growers’ opinions of the overcomplicated nature of urban food planning corresponded with the mixed policy responses of the LGAs towards UA. This further supports the participants’ desire for a supportive State Government stance on UA to encourage consistency in LGAs.

  2. Acceptance test report for core sample trucks 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Report is to provide documentation for the acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4, designated as HO-68K-4600 and HO-68K-4647, respectively. This report conforms to the guidelines established in WHC-IP-1026, ''Engineering Practice Guidelines,'' Appendix M, ''Acceptance Test Procedures and Reports.'' Rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4 were based upon the design of the second core sample truck (HO-68K-4345) which was constructed to implement rotary mode sampling of the waste tanks at Hanford. Successful completion of acceptance testing on June 30, 1995 verified that all design requirements were met. This report is divided into four sections, beginning with general information. Acceptance testing was performed on trucks 3 and 4 during the months of March through June, 1995. All testing was performed at the ''Rock Slinger'' test site in the 200 West area. The sequence of testing was determined by equipment availability, and the initial revision of the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was used for both trucks. Testing was directed by ICF-KH, with the support of WHC Characterization Equipment Engineering and Characterization Project Operations. Testing was completed per the ATP without discrepancies or deviations, except as noted

  3. DOE not planning to accept spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Samuel K. Skinner, president of Commonwealth Edison Co. (ComEd), said open-quotes The federal government has a clear responsibility to begin accepting spent nuclear fuel in 1988,close quotes citing the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. Based in Chicago, ComEd operates 12 nuclear units, making it the nation's largest nuclear utility. open-quotes Since 1983, the consumers who use electricity produced at all nuclear power plants have been paying to fund federal management of spent nuclear fuel. Consumer payments and obligations, with interest, now total more than $10 billion. Electricity consumers have held up their side of the deal. The federal government must do the same,close quotes Skinner added. Skinner represented the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) before the committee. NEI is the Washington-based trade association of the nuclear energy industries. For more than 12 years, utility customers have been paying one-tenth of a cent per kWhr to fund a federal spent fuel management program under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Under this act, the federal government assumed responsibility for management of spent fuel from the nation's nuclear power plants. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was assigned to manage the storage and disposal program. DOE committed to begin accepting spent fuel from nuclear power plants by January 31, 1988. DOE has spent almost $5 million studying a site in Nevada, but is about 12 years behind schedule and does not plan to accept spent fuel beginning in 1998. DOE has said a permanent storage site will not be ready until 2010. This poses a major problem for many of the nation's nuclear power plants which supply about 20% of the electricity in the US

  4. Large shaft development test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, A.D.

    1984-03-01

    This test plan proposes the conduct of a large shaft development test at the Hanford site in support of the repository development program. The purpose and objective of the test plan is to obtain the information necessary to establish feasibility and to predict the performance of the drilling system used to drill large diameter shafts. The test plan is based upon drilling a 20 ft diameter shaft to a depth of 1,000 feet. The test plan specifies series of tests to evaluate the performance of the downhole assembly, the performance of the rig, and the ability of the system to cope with geologic hazards. The quality of the hole produced will also be determined. This test plan is considered to be preliminary in that it was prepared as input for the decision to determine if development testing is required in this area. Should the decision be made to proceed with development testing, this test plan shall be updated and revised. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  5. GMS/DACS interface acceptance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuehlke, A.C.

    1994-01-01

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring of existing, and newly installed, instrumentation associated with the SY-101 tank Gas Monitoring Systems will be systematically evaluated by performance of this procedure. All new alarms will be verified to function at the required setpoints. The change of I/O Drop 17 to I/O Drop 13 will be checked to verify that all associated alarms and screen displays are correct. All new or changed Control Screens which provide operator interface with the Gas Monitoring Systems readouts during operations will be verified to be adequate and correct. The DACS, which is housed in a trailer located just outside of the north fence at the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors located in and around the SY-101 tank. These sensors provide information such as: tank vapor space and ventilation system H 2 concentration; tank waste temperature; tank pressure; waste density; operating pump parameters such as speed, flow, rotational position, discharge pressure, and internal temperature; strain (for major equipment); and waste level. The output of these sensors is conditioned and transmitted to the DACS computers where these signals are displayed, recorded, and monitored for out-of-specification conditions. If abnormal conditions are detected, then, in certain situations, the DACS automatically generates alarms and causes the system to abort pump operations. The portions of the system to be tested include: new RGA5 gas monitor; existing gas chromatographs; FTIR; B ampersand K (Photo) NH 3 equipment; any new or changed Genesis screens; and I/O Drop 13

  6. Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP's facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson's facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified

  7. Factory Acceptance Test Procedure Westinghouse 100 ton Hydraulic Trailer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aftanas, B.L.

    1994-01-01

    This Factory Acceptance Test Procedure (FAT) is for the Westinghouse 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer. The trailer will be used for the removal of the 101-SY pump. This procedure includes: safety check and safety procedures; pre-operation check out; startup; leveling trailer; functional/proofload test; proofload testing; and rolling load test

  8. Tunnel boring waste test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patricio, J.G.

    1984-03-01

    The test plan has been prepared in anticipation of the need to excavate certain repository openings by relying upon mechanical excavation techniques. The test plan proposes that specific technical issues can be resolved and key design parameters defined by excavating openings in basalt near the surface, utilizing a full face tunnel boring machine (TBM). The purpose and objective of this type of testing will define the overall feasibility and attributes of mechanical excavation in basalt. The test plan recognizes that although this technology is generally available for underground construction for some geologic settings, the current state of technology for excavation in basalt is limited and the potential for improvement is considerable. The test plan recommends that it is economically advantageous to conduct additional testing in the laboratory to allow refinement of this plan based on the laboratory results. Thus, this test plan is considered preliminary in nature, with respect to detailed testing recommendations. However, the gross design attributes and resource requirements of a near-surface TBM demonstration are considered to be valid. 15 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Standardization of waste acceptance test methods by the Materials Characterization Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slate, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the role of standardized test methods in demonstrating the acceptability of high-level waste (HLW) forms for disposal. Key waste acceptance tests are standardized by the Materials Characterization Center (MCC), which the US Department of Energy (DOE) has established as the central agency in the United States for the standardization of test methods for nuclear waste materials. This paper describes the basic three-step process that is used to show that waste is acceptable for disposal and discusses how standardized tests are used in this process. Several of the key test methods and their areas of application are described. Finally, future plans are discussed for using standardized tests to show waste acceptance. 9 refs., 1 tab

  10. Acceptance test procedure MICON software exhaust fan control modifications; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SILVAN, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    This acceptance test verifies the MICON program changes for the new automatic transfer switch ATS-2 alarms, the Closed Loop Cooling isolator status, the CB-3 position alarm, and the alarms for the new emergency fan damper backup air compressor

  11. Intelligent Network Flow Optimization (INFLO) prototype acceptance test summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of System Acceptance Testing for the implementation of the Intelligent Network : Flow Optimization (INFLO) Prototype bundle within the Dynamic Mobility Applications (DMA) portion of the Connected : Vehicle Program. ...

  12. Instrumentation Cables Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muna, Alice Baca [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); LaFleur, Chris Bensdotter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    A fire at a nuclear power plant (NPP) has the potential to damage structures, systems, and components important to safety, if not promptly detected and suppressed. At Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant on March 22, 1975, a fire in the reactor building damaged electrical power and control systems. Damage to instrumentation cables impeded the function of both normal and standby reactor coolant systems, and degraded the operators’ plant monitoring capability. This event resulted in additional NRC involvement with utilities to ensure that NPPs are properly protected from fire as intended by the NRC principle design criteria (i.e., general design criteria 3, Fire Protection). Current guidance and methods for both deterministic and performance based approaches typically make conservative (bounding) assumptions regarding the fire-induced failure modes of instrumentation cables and those failure modes effects on component and system response. Numerous fire testing programs have been conducted in the past to evaluate the failure modes and effects of electrical cables exposed to severe thermal conditions. However, that testing has primarily focused on control circuits with only a limited number of tests performed on instrumentation circuits. In 2001, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted a series of cable fire tests designed to address specific aspects of the cable failure and circuit fault issues of concern1. The NRC was invited to observe and participate in that program. The NRC sponsored Sandia National Laboratories to support this participation, whom among other things, added a 4-20 mA instrumentation circuit and instrumentation cabling to six of the tests. Although limited, one insight drawn from those instrumentation circuits tests was that the failure characteristics appeared to depend on the cable insulation material. The results showed that for thermoset insulated cables, the instrument reading tended to drift

  13. Acceptance test report for the AY-102 ENRAF densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    On February 11, 1998, the AY-1 02, Riser 15E ENRAF Densitometer was acceptance tested per HNF-SD-WM-ATP-077. The test was performed at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, 200 East Area, building MO-407. The test validated the functionality of the Densitometer for use by project W-320, C-1 06 Retrieval. The purpose of the test procedure was to verify the functionality of the ENRAF Series 854 ATG densitometer. Typically, all ENRAF Series 854 ATGs are acceptance tested before transport to the field. The ATP, as performed for level gauges, sets default program values within the gauge and verifies the gauge's force transducer calibration

  14. W-026, transuranic waste (TRU) glovebox acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    On July 18, 1997, the Transuranic (TRU) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13021A-86. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, sorting table, lidder/delidder device and the TRU empty drum compactor were also conducted. As of February 25, 1998, 10 of the 102 test exceptions that affect the TRU glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test exceptions are provided as appendices to this report

  15. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report

  16. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-17

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  17. PUREX SAMCONS uninterruptible power supply (UPS) acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackaby, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Report for the PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) Acceptance Test Procedure validates the operation of the UPS, all alarming and display functions and the ability of the UPS to supply power to the SAMCONS as designed. The proper installation of the PUREX SAMCONS Trailer UPS components and wiring will be systematically evaluated by performance of this procedure. Proper operation of the SAMCONS computer UPS will be verified by performance of a timed functional load test, and verification of associated alarms and trouble indications. This test procedure will be performed in the SAMCONS Trailer and will include verification of receipt of alarms at the SAMCONS computer stations. This test may be performed at any time after the completion of HNF-SD-CP-ATP-083, PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Acceptance Test Procedure, when computer display and alarm functions have been proven to operate correctly

  18. Surface moisture measurement system hardware acceptance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this acceptance test procedure is to verify that the mechanical and electrical features of the Surface Moisture Measurement System are operating as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. This procedure will be used in conjunction with a software acceptance test procedure, which addresses testing of software and electrical features not addressed in this document. Hardware testing will be performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 Area and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility in the 400 Area. These systems were developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks

  19. Digface characterization test plan (remote testing)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croft, K.; Hyde, R.; Allen, S.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of the Digface Characterization (DFC) Remote Testing project is to remotely deploy a sensor head (Mini-Lab) across a digface to determine if it can characterize the contents below the surface. The purpose of this project is to provide a robotics technology that allows removal of workers from hazards, increases speed of operations, and reduces life cycle costs compared to alternate methods and technologies. The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is funding the demonstration, testing, and evaluation of DFC. This document describes the test plan for the DFC remote deployment demonstration for the BWID. The purposes of the test plan are to establish test parameters so that the demonstration results are deemed useful and usable and perform the demonstration in a safe manner and within all regulatory requirements

  20. Neutron absorber qualification and acceptance testing from the designer's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracey, W.; Chiocca, R.

    2004-01-01

    Starting in the mid 1990's, the USNRC began to require less than 100% credit for the 10B present in fixed neutron absorbers spent fuel transport packages. The current practice in the US is to use only 75% of the specified 10B in criticality safety calculations unless extensive acceptance testing demonstrates both the presence of the 10B and uniformity of its distribution. In practice, the NRC has accepted no more than 90% credit for 10B in recent years, while other national competent authorities continue to accept 100%. More recently, with the introduction of new neutron absorber materials, particularly aluminum / boron carbide metal matrix composites, the NRC has also expressed expectations for qualification testing, based in large part on Transnuclear's successful application to use a new composite material in the TN-68 storage / transport cask. The difficulty is that adding more boron than is really necessary to a metal has some negative effects on the material, reducing the ductility and the thermal conductivity, and increasing the cost. Excessive testing requirements can have the undesired effect of keeping superior materials out of spent fuel package designs, without a corresponding justification based on public safety. In European countries and especially in France, 100% credit has been accepted up to now with materials controls specified in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR): Manufacturing process approved by qualification testing Materials manufacturing controlled under a Quality Assurance system. During fabrication, acceptance testing directly on products or on representative samples. Acceptance criteria taking into account a statistical uncertainty corresponding to 3σ. The original and current bases for the reduced 10 B credit, the design requirements for neutron absorber materials, and the experience of Transnuclear and Cogema Logistics with neutron absorber testing are examined. Guidelines for qualification and acceptance testing and process controls

  1. Acceptance test report MICON software exhaust fan control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keck, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    This test procedure specifies instructions for acceptance testing of software for exhaust fan control under Project ESPT (Energy Savings Performance Contract). The software controls the operation of two emergency exhaust fans when there is a power failure. This report details the results of acceptance testing for the MICON software upgrades. One of the modifications is that only one of the emergency fans will operate at all times. If the operating fan shuts off or fails, the other fan will start and the operating fan will be stopped

  2. Initial acceptance test experience with FFTF plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.K.; Coleman, K.A.; Mahaffey, M.K.; McCargar, C.G.; Young, M.W.

    1978-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the initial acceptance test experience of certain pieces of auxiliary equipment of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The scope focuses on the DHX blowers and drive train, inert gas blowers, H and V containment isolation valves, and the Surveillance and In-service Inspection (SISI) transporter and trolley. For each type of equipment, the discussion includes a summary of the design and system function, installation history, preoperational acceptance testing procedures and results, and unusual events and resolutions

  3. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of nuclear power reactor security plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    This guidance document contains acceptance criteria to be used in the NRC license review process. It contains specific criteria for use in evaluating the acceptability of nuclear power reactor security programs as detailed in security plans

  4. ISOLOK VALVE ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR DWPF SME SAMPLING PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok{reg_sign} sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard{reg_sign} valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from

  5. Acceptance test report, plutonium finishing plant life safety upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    This acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that modifications to the Fir Protection systems function as required by project criteria. The ATP will test the Fire Alarm Control Panels, Flow Alarm Pressure Switch, Heat Detectors, Smoke Detectors, Flow Switches, Manual Pull Stations, and Gong/Door By Pass Switches

  6. Acceptance test report for portable exhauster POR-007/Skid E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriskovich, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes Acceptance Testing performed on Portable Exhauster POR-007/Skid E. It includes measurements of bearing vibration levels, pressure decay testing, programmable logic controller interlocks, high vacuum, flow and pressure control functional testing. The purpose of Acceptance testing documented by this report was to demonstrate compliance of the exhausters with the performance criteria established within HNF-0490, Rev. 1 following a repair and upgrade effort at Hanford. In addition, data obtained during this testing is required for the resolution of outstanding Non-conformance Reports (NCR), and finally, to demonstrate the functionality of the associated software for the pressure control and high vacuum exhauster operating modes provided for by W-320. Additional testing not required by the ATP was also performed to assist in the disposition and close out of receiving inspection report and for application design information (system curve). Results of this testing are also captured within this document

  7. Multiport riser and flange assemblies acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precechtel, D.R.; Schroeder, B.K.

    1994-01-01

    This document presents the results of the acceptance test for the multiport riser (MPR) and multiport flange (MPF) assemblies. The accepted MPR and MPF assemblies will be used in support of the hydrogen mitigation project for double-shell waste tank 241-SY-101 and other related projects. The testing described in this document verifies that the mechanical and interface features are operating as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. The objectives of the acceptance testing were as follows: Basic equipment functions and mechanical interfaces were verified; Installation and removal of equipment were demonstrated to the degree possible; Operation of the decon spray system and all valving was confirmed; and the accumulated leak rate of the MPR and MPF assemblies was determined

  8. Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, R.A.

    1995-03-06

    The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP`s facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson`s facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified.

  9. Acceptance test for graphite components and construction status of HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, T.; Ishihara, M.; Maruyama, S.; Shiozawa, S.; Tsuji, N.; Miki, T.

    1996-01-01

    In March, 1991, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started to constructed the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor(HTTR) which is a 30-MW(thermal) helium gas-cooled reactor with a core composed of prismatic graphite blocks piled on the core support graphite structures. Two types of graphite materials are used in the HTTR. One is the garde IG-110, isotropic fine grain graphite, another is the grade PGX, medium-to-fine grained molded graphite. These materials were selected on the basis of the appropriate properties required by the HTTR reactor design. Industry-wide standards for an acceptance test of graphite materials used as main components of a nuclear reactor had not been established. The acceptance standard for graphite components of the HTTR, therefore, was drafted by JAERI and reviewed by specialists outside JAERI. The acceptance standard consists of the material testing, non-destructive examination such as the ultrasonic and eddy current testings, dimensional and visual inspections and assembly test. Ultrasonic and eddy current testings are applied to graphite logs to detect an internal flaw and to graphite components to detect a surface flaw, respectively. The assembly test is performed at the works, prior to their installation in the reactor pressure vessel, to examine fabricating precision of each component and alignment of piled-up structures. The graphite components of the HTTR had been tested on the basis of the acceptance standard. It was confirmed that the graphite manufacturing process was well controlled and high quality graphite components were provided to the HTTR. All graphite components except for the fuel graphite blocks are to be installed in the reactor pressure vessel of the HTTR in September 1995. The paper describes the construction status of the HTTR focusing on the graphite components. The acceptance test results are also presented in this paper. (author). Figs

  10. ENRAF Series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUBER, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    This procedure provides acceptance testing for Enraf Series 854 level gauges used to monitor levels in Hanford Waste Storage Tanks. The test will verify that the gauge functions according to the manufacturer's instructions and specifications and is properly setup prior to being delivered to the tank farm area. This ATP does not set up the gauge for any specific tank, but is generalized to permit testing the gauge prior to installation package preparation

  11. Test plan, sludge retrieval, sludge packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feigenbutz, L.V.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides direction for the cold testing of tools, equipment and systems which will be installed and operated in K-East (KE) Basin in support of the sludge retrieval and packaging project. The technical uncertainties related to the effectiveness of sludge retrieval procedures and equipment require that cold testing be completed before installation in KE Basin to identify and resolve existing problems, and to optimize the efficiency of all equipment and systems used. This plan establishes the responsibilities, test requirements, and documentation requirements necessary to complete cold tests of: (1) equipment with no potential for plant use; (2) prototype equipment and systems which may be upgraded for use in K-Basin; and (3) plant equipment and systems requiring cold acceptance testing prior to plant use. Some equipment and systems may have been subject to a formal design review and safety assessment; the results of which will be included as supporting documents to the operational readiness review (ORR)

  12. 30 CFR 282.23 - Testing Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Testing Plan. 282.23 Section 282.23 Mineral... § 282.23 Testing Plan. All testing activities shall be conducted in accordance with a Testing Plan... detailed Mining Plan than is obtainable under an approved Delineation Plan, to prepare feasibility studies...

  13. Project W-320 acceptance test report for AY-farm electrical distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevins, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the AY-Farm Electrical Distribution System functions as required by the design criteria. This test is divided into three parts to support the planned construction schedule; Section 8 tests Mini-Power Pane AY102-PPI and the EES; Section 9 tests the SSS support systems; Section 10 tests the SSS and the Multi-Pak Group Control Panel. This test does not include the operation of end-use components (loads) supplied from the distribution system. Tests of the end-use components (loads) will be performed by other W-320 ATPs

  14. Acceptance test report MICON software exhaust fan control modifications; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SILVAN, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents the results the acceptance test HNF-4108 which verifies the MICON program changes for the new automatic transfer switch ATS-2 alarms, the Closed Loop Cooling isolator status, the CB-3 position alarm, the alarms for the new emergency fan damper backup air compressor, and the generator sequencer logic

  15. Acceptance of enterprise resource planning systems by small manufacturing enterprises

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adam, R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available systems by small enterprises. This paper addresses this gap by considering the strategic, business, technical and human factors that influence the acceptance of ERP systems in small manufacturing enterprises in South Africa. The consultative list...

  16. Automatically generated acceptance test: A software reliability experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protzel, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    This study presents results of a software reliability experiment investigating the feasibility of a new error detection method. The method can be used as an acceptance test and is solely based on empirical data about the behavior of internal states of a program. The experimental design uses the existing environment of a multi-version experiment previously conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center, in which the launch interceptor problem is used as a model. This allows the controlled experimental investigation of versions with well-known single and multiple faults, and the availability of an oracle permits the determination of the error detection performance of the test. Fault interaction phenomena are observed that have an amplifying effect on the number of error occurrences. Preliminary results indicate that all faults examined so far are detected by the acceptance test. This shows promise for further investigations, and for the employment of this test method on other applications.

  17. Acceptability of HIV self-testing: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Janne; Subklew-Sehume, Friederike; Kenyon, Chris; Colebunders, Robert

    2013-08-08

    The uptake of HIV testing and counselling services remains low in risk groups around the world. Fear of stigmatisation, discrimination and breach of confidentiality results in low service usage among risk groups. HIV self-testing (HST) is a confidential HIV testing option that enables people to find out their status in the privacy of their homes. We evaluated the acceptability of HST and the benefits and challenges linked to the introduction of HST. A literature review was conducted on the acceptability of HST in projects in which HST was offered to study participants. Besides acceptability rates of HST, accuracy rates of self-testing, referral rates of HIV-positive individuals into medical care, disclosure rates and rates of first-time testers were assessed. In addition, the utilisation rate of a telephone hotline for counselling issues and clients` attitudes towards HST were extracted. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria (HST had been offered effectively to study participants and had been administered by participants themselves) and demonstrated universally high acceptability of HST among study populations. Studies included populations from resource poor settings (Kenya and Malawi) and from high-income countries (USA, Spain and Singapore). The majority of study participants were able to perform HST accurately with no or little support from trained staff. Participants appreciated the confidentiality and privacy but felt that the provision of adequate counselling services was inadequate. The review demonstrates that HST is an acceptable testing alternative for risk groups and can be performed accurately by the majority of self-testers. Clients especially value the privacy and confidentiality of HST. Linkage to counselling as well as to treatment and care services remain major challenges.

  18. PUREX (SAMCONS) uninterruptible power supply (UPS) acceptance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackaby, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure for the PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) provides for testing and verifying the proper operation of the control panel alarms and trouble functions, the 6roper functioning of the AC inverter, ability of the battery supply to maintain the SAMCONS load for a minimum of two hours , and proper interaction with the SAMCONS Video graphic displays for alarm displays

  19. 7 CFR 1717.605 - Design standards, plans and specifications, construction standards, and RUS accepted materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., construction standards, and RUS accepted materials. 1717.605 Section 1717.605 Agriculture Regulations of the... standards, plans and specifications, construction standards, and RUS accepted materials. All borrowers... system design, construction standards, and the use of RUS accepted materials. Borrowers must comply with...

  20. Waste feed delivery test and evaluation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' TOOLE, S.M.

    1999-09-30

    This plan documents the Waste Feed Delivery Program test and evaluation planning and implementation approach. The purpose of this document is to define and communicate the Waste Feed Delivery Program Test and Evaluation scope, objectives, planning and implementation approach.

  1. Waste feed delivery test and evaluation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'TOOLE, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    This plan documents the Waste Feed Delivery Program test and evaluation planning and implementation approach. The purpose of this document is to define and communicate the Waste Feed Delivery Program Test and Evaluation scope, objectives, planning and implementation approach

  2. NASA's Plan for SDLS Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    The Space Data Link Security (SDLS) Protocol is a Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) standard which extends the known Data Link protocols to secure data being sent over a space link by providing confidentiality and integrity services. This plan outlines the approach by National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) in performing testing of the SDLS protocol using a prototype based on an existing NASA missions simulator.

  3. Surface moisture measurement system hardware acceptance test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, G.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-28

    This document summarizes the results of the hardware acceptance test for the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS). This test verified that the mechanical and electrical features of the SMMS functioned as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. The bulk of hardware testing was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 Area and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility in the 400 Area. The SMMS was developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks.

  4. Analysis of Survivor Benefit Plan - Acceptance and Comparison with Private Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    I COPY AIU WAR COLLEGE ,.SEARCH REPORT ,YSIS OF SURVIVOR BENEFIT PLAN-__CCEPTANCE ’-U AND COMPARISON WITH PRIVATE SECTOR LIEUENNT COLONEL JOHN R...AAA AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY ANALYSIS OF SURVIVOR BENEFIT PLAN--ACCEPTANCE AND COMPARISON WITH PRIVATE SECTOR by John R. Adams Lieutenant...Survivor Benefit Plan (SBP)--Acceptance and Comparison With Private Sector . AUTHORS: John R. Adams, Lieutenant Colonel, USAF; Daniel 3. Kohn

  5. MCO combustible gas management leak test acceptance criteria; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHERRELL, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Existing leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed multi-canister overpacks (MCO) were evaluated to ensure that MCOs can be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCO's or within their surroundings. The document concludes that the integrated leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs (1 x 10(sup -5) std cc/sec and 1 x 10(sup -7) std cc/sec, respectively) are adequate to meet all current and foreseeable needs of the project, including capability to demonstrate compliance with the NFPA 60 Paragraph 3-3 requirement to maintain hydrogen concentrations[within the air atmosphere CSB tubes] t or below 1 vol% (i.e., at or below 25% of the LFL)

  6. Project W-049H Collection System Acceptance Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckles, D.I.

    1994-01-01

    The Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) Program for Project W-049H covers the following activities: Disposal system, Collection system, Instrumentation and control system. Each activity has its own ATP. The purpose of the ATPs is to verify that the systems have been constructed in accordance with the construction documents and to demonstrate that the systems function as required by the Project criteria. This ATP has been prepared to demonstrate that the Collection System Instrumentation functions as required by project criteria

  7. Acceptance Rate of HIV Testing among Women Seeking Induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A l\\'aide d\\'un questionnaire semi-structuré et auto-administré, nous avons interviewé 1051 femmes qui recherchaient l\\'avortement provoqué dans quatre cliniques selectionnées au hazard à Benin City entre janvier et septembre 2002. Les échantillons sanguins de celles qui ont accepté le test du VIH ont été collectés et ont ...

  8. 242A Distributed Control System Year 2000 Acceptance Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEATS, M.C.

    1999-08-31

    This report documents acceptance test results for the 242-A Evaporator distributive control system upgrade to D/3 version 9.0-2 for year 2000 compliance. This report documents the test results obtained by acceptance testing as directed by procedure HNF-2695. This verification procedure will document the initial testing and evaluation of the potential 242-A Distributed Control System (DCS) operating difficulties across the year 2000 boundary and the calendar adjustments needed for the leap year. Baseline system performance data will be recorded using current, as-is operating system software. Data will also be collected for operating system software that has been modified to correct year 2000 problems. This verification procedure is intended to be generic such that it may be performed on any D/3{trademark} (GSE Process Solutions, Inc.) distributed control system that runs with the VMSTM (Digital Equipment Corporation) operating system. This test may be run on simulation or production systems depending upon facility status. On production systems, DCS outages will occur nine times throughout performance of the test. These outages are expected to last about 10 minutes each.

  9. Acceptance test report for portable exhauster POR-008/Skid F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriskovich, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Portable Exhauster POR-008 was procured via HNF-0490, Specification for a Portable Exhausted System for Waste Tank Ventilation. Prior to taking ownership, acceptance testing was performed at the vendors. However at the conclusion of testing a number of issues remained that required resolution before the exhausters could be used by Project W-320. The purpose of acceptance testing documented by this report was to demonstrate compliance of the exhausters with the performance criteria established within HNF-O49O, Rev. 1 following a repair and upgrade effort at Hanford. In addition, data obtained during this testing is required for the resolution of outstanding Non-conformance Reports (NCR), and finally, to demonstrate the functionality of the associated software for the pressure control and high vacuum exhauster operating modes provided for by W-320. Additional testing not required by the ATP was also performed to assist in the disposition and close out of receiving inspection report and for application design information (system curve). Results of this testing are also captured within this document

  10. Acceptance test report for 241-AW process air system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    The acceptance test procedure (ATP) for the compressed air system at building 241-AW-273 was completed on March 11, 1993. The system was upgraded to provide a reliable source of compressed air to the tank farm. The upgrade included the demolition of the existing air compressor and associated piping, as well as the installation of a new air compressor with a closed loop cooling system. A compressed air cross-tie was added to allow the process air compressor to function as a back-up to the existing instrument air compressor. The purpose of the ATP was to achieve three primary objectives: verify system upgrade in accordance with the design media; provide functional test of system components and controls; and prepare the system for the Operational Test. The ATP was successfully completed with thirteen exceptions, which were resolved prior to completing the acceptance test. The repaired exceptions had no impact to safety or the environment and are briefly summarized. Testing ensured that the system was installed per design, that its components function as required and that it is ready for operational testing and subsequent turnover to operations

  11. Acceptance test for 900 MWe PWR unit replacement steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourguechon, B.

    1993-01-01

    During the first half of 1994, the Gravelines 1 steam generators will be replaced (SG replacement procedure). The new SG's differ from the former components notably by the alloy used for the tube bundle, in this case, the high chromium content Inconel 690. So, from this standpoint, they are to be considered as PWR 900 replacement SG first models and their thermal efficiency has consequently to be assessed. This will provide an opportunity of ensuring that the performance of the components delivered is in compliance with requirements and of making the necessary provisions if significant deviations are observed. The EFMT branch, which has been in charge of the instrumentation and acceptance of the different SG first models since the first PWR plants were commissioned, will be responsible for the acceptance tests and the ultimate validation of a performance assessment procedure applicable to the future replacement steam generators. The methods and tests proposed for SG expert appraisal are based on consideration of the importance of primary measurement quality for satisfactory SG assessment and of the new test facilities with which the 900 and 1 300 PWR plants are gradually being equipped. These facilities provide an on-site computer environment for tests compatible with the tools (PATTERN, etc.) used at EFMT and in other departments. This test is the first of this kind performed by EFMT and the test facility of a nuclear power plant. (author). 6 figs

  12. 242A Distributed Control System Year 2000 Acceptance Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TEATS, M.C.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents acceptance test results for the 242-A Evaporator distributive control system upgrade to D/3 version 9.0-2 for year 2000 compliance. This report documents the test results obtained by acceptance testing as directed by procedure HNF-2695. This verification procedure will document the initial testing and evaluation of the potential 242-A Distributed Control System (DCS) operating difficulties across the year 2000 boundary and the calendar adjustments needed for the leap year. Baseline system performance data will be recorded using current, as-is operating system software. Data will also be collected for operating system software that has been modified to correct year 2000 problems. This verification procedure is intended to be generic such that it may be performed on any D/3(trademark) (GSE Process Solutions, Inc.) distributed control system that runs with the VMSTM (Digital Equipment Corporation) operating system. This test may be run on simulation or production systems depending upon facility status. On production systems, DCS outages will occur nine times throughout performance of the test. These outages are expected to last about 10 minutes each

  13. Project W-049H collection system Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrigan, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) for the Project W-049H, Treated Effluent Disposal Facility, is to verify that the collection system equipment installed as Pump Station No. 1 (225-W) and Pump Station No. 2 (225-E) have been installed in accordance with the design documents and function as required by the project criteria. This will be a wet test with potable water being introduced into the pump pits to test for leakage. Potable water will also be employed in the testing of the pumps and related mechanical equipment. All Instrument and Control equipment related to the pump stations will be checked electronically with simulated inputs/outputs when actual input/output signals are unavailable. Water from Pump Station 1 will be moved through the TEDF piping system and discharged into the disposal ponds. This will check the proper function of the air/vac valves not tested during construction, and the automated samplers

  14. Dissolution test for low-activity waste product acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have measured the mean and standard deviation of the solution concentrations of B, Na, and Si attained in replicate dissolution tests conducted at temperatures of 20, 40, and 70 C, for durations of 3 and 7 days, and at glass/water mass ratios of 1:10 and 1:1. These and other tests were conducted to evaluate the adequacy of the test methods specified in privatization contracts and to develop a data base that can be used to evaluate the reliability of reported results for tests performed on the waste products. Tests were conducted with a glass that we formulated to be similar to low-activity waste products that will be produced during the remediation of Hanford tank wastes. Statistical analyses indicated that, while the mean concentrations of B, Na, and Si were affected by the values of test parameters, the standard deviation of replicate tests was not. The precision of the tests was determined primarily by uncertainties in the analysis of the test solutions. Replicate measurements of other glass properties that must be reported for Hanford low-activity waste products were measured to evaluate the possible adoption of the glass used in these tests as a standard test material for the product acceptance process

  15. LERF Basin 44 Process Test Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUECK, K.J.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents a plan to process a portion of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) Basin 44 wastewater through the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The objective of this process test is to determine the most effective/efficient method to treat the wastewater currently stored in LERF Basin 44. The process test will determine the operational parameters necessary to comply with facility effluent discharge permit limits (Ecology 1995) and the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) acceptance criteria (BHI-00139), while achieving ALARA goals and maintaining the integrity of facility equipment. A major focus of the test plan centers on control of contamination due to leaks and/or facility maintenance. As a pre-startup item, all known leaks will be fixed before the start of the test. During the course of the test, a variety of contamination control measures will be evaluated for implementation during the treatment of the remaining Basin 44 inventory. Of special interest will be techniques and tools used to prevent contamination spread during sampling and when opening contaminated facility equipment/piping. At the conclusion of the test, a post ALARA review will be performed to identify lessons learned from the test run which can be applied to the treatment of the remaining Basin 44 inventory. The volume of wastewater to be treated during this test run is 500,000 gallons. This volume limit is necessary to maintain the ETF radiological inventory limits per the approved authorization basis. The duration of the process test is approximately 30 days

  16. Nevada Test Site waste acceptance criteria [Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1997-08-01

    Revision one updates the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

  17. Nevada Test Site waste acceptance criteria [Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    1997-01-01

    Revision one updates the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document

  18. Computer-facilitated rapid HIV testing in emergency care settings: provider and patient usability and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, Freya; Kurth, Ann E; Severynen, Anneleen; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Moring-Parris, Daniel; Mackenzie, Sara; Rothman, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Providers in emergency care settings (ECSs) often face barriers to expanded HIV testing. We undertook formative research to understand the potential utility of a computer tool, "CARE," to facilitate rapid HIV testing in ECSs. Computer tool usability and acceptability were assessed among 35 adult patients, and provider focus groups were held, in two ECSs in Washington State and Maryland. The computer tool was usable by patients of varying computer literacy. Patients appreciated the tool's privacy and lack of judgment and their ability to reflect on HIV risks and create risk reduction plans. Staff voiced concerns regarding ECS-based HIV testing generally, including resources for follow-up of newly diagnosed people. Computer-delivered HIV testing support was acceptable and usable among low-literacy populations in two ECSs. Such tools may help circumvent some practical barriers associated with routine HIV testing in busy settings though linkages to care will still be needed.

  19. Acceptance test report: Field test of mixer pump for 241-AN-107 caustic addition project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    The field acceptance test of a 75 HP mixer pump (Hazleton serial number N-20801) installed in Tank 241-AN-107 was conducted from October 1995 thru February 1996. The objectives defined in the acceptance test were successfully met, with two exceptions recorded. The acceptance test encompassed field verification of mixer pump turntable rotation set-up and operation, verification that the pump instrumentation functions within established limits, facilitation of baseline data collection from the mixer pump mounted ultrasonic instrumentation, verification of mixer pump water flush system operation and validation of a procedure for its operation, and several brief test runs (bump) of the mixer pump

  20. Acceptance test report for project C-157 ''T-Plant electrical upgrade''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents for record purposes the field results, acceptance, and approvals of the completed acceptance test per WHC-SD-Cl57-ATP-001, Rev. 0, ''Acceptance Test Proceedure for Project C-157 'T Plant Electrical Upgrade''' The test was completed and approved without any problems or exceptions

  1. Acceptance test report for project C-157 ``T-Plant electrical upgrade``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppson, L.A.

    1997-08-05

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents for record purposes the field results, acceptance, and approvals of the completed acceptance test per WHC-SD-Cl57-ATP-001, Rev. 0, ``Acceptance Test Proceedure for Project C-157 `T Plant Electrical Upgrade``` The test was completed and approved without any problems or exceptions.

  2. Failure-censored accelerated life test sampling plans for Weibull distribution under expected test time constraint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, D.S.; Chun, Y.R.; Kim, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper considers the design of life-test sampling plans based on failure-censored accelerated life tests. The lifetime distribution of products is assumed to be Weibull with a scale parameter that is a log linear function of a (possibly transformed) stress. Two levels of stress higher than the use condition stress, high and low, are used. Sampling plans with equal expected test times at high and low test stresses which satisfy the producer's and consumer's risk requirements and minimize the asymptotic variance of the test statistic used to decide lot acceptability are obtained. The properties of the proposed life-test sampling plans are investigated

  3. Acceptance test procedure for SY Tank Farm replacement exhauster unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becken, G.W.

    1994-12-16

    The proper functioning of a new 241-SY Tank Farm replacement exhauster will be acceptance tested, to establish operability and to provide an operational baseline for the equipment. During this test, a verification of all of the alarm and control circuits associated with the exhaust, which provide operating controls and/or signals to local and remote alarm/annunciator panels, shall be performed. Test signals for sensors that provide alarms, warnings, and/or interlocks will be applied to verify that alarm, warning, and interlock setpoints are correct. Alarm and warning lights, controls, and local and remote readouts for the exhauster will be verified to be adequate for proper operation of the exhauster. Testing per this procedure shall be conducted in two phases. The first phase of testing, to verify alarm, warning, and interlock setpoints primarily, will be performed in the MO-566 Fab Shop. The second phase of testing, to verify proper operation and acceptable interface with other tank farm systems, will be conducted after the exhauster and all associated support and monitoring equipment have been installed in the SY Tank Farm. The exhauster, which is mounted on a skid and which will eventually be located in the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors mounted on the skid and associated equipment. These sensors provide information such as: exhauster system inlet vacuum pressure; prefilter and HEPA filter differential pressures; exhaust stack sampler status; exhaust fan status; system status (running/shut down); and radiation monitoring systems status. The output of these sensors is transmitted to the exhauster annunciator panel where the signals are displayed and monitored for out-of-specification conditions.

  4. Acceptance Test Report for Fourth-Generation Hanford Corrosion Monitoring Cabinet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Plan (ATP) will document the satisfactory operation of the third-generation corrosion monitoring cabinet (Hiline Engineering Part No.0004-CHM-072-C01). This ATP will be performed by the manufacturer of the cabinet prior to delivery to the site. The objective of this procedure is to demonstrate and document the acceptance of the corrosion monitoring cabinet. The test will consist of a continuity test of the cabinet wiring from the end of cable to be connected to corrosion probe, through the appropriate intrinsic safety barriers and out to the 15 pin D-shell connectors to be connected to the corrosion monitoring instrument. Additional testing will be performed using a constant current and voltage source provided by the corrosion monitoring hardware manufacturer to verify proper operation of corrosion monitoring instrumentation

  5. Acceptance testing and quality assurance of Simulix evolution radiotherapy simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Ashutosh; Singh, Navin; Gurjar, Om Prakash; Bagdare, Priyusha

    2015-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy depends on precise treatment simulation and proper patient positioning. The simulator is a conventional radiographic and fluoroscopic system which emulates the geometrical positions of radiotherapy treatment unit. Hence, the acceptance tests and quality assurance (QA) of the simulator are important prior to its commissioning for the safe and precise clinical use. The verification of mechanical and optical readouts, field size, isocenter, optical and radiation field congruence were performed. The X-ray beam parameters were tested for kVp, mAs and consistency of radiation output. The flat panel detector performance was checked with respect to resolution, low contrast sensitivity (LCS), automatic dose rate control (ADRC), and gray image resolution (GIR). Gantry, table, and imaging system collision possibility was checked. Radiation survey around the room was also performed. The field size test for digital readout and on graph paper, the results of isocenter checkup for rotation of gantry, collimator, and couch, and the deviations observed in auto stop for various movements were found within the tolerance limits. Optical field and radiation field was found congruent. All the lasers were found aligned with the established isocenter. Maximum deviation for set and measured kV was found to be 3% in fluoro mode. The maximum deviation observed in mAs was 1.5% in 3-point as well as in 2-point film exposed mode. The X-ray output was found consistent. The results of tests for resolution, LCS, ADRC, and GIR of the flat panel detector were within tolerance limits. All the six safety interlocks were found working. Radiation level around the room was found within the acceptable limits. All the tests carried out were found within the tolerance limits. The data which has been taken in this study will provide basic support to the routine QA of the simulator. (author)

  6. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5489. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''N''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document

  7. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5073. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''M''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document

  8. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-11-09

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5055. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''L''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

  9. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5055. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''L''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document

  10. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-12-13

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5073. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''M''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

  11. Acceptance test procedure, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase III testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure is for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase III Testing. This procedure will test the sealing integrity of the Flexible Receiver System to ensure that release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from tank SY-101

  12. Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 1 testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document summarizes the results of the Phase 1 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). This acceptance test consisted of a pressure-decay/leak test of the containment bag to verify that the seams along the length of the bag had been adequately sealed. The sealing integrity of the FRS must be verified to ensure that the release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from Tank 241-SY-101. The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the mixer pump. This acceptance test was performed at Lancs Industries in Kirkland, Washington on January 17, 1995. The bag temperature-compensated pressure loss of 575 Pa was below the acceptance criteria of 625 Pa and the test results were therefore found to be acceptable. The bag manufacturer estimates that 80--90% of the pressure loss is attributed to leakage around the bag inflation valve where the pressure gage was connected. A leak detector was applied over the entire bag during the pre-tests and no leakage was found. Furthermore, the leak rate corresponding to this pressure loss is very small when compared to the acceptable leak rate of the completely assembled FRS. The sealing integrity of the assembled FRS is verified in Phase 3 testing

  13. Topographical mapping system for radiological and hazardous environments acceptance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Dochat, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    During the summer of 1996, the Topographical Mapping System (TMS) for hazardous and radiological environments and its accompanying three-dimensional (3-D) visualization tool, the Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote-Viewing System (ICERVS), were delivered to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL and Mechanical Technology, Inc., performed final acceptance testing of the TMS during the next eight months. The TMS was calibrated and characterized during this period. This paper covers the calibration, characterization, and acceptance testing of the TMS. Development of the TMS and ICERVS was initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of characterization and remediation of underground storage tanks (USTs) at DOE sites across the country. DOE required a 3-D, topographical mapping system suitable for use in hazardous and radiological environments. The intended application is the mapping of the interior of USTs as part of DOE's waste characterization and remediation efforts and to obtain baseline data on the content of the storage tank interiors as well as data on changes in the tank contents and levels brought about by waste remediation steps. Initially targeted for deployment at the Hanford Washington site, the TMS is designed to be a self-contained, compact, and reconfigurable system that is capable of providing rapid, variable-resolution mapping information in poorly characterized workspaces with a minimum of operator intervention

  14. Topographical mapping system for radiological and hazardous environments acceptance testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Gary A.; Dochat, G. R.

    1997-09-01

    During the summer of 1996, the topographical mapping system (TMS) for hazardous and radiological environments and its accompanying three-dimensional (3-D) visualization tool, the interactive computer-enhanced remote-viewing system (ICERVS), were delivered to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL and Mechanical Technology, Inc., performed final acceptance testing of the TMS during the next eight months. The TMS was calibrated and characterized during this period. This paper covers the calibration, characterization, and acceptance testing of the TMS. Development of the TMS and the ICERVS was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the purpose of characterization and remediation of underground storage tanks (USTs) at DOE sites across the country. DOE required a 3-D, topographical mapping system suitable for use in hazardous and radiological environments. The intended application is the mapping of the interior of USTs as part of DOE's waste characterization and remediation efforts and to obtain baseline data on the content of the storage tank interiors as well as data on changes in the tank contents and levels brought about by waste remediation steps. Initially targeted for deployment at the Hanford Washington site, the TMS is designed to be a self-contained, compact, reconfigurable system that is capable of providing rapid, variable-resolution mapping information in poorly characterized workspaces with a minimum of operator intervention.

  15. Acceptance sampling for attributes via hypothesis testing and the hypergeometric distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samohyl, Robert Wayne

    2017-10-01

    This paper questions some aspects of attribute acceptance sampling in light of the original concepts of hypothesis testing from Neyman and Pearson (NP). Attribute acceptance sampling in industry, as developed by Dodge and Romig (DR), generally follows the international standards of ISO 2859, and similarly the Brazilian standards NBR 5425 to NBR 5427 and the United States Standards ANSI/ASQC Z1.4. The paper evaluates and extends the area of acceptance sampling in two directions. First, by suggesting the use of the hypergeometric distribution to calculate the parameters of sampling plans avoiding the unnecessary use of approximations such as the binomial or Poisson distributions. We show that, under usual conditions, discrepancies can be large. The conclusion is that the hypergeometric distribution, ubiquitously available in commonly used software, is more appropriate than other distributions for acceptance sampling. Second, and more importantly, we elaborate the theory of acceptance sampling in terms of hypothesis testing rigorously following the original concepts of NP. By offering a common theoretical structure, hypothesis testing from NP can produce a better understanding of applications even beyond the usual areas of industry and commerce such as public health and political polling. With the new procedures, both sample size and sample error can be reduced. What is unclear in traditional acceptance sampling is the necessity of linking the acceptable quality limit (AQL) exclusively to the producer and the lot quality percent defective (LTPD) exclusively to the consumer. In reality, the consumer should also be preoccupied with a value of AQL, as should the producer with LTPD. Furthermore, we can also question why type I error is always uniquely associated with the producer as producer risk, and likewise, the same question arises with consumer risk which is necessarily associated with type II error. The resolution of these questions is new to the literature. The

  16. Perceived Use and Acceptance of Cloud Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Implementation in the Manufacturing Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeboje, Adewale

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain an insight into perceived use and acceptance for implementing an enterprise resource planning system and the decision whether to contract out the enterprise resource planning (ERP) service to a cloud provider. Cloud-based ERP systems can provide many advantages to the normal implementation of the same systems…

  17. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

  18. 78 FR 38411 - Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4; Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... Plant, Unit 4; Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria completion. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has determined that the inspections, tests...

  19. Acceptance test procedure for Project W-049H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckles, D.I.

    1994-01-01

    The Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) program for Project W-049H (200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility [TEDF]) covers three activities as follows: (1) Disposal System; (2) Collection System; and (3) Instrumentation and Control System. Each activity has its own ATP. The purpose of the ATPs is to reverify that the systems have been constructed in accordance with the construction documents and to demonstrate that the systems function as required by the Project criteria. The Disposal System ATP covers the testing of the following: disposal line flowmeters, room air temperatures in the Disposal Station Sampling Building, effluent valves and position indicators, disposal pond level monitors, automated sampler, pressure relief valves, and overflow diversion sluice gates. The Collection System ATP covers the testing of the two pump stations and all equipment installed therein. The Instrumentation and Control (I and C) ATP covers the testing of the entire TEDF I and C system. This includes 3 OCS units, modem, and GPLI cabinets in the ETC control room; 2 pump stations; disposal station sampling building; and all LCUs installed in the field

  20. Loss on Ignition Furnace Acceptance and Operability Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOHNSTON, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure and Operability Test Procedure (ATP/OTP)is to verify the operability of newly installed Loss on Ignition (LOI) equipment, including a model 1608FL CMTM Furnace, a dessicator, and balance. The operability of the furnace will be verified. The arrangement of the equipment placed in Glovebox 157-3/4 to perform LOI testing on samples supplied from the Thermal Stabilization line will be verified. In addition to verifying proper operation of the furnace, this ATP/OTP will also verify the air flow through the filters, verify a damper setting to establish and maintain the required differential pressure between the glovebox and the room pressure, and test the integrity of the newly installed HEPA filter. In order to provide objective evidence of proper performance of the furnace, the furnace must heat 15 crucibles, mounted on a crucible rack, to 1000 C, according to a program entered into the furnace controller located outside the glovebox. The glovebox differential pressure will be set to provide the 0.5 to 2.0 inches of water (gauge) negative pressure inside the glovebox with an expected airflow of 100 to 125 cubic feet per minute (cfm) through the inlet filter. The glovebox inlet G1 filter will be flow tested to ensure the integrity of the filter connections and the efficiency of the filter medium. The newly installed windows and glovebox extension, as well as all disturbed joints, will be sonically tested via ultra probe to verify no leaks are present. The procedure for DOS testing of the filter is found in Appendix A

  1. Loss on Ignition Furnace Acceptance and Operability Test Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSON, D.C.

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure and Operability Test Procedure (ATP/OTP)is to verify the operability of newly installed LOI equipment, including a model 1608FL CM{trademark} Furnace, a dessicator, and balance. The operability of the furnace will be verified. The arrangement of the equipment placed in Glovebox 157-3/4 to perform Loss on Ignition (LOI) testing on samples supplied from the Thermal Stabilization line will be verified. In addition to verifying proper operation of the furnace, this ATP/OTP will also verify the air flow through the filters, verify a damper setting to establish and maintain the required differential pressure between the glovebox and the room pressure, and test the integrity of the newly installed HEPA filter. In order to provide objective evidence of proper performance of the furnace, the furnace must heat 15 crucibles, mounted on a crucible rack, to 1000 C, according to a program entered into the furnace controller located outside the glovebox. The glovebox differential pressure will be set to provide the 0.5 to 2.0 inches of water (gauge) negative pressure inside the glovebox with an airflow of 100 to 125 cubic feet per minute (cfm) through the inlet filter. The glovebox inlet Glfilter will he flow tested to ensure the integrity of the filter connections and the efficiency of the filter medium. The newly installed windows and glovebox extension, as well as all disturbed joints, will be sonically tested via ultra probe to verify no leaks are present. The procedure for DOS testing of the filter is found in Appendix A.

  2. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''P''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) provides the test results for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''P''. The ATR summaries the results and provides a copy of the ATP and inspections in the Appendix

  3. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid Q

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) provides the test results for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''Q''. The ATR summaries the results and provides a copy of the ATP and inspections in the Appendix

  4. Test plan for K-Basin fuel handling tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, A.E.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the test plan and procedures for the acceptance testing of the handling tools enveloped for the removal of an N-Reactor fuel element from its storage canister in the K-Basins storage pool and insertion into the Single fuel Element Can for subsequent shipment to a Hot Cell for examination. Examination of these N-Reactor fuel elements is part of the overall characterization effort. New hand tools were required since previous fuel movement has involved grasping the fuel in a horizontal position. The 305 Building Cold Test Facility will be used to conduct the acceptance testing of the Fuel Handling Tools. Upon completion of this acceptance testing and any subsequent training of operators, the tools will be transferred to the 105 KW Basin for installation and use

  5. Test marketing and consumer acceptance of irradiated meat products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhicheng; Feng Zhixiong; Jiang Peizhen

    2001-01-01

    This study consists of two parts: irradiation processing of cooked meat and irradiation preservation of prepackaged chilled fresh cut meats. Irradiation of prepackaged pickled meat products dipped in grains stillage at a dose 6-8 kGy eliminated common food-borne microorganisms, such as E. Coli and other microbial pathogens and extended the shelf life of the product to 10 days at 5 deg. C. Test marketing of 40,000 bags (about 10,000 kg) of the product in more than 100 supermarkets in the city of Shanghai showed no untoward problem with consumer acceptance. Irradiation of prepackaged chilled fresh cut pork at a dose 3 kGy led to inactivation of microbial pathogens and parasites with a concomitant reduction in numbers of common spoilage microorganisms and extension of shelf life of the product for 30 days at 5 deg. C. The cost benefit and marketing applications were evaluated. (author)

  6. Acceptance testing and commissioning of a new model HDR afterloader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, Patrick N.; Somnay, Archana R.; Alecu, Rodica

    1996-01-01

    We have recently performed acceptance testing procedures and have commissioned a new model HDR afterloader, the Varian VariSource with ''Intelligent Drive.'' Our site was one of the first installations worldwide. It is our intent to describe our tests and the results of the tests particularly as they may differ from other afterloaders. The Ir-192 source is unique among afterloaders marketed in the US in that it is very slender (OD of source wire is 0.59 mm) and relatively long (two 0.5 cm sources for a total active length of 1.0 cm). A check of source homogeneity by autoradiograph as urged by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission demonstrates no detectable source inhomogeneity. Reentrant well ionization chambers are calibrated in the US with a 3.5 mm long source at Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratories. Therefore calibration needs to be considered with some care. Calibration of the first delivered source with a well ionization chamber indicated agreement with the manufacturer's stated activity to within 0.5%. Source positioning is checked with a device called a 'cam scale'. Tests have been carried out on this system and it has been found to accurately indicate source position to within ±0.5 mm. Timer accuracy has been found to be better than 0.1% for dwell times of several hundred seconds. The intelligent drive system and the small source diameter allow the source wire to negotiate paths with small radius of curvature. A series of tests have been made in which the source is forced to negotiate 'U' turns of decreasing radius of curvature. A 4.7 F, 100 cm long catheter was used for these tests and the 'U' turn was positioned at approximately 90 cm. Under these conditions, the VariSource was consistently able to traverse a 1.25 cm radius of curvature, which is better than the manufacturer's stated limit of 1.5 cm

  7. The Client Risk and The Audit Planning: Influence of Acceptance of Audit Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deby Suryani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study briefly aims to extend the relationship between client risks with the audit planning by proposes the acceptance of audit engagement as a mediate variable to fill a gap research, furthermore to determine the effect of client risk toward the audit planning in Public Accounting Firm in Jakarta, Indonesia. This research is a quantitative causal with primary data obtained by questionnaires. The population of this study is the auditors of Public Accounting Firm registered in the Directory Indonesian Institute of Accountants (Certified 2016 in Jakarta and to obtain the sample used purposive sampling technique and obtained samples of 197 respondents from 45 Public Accounting Firms spread in Jakarta. The analysis of data is using Structural Equation Modeling. The results of this research shows; (1. The Client risks directly may affect the audit planning in a positive but not significantly, (2. The Client risk directly affects the acceptance of audit positively and significantly, (3. The acceptance of audit engagement has positively and significantly influence on audit planning. Therefore the acceptance of audit engagement perfectly can act as mediate variable between client's risks with the audit planning, whereas the acceptance of audit engagement indicated by Time Budget Pressure, Audit Fee. Letter of Auditing and all indicator have a high loading factor.

  8. AFFTC Instruction 99-1, Test and Evaluation Test Plans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crane, Roger

    2002-01-01

    .... Test Information Sheets (TISs) are actually appendices to test plans and contain sufficient information for use by a flight test engineer to develop flight test cards and for management to discern the overall technical approach being taken...

  9. Test report for the run-in acceptance testing of the hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglin, B.G.; Nash, Ch.R.

    1997-01-01

    This report will provide the findings of the demonstration test conducted on the Double-Shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 HMR Pump-3 in accordance with WHC-SDWM-TP-434 ''Test plan for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation/retrieval pump-3'' at the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building from 7 June 1996 through 30 July 1996 per work package 4A-96-92/W. The DST 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3 is a 200-HP submersible electric driven pump that has been modified for use in the DST 241-SY-101 containing mixed waste located in the 200W area. The pump has a motor driven rotation mechanism that allows the pump column to rotate through 355 degree. Prior to operation, pre-operational checks were performed which included loop calibration grooming and alignment of instruments, learning how plumb HMR-3 assembly hung in a vertical position and bump test of the motor to determine rotation direction. The pump was tested in the MASF Large Diameter Cleaning Vessel (LDCV) with process water at controlled temperatures and levels. In addition, the water temperature of the cooling water to the motor oil heat exchanger was recorded during testing. A 480-volt source powered a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD). The VFD powered the pump at various frequencies and voltages to control speed and power output of the pump. A second VFD powered the oil cooling pump. A third VFD was not available to operate the rotational drive motor during the 72 hour test, so it was demonstrated as operational before and after the test. A Mini Acquisition and Control System (Mini-DACS) controls pump functions and monitoring of the pump parameters. The Mini-DACS consists of three computers, software and some Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). Startup and shutdown of either the pump motor or the oil cooling pump can be accomplished by the Mini-DACS. When the pump was in operation, the Mini-DACS monitors automatically collects data electronically. However, some required data

  10. Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 3 testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document summarizes the results of the phase 3 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the sealing integrity of the FRS to ensure that the release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from Tank 241-SY-101. The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the mixer pump. This acceptance test was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 area from January 10, 1995 to January 17, 1995. The Phase 3 test consisted of two parts. Part one was a water leak test of the seal between the blast shield and mock load distribution frame (LDF) to ensure that significant contamination of the pump pit and waste interaction with the aluminum impact-limiting material under the LDF are prevented during the pump removal operation. The second part of this acceptance test was an air leak test of the assembled flexible receiver system. The purpose of this test was to verify that the release of hazardous aerosols will be minimized if the tank dome pressure becomes slightly positive during the decontamination of the mixer pump

  11. Planning of digital building automation. Fundamentals of system and constructor selection, construction, acceptance testing and billing; Die Planung der digitalen Gebaeudeautomation. Grundlage fuer Systemfestlegung, Vergabe, Ausfuehrung, Abnahme und Abrechnung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, J. [Ingenieurbuero Dr. Ellrich und Partner, Muenchen (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    In chapter 6 of the anthology about building control the planning of digital building automation is described. The basics for the system arrangements are presented such as award, construction, inspection approval, and cashing up. Major points are quality criteria as well as the separation of the performance ranges. (BWI) [Deutsch] Kapitel 6 des Sammelbandes ueber Building Control ist der Planung der digitalen Gebaeudeautomation gewidmet. Es werden dabei Grundlagen fuer die Systemfestlegung vorgestellt sowie Vergabe, Ausfuehrung, Abnahme und Abrechnung diskutiert. Wesentliche Punkte sind dabei Qualitaetskriterien sowie die Abgrenzung der Leistungsbereiche. (BWI)

  12. Designing a two-rank acceptance sampling plan for quality inspection of geospatial data products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaohua; Wang, Zhenhua; Xie, Huan; Liang, Dan; Jiang, Zuoqin; Li, Jinchao; Li, Jun

    2011-10-01

    To address the disadvantages of classical sampling plans designed for traditional industrial products, we originally propose a two-rank acceptance sampling plan (TRASP) for the inspection of geospatial data outputs based on the acceptance quality level (AQL). The first rank sampling plan is to inspect the lot consisting of map sheets, and the second is to inspect the lot consisting of features in an individual map sheet. The TRASP design is formulated as an optimization problem with respect to sample size and acceptance number, which covers two lot size cases. The first case is for a small lot size with nonconformities being modeled by a hypergeometric distribution function, and the second is for a larger lot size with nonconformities being modeled by a Poisson distribution function. The proposed TRASP is illustrated through two empirical case studies. Our analysis demonstrates that: (1) the proposed TRASP provides a general approach for quality inspection of geospatial data outputs consisting of non-uniform items and (2) the proposed acceptance sampling plan based on TRASP performs better than other classical sampling plans. It overcomes the drawbacks of percent sampling, i.e., "strictness for large lot size, toleration for small lot size," and those of a national standard used specifically for industrial outputs, i.e., "lots with different sizes corresponding to the same sampling plan."

  13. 78 FR 53483 - Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 052-00025; NRC-2008-0252] Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria (ITAAC) completion...

  14. 78 FR 53484 - Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 052-00026; NRC-2008-0252] Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria (ITAAC) completion...

  15. 78 FR 65007 - Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 052-00026; NRC-2008-0252] Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria completion...

  16. Acceptability of a theory of planned behaviour email-based nutrition intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothe, E J; Mullan, B A

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated feasibility and acceptability of a new email-delivered intervention promoting fruit and vegetable consumption in a university-based population of Australian young adults. The study explored whether there are differences in the reported feasibility and acceptability between demographic groups within the population of interest and at three levels of intervention intensity. The email-delivered intervention program consists of an implementation intention 'planning task' and between 3 and 15 short email messages over a 15-day study period. The intervention program was developed using the Theory of Planned Behaviour and was designed to modify perceived behavioural control. One hundred and ten participants (mean age = 19.21 years, 25.6% male) completed the feasibility and acceptability questionnaire at Day 15. This questionnaire contained items about all intervention components. High acceptability and feasibility scores were found for all intervention parts and at all levels of intervention intensity. There were few significant differences in the reported acceptability of items between key demographic sub-groups, and no differences in reported acceptability at different levels of intervention intensity. These results suggest that this email-delivered intervention is an acceptable and feasible tool for promoting fruit and vegetable consumption for participants in the target population.

  17. Specification and acceptance testing of nuclear medicine equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegst, A.V.; Erickson, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The purchase of nuclear medicine equipment is of prime importance in the operation of a clinical service. Failure to properly evaluate the potential uses of the instrumentation and the various operational characteristics of the equipment can often result in the purchase of inappropriate or inferior instruments. The magnitude of the purchase in terms of time and financial investments make it imperative that the purchase be approached in a systematic manner. Consideration of both the intended clinical functions and personnel requirements is important. It is necessary also to evaluate the ability of the equipment vendor to support the instrumentation after the purchase has been completed and the equipment installed in the clinical site. The desired specifications of the instrument characteristics should be stated in terms that can be verified by acceptance testing. The complexity of modern instrumentation and the sensitivity of it to the environment require the buyer to take into account the potential problems of controlling the temperature, humidity, and electrical power of the installation site. If properly and systematically approached, the purchase of new nuclear medicine instrumentation can result in the acquisition of a powerful diagnostic tool which will have a useful lifetime of many years. If not so approached, it may result in the expenditure of a large amount of money and personnel time without the concomitant return in useful clinical service. (author)

  18. In situ vitrification large-scale operational acceptance test analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.; Carter, J.G.

    1986-05-01

    A thermal treatment process is currently under study to provide possible enhancement of in-place stabilization of transuranic and chemically contaminated soil sites. The process is known as in situ vitrification (ISV). In situ vitrification is a remedial action process that destroys solid and liquid organic contaminants and incorporates radionuclides into a glass-like material that renders contaminants substantially less mobile and less likely to impact the environment. A large-scale operational acceptance test (LSOAT) was recently completed in which more than 180 t of vitrified soil were produced in each of three adjacent settings. The LSOAT demonstrated that the process conforms to the functional design criteria necessary for the large-scale radioactive test (LSRT) to be conducted following verification of the performance capabilities of the process. The energy requirements and vitrified block size, shape, and mass are sufficiently equivalent to those predicted by the ISV mathematical model to confirm its usefulness as a predictive tool. The LSOAT demonstrated an electrode replacement technique, which can be used if an electrode fails, and techniques have been identified to minimize air oxidation, thereby extending electrode life. A statistical analysis was employed during the LSOAT to identify graphite collars and an insulative surface as successful cold cap subsidence techniques. The LSOAT also showed that even under worst-case conditions, the off-gas system exceeds the flow requirements necessary to maintain a negative pressure on the hood covering the area being vitrified. The retention of simulated radionuclides and chemicals in the soil and off-gas system exceeds requirements so that projected emissions are one to two orders of magnitude below the maximum permissible concentrations of contaminants at the stack

  19. Optimized FFTF Acceptance Test Program covering Phases III, IV, and V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wykoff, W.R.; Jones, D.H.

    1977-03-01

    A detailed review of Phases III, IV, and V of the FFTF Acceptance Test Program has been completed. The purpose of this review was to formulate that test sequence which not only meets requirements for safe, reliable and useful operation of the plant, but also results in the earliest prudent demonstration of full-power performance. A test sequence based on the underlying assumption that sodium flows into the secondary sodium storage tank (T-44) no later than August 31, 1978, is described in detail. A time-scale which allows extra time to put systems and equipment into operation the first time, debugging, and learning how to operate most effectively has been superimposed on the test sequence. Time is not included for major equipment malfunctions. This test plan provides the basis for coordinating the many and varied activities and interfaces necessary for successful and timely execution of the FFTF Acceptance Test Program. In this report, the need dates have been identified for presently scheduled test articles and standard core components

  20. Test plan for core drilling ignitability testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witwer, K.S.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this testing is to determine if ignition occurs while core drilling in a flammable gas environment. Drilling parameters are chosen so as to provide bounding conditions for the core sampling environment. If ignition does not occur under the conditions set forth in this test, then a satisfactory level of confidence will be obtained which would allow field operations under the normal drilling conditions

  1. Test Plan for WEPTOS #1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margheritini, Lucia; Tetu, Amélie; Ferri, Francesco

    This report presents the test program for the WEPTOS Prototype in Brandsø and should be used during testing in order to prioritize and implement the selected configurations to be tested in the available time frame. One configuration is characterized by a defined combination of device opening angl...

  2. Acceptance test procedure for the 105-KW isolation barrier leak rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, K.J.

    1995-01-01

    This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals. This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared in accordance with CM-6-1 EP 4.2, Standard Engineering Practices

  3. Acceptance and implementation of a system of planning computerized based on Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Tarjuelo, J.; Garcia-Molla, R.; Suan-Senabre, X. J.; Quiros-Higueras, J. Q.; Santos-Serra, A.; Marco-Blancas, N.; Calzada-Feliu, S.

    2013-01-01

    It has been done the acceptance for use clinical Monaco computerized planning system, based on an on a virtual model of the energy yield of the head of the linear electron Accelerator and that performs the calculation of the dose with an algorithm of x-rays (XVMC) based on Monte Carlo algorithm. (Author)

  4. Proceedings - Limits of Acceptable Change and related planning processes: Progress and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. McCool; David N. Cole

    1997-01-01

    Experience with Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) and related planning processes has accumulated since the mid-1980's. These processes were developoed as a means of dealing with recreation carrying capacity issues in wilderness and National Parks. These processes clearly also have application outside of protected areas and to issues other than recreation...

  5. Empirical Testing of a Theoretical Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model: An Exploratory Study of Educational Wikis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xun

    2010-01-01

    This study extended the technology acceptance model and empirically tested the new model with wikis, a new type of educational technology. Based on social cognitive theory and the theory of planned behavior, three new variables, wiki self-efficacy, online posting anxiety, and perceived behavioral control, were added to the original technology…

  6. Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 2 testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document summarizes the results of the Phase 2 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the test mixer pump currently installed in Tank 241-SY-101. The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the strength of the containment bag and bag bottom cinching mechanism. It is postulated that 68 gallons of waste could be trapped inside the pump internals. The bag must be capable of supporting this waste if it shakes loose and drains to the bottom of the bag after the bag bottom has been cinched closed. This acceptance test was performed at the Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) Facility in the 400 area on January 23, 1995. The bag assembly supported the weight of 920 kg (2,020 lbs) of water with no leakage or damage to the bag. This value meets the acceptance criteria of 910 kg of water and therefore the results were found to be acceptable. The maximum volume of liquid expected to be held up in the pump internals is 258 L (68 gallons), which corresponds to 410 kg. This test weight gives just over a safety factor of 2. The bag also supported a small shock load while it was filled with water when the crane hoisted the bag assembly up and down. Based on the strength rating of the bag components, the bag assembly should support 2--3 times the test weight of 910 kg

  7. STUDENT PLANNING TIME IN ORAL TESTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangLei

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the process of planning in an oral test situation. Since many researchers have studied the impact of pretask planning in the Second Language Acquisition (SLA) field and some have explored the same subject into the area of oral tests, the present study tries to make a tentative attempt to see what the test takers are actually doing in the planning time while taking an oral test. A questionnaire was designed with the effort to find out whether planning time results in an increased focus on form, particularly at the level of strategic attention to form.The result of the investigation tells us that restricted by the type of situation, test takers can only plan the framework of what they are going to say, which may differ to the results achieved by previous studies.

  8. Philips Gemini TF64 PET/CT Acceptance Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González Gonzalez, Joaquín J.; Calderón Marin, Carlos F.; Varela Corona, Consuelo; Machado Tejeda, Adalberto; González Correa, Héctor J.

    2016-01-01

    The Philips Gemini TF64 is the first PET/CT scanner installed in Cuba at the Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology in 2014. It is a third generation fully tridimensional whole body PET scanner with time-of-flight (TOF) technology combined with a 64-slice Brilliance CT scanner. The CT detector module contains 672x64 solid state detector, incorporating GOS scintillators, optical diodes and electronic signal channels arranged in 64 side by side arcs, with 672 detectors in each arc. There are sixteen 0.75 mm individual detector elements around the center and four 1.5 mm elements at each end, resulting in a 24 mm total detection length. The PET detector consists of 28 pixelar modules of a 23x44 array of 4x4x22 mm3 of LYSO crystals arranged in an Anger-logic detector design. The hardware coincidence-timing window for this scanner is set at 4 ns and delayed coincidence window technique is used to estimate the random coincidences in collected data. In this study the performance characteristics of PET/CT scanner were measured as part of the program tests of acceptance for clinical use.Methodology. The performance characteristics of CT scanner were evaluated by manufacturer protocol using Philips system performance phantom. Some additional geometrical tests were performed by the user. The intrinsic measurements of energy resolution as well as timing resolution, which define the TOF performance of PET scanner, were performed following the recommendations of manufacturer using 18 F. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, counting rate performance, image quality and accuracy were measured according to the NEMA NU-2 2007 procedures. Additionally, to characterize the effect of TOF reconstruction on lesion contrast and noise, the standard NEMA torso phantom was reconstructed with and without TOF capability. The accuracy of PET/CT image registration was tested according to the manufacturer protocol using an image alignment calibration holder with 6 point sources of 22

  9. Kodak AMSD Cryogenic Test Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gary; Hammon, John; Barrett, David; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NGST will be an IR based optical system that will operate at cryogenic temperatures. As part of the AMSD program, Kodak must demonstrate the ability of our system to perform at these very cold temperatures. Kodak will discuss the test approach that will be used for cryogenic testing at MSFC's XRCF.

  10. Acceptance Test Report for the 241-AZ-101 Ultrasonic Interface Level Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ANDREWS, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    This document comprises the Acceptance Test Report for the 241-AZ-101 Ultrasonic Interface Level Analyzer. This document presents the results of Acceptance Testing of the 241-AZ-101 Ultrasonic Interface Level Analyzers (URSILLAs). Testing of the URSILLAs was performed in accordance with ATP-260-001, ''URSILLA Pre-installation Acceptance Test Procedure''. The objective of the testing was to verify that all equipment and components function in accordance with design specifications and original equipment manufacturer's specifications

  11. Hanford Immobilized LAW Product Acceptance: Tanks Focus Area Testing Data Package II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Rebecca L.; Lorier, Troy H.; Peeler, David K.; Brown, Kevin G.; Reamer, Irene A.; Vienna, John D.; Jiricka, Antonin; Jorgensen, Benaiah M.; Smith, Donald E.

    2001-01-01

    This report is a continuation of the Hanford Immobilized Low Activity Waste (LAW) Product Acceptance (HLP): Initial Tanks Focus Area Testing Data Package (Vienna (and others) 2000). In addition to new 5000-h product consistency test (PCT), vapor hydration test (VHT), and alteration products data, some previously reported data together with relevant background information are included for an easily accessible source of reference when comparing the response of the various glasses to different test conditions. A matrix of 55 glasses was developed and tested to identify the impact of glass composition on long-term corrosion behavior and to develop an acceptable composition region for Hanford LAW glasses. Of the 55 glasses, 45 were designed to systematically vary the glass composition, and 10 were selected because large and growing databases on their corrosion characteristics had accumulated. The targeted and measured compositions of these glasses are found in the Appendix A. All glasses were fabricated according to standard procedures and heat treated to simulate the slow cooling that will occur in a portion of the waste glass after vitrification in the planned treatment facility at Hanford

  12. GPS test range mission planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Iris P.; Hancock, Thomas P.

    The principal features of the Test Range User Mission Planner (TRUMP), a PC-resident tool designed to aid in deploying and utilizing GPS-based test range assets, are reviewed. TRUMP features time history plots of time-space-position information (TSPI); performance based on a dynamic GPS/inertial system simulation; time history plots of TSPI data link connectivity; digital terrain elevation data maps with user-defined cultural features; and two-dimensional coverage plots of ground-based test range assets. Some functions to be added during the next development phase are discussed.

  13. Economic Design of Acceptance Sampling Plans in a Two-Stage Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lie-Fern Hsu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Supply Chain Management, which is concerned with material and information flows between facilities and the final customers, has been considered the most popular operations strategy for improving organizational competitiveness nowadays. With the advanced development of computer technology, it is getting easier to derive an acceptance sampling plan satisfying both the producer's and consumer's quality and risk requirements. However, all the available QC tables and computer software determine the sampling plan on a noneconomic basis. In this paper, we design an economic model to determine the optimal sampling plan in a two-stage supply chain that minimizes the producer's and the consumer's total quality cost while satisfying both the producer's and consumer's quality and risk requirements. Numerical examples show that the optimal sampling plan is quite sensitive to the producer's product quality. The product's inspection, internal failure, and postsale failure costs also have an effect on the optimal sampling plan.

  14. Social acceptance of wind energy development and planning in rural communities of Australia: A consumer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, Clare; Yiridoe, Emmanuel K.

    2014-01-01

    Social acceptance is necessary for widespread adoption of new renewable energy technologies. A lack of social acceptance by local community residents is a barrier to increasing the renewable energy mix and targets in Australia. This study empirically evaluated predictor importance of key constructs of social acceptance, using responses from a sample of 226 survey respondents in Australia. Regression analysis suggest that ‘Concerns with wind turbines’ was the predictor most strongly correlated with Social Acceptance, followed by ‘Annoyance with wind turbines’, and then ‘Consultation with stakeholders’. Implications of the study and recommendations for consideration by various interest groups (such as policy makers, and potential entrepreneurs) are discussed. This research contributes to theory building rather than theory testing of social acceptance of wind energy development

  15. Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Product Acceptance Test Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeler, D.

    1999-01-01

    'The Hanford Site has been used to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste, largely generated during Pu production, exists in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks. These wastes are to be retrieved and separated into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The DOE is proceeding with an approach to privatize the treatment and immobilization of Handord''s LAW and HLW.'

  16. Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Product Acceptance Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, D.

    1999-06-22

    'The Hanford Site has been used to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste, largely generated during Pu production, exists in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks. These wastes are to be retrieved and separated into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The DOE is proceeding with an approach to privatize the treatment and immobilization of Handord''s LAW and HLW.'

  17. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, mass properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents the thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is the backup RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at the Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on these tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also shown. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over 5% are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission

  18. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is tile back-up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission

  19. Test plan for Tank 241-AW-101 solubility screening tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Person, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Tank 241-AW-101 (101-AW) has been identified as one of the early tanks to be for retrieved for low level waste pretreatment and immobilization and retrieval of the tank waste may require dilution. This test is to determine the effects of dilution on the mass of solids and their composition. This test plan gives test instructions, example data sheets, a waste compatibility review, and a waste stream fact sheet. This test Plan is similar to tests on tanks 241-AN-102 (Person 1998a) and 241-AN-107 (Person 1998 b). The 101-AW tests will be done with composites of liquid and solids from grab samples that were taken in 1998 (Benar 1998). Future revisions of the Tank Sampling and Analysis Plan (Benar 1998) may change the details of the work performed under this test plan

  20. In Shop Acceptance Test Report for the SY Farm Annulus Leak Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, S.G.

    1999-01-01

    The following test report was written for the SY tank farm annulus leak detectors. The test plan used was HNF-4546, Revision 1. The purpose of the test plan was to test the ENRAF series 854 ATG with SPU II card prior to installation. The test plan set various parameters and verifies the gauge and alarms functionality

  1. Acceptance Test Report for Gamma Carts A and B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FULLER, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    Report of Shop Test of the Gamma Cart System to be used in the AZ-101 Mixer Pump Demonstration Test. Reports of the hardware and software tests. The objective of the testing was to verify in the shop that the hardware and software operated according to design specifications before field-testing and installation

  2. Using Optimization to Improve Test Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    OPTIMIZATION TO IMPROVE TEST PLANNING by Arlene M. Payne September 2017 Thesis Advisor: Jeffrey E. Kline Second Reader: Oleg A. Yakimenko THIS... Project (0704-0188) Washington, DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE September 2017 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s...thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE USING OPTIMIZATION TO IMPROVE TEST PLANNING 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Arlene M. Payne 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  3. Thermocouple module halt acceptance test report for tank 241-SY-101 DACS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    Testing was started on February 24, 1998 and completed on February 25, 1998. The completed procedure consists of 4 acceptance test sections, 6.1 through 6.4. Three test exceptions were identified during the procedure. The first test exception was determined to be unrelated to the ATP and unfortunate that the instrument failed during the ATP. The next two test exceptions were disposition as acceptable because the alarming functions worked correctly in identifying a problem when software communications were interrupted. The test was completed satisfactorily over 2 days. The remainder of the acceptance test report is the completed test procedure

  4. Public acceptance as a mainstay of energy policy planning; Gesellschaftliche Akzeptanz als Saeule der energiepolitischen Zielsetzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauff, Jochen; Heider, Conrad; Arms, Hanjo [A.T. Kearney, Berlin (Germany); Gerber, Jochen [GVS Netz GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany); Schilling, Martin [Decision Institute, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    How will it be possible in future to implement energy policy in Germany, that is to say carry out major infrastructural projects needed for its energy supply? Aside from new laws for accelerating planning and construction, viable solutions must always be built on trust developed through transparent decision processes and earnest, timely participation procedures. Although the path to public acceptance can be toilsome, current examples show that dedication to the pursuit of a workable energy policy is of crucial importance.

  5. Acceptance of family planning methods by induced abortion seekers: An observational study over five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathpalia, S K

    2016-01-01

    Prior to legalization of abortion, induced abortions were performed in an illegal manner and that resulted in many complications hence abortion was legalized in India in 1971 and the number of induced abortions has been gradually increasing since then. One way of preventing abortions is to provide family planning services to these abortion seekers so that same is not repeated. The study was performed to find out the acceptance of contraception after abortion. A prospective study was performed over a period of five years from 2010 to 2014. The study group included all the cases reporting for abortion. A proforma was filled in detail to find out the type of contraception being used before pregnancy and acceptance of contraception after abortion. The existing facilities were also evaluated. 1228 abortions were performed over a period of five years. 94.5% of abortions were during the first trimester. 39.9% had not used any contraceptive before, contraceptives used were natural and barrier which had high failure. The main indication for seeking abortion was failure of contraception and completion of family. 39.6% of patients accepted sterilization as a method of contraception. The existing post abortion family planning services are inadequate. Post abortion period is one which is important to prevent subsequent abortions and family planning services after abortion need to be strengthened.

  6. Acceptance Test Report for the 241-AN-107 Enraf Advanced Technology Gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, J.L.; Enderlin, V.R.

    1995-06-01

    This Acceptance Test Report covers the results of the execution of the Acceptance Test Procedure for the 241-AN-107 Enraf Advanced Technology Gauges. The test verified the proper operation of the gauges to measure waste density and level in the 241-AN-107 tank

  7. Evaluation Of ARG-1 Samples Prepared By Cesium Carbonate Dissolution During The Isolok SME Acceptability Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. The Mechanical Systems and Custom Equipment Development (MS and CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently completed the evaluation of one of these opportunities - the possibility of using an Isolok sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard valve for taking DWPF process samples at the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The use of an Isolok for SME sampling has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time, and decrease CPC cycle time. The SME acceptability testing for the Isolok was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 and was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNLRP-2011-00145. RW-0333P QA requirements applied to the task, and the results from the investigation were documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00693. Measurement of the chemical composition of study samples was a critical component of the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. A sampling and analytical plan supported the investigation with the analytical plan directing that the study samples be prepared by a cesium carbonate (Cs 2 CO 3 ) fusion dissolution method and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The use of the cesium carbonate preparation method for the Isolok testing provided an opportunity for an additional assessment of this dissolution method, which is being investigated as a potential replacement for the two methods (i.e., sodium peroxide fusion and mixed acid dissolution) that have been used at the DWPF for the analysis of SME samples. Earlier testing of the Cs 2 CO 3 method yielded promising results which led to a TTR from Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) to SRNL for additional support and an associated TTQAP to direct the SRNL efforts. A technical report resulting from this

  8. Canister disposition plan for the DWPF Startup Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbour, J.R.; Payne, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    This report details the disposition of canisters and the canistered waste forms produced during the DWPF Startup Test Program. The six melter campaigns (DWPF Startup Tests FA-13, WP-14, WP-15, WP-16, WP-17, and FA-18) will produce 126 canistered waste forms. In addition, up to 20 additional canistered waste forms may be produced from glass poured during the transition between campaigns. In particular, this canister disposition plan (1) assigns (by alpha-numeric code) a specific canister to each location in the six campaign sequences, (2) describes the method of access for glass sampling on each canistered waste form, (3) describes the nature of the specific tests which will be carried out, (4) details which tests will be carried out on each canistered waste form, (5) provides the sequence of these tests for each canistered waste form, and (6) assigns a storage location for each canistered waste form. The tests are designed to provide evidence, as detailed in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP 1 ), that the DWPF product will comply with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS 2 ). The WAPS must be met before the canistered waste form is accepted by DOE for ultimate disposal at the Federal Repository. The results of these tests will be included in the Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR)

  9. The Development of a Competency Testing Systems: Adopting TAM to Explore User’s Acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Wahyu Saputra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main problems of learning evaluation using paper based-test are inefficient time and cost. Technology can be used as a system to evaluate the learning process. Using technology can save time and cost of implementing learning evaluations. The aims of this study are to create a software product that can be used to evaluate the learning process. This software product is designed to be used by the test organizer or test committee, the teachers and the students (test takers. This software product was developed using Waterfall Model with five stages of development; communication, planning, modeling, construction, and deployment. The testing was conducted by using Blackbox Method and TAM Theory by considering the aspect of usefulness and the aspect ease of use. The analysis was based on the flow of the current test system. The web-based platform enables ease of access for conducting work in various places. According to the result, the Developed Skills Competency Test System is accepted and can be used by the user as an evaluation system.

  10. Perceptions about the acceptability and prevalence of HIV testing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yoliswa Ntsepe

    2014-07-25

    Jul 25, 2014 ... Keywords: HIV Counselling and Testing, perceptions, stigma, discrimination and confidentiality, ..... was very little self-initiated HIV testing in their communities. ..... women seek help much earlier as it a normalized behaviour,.

  11. Tank Monitoring and Control System (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLM, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver devices. The development system will not be talking to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab

  12. Light Duty Utility Arm Software Test Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    This plan describes how validation testing of the software will be implemented for the integrated control and data acquisition system of the Light Duty Utility Arm System (LDUA). The purpose of LDUA software validation testing is to demonstrate and document that the LDUA software meets its software requirements specification

  13. Project B610 process control configuration acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvan, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this test is to verify the Westinghouse configuration of the MICON A/S Distributed Control System for project B610. The following will be verified: (1) proper assignment and operation of all field inputs to and outputs from the MICON Termination panels; (2) proper operation of all display data on the operators' console; (3) proper operation of all required alarms; and (4) proper operation of all required interlocks. This test only verifies the proper operation of the Westinghouse control configuration (or program). It will not be responsible for verifying proper operation of the MICON hardware or operating software. Neither does it test any of the B610 instrument. The MICON hardware and software has been tested as part of the equipment procurement. Instrumentation and wiring installed under project B620 will be tested under a separate functional test. In some cases, precise transmitter ranges, alarm setpoints, and controller tuning parameters are not available at this time. Therefore, approximate values are used during the test. This should not affect the proper operation of the configuration or the validity of this test. Final values will be assigned during operability testing

  14. Tank Monitoring and Control System (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARNES, D.A.

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 12.0 of the TMACS Monitor and Control System (TMACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be communicating to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab.

  15. Tank Monitoring and Control System (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BARNES, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 12.0 of the TMACS Monitor and Control System (TMACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be communicating to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab

  16. Determinants of the Acceptance of Sustainable Production Strategies among Dairy Farmers: Development and Testing of a Modified Technology Acceptance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Naspetti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An extended version of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM was applied by means of Structural Equation Modelling to testing various hypotheses on attitudes and intentions of dairy farmers towards three novel sustainable production strategies, as well as the influence of organic practices and collaborative behaviours, such as information sharing with supply-chain partners. Data on the acceptance of three sustainable production strategies, namely ‘Agro-forestry’, ‘Alternative protein source’, and ‘Prolonged maternal feeding’ were collected by a survey of dairy farmers in six European Union (EU countries (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Italy, United Kingdom. We found that perceived usefulness is the key determinant of acceptance, while the intention to adopt a sustainable production strategy may derive from the influence of opinions (and behaviours of relevant others (e.g., leading dairy farmers, family members, advisors showing the role of interactions among farmers and other stakeholders in the adoption of innovations. Finally, the perceived usefulness of all of the investigated strategies is higher for organic farmers, while collaborative patterns reduce the impact of subjective norm on usefulness and overall acceptance. Our findings should encourage policy makers to consider the important role of supply chain management practices, including collaboration, to enhance the sustainability of dairy farming systems.

  17. Acceptance of genetic testing in a general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Hakonen, A; Hietala, M

    1997-01-01

    in favour of mandatory genetic testing than other respondents. Respondents with university education were more critical towards genetic testing and expressed their worry about eugenics more often than other education groups. In conclusion, there are age, education and gender related differences...

  18. Acceptance test procedure: RMW Land Disposal Facility Project W-025

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roscha, V.

    1994-01-01

    This ATP establishes field testing procedures to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation system functions as intended by design for the Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility. Procedures are outlined for the field testing of the following: electrical heat trace system; transducers and meter/controllers; pumps; leachate storage tank; and building power and lighting

  19. Perceptions about the acceptability and prevalence of HIV testing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV counselling and testing (HCT) is considered important because it is an entry point to a comprehensive continuum of care for HIV/AIDS. The South African Department of Health launched an HCT campaign in April 2010, and this reached 13,269,746 people by June 2011, of which 16% tested HIV positive and 400,000 of ...

  20. Retrofit and acceptance test of 30-cm ion thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeschel, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Six 30 cm mercury thrusters were modified to the J-series design and evaluated using standardized test procedures. The thruster performance meets the design objectives (lifetime objective requires verification), and documentation (drawings, etc.) for the design is completed and upgraded. The retrofit modifications are described and the test data for the modifications are presented and discussed.

  1. Test and acceptance from the AE point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.C.

    1976-01-01

    The power industry has undergone the transition from utilizing construction engineers for startup activities to utilizing test engineers who are responsible for the preparation or execution of a formal test program. This has come about because testing has been given sufficient importance to justify those participating within the industry to establish it as a specialty phase apart from engineering/design and construction. Presently testing is being conducted by those organizations that have either engineered and/or constructed the unit which may be a position of conflict in regards to unbiased test. The tester (third party) concept promotes the repetition, independence, and expertise of a test organization responsible to the utility for certifying that each system has been tested to the design criteria established by others. A move to this concept should result in better generating stations with higher availability because it has been completely tested by an organization with this sole contractual responsibility. The AE, NSSS, and utility would all benefit with possibly no additional costs incurred

  2. Acceptance Test Report for 241-SY Pump Cradle Hydraulic System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koons, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this ATP is to verify that hydraulic system/cylinder procured to replace the cable/winch system on the 101-SY Mitigation Pump cradle assembly fulfills its functional requirements for raising and lowering the cradle assembly between 70 and 90 degrees, both with and without pump. A system design review was performed on the 101-SY Cradle Hydraulic System by the vendor before shipping (See WHC-SD-WM-DRR-045, 241-SY-101 Cradle Hydraulic System Design Review). The scope of this plan focuses on verification of the systems ability to rotate the cradle assembly and any load through the required range of motion

  3. Waste retrieval sluicing system data acquisition system acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevins, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the test procedure for the Project W-320 Tank C-106 Sluicing Data Acquisition System (W-320 DAS). The Software Test portion will test items identified in the WRSS DAS System Description (SD), HNF-2115. Traceability to HNF-2115 will be via a reference that follows in parenthesis, after the test section title. The Field Test portion will test sensor operability, analog to digital conversion, and alarm setpoints for field instrumentation. The W-320 DAS supplies data to assist thermal modeling of tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. It is designed to be a central repository for information from sources that would otherwise have to be read, recorded, and integrated manually. Thus, completion of the DAS requires communication with several different data collection devices and output to a usable PC data formats. This test procedure will demonstrate that the DAS functions as required by the project requirements stated in Section 3 of the W-320 DAS System Description, HNF-2115

  4. DEEP VADOSE ZONE TREATABILITY TEST PLAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronister, G.B.; Truex, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    (sm b ullet) Treatability test plan published in 2008 (sm b ullet) Outlines technology treatability activities for evaluating application of in situ technologies and surface barriers to deep vadose zone contamination (technetium and uranium) (sm b ullet) Key elements - Desiccation testing - Testing of gas-delivered reactants for in situ treatment of uranium - Evaluating surface barrier application to deep vadose zone - Evaluating in situ grouting and soil flushing

  5. Tank Monitoring and Control System (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WANDLING, R.R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 11.2 of the TMACS Monitor and Control System (TMCACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be talking to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab

  6. Review of the Factory Acceptance Tests and Cold Tests of the W7-X Superconducting Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehmler, H.; Baldzuhn, J.; Genini, L.

    2006-01-01

    The W7-X magnet system consists of 50 non-planar coils of five different types and 20 planar coils of two different types. Factory acceptance tests of the non-planar coils are carried out at the manufacturer site of Babcock-Noell, Germany, and for the planar coils at Tesla Engineering, UK. They consist of electrical insulation checks, mass flow measurements and leak tests. In the test facility of CEA Saclay, France, each coil is cooled down to ∼ 6 K and operated at nominal current. At least one coil of each type is quenched by increasing the inlet temperature. The characteristic parameters of the quench tests (temperature, pressure, speed of normal-conducting zone, etc.) will be presented. Coils of the same type show a uniform behavior. The occurrences of leaks during cool-down on planar coils revealed quality problems with aluminum welds and stress corrosion of stainless steel tubes at the soldered connections with copper heat sinks. AC tests (impulse and impedance tests) were applied to detect short circuits during the fabrication of the winding packs. High voltage DC tests under vacuum and low gas pressure (Paschen-minimum conditions) revealed electrical insulation defects, which had not been found using standard high-voltage tests. These were mainly due to voids and cavities present in the winding pack after vacuum impregnation, insufficient glass-epoxy wrapped insulation and inappropriate design of the Kapton insulated quench detection cables. The mass flow measurements of the superconductor showed that the deviation between individual double layers of the coils is within acceptable limits. Two winding packs were given up by the supplier because of a superconductor blockage with resin and a short circuited winding, respectively. All other quality issues could be resolved by repair or changes in the components. The coil instrumentation with temperature sensors seems to be adequate. The strain gauges need improvements in temperature compensation and gluing

  7. MAC mini acceptance test procedure, software Version 3.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, V.K.

    1994-01-01

    The K Basins Materials Accounting (MAC) programs had some major improvements made to it to organize the main-tables by Location, Canister, and Material. This ATP describes how the code was to be tested to verify its correctness

  8. willingness to accept hiv testing among caretakers with a child

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    Results: All the 241 caretakers approached to participate agreed to take ... interviewed were female and only 15 were male.233 out .... Workplace HIV Counselling and Testing: A Cluster- ... Francis Bajunirwe and Michael Muzoora, Barriers to.

  9. Acceptability of self-collected vaginal samples for HPV testing in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the acceptability of self-collected vaginal samples for HPV testing in women living in rural and urban areas of ... Conclusion: Acceptability of self-sampling for HPV testing was similarly excellent in both groups despite their difference in terms ... cancer is the leading cause of death caused by cancer in.

  10. Acceptance testing of Siemens e.cam SPECT system at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosu, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    Acceptance testing has been performed on the Siemens e.cam Signature Series (Single Head) Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) system; the first of its kind, at the Nuclear Medicine Department, Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra. The various tests were performed according to NEMA NU 1 (2001) specifications as far as possible. The most important parameters that characterized the performance of the camera, gantry system, patient bed, collimators, computer system and fundamental software were evaluated based on visual inspection techniques. Various measuring instruments, different kinds of phantoms, point and flood sources containing 99m-Tc were also used for quantitative studies. Tests performed were divided into Physical inspection, intrinsic measurements (without collimator), extrinsic measurements (with collimator) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) system measurement. Some results obtained were better than factory specifications, others were within specifications. Other results obtained from this study which did not have factory specifications for comparison can serve as baseline for future measurements and quality control. Although not all the tests originally planned for could be done due to the non-availability of certain phantoms and radionuclide, it had been possible to perform sufficient and relevant tests to ensure that the system had no serious problems and that it can be used for clinical nuclear medicine imaging. (au)

  11. Acceptance Test Procedure: SY101 air pallet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koons, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this test procedure is to verify that the system(s) procured to load the SY-101 Mitigation Test Pump package fulfills its functional requirements. It will also help determine the man dose expected due to handling of the package during the actual event. The scope of this procedure focuses on the ability of the air pallets and container saddles to carry the container package from the new 100 foot concrete pad into 2403-WD where it will be stored awaiting final disposition. This test attempts to simulate the actual event of depositing the SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test pump into the 2403-WD building. However, at the time of testing road modifications required to drive the 100 ton trailer into CWC were not performed. Therefore a flatbed trailer will be use to transport the container to CWC. The time required to off load the container from the 100 ton trailer will be recorded for man dose evaluation on location. The cranes used for this test will also be different than the actual event. This is not considered to be an issue due to minimal effects on man dose

  12. Surface stability test plan for protective barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of buried waste have been identified as integral components of a plan to isolate a number of Hanford defense waste sites. Standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance will mandate a barrier surface layer that is resistant to the eolian erosion processes of wind erosion (deflation) and windborne particle deposition (formation of sand dunes). Thus, experiments are needed to measure rates of eolian erosion processes impacting those surfaces under different surface and climatological conditions. Data from these studies will provide information for use in the evaluation of selected surface layers as a means of providing stable cover over waste sites throughout the design life span of protective barriers. The multi-year test plan described in this plan is directed at understanding processes of wind erosion and windborne particle deposition, providing measurements of erosion rates for models, and suggesting construction materials and methods for reducing the effect of long-term eolian erosion on the barrier. Specifically, this plan describes possible methods to measure rates of eolian erosion, including field and laboratory procedure. Advantages and disadvantages of laboratory (wind tunnel) tests are discussed, and continued wind tunnel tests are recommended for wind erosion studies. A comparison between field and wind tunnel erosive forces is discussed. Plans for testing surfaces are described. Guidance is also presented for studying the processes controlling sand dune and blowout formation. 24 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Acceptance Test Report for the 241-AZ-101 Ultrasonic Interface Level Analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDREWS, J.E.

    2000-01-27

    This document comprises the Acceptance Test Report for the 241-AZ-101 Ultrasonic Interface Level Analyzer. This document presents the results of Acceptance Testing of the 241-AZ-101 Ultrasonic Interface Level Analyzers (URSILLAs). Testing of the URSILLAs was performed in accordance with ATP-260-001, ''URSILLA Pre-installation Acceptance Test Procedure''. The objective of the testing was to verify that all equipment and components function in accordance with design specifications and original equipment manufacturer's specifications.

  14. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid designed as ''L''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the shop

  15. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''P''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''P''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  16. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid designed as ''N''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the shop

  17. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''W''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  18. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control. (PIC) skid designed as ''V''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  19. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''V''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designated as ''V''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  20. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''Q''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''Q''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  1. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''T''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designated as ''T''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  2. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing Of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''T''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  3. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''R''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  4. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''U''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''U''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop

  5. Acceptance test report for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver Gamma Detector System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Report is for the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver Gamma Detector System. This test verified that the data logger and data converter for the gamma detector system functions as intended

  6. Parallel hole collimator acceptance tests for SPECT and planar studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babicheva, R.R.; Bennie, D.N.; Collins, L.T.; Gruenwald, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Different kinds of collimator damage can occur either during shipping or from regular use. Imperfections of construction along the strips or their connections give rise to nonperpendicular hole alignments to the crystal face and can produce potential problems such as ring artifacts and image degradation. Gamma camera collimator hole alignments and integrity were compared in four parallel hole high resolution collimators-two new cast and two used foil collimators, one with damage to the protective surface. [1] The point source flood image of the defective collimator was non-circular as were the images of cast collimators. The image of new foil collimator was circular. [2] High count sheet flood did not show any imperfections. [3] Bone mineral densitometer was used to perform collimated X-ray beam. The collimator was placed on the scanning bed with an X-ray cassette placed directly above it. The damaged area was well demonstrated. [4] The COR offset test was taken at two extreme radii. The offset value with the defective collimator is increased by 0.53 pixel or 129% with increase of COR from radius 14 cm to 28cm. [5] The collimator hole alignment test involves performing multiple measurements of COR along the length of the collimator, and checking for variations in COR with both position of source and angle of rotation. The maximum variation in COR of the defective collimator hole alignment was 1.13 mm. Collimators require testing when new and at regular intervals, or following damage. The point source test can be used for foil collimators. The most sensitive tests were collimated X-ray source, COR offset test and collimator hole alignment

  7. Community acceptability of use of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria by community health workers in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waiswa Peter

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many malarious countries plan to introduce artemisinin combination therapy (ACT at community level using community health workers (CHWs for treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Use of ACT with reliance on presumptive diagnosis may lead to excessive use, increased costs and rise of drug resistance. Use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs could address these challenges but only if the communities will accept their use by CHWs. This study assessed community acceptability of the use of RDTs by Ugandan CHWs, locally referred to as community medicine distributors (CMDs. Methods The study was conducted in Iganga district using 10 focus group discussions (FGDs with CMDs and caregivers of children under five years, and 10 key informant interviews (KIIs with health workers and community leaders. Pre-designed FGD and KII guides were used to collect data. Manifest content analysis was used to explore issues of trust and confidence in CMDs, stigma associated with drawing blood from children, community willingness for CMDs to use RDTs, and challenges anticipated to be faced by the CMDs. Results CMDs are trusted by their communities because of their commitment to voluntary service, access, and the perceived effectiveness of anti-malarial drugs they provide. Some community members expressed fear that the blood collected could be used for HIV testing, the procedure could infect children with HIV, and the blood samples could be used for witchcraft. Education level of CMDs is important in their acceptability by the community, who welcome the use of RDTs given that the CMDs are trained and supported. Anticipated challenges for CMDs included transport for patient follow-up and picking supplies, adults demanding to be tested, and caregivers insisting their children be treated instead of being referred. Conclusion Use of RDTs by CMDs is likely to be acceptable by community members given that CMDs are properly trained, and receive regular technical

  8. Provider initiated HIV testing and counseling, acceptance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    2007-11-29

    Nov 29, 2007 ... Methods: A facility-based cross-sectional quantitative survey was taken from December 1, 2010 to January 10, 2011 among 414 clients coming .... Debre Berhan Referral Hospital has implemented routine. HIV testing for all out .... (died of) HIV and thinking that they can get the virus showed no association ...

  9. A Muffler Design for Tank Cannon Acceptance Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    designed a muffler to reduce the noise associated with proofing. This muffler is ;maller and lighter than the mufi ±rs tested by CSTA. Figure 1 shows...1 Old Dominion University Mathematics Department ATITN: Dr. Charlie Cooke Norfolk, VA 23508 Aberdeen Proving Ground 2 Dir, USAMSAA ATIN: AMXSY-D, Mr

  10. 10 CFR 36.41 - Construction monitoring and acceptance testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... system will operate properly if offsite power is lost and shall verify that the computer has security... system to assure that the requirements in § 36.35 are met for protection of the source rack and the... protection. For panoramic irradiators, the licensee shall test the ability of the heat and smoke detectors to...

  11. MAC mini acceptance test procedures, software Version 3.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, V.K.

    1994-01-01

    The K Basins Materials Accounting (MAC) programs had some improvements made to it to to change slightly the access authorized users had to the modification of critical data. This ATP describes how the code was to be tested to verify its correctness

  12. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation test pump-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, A.K.; Kolowith, R.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides the results of the run-in test of the replacement mixer pump for the Tank 241-SY-101. The test was conducted at the 400 Area MASF facility between August 12 and September 29, 1994. The report includes findings, analysis, recommendations, and corrective actions taken

  13. 305 Building Cold Test Facility Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehurst, R.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides direction for the conduct of business in Building 305 for cold testing tools and equipment. The Cold Test Facility represents a small portion of the overall building, and as such, the work instructions already implemented in the 305 Building will be utilized. Specific to the Cold Test there are three phases for the tools and equipment as follows: 1. Development and feature tests of sludge/fuel characterization equipment, fuel containerization equipment, and sludge containerization equipment to be used in K-Basin. 2. Functional and acceptance tests of all like equipment to be installed and operated in K-Basin. 3. Training and qualification of K-Basin Operators on equipment to be installed and operated in the Basin

  14. Phased Startup Initiative Phases 3 and 4 Test Plan and Test Specification (OCRWM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    Construction for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities is continuing per the Level III Baseline Schedule, and installation of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) and Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) in K West Basin is now complete. In order to accelerate the project, a phased start up strategy to initiate testing of the FRS and IWTS early in the overall project schedule was proposed (Williams 1999). Wilkinson (1999) expands the definition of the original proposal into four functional testing phases of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). Phases 1 and 2 are based on performing functional tests using dummy fuel. These tests are described in separate planning documents. This test plan provides overall guidance for Phase 3 and 4 tests, which are performed using actual irradiated N fuel assemblies. The overall objective of the Phase 3 and 4 testing is to verify how the FRS and IWTS respond while processing actual fuel. Conducting these tests early in the project schedule will allow identification and resolution of equipment and process problems before they become activities on the start-up critical path. The specific objectives of this test plan are to: (1) Define the test scope for the FRS and IWTS; (2) Provide detailed test requirements that can be used to write the specific test procedures; (3) Define data required and measurements to be taken. Where existing methods to obtain these do not exist, enough detail will be provided to define required additional equipment; and (4) Define specific test objectives and acceptance criteria

  15. The Northern Regional Programme for the acceptance testing of X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Harrison, R.M.; Kotre, C.J.; Smith, S.; Davies, M.; Barker, P.

    1989-01-01

    Since 1984 the Regional Medical Physics Department has participated in a regional acceptance testing programme for all X-ray equipment from mobile units to computed tomography scanners. The organizational and radiation physics aspects of the programme are described. Three levels of tests are performed by physicists: the first on installation, the second after 3 months, and the final visit just prior to the end of the manufacturer's warranty. The second test is only performed if any aspect of performance requires rechecking as a result of the first visit. Acceptance test protocols are based on those published by the Institute of Physical Sciences in Medicine. Details of the limiting values for the acceptance test measurements are given. The results of the programme are discussed. In some instances the testing has resulted in modifications to the design and construction of X-ray equipment. Acceptance testing is important in determining a baseline standard of performance against which routine quality assurance may be assessed. (author)

  16. The Northern regional programme for the acceptance testing of X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Harrison, R.M.; Kotre, C.J.; Smith, S.; Davies, M.; Barker, P.

    1989-01-01

    Since 1984 the UK Northern Regional Medical Physics Department has participated in a regional acceptance testing programme for all X-ray equipment from mobile units to computed tomography scanners. Organizational and radiation physics aspects of the programme are described. Three levels of tests are performed by physicists: the first on installation, the second after 3 months, the final visit just prior to the end of the manufacturers warranty. The second test is only performed if any aspect of performance requires rechecking as a result of the first. Acceptance test protocols are based on those published by the Institute of Physical Sciences in Medicine. Details limiting values for the acceptance test measurements are given. In some instances testing has resulted in modifications to the design and construction of X-ray equipment. Acceptance testing is important in determining a baseline standard of performance against which routine quality assurance may be assessed. (author)

  17. Solar panel acceptance testing using a pulsed solar simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    Utilizing specific parameters as area of an individual cell, number in series and parallel, and established coefficient of current and voltage temperature dependence, a solar array irradiated with one solar constant at AMO and at ambient temperature can be characterized by a current-voltage curve for different intensities, temperatures, and even different configurations. Calibration techniques include: uniformity in area, depth and time, absolute and transfer irradiance standards, dynamic and functional check out procedures. Typical data are given for individual cell (2x2 cm) to complete flat solar array (5x5 feet) with 2660 cells and on cylindrical test items with up to 10,000 cells. The time and energy saving of such testing techniques are emphasized.

  18. Nurses' perceptions, acceptance, and use of a novel in-room pediatric ICU technology: testing an expanded technology acceptance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Richard J; Asan, Onur; Wozniak, Erica M; Flynn, Kathryn E; Scanlon, Matthew C

    2016-11-15

    The value of health information technology (IT) ultimately depends on end users accepting and appropriately using it for patient care. This study examined pediatric intensive care unit nurses' perceptions, acceptance, and use of a novel health IT, the Large Customizable Interactive Monitor. An expanded technology acceptance model was tested by applying stepwise linear regression to data from a standardized survey of 167 nurses. Nurses reported low-moderate ratings of the novel IT's ease of use and low to very low ratings of usefulness, social influence, and training. Perceived ease of use, usefulness for patient/family involvement, and usefulness for care delivery were associated with system satisfaction (R 2  = 70%). Perceived usefulness for care delivery and patient/family social influence were associated with intention to use the system (R 2  = 65%). Satisfaction and intention were associated with actual system use (R 2  = 51%). The findings have implications for research, design, implementation, and policies for nursing informatics, particularly novel nursing IT. Several changes are recommended to improve the design and implementation of the studied IT.

  19. Would you test for 5000 Shillings? HIV risk and willingness to accept HIV testing in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Jan; Brown, Derek S; Mühlbacher, Axel; Njau, Bernard; Thielman, Nathan

    2015-12-01

    Despite substantial public health efforts to increase HIV testing, testing rates have plateaued in many countries and rates of repeat testing for those with ongoing risk are low. To inform policies aimed at increasing uptake of HIV testing, we identified characteristics associated with individuals' willingness-to-accept (WTA) an HIV test in a general population sample and among two high-risk populations in Moshi, Tanzania. In total, 721 individuals, including randomly selected community members (N = 402), female barworkers (N = 135), and male Kilimanjaro mountain porters (N = 184), were asked in a double-bounded contingent valuation format if they would test for HIV in exchange for 2000, 5000 or 10,000 Shillings (approximately $1.30, $3.20, and $6.40, respectively). The study was conducted between September 2012 and February 2013. More than one quarter of participants (196; 27 %) stated they would be willing to test for Tanzania Shilling (TSH) 2000, whereas one in seven (98; 13.6 %) required more than TSH 10,000. The average WTA estimate was TSH 4564 (95 % Confidence Interval: TSH 4201 to 4927). Significant variation in WTA estimates by gender, HIV risk factors and other characteristics plausibly reflects variation in individuals' valuations of benefits of and barriers to testing. WTA estimates were higher among males than females. Among males, WTA was nearly one-third lower for those who reported symptoms of HIV than those who did not. Among females, WTA estimates varied with respondents' education, own and partners' HIV testing history, and lifetime reports of transactional sex. For both genders, the most significant association was observed with respondents' perception of the accuracy of the HIV test; those believing HIV tests to be completely accurate were willing to test for approximately one third less than their counterparts. The mean WTA estimates identified in this study suggest that within the study population, incentivized universal HIV

  20. Test plan for spent fuel cladding containment credit tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1983-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has chosen Westinghouse Hanford Company as a subcontractor to assist them in determining the requirements for successful disposal of spent fuel rods in the proposed Nevada Test Site repository. An initial scoping test, with the objective of determining whether or not the cladding of a breached fuel rod can be given any credit as an effective barrier to radionuclide release, is described in this test plan. 8 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  1. MBA acceptance test procedures, software Version 1.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullaney, J.E.; Russell, V.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Mass Balance Program (MBA) is an adjunct to the Materials Accounting database system, Version 3.4. MBA was written to equip the personnel performing K-Basin encapsulation tasks with a conservative estimate of accumulated sludge during the processing of canisters into and out of the chute. The K Basins Materials Balance programs had some minor improvements made to it to feedback the chute processing status to the operator better. This ATP describes how the code was to be tested to verify its correctness

  2. SU-E-P-46: Clinical Acceptance Testing and Implementation of a Portable CT Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFrance, M; Marsh, S; Hicks, R; O’Donnell-Moran, G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Planning for the first installation in New England of a new portable CT unit to be used in the Operating Room required the integration of many departments including Surgery, Neurosurgery, Information Services, Clinical Engineering, Radiology and Medical Physics/Radiation Safety. Acceptance testing and the quality assurance procedures were designed to optimize image quality and patient and personnel radiation exposure. Methods: The vendor’s protocols were tested using the CT Dosimetry phantoms. The system displayed the CTDIw instead of the CTDIvol while testing the unit. Radiation exposure was compared to existing CT scanners from installed CT units throughout the facility. Brainlab measures all 4 periphery slots on the CT Dosimetry phantom. The ACR measures only the superior slot for the periphery measurement. A comprehensive radiation survey was also performed for several locations. Results: The CTDIvol measurements were comparable for the following studies: brain, C-Spine, and sinuses. However, the mobile CT measurements were slightly higher than other CT units but within acceptable tolerance if measured using the ACR method.Based on scatter measurements, it was determined if any personnel were to stay in the OR Suite during image acquisition that the appropriate lead apron and thyroid shields had to be worn.In addition, to reduce unnecessary scatter, there were two mobile 6 foot wide shields (1/16″ lead equivalent) available to protect personnel in the room and adjacent areas. Conclusion: Intraoperative CT provides the physician new opportunities for evaluation of the progression of surgical resections and device placement at the cost of increasing the amount of trained personnel required to perform this procedure. It also brings with it challenges to keep the radiation exposure to the patients and staff within reasonable limits

  3. SU-E-P-46: Clinical Acceptance Testing and Implementation of a Portable CT Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFrance, M; Marsh, S; Hicks, R; O’Donnell-Moran, G [Baystate Health Systems, Inc., Springfield, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Planning for the first installation in New England of a new portable CT unit to be used in the Operating Room required the integration of many departments including Surgery, Neurosurgery, Information Services, Clinical Engineering, Radiology and Medical Physics/Radiation Safety. Acceptance testing and the quality assurance procedures were designed to optimize image quality and patient and personnel radiation exposure. Methods: The vendor’s protocols were tested using the CT Dosimetry phantoms. The system displayed the CTDIw instead of the CTDIvol while testing the unit. Radiation exposure was compared to existing CT scanners from installed CT units throughout the facility. Brainlab measures all 4 periphery slots on the CT Dosimetry phantom. The ACR measures only the superior slot for the periphery measurement. A comprehensive radiation survey was also performed for several locations. Results: The CTDIvol measurements were comparable for the following studies: brain, C-Spine, and sinuses. However, the mobile CT measurements were slightly higher than other CT units but within acceptable tolerance if measured using the ACR method.Based on scatter measurements, it was determined if any personnel were to stay in the OR Suite during image acquisition that the appropriate lead apron and thyroid shields had to be worn.In addition, to reduce unnecessary scatter, there were two mobile 6 foot wide shields (1/16″ lead equivalent) available to protect personnel in the room and adjacent areas. Conclusion: Intraoperative CT provides the physician new opportunities for evaluation of the progression of surgical resections and device placement at the cost of increasing the amount of trained personnel required to perform this procedure. It also brings with it challenges to keep the radiation exposure to the patients and staff within reasonable limits.

  4. WRAP low level waste restricted waste management (LLW RWM) glovebox acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leist, K.J.

    1997-01-01

    On April 22, 1997, the Low Level Waste Restricted Waste Management (LLW RWM) glovebox was tested using acceptance test procedure 13027A-87. Mr. Robert L. Warmenhoven served as test director, Mr. Kendrick Leist acted as test operator and test witness, and Michael Lane provided miscellaneous software support. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine glovebox control system interlocks, operator Interface Unit (OIU) menus, alarms, and messages. Basic drum port and lift table control sequences were demonstrated. OIU menus, messages, and alarm sequences were examined, with few exceptions noted. Barcode testing was bypassed, due to the lack of installed equipment as well as the switch from basic reliance on fixed bar code readers to the enhanced use of portable bar code readers. Bar code testing was completed during performance of the LLW RWM OTP. Mechanical and control deficiencies were documented as Test Exceptions during performance of this Acceptance Test. These items are attached as Appendix A to this report

  5. The role of traditional organization on family planning acceptance in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancok, D

    1991-01-01

    The nature of and the reasons for the decline in Indonesian fertility and the utilization of the village traditional organization, banjar, in the family planning (FP) program are discussed. The total fertility rate computed from census data shows a decline in fertility from 5.6 in the mid-1960s to 4.1 for 1981-1984, a 28% decline in 15 years. A further 23% decline evidenced in the Contraceptive Prevalence Survey appeared as 4.3 children reproductive woman in 1981-83 and 3.3 between 1984-87. The success of the FP program in contributing a major impact on the decline is attributed to a strong political commitment to antinatalist policy which meant increased allocation to FP when government income was declining, effective organizational structure, and effective strategies such as the mobilization of traditional village organizations. The impact of FP can also be seen in the increase in the number of family acceptors. Another source of the fertility decline is due to the impact of development. 1) Improvement in education has contributed to fertility decline in the increase in the number graduating from elementary and secondary school, the increased value of children, the acceptance of new ideas, the postponement of marriage, and the increase in the never-married group. 2) The decline in the infant mortality rate from 142 in 1971 to 70.2/1000 births in 1982-87 due to the improvement in health facilities and service also contributed to fertility decline. 3) The growth in the number of women participating in the nonagricultural labor force has also contributed to fertility decline. To what extent each has contributed to the decline has not been empirically tested. Molyneaux' study is cited for demonstrating that both socioeconomic variables and contraceptive use, which are affected by socioeconomic variables and family planning, have influenced the fertility decline. Households with electricity, children engaged in the labor force, and frequency of mobile medical team

  6. Project B610 process control configuration acceptance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvan, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this test is to verify the Westinghouse configuration of the MICON A/S Distributed Control System for project B610. The following will be verified: proper assignment and operation of all field inputs to and outputs from the MICON Termination panels; proper operation of all display data on the operator's console; proper operation of all required alarms; and proper operation of all required interlocks. The MICON A/S control system is configured to replace all the control, indication, and alarm panels now located in the Power Control Room. Nine systems are covered by this control configuration, 2736-ZB HVAC, 234-5Z HVAC, Process Vacuum, Dry Air, 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling, Building Accelerometer, Evacuation Siren, Stack CAMs, and Fire. The 2736-ZB HVAC system consists of the ventilation controls for 2736-ZB and 2736-Z as well as alarms for the emergency generators and 232-Z. The 234-5Z HVAC system is the ventilation controls for 235-5Z and 236-Z buildings. Process Vacuum covers the controls for the 26 inch vacuum system. Dry Air covers the controls for the steam and electric air dryers. The 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling system consists of the status indications and alarms for the 291-Z compressor and vacuum pump closed loop cooling system. The rest of closed loop cooling was tested earlier. The Building Accelerometer system consists of the status indications for the two seismic system accelerometers. The Evacuation Siren system includes the controls for the evacuation and take cover sirens. Stack CAMs cover the alarms for the various building ventilation stack continuous air monitors. Finally, the Fire system covers the various fire alarms now located in Room 321-A

  7. Gallium-cladding compatibility testing plan. Phases 1 and 2: Test plan for gallium corrosion tests. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.F.; Morris, R.N.

    1998-05-01

    This test plan is a Level-2 document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water-Reactor Mixed-Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. The plan summarizes and updates the projected Phases 1 and 2 Gallium-Cladding compatibility corrosion testing and the following post-test examination. This work will characterize the reactions and changes, if any, in mechanical properties that occur between Zircaloy clad and gallium or gallium oxide in the temperature range 30--700 C

  8. Acceptance test report for the Tank 241-C-106 in-tank imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, L.T.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the results of Acceptance Testing of the 241-C-106 in-tank video camera imaging system. The purpose of this imaging system is to monitor the Project W-320 sluicing of Tank 241-C-106. The objective of acceptance testing of the 241-C-106 video camera system was to verify that all equipment and components function in accordance with procurement specification requirements and original equipment manufacturer's (OEM) specifications. This document reports the results of the testing

  9. Alternatives to animal testing: research, trends, validation, regulatory acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Current trends and issues in the development of alternatives to the use of animals in biomedical experimentation are discussed in this position paper. Eight topics are considered and include refinement of acute toxicity assays; eye corrosion/irritation alternatives; skin corrosion/irritation alternatives; contact sensitization alternatives; developmental/reproductive testing alternatives; genetic engineering (transgenic) assays; toxicogenomics; and validation of alternative methods. The discussion of refinement of acute toxicity assays is focused primarily on developments with regard to reduction of the number of animals used in the LD(50) assay. However, the substitution of humane endpoints such as clinical signs of toxicity for lethality in these assays is also evaluated. Alternative assays for eye corrosion/irritation as well as those for skin corrosion/irritation are described with particular attention paid to the outcomes, both successful and unsuccessful, of several validation efforts. Alternative assays for contact sensitization and developmental/reproductive toxicity are presented as examples of methods designed for the examination of interactions between toxins and somewhat more complex physiological systems. Moreover, genetic engineering and toxicogenomics are discussed with an eye toward the future of biological experimentation in general. The implications of gene manipulation for research animals, specifically, are also examined. Finally, validation methods are investigated as to their effectiveness, or lack thereof, and suggestions for their standardization and improvement, as well as implementation are reviewed.

  10. Integrated development and testing plan for the plutonium immobilization project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, T.

    1998-01-01

    This integrated plan for the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) describes the technology development and major project activities necessary to support the deployment of the immobilization approach for disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium. The plan describes details of the development and testing (D and T) tasks needed to provide technical data for design and operation of a plutonium immobilization plant based on the ceramic can-in-canister technology (''Immobilization Fissile Material Disposition Program Final Immobilization Form Assessment and Recommendation'', UCRL-ID-128705, October 3, 1997). The plan also presents tasks for characterization and performance testing of the immobilization form to support a repository licensing application and to develop the basis for repository acceptance of the plutonium form. Essential elements of the plant project (design, construction, facility activation, etc.) are described, but not developed in detail, to indicate how the D and T results tie into the overall plant project. Given the importance of repository acceptance, specific activities to be conducted by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) to incorporate the plutonium form in the repository licensing application are provided in this document, together with a summary of how immobilization D and T activities provide input to the license activity. The ultimate goal of the Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize from about 18 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons usable plutonium materials in a manner that meets the ''spent fuel'' standard (Fissile Materials Storage and Disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, ''Storage and Disposition Final PEIS'', issued January 14, 1997, 62 Federal Register 3014) and is acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. In the can-in-canister technology, this is accomplished by encapsulating the

  11. Tests to Help Plan Opportunity Moves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Rover engineers check how a test rover moves in material chosen to simulate some difficult Mars driving conditions. The scene is inside the In-Situ Instrument Laboratory at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. These tests in early May 2005 were designed to help plan the best way for the rover Opportunity to drive off of a soft-sand dune that the rover dug itself into the previous week. The mixture of sandy and powdery material brought in for these specific tests matched the way the soil underneath Opportunity caked onto wheels, filling the spaces between the cleats on the wheels.

  12. 46 CFR 159.007-5 - Production inspections and tests: Application for acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... acceptance. 159.007-5 Section 159.007-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL APPROVAL OF EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS...) Is accepted by the Commandant for approval inspections and tests of the equipment or material under...

  13. Acceptance Test Report for the high pressure water jet system canister cleaning fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdin, J.R.

    1995-10-25

    This Acceptance Test confirmed the test results and recommendations, documented in WHC-SD-SNF-DTR-001, Rev. 0 Development Test Report for the High Pressure Water Jet System Nozzles, for decontaminating empty fuel canisters in KE-Basin. Optimum water pressure, water flow rate, nozzle size and overall configuration were tested

  14. Acceptability of routine offer of HIV testing (opt-out approach) among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: With the introduction of the opt out HIV testing policy in Ghana, the HIV test is offered routinely to all pregnant women unless they decline testing. Objective: To assess acceptability of the routine offer of HIV testing antenatal clinic (ANC) clients in the Wa municipality, Ghana. Design: Cross-sectional study of 270 ...

  15. 242-A MCS Logic Acceptance Test Report for Year 2000 Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TEATS, M.C.

    1999-01-01

    242-A Evaporator distributive control system upgrade to D/3 version 9.0-2 for year 2000 compliance. Testing was performed per test procedure HNF-3568. There were no unresolved exceptions. The system responded correctly to all testing and meets the requirements to operate the 242-A This report documents the acceptance test results for the Evaporator facility

  16. Acceptance Test Report for the high pressure water jet system canister cleaning fixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdin, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    This Acceptance Test confirmed the test results and recommendations, documented in WHC-SD-SNF-DTR-001, Rev. 0 Development Test Report for the High Pressure Water Jet System Nozzles, for decontaminating empty fuel canisters in KE-Basin. Optimum water pressure, water flow rate, nozzle size and overall configuration were tested

  17. Geochemical Testing And Model Development - Residual Tank Waste Test Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, K.J.; Connelly, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

  18. Understanding patient acceptance and refusal of HIV testing in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopoulos Katerina A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Despite high rates of patient satisfaction with emergency department (ED HIV testing, acceptance varies widely. It is thought that patients who decline may be at higher risk for HIV infection, thus we sought to better understand patient acceptance and refusal of ED HIV testing. Methods In-depth interviews with fifty ED patients (28 accepters and 22 decliners of HIV testing in three ED HIV testing programs that serve vulnerable urban populations in northern California. Results Many factors influenced the decision to accept ED HIV testing, including curiosity, reassurance of negative status, convenience, and opportunity. Similarly, a number of factors influenced the decision to decline HIV testing, including having been tested recently, the perception of being at low risk for HIV infection due to monogamy, abstinence or condom use, and wanting to focus on the medical reason for the ED visit. Both accepters and decliners viewed ED HIV testing favorably and nearly all participants felt comfortable with the testing experience, including the absence of counseling. While many participants who declined an ED HIV test had logical reasons, some participants also made clear that they would prefer not to know their HIV status rather than face psychosocial consequences such as loss of trust in a relationship or disclosure of status in hospital or public health records. Conclusions Testing for HIV in the ED as for any other health problem reduces barriers to testing for some but not all patients. Patients who decline ED HIV testing may have rational reasons, but there are some patients who avoid HIV testing because of psychosocial ramifications. While ED HIV testing is generally acceptable, more targeted approaches to testing are necessary for this subgroup.

  19. Integrated Test and Evaluation Flight Test 3 Flight Test Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Michael Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The desire and ability to fly Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) is of increasing urgency. The application of unmanned aircraft to perform national security, defense, scientific, and emergency management are driving the critical need for less restrictive access by UAS to the NAS. UAS represent a new capability that will provide a variety of services in the government (public) and commercial (civil) aviation sectors. The growth of this potential industry has not yet been realized due to the lack of a common understanding of what is required to safely operate UAS in the NAS. NASA's UAS Integration into the NAS Project is conducting research in the areas of Separation Assurance/Sense and Avoid Interoperability, Human Systems Integration (HSI), and Communication to support reducing the barriers of UAS access to the NAS. This research is broken into two research themes namely, UAS Integration and Test Infrastructure. UAS Integration focuses on airspace integration procedures and performance standards to enable UAS integration in the air transportation system, covering Sense and Avoid (SAA) performance standards, command and control performance standards, and human systems integration. The focus of Test Infrastructure is to enable development and validation of airspace integration procedures and performance standards, including the integrated test and evaluation. In support of the integrated test and evaluation efforts, the Project will develop an adaptable, scalable, and schedulable relevant test environment capable of evaluating concepts and technologies for unmanned aircraft systems to safely operate in the NAS. To accomplish this task, the Project will conduct a series of Human-in-the-Loop and Flight Test activities that integrate key concepts, technologies and/or procedures in a relevant air traffic environment. Each of the integrated events will build on the technical achievements, fidelity and complexity of the previous tests and

  20. 26. willingness to accept hiv testing among caretakers with a child

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    women and 11% of men have ever been tested for HIV. With all these efforts in place the .... important strategy in determining the gap in knowledge and its relationship with ... salary, education, and religion to be associated with accepting VCT ...

  1. Acceptance/Operational Test Report for Tank 241-AN-104 camera and camera purge control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castleberry, J.L.

    1995-11-01

    This Acceptance/Operational Test Procedure (ATP/OTP) will document the satisfactory operation of the camera purge panel, purge control panel, color camera system and associated control components destined for installation. The final acceptance of the complete system will be performed in the field. The purge panel and purge control panel will be tested for its safety interlock which shuts down the camera and pan-and-tilt inside the tank vapor space during loss of purge pressure and that the correct purge volume exchanges are performed as required by NFPA 496. This procedure is separated into seven sections. This Acceptance/Operational Test Report documents the successful acceptance and operability testing of the 241-AN-104 camera system and camera purge control system

  2. Void fraction instrument software, Version 1,2, Acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimera, M.

    1995-01-01

    This provides the report for the void fraction instrument acceptance test software Version 1.2. The void fraction will collect data that will be used to calculate the quantity of gas trapped in waste tanks

  3. Establishment of a radiotherapy service with a linear accelerator (photons): acceptance tests, dosimetry and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdaky, Mafalda Feliciano

    2000-01-01

    This work presents the operational part of the final process of the establishment of a radiotherapy service with a linear accelerator (6 MeV photon beams), including the acceptance tests, commissioning tests and the implementation of a quality control program through routine mechanical and radiation tests. All acceptance tests were satisfactory, showing results below the allowed limits of the manufacturer, the commissioning tests presented results within those of the international recommendations. The quality control program was performed during 34 months and showed an excellent stability of this accelerator. (author)

  4. Test plan for ISV laboratory-pyrolysis testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAtee, R.E.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the laboratory-pyrolysis studies is to obtain information on the high temperature (< 1200{degree}C) degradation and alteration of organic chemicals and materials similar to those found in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Pit 9. This test plan describes experimental procedures, sampling and analysis strategy, sampling procedures, sample control, and document management. It addresses safety issues in the experimental apparatus and procedures, personal training, and hazardous waste disposal. Finally, it describes the data quality objectives using the EPA tiered approach to treatability studies to define where research/scoping tests fit into these studies and the EPA analytical levels required for the tests.

  5. Phase Startup Initiative Phases 3 and 4 Test Plan and Test Specification (OCRWM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.; LANGEVIN, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Construction for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities is continuing per the Level III Baseline Schedule, and installation of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) and Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) in K West Basin is now complete. In order to accelerate the project, a phased start up strategy to initiate testing of the FRS and IWTS early in the overall project schedule was proposed (Williams 1999). Wilkinson (1999) expands the definition of the original proposal into four functional testing phases of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). Phases 1 and 2 are based on performing functional tests using dummy fuel. This test plan provides overall guidance for Phase 3 and 4 tests, which are performed using actual irradiated N fuel assemblies. The overall objective of the Phase 3 and 4 testing is to verify how the FRS and IWTS respond while processing actual fuel. Conducting these tests early in the project schedule will allow identification and resolution of equipment and process problems before they become activities on the start-up critical path. The specific objectives of this test plan are to: Define the Phase 3 and 4 test scope for the FRS and IWTS; Provide detailed test requirements that can be used to write the specific test procedures; Define data required and measurements to be taken. Where existing methods to obtain these do not exist, enough detail will be provided to define required additional equipment; and Define specific test objectives and acceptance criteria

  6. Phase Startup Initiative Phases 3 and 4 Test Plan and Test Specification ( OCRWM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.; LANGEVIN, M.J.

    2000-08-07

    Construction for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities is continuing per the Level III Baseline Schedule, and installation of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) and Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) in K West Basin is now complete. In order to accelerate the project, a phased start up strategy to initiate testing of the FRS and IWTS early in the overall project schedule was proposed (Williams 1999). Wilkinson (1999) expands the definition of the original proposal into four functional testing phases of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). Phases 1 and 2 are based on performing functional tests using dummy fuel. This test plan provides overall guidance for Phase 3 and 4 tests, which are performed using actual irradiated N fuel assemblies. The overall objective of the Phase 3 and 4 testing is to verify how the FRS and IWTS respond while processing actual fuel. Conducting these tests early in the project schedule will allow identification and resolution of equipment and process problems before they become activities on the start-up critical path. The specific objectives of this test plan are to: Define the Phase 3 and 4 test scope for the FRS and IWTS; Provide detailed test requirements that can be used to write the specific test procedures; Define data required and measurements to be taken. Where existing methods to obtain these do not exist, enough detail will be provided to define required additional equipment; and Define specific test objectives and acceptance criteria.

  7. Fueled viking generator S/N 106 acceptance vibration test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.; Brewer, C.O.; Abrahamson, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking Generator S/N 106 was vibrated to the Teledyne Isotope Flight Acceptance Schedule (Random Only) with no deviation from normal generator functional output. Radiographic analysis and power tests before and after the vibration test indicated no change in the condition of the generator. The work was conducted in the Alpha Fuels Environmental Test Facility at Mound Laboratory

  8. 3D augmented reality for improving social acceptance and public participation in wind farms planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S.; Klein, T. M.

    2016-09-01

    Wind energy is one of the most important source of renewable energy characterized by a significant growth in the last decades and giving a more and more relevant contribution to the energy supply. One of the main disadvantages of a faster integration of wind energy into the energy mix is related to the visual impact of wind turbines on the landscape. In addition, the siting of new massive infrastructures has the potential to threaten a community's well-being if new projects are perceived being unfair. The public perception of the impact of wind turbines on the landscape is also crucial for their acceptance. The implementation of wind energy projects is hampered often because of a lack of planning or communication tools enabling a more transparent and efficient interaction between all stakeholders involved in the projects (i.e. developers, local communities and administrations, NGOs, etc.). Concerning the visual assessment of wind farms, a critical gap lies in effective visualization tools to improve the public perception of alternative wind turbines layouts. In this paper, we describe the advantages of a 3D dynamical and interactive visualization platform for an augmented reality to support wind energy planners in order to enhance the social acceptance of new wind energy projects.

  9. On the comparability of acceptance tests for concrete by operation characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rackwitz, R.

    1978-01-01

    The purely statistical aspect of acceptance tests can be estimated by means of operation characteristics, the position and steepness of which determine the probability for acceptance or rejection of offered loads. For negative decisions in concrete checking there will be, as a rule, an after-check in normal quality control. The operation characteristics with after-check valid for DIN 1045, DIN 1084, and DIN 1048 are set up. Complete comparability of different acceptance tests by means of the operation characteristic can only be achieved if the different sampling rates and the number of decisions are also included in the consideration. Proposals for improving the acceptance tests for concrete are presented. (orig.) [de

  10. Water NSTF Design, Instrumentation, and Test Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisowski, Darius D.; Gerardi, Craig D.; Hu, Rui; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.; Bremer, Nathan C.; Lomperski, Stephen W.; Kraus, Adam R.; Bucknor, Matthew D.; Lv, Qiuping; Farmer, Mitchell T.

    2017-08-01

    The following report serves as a formal introduction to the water-based Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) program at Argonne. Since 2005, this US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored program has conducted large scale experimental testing to generate high-quality and traceable validation data for guiding design decisions of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) concept for advanced reactor designs. The most recent facility iteration, and focus of this report, is the operation of a 1/2 scale model of a water-RCCS concept. Several features of the NSTF prototype align with the conceptual design that has been publicly released for the AREVA 625 MWt SC-HTGR. The design of the NSTF also retains all aspects common to a fundamental boiling water thermosiphon, and thus is well poised to provide necessary experimental data to advance basic understanding of natural circulation phenomena and contribute to computer code validation. Overall, the NSTF program operates to support the DOE vision of aiding US vendors in design choices of future reactor concepts, advancing the maturity of codes for licensing, and ultimately developing safe and reliable reactor technologies. In this report, the top-level program objectives, testing requirements, and unique considerations for the water cooled test assembly are discussed, and presented in sufficient depth to support defining the program’s overall scope and purpose. A discussion of the proposed 6-year testing program is then introduced, which outlines the specific strategy and testing plan for facility operations. The proposed testing plan has been developed to meet the toplevel objective of conducting high-quality test operations that span across a broad range of single- and two-phase operating conditions. Details of characterization, baseline test cases, accident scenario, and parametric variations are provided, including discussions of later-stage test cases that examine the influence of geometric

  11. Test plan for K Basin Sludge Canister and Floor Sampling Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meling, T.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides the test plan and procedure forms for conducting the functional and operational acceptance testing of the K Basin Sludge Canister and Floor Sampling Device(s). These samplers samples sludge off the floor of the 100K Basins and out of 100K fuel storage canisters

  12. Group SkSP-R sampling plan for accelerated life tests

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Muhammad Aslam

    2017-09-15

    Sep 15, 2017 ... SkSP-R sampling; life test; Weibull distribution; producer's risk; ... designed a sampling plan under a time-truncated life test .... adjusted using an acceleration factor. ... where P is the probability of lot acceptance for a single.

  13. Test Plan: WIPP bin-scale CH TRU waste tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1990-08-01

    This WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program described herein will provide relevant composition and kinetic rate data on gas generation and consumption resulting from TRU waste degradation, as impacted by synergistic interactions due to multiple degradation modes, waste form preparation, long-term repository environmental effects, engineered barrier materials, and, possibly, engineered modifications to be developed. Similar data on waste-brine leachate compositions and potentially hazardous volatile organic compounds released by the wastes will also be provided. The quantitative data output from these tests and associated technical expertise are required by the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) program studies, and for the scientific benefit of the overall WIPP project. This Test Plan describes the necessary scientific and technical aspects, justifications, and rational for successfully initiating and conducting the WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program. This Test Plan is the controlling scientific design definition and overall requirements document for this WIPP in situ test, as defined by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), scientific advisor to the US Department of Energy, WIPP Project Office (DOE/WPO). 55 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs

  14. 118-B-1 excavation treatability test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    The Hanford 118-B-1 Burial Ground Treatability Study has been required by milestone change request number-sign M-15-93-04, dated September 30, 1993. The change request requires that a treatability test be conducted at the 100-B Area to obtain additional engineering information for remedial design of burial grounds receiving waste from 100 Area removal actions. This treatability study has two purposes: (1) to support development of the Proposed Plan (PP) and Record of Decision (ROD), which will identify the approach to be used for burial ground remediation, and (2) to provide specific engineering information for receiving waste generated from the 100 Area removal actions. Data generated from this test also will provide critical performance and cost information necessary for remedy evaluation in the detailed analysis of alternatives during preparation of the focused feasibility study (FFS). This treatability testing supports the following 100 Area alternatives: (1) excavation and disposal, and (2) excavation, sorting, (treatment), and disposal

  15. 100 Area excavation treatability test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    This test plan documents the requirements for a treatability study on field radionuclide analysis and dust control techniques. These systems will be used during remedial actions involving excavation. The data from this treatability study will be used to support the feasibility study (FS) process. Excavation is one of the high-priority, near-term, treatability study needs identified in the program plan (DOE-RL 1992f). Excavation of contaminated soils and buried solid wastes is included in several of the alternatives identified in the 100 Area FS. Although a common activity, excavation has only been used occasionally at the Hanford Site for waste removal applications. The most recent applications are excavation of the 618-9 burial ground and partial remediation of the 316-5 process trenches (DOE-RL 1992a, 1992b). Both projects included excavation of soil and dust control (using water sprays). Excavation is a well-developed technology and equipment is readily available; however, certain aspects of the excavation process require testing before use in full-scale operations. These include the following: Measurement and control of excavation-generated dust and airborne contamination; verification of field analytical system capabilities; demonstration of soil removal techniques specific to the 100 Area waste site types and configurations. The execution of this treatability test may produce up to 500 yd 3 of contaminated soil, which will be used for future treatability tests. These tests may include soil washing with vitrification of the soil washing residuals. Other tests will be conducted if soil washing is not a viable alternative

  16. Women's career priority is associated with attitudes towards family planning and ethical acceptance of reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Michael K; Mu, Lin; Collins, Stephen C

    2017-10-01

    Do women who place high importance on career success have different perceptions of pregnancy planning, delayed reproduction, and the ethical acceptability of ART than women with less emphasis on their career? Career-focused women place more importance on pregnancy planning, have greater confidence in delayed childbearing, and are more ethically accepting of donor gamete ART than women who do not place as much importance on career success. Women in high-professional careers are more likely to delay childbearing while simultaneously possessing a stronger desire for motherhood. The underlying values which enable these competing desires have not been elucidated. This cross-sectional study utilized data from the National Survey of Fertility Barriers (NSFB), a nationally representative telephone survey of US women aged 25-45. Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the NSFB surveyed 4712 women from 2004 to 2007. In addition to demographic data, the NSFB obtained information about the reproductive history and personal values of participants. Weighted multivariate regression analysis was used to assess reproductive values in career-focused women. In total, 48.8% of women considered success in work very important, while 17.3% considered it somewhat or not important. Women who placed less value on career success were less likely to consider pregnancy planning important and were less optimistic about the success of delayed childbearing than their work-centric counterparts. Women less focused on their careers were also more likely to have serious ethical concerns about donor gametes, but less likely to have ethical concerns about IUI or IVF, when compared to career-focused women. Intention to bear children could not be evaluated in the setting of career intentions due to a lack of data on when the participant intended on pursuing motherhood. Political preferences on reproductive health were also not evaluated. The validity

  17. Neutron absorber qualification and acceptance testing from the designer's perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracey, W. [Transnuclear, Inc, Hawthorne, NY (United States); Chiocca, R. [Cogema Logistics, St. Quentin en Yvelines (France)

    2004-07-01

    Starting in the mid 1990's, the USNRC began to require less than 100% credit for the 10B present in fixed neutron absorbers spent fuel transport packages. The current practice in the US is to use only 75% of the specified 10B in criticality safety calculations unless extensive acceptance testing demonstrates both the presence of the 10B and uniformity of its distribution. In practice, the NRC has accepted no more than 90% credit for 10B in recent years, while other national competent authorities continue to accept 100%. More recently, with the introduction of new neutron absorber materials, particularly aluminum / boron carbide metal matrix composites, the NRC has also expressed expectations for qualification testing, based in large part on Transnuclear's successful application to use a new composite material in the TN-68 storage / transport cask. The difficulty is that adding more boron than is really necessary to a metal has some negative effects on the material, reducing the ductility and the thermal conductivity, and increasing the cost. Excessive testing requirements can have the undesired effect of keeping superior materials out of spent fuel package designs, without a corresponding justification based on public safety. In European countries and especially in France, 100% credit has been accepted up to now with materials controls specified in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR): Manufacturing process approved by qualification testing Materials manufacturing controlled under a Quality Assurance system. During fabrication, acceptance testing directly on products or on representative samples. Acceptance criteria taking into account a statistical uncertainty corresponding to 3{sigma}. The original and current bases for the reduced {sup 10}B credit, the design requirements for neutron absorber materials, and the experience of Transnuclear and Cogema Logistics with neutron absorber testing are examined. Guidelines for qualification and acceptance testing and

  18. Single Event Effects (SEE) Testing: Practical Approach to Test Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Pellish, Jonathan Allen; Berg, Melanie D.

    2014-01-01

    While standards and guidelines for performing SEE testing have existed for several decades, guidance for developing SEE test plans has not been as easy to find. In this presentation, the variety of areas that need to be considered ranging from resource issues (funds, personnel, schedule) to extremely technical challenges (particle interaction and circuit application), shall be discussed. Note: we consider the approach outlined here as a "living" document: Mission-specific constraints and new technology related issues always need to be taken into account.

  19. Dynamic simulations for preparing the acceptance test of JT-60SA cryogenic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, R.; Hoa, C.; Michel, F.; Poncet, J. M.; Rousset, B.

    2016-12-01

    Power generation in the future could be provided by thermo-nuclear fusion reactors like tokamaks. There inside, the fusion reaction takes place thanks to the generation of plasmas at hundreds of millions of degrees that must be confined magnetically with superconductive coils, cooled down to around 4.5 K. Within this frame, an experimental tokamak device, JT-60SA is currently under construction in Naka (Japan). The plasma works cyclically and the coil system is subject to pulsed heat loads. In order to size the refrigerator close to the average power and hence optimizing investment and operational costs, measures have to be taken to smooth the heat load. Here we present a dynamic model of the JT-60SA's Auxiliary Cold box (ACB) for preparing the acceptance tests of the refrigeration system planned in 2016 in Naka. The aim of this study is to simulate the pulsed load scenarios using different process controls. All the simulations have been performed with EcosimPro® and the associated cryogenic library: CRYOLIB.

  20. Integrated test plan for directional boring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volk, B.W.

    1993-01-01

    This integrated test plan describes the field testing of the DITCH WITCH Directional Boring System. DITCH WITCH is a registered trademark of The Charles Machine Works, Inc., Perry, Oklahoma. The test is being conducted as a coordinated effort between Charles Machine Works (CMW), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Funding for the WHC portion of the project is through the Volatile Organic Compound-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). The purpose of the test is to evaluate the performance of the directional boring system for possible future use on environmental restoration projects at Hanford and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The test will be conducted near the 200 Areas Fire Station located between the 200 East and 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The directional boring system will be used to drill and complete (with fiberglass casing) two horizontal boreholes. A third borehole will be drilled to test sampling equipment but will not be completed with casing

  1. Inspection Program Development for an Aircraft Fleet and an Airline on the Basis of the Acceptance Fatigue Test Result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramonov Yuri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An inspection interval planning is considered in order to limit the probability of any fatigue failure (FFP in a fleet of N aircraft (AC and to provide an economical effectiveness of airline (AL under the limitation of fatigue failure rate (FFR. A solution of these two problems is based on the processing of the result of acceptance fatigue test of a new type of aircraft. During this test an estimate of the parameter ϴ, of a fatigue crack growth trajectory has been obtained. If the result of this acceptance test is too bad then this new type of aircraft will not be used in service. A redesign of this project should be done. If the result the acceptance test is pretty good then the reliability of the aircraft fleet and the airline will be provided without inspections. For this strategy there is a maximum of FFP (a maximum of FFR as a function of an unknown parameter ᶿ. This maximum can be limited by the use of the offered here procedure of the choice of the inspection number. The economic effectiveness of the AL operation is considered using the theory of Markov process with rewords.

  2. Nevada test site defense waste acceptance criteria, certification, and transfer requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria, Certification and Transfer Requirements establishes procedures and criteria for safe transfer, disposal, and storage of defense transuranic, low-level, and mixed waste at the NTS. Included are an overview of the NTS defense waste management program; the NTS waste acceptance criteria for transuranic, low-level, and mixed wastes; waste certification requirements and guidance; application to submit waste; and requirements for waste transfer and receipt. 5 figs., 16 tabs

  3. Aerosol can puncture device operational test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leist, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    Puncturing of aerosol cans is performed in the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 (WRAP 1) process as a requirement of the waste disposal acceptance criteria for both transuranic (TRU) waste and low-level waste (LLW). These cans have contained such things as paints, lubricating oils, paint removers, insecticides, and cleaning supplies which were used in radioactive facilities. Due to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Fire Protection concerns of the baseline system's fire/explosion proof characteristics, a study was undertaken to compare the baseline system's design to commercially available puncturing devices. While the study found no areas which might indicate a risk of fire or explosion, WHC Fire Protection determined that the puncturing system must have a demonstrated record of safe operation. This could be obtained either by testing the baseline design by an independent laboratory, or by substituting a commercially available device. As a result of these efforts, the commercially available Aerosolv can puncturing device was chosen to replace the baseline design. Two concerns were raised with the system. Premature blinding of the coalescing/carbon filter, due to its proximity to the puncture and draining operation; and overpressurization of the collection bottle due to its small volume and by blinding of the filter assembly. As a result of these concerns, testing was deemed necessary. The objective of this report is to outline test procedures for the Aerosolv

  4. 100 area excavation treatability test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    This test plan documents the requirements for a treatability study on field radionuclide analysis and dust control techniques. These systems will be used during remedial actions involving excavation. The data from this treatability study will be used to support the feasibility study (FS) process. Development and screening of remedial alternatives for the 100 Area, using existing data, have been completed and are documented in the 100 Area Feasibility Study, Phases 1 and 2 (DOE-RL 1992a). Based on the results of the FS, the Treatability Study Program Plan (DOE-RL 1992b) identifies and prioritizes treatability studies for the 100 Area. The data from the treatability study program support future focused FS, interim remedial measures (IRM) selection, operable unit final remedy selection, remedial design, and remedial actions. Excavation is one of the high-priority, near-term, treatability study needs identified in the program plan (DOE-RL 1992b). Excavation of contaminated soils and buried solid wastes is included in several of the alternatives identified in the 100 Area FS. Although a common activity, excavation has only been used occasionally at the Hanford Site for waste removal applications

  5. Determinants of family planning acceptance and changing social norms among the tribes of Tamil Nadu – A qualitative exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Yadav

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are very few studies done among tribes that explore the contribution of changing social norms which influences the acceptance of family planning methods. Objective: To discover various changing traditional social norms that influence tribal people to accept contraceptive methods. Methodology: Ten in-depth interviews were conducted among Toda and Irula tribes of Nilagiri district, Tamil Nadu. Family planning acceptors were interviewed and sampling was purposive to get data richness. The interviewed were summarized and themes identified. The themes were used to construct a conceptual framework of social factors influencing family planning acceptance. Results: The important themes that emerged were: (1 Perceived need for development in terms of education and sufficient savings for future. (2 Improved perception on attaining gender equality by women. (3 Lack of bonding between parents and children due to poor attention and poor understanding in large families. (4 Learning from the bad experiences of others with large families was a major reason for adopting small families. Conclusion: The social norms which influenced acceptance of family planning methods seem to be related to perceived financial and economic development of families directly or indirectly. Therefore family planning education programs should emphasize on the financial and economic benefits of family planning.

  6. Standard-B auto grab sampler hydrogen monitoring system, Acceptance Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, D.T.

    1995-01-01

    Project W-369, Watch List Tank Hydrogen Monitors, installed a Standard-C Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) on the Flammable gas waste tank AN-104. General Support Projects (8K510) was support by Test Engineering (7CH30) in the performance of the Acceptance Test Procedures (ATP) to qualify the SHMS cabinets on the waste tank. The ATP's performance was controlled by Tank Farm work package. This completed ATP is transmitted by EDT-601748 as an Acceptance Test Report (ATR) in accordance with WHC-6-1, EP 4.2 and EP 1.12

  7. Project W-314 specific test and evaluation plan for 241-AN-A valve pit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hays, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system's performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a ''lower tier'' document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP) This STEP encompasses all testing activities required to demonstrate compliance to the project design criteria as it relates to the modifications of the AN-A valve pit. The Project Design Specifications (PDS) identify the specific testing activities required for the Project. Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the modifications to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation

  8. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) verifies proper construction per the design drawings and tests for proper functioning of the Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid ''M''. The Scope section lists the systems and functions to be checked. This ATP will be performed at the Site Fabrication Service's (SFS) shop upon completion of construction of the PIC skid

  9. 241-AZ-101 Waste Tank Color Video Camera System Shop Acceptance Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WERRY, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    This report includes shop acceptance test results. The test was performed prior to installation at tank AZ-101. Both the camera system and camera purge system were originally sought and procured as a part of initial waste retrieval project W-151

  10. 241-AZ-101 Waste Tank Color Video Camera System Shop Acceptance Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WERRY, S.M.

    2000-03-23

    This report includes shop acceptance test results. The test was performed prior to installation at tank AZ-101. Both the camera system and camera purge system were originally sought and procured as a part of initial waste retrieval project W-151.

  11. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''V''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) verifies proper construction per the design drawings and tests for proper functioning of the Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid ''V''. The scope section lists the systems and functions to be checked. This ATP will be performed at the Site Fabrication Services (SFS) shop upon completion of the construction of the PIC skid

  12. Acceptability of Sexually Transmitted Infection Testing Using Self-Collected Vaginal Swabs among College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielder, Robyn L.; Carey, Kate B.; Carey, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the acceptability of sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing using self-collected vaginal swabs (SCVS) among college women. Participants: First-year female students ("N" = 483). Methods: Participants were offered free testing for 3 STIs using SCVS in April 2010 and later completed a survey regarding their…

  13. Enraf series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) acceptance test procedure. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    This procedure provides acceptance testing for Enraf Series 854 level gauges used to monitor levels in Hanford Waste Storage Tanks. The test will verify that the gauge functions according to the manufacturer's instructions and specifications and is properly setup prior to being delivered to the tank farm area

  14. Understanding Student Teachers' Behavioural Intention to Use Technology: Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) Validation and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kung-Teck; Osman, Rosma bt; Goh, Pauline Swee Choo; Rahmat, Mohd Khairezan

    2013-01-01

    This study sets out to validate and test the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) in the context of Malaysian student teachers' integration of their technology in teaching and learning. To establish factorial validity, data collected from 302 respondents were tested against the TAM using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and structural equation…

  15. Delinquency and Peer Acceptance in Adolescence: A Within-Person Test of Moffitt's Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, Kelly L.; Kreager, Derek A.; Osgood, D. Wayne

    2014-01-01

    We tested 2 hypotheses derived from Moffitt's (1993) taxonomic theory of antisocial behavior, both of which are central to her explanation for the rise in delinquency during adolescence. We tested whether persistently delinquent individuals become more accepted by their peers during adolescence and whether individuals who abstain from delinquent…

  16. System acceptance and operability test report for the RMCS exhauster C on flammable gas tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldo, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    This test report documents the completion of acceptance and operability testing of the rotary mode core sampling (RMCS) exhauster C, as modified for use as a major stack (as defined by the Washington State Department of Health) on flammable gas tanks

  17. 100 Area soil washing treatability test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This test plan describes specifications, responsibilities, and general methodology for conducting a soil washing treatability study as applied to source unit contamination in the 100 Area. The objective ofthis treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The purpose of separating these fractions is to minimize the volume of soil requiring permanent disposal. It is anticipated that this treatability study will be performed in two phases of testing, a remedy screening phase and a remedy selection phase. The remedy screening phase consists of laboratory- and bench-scale studies performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest laboratories (PNL) under a work order issued by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). This phase will be used to provide qualitative evaluation of the potential effectiveness of the soil washing technology. The remedy selection phase, consists of pilot-scale testing performed under a separate service contract to be competitively bid under Westinghouse Hanford direction. The remedy selection phase will provide data to support evaluation of the soil washing technology in future feasibility studies for Interim Remedial Measures (IRMs) or final operable unit (OU) remedies. Performance data from these tests will indicate whether applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) or cleanup goals can be met at the site(s) by application of soil washing. The remedy selection tests wig also allow estimation of costs associated with implementation to the accuracy required for the Feasibility Study

  18. Test plan for the retrieval demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentich, D.J.

    1993-05-01

    This test plan describes a simulated buried waste retrieval demonstration that will be performed at the Caterpillar, Inc., Edwards Training Center located near Peoria, Illinois. The purpose of the demonstration is to determine the effectiveness of using readily available excavation equipment to retrieve, size, and handle various simulated waste forms that are similar in size, structure, and composition to those expected to be found in US Department of Energy contaminated waste pits and trenches. The objectives of this demonstration are to: meet and maintain daily production goals of 80 yd 3 /day; minimize spillage and dust generation through careful and deliberate operations; document and evaluate methods for manipulating, sizing, and/or working around large objects; and document and evaluate requirements for operator augmentation and remote operation for hot test pit excavation operations. Four conditions comprising the range of environments to be evaluated include excavation of random material from below grade; stacked boxes and barrels from below grade; random materials from at grade; and stacked boxes and barrels from at grade. Results of the retrieval demonstration will reduce unknowns in the body of knowledge about retrieval equipment and procedural options for removal of buried transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It is anticipated that DOE will factor this information into a remedial investigation/feasibility plan leading to a final record of decision for disposition of buried TRU waste

  19. An Exploration of Social Networking Sites (SNS) Adoption in Malaysia Using Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) And Intrinsic Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Goh Say Leng; Suddin Lada; Mohd Zulkifli Muhammad; Ag Asri Hj Ag Ibrahim; Tamrin Amboala

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to explore the factors that encourage students to adopt social network sites (SNS) in Malaysia and to use the study’s findings to develop guidelines for SNS providers on how to maximize the rate of adoption. A conceptual model of Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and intrinsic motivation is proposed and empirically tested in the context of SNS usage. Structural Equation modelling was used on the survey data from 283 university s...

  20. Test plan for dig-face characterization performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josten, N.E.

    1993-09-01

    The dig-face characterization concept has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since FY 1992 through the support of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program. A Dig-face Characterization System conducts continuous subsurface characterization simultaneously with retrieval of hazardous and radioactive waste from buried waste sites. The system deploys multiple sensors at the retrieval operation dig-face and collects data that provide a basis for detecting, locating, and identifying hazardous conditions before they are disturbed by the retrieval equipment. This test plan describes initial efforts to test the dig-face characterization concept at the INEL Cold Test Pit using a simplified prototype apparatus and off-the-shelf sensors. The Cold Test Pit is a simulated waste site containing hazardous and radioactive waste surrogates at known locations. Testing will be directed toward three generic characterization problems: metal detection, plume detection, and radioactive source detection. The prototype apparatus will gather data using magnetometers, a ground conductivity meter, a trace gas analyzer, and a gamma ray sensor during simulated retrieval of the surrogate waste materials. The data acquired by a dig-face characterization system are unique because of the high precision, high data density, and multiple viewpoints attainable through the dig-face deployment approach. The test plan establishes procedures for collecting and validating a representative dig-face characterization data set. Analysis of these data will focus on developing criteria for predicting the depth, location, composition, and other characteristics of the surrogate waste materials. If successful, this proof-of-concept exercise will provide a foundation for future development of a fully-operational system that is capable of operating on an actual waste site

  1. Local tolerance testing under REACH: Accepted non-animal methods are not on equal footing with animal tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Ursula G; Hill, Erin H; Curren, Rodger D; Raabe, Hans A; Kolle, Susanne N; Teubner, Wera; Mehling, Annette; Landsiedel, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In general, no single non-animal method can cover the complexity of any given animal test. Therefore, fixed sets of in vitro (and in chemico) methods have been combined into testing strategies for skin and eye irritation and skin sensitisation testing, with pre-defined prediction models for substance classification. Many of these methods have been adopted as OECD test guidelines. Various testing strategies have been successfully validated in extensive in-house and inter-laboratory studies, but they have not yet received formal acceptance for substance classification. Therefore, under the European REACH Regulation, data from testing strategies can, in general, only be used in so-called weight-of-evidence approaches. While animal testing data generated under the specific REACH information requirements are per se sufficient, the sufficiency of weight-of-evidence approaches can be questioned under the REACH system, and further animal testing can be required. This constitutes an imbalance between the regulatory acceptance of data from approved non-animal methods and animal tests that is not justified on scientific grounds. To ensure that testing strategies for local tolerance testing truly serve to replace animal testing for the REACH registration 2018 deadline (when the majority of existing chemicals have to be registered), clarity on their regulatory acceptance as complete replacements is urgently required. 2016 FRAME.

  2. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC), Rev. 7-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-05-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NTSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal.

  3. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC), Rev. 7-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NTSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal.

  4. 105 K east ion exchange and cartridge filter restart instrumentation acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehurst, R.

    1996-01-01

    Acceptance Test Report following the completion of ATP-012 for the 105KE CP-A and CP-A Computer and PLC Panels. The test was conducted from 11/13/95 to 12/11/95. Three test discrepancies were generated during the ATP and all were dispositioned and closed. All sections were completed except Section 5.9 which was deleted per ECN 190556

  5. KE basin recirculation/skimmer/IX systems restart acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derosa, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    The 105 KE Basin Recirculation System and Skimmer Loop have been upgraded to provide the flexibility to run the Ion Exchange Modules on either system to support spent fuel removal for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. This Acceptance Test Report Provides the documentation of the leak Testing for the construction work associated with the IXM inlet and outlet piping, places the cartridge filters back in service and provides the functional testing of the IXM's on the recirculation and skimmer systems

  6. MAC Version 3.3, MBA Version 1.3 acceptance test summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, V.K.

    1994-01-01

    The K Basins Materials Accounting (MAC) and Materials Balance (MBA) programs had the Paradox Code Cleanup ATP run to check out the systems. This report describes the results of the test and provides the signoff sheets associated with the testing. The Acceptance Test results indicate that the MAC and MBA systems are ready for operation using the cleaned up code. The final codes were removed to the production space on the customer server on April 15th

  7. WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] test phase plan: Performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for managing the disposition of transuranic (TRU) wastes resulting from nuclear weapons production activities of the United States. These wastes are currently stored nationwide at several of the DOE's waste generating/storage sites. The goal is to eliminate interim waste storage and achieve environmentally and institutionally acceptable permanent disposal of these TRU wastes. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico is being considered as a disposal facility for these TRU wastes. This document describes the first of the following two major programs planned for the Test Phase of WIPP: Performance Assessment -- determination of the long-term performance of the WIPP disposal system in accordance with the requirements of the EPA Standard; and Operations Demonstration -- evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of the DOE TRU waste management system's ability to emplace design throughput quantities of TRU waste in the WIPP underground facility. 120 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs

  8. Test plan for qualification of the S-type fiberglass materials for use as the liquid observation well casing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    This test plan presents the guidelines and requirements for acceptance of the S-type fiberglass material for use as the liquid observation well casing material. The plan for evaluating the physical properties of the candidate fiberglass materials when subjected to radiation, corrosive chemicals, and high temperatures typically found in the waste tanks are outlined. The tests also include tube connection evaluations. Finally, the test plan identifies the participants, their responsibilities, and the schedule for completion of the work

  9. Tracer gas diffusion sampling test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohay, V.J.

    1993-01-01

    Efforts are under way to employ active and passive vapor extraction to remove carbon tetrachloride from the soil in the 200 West Area an the Hanford Site as part of the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action. In the active approach, a vacuum is applied to a well, which causes soil gas surrounding the well to be drawn up to the surface. The contaminated air is cleaned by passage through a granular activated carbon bed. There are questions concerning the radius of influence associated with application of the vacuum system and related uncertainties about the soil-gas diffusion rates with and without the vacuum system present. To address these questions, a series of tracer gas diffusion sampling tests is proposed in which an inert, nontoxic tracer gas, sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ), will be injected into a well, and the rates of SF 6 diffusion through the surrounding soil horizon will be measured by sampling in nearby wells. Tracer gas tests will be conducted at sites very near the active vacuum extraction system and also at sites beyond the radius of influence of the active vacuum system. In the passive vapor extraction approach, barometric pressure fluctuations cause soil gas to be drawn to the surface through the well. At the passive sites, the effects of barometric ''pumping'' due to changes in atmospheric pressure will be investigated. Application of tracer gas testing to both the active and passive vapor extraction methods is described in the wellfield enhancement work plan (Rohay and Cameron 1993)

  10. Reliability demonstration test planning using bayesian analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandran, Senthil Kumar; Arul, John A.

    2003-01-01

    In Nuclear Power Plants, the reliability of all the safety systems is very critical from the safety viewpoint and it is very essential that the required reliability requirements be met while satisfying the design constraints. From practical experience, it is found that the reliability of complex systems such as Safety Rod Drive Mechanism is of the order of 10 -4 with an uncertainty factor of 10. To demonstrate the reliability of such systems is prohibitive in terms of cost and time as the number of tests needed is very large. The purpose of this paper is to develop a Bayesian reliability demonstrating testing procedure for exponentially distributed failure times with gamma prior distribution on the failure rate which can be easily and effectively used to demonstrate component/subsystem/system reliability conformance to stated requirements. The important questions addressed in this paper are: With zero failures, how long one should perform the tests and how many components are required to conclude with a given degree of confidence, that the component under test, meets the reliability requirement. The procedure is explained with an example. This procedure can also be extended to demonstrate with more number of failures. The approach presented is applicable for deriving test plans for demonstrating component failure rates of nuclear power plants, as the failure data for similar components are becoming available in existing plants elsewhere. The advantages of this procedure are the criterion upon which the procedure is based is simple and pertinent, the fitting of the prior distribution is an integral part of the procedure and is based on the use of information regarding two percentiles of this distribution and finally, the procedure is straightforward and easy to apply in practice. (author)

  11. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Management Plan (RMP) describes the NTS Stewardship Mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. The NTS Stewardship Mission is to manage the land and facilities at the NTS as a unique and valuable national resource. The RMP has defined goals for twelve resource areas based on the principles of ecosystem management. These goals were established using an interdisciplinary team of DOE/NV resource specialists with input from surrounding land managers, private parties, and representatives of Native American governments. The overall goal of the RMP is to facilitate improved NTS land use management decisions within the Great Basin and Mojave Desert ecoregions.

  12. Vacuum Acceptance Tests for the UHV Room Temperature Vacuum System of the LHC during LS1

    CERN Document Server

    Cattenoz, G; Bregliozzi, G; Calegari, D; Gallagher, J; Marraffa, A; Chiggiato, P

    2014-01-01

    During the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) first long shut down (LS1), a large number of vacuum tests are carried out on consolidated or newly fabricated devices. In such a way, the vacuum compatibility is assessed before installation in the UHV system of the LHC. According to the equipment’s nature, the vacuum acceptance tests consist in functional checks, leak test, outgassing rate measurements, evaluation of contaminants by Residual Gas Analysis (RGA), pumping speed measurements and qualification of the H2 sticking probability of Non-Evaporable-Getter (NEG) coating. In this paper, the methods used for the tests and the acceptance criteria are described. A summary of the measured vacuum characteristics for the tested components is also given.

  13. Acceptance test procedure for a portable, self-contained nitrogen supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of WHC-S-0249 Rev. 1 and ECN 606112. The equipment being tested is a Portable, Self-Contained Nitrogen Supply. The unit was purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity. The Functional Test was written by the Seller and is contained in Appendix A. The Functional test will be performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company performing inspection and witnessing the functional test at the Seller's location

  14. Factors of Online Learning Adoption: A Comparative Juxtaposition of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndubisi, Nelson

    2006-01-01

    Organisational investments in information technologies have increased significantly in the past few decades. All around the globe and in Malaysia particularly, a number of educational institutions are experimenting with e-learning. Adopting the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and the technology acceptance model (TAM) this article tries to…

  15. Implementation plan of the environmental impact statement on a proposed policy for acceptance of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of selected portions of the United States Department of Energy's ''Implementation Plan for the Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Policy for Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel'', DOE/EIS-0218, October 1994

  16. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Pre-Service Teachers' Technology Acceptance: A Validation Study Using Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy; Tan, Lynde

    2012-01-01

    This study applies the theory of planned behavior (TPB), a theory that is commonly used in commercial settings, to the educational context to explain pre-service teachers' technology acceptance. It is also interested in examining its validity when used for this purpose. It has found evidence that the TPB is a valid model to explain pre-service…

  17. The acceptability, knowledge and perceptions of pregnant women toward HIV Testing in pregnancy at Ilembe District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FN Dube

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This research study aimed to investigate the acceptability, knowledge and perceptions of pregnant women toward HIV testing in pregnancy in Ilembe District. An exploratory research design guided the study. A systematic random sampling was used to select pregnant women who were attending the ante-natal clinic for the first time in their current pregnancy.

  18. Acceptability of self-collected vaginal samples for HPV testing in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the acceptability of self-collected vaginal samples for HPV testing in women living in rural and urban areas of Madagascar. Materials and methods: Participants were recruited in a health care center (urban group) and smaller affiliated dispensaries (rural group). They were invited to perform ...

  19. Acceptance Test Report for the Modular Automation System (MAS) Manufactured by Honeywell Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ANDERSON, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    This document details the performance of the acceptance test of the Honeywell MAS Control System for equipment to be installed in gloveboxes HA-20MB and HA-211 at a later date. Equipment that was anticipated included 6 stabilization furnaces, only three and their associated equipment were installed

  20. Integrating Telemedicine for Disaster Response: Testing the Emergency Telemedicine Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is little evidence that technology acceptance is well understood in healthcare. The hospital environment is complex and dynamic creating a challenge when new technology is introduced because it impacts current processes and workflows which can significantly affect patient care delivery and outcomes. This study tested the effect…

  1. General Vehicle Test Plan (GVTP) for Urban Rail Transit Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-01

    The General Vehicle Test Plan provides a system for general vehicle testing and for documenting and utilizing data and information in the testing of urban rail transit cars. Test procedures are defined for nine categories: (1) Performance; (2) Power ...

  2. Current use and acceptability of novel diagnostic tests for active tuberculosis: a worldwide survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Amicosante

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the current use and potential acceptance (by tuberculosis experts worldwide of novel rapid tests for the diagnosis of tuberculosis that are in line with World Health Organization target product profiles. Methods: A multilingual survey was disseminated online between July and November of 2016. Results: A total of 723 individuals from 114 countries responded to the survey. Smear microscopy was the most commonly used rapid tuberculosis test (available to 90.9% of the respondents, followed by molecular assays (available to 70.7%. Only a small proportion of the respondents in middle- and low-income countries had access to interferon-gamma-release assays. Serological and lateral flow immunoassays were used by more than a quarter (25.4% of the respondents. Among the respondents who had access to molecular tests, 46.7% were using the Xpert assay overall, that proportion being higher in lower middle-income countries (55.6% and low-income countries (76.6%. The data also suggest that there was some alignment of pricing for molecular assays. Respondents stated they would accept novel rapid tuberculosis tests if available, including molecular assays (acceptable to 86.0% or biomarker-based serological assays (acceptable to 81.7%. Simple biomarker-based assays were more commonly deemed acceptable in middle- and low-income countries. Conclusions: Second-generation molecular assays have become more widely available in high- and low-resource settings. However, the development of novel rapid tuberculosis tests continues to be considered important by tuberculosis experts. Our data also underscore the need for additional training and education of end users.

  3. Test Plan for the overburden removal demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, P.; Thompson, D.; Winberg, M.; Skaggs, J.

    1993-06-01

    The removal of soil overburdens from contaminated pits and trenches involves using equipment that will remove a small layer of soil from 3 to 6 in. at any time. As a layer of soil is removed, overburden characterization techniques perform surveys to a depth that exceeds each overburden removal layer to ensure that the removed soil will be free of contamination. It is generally expected that no contamination will be found in the soil overburden, which was brought in after the waste was put in place. It is anticipated that some containers in the waste zone have lost their integrity, and the waste leakage from those containers has migrated by gravity downward into the waste zone. To maintain a safe work environment, this method of overburden removal should allow safe preparation of a pit or trench for final remediation. To demonstrate the soil overburden techniques, the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program has contracted vendor services to provide equipment and techniques demonstrating soil overburden removal technology. The demonstration will include tests that will evaluate equipment performance and techniques for removal of overburden soil, control of contamination spread, and dust control. To evaluate the performance of these techniques, air particulate samples, physical measurements of the excavation soil cuts, maneuverability measurements, and time versus volume (rate) of soil removal data will be collected during removal operations. To provide a medium for sample evaluation, the overburden will be spiked at specific locations and depths with rare earth tracers. This test plan will be describe the objectives of the demonstration, data quality objectives, methods to be used to operate the equipment and use the techniques in the test area, and methods to be used in collecting data during the demonstration

  4. Acceptance test procedure for K basins dose reduction project clean and coat equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creed, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    This document is the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) for the clean and coat equipment designed by Oceaneering Hanford, Inc. under purchase order MDK-XVC-406988 for use in the 105 K East Basin. The ATP provides the guidelines and criteria to test the equipment's ability to clean and coat the concrete perimeter, divider walls, and dummy elevator pit above the existing water level. This equipment was designed and built in support of the Spent Nuclear Fuel, Dose Reduction Project. The ATP will be performed at the 305 test facility in the 300 Area at Hanford. The test results will be documented in WHC-SD-SNF-ATR-020

  5. Project W-314 specific test and evaluation plan for AZ tank farm upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hays, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made by the addition of the SN-631 transfer line from the AZ-O1A pit to the AZ-02A pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system's performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation P1 an (TEP). Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities, etc), Factory Tests and Inspections (FTIs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Tests and Inspections (CTIs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation

  6. Test plan for Enraf Series 854 level gauge wire testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    An Enraf Series 854 level gauge was installed on tank 241-S-106 during the first week of June 1994. On August 11, 1994, the gauge's stainless steel measuring wire broke. After examination and laboratory analysis, it was determined that the wire broke due to severe chloride ion corrosion. It is suspected that the chloride ion contamination came from the radiation induced breakdown of the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) riser liner. It is well documented that the breakdown of PVC due to radiation produces chloride containing compounds. This document provides a qualification test plan to remove and have analyzed the wire in all of the Enraf Series 854 that have been installed to date. These tests will confirm the presence or absence of chloride ions in the PVC liners and/or on the Enraf measuring wires installed in the tanks. This test will involve removing the 316 stainless steel wire drums from all of the existing Enraf Series 854 level gauges that have been installed. New 316 stainless steel wire drums shall be installed into the gauges and the gauges will be placed back into service. The wire that is removed from the gauges shall be sent to the 222-S Lab or the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for analysis. Additional wire replacements will occur at intervals as determined necessary by the results of the laboratory analyses

  7. Patients' Acceptance of Smartphone Health Technology for Chronic Disease Management: A Theoretical Model and Empirical Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Kaili; Yu, Ping; Deng, Ning; Liu, Fang; Guan, YingPing; Li, Zhenye; Ji, Yumeng; Du, Ningkai; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong

    2017-12-06

    Chronic disease patients often face multiple challenges from difficult comorbidities. Smartphone health technology can be used to help them manage their conditions only if they accept and use the technology. The aim of this study was to develop and test a theoretical model to predict and explain the factors influencing patients' acceptance of smartphone health technology for chronic disease management. Multiple theories and factors that may influence patients' acceptance of smartphone health technology have been reviewed. A hybrid theoretical model was built based on the technology acceptance model, dual-factor model, health belief model, and the factors identified from interviews that might influence patients' acceptance of smartphone health technology for chronic disease management. Data were collected from patient questionnaire surveys and computer log records about 157 hypertensive patients' actual use of a smartphone health app. The partial least square method was used to test the theoretical model. The model accounted for .412 of the variance in patients' intention to adopt the smartphone health technology. Intention to use accounted for .111 of the variance in actual use and had a significant weak relationship with the latter. Perceived ease of use was affected by patients' smartphone usage experience, relationship with doctor, and self-efficacy. Although without a significant effect on intention to use, perceived ease of use had a significant positive influence on perceived usefulness. Relationship with doctor and perceived health threat had significant positive effects on perceived usefulness, countering the negative influence of resistance to change. Perceived usefulness, perceived health threat, and resistance to change significantly predicted patients' intentions to use the technology. Age and gender had no significant influence on patients' acceptance of smartphone technology. The study also confirmed the positive relationship between intention to use

  8. Patients’ Acceptance of Smartphone Health Technology for Chronic Disease Management: A Theoretical Model and Empirical Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Kaili; Yu, Ping; Liu, Fang; Guan, YingPing; Li, Zhenye; Ji, Yumeng; Du, Ningkai; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic disease patients often face multiple challenges from difficult comorbidities. Smartphone health technology can be used to help them manage their conditions only if they accept and use the technology. Objective The aim of this study was to develop and test a theoretical model to predict and explain the factors influencing patients’ acceptance of smartphone health technology for chronic disease management. Methods Multiple theories and factors that may influence patients’ acceptance of smartphone health technology have been reviewed. A hybrid theoretical model was built based on the technology acceptance model, dual-factor model, health belief model, and the factors identified from interviews that might influence patients’ acceptance of smartphone health technology for chronic disease management. Data were collected from patient questionnaire surveys and computer log records about 157 hypertensive patients’ actual use of a smartphone health app. The partial least square method was used to test the theoretical model. Results The model accounted for .412 of the variance in patients’ intention to adopt the smartphone health technology. Intention to use accounted for .111 of the variance in actual use and had a significant weak relationship with the latter. Perceived ease of use was affected by patients’ smartphone usage experience, relationship with doctor, and self-efficacy. Although without a significant effect on intention to use, perceived ease of use had a significant positive influence on perceived usefulness. Relationship with doctor and perceived health threat had significant positive effects on perceived usefulness, countering the negative influence of resistance to change. Perceived usefulness, perceived health threat, and resistance to change significantly predicted patients’ intentions to use the technology. Age and gender had no significant influence on patients’ acceptance of smartphone technology. The study also

  9. Rein tension acceptance in young horses in a voluntary test situation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Janne Winther; zharkikh, T.L.; Antoine, A.

    2011-01-01

    Reasons for performing the study: During riding, horses are frequently exposed to pressure from the rider, e.g. through the bit and reins, but few studies have investigated at which point rein tension becomes uncomfortable for the horse. Objectives: To investigate how much rein tension young...... inexperienced horses are willing to accept in order to obtain a food reward; whether the tension acceptance changes during 3 consecutive test days; and whether rein tension correlates with the expression of conflict behaviour and heart rate. Hypotheses: Pressure-naïve horses will apply only little rein tension...... in the first voluntary trial, but their acceptance will gradually increase. High levels of rein tension will lead to expression of conflict behaviour and increases in heart rate. Methods: Fifteen 2-year-old, bridle-naïve mares were encouraged to stretch their head forward (across a 0.95 m high metal bar...

  10. Acceptance test procedure, 241-SY-101/241-C-106 shot loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrom, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure is for the 241-SY-101/241-C-106 Shot Loading System. The procedure will test the components of the Shot Loading System and its capability of adequately loading shot into the annular space of the Container. The loaded shot will provide shielding as required for transporting and storage of a contaminated pump after removal from the tank. This test serves as verification that the SLS is acceptable for use in the pump removal operations for Tanks 241-SY-101, 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. The pump removal operation for these three tanks will be performed by two different organizations with different equipment, but the Shot Loading System will be compatible between the two operations

  11. The deformable secondary mirror of VLT: final electro-mechanical and optical acceptance test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briguglio, Runa; Biasi, Roberto; Xompero, Marco; Riccardi, Armando; Andrighettoni, Mario; Pescoller, Dietrich; Angerer, Gerald; Gallieni, Daniele; Vernet, Elise; Kolb, Johann; Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves

    2014-07-01

    The Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) for the VLT ended the stand-alone electro-mechanical and optical acceptance process, entering the test phase as part of the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) at the ESO Headquarter (Garching). The VLT-DSM currently represents the most advanced already-built large-format deformable mirror with its 1170 voice-coil actuators and its internal metrology based on co-located capacitive sensors to control the shape of the 1.12m-diameter 2mm-thick convex shell. The present paper reports the final results of the electro-mechanical and optical characterization of the DSM executed in a collaborative effort by the DSM manufacturing companies (Microgate s.r.l. and A.D.S. International s.r.l.), INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri and ESO. The electro-mechanical acceptance tests have been performed in the company premises and their main purpose was the dynamical characterization of the internal control loop response and the calibration of the system data that are needed for its optimization. The optical acceptance tests have been performed at ESO (Garching) using the ASSIST optical test facility. The main purpose of the tests are the characterization of the optical shell flattening residuals, the corresponding calibration of flattening commands, the optical calibration of the capacitive sensors and the optical calibration of the mirror influence functions.

  12. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid ''P''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Test Plan provides a test method to dedicate the leak detection relays used on the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skids. The new skids are fabricated on-site. The leak detection system is a safety class system per the Authorization Basis

  13. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid Q

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Test Plan provides a test method to dedicate the leak detection relays used on the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skids. The new skids are fabricated on-site. The leak detection system is a safety class system per the Authorization Basis

  14. Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing: A Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M. J.; Mehos, M. S.; Kearney, D. W.; McMahan, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    As deployment of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) systems ramps up, the need for reliable and robust performance acceptance test guidelines for the solar field is also amplified. Project owners and/or EPC contractors often require extensive solar field performance testing as part of the plant commissioning process in order to ensure that actual solar field performance satisfies both technical specifications and performance guaranties between the involved parties. Performance test code work is currently underway at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with the SolarPACES Task-I activity, and within the ASME PTC-52 committee. One important aspect of acceptance testing is the selection of a robust technology performance model. NREL1 has developed a detailed parabolic trough performance model within the SAM software tool. This model is capable of predicting solar field, sub-system, and component performance. It has further been modified for this work to support calculation at subhourly time steps. This paper presents the methodology and results of a case study comparing actual performance data for a parabolic trough solar field to the predicted results using the modified SAM trough model. Due to data limitations, the methodology is applied to a single collector loop, though it applies to larger subfields and entire solar fields. Special consideration is provided for the model formulation, improvements to the model formulation based on comparison with the collected data, and uncertainty associated with the measured data. Additionally, this paper identifies modeling considerations that are of particular importance in the solar field acceptance testing process and uses the model to provide preliminary recommendations regarding acceptable steady-state testing conditions at the single-loop level.

  15. Toward optimizing patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in the accurate detection of dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable patient plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Elizabeth M; Balter, Peter A; Stingo, Francesco C; Jones, Jimmy; Followill, David S; Kry, Stephen F

    2014-12-01

    The authors investigated the performance of several patient-specific intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) dosimeters in terms of their ability to correctly identify dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable IMRT patient plans, as determined by an in-house-designed multiple ion chamber phantom used as the gold standard. A further goal was to examine optimal threshold criteria that were consistent and based on the same criteria among the various dosimeters. The authors used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the sensitivity and specificity of (1) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with field-by-field evaluation, (2) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with composite evaluation, (3) a 2D diode array using planned irradiation angles with composite evaluation, (4) a helical diode array, (5) radiographic film, and (6) an ion chamber. This was done with a variety of evaluation criteria for a set of 15 dosimetrically unacceptable and 9 acceptable clinical IMRT patient plans, where acceptability was defined on the basis of multiple ion chamber measurements using independent ion chambers and a phantom. The area under the curve (AUC) on the ROC curves was used to compare dosimeter performance across all thresholds. Optimal threshold values were obtained from the ROC curves while incorporating considerations for cost and prevalence of unacceptable plans. Using common clinical acceptance thresholds, most devices performed very poorly in terms of identifying unacceptable plans. Grouping the detector performance based on AUC showed two significantly different groups. The ion chamber, radiographic film, helical diode array, and anterior-delivered composite 2D diode array were in the better-performing group, whereas the anterior-delivered field-by-field and planned gantry angle delivery using the 2D diode array performed less well. Additionally, based on the AUCs, there was no significant difference

  16. Test report for run-in acceptance testing of Project W-151 300 HP mixing pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglin, B.G.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the results of a performance demonstration and operational checkout of three 300 HP mixer pumps in accordance with WHC-SD-WI51-TS-001 ''Mixer Pump Test Specification for Project W-151'' and Statement of Work 8K520-EMN-95-004 ''Mixer Pump Performance Demonstration at MASF'' in the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building. Testing of the pumps was performed by Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Engineering and funded by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project W-151. Testing began with the first pump on 04-01-95 and ended with the third pump on 11-01-96. Prior to testing, the MASF was modified and prepared to meet the pump testing requirements set forth by the Test Specification and the Statement of Work

  17. Cognitive styles, user acceptance and commitment to strategic plans in public organizations: an empirical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.R.J. George (Bert); S. Desmidt (Sebastian); E. Cools (Eva); A. Prinzie (Anita)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractGiven the lack of insights into the micro-determinants of strategic planning (SP) in public organizations, this study uses information-processing theory and self-efficacy theory to investigate individual-level predictors of commitment to strategic plans among planning team members

  18. An Evaluation of GeoBEST Contingency Beddown Planning Software Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jensen, Shawn

    2002-01-01

    .... The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was applied, which measures a prospective user's perceptions of the technology's usefulness and ease-of-use and predicts their intentions to use the software in the future...

  19. Disintegration of sublingual tablets: proposal for a validated test method and acceptance criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weda, M; van Riet-Nales, D A; van Aalst, P; de Kaste, D; Lekkerkerker, J F F

    2006-12-01

    In the Netherlands the market share of isosorbide dinitrate 5 mg sublingual tablets is dominated by 2 products (A and B). In the last few years complaints have been received from health care professionals on product B. During patient use the disintegration of the tablet was reported to be slow and/or incomplete, and ineffectiveness was experienced. In the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) no requirement is present for the disintegration time of sublingual tablets. The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro disintegration time of products A and B, and to establish a suitable test method and acceptance criterion. A and B were tested with the Ph. Eur. method described in the monograph on disintegration of tablets and capsules as well as with 3 modified tests using the same Ph. Eur. apparatus, but without movement of the basket-rack assembly. In modified test 1 and modified test 2 water was used as medium (900 ml and 50 ml respectively), whereas in modified test 3 artificial saliva was used (50 ml). In addition, disintegration was tested in Nessler tubes with 0.5 and 2 ml of water. Finally, the Ph. Eur. method was also applied to other sublingual tablets with other drug substances on the Dutch market. With modified test 3 no disintegration could be achieved within 20 min. With the Ph. Eur. method and modified tests 1 and 2 product A and B differed significantly (p disintegration times. These 3 methods were capable of discriminating between products and between batches. The time measured with the Ph. Eur. method was significantly lower compared to modified tests 1 and 2 (p tablets the disintegration time should be tested. The Ph. Eur. method is considered suitable for this test. In view of the products currently on the market and taking into consideration requirements in the United States Pharmacopeia and Japanese Pharmacopoeia, an acceptance criterion of not more than 2 min is proposed.

  20. Fast flux test facility, transition project plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttenberg, S.

    1994-01-01

    The FFTF Transition Project Plan, Revision 1, provides changes and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition

  1. Airborne Data Link Operational Evaluation Test Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This plan describes an end-to-end study of operational concepts and procedures associated with the introduction of electronic data communications between flight crews and air traffic controllers. Full performance controllers from : terminal facilitie...

  2. Fast flux test facility, transition project plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttenberg, S.

    1994-11-15

    The FFTF Transition Project Plan, Revision 1, provides changes and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  3. Integration and test planning patterns in different organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de I.S.M.; Boumen, R.; Mortel - Fronczak, van de J.M.; Rooda, J.E.; Tretmans, J.

    2007-01-01

    Planning an integration and test phase is often done by experts in the visited organizations. These experts have a thorough knowledge about the system, integration and testing and the business drivers of an organization. An integration and test plan developedfor an airplane is different than the

  4. Implementation and acceptability of strategies instituted for engaging men in family planning services in Kibaha district, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msovela, Judith; Tengia-Kessy, Anna

    2016-11-21

    Men as the main decision makers in most of African families have an important role to play towards acceptance of family planning methods. This study sought to identify strategies used to engage men in family planning services and determine the extent to which men in Kibaha district in Tanzania accept these interventions. We conducted a cross sectional study using both quantitative and qualitative techniques. We used a questionnaire to interview a random sample of 365 of currently married or cohabiting men who had at least one child under the age of five years. We further conducted in-depth interviews with health workers involved in delivering reproductive health services as well as community dispensers of family planning commodities. Descriptive analysis was used to determine the extent to which men were engaged in family planning services. The data from the indepth interviews were analysed manually according to the predetermined themes, guided by the grounded theory to identify the existing strategies used to encourage male involvement in family planning services. According to the key informants, strategies that are used to encourage men to engage in family planning services include invitations through their spouses, either verbally or by using partner notification cards, incorporating family planning messages during monthly meetings and community outreach reproductive health programs. Of 365 men responding to the questionnaire, only 31 (8.4%) said they were invited to accompany their spouses to family planning clinics. Among them, 71% (22/31) visited family planning clinics. A third (32%) of the respondents had heard of community health meetings and only 20.7% of them attended these meetings. More than a third (12/34) of men who attended these meeting asserted that family planning messages targeting men featured in the agenda and subsequently half of them visited health facilities for family planning services. Existing strategies such as invitations to clinics

  5. Social trust, risk perceptions and public acceptance of recycled water: testing a social-psychological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Victoria L; Fielding, Kelly S; Louis, Winnifred R

    2014-05-01

    Faced with a severe drought, the residents of the regional city of Toowoomba, in South East Queensland, Australia were asked to consider a potable wastewater reuse scheme to supplement drinking water supplies. As public risk perceptions and trust have been shown to be key factors in acceptance of potable reuse projects, this research developed and tested a social-psychological model of trust, risk perceptions and acceptance. Participants (N = 380) were surveyed a few weeks before a referendum was held in which residents voted against the controversial scheme. Analysis using structural equation modelling showed that the more community members perceived that the water authority used fair procedures (e.g., consulting with the community and providing accurate information), the greater their sense of shared identity with the water authority. Shared social identity in turn influenced trust via increased source credibility, that is, perceptions that the water authority is competent and has the community's interest at heart. The findings also support past research showing that higher levels of trust in the water authority were associated with lower perceptions of risk, which in turn were associated with higher levels of acceptance, and vice versa. The findings have a practical application for improving public acceptance of potable recycled water schemes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biological and chemical tests of contaminated soils to determine bioavailability and environmentally acceptable endpoints (EAE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, C.R.; Menzie, C.A.; Pauwells, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The understanding of the concept of bioavailability of soil contaminants to receptors and its use in supporting the development of EAE is growing but still incomplete. Nonetheless, there is increased awareness of the importance of such data to determine acceptable cleanup levels and achieve timely site closures. This presentation discusses a framework for biological and chemical testing of contaminated soils developed as part of a Gas Research Institute (GRI) project entitled ''Environmentally Acceptable Endpoints in Soil Using a Risk Based Approach to Contaminated Site Management Based on Bioavailability of Chemicals in Soil.'' The presentation reviews the GRI program, and summarizes the findings of the biological and chemical testing section published in the GRI report. The three primary components of the presentation are: (1) defining the concept of bioavailability within the existing risk assessment paradigm, (2) assessing the usefulness of the existing tests to measure bioavailability and test frameworks used to interpret these measurements, and (3) suggesting how a small selection of relevant tests could be incorporated into a flexible testing scheme for soils to address this issue

  7. Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA) Electrical Power Systems Test Operations: User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ESTA Electrical Power Systems Test Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  8. Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA) Battery Test Operations User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ESTA Battery Test Operations. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  9. Analysis of the cool down related cavity performance of the European XFEL vertical acceptance tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc; Schaffran, J.

    2017-09-15

    For the European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) cavity production, the cold radio-frequency (RF) test of the cavities at 2 K after delivery from the two vendors was the mandatory acceptance test. It has been previously reported, that the cool down dynamics of a cavity across T{sub c} has a significant influence on the observed intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0}, which is a measure of the losses on the inner cavity surface. A total number of 367 cool downs is used to analyze this correlation and we show that such a correlation is not observed during the European XFEL cavity production.

  10. W-026 acceptance test report system integration equipment (SIE)(submittal {number_sign} 018.6.A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, T.L.

    1997-01-27

    Acceptance testing of the System Integration Equipment (SIE) at Hanford was performed in two stages. The first was inconclusive, and resulted in a number of findings. These finding. are summarized as part of this report. The second stage of testing addressed these findings, and performed full system testing per the approved test procedure. This report includes summaries of all testing, results and finding.. Although the SIE did not in some cases perform as required for plant operations, it did perform per the system specification. (These discrepancies were noted and are addressed elsewhere.) Following testing, the system was formaLLy accepted. Documentation of this acceptance is incLuded in this report.

  11. Test plan for FY-91 dust control studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winberg, M.R.

    1991-03-01

    This test plan defines basic test procedures for testing commercially available vendor products as soil fixatives and dust suppression agents to determine their capability to control fugitive dust generation during transuranic waste retrieval and handling operations. A description of the test apparatus and methods are provided in this test plan. This test plan defines the sampling procedures, controls, and analytical methods for the samples collected. Data management is discussed, as well as quality assurance and safety requirements for the study. 6 refs., 5 figs

  12. Quality assurance in diagnostic radiology in Hungary - first experiences in acceptance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porubszky, T.; Pellet, S.; Ballay, L.; Talian, L.; Giczi, F.

    2003-01-01

    It is a general experience that optimum imaging with minimum patient doses, moreover, the safe operation and long life of X-ray equipment can be assured by regular measurement of technical parameters and checking of their constancy (routine performance testing) only. These tests are generally known as quality control, while together with the so-called corrective actions and its management it is called (physical-technical) quality assurance (QA). In the European Union, Directive 97/43/EURATOM about radiation protection of patients requires - among others - the good practice of (physical-technical) quality assurance. In Hungary, Decree No. 31/2001. (X.3.) of the Minister of Health harmonizes all of its requirements. Acceptance testing of new diagnostic X-ray equipment is assigned to NPHC-NRIRR. QA has been a daily practice in radiation therapy and nuclear medicine for a long time. A National Patient Dose Assessment Programme has also successfully run since 1989. We had, however, only few preliminaries in QA in diagnostic radiology in the second half of the eighties. Nowadays there are running QA programmes in some hospitals and mammography centres. he testing activity of our institute is independent from manufacturers, it is run within the frame of an accredited testing laboratory, using calibrated measuring instruments and based on valid international standards. So the started way of implementing QA in diagnostic radiology needs a lot of further efforts, adapting experiences of other countries, and also some financial help to reach an acceptable level in the EU. (authors)

  13. Consumer acceptance, market test and market development of irradiated rice, dehydrated vegetables and spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Peixin; Lin Yin

    2001-01-01

    Establishment of irradiation processing parameters, a quality assurance system, consumer acceptance, market test and market development of irradiated rice, dehydrated vegetables and spices were the activities carried out in this project by the Chinese Agricultural Irradiation Center. The results of the studies showed that the process dose for rice was 0.2-0.5 kGy when the non-uniformity was lower than 2.5, dose range for dehydrated vegetables was 5-7 kGy, dose for spices was 7-8 kGy. The system for quality assurance was established. The processing standards for several irradiated food items were set up. Market test showed that more than 70-80% of consumers accepted irradiated food. Industrial companies also accepted irradiated dehydrated vegetables and spices. The latter were successfully introduced to the markets and successful commercialization of irradiated garlic was followed. The economic benefit of operating the Chinese Agricultural Irradiation Center was analyzed and found attractive, especially for low dose irradiation of foods in sufficient supply. (author)

  14. Consumer acceptance, market test and market development of irradiated rice, dehydrated vegetables and spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixin, Shi; Yin, Lin [Chinese Agricultural Irradiation Center, Institute for Application of Atomic Energy, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2001-05-01

    Establishment of irradiation processing parameters, a quality assurance system, consumer acceptance, market test and market development of irradiated rice, dehydrated vegetables and spices were the activities carried out in this project by the Chinese Agricultural Irradiation Center. The results of the studies showed that the process dose for rice was 0.2-0.5 kGy when the non-uniformity was lower than 2.5, dose range for dehydrated vegetables was 5-7 kGy, dose for spices was 7-8 kGy. The system for quality assurance was established. The processing standards for several irradiated food items were set up. Market test showed that more than 70-80% of consumers accepted irradiated food. Industrial companies also accepted irradiated dehydrated vegetables and spices. The latter were successfully introduced to the markets and successful commercialization of irradiated garlic was followed. The economic benefit of operating the Chinese Agricultural Irradiation Center was analyzed and found attractive, especially for low dose irradiation of foods in sufficient supply. (author)

  15. Acceptance criteria for reprocessed AcuNav catheters: comparison between functionality testing and clinical image assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Alan J; Berry, James M; Wilson, Robert F; Lester, Bruce R

    2009-03-01

    The AcuNav-catheter is a vector-phased array ultrasound catheter that has shown great utility for both diagnosis and electrophysiological interventions. To test the feasibility of limited catheter reuse and to ensure that reprocessed catheters would produce acceptable clinical images, the present study compared the 2-D and Doppler image quality, as determined by clinical assessment, with the catheter's functional status as determined by the FirstCall 2000 transducer tester. Reprocessed catheters from four functional categories, two acceptable and two unacceptable, were used to collect images, 2-D and Doppler, from a porcine heart. The images were blinded and then rated by clinical evaluation. The study found that catheter images from all functional categories were found to be clinically acceptable except for those from the lowest unacceptable category. In addition, examination of tip deflection characteristics showed no significant difference between new and reprocessed catheters. We conclude that reprocessed AcuNav catheters that pass functional tests are able to produce clinical images, 2-D and Doppler, which are equivalent to their new counterparts.

  16. Home-based voluntary HIV counselling and testing found highly acceptable and to reduce inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelo Charles

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low uptake of voluntary HIV counselling and testing (VCT in sub-Saharan Africa is raising acceptability concerns which might be associated with ways by which it is offered. We investigated the acceptability of home-based delivery of counselling and HIV testing in urban and rural populations in Zambia where VCT has been offered mostly from local clinics. Methods A population-based HIV survey was conducted in selected communities in 2003 (n = 5035. All participants stating willingness to be HIV tested were offered VCT at home and all counselling was conducted in the participants' homes. In the urban area post-test counselling and giving of results were done the following day whereas in rural areas this could take 1-3 weeks. Results Of those who indicated willingness to be HIV tested, 76.1% (95%CI 74.9-77.2 were counselled and received the test result. Overall, there was an increase in the proportion ever HIV tested from 18% before provision of home-based VCT to 38% after. The highest increase was in rural areas; among young rural men aged 15-24 years up from 14% to 42% vs. for urban men from 17% to 37%. Test rates by educational attainment changed from being positively associated to be evenly distributed after home-based VCT. Conclusions A high uptake was achieved by delivering HIV counselling and testing at home. The highest uptakes were seen in rural areas, in young people and groups with low educational attainment, resulting in substantial reductions in existing inequalities in accessing VCT services.

  17. The Rapid Integration and Test Environment - A Process for Achieving Software Test Acceptance

    OpenAIRE

    Jack, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Proceedings Paper (for Acquisition Research Program) Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. The Rapid Integration and Test Environment (RITE) initiative, implemented by the Program Executive Office, Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence, Command and Control Program Office (PMW-150), was born of necessity. Existing processes for requirements definition and management, as well as those for software development, did not consistently deliver high-qualit...

  18. Overview of planning process at FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadeken, A.D.

    1986-03-01

    The planning process at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is controlled through a hierarchy of documents ranging from a ten-year strategic plan to a weekly schedule. Within the hierarchy are a Near-Term (three-year) Operating Plan, a Cycle (six-month) Plan, and an Outage/Operating Phase Schedule. Coordination of the planning process is accomplished by a dedicated preparation team that also provides an overview of the formal planning timetable which identifies key action items required to be completed before an outage/operating phase can begin

  19. Rein tension acceptance in young horses in a voluntary test situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, J W; Zharkikh, T L; Antoine, A; Malmkvist, J

    2011-03-01

    During riding, horses are frequently exposed to pressure from the rider, e.g. through the bit and reins, but few studies have investigated at which point rein tension becomes uncomfortable for the horse. To investigate how much rein tension young inexperienced horses are willing to accept in order to obtain a food reward; whether the tension acceptance changes during 3 consecutive test days; and whether rein tension correlates with the expression of conflict behaviour and heart rate. Pressure-naïve horses will apply only little rein tension in the first voluntary trial, but their acceptance will gradually increase. High levels of rein tension will lead to expression of conflict behaviour and increases in heart rate. Fifteen 2-year-old, bridle-naïve mares were encouraged to stretch their head forward (across a 0.95 m high metal bar) to obtain a food reward in a voluntary test situation. On each test day, each horse was exposed to 2 control sessions (loose reins), an intermediate and a short rein session (1 min/session). Rein tension, heart rate and behaviour were recorded. The horses applied significantly more tension on the first day (mean rein tension: 10.2 N), compared to the second and third test day (Day 2: 6.0 and Day 3: 5.7 N). The horses showed significantly more conflict behaviour in the short rein treatment. There was no treatment effect on heart rate. The horses applied the highest rein tension on the first day, and apparently learned to avoid the tension, rather than habituate to it. Rein tension correlated with expression of conflict behaviour, indicating that the horses found the tension aversive. Further studies should focus on the correlation between rein tension and conflict behaviour in ridden horses. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  20. Low acceptance of HSV-2 testing among high-risk women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, A M; Dodge, B M; Van Der Pol, B; Reece, M; Zimet, G D

    2011-06-01

    We evaluated the acceptability of a community-based herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) screening programme for at-risk women and assessed factors related to uptake of point of care HSV-2 testing. One hundred recently arrested women (median age 34 years) were recruited from a community court handling lower-level misdemeanour cases in Indianapolis, Indiana. Individuals completed a survey assessing factors related to HSV-2 screening intentions and were offered point of care HSV-2 testing. Rates of HSV-2 infection in this population are high; 61.1% of women tested were positive. The majority (81%) accepted a prescription for suppressive therapy. Women in this sample indicated that HSV-2 screening is an important component of health care but were unwilling to pay the US$10 it cost to be tested. To encourage this and other high-risk populations to be screened for HSV-2, public health resources will be needed to help individuals overcome cost-related barriers to care.

  1. Standard Ship Test and Inspection Plan, Procedures and Database

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    ... construction schedules and increased cost is the area of test and inspection. This project investigates existing rules and regulations for testing and inspection of commercial ships and identifies differences and similarities within the requirements. The results include comparison matrices, a standard test plan, a set of standard test procedures, and a sample test database developed for a typical commercial ship.

  2. ENRAF Series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) with SPU II card for Leak Detector Use Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, S.G.

    1999-01-01

    The following Acceptance Test Procedure was written to test the ENRAF series 854 ATG with SPU II card prior to installation in the Tank Farms. The procedure sets various parameters and verifies the gauge and alarms functionality

  3. ENRAF Series 854 Advanced Technology Gauge (ATG) with SPU ll Card for Leak Detector Use Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, S.G.

    1999-01-01

    The following Acceptance Test Procedure was written to test the Enraf Series 854 ATG with SPU-II card prior to installation in the Tank Farms. The procedure sets various parameters and verifies the gauge and the alarms functionality

  4. Configuration management plan for Machine Interface Test System (MITS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, C.K.

    1980-01-01

    The discipline required by this plan will apply from the establishment of a configuration baseline until completion of the final test in the MITS. The plan applies to configured items of hardware and software as well as to the specifications and drawings for these items. The plan encompasses establishment of the facility baseline, interface definition, classes of change, change control, change paper, organizational responsibilities and relationships, test configuration (as opposed to facility), and configuration data retention

  5. Basic considerations for the preparation of performance testing materials as related to performance evaluation acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCurdy, D.E.; Morton, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    The preparation of performance testing (PT) materials for environmental and radiobioassay applications involves the use of natural matrix materials containing the analyte of interest, the addition (spiking) of the analyte to a desired matrix (followed by blending for certain matrices) or a combination of the two. The distribution of the sample analyte concentration in a batch of PT samples will reflect the degree of heterogeneity of the analyte in the PT material and/or the reproducibility of the sample preparation process. Commercial and government implemented radioanalytical performance evaluation programs have a variety of acceptable performance criteria. The performance criteria should take into consideration many parameters related to the preparation of the PT materials including the within and between sample analyte heterogeneity, the accuracy of the quantification of an analyte in the PT material and to what 'known' value will a laboratory's result be compared. How sample preparation parameters affect the successful participation in performance evaluation (PE) programs having an acceptance criteria established as a percent difference from a 'known' value or in PE programs using other acceptance criteria, such as the guidance provided in ANSI N42.22 and N13.30 is discussed. (author)

  6. SU-F-T-313: Clinical Results of a New Customer Acceptance Test for Elekta VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusk, B; Fontenot, J [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To report the results of a customer acceptance test (CAT) for VMAT treatments for two matched Elekta linear accelerators. Methods: The CAT tests were performed on two clinically matched Elekta linear accelerators equipped with a 160-leaf MLC. Functional tests included performance checks of the control system during dynamic movements of the diaphragms, MLC, and gantry. Dosimetric tests included MLC picket fence tests at static and variable dose rates and a diaphragm alignment test, all performed using the on-board EPID. Additionally, beam symmetry during arc delivery was measured at the four cardinal angles for high and low dose rate modes using a 2D detector array. Results of the dosimetric tests were analyzed using the VMAT CAT analysis tool. Results: Linear accelerator 1 (LN1) met all stated CAT tolerances. Linear accelerator 2 (LN2) passed the geometric, beam symmetry, and MLC position error tests but failed the relative dose average test for the diaphragm abutment and all three picket fence fields. Though peak doses in the abutment regions were consistent, the average dose was below the stated tolerance corresponding to a leaf junction that was too narrow. Despite this, no significant differences in patient specific VMAT quality assurance measured were observed between the accelerators and both passed monthly MLC quality assurance performed with the Hancock test. Conclusion: Results from the CAT showed LN2 with relative dose averages in the abutment regions of the diaphragm and MLC tests outside the tolerances resulting from differences in leaf gap distances. Tolerances of the dose average tests from the CAT may be small enough to detect MLC errors which do not significantly affect patient QA or the routine MLC tests.

  7. SU-F-T-313: Clinical Results of a New Customer Acceptance Test for Elekta VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusk, B; Fontenot, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a customer acceptance test (CAT) for VMAT treatments for two matched Elekta linear accelerators. Methods: The CAT tests were performed on two clinically matched Elekta linear accelerators equipped with a 160-leaf MLC. Functional tests included performance checks of the control system during dynamic movements of the diaphragms, MLC, and gantry. Dosimetric tests included MLC picket fence tests at static and variable dose rates and a diaphragm alignment test, all performed using the on-board EPID. Additionally, beam symmetry during arc delivery was measured at the four cardinal angles for high and low dose rate modes using a 2D detector array. Results of the dosimetric tests were analyzed using the VMAT CAT analysis tool. Results: Linear accelerator 1 (LN1) met all stated CAT tolerances. Linear accelerator 2 (LN2) passed the geometric, beam symmetry, and MLC position error tests but failed the relative dose average test for the diaphragm abutment and all three picket fence fields. Though peak doses in the abutment regions were consistent, the average dose was below the stated tolerance corresponding to a leaf junction that was too narrow. Despite this, no significant differences in patient specific VMAT quality assurance measured were observed between the accelerators and both passed monthly MLC quality assurance performed with the Hancock test. Conclusion: Results from the CAT showed LN2 with relative dose averages in the abutment regions of the diaphragm and MLC tests outside the tolerances resulting from differences in leaf gap distances. Tolerances of the dose average tests from the CAT may be small enough to detect MLC errors which do not significantly affect patient QA or the routine MLC tests.

  8. Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) standby plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1997-03-06

    The FFTF Standby Plan, Revision 0, provides changes to the major elements and project baselines to maintain the FFTF plant in a standby condition and to continue washing sodium from irradiated reactor fuel. The Plan is consistent with the Memorandum of Decision approved by the Secretary of Energy on January 17, 1997, which directed that FFTF be maintained in a standby condition to permit the Department to make a decision on whether the facility should play a future role in the Department of Energy`s dual track tritium production strategy. This decision would be made in parallel with the intended December 1998 decision on the selection of the primary, long- term source of tritium. This also allows the Department to review the economic and technical feasibility of using the FFTF to produce isotopes for the medical community. Formal direction has been received from DOE-RL and Fluor 2020 Daniel Hanford to implement the FFTF standby decision. The objective of the Plan is maintain the condition of the FFTF systems, equipment and personnel to preserve the option for plant restart within three and one-half years of a decision to restart, while continuing deactivation work which is consistent with the standby mode.

  9. Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) standby plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    The FFTF Standby Plan, Revision 0, provides changes to the major elements and project baselines to maintain the FFTF plant in a standby condition and to continue washing sodium from irradiated reactor fuel. The Plan is consistent with the Memorandum of Decision approved by the Secretary of Energy on January 17, 1997, which directed that FFTF be maintained in a standby condition to permit the Department to make a decision on whether the facility should play a future role in the Department of Energy's dual track tritium production strategy. This decision would be made in parallel with the intended December 1998 decision on the selection of the primary, long- term source of tritium. This also allows the Department to review the economic and technical feasibility of using the FFTF to produce isotopes for the medical community. Formal direction has been received from DOE-RL and Fluor 2020 Daniel Hanford to implement the FFTF standby decision. The objective of the Plan is maintain the condition of the FFTF systems, equipment and personnel to preserve the option for plant restart within three and one-half years of a decision to restart, while continuing deactivation work which is consistent with the standby mode

  10. Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Combustible Gas Management Leak Test Acceptance Criteria (OCRWM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHERRELL, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to support the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's combustible gas management strategy while avoiding the need to impose any requirements for oxygen free atmospheres within storage tubes that contain multi-canister overpacks (MCO). In order to avoid inerting requirements it is necessary to establish and confirm leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs that are adequte to ensure that, in the unlikely event the leak test results for any MCO were to approach either of those criteria, it could still be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the SNF Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCOs or within their surroundings. To support that strategy, this document: (1) establishes combustible gas management functions and minimum functional requirements for the MCO's mechanical seals and closure weld(s); (2) establishes a maximum practical value for the minimum required initial MCO inert backfill gas pressure; and (3) based on items 1 and 2, establishes and confirms leak test acceptance criteria for the MCO's mechanical seal and final closure weld(s)

  11. Testing the validity and acceptability of the diagnostic criteria for Hoarding Disorder: a DSM-5 survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Cols, D; Fernández de la Cruz, L; Nakao, T; Pertusa, A

    2011-12-01

    The DSM-5 Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Sub-Workgroup is recommending the creation of a new diagnostic category named Hoarding Disorder (HD). The validity and acceptability of the proposed diagnostic criteria have yet to be formally tested. Obsessive-compulsive disorder/hoarding experts and random members of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) were shown eight brief clinical vignettes (four cases meeting criteria for HD, three with hoarding behaviour secondary to other mental disorders, and one with subclinical hoarding behaviour) and asked to decide the most appropriate diagnosis in each case. Participants were also asked about the perceived acceptability of the criteria and whether they supported the inclusion of HD in the main manual. Altogether, 211 experts and 48 APA members completed the survey (30% and 10% response rates, respectively). The sensitivity and specificity of the HD diagnosis and the individual criteria were high (80-90%) across various types of professionals, irrespective of their experience with hoarding cases. About 90% of participants in both samples thought the criteria would be very/somewhat acceptable for professionals and sufferers. Most experts (70%) supported the inclusion of HD in the main manual, whereas only 50% of the APA members did. The proposed criteria for HD have high sensitivity and specificity. The criteria are also deemed acceptable for professionals and sufferers alike. Training of professionals and the development and validation of semi-structured diagnostic instruments should improve diagnostic accuracy even further. A field trial is now needed to confirm these encouraging findings with real patients in real clinical settings.

  12. Formulation of a candidate glass for use as an acceptance test standard material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Wolf, S.F.

    1998-04-01

    In this report, the authors discuss the formulation of a glass that will be used in a laboratory testing program designed to measure the precision of test methods identified in the privatization contracts for the immobilization of Hanford low-activity wastes. Tests will be conducted with that glass to measure the reproducibility of tests and analyses that must be performed by glass producers as a part of the product acceptance procedure. Test results will be used to determine if the contractually required tests and analyses are adequate for evaluating the acceptability of likely immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) products. They will also be used to evaluate if the glass designed for use in these tests can be used as an analytical standard test material for verifying results reported by vendors for tests withg ILAW products. The results of those tests and analyses will be presented in a separate report. The purpose of this report is to document the strategy used to formulate the glass to be used in the testing program. The low-activity waste reference glass LRM that will be used in the testing program was formulated to be compositionally similar to ILAW products to be made with wastes from Hanford. Since the ILAW product compositions have not been disclosed by the vendors participating in the Hanford privatization project, the composition of LRM was formulated based on simulated Hanford waste stream and amounts of added glass forming chemicals typical for vitrified waste forms. The major components are 54 mass % SiO 2 , 20 mass % Na 2 O, 10 mass % Al 2 O 3 , 8 mass % B 2 O 3 , and 1.5 mass % K 2 O. Small amounts of other chemicals not present in Hanford wastes were also included in the glass, since they may be included as chemical additives in ILAW products. This was done so that the use of LRM as a composition standard could be evaluated. Radionuclides were not included in LRM because a nonradioactive material was desired

  13. Commissioning and Acceptance Testing of the existing linear accelerator upgraded to volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, Ekambaram; Ramasubramanian, Velayudham

    2013-01-01

    Aim The RapidArc commissioning and Acceptance Testing program will test and ensure accuracy in DMLC position, precise dose-rate control during gantry rotation and accurate control of gantry speed. Background Recently, we have upgraded our linear accelerator capable of performing IMRT which was functional from 2007 with image guided RapidArc facility. The installation of VMAT in the existing linear accelerator is a tedious process which requires many quality assurance procedures before the proper commissioning of the facility and these procedures are discussed in this study. Materials and methods Output of the machine at different dose rates was measured to verify its consistency at different dose rates. Monitor and chamber linearity at different dose rates were checked. DMLC QA comprising of MLC transmission factor measurement and dosimetric leaf gap measurements were performed using 0.13 cm3 and 0.65 cm3 Farmer type ionization chamber, dose 1 dosimeter, and IAEA 30 cm × 30 cm × 30 cm water phantom. Picket fence test, garden fence test, tests to check leaf positioning accuracy due to carriage movement, calibration of the leaves, leaf speed stability effects due to the acceleration and deceleration of leaves, accuracy and calibration of leaves in producing complex fields, effects of interleaf friction, etc. were verified using EDR2 therapy films, Vidar scanner, Omnipro accept software, amorphous silicon based electronic portal imaging device and EPIQA software.1–8 Results All the DMLC related quality assurance tests were performed and evaluated by film dosimetry, portal dosimetry and EPIQA.7 Conclusion Results confirmed that the linear accelerator is capable of performing accurate VMAT. PMID:24416566

  14. Commissioning and Acceptance Testing of the existing linear accelerator upgraded to volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, Ekambaram; Ramasubramanian, Velayudham

    2013-01-01

    The RapidArc commissioning and Acceptance Testing program will test and ensure accuracy in DMLC position, precise dose-rate control during gantry rotation and accurate control of gantry speed. Recently, we have upgraded our linear accelerator capable of performing IMRT which was functional from 2007 with image guided RapidArc facility. The installation of VMAT in the existing linear accelerator is a tedious process which requires many quality assurance procedures before the proper commissioning of the facility and these procedures are discussed in this study. Output of the machine at different dose rates was measured to verify its consistency at different dose rates. Monitor and chamber linearity at different dose rates were checked. DMLC QA comprising of MLC transmission factor measurement and dosimetric leaf gap measurements were performed using 0.13 cm(3) and 0.65 cm(3) Farmer type ionization chamber, dose 1 dosimeter, and IAEA 30 cm × 30 cm × 30 cm water phantom. Picket fence test, garden fence test, tests to check leaf positioning accuracy due to carriage movement, calibration of the leaves, leaf speed stability effects due to the acceleration and deceleration of leaves, accuracy and calibration of leaves in producing complex fields, effects of interleaf friction, etc. were verified using EDR2 therapy films, Vidar scanner, Omnipro accept software, amorphous silicon based electronic portal imaging device and EPIQA software.(1-8.) All the DMLC related quality assurance tests were performed and evaluated by film dosimetry, portal dosimetry and EPIQA.(7.) Results confirmed that the linear accelerator is capable of performing accurate VMAT.

  15. Project W-314 Polyurea Special Protective Coating (SPC) Test Plan Chemical Compatibility and Physical Characteristics Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAUSER, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    This Test Plan outlines the testing to be done on the Special Protective Coating (SPC) Polyurea which includes: Tank Waste Compatibility, Decontamination Factor Testing, and Adhesion Strength Testing after a sample has been exposed to Radiation

  16. Test Plan for Cask Identification Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Eric Benton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-29

    This document serves to outline the testing of a Used Fuel Cask Identification Detector (CID) currently being designed under the DOE-NE MPACT Campaign. A bench-scale prototype detector will be constructed and tested using surrogate neutron sources. The testing will serve to inform the design of the full detector that is to be used as a way of fingerprinting used fuel storage casks based on the neutron signature produced by the used fuel inside the cask.

  17. Accuracy and user-acceptability of HIV self-testing using an oral fluid-based HIV rapid test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oon Tek Ng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The United States FDA approved an over-the-counter HIV self-test, to facilitate increased HIV testing and earlier linkage to care. We assessed the accuracy of self-testing by untrained participants compared to healthcare worker (HCW testing, participants' ability to interpret sample results and user-acceptability of self-tests in Singapore. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross-sectional study, involving 200 known HIV-positive patients and 794 unknown HIV status at-risk participants was conducted. Participants (all without prior self-test experience performed self-testing guided solely by visual instructions, followed by HCW testing, both using the OraQuick ADVANCE Rapid HIV 1/2 Antibody Test, with both results interpreted by the HCW. To assess ability to interpret results, participants were provided 3 sample results (positive, negative, and invalid to interpret. Of 192 participants who tested positive on HCW testing, self-testing was positive in 186 (96.9%, negative in 5 (2.6%, and invalid in 1 (0.5%. Of 794 participants who tested negative on HCW testing, self-testing was negative in 791 (99.6%, positive in 1 (0.1%, and invalid in 2 (0.3%. Excluding invalid tests, self-testing had sensitivity of 97.4% (95% CI 95.1% to 99.7% and specificity of 99.9% (95% CI: 99.6% to 100%. When interpreting results, 96%, 93.1% and 95.2% correctly read the positive, negative and invalid respectively. There were no significant demographic predictors for false negative self-testing or wrongly interpreting positive or invalid sample results as negative. Eighty-seven percent would purchase the kit over-the-counter; 89% preferred to take HIV tests in private. 72.5% and 74.9% felt the need for pre- and post-test counseling respectively. Only 28% would pay at least USD15 for the test. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Self-testing was associated with high specificity, and a small but significant number of false negatives. Incorrectly identifying model results as

  18. Acceptance/operational test procedure 241-AN-107 Video Camera System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, L.T.

    1994-01-01

    This procedure will document the satisfactory operation of the 241-AN-107 Video Camera System. The camera assembly, including camera mast, pan-and-tilt unit, camera, and lights, will be installed in Tank 241-AN-107 to monitor activities during the Caustic Addition Project. The camera focus, zoom, and iris remote controls will be functionally tested. The resolution and color rendition of the camera will be verified using standard reference charts. The pan-and-tilt unit will be tested for required ranges of motion, and the camera lights will be functionally tested. The master control station equipment, including the monitor, VCRs, printer, character generator, and video micrometer will be set up and performance tested in accordance with original equipment manufacturer's specifications. The accuracy of the video micrometer to measure objects in the range of 0.25 inches to 67 inches will be verified. The gas drying distribution system will be tested to ensure that a drying gas can be flowed over the camera and lens in the event that condensation forms on these components. This test will be performed by attaching the gas input connector, located in the upper junction box, to a pressurized gas supply and verifying that the check valve, located in the camera housing, opens to exhaust the compressed gas. The 241-AN-107 camera system will also be tested to assure acceptable resolution of the camera imaging components utilizing the camera system lights

  19. Ice condenser testing facility and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannberg, L.D.; Ross, B.A.; Eschbach, E.J.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    A facility is being constructed to experimentally validate the ICEDF computer code. The code was developed to estimate the extent of fission product retention in the ice compartments of pressurized water reactor ice condenser containment systems during severe accidents. The design and construction of the facility is based on a test design that addresses the validation needs of the code for conditions typical of those expected to occur during severe pressurized water reactor accidents. Detailed facility design has followed completion of a test design (i.e., assembled test cases each involving a different set of aerosol and thermohydraulic flow conditions). The test design was developed with the aid of statistical test design software and was scrutinized for applicability with the aid of ICEDF simulations. The test facility will incorporate a small section of a prototypic ice condenser (e.g., a cross section comprising the equivalent of four 1-ft-diameter ice baskets to their full prototypic height of 48 ft). The development of the test design, the detailed facility design, and the construction progress are described in this paper

  20. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan: Annual summary, January 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan published in December of 1998 (DOE/NV--518) describes the Nevada Test Site stewardship mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. As part of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, DOE Nevada Operations Office has committed to perform and publish an annual summary review of DOE Nevada Operations' stewardship of the Nevada Test Site. This annual summary includes a description of progress made toward the goals of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, pertinent monitoring data, actions that were taken to adapt to changing conditions, and any other changes to the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan

  1. Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan: Annual summary, January 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan published in December of 1998 (DOE/NV--518) describes the Nevada Test Site stewardship mission and how its accomplishment will preserve the resources of the ecoregion while accomplishing the objectives of the mission. As part of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, DOE Nevada Operations Office has committed to perform and publish an annual summary review of DOE Nevada Operations' stewardship of the Nevada Test Site. This annual summary includes a description of progress made toward the goals of the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan, pertinent monitoring data, actions that were taken to adapt to changing conditions, and any other changes to the Nevada Test Site Resource Management Plan.

  2. Performance of the JT-60SA cryogenic system under pulsed heat loads during acceptance tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, C.; Bonne, F.; Roussel, P.; Lamaison, V.; Girard, S.; Fejoz, P.; Goncalves, R.; Vallet, J. C.; Legrand, J.; Fabre, Y.; Pudys, V.; Wanner, M.; Cardella, A.; Di Pietro, E.; Kamiya, K.; Natsume, K.; Ohtsu, K.; Oishi, M.; Honda, A.; Kashiwa, Y.; Kizu, K.

    2017-12-01

    The JT-60SA cryogenic system a superconducting tokamak currently under assembly at Naka, Japan. After one year of commissioning, the acceptance tests were successfully completed in October 2016 in close collaboration with Air Liquide Advanced Technologies (ALaT), the French atomic and alternative energies commission (CEA), Fusion for Energy (F4E) and the Quantum Radiological Science and Technology (QST). The cryogenic system has several cryogenic users at various temperatures: the superconducting magnets at 4.4 K, the current leads at 50 K, the thermal shields at 80 K and the divertor cryo-pumps at 3.7 K. The cryogenic system has an equivalent refrigeration power of about 9.5 kW at 4.5 K, with peak loads caused by the nuclear heating, the eddy currents in the structures and the AC losses in the magnets during cyclic plasma operation. The main results of the acceptance tests will be reported, with emphasis on the management of the challenging pulsed load operation using a liquid helium volume of 7 m3 as a thermal damper.

  3. The Worlds First Ever Cooling Tower Acceptance Test Using Process Data Reconciliation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnus Langenstein; Jan Hansen-Schmidt

    2006-01-01

    The cooling capacity of cooling towers is influenced by multiple constructive and atmospheric parameters in a very complex way. This leads to strong variations of the measured cold-water temperature and causes unacceptable unreliability of conventional acceptance tests, which are based on single point measurements. In order to overcome this lack of accuracy a new approach to acceptance test based on process data reconciliation has been developed by BTB Jansky and applied at a nuclear power plant. This approach uses process data reconciliation according to VDI 2048 to evaluate datasets over a long period covering different operating conditions of the cooling tower. Data reconciliation is a statistical method to determine the true process parameters with a statistical probability of 95% by considering closed material-, mass-and energy balances. Datasets which are not suitable for the evaluation due to strong transient gradients are excluded beforehand, according to well-defined criteria. The reconciled cold-water temperature is then compared, within a wet bulb temperature range of 5 deg. C to 20 deg. C to the manufacturer's guaranteed temperature. Finally, if the average deviation between reconciled and guaranteed value over the evaluated period is below zero, the cooling tower guarantee is fulfilled. (authors)

  4. Reliability Estimation Based Upon Test Plan Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Read, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The report contains a brief summary of aspects of the Maximus reliability point and interval estimation technique as it has been applied to the reliability of a device whose surveillance tests contain...

  5. In situ vitrification engineering-scale test ES-INEL-5 test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoots, P.R.

    1990-06-01

    In 1952, the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) was established at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). RWMC is located on approximately 144 acres in the southwestern corner of the INEL site and was established as a controlled area for the burial of solid low-level wastes generated by INEL operations. In 1954, the 88-acre Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of RWMC began accepting solid transuranic-contaminated waste. From 1954 to 1970, transuranic-contaminated waste was accepted from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) near Golden, CO, as well as from other US Department of Energy (DOE) locations. In 1987, the Buried Waste Program (BWP) was established by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., the prime contractor at INEL. Following the Environmental Restoration guidelines of the Buried Waste Program, the In Situ Vitrification Program is participating in a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for permanent disposal of INEL waste, in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This study was requested and is being funded by the Office of Technology Development of the Idaho Operations Office of DOE (DOE-ID). As part of the RI/FS, an in situ vitrification (ISV) scoping study on the treatability of mixed low-level and mixed transuranic-contaminated waste is being performed to determine applicability of ISV to remediation of waste at SDA. This In Situ Vitrification Engineering-Scale Test ES-INEL-5 Test Plan considers the data needs of engineering, regulatory, health, and safety activities for all sampling and analysis activities in support of engineering scale test ES-INEL-5. 5 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  6. The Careful Puppet Master: Reducing risk and fortifying acceptance testing with Jenkins CI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jason A.; Richman, Gabriel; DeStefano, John; Pryor, James; Rao, Tejas; Strecker-Kellogg, William; Wong, Tony

    2015-12-01

    Centralized configuration management, including the use of automation tools such as Puppet, can greatly increase provisioning speed and efficiency when configuring new systems or making changes to existing systems, reduce duplication of work, and improve automated processes. However, centralized management also brings with it a level of inherent risk: a single change in just one file can quickly be pushed out to thousands of computers and, if that change is not properly and thoroughly tested and contains an error, could result in catastrophic damage to many services, potentially bringing an entire computer facility offline. Change management procedures can—and should—be formalized in order to prevent such accidents. However, like the configuration management process itself, if such procedures are not automated, they can be difficult to enforce strictly. Therefore, to reduce the risk of merging potentially harmful changes into our production Puppet environment, we have created an automated testing system, which includes the Jenkins CI tool, to manage our Puppet testing process. This system includes the proposed changes and runs Puppet on a pool of dozens of RedHat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) virtual machines (VMs) that replicate most of our important production services for the purpose of testing. This paper describes our automated test system and how it hooks into our production approval process for automatic acceptance testing. All pending changes that have been pushed to production must pass this validation process before they can be approved and merged into production.

  7. Treatability Test Plan for an In Situ Biostimulation Reducing Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Oostrom, Mart; Hubbard, Susan; Borden, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2007-07-21

    This treatability test plan supports a new, integrated strategy to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the Hanford 100 Areas. This plan includes performing a field-scale treatability test for bioreduction of chromate, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen. In addition to remediating a portion of the plume and demonstrating reduction of electron acceptors in the plume, the data from this test will be valuable for designing a full-scale bioremediation system to apply at this and other chromium plumes at Hanford.

  8. Test plan for FY-91 alpha CAM evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winberg, M.R.

    1991-03-01

    This report describes the test plan for evaluating the Merlin Gerin, Inc., Edgar alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) and associated analysis system to be conducted by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Department of Energy. INEL has evaluated other commercial alpha CAM systems to detect transuranic contaminants during waste handling and retrieval operations. This test plan outlines experimental methods, sampling methods, sampling and analysis techniques, and equipment needed and safety and quality requirements to test the commercial CAM. 8 refs., 3 figs

  9. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1991-10-01

    This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material.

  10. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1991-10-01

    This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material

  11. Tank Monitor and Control System sensor acceptance test procedure. Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaief, C.C. III.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) is to verify the correct reading of sensor elements connected to the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS). The system functional requirements are contained in WHC-SD-WM-RD-013, Rev. 1 (WHC 1992a). This ATP is intended to be used for testing of the connection of existing temperature sensors, new temperature sensors, pressure sensing equipment, new Enraf level gauges, sensors that generate a current output, and discrete (on/off) inputs. The TMACS operation was verified by the original ATP (WHC 1991 c). It is intended that this ATP will be used each time sensors are added to the system. As a result, the data sheets have been designed to be generic

  12. Tank Monitor and Control System sensor acceptance test procedure. Revision 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaief, C.C. III.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this acceptance test procedure (ATP) is to verify the correct reading of sensor elements connected to the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS). This ATP is intended to be used for testing of the connection of existing temperature sensors, new temperature sensors, pressure sensing equipment, new Engraf level gauges, sensors that generate a current output, and discrete (on/off) inputs. It is intended that this ATP will be used each time sensors are added to the system. As a result, the data sheets have been designed to be generic. The TMACS has been designed in response to recommendations from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board primarily for improved monitoring of waste tank temperatures. The system has been designed with the capability to monitor other types of sensor input as well

  13. Eddy current testing on structures of nuclear-grade IG-110 graphite for acceptance test in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Saikusa, Akio; Iyoku, Tatsuo

    1993-09-01

    Core and core support graphite structures in the HTTR are mainly made of IG-110 graphite which is fine-grained isotropic and nuclear-grade. Nondestructive inspection with eddy current testing is planned to be applied to these graphite structures. Eddy current testing is widely applied to metallic structures and its testing method has been already established. On the other hand, the characteristics of graphite are quite different in micro-structure from these of metals. Therefore, the eddy current testing method provided for metallic structures can not be applied directly to graphite structures. Thus the eddy current testing method and condition were established for the graphite structures made of IG-110 graphite. (author)

  14. Acceptance testing and commissioning of Kodak Directview CR-850 digital radiography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezak, E; Nelligan, R A

    2006-03-01

    This Technical Paper describes Acceptance Testing and Commissioning of the Kodak DirectView CR-850 digital radiography system installed at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. The first of its type installed in Australia, the system is a "dry" image processor, for which no chemicals are required to develop images. Rather, latent radiographic images are stored on photostimulable phosphor screens, which are scanned and displayed by a reader unit. The image can be digitally processed and enhanced before it is forwarded to a storage device, printer or workstation display, thereby alleviating the need to re-expose patients to achieve satisfactory quality images. The phosphor screens are automatically erased, ready for re-use. Results are reported of tests carried out using the optional "Total Quality Tool" quality assurance package installed with the system. This package includes analysis and reporting software which provides for simple testing and reporting of many important characteristics of the system, such as field uniformity, aspect ratio, line and pixel positions, image and system noise, exposure response, scan linearity, modulation transfer function (MTF) and image artefacts. Acceptance Tests were performed for kV and MV exposures. Resolution for MV exposures was at least 0.8 l/mm, and measured phantom dimensions were within 1.05% of expected magnification. Reproducibility between cassettes was within 1.6%. The mean pixel values on the central axis were close to linear for MV exposures from 3 to 10 MU and reached saturation level at around 20 MU for 6 MV and around 30 MV for 23 MV beams. Noise levels were below 0.2 %.

  15. Is it acceptable to approach colorectal cancer patients at diagnosis to discuss genetic testing? A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Porteous, M; Dunckley, M; Appleton, S; Catt, S; Dunlop, M; Campbell, H; Cull, A

    2003-01-01

    In this pilot study, the acceptability of approaching 111 newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients with the offer of genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was assessed. A total of 78% of participants found it highly acceptable to have the information about HNPCC brought to their attention at that time.

  16. A review of acceptance testing of the Los Alamos, Canberra Alpha Sentry Continuous Air Monitor (CAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) undertook the design and development of a new generation of alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) instrumentation that would incorporate advanced technologies in the design of the sampling inlet, multi-channel analyzer (MCA) electronics, solid state alpha detectors, radon background interference suppression, background interference compensation and based on spectral analysis, and microcomputer based data communication, processing, storage, and retrieval. The ANSI air monitoring instrument standards (Performance Specifications for Health Physics Instrumentation -- Occupational Airborne Radioactivity Monitoring Instrumentation, N42.17B) specify performance criteria and testing procedures for instruments and instrument systems designed to continuously sample and quantify airborne radioactivity in the workplace. Although the intent of the standard is to provide performance testing criteria for type testing, it is appropriate to evaluate the performance of a new instrument such as the Alpha Sentry against certain of these criteria for purposes of an acceptance test based on stated specifications and the Los Alamos CAM Requirements document. This report provides an overview of the results of these tests, as they pertain to instruments designed to detect alpha-emitting radionuclides in particulate form

  17. Test plan: Potash Core Test. WIPP experimental program borehole plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, C.L.

    1979-09-01

    The Potash Core Test will utilize a WIPP emplaced plug to obtain samples of an in-situ cured plug of known mix constituents for bench scale testing. An earlier effort involved recovery at the salt horizon of Plug 217, a 17 year old plug in a potash exploration hole for bond testing, but the lack of particulars in the emplacement precluded significant determination of plug performance

  18. Plans and status for accepting spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitoun, Abe; Williams, John; Brown, Keith; Chacey, Kenneth

    1996-01-01

    In May 1996, the Department of Energy, acting with the cooperation of the Department of State, announced adoption of a policy that will have a significant influence on international efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons. This policy is concerned with the management of spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors. Spent nuclear fuel, unirradiated fuel, and target material accepted under the policy must contain uranium enriched in the U.S. Although such spent fuel will comprise a relatively small part of the Department of Energy's (the Department's) overall inventory of spent nuclear fuel, the policy invokes actions that provide a cornerstone of U.S. nonproliferation activities. Implementation of this policy is now underway. This paper describes the Department's implementation strategy with the emphasis on those actions that will affect foreign research reactor operators. (author)

  19. Nevada test site radionuclide inventory and distribution: project operations plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordas, J.F.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    This document is the operational plan for conducting the Radionuclide Inventory and Distribution Program (RIDP) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The basic objective of this program is to inventory the significant radionuclides of NTS origin in NTS surface soil. The expected duration of the program is five years. This plan includes the program objectives, methods, organization, and schedules

  20. Test plan for tank 241-C-104 retrieval testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HERTING, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Tank 241-C-104 has been identified as one of the first tanks to be retrieved for high-level waste pretreatment and immobilization. Retrieval of the tank waste will require dilution. Laboratory tests are needed to determine the amount of dilution required for safe retrieval and transfer of feed. The proposed laboratory tests are described in this document

  1. Test Plan for Tank 241-C-104 Retrieval Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HERTING, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Tank 241-C-104 has been identified as one of the first tanks to be retrieved for high-level waste pretreatment and immobilization. Retrieval of the tank waste will require dilution. Laboratory tests are needed to determine the amount of dilution required for safe retrieval and transfer of feed. The proposed laboratory tests are described in this document

  2. Understanding Student Teachers’ Behavioural Intention to Use Technology: Technology Acceptance Model (TAM Validation and Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung-Teck, Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study sets out to validate and test the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM in the context of Malaysian student teachers’ integration of their technology in teaching and learning. To establish factorial validity, data collected from 302 respondents were tested against the TAM using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, and structural equation modelling (SEM was used for model comparison and hypotheses testing. The goodness-of-fit test of the analysis shows partial support of the applicability of the TAM in a Malaysian context. Overall, the TAM accounted for 37.3% of the variance in intention to use technology among student teachers and of the five hypotheses formulated, four are supported. Perceived usefulness is a significant influence on attitude towards computer use and behavioural intention. Perceived ease of use significantly influences perceived usefulness, and finally, behavioural intention is found to be influenced by attitude towards computer use. The findings of this research contribute to the literature by validating the TAM in the Malaysian context and provide several prominent implications for the research and practice of technology integration development.

  3. Evaluation of CCTF Core-II second acceptance Test C2-AC2 (Run 052)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio

    1984-03-01

    In order to investigate the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior in a PWR during the reflood phase of the LOCA, large scale reflooding tests have been conducted at JAERI using the CCTF Core-I and Core-II facilities. This report presents the investigation on the difference in the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior observed between in the CCTF Core-I and Core-II facilities. For this purpose the test data of the second CCTF Core-II acceptance test C2-AC2 (Run 052) were evaluated by using the data of the Test CL-21 (Run 040) in the Core-I test series. The experimental conditions for these two tests were almost identical. Comparing the data of those two tests, the following is obtained. 1. The system behavior observed in the Core-II facility was nearly identical to that observed in the Core-I facility. 2. The core behavior observed in the Core-II facility was also nearly identical to that observed in the Core-I facility except for the top quenching behavior. 3. The differences in the top quenching behavior between the two facilities were as follows: (1) The selective occurrence of top quenching below the open holes of the upper core support plate observed in the Core-I facility was not observed in the Core-II facility. (2) Top quenching tended to occur less in the Core-II facility in the region where the initial average linear power density was over 1.69 kW/m. (author)

  4. Gallium-cladding compatibility testing plan: Phase 3: Test plan for centrally heated surrogate rodlet test. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.N.; Baldwin, C.A.; Wilson, D.F.

    1998-07-01

    The Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) is investigating the use of weapons grade plutonium in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for light-water reactors (LWR). Commercial MOX fuel has been successfully used in overseas reactors for many years; however, weapons derived fuel may differ from the previous commercial fuels because of small amounts of gallium impurities. A concern presently exists that the gallium may migrate out of the fuel, react with and weaken the clad, and thereby promote loss of fuel pin integrity. Phases 1 and 2 of the gallium task are presently underway to investigate the types of reactions that occur between gallium and clad materials. This is a Level-2 document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water Reactor Mixed-Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. This Plan summarizes the projected Phase 3 Gallium-Cladding compatibility heating test and the follow-on post test examination (PTE). This work will be performed using centrally-heated surrogate pellets, to avoid unnecessary complexities and costs associated with working with plutonium and an irradiation environment. Two sets of rodlets containing pellets prepared by two different methods will be heated. Both sets will have an initial bulk gallium content of approximately 10 ppm. The major emphasis of the PTE task will be to examine the material interactions, particularly indications of gallium transport from the pellets to the clad

  5. Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition

  6. Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  7. Minnesota urban partnership agreement national evaluation : content analysis test plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-17

    This report presents the content analysis test plan for the Minnesota Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) UPA Program. The Minnesota UPA projects focus on reducing congestion by employing ...

  8. Minnesota urban partnership agreement national evaluation : exogenous factors test plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-17

    This report presents the exogenous factors test plan for the national evaluation of the Minnesota Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) UPA Program. The Minnesota UPA projects focus on reduc...

  9. Minnesota urban partnership agreement national evaluation : safety data test plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-17

    This report provides the safety data test plan for the Minnesota Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) UPA Program. The Minnesota UPA projects focus on reducing congestion by employing strat...

  10. Minnesota urban partnership agreement national evaluation : tolling test plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-17

    This report presents the test plan for collecting and analyzing toll data for the Minnesota Urban Partnership : Agreement (UPA) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) UPA Program. The : Minnesota UPA projects focus on reducin...

  11. Minnesota urban partnership agreement national evaluation : telecommuting test plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-17

    This report presents the telecommuting test plan for the Minnesota Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) UPA Program. The Minnesota UPA projects focus on reducing congestion by employing str...

  12. Family Planning Behavior and Small Family Concept Acceptance in Two Different Geographical Characteristics Municipality of South Klaten, Klaten, Central Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Priyono

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The research aim to know the family planning behaviour, the acceptance small family norm and the influential factors in two villages that have different geographical aspect. The behaviour involve the knowledge, the attitude and the practice where as the influential factors involve education, accupation, values of children, income, children still born and family size desired. The research areas are chosen purposive in two villages that have different geographical aspect, social aspect and cultural aspect. The aspect are: 1 location and topography, 2 socialy  structure, and 3 the achievement of effective acceptor. Based on the three aspects, Ngalas village (developing and Sumberejo (developed are chosen as research areas. The recorded as ative acceptor (recordedin RI/PUS/1991 form. The respondents are chosen by cencus at two neighborhoord association at every village. There are six variables in this research are assumed influence the periode of the contraceptives use, such as education, occupation status, values of children, family income, children still born, and family size desired. There are three variables are assumed influence the small family norm, such as education, occupation status, and values of children. The data was analyzed by frequency table, crosee table, and statistical analysis (Q square and Regresion. The data was always compared between the two villages. The analysis use computer by Microsoft Program.  The research result showed that Sumberejo was better than Ngalas in the knowledge, the attitude, and the practice of family planning. Most of the people who live in Sumberejo understood the contraception device well (52,4%, where as in Ngalas (26,8%. Both of them agreed on using contraception device (more than 70%. The respondent who live in Sumberejo used IUD (40% and MOW/MOP (23,23%. They had used of the contraception device for 4.8 years on an average. Mean  while the respondents in Ngalas use IUD (23,68% and MOW/MOP (2

  13. Factors predicting the acceptance of herpes simplex virus type 2 antibody testing among adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimet, Gregory D; Rosenthal, Susan L; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Brady, Rebecca C; Tu, Wanzhu; Wu, Jingwei; Bernstein, David I; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Stone, Katherine M; Leichliter, Jami S; Fife, Kenneth H

    2004-11-01

    The rates and determinants of acceptance of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) testing have not been adequately studied. The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with acceptance of HSV-2 antibody testing in individuals with no history of genital herpes. We conducted a cross-sectional survey study followed by the offer of free HSV-2 serologic testing at an urban sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic, 2 general adult medical clinics, an urban university campus, and an urban adolescent medicine clinic. A total of 1199 individuals aged 14 to 30 years completed the survey and were offered testing. A total of 68.4% accepted HSV-2 testing. Factors independently associated with acceptance were female sex, older age, having an STD history, having 1 or more sexual partners in the last 6 months, perceived vulnerability to HSV-2 infection, and perceived benefits of HSV-2 testing. Fear of needles predicted rejection of testing, as did attending a general medical clinic versus an STD clinic and nonwhite race. There is a substantial interest in HSV-2 antibody testing across a variety of settings. Those at greatest behavioral and historic risk for HSV-2 infection, women, and persons whose health beliefs are consistent with testing are more likely to accept serologic testing when it is offered.

  14. Full-Scale Cask Testing and Public Acceptance of Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments - 12254

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilger, Fred [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects Carson City, NV 80906 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Full-scale physical testing of spent fuel shipping casks has been proposed by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) 2006 report on spent nuclear fuel transportation, and by the Presidential Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future 2011 draft report. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2005 proposed full-scale testing of a rail cask, and considered 'regulatory limits' testing of both rail and truck casks (SRM SECY-05-0051). The recent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project, NRC evaluation of extended spent fuel storage (possibly beyond 60-120 years) before transportation, nuclear industry adoption of very large dual-purpose canisters for spent fuel storage and transport, and the deliberations of the BRC, will fundamentally change assumptions about the future spent fuel transportation system, and reopen the debate over shipping cask performance in severe accidents and acts of sabotage. This paper examines possible approaches to full-scale testing for enhancing public confidence in risk analyses, perception of risk, and acceptance of spent fuel shipments. The paper reviews the literature on public perception of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste transportation risks. We review and summarize opinion surveys sponsored by the State of Nevada over the past two decades, which show consistent patterns of concern among Nevada residents about health and safety impacts, and socioeconomic impacts such as reduced property values along likely transportation routes. We also review and summarize the large body of public opinion survey research on transportation concerns at regional and national levels. The paper reviews three past cask testing programs, the way in which these cask testing program results were portrayed in films and videos, and examines public and official responses to these three programs: the 1970's impact and fire testing of spent fuel truck casks at Sandia National

  15. Test plan for engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L.C.

    1993-02-01

    This test plan describes experimental details of an engineering-scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration to be performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in fiscal year (FY)-93. This demonstration will investigate, in the engineering scale, the feasibility of using electrostatic enclosures and devices to control the spread of contaminants during transuranic waste handling operations. Test objectives, detailed experimental procedures, and data quality objectives necessary to perform the FY-93 experiments are included in this plan

  16. Shielding requirements on-site loading and acceptance testing on the Leksell gamma knife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maitz, A.H.; Lunsford, L.D.; Wu, A.; Lindner, G.; Flickinger, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    On August 14, 1987, the first stereotactic radiosurgical procedure using the gamma knife was performed in North America. Located in a self-contained radiosurgical suite in the basement of Presbyterian-University Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This device uses 201 highly focused beams 60Co for the single-treatment closed-skull irradiation of brain lesions localized by stereotactic techniques (radiosurgery). One hundred and fifty-two patients with intracranial arteriovenous malformations or brain tumors were treated in the first year of operation. The Presbyterian University Hospital of Pittsburgh gamma knife is the first such unit in which the 60Co sources were loaded on-site. This effort required us to solve some difficult and unusual problems encountered during site preparation, delivery, and loading of the unit in a busy hospital setting. The solutions developed enabled installation and use of the gamma knife with minimal disruption of hospital activities while maintaining acceptable levels of exposure to radiation. Environmental surveys performed during the loading of the 201 radioactive sources (total, 219 TBq) confirmed that on-site loading is possible and practical. Our experience in the design, construction, and implementation of the first North American gamma knife supports the practicality and safety of on-site loading and may be of value in the planning and development of future gamma knife installations

  17. SCTI chemical leak detection test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Tests will be conducted on the CRBRP prototype steam generator at SCTI to determine the effects of steam generator geometry on the response of the CRBRP chemical leak detection system to small water-to-sodium leaks in various regions of the steam generator. Specifically, small injections of hydrogen gas (simulating water leaks) will be made near the two tubesheets, and the effective transport times to the main stream exit and vent line hydrogen meters will be measured. The magnitude and time characteristics of the meters' response will also be measured. This information will be used by the Small Leak Protection Base Program (SG027) for improved predictions of meter response times and leak detection sensitivity

  18. Light Duty Utility Arm system pre-operational (cold test) test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Light Duty Utility (LDUA) Cold Test Facility, located in the Hanford 400 Area, will be used to support cold testing (pre- operational tests) of LDUA subsystems. Pre-operational testing is composed of subsystem development testing and rework activities, and integrated system qualification testing. Qualification testing will be conducted once development work is complete and documentation is under configuration control. Operational (hot) testing of the LDUA system will follow the testing covered in this plan and will be covered in a separate test plan

  19. Development of OSSA(Operation Service Support Agreement) Simulator and Site Acceptance Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, DaeSeung; Ahn, Sung-Jin; Lee, Jong-Beom [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Building the nuclear power plant is on the schedule, remaining question is who could operate the NPP after the construction is finished. OSSA is known as Operation Service Support Agreement, it is the contract between KHNP(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.,) and ENEC(Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation) for United Arab Emirates Nuclear Power Plant operations support. The contract is mostly about the safety and reliability operations and as well as of the training of UAE operators to have better experiences. UAE operators needed to be trained and tested before they come to UAE for operate the NPP. The OSSA simulator was built because operator shall not make any mistakes even if the plant is not yet constructed. Simulator Training is a key for getting experiences without operating the actual plant, because the nuclear power plant never used as the test in real situations. Operators’ requirement is to have more than 2 years at site experiences and also they have to be trained 5 to 8 months of the training. The experience such as the site acceptance test will lead the future nuclear industry to meet the global standard and to lead the safety of the NPP. Under the OSSA agreement 400 KHNP experts will support the operations. Most of the operators were trained at the OSSA simulator which is most reliable simulator that can demonstrate satisfactory performance for the simulator.

  20. LS1 Report: testing Plan B

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer & Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    A team from the TE Department is currently testing the secondary electrical network for the LHC’s main dipoles – that is, the power circuit used in the event of a quench (loss of superconductivity). This secondary network is essential for the safety of the machine and has been strengthened as part of the SMACC project (see here).   In event of a quench, the current travels via a secondary circuit (in yellow). In order to reach an energy of 6.5 TeV per beam, the LHC will need to be supplied with an electrical current of 11 kA. While the machine’s dozens of kilometres of superconducting cables usually transport the current without any problems (i.e. with no electrical resistance), quenches can sometimes occur as a result of instabilities that cause a loss of superconductivity. In this case, the current travels via a secondary circuit, a short back-up network:  diodes that divert the current if the quench occurs in a magnet and copper bars ...

  1. Test plan for prototype dielectric permittivity sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, M.C.

    1993-07-01

    The digface characterization project funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is designed to test a new method of monitoring hazardous conditions during the remediation at waste sites. Often on a large scale, the exact cause of each anomaly is difficult to determine and ambiguities remain in the characterization of a site. The digface characterization concept is designed to alleviate some of this uncertainty by creating systems that monitor small volumes of soil and detect anomalous areas during remediation before they are encountered. The goal of the digface characterization demonstration is to detect changes in the physical properties from one volume to another and relate these changes in physical properties to changes in the level of contamination. Dielectric permittivity mapping is a method that might prove useful in digface characterization. In this project, the role of a dielectric permittivity monitoring device is under investigation. This project addresses two issues: what are the optimal means of mapping dielectric permittivity contrasts and what types of targets can be detected using dielectric permittivity mapping

  2. When it is unfamiliar to me: Local acceptance of planned nuclear power plants in China in the post-fukushima era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yue; Ren, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Many contributions have been made in the studies of the factors that influence public acceptance of nuclear power. However, previous studies seldom focused on nuclear power plants in the planning stage. Actually public perception is usually more sensitive at the preliminary planning stage of a nuclear power station. Mainly utilizing questionnaire survey and focus group methods, we have identified the factors that are correlated with local acceptance of planned nuclear power plants in China. We conducted our survey in two cities, Huludao, Liaoning province in northern China, and Shanwei, Guangdong province in southern China, where the local government was planning to build its first nuclear power plant. We find that people who live closer to the plant sites are less willing to accept nuclear power than those who live farther away. As for “surface psychology” factors, perceived benefits and risks significantly influence local acceptance. As for “deep psychology” factors, emotional identification and social trust can significantly influence local acceptance, while perceived knowledge cannot. When citizens are unfamiliar with nuclear power plants, they are more inclined to evaluate the benefits and risks through emotional identification and social trust, rather than through pure rational deduction based on concrete facts. - Highlights: • We focus on the local acceptance of nuclear power in the planning stages. • People who live closer to plant sites are less willing to accept nuclear power. • Perceived benefits and risks significantly influence local acceptance. • Emotional identification and trust can significantly influence local acceptance. • While perceived knowledge cannot significantly influence local acceptance.

  3. Ordinary risks and accepted fictions: how contrasting and competing priorities work in risk assessment and mental health care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Michael; Cohen, Rachel; Faulkner, Alison; Hannigan, Ben; Simpson, Alan; Barlow, Sally

    2017-06-01

    Communication and information sharing are considered crucial to recovery-focused mental health services. Effective mental health care planning and coordination includes assessment and management of risk and safety. Using data from our cross-national mixed-method study of care planning and coordination, we examined what patients, family members and workers say about risk assessment and management and explored the contents of care plans. Thematic analysis of qualitative research interviews (n = 117) with patients, family members and workers, across four English and two Welsh National Health Service sites. Care plans were reviewed (n = 33) using a structured template. Participants have contrasting priorities in relation to risk. Patients see benefit in discussions about risk, but cast the process as a worker priority that may lead to loss of liberty. Relationships with workers are key to family members and patients; however, worker claims of involving people in the care planning process do not extend to risk assessment and management procedures for fear of causing upset. Workers locate risk as coming from the person rather than social or environmental factors, are risk averse and appear to prioritize the procedural aspects of assessment. Despite limitations, risk assessment is treated as legitimate work by professionals. Risk assessment practice operates as a type of fiction in which poor predictive ability and fear of consequences are accepted in the interests of normative certainty by all parties. As a consequence, risk adverse options are encouraged by workers and patients steered away from opportunities for ordinary risks thereby hindering the mobilization of their strengths and abilities. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Standard review plan for the review and evaluation of emergency plans for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    This document provides a Standard Review Plan to assure that complete and uniform reviews are made of research and test reactor radiological emergency plans. The report is organized under ten planning standards which correspond to the guidance criteria in American National Standard ANSI/ANS 15.16 - 1982 as endorsed by Revision 1 to Regulatory Guide 2.6. The applicability of the items under each planning standard is indicated by subdivisions of the steady-state thermal power levels at which the reactors are licensed to operate. Standard emergency classes and example action levels for research and test reactors which should initiate these classes are given in an Appendix. The content of the emergency plan is as follows: the emergency plan addresses the necessary provisions for coping with radiological emergencies. Activation of the emergency plan is in response to the emergency action levels. In addition to addressing those severe emergencies that will fall within one of the standard emergency classes, the plan also discusses the necessary provisions to deal with radiological emergencies of lesser severity that can occur within the operations boundary. The emergency plan allows for emergency personnel to deviate from actions described in the plan for unusual or unanticipated conditions

  5. Open test assembly (OTA) shear demonstration testing work/test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, S.W.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the development testing phase associated with the OTA Shear activity and defines the controls to be in place throughout the testing. The purpose of the OTA Shear Program was to provide equipment that is needed for the processing of 40 foot long, sodium wetted, irradiated core components previously used in the FFTF reactor to monitor fuel and materials tests. There are currently 15 of these OTA test stalks located in the Test Assembly Conditioning Station (TACS) inerted vault. These need to be dispositioned for a shutdown mission to eliminate this highly activated, high dose inventory prior to turnover to the ERC since they must be handled by remote operations. These would also need to be dispositioned for a restart mission to free up the vault they currently reside in. The waste handling and cleaning equipment in the J33M Cell was designed and built for the handling of reactor components up to the standard 12 foot length. This program will provide the equipment to the IEM Cell to remotely section the OTAS into pieces less than 12 feet in length to allow for the necessary handling and cleaning operations required for proper disposition. Due to the complexity of all operations associated with remote handling, the availability of the IEM Cell training facility, and the major difficulty with reworking contaminated equipment, it was determined that preliminary testing of the equipment was desirable, This testing activity would provide the added assurance that the equipment will operate as designed prior to performance of the formal Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) at the IEM Cell, This testing activity will also allow for some operator familiarity and procedure checkout prior to actual installation into the IEM Cell. This development testing will therefore be performed at the conclusion of equipment fabrication and prior to transfer of the equipment to the 400 Area

  6. Who accepts a rapid HIV antibody test? The role of race/ethnicity and HIV risk behavior among community adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Rebecca R; Hadley, Wendy S; Houck, Christopher D; Dance, S Kwame; Brown, Larry K

    2011-05-01

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines recommend routine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening in health care settings for all individuals aged 13-64 years; however, overall testing rates among adolescents still continue to remain low. This study examined factors related to the acceptance of HIV testing among an at-risk sample of ethnically/racially diverse community adolescents. Adolescents aged 15-21 (N = 81) years were recruited from community-based youth organizations to complete HIV risk assessment surveys. After the completion of the survey, participants were offered a free OraQuick rapid HIV antibody test. More than half (53.1%) of the participants accepted the test, with the black population being more likely to accept testing as compared to Latinos (75% vs. 39%). After controlling for race/ethnicity, significant predictors of test acceptance included history of sexual intercourse (OR = 5.43), having only one sexual partner in the past 3 months (OR = 4.88), not always using a condom with a serious partner (OR = 3.94), and not using a condom during last sexual encounter (OR = 4.75). Given that many adolescents are willing to know their HIV status, policies that support free or low-cost routine testing may lead to higher rates of case identification among youth. However, approaches must be developed to increase test acceptance among Latino adolescents and teenagers with multiple sexual partners. Copyright © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors associated with willingness to accept oral fluid HIV rapid testing among most-at-risk populations in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanmiao Xun

    Full Text Available The availability of oral fluid HIV rapid testing provides an approach that may have the potential to expand HIV testing in China, especially among most-a-risk populations. There are few investigations about the acceptability of oral fluid HIV testing among most-at-risk populations in China.A cross-sectional study with men who have sex with men (MSM, female sex workers (FSW and voluntary counseling and testing (VCT clients was conducted in three cities of Shandong province, China from 2011 to 2012. Data were collected by face-to-face questionnaire.About 71% of participants were willing to accept the oral fluid HIV rapid testing, and home HIV testing was independently associated with acceptability of the new testing method among MSM, FSW and VCT clients (AOR of 4.46, 3.19 and 5.74, respectively. Independent predictors of oral fluid HIV rapid testing acceptability among MSM were having ever taken an oral fluid HIV rapid test (AOR= 15.25, having ever taken an HIV test (AOR= 2.07, and education level (AOR= 1.74. Engagement in HIV-related risk behaviors (AOR= 1.68 was an independent predictor of acceptability for FSW. Having taken an HIV test (AOR= 2.85 was an independent predictor of acceptability for VCT clients. The primary concern about the oral fluid HIV testing was accuracy. The median price they would pay for the testing ranged from 4.8 to 8.1 U.S. dollars.High acceptability of oral fluid HIV rapid testing was shown among most-at-risk populations. Findings provide support for oral rapid HIV testing as another HIV prevention tool, and provide a backdrop for the implementation of HIV home testing in the near future. Appropriate pricing and increased public education through awareness campaigns that address concerns about the accuracy and safety of the oral fluid HIV rapid testing may help increase acceptability and use among most-at-risk populations in China.

  8. Optimal grasp planning for a dexterous robotic hand using the volume of a generalized force ellipsoid during accepted flattening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A grasp planning method based on the volume and flattening of a generalized force ellipsoid is proposed to improve the grasping ability of a dexterous robotic hand. First, according to the general solution of joint torques for a dexterous robotic hand, a grasping indicator for the dexterous hand—the maximum volume of a generalized external force ellipsoid and the minimum volume of a generalized contact internal force ellipsoid during accepted flattening—is proposed. Second, an optimal grasp planning method based on a task is established using the grasping indicator as an objective function. Finally, a simulation analysis and grasping experiment are performed. Results show that when the grasping experiment is conducted with the grasping configuration and positions of contact points optimized using the proposed grasping indicator, the root-mean-square values of the joint torques and contact internal forces of the dexterous hand are at a minimum. The effectiveness of the proposed grasping planning method is thus demonstrated.

  9. R&D Plan for RISMC Industry Application #1: ECCS/LOCA Cladding Acceptance Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo Henriques [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Epiney, Aaron Simon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tu, Lei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is finalizing a rulemaking change that would revise the requirements in 10 CFR 50.46. In the proposed new rulemaking, designated as 10 CFR 50.46c, the NRC proposes a fuel performance-based equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) criterion as a function of cladding hydrogen content before the accident (pre-transient) in order to include the effects of higher burnup on cladding performance as well as to address other technical issues. A loss of operational margin may result due to the more restrictive cladding embrittlement criteria. Initial and future compliance with the rule may significantly increase vendor workload and licensee costs as a spectrum of fuel rod initial burnup states may need to be analyzed to demonstrate compliance. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated a project, as part of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), to develop analytical capabilities to support the industry in the transition to the new rule. This project is called the Industry Application 1 (IA1) within the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of LWRS. The general idea behind the initiative is the development of an Integrated Evaluation Model (IEM). The motivation is to develop a multiphysics framework to analyze how uncertainties are propagated across the stream of physical disciplines and data involved, as well as how risks are evaluated in a LOCA safety analysis as regulated under 10 CFR 50.46c. This IEM is called LOTUS which stands for LOCA Toolkit for US, and it represents the LWRS Program’s response to the proposed new rule making. The focus of this report is to complete an R&D plan to describe the demonstration of the LOCA/ECCS RISMC Industry Application # 1 using the advanced RISMC Toolkit and methodologies. This report includes the description and development plan for a RISMC LOCA tool that fully couples advanced MOOSE tools already in development in order to characterize and optimize

  10. Wireless fetal heart rate monitoring in inpatient full-term pregnant women: testing functionality and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatin, Adeline A; Wylie, Blair; Goldfarb, Ilona; Azevedo, Robin; Pittel, Elena; Ng, Courtney; Haberer, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    We tested functionality and acceptability of a wireless fetal monitoring prototype technology in pregnant women in an inpatient labor unit in the United States. Women with full-term singleton pregnancies and no evidence of active labor were asked to wear the prototype technology for 30 minutes. We assessed functionality by evaluating the ability to successfully monitor the fetal heartbeat for 30 minutes, transmit this data to Cloud storage and view the data on a web portal. Three obstetricians also rated fetal cardiotocographs on ease of readability. We assessed acceptability by administering closed and open-ended questions on perceived utility and likeability to pregnant women and clinicians interacting with the prototype technology. Thirty-two women were enrolled, 28 of whom (87.5%) successfully completed 30 minutes of fetal monitoring including transmission of cardiotocographs to the web portal. Four sessions though completed, were not successfully uploaded to the Cloud storage. Six non-study clinicians interacted with the prototype technology. The primary technical problem observed was a delay in data transmission between the prototype and the web portal, which ranged from 2 to 209 minutes. Delays were ascribed to Wi-Fi connectivity problems. Recorded cardiotocographs received a mean score of 4.2/5 (± 1.0) on ease of readability with an interclass correlation of 0.81(95%CI 0.45, 0.96). Both pregnant women and clinicians found the prototype technology likable (81.3% and 66.7% respectively), useful (96.9% and 66.7% respectively), and would either use it again or recommend its use to another pregnant woman (77.4% and 66.7% respectively). In this pilot study we found that this wireless fetal monitoring prototype technology has potential for use in a United States inpatient setting but would benefit from some technology changes. We found it to be acceptable to both pregnant women and clinicians. Further research is needed to assess feasibility of using this

  11. Wireless fetal heart rate monitoring in inpatient full-term pregnant women: testing functionality and acceptability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline A Boatin

    Full Text Available We tested functionality and acceptability of a wireless fetal monitoring prototype technology in pregnant women in an inpatient labor unit in the United States. Women with full-term singleton pregnancies and no evidence of active labor were asked to wear the prototype technology for 30 minutes. We assessed functionality by evaluating the ability to successfully monitor the fetal heartbeat for 30 minutes, transmit this data to Cloud storage and view the data on a web portal. Three obstetricians also rated fetal cardiotocographs on ease of readability. We assessed acceptability by administering closed and open-ended questions on perceived utility and likeability to pregnant women and clinicians interacting with the prototype technology. Thirty-two women were enrolled, 28 of whom (87.5% successfully completed 30 minutes of fetal monitoring including transmission of cardiotocographs to the web portal. Four sessions though completed, were not successfully uploaded to the Cloud storage. Six non-study clinicians interacted with the prototype technology. The primary technical problem observed was a delay in data transmission between the prototype and the web portal, which ranged from 2 to 209 minutes. Delays were ascribed to Wi-Fi connectivity problems. Recorded cardiotocographs received a mean score of 4.2/5 (± 1.0 on ease of readability with an interclass correlation of 0.81(95%CI 0.45, 0.96. Both pregnant women and clinicians found the prototype technology likable (81.3% and 66.7% respectively, useful (96.9% and 66.7% respectively, and would either use it again or recommend its use to another pregnant woman (77.4% and 66.7% respectively. In this pilot study we found that this wireless fetal monitoring prototype technology has potential for use in a United States inpatient setting but would benefit from some technology changes. We found it to be acceptable to both pregnant women and clinicians. Further research is needed to assess feasibility of

  12. Scaling of Lift Degradation Due to Anti-Icing Fluids Based Upon the Aerodynamic Acceptance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Riley, James T.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the FAA has worked with Transport Canada, National Research Council Canada (NRC) and APS Aviation, Inc. to develop allowance times for aircraft operations in ice-pellet precipitation. These allowance times are critical to ensure safety and efficient operation of commercial and cargo flights. Wind-tunnel testing with uncontaminated anti-icing fluids and fluids contaminated with simulated ice pellets had been carried out at the NRC Propulsion and Icing Wind Tunnel (PIWT) to better understand the flowoff characteristics and resulting aerodynamic effects. The percent lift loss on the thin, high-performance wing model tested in the PIWT was determined at 8 angle of attack and used as one of the evaluation criteria in determining the allowance times. Because it was unclear as to how performance degradations measured on this model were relevant to an actual airplane configuration, some means of interpreting the wing model lift loss was deemed necessary. This paper describes how the lift loss was related to the loss in maximum lift of a Boeing 737-200ADV airplane through the Aerodynamic Acceptance Test (AAT) performed for fluids qualification. A loss in maximum lift coefficient of 5.24 percent on the B737-200ADV airplane (which was adopted as the threshold in the AAT) corresponds to a lift loss of 7.3 percent on the PIWT model at 8 angle of attack. There is significant scatter in the data used to develop the correlation related to varying effects of the anti-icing fluids that were tested and other factors. A statistical analysis indicated the upper limit of lift loss on the PIWT model was 9.2 percent. Therefore, for cases resulting in PIWT model lift loss from 7.3 to 9.2 percent, extra scrutiny of the visual observations is required in evaluating fluid performance with contamination.

  13. Fun During Knee Rehabilitation: Feasibility and Acceptability Testing of a New Android-Based Training Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Spickschen, Thomas Sanjay; Colcuc, Christian; Hanke, Alexander; Clausen, Jan-Dierk; James, Paul Abraham; Horstmann, Hauke

    2017-01-01

    The initial goals of rehabilitation after knee injuries and operations are to achieve full knee extension and to activate quadriceps muscle. In addition to regular physiotherapy, an android-based knee training device is designed to help patients achieve these goals and improve compliance in the early rehabilitation period. This knee training device combines fun in a computer game with muscular training or rehabilitation. Our aim was to test the feasibility and acceptability of this new device. 50 volunteered subjects enrolled to test out the computer game aided device. The first game was the high-striker game, which recorded maximum knee extension power. The second game involved controlling quadriceps muscular power to simulate flying an aeroplane in order to record accuracy of muscle activation. The subjects evaluated this game by completing a simple questionnaire. No technical problem was encountered during the usage of this device. No subjects complained of any discomfort after using this device. Measurements including maximum knee extension power, knee muscle activation and control were recorded successfully. Subjects rated their experience with the device as either excellent or very good and agreed that the device can motivate and monitor the progress of knee rehabilitation training. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first android-based tool available to fast track knee rehabilitation training. All subjects gave very positive feedback to this computer game aided knee device.

  14. CISO's guide to penetration testing a framework to plan, manage, and maximize benefits

    CERN Document Server

    Tiller, James S

    2011-01-01

    CISO's Guide to Penetration Testing: A Framework to Plan, Manage, and Maximize Benefits details the methodologies, framework, and unwritten conventions penetration tests should cover to provide the most value to your organization and your customers. Discussing the process from both a consultative and technical perspective, it provides an overview of the common tools and exploits used by attackers along with the rationale for why they are used. From the first meeting to accepting the deliverables and knowing what to do with the results, James Tiller explains what to expect from all phases of th

  15. Accelerated testing statistical models, test plans, and data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Wayne B

    2009-01-01

    The Wiley-Interscience Paperback Series consists of selected books that have been made more accessible to consumers in an effort to increase global appeal and general circulation. With these new unabridged softcover volumes, Wiley hopes to extend the lives of these works by making them available to future generations of statisticians, mathematicians, and scientists. "". . . a goldmine of knowledge on accelerated life testing principles and practices . . . one of the very few capable of advancing the science of reliability. It definitely belongs in every bookshelf on engineering.""-Dev G.

  16. In situ vitrification laboratory-scale test work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, P.K.; Smith, N.L.

    1991-05-01

    The Buried Waste Program was established in October 1987 to accelerate the studies needed to develop a long-term management plan for the buried mixed waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at Idaho Engineering Laboratory. The In Situ Vitrification Project is being conducted in a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act feasibility study format to identify methods for the long-term management of mixed buried waste. To support the overall feasibility study, the situ vitrification treatability investigations are proceeding along the three parallel paths: laboratory-scale tests, intermediate field tests, and field tests. Laboratory-scale tests are being performed to provide data to mathematical modeling efforts, which, in turn, will support design of the field tests and to the health and safety risk assessment. This laboratory-scale test work plan provides overall testing program direction to meet the current goals and objectives of the in situ vitrification treatability investigation. 12 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs

  17. Test plan for air monitoring during the Cryogenic Retrieval Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokuda, E.

    1992-06-01

    This report presents a test plan for air monitoring during the Cryogenic Retrieval Demonstration (CRD). Air monitors will be used to sample for the tracer elements neodymium, terbium, and ytterbium, and dysprosium. The results from this air monitoring will be used to determine if the CRD is successful in controlling dust and minimizing contamination. Procedures and equipment specifications for the test are included

  18. Mixer pump test plan for double shell tank AZ-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STAEHR, T.W.

    1999-01-01

    Mixer pump systems have been chosen as the method for retrieval of tank wastes contained in double shell tanks at Hanford. This document describes the plan for testing and demonstrating the ability of two 300 hp mixer pumps to mobilize waste in tank AZ-101. The mixer pumps, equipment and instrumentation to monitor the test were installed by Project W-151

  19. Experimental Test Plan DOE Tidal and River Reference Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Gunawan, Budi [ORNL

    2012-09-01

    Our aim is to provide details of the experimental test plan for scaled model studies in St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) Main Channel at the University of Minnesota, including a review of study objectives, descriptions of the turbine models, the experimental set-up, instrumentation details, instrument measurement uncertainty, anticipated experimental test cases, post-processing methods, and data archiving for model developers.

  20. Treatability Test Plan for an In Situ Biostimulation Reducing Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Long, Philip E.; Brockman, Fred J.; Oostrom, Mart; Hubbard, Susan; Borden, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2007-10-26

    This treatability test plan supports a new, integrated strategy to accelerate cleanup of chromium in the 100 Areas at the Hanford Site. This plan includes performing a field-scale treatability test for bioreduction of chromate, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen. In addition to remediating a portion of the plume and demonstrating reduction of electron acceptors in the plume, the data from this test will be valuable for designing a full-scale bioremediation system to apply at this and other chromium plumes at the Hanford Site.

  1. Crawler Acquisition and Testing Demonstration Project Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DEFIGH-PRICE, C.

    2000-01-01

    If the crawler based retrieval system is selected, this project management plan identifies the path forward for acquiring a crawler/track pump waste retrieval system, and completing sufficient testing to support deploying the crawler for as part of a retrieval technology demonstration for Tank 241-C-104. In the balance of the document, these activities will be referred to as the Crawler Acquisition and Testing Demonstration. During recent Tri-Party Agreement negotiations, TPA milestones were proposed for a sludge/hard heel waste retrieval demonstration in tank C-104. Specifically one of the proposed milestones requires completion of a cold demonstration of sufficient scale to support final design and testing of the equipment (M-45-03G) by 6/30/2004. A crawler-based retrieval system was one of the two options evaluated during the pre-conceptual engineering for C-104 retrieval (RPP-6843 Rev. 0). The alternative technology procurement initiated by the Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) project, combined with the pre-conceptual engineering for C-104 retrieval provide an opportunity to achieve compliance with the proposed TPA milestone M-45-03H. This Crawler Acquisition and Testing Demonstration project management plan identifies the plans, organizational interfaces and responsibilities, management control systems, reporting systems, timeline and requirements for the acquisition and testing of the crawler based retrieval system. This project management plan is complimentary to and supportive of the Project Management Plan for Retrieval of C-104 (RPP-6557). This project management plan focuses on utilizing and completing the efforts initiated under the Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) to acquire and cold test a commercial crawler based retrieval system. The crawler-based retrieval system will be purchased on a schedule to support design of the waste retrieval from tank C-104 (project W-523) and to meet the requirement of proposed TPA milestone M-45-03H. This Crawler

  2. Acceptability of rapid oral fluid HIV testing among male injection drug users in Taiwan, 1997 and 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Shu-Yu; Morisky, Donald E; Yeh, Ching-Ying; Twu, Shiing-Jer; Peng, Eugene Yu-Chang; Malow, Robert M

    2011-04-01

    Rapid oral fluid HIV testing (rapid oral testing) is in the process of being adapted in Taiwan and elsewhere given its advantages over prior HIV testing methods. To guide this process, we examined the acceptability of rapid oral testing at two time points (i.e., 1997 and 2007) among one of the highest risk populations, male injection drug users (IDUs). For this purpose, an anonymous self-administered survey was completed by HIV-negative IDUs involved in the criminal justice system in 1997 (N (1)=137 parolees) and 2007 (N (2)=106 prisoners). A social marketing model helped guide the design of our questionnaire to assess the acceptability of rapid oral testing. This included assessing a new product, across four marketing dimensions: product, price, promotion, and place. Results revealed that in both 1997 and 2007, over 90% indicated that rapid oral testing would be highly acceptable, particularly if the cost was under US$6, and that a pharmacy would be the most appropriate and accessible venue for selling the rapid oral testing kits. The vast majority of survey respondents believed that the cost of rapid oral testing should be federally subsidized and that television and newspaper advertisements would be the most effective media to advertise for rapid oral testing. Both the 1997 and 2007 surveys suggested that rapid oral HIV testing would be particularly accepted in Taiwan by IDUs after release from the criminal justice system.

  3. SigmaPlot 2000, Version 6.00, SPSS Inc. Computer Software Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HURLBUT, S.T.

    2000-10-24

    SigmaPlot is a vendor software product used in conjunction with the supercritical fluid extraction Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (SFE-FTIR) system. This product converts the raw spectral data to useful area numbers. SigmaPlot will be used in conjunction with procedure ZA-565-301, ''Determination of Moisture by Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Infrared Detection.'' This test plan will be performed in conjunction with or prior to HNF-6936, ''HA-53 Supercritical Fluid Extraction System Acceptance Test Plan'', to perform analyses for water. The test will ensure that the software can be installed properly and will manipulate the analytical data correctly.

  4. Statistical analysis and planning of multihundred-watt impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martz, H.F. Jr.; Waterman, M.S.

    1977-10-01

    Modular multihundred-watt (MHW) radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) are used as a power source for spacecraft. Due to possible environmental contamination by radioactive materials, numerous tests are required to determine and verify the safety of the RTG. There are results available from 27 fueled MHW impact tests regarding hoop failure, fingerprint failure, and fuel failure. Data from the 27 tests are statistically analyzed for relationships that exist between the test design variables and the failure types. Next, these relationships are used to develop a statistical procedure for planning and conducting either future MHW impact tests or similar tests on other RTG fuel sources. Finally, some conclusions are given

  5. FAKTOR PENENTU MINAT PENGGUNAAN INSTAGRAM UNTUK PEMBELIAN ONLINE MENGGUNAKAN TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL (TAM DAN THEORY OF PLANNED BEHAVIOR (TPB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayu Indrayana

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to examine the factors that determine the interest in using Instagram in making online purchases. This study also analyzes the pattern of attitude relationship, subjective norms, behavioral control, and uses on interest in using Instagram for online purchases. In addition, the purpose of the research is to analyze whether there are contributions of usability and convenience toward the attitudes and easiness in using the Instagram toward the usage. Data analysis tool used is the structural equation modeling (SEM which is based technology acceptance model (TAM and theory of planned behavior (TPB. The results showed that subjective norms significantly influence the interest in using Instagram for online purchases; however, behavior control factors, usability and attitude are not significantly influential. Attitude is a factor that has the greatest influence among other factors. Instagram users from companies/businesses that intend to make use of Instagram as their digital marketing media need to pay attention to aspects of attitudes, subjective norms, behavioral control and usability.Key words: model of technology acceptance, consumer behavior, Structural Equation Modelling (SEM, social media

  6. Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-01-01

    To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that

  7. Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-08-12

    To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that

  8. Acceptance testing in digital systens of mammography. Protocols applicability; Pruebas de aceptacion en equipos digitales de mamografia. Aplicabilidad de protocolos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, R.; Espana, M.L.; Garcia Castanon, P.; Gomez Barrado, A.; Rodriguez Martin, G.; Fernandez Bedoya, B.

    2011-07-01

    Acceptance testing of mammographic imaging systems technical is the first approach in order to guarantee that mammograms will be achieved with the minimun radiation dose compatible with an image quality sutiable for diagnose purposes. The aim of this study is to assess the practical applicability of different protocols in acceptance test of digital mammographyc systems. This study has been carried out on the results of ltyhe acceptance tests of five flat panel digital mammographic systems. Parameters established in the systems technical specifications and those evaluated in the consulted protocols were tested. Due to the fact that the legislation oin our country does not demand to consider a specific protocol, the results obtained were also compared considering different existing protocols. Results show discrepancies between manufacturers limiting values and those established in the protocols. Some parameters, such as the authomatic exposure control compensation and the detector noise, were found out to meet or not the limiting value, depending on the selected protocol. From our results we could suggest, that protocols from manufacturers should be adapted to acknowledged documents on acceptance testing in digital mammography. They buyer representative could even specify the protocol to be followed during the acceptance tests. (Author). 25 refs.

  9. Acceptance testing in digital systems of mammography. Protocols applicability; Pruebas de aceptacion en equipos digitales de mamografia. Aplicabilidad de protocolos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, R.; Espana, M.L.; Garcia Castanon, P.; Gomez Barrado, A.; Rodriguez Martin, G.; Fernandez Bedoya, B.

    2011-07-01

    Acceptance testing of mammographic imaging systems technical is the first approach in order to guarantee that mammograms will be achieved with the minimum radiation dose compatible with an image quality suitable for diagnose purposes. The aim of this study is to assess the practical applicability of different protocols in acceptance test of digital mammographic systems. This study has been carried out on the results of the acceptance tests of five flat panel digital mammographic systems. Parameters established in the systems technical specifications and those evaluated in the consulted protocols were tested. Due to the fact that the legislation in our country does not demand to consider a specific protocol, the results obtained were also compared considering different existing protocols. Results show discrepancies between manufacturers limiting values and those established in the protocols. Some parameters, such as the automatic exposure control compensation and the detector noise, were found out to meet or not the limiting value, depending on the selected protocol. From our results we could suggest, that protocols from manufacturers should be adapted to acknowledged documents on acceptance testing in digital mammography. They buyer representative could even specify the protocol to be followed during the acceptance tests. (Author). 25 refs.

  10. Pill testing or drug checking in Australia: Acceptability of service design features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Monica J; Bruno, Raimondo; Ezard, Nadine; Ritter, Alison

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to determine design features of a drug-checking service that would be feasible, attractive and likely to be used by Australian festival and nightlife attendees. Web survey of 851 Australians reporting use of psychostimulants and/or hallucinogens and attendance at licensed venues past midnight and/or festivals in the past year (70% male; median age 23 years). A drug-checking service located at festivals or clubs would be used by 94%; a fixed-site service external to such events by 85%. Most (80%) were willing to wait an hour for their result. Almost all (94%) would not use a service if there was a possibility of arrest, and a majority (64%) would not use a service that did not provide individual feedback of results. Drug-checking results were only slightly more attractive if they provided comprehensive quantitative results compared with qualitative results of key ingredients. Most (93%) were willing to pay up to $5, and 68% up to $10, per test. One-third (33%) reported willingness to donate a whole dose for testing: they were more likely to be male, younger, less experienced, use drugs more frequently and attend venues/festivals less frequently. In this sample, festival- or club-based drug-checking services with low wait times and low cost appear broadly attractive under conditions of legal amnesty and individualised feedback. Quantitative analysis of ecstasy pills requiring surrender of a whole pill may appeal to a minority in Australia where pills are more expensive than elsewhere. [Barratt MJ, Bruno R, Ezard N, Ritter A. Pill testing or drug checking in Australia: Acceptability of service design features. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;00:000-000]. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  11. ORCWM test and evaluaton master plan. Revision 00

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Test and Evaluation Master Plan (TEMP) describes the program Test and Evaluation (T ampersand E) policy, objectives, requirements, general methodology (test flow and description of each T ampersand E phase), responsibilities, and scheduling of test phases for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). This TEMP is a program-level management planning document for al CRWMS T ampersand E activities and will be used in conjunction with Section 11 of the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD), as appropriate, as a guide for the projects in developing their T ampersand E plans. In the OCRWM document hierarchy, that is described in the OCRWM Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP), the TEMP is subordinate to the program SEMP. To ensure CRWMS operates as an integrated system, the plans for verifying the performance and evaluating the operational suitability and effectiveness of the overall system are also described. Test and evaluation is an integral part of the systems engineering process. Key aspects of the systems engineering process, more fully described in the OCRWM SEMP, are discussed in this TEMP to illustrate how T ampersand E supports the overall systems engineering process

  12. Treatability test plan for the 200-ZP-1 operable unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit. The approach discussed in this treatability test plan is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for the contaminant plume associated with the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit. The primary contaminants of concern are carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and trichloroethylene (TCE). The pilot-scale treatability testing has as its primary purpose to assess the performance of aboveground treatment systems with respect to the ability to remove the primary contaminants present in groundwater withdrawn from the contaminant plume. The overall scope of this test plan includes: description of the pump and treat system to be tested, as well as the test performance objectives and data quality objectives (DQOs) that will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the pilot-scale treatment system; discussion of the treatment technology to be tested and supporting development activities, including process flow and conceptual design descriptions and equipment, fabrication, utility, and system startup needs; description of pilot-scale treatment system performance, operating procedures, and operational controls, as well as anticipated monitoring activities, analytes, parameters, analytical procedures, and quality assurance protocols; summaries of other related treatability testing elements, including personnel and environmental health and safety controls, process and secondary waste management and disposition, schedule, and program organization

  13. Field test plan: Buried waste technologies, Fiscal Year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heard, R.E.; Hyde, R.A.; Engleman, V.S.; Evans, J.D.; Jackson, T.W.

    1995-06-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development, supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that, when integrated with commercially available baseline technologies, form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The Fiscal Year 1995 effort is to deploy and test multiple technologies from four functional areas of buried waste remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment. This document is the basic operational planning document for the deployment and testing of the technologies that support the field testing in Fiscal Year 1995. Discussed in this document are the scope of the tests; purpose and objective of the tests; organization and responsibilities; contingency plans; sequence of activities; sampling and data collection; document control; analytical methods; data reduction, validation, and verification; quality assurance; equipment and instruments; facilities and utilities; health and safety; residuals management; and regulatory management

  14. Mercury flow tests (first report). Wall friction factor measurement tests and future tests plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Masanori; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Haga, Katsuhiro; Hino, Ryutaro; Sudo, Yukio

    1999-07-01

    In the neutron science project at JAERI, we plan to inject a pulsed proton beam of a maximum power of 5 MW from a high intense proton accelerator into a mercury target in order to produce high energy neutrons of a magnitude of ten times or more than existing facilities. The neutrons produced by the facility will be utilized for advanced field of science such as the life sciences etc. An urgent issue in order to accomplish this project is the establishment of mercury target technology. With this in mind, a mercury experimental loop with the capacity to circulate mercury up to 15 L/min was constructed to perform thermal hydraulic tests, component tests and erosion characteristic tests. A measurement of the wall friction factor was carried out as a first step of the mercury flow tests, while testing the characteristic of components installed in the mercury loop. This report presents an outline of the mercury loop and experimental results of the wall friction factor measurement. From the wall friction factor measurement, it was made clear that the wettability of the mercury was improved with an increase of the loop operation time and at the same time the wall friction factors were increased. The measured wall friction factors were much lower than the values calculated by the Blasius equation at the beginning of the loop operation because of wall slip caused by a non-wetted condition. They agreed well with the values calculated by the Blasius equation within a deviation of 10% when the sum of the operation time increased more than 11 hours. This report also introduces technical problems with a mercury circulation and future tests plan indispensable for the development of the mercury target. (author)

  15. Acceptance of HIV testing among women attending antenatal care in south-western Uganda: risk factors and reasons for test refusal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, V; Mellhammar, L; Bajunirwe, F; Björkman, P

    2008-07-01

    A problem commonly encountered in programs for prevention of mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT) of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa is low rates of HIV test acceptance among pregnant women. In this study, we examined risk factors and reasons for HIV test refusal among 432 women attending three antenatal care clinics offering PMTCT in urban and semi-urban parts of the Mbarara district, Uganda. Structured interviews were performed following pre-test counselling. Three-hundred-eighty women were included in the study, 323 (85%) of whom accepted HIV testing. In multivariate analysis, testing site (Site A: OR = 1.0; Site B: OR = 3.08; 95%CI: 1.12-8.46; Site C: OR = 5.93; 95%CI: 2.94-11.98), age between 30 and 34 years (refusal. Testing sites operating for longer durations had higher rates of acceptance. The most common reasons claimed for test refusal were: lack of access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-infected women (88%; n=57), a need to discuss with partner before decision (82%; n=57) and fear of partner's reaction (54%; n=57). Comparison with previous periods showed that the acceptance rate increased with the duration of the program. Our study identified risk factors for HIV test refusal among pregnant women in Uganda and common reasons for not accepting testing. These findings may suggest modifications and improvements in the performance of HIV testing in this and similar populations.

  16. IFE chamber technology testing program in NIF and chamber development test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Issues concerning chamber technology testing program in NIF involving: criteria for evaluation/prioritization of experiments, engineering scaling requirements for test article design and material selection and R and D plan prior to NIF testing were addressed in this paper. In order to maximize the benefits of testing program in NIF, the testing in NIF should provide the experimental data relevant to DEMO design choice or to DEMO design predictive capability by utilizing engineering scaling test article designs. Test plans were developed for 2 promising chamber design concepts. Early testing in non-fusion/non-ignition prior to testing in ignition facility serves a critical role in chamber R and D test plans in order to reduce the risks and costs of the more complex experiments in NIF

  17. DiAlert: a prevention program for overweight first degree relatives of type 2 diabetes patients: results of a pilot study to test feasibility and acceptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heideman Wieke H

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing due to lifestyle changes, particularly affecting those genetically at risk. We developed DiAlert as a targeted group-based intervention aimed to promote intrinsic motivation and action planning for lifestyle changes and weight loss in first degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The main objective of the pilot of the DiAlert intervention was to assess fidelity, feasibility and acceptability prior to starting the randomized controlled trial. Methods Individuals with a family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus were self-identified and screened for eligibility. DiAlert consists of two group sessions. Feasibility, fidelity, acceptability and self-reported perceptions and behavioral determinants were evaluated in a pre-post study using questionnaires and observations. Determinants of behavior change were analyzed using paired-samples t tests and Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results DiAlert was delivered to two groups of first degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N = 9 and N = 12. Feasibility and fidelity were confirmed. Overall, the DiAlert group sessions were positively evaluated (8.0 on a scale of 1 to 10 by participants. The intervention did not impact perceived susceptibility or worry about personal diabetes risk. Action planning with regard to changing diet and physical activity increased. Conclusions DiAlert proved feasible and was well-accepted by participants. Positive trends in action planning indicate increased likelihood of actual behavior change following DiAlert. Testing the effectiveness in a randomized controlled trial is imperative. Trial registration Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR: NTR2036

  18. Evaluating outcomes of computer-based classroom testing: Student acceptance and impact on learning and exam performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Meixun; Bender, Daniel

    2018-03-13

    Computer-based testing (CBT) has made progress in health sciences education. In 2015, the authors led implementation of a CBT system (ExamSoft) at a dental school in the U.S. Guided by the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), the purposes of this study were to (a) examine dental students' acceptance of ExamSoft; (b) understand factors impacting acceptance; and (c) evaluate the impact of ExamSoft on students' learning and exam performance. Survey and focus group data revealed that ExamSoft was well accepted by students as a testing tool and acknowledged by most for its potential to support learning. Regression analyses showed that perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of ExamSoft significantly predicted student acceptance. Prior CBT experience and computer skills did not significantly predict acceptance of ExamSoft. Students reported that ExamSoft promoted learning in the first program year, primarily through timely and rich feedback on examination performance. t-Tests yielded mixed results on whether students performed better on computerized or paper examinations. The study contributes to the literature on CBT and the application of the TAM model in health sciences education. Findings also suggest ways in which health sciences institutions can implement CBT to maximize its potential as an assessment and learning tool.

  19. Electrical/instrumentation acceptance test report for Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant condensate treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compau, R.A. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This project is part of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility. The acceptance test procedure describes test methods for leak detection units, pump flow switches, pump level control valves, room air temperature monitor, leachate pump status contacts, basin pump status contacts, catch basin leak detector, leachate level monitors, and basin level monitors. These are all components of the C-018H Collection System

  20. 46 CFR 159.007-7 - Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and tests: Coast Guard action. 159.007-7 Section 159.007-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL APPROVAL....007-7 Application for acceptance for production inspections and tests: Coast Guard action. (a) From...

  1. Six-Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS) User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, LeBarian

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the SDTS. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  2. Shifting away from doorstep distribution of contraceptives in urban Bangladesh: effects on discontinuation and acceptance of family planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routh, S; Jahan, S A

    2000-01-01

    This paper examined the effects of alternative service-delivery strategies with regard to dropouts among the current pill and condom users who, before the intervention, were supplied with the methods by the fieldworkers at their homes in an operations research conducted by the Centre for Health and Population Research in urban Bangladesh. Moreover, the effects of the selective home visitation approach on acceptance of modern family planning methods among current nonusers were assessed. Two program areas of the Concerned Women for Family Planning in Dhaka City, one each at Wari and Siddiquebazar, served as the comparison areas. Data for the analyses came from the service records of the fieldworkers and community-based surveys. Results showed that the contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) considerably increased in both the intervention areas: from the pre-intervention level of 63% to 68% at the Hazaribag primary health care clinic (PHCC) intervention area and from 55% to 57% at the Gandaria community service points (CSPs) intervention area. The corresponding increases at the two comparison areas were from 61% to 63% at Wari and from 60% to 63% at Siddiquebazar. The quantitative growth in the CPR in the PHCC-based strategy clearly indicated the comparative advantage of the clinic-based strategy in terms of sustainable program performance over conventional doorstep CBD- and CSP-based strategies.

  3. Aquifer test plan for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, L.C.; Hartman, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    This test plan directs hydrologic testing activities planned at three existing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) wells in the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit of the Hanford Site. Three additional wells will be installed near these existing wells and used as additional testing arid observation points during the field activities. Figure 1 shows the locations of the three test sites. A primary objective of the testing program is to provide more detailed hydraulic characterization information for the unconfined aquifer and targeted test sites than provided by the initial reconnaissance-level slug testing of Vukelich. A second objective is to evaluate the applicability of slug interference and dipole flow tests for detailed hydraulic characterization in an unconfined aquifer. This aquifer testing program will also be useful for substantiating hydraulic conductivities reported from previous slug tests and evaluating the effects of filter pack volume/configuration on slug test data. Vukelich recommended additional testing to address the latter two issues

  4. Acceptance of referral for partners by clients testing positive for human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netsanet F

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetene Netsanet,1 Ayalew Dessie21IMA World Health SuddHealth Multi Donor Trust Fund-Basic Package of Health Services Project, Juba, South Sudan; 2United States Agency for International Development, Private Health Sector Program, Abt Associates Inc, Addis Ababa, EthiopiaBackground: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive individuals who do not disclose their HIV status to their partners are more likely to present late for HIV and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS care than those who have disclosed their HIV status to their partners. A major area of challenge with regards to HIV counseling for clients is disclosure of their HIV status to their partners. The main methods of partner notification are patient referral, provider referral, contract referral, and outreach assistance. The emphasis on a plausible and comprehensive partner referral strategy for widespread positive case detection in resource-limited countries needs to be thought out and developed.Methods: A qualitative study was conducted among newly HIV-positive clients to identify partners for notification and acceptance of referral by their partners. Health service providers working in HIV testing and counseling clinics were also provided with semistructured questionnaires in order to assess their view towards partner notification strategies for clients testing positive for HIV.Results: Fifteen newly diagnosed HIV-positive clients were counseled to provide referral slips to their partners. All clients agreed and took the referral card. However, only eight were willing and actually provided the card to their partners. Five of the eight partners of clients who tested HIV-positive and who were provided with referral cards responded to the referral and were tested for HIV. Three were positive and two were negative. Nine of 11 counselors did not agree to requesting partner locator information from HIV-positive clients for contractual referral and/or outreach assistance. The findings

  5. Clinical acceptance testing and scanner comparison of ultrasound shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Zaiyang; Tradup, Donald J; Song, Pengfei; Stekel, Scott F; Chen, Shigao; Glazebrook, Katrina N; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J

    2018-03-15

    Because of the rapidly growing use of ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) in clinical practices, there is a significant need for development of clinical physics performance assessment methods for this technology. This study aims to report two clinical medical physicists' tasks: (a) acceptance testing (AT) of SWE function on ten commercial ultrasound systems for clinical liver application and (b) comparison of SWE measurements of targets across vendors for clinical musculoskeletal application. For AT, ten GE LOGIQ E9 XDclear 2.0 scanners with ten C1-6-D and ten 9L-D transducers were studied using two commercial homogenous phantoms. Five measurements were acquired at two depths for each scanner/transducer pair by two operators. Additional tests were performed to access effects of different coupling media, phantom locations and operators. System deviations were less than 5% of group mean or three times standard deviation; therefore, all systems passed AT. A test protocol was provided based on results that no statistically significant difference was observed between using ultrasound gel and salt water for coupling, among different phantom locations, and that interoperator and intraoperator coefficient of variation was less than 3%. For SWE target measurements, two systems were compared - a Supersonic Aixplorer scanner with a SL10-2 and a SL15-4 transducer, and an abovementioned GE scanner with 9L-D transducer. Two stepped cylinders with diameters of 4.05-10.40 mm were measured both longitudinally and transaxially. Target shear wave speed quantification was performed using an in-house MATLAB program. Using the target shear wave speed deduced from phantom specs as a reference, SL15-4 performed the best at the measured depth. However, it was challenging to reliably measure a 4.05 mm target for either system. The reported test methods and results could provide important information when dealing with SWE-related tasks in the clinical environment. © 2018 The Authors

  6. Nuclear material control and accountancy planning and performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mike Enhinger; Dennis Wilkey; Rod Martin; Ken Byers; Brian Smith

    1999-01-01

    An overview of performance testing as used at U.S. Department of Energy facilities is provided. Performance tests are performed on specific aspects of the regulations or site policy. The key issues in establishing a performance testing program are: identifying what needs to be tested; determining how to test; establishing criteria to evaluate test results. The program elements of performance testing program consist of: planning; coordination; conduct; evaluation. A performance test may be conducted of personnel or equipment. The DOE orders for nuclear material control and accountancy are divided into three functional areas: program administration, material accounting, and material control. Examples performance tests may be conducted on program administration, accounting, measurement and measurement control, inventory, and containment [ru

  7. SU-F-T-180: Evaluation of a Scintillating Screen Detector for Proton Beam QA and Acceptance Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghebremedhin, A; Taber, M; Koss, P; Camargo, G; Patyal, B [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Ebstein, S [Lexitek, Inc, Wellesley, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To test the performance of a commercial scintillating screen detector for acceptance testing and Quality Assurance of a proton pencil beam scanning system. Method: The detector (Lexitek DRD 400) has 40cm × 40cm field, uses a thin scintillator imaged onto a 16-bit scientific CCD with ∼0.5mm resolution. A grid target and LED illuminators are provided for spatial calibration and relative gain correction. The detector mounts to the nozzle with micron precision. Tools are provided for image processing and analysis of single or multiple Gaussian spots. Results: The bias and gain of the detector were studied to measure repeatability and accuracy. Gain measurements were taken with the LED illuminators to measure repeatability and variation of the lens-CCD pair as a function with f-stop. Overall system gain was measured with a passive scattering (broad) beam whose shape is calibrated with EDR film placed in front of the scintillator. To create a large uniform field, overlapping small fields were recorded with the detector translated laterally and stitched together to cover the full field. Due to the long exposures required to obtain multiple spills of the synchrotron and very high detector sensitivity, borated polyethylene shielding was added to reduce direct radiation events hitting the CCD. Measurements with a micro ion chamber were compared to the detector’s spot profile. Software was developed to process arrays of Gaussian spots and to correct for radiation events. Conclusion: The detector background has a fixed bias, a small component linear in time, and is easily corrected. The gain correction method was validated with 2% accuracy. The detector spot profile matches the micro ion chamber data over 4 orders of magnitude. The multiple spot analyses can be easily used with plan data for measuring pencil beam uniformity and for regular QA comparison.

  8. SU-F-T-180: Evaluation of a Scintillating Screen Detector for Proton Beam QA and Acceptance Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghebremedhin, A; Taber, M; Koss, P; Camargo, G; Patyal, B; Ebstein, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the performance of a commercial scintillating screen detector for acceptance testing and Quality Assurance of a proton pencil beam scanning system. Method: The detector (Lexitek DRD 400) has 40cm × 40cm field, uses a thin scintillator imaged onto a 16-bit scientific CCD with ∼0.5mm resolution. A grid target and LED illuminators are provided for spatial calibration and relative gain correction. The detector mounts to the nozzle with micron precision. Tools are provided for image processing and analysis of single or multiple Gaussian spots. Results: The bias and gain of the detector were studied to measure repeatability and accuracy. Gain measurements were taken with the LED illuminators to measure repeatability and variation of the lens-CCD pair as a function with f-stop. Overall system gain was measured with a passive scattering (broad) beam whose shape is calibrated with EDR film placed in front of the scintillator. To create a large uniform field, overlapping small fields were recorded with the detector translated laterally and stitched together to cover the full field. Due to the long exposures required to obtain multiple spills of the synchrotron and very high detector sensitivity, borated polyethylene shielding was added to reduce direct radiation events hitting the CCD. Measurements with a micro ion chamber were compared to the detector’s spot profile. Software was developed to process arrays of Gaussian spots and to correct for radiation events. Conclusion: The detector background has a fixed bias, a small component linear in time, and is easily corrected. The gain correction method was validated with 2% accuracy. The detector spot profile matches the micro ion chamber data over 4 orders of magnitude. The multiple spot analyses can be easily used with plan data for measuring pencil beam uniformity and for regular QA comparison.

  9. DOE standard: Filter test facility quality program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-02-01

    This standard was developed primarily for application in US Department of Energy programs. It contains specific direction for HEPA filter testing performed at a DOE-accepted HEPA Filter Test Facility (FTF). Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should be sent to the Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards (EH-31), US Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585, by letter or by using the self-addressed Document Improvement Proposal form (DOE F 1300.3) appearing at the end of this document

  10. A data base and a standard material for use in acceptance testing of low-activity waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, S.F.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.; Strachan, D.M.

    1998-04-01

    The authors have conducted replicate dissolution tests following the product consistency test (PCT) procedure to measure the mean and standard deviation of the solution concentrations of B, Na, and Si at various combinations of temperature, duration, and glass/water mass ratio. Tests were conducted with a glass formulated to be compositionally similar to low-activity waste products anticipated for Hanford to evaluate the adequacy of test methods that have been designated in privatization contracts for use in product acceptance. An important finding from this set of tests is that the solution concentrations generated in tests at 20 C will likely be too low to measure the dissolution rates of waste products reliably. Based on these results, the authors recommend that the acceptance test be conducted at 40 C. Tests at 40 C generated higher solution concentrations, were more easily conducted, and the measured rates were easily related to those at 20 C. Replicate measurements of other glass properties were made to evaluate the possible use of LRM-1 as a standard material. These include its composition, homogeneity, density, compressive strength, the Na leachability index with the ANSI/ANS 16.1 leach test, and if the glass is characteristically hazardous with the toxicity characteristic leach procedure. The values of these properties were within the acceptable limits identified for Hanford low-activity waste products. The reproducibility of replicate tests and analyses indicates that the glass would be a suitable standard material

  11. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 3 Gearbox 3 Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jonathan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wallen, Robb [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This document describes the Phase 3 test plan for the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Gearbox #3. The primary test objective is to measure the planetary load sharing characteristics in the same conditions as the original gearbox design. If the measured load-sharing characteristics are close to the design model, the projected three-times improvement in planetary section predicted fatigue life and the efficacy of preloaded tapered roller bearings in mitigating the planetary bearing fatigue failure mode will have been demonstrated.

  12. Operational radioactive waste management plan for the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    The Operational Radioactive Waste Management Plan for the Nevada Test Site establishes procedures and methods for the safe shipping, receiving, processing, disposal, and storage of radioactive waste. Included are NTS radioactive waste disposition program guidelines, procedures for radioactive waste management, a description of storage and disposal areas and facilities, and a glossary of specifications and requirements

  13. A nuclear power plant certification test plan and checklist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halverson, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Regulations within the nuclear industry are requiring that all reference plant simulators be certified prior to or during 1991. A certification test plan is essential to ensure that this goal is met. A description of each step in the certification process is provided in this paper, along with a checklist to help ensure completion of each item

  14. Plan for 3-D full-scale earthquake testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtani, K.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the lessons learnt from the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention plan to construct the 3-D Full-Scale Earthquake Testing Facility. This will be the world's largest and strongest shaking table facility. This paper describes the outline of the project for this facility. This facility will be completed in early 2005. (author)

  15. Setup of a testing environment for mission planning in mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenen, J.P.J.; Steinbuch, M.

    2013-01-01

    Mission planning algorithms for surface mining applications are difficult to test as a result of the large scale tasks. To validate these algorithms, a scaled setup is created where the mining excavator is mimicked by an industrial robot. This report discusses the development of a software

  16. In situ gas treatment technology demonstration test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, E.C.; Miller, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    This document defines the objectives and requirements associated with undertaking a field demonstration of an in situ gas treatment appoach to remediation chromate-contaminated soil. The major tasks presented in this plan include the design and development of the surface gas treatment system, performance of permitting activities, and completion of site preparation and field testing activities

  17. Closure Plan for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-01-01

    The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the preliminary closure plan for the Area 5 RWMS at the NTS that was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (DOE, 2005a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure schedule, updated closure inventory, updated site and facility characterization data, the Title II engineering cover design, and the closure process for the 92-Acre Area of the RWMS. The format and content of this site-specific plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). This interim closure plan meets closure and post-closure monitoring requirements of the order DOE O 435.1, manual DOE M 435.1-1, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 40 CFR 265, Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) 444.743, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements as incorporated into NAC 444.8632. The Area 5 RWMS accepts primarily packaged low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) for disposal in excavated disposal cells

  18. Closure Plan for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-09-01

    The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the preliminary closure plan for the Area 5 RWMS at the NTS that was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (DOE, 2005a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure schedule, updated closure inventory, updated site and facility characterization data, the Title II engineering cover design, and the closure process for the 92-Acre Area of the RWMS. The format and content of this site-specific plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). This interim closure plan meets closure and post-closure monitoring requirements of the order DOE O 435.1, manual DOE M 435.1-1, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 40 CFR 265, Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) 444.743, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements as incorporated into NAC 444.8632. The Area 5 RWMS accepts primarily packaged low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) for disposal in excavated disposal cells.

  19. Optimization of the general acceptability though affective tests and response surface methodology of a dry cacao powder mixture based beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Chau Loo Kung

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This research work had as main objective optimizing the general acceptability though affective tests and response surface methodology of a dry cacao powder mixture based beverage. We obtained formulations of mixtures of cacao powder with different concentrations of 15%, 17.5% and 20%, as well as lecithin concentrations of 0.1%; 0.3%; and 0.5% maintaining a constant content of sugar (25 %, Vanillin (1% that included cacao powder with different pH values: natural (pH 5 and alkalinized (pH 6.5 and pH 8 and water by difference to 100%, generating a total of fifteen treatments to be evaluated, according to the Box-Behnen design for three factors. The treatments underwent satisfaction level tests to establish the general acceptability. The treatment that included cacao powder with a concentration of 17.5 %, pH 6.5 and lecithin concentration of 0.3 % obtained the best levels of acceptability. The software Statgraphics Plus 5.1 was used to obtain the treatment with maximum acceptability that corresponded to cacao powder with pH 6.81, with a concentration of 18.24 % and soy lecithin in 0.28% with a tendency to what was obtained in the satisfaction levels tests. Finally we characterized in a physical-chemistry and microbiological way the optimum formulation as well as evaluated sensitively obtaining an acceptability of 6.17.

  20. Acceptability of using electronic vending machines to deliver oral rapid HIV self-testing kits: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean D Young

    Full Text Available Rates of unrecognized HIV infection are significantly higher among Latino and Black men who have sex with men (MSM. Policy makers have proposed that HIV self-testing kits and new methods for delivering self-testing could improve testing uptake among minority MSM. This study sought to conduct qualitative assessments with MSM of color to determine the acceptability of using electronic vending machines to dispense HIV self-testing kits.African American and Latino MSM were recruited using a participant pool from an existing HIV prevention trial on Facebook. If participants expressed interest in using a vending machine to receive an HIV self-testing kit, they were emailed a 4-digit personal identification number (PIN code to retrieve the test from the machine. We followed up with those who had tested to assess their willingness to participate in an interview about their experience.Twelve kits were dispensed and 8 interviews were conducted. In general, participants expressed that the vending machine was an acceptable HIV test delivery method due to its novelty and convenience.Acceptability of this delivery model for HIV testing kits was closely associated with three main factors: credibility, confidentiality, and convenience. Future research is needed to address issues, such as user-induced errors and costs, before scaling up the dispensing method.